WorldWideScience

Sample records for university changing roles

  1. Strategic agency and institutional change: investigating the role of universities in regional innovation systems (RISs)

    Benneworth, Paul; Pinheiro, Rómulo; Karlsen, James

    2017-01-01

    Strategic agency and institutional change: investigating the role of universities in regional innovation systems (RISs). Regional Studies. Past analyses rooted in the thick description of regions successful in constructing regional innovation systems have given way to analyses more focused on the

  2. Europe's Southeastern Gateway: Responding to Rapidly Changing Patterns of World Shipping. The University's Role

    Roger E. HAMLIN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available World trade and transportation are changing dramatically. Energy prices and transport sustainability concerns are reinvigorating ocean freighter shipping. An ever-increasing portion of trade is in containers, and container ships are getting larger quickly. Many ports, nations and continents are not keeping up with ship size increases putting them at a trade disadvantage. Major canals and seaways must also upgrade or be rendered obsolete, causing a change in the pattern of world trade. Ports have to do more than expand vessel size limits. Port regions must also invest in infrastructure that improves multi-modal access to the port and augments hand-off of containers to smaller seaway ships, trains and trucks. With heightened security and evolving emphasis on flexible and efficient logistics, ports must become high-tech logistics hubs with improved real-time data about port throughput. Constanţa, Romania provides an example of an attempt to respond to this rapid change. Near the Danube Delta, on the Black Sea, Constanţa offers a potential southeastern gateway to Europe for the Black Sea, the Eastern Mediterranean and beyond. Ships from Asia, entering via the Suez Canal can easily access Constanţa, and thus save more than ten days of shipping time for destinations in southeastern Europe compared to shipping through Rotterdam or Hamburg. But Constanţa needs to make all the improvements mentioned above. Universities have several roles in this endeavor, including identifying and forecasting trends, providing the technical knowledge to develop high-tech logistics hubs, pursing publicprivate partnerships for infrastructure development and offering training.

  3. The changing role of universities in the German research system: engagement in regional networks, clusters and beyond

    Koschatzky, Knut; Stahlecker, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In Germany, but in other countries as well, a trend towards a regionalisation in technology and innovation policy is clearly evident. This triggers the expectation towards universities to establish regional ties and networks and to exploit the advantages of spatial proximity to other research institutes, to industry and to policy and regional administration. It is the objective of this paper to analyse the changing role of universities as driving force in the development of new modes and mode...

  4. The science behind Kyoto: the role of universities in the climate change debate. Part I

    O' Keefe, W.F. (American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC (United States))

    1999-01-01

    In the debate over climate change pseudo-arguments have become more important than scientific evidence, as there is little evidence of fossil fuel burning affecting the climate. The lobbyists claims must be refuted by disinterested scientific analysis, and in this the universities must play their part.

  5. The Emphasis on Employability and the Changing Role of the University in Europe

    Prokou, Eleni

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that in today's knowledge societies, European universities are called upon to make students more employable, by cultivating their skills and by encouraging them to lifelong learning for enhancing their flexibility in the labour market. Employability is emphatically stressed and, to a certain extent, is associated with equity…

  6. The Quest for Innovation and Entrepreneurship: The Changing Role of University in East Asia

    Mok, Ka Ho

    2012-01-01

    This article critically reviews the national innovation systems of the four little tigers in East Asia, namely Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea, in fostering R&D and technological research. A national innovation system is characterised by the interactions between the state, industries and universities in promoting innovation. This…

  7. Universality of accelerating change

    Eliazar, Iddo; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2018-03-01

    On large time scales the progress of human technology follows an exponential growth trend that is termed accelerating change. The exponential growth trend is commonly considered to be the amalgamated effect of consecutive technology revolutions - where the progress carried in by each technology revolution follows an S-curve, and where the aging of each technology revolution drives humanity to push for the next technology revolution. Thus, as a collective, mankind is the 'intelligent designer' of accelerating change. In this paper we establish that the exponential growth trend - and only this trend - emerges universally, on large time scales, from systems that combine together two elements: randomness and amalgamation. Hence, the universal generation of accelerating change can be attained by systems with no 'intelligent designer'.

  8. Strategic agency and institutional change: investigating the role of universities in regional innovation systems (RISs)

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Pinheiro, Romulo; Karlsen, James

    2014-01-01

    Past analyses rooted in thick description of regions successful in constructing regional innovation systems have given way to analyses more focused on the intentionality in these processes, and how actors in regions with their own wider networks can shape these high-level changes in regional

  9. Climate-smart agriculture: possible roles of agricultural universities in a strengthened Norwegian climate change engagement in Africa

    Synnevaag, Gry; Lambrou, Jayne Patricia

    2012-02-15

    The recent rise in the number of food insecure people in the world, coupled with incidences of crop failure due to adverse weather, have made world leaders increasingly aware that future climate change may severely limit our ability to feed the growing population towards 2050. So far, in addition to industrial emission control, Norwegian efforts to restrict climate change have focused on mitigation through forest protection (REDD+) and clean energy (Energy+). A third area of attention is climate-smart agriculture. Producing food in a more 'climate smart' way is seen as having three advantages: 1) Providing food for an increasing population, 2) maintaining food production under a changing climate, and 3) reducing greenhouse gas emission from agriculture while absorbing carbon in vegetation and soil. This report explores how Norway can support Africa's efforts to make agriculture more climate-smart through support to African universities.Among the three benefits of climate-smart agriculture, African farmers will be most inclined to focus on the two first, the production increase and the adaptation. Mitigation may require external support. African leaders are in the forefront of developing policies and institutional arrangements for climate-smart agriculture. Among other initiatives, the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme under the African Union is in the process of preparing member states for substantial investments in agriculture. Capacity building and the generation of new knowledge are essential for the achievement of climate-smart agriculture. Given the long history of Norwegian support to agricultural research and higher agricultural education in several African countries, Norway can, without doubt, make significant contributions to African food security, now and in the future.Norwegian support to climate-smart agriculture can be based on its experience with REDD+ and Energy+ initiatives. The possible roles include: 1) Human and institutional

  10. Climate-smart agriculture: possible roles of agricultural universities in a strengthened Norwegian climate change engagement in Africa

    Synnevaag, Gry; Lambrou, Jayne Patricia

    2012-02-15

    The recent rise in the number of food insecure people in the world, coupled with incidences of crop failure due to adverse weather, have made world leaders increasingly aware that future climate change may severely limit our ability to feed the growing population towards 2050. So far, in addition to industrial emission control, Norwegian efforts to restrict climate change have focused on mitigation through forest protection (REDD+) and clean energy (Energy+). A third area of attention is climate-smart agriculture. Producing food in a more 'climate smart' way is seen as having three advantages: 1) Providing food for an increasing population, 2) maintaining food production under a changing climate, and 3) reducing greenhouse gas emission from agriculture while absorbing carbon in vegetation and soil. This report explores how Norway can support Africa's efforts to make agriculture more climate-smart through support to African universities.Among the three benefits of climate-smart agriculture, African farmers will be most inclined to focus on the two first, the production increase and the adaptation. Mitigation may require external support. African leaders are in the forefront of developing policies and institutional arrangements for climate-smart agriculture. Among other initiatives, the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme under the African Union is in the process of preparing member states for substantial investments in agriculture. Capacity building and the generation of new knowledge are essential for the achievement of climate-smart agriculture. Given the long history of Norwegian support to agricultural research and higher agricultural education in several African countries, Norway can, without doubt, make significant contributions to African food security, now and in the future.Norwegian support to climate-smart agriculture can be based on its experience with REDD+ and Energy+ initiatives. The possible roles include: 1) Human

  11. From Access to Excess: Changing Roles and Relationships for Distance Education, Continuing Education, and Academic Departments in American Universities

    Ashcroft, Judy Copeland

    2013-01-01

    In American universities, early distance education needed both continuing education and academic departments for establishing institutional cooperation, developing quality standards, adapting to change, and finding a funding model. Today, the Internet and the need for additional revenue are driving new distance education models.

  12. Changing Times, Changing Roles?

    Parker, Stella

    1994-01-01

    Completion of the Vocational Preference Inventory by 97 British continuing educators showed their vocational interests were primarily creative and intellectual and least preferred activities were administration, marketing, and accounting. Because the latter are increasingly part of the job, conflicts and barriers to change could arise. (SK)

  13. From Ignoring to Leading Changes – What Role do Universities Play in Developing Countries? (Case of Croatia

    Slavica Singer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the model of entrepreneurial university, the paper presents major blockages (university’s own institutional rigidity, fragmented organization, lack of mutual trust between the business sector and universities, no real benchmarks, legal framework not supportive of opening the university to new initiatives in Triple Helix interactions in Croatia. Comparing identified blockages with expectations (multidimensional campus, cooperation with the business sector and other stakeholders in designing new educational and research programs expressed by HEIs in developed countries around the world (2008 EIU survey indicates new challenges for universities in developing countries. With Triple Helix approach, not confined within national borders, but as an international networking opportunity, these challenges can be seen as opportunities, otherwise they are threats. On the scale of ignoring, observing, participating and leading positive changes in its surroundings, for the purpose of measuring vitality of Triple Helix interactions, Croatian universities are located more between ignoring and observing position. To move them towards a leading position, coordinated and consistent policies are needed in order to focus on eliminating identified blockages. Universities should take the lead in this process; otherwise they are losing credibility as desired partners in developing space for Triple Helix interactions.

  14. Changes in sleep quality and levels of psychological distress during the adaptation to university: The role of childhood adversity.

    John-Henderson, Neha A; Williams, Sarah E; Brindle, Ryan C; Ginty, Annie T

    2018-05-25

    Stress-related sleep disturbances are common, and poor sleep quality can negatively affect health. Previous work indicates that early-life adversity is associated with compromised sleep quality later in life, but it is unknown whether it predicts greater declines in sleep quality during stressful life transitions. We propose and test a conceptual model whereby individuals who reported experiencing greater levels of child maltreatment would experience greater psychological distress during a stressful life transition, which in turn would contribute to greater declines in sleep quality, relative to their quality of sleep before the stressful transition. Controlling for potential confounding variables (e.g., age, gender), structural equation modelling demonstrated that psychological distress experienced during a stressful transition (i.e., beginning life at university) mediated the relationship between childhood emotional neglect and changes in sleep quality. The hypothesized model demonstrated a good overall fit to the data, χ 2 (15) = 17.69, p = .279, CFI = .99, TLI = .97, SRMR = .04, RMSEA = .04 (90% CI quality (β = .31) during a stressful transition. Future research should aim to understand the specific stressors in the university environment that are most challenging to individuals who faced early-life emotional maltreatment. These findings will help inform interventions to facilitate adaptation to a new environment and improve sleep quality for these university students. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Predicting change in symptoms of depression during the transition to university: the roles of BDNF and working memory capacity.

    LeMoult, Joelle; Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Joormann, Jutta

    2015-03-01

    Studies on depression risk emphasize the importance of both cognitive and genetic vulnerability factors. The present study has provided the first examination of whether working memory capacity, the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, and their interaction predict changes in symptoms of depression during the transition to university. Early in the semester, students completed a self-report measure of depressive symptoms and a modified version of the reading span task to assess working memory capacity in the presence of both neutral and negative distractors. Whole blood was genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism. Students returned at the end of the semester to complete additional self-report questionnaires. Neither working memory capacity nor the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism predicted change in depressive symptoms either independently or in interaction with self-reported semester difficulty. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, however, moderated the association between working memory capacity and symptom change. Among met carriers, lower working memory capacity in the presence of negative-but not neutral-distractors was associated with increased symptoms of depression over the semester. For the val/val group, working memory capacity did not predict symptom change. These findings contribute directly to biological and cognitive models of depression and highlight the importance of examining Gene × Cognition interactions when investigating risk for depression.

  16. Role Strain in University Research Centers

    Boardman, Craig; Bozeman, Barry

    2007-01-01

    One way in which university faculty members' professional lives have become more complex with the advent of contemporary university research centers is that many faculty have taken on additional roles. The authors' concern in this article is to determine the extent to which role strain is experienced by university faculty members who are…

  17. Patent, Nanotechnology, and the Role of University

    Sardjono, Agus

    2011-01-01

    University has significant contribution tot the development of nanotechnology, The role of university can be implemented through the TTLO, particulary in an effort to build a bridge for bottom-up nanotechnology for commercial purposes. There will be an increasingly significant link betweent the patent system on the university role in the development of nanotechnology.

  18. Pollution prevention: The role of a university

    Barkenbus, J.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Pollution prevention is at the top of the waste management hierarchy in the United States. If you don`t create pollution in the first place, concerns about transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of waste are moot. While industry is on the front line in accomplishing significant pollution prevention, universities can play a meaningful role in its accomplishment as well. Universities can do this through three basic missions: education, research, and public service. Examples of how this is carried out at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville are provided. To be fully effective, universities need to organize in an interdisciplinary manner and adopt a public outreach agenda.

  19. [Changes in body weight of the university students at university].

    Soto Ruiz, María Nelia; Aguinaga Ontonso, Inés; Canga Armayor, Navidad; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; Hermoso de Mendoza, Juana; Serrano Monzo, Inmaculada; Marín Fernández, Blanca

    2015-06-01

    One of the strategies for the prevention of the obesity is the identification of critical periods of gain weight. Some studies confirm gain weight during the university period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the changes in the body weight of the university students in Navarre. Prospective cohort study. Public University of Navarre and the University of Navarre, in Pamplona. Study examined weight change among 452 students attending at university in Pamplona, during first and third course. Four hundred and fifty two students completed the questionnaire. Weight and height were measures and body mass index was calculated. The mean body weight increased 0,600 kg, 1,8 kg for males and no change in body weight was observed in female. 44,7 % of students gained weight (60,8 % of men and 36,8 % of women), and the gain weight was of 3,4 kg. University years are a critical factor for the gain weight, particularly males. Consideration of this, is necessary the development of effective weight gain prevention strategies during the university. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Change Leadership in Universities: The Confucian Dimension

    Tjeldvoll, Arild

    2011-01-01

    The intensified competition of the global, market-based knowledge economy requires change leadership in universities and colleges throughout the world. National policy makers increasingly see knowledge as a core resource of modern economies and a prerequisite for global competitiveness. By implication, the quality of university leadership becomes…

  1. Introducing Change From the Top in Universities and Colleges. 10 Personal Accounts. Managing Innovation and Change in Universities and Colleges.

    Weil, Susan, Ed.

    Ten personal accounts by successful leaders of colleges and universities in the United Kingdom describe how these individuals are reshaping their roles to respond to and shape the rapid and profound changes in higher education today. The opening and closing papers are by the editor and review current changes in education, and the importance of…

  2. Global monopoles can change Universe's topology

    Marunović, Anja; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    If the Universe undergoes a phase transition, at which global monopoles are created or destroyed, topology of its spatial sections can change. More specifically, by making use of Myers' theorem, we show that, after a transition in which global monopoles form, spatial sections of a spatially flat, infinite Universe becomes finite and closed. This implies that global monopoles can change the topology of Universe's spatial sections (from infinite and open to finite and closed). Global monopoles cannot alter the topology of the space-time manifold.

  3. Managing Change in Universities: A Sisyphean Task?

    Brown, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Implementing change in higher education is complex and challenging and its results are difficult to measure. This article will argue that university senior management can make change happen but it is rarely straightforward and never easy. It reviews the ways in which leaders aiming to enhance practice can implement enhancement activities,…

  4. The Role of Universities in Technology Entrepreneurship

    Jonathan Wells

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the role that universities play in the process of technology entrepreneurship, where entrepreneurship is restricted to the process of launching and supporting small and medium-sized technology-based businesses. The article briefly discusses a few of the issues that influence a university’s participation in the process of entrepreneurship. Although there is no “one-size-fits-all” model, the article discusses various ways that Canadian universities may help entrepreneurs, including contract research, the provision of business parks, and sensible handling of intellectual property issues. Finally, the article suggests that the return on “investment”, for both the university and the province, is a difficult thing to measure – nevertheless, participation in the entrepreneurship process may result in some tangible and intangible benefits for both parties.

  5. The change law of the universe

    Yongquan, Han

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ''gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 Ã 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = 6 à 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant

  6. The Role and Responsibility of the University Library in Publishing in a University

    Bas Savenije

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of developments in information technology, the traditional information chain is subject to change: the separate functions in this chain become more and more integrated and the roles played by the traditional parties are most uncertain. Several new models in scholarly publishing and communication are emerging, in which the scientific community and the scientists themselves play a central role. It is more than natural for universities to support these developments in order to realise new models of scientific communication that are more in tune with the needs of the academic community than the traditional model, which has led to a serious serials crisis. An important step in this direction is that each university encourages scientists to make more use of ICT in their research publications. However, it is also necessary to give serious attention to organisational matters: in this respect every university should take responsibility for collecting, archiving and disclosing the scientific output of its own scientists. The provision of scientific information is the traditional core business of university libraries and it is a natural extension of this role for university libraries to support this development and to organise the processes needed. The paper describes the role that universities and their libraries have to play. It also gives some examples of library initiatives in this field, including an evaluation of their impact on the innovation of scientific communication.

  7. On the Role of Dust in the Universe

    Martin, P. G.

    2004-05-01

    This article is a personal discourse on the various aspects of dust in the universe, its so-called role. My conclusion is that dust does make a difference. It directly alters the way we view the universe. It also changes the nature of the universe that we see. Finally, it is woven into the big picture of our own place in the universe and our understanding and responses. In arriving at this conclusion I explore a range of topics: the curse of extinction, dust as a photon converter, diversity, Galactic ecology, and a cosmic bawdy house. I also reflect on dust and (in)humanity. I argue that we must advance the post-Copernican enlightenment, so that a coherent understanding of our place in the universe, the big picture, becomes widely held, to provide a basis for improving life here and now, bringing humans into harmony with one another, other living fauna and flora, and the shared environment. Countering pernicious trends to the contrary will require a social revolution to accompany the scientific, through ``ideas transfer.'' This is much more challenging than propagating technology. Astronomers, particularly those versed in the beauties and multiple dimensions of dust in the universe, have an opportunity to participate, indeed to intervene. Since ``dust is us,'' this too is a role of dust in the universe, arguably the most profound if it is accepted that continued human existence has any importance.

  8. The Complexity of Leveraging University Program Change

    Crow, Gary M.; Arnold, Noelle Witherspoon; Reed, Cynthia J.; Shoho, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    This article identifies four elements of complexity that influence how university educational leadership programs can leverage program change: faculty reward systems, faculty governance, institutional resources, and state-level influence on leadership preparation. Following the discussion of the elements of complexity, the article provides a…

  9. The role of universities in the US nuclear enterprise

    Stephens, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) support for nuclear engineering and related education programs involving universities. Universities are participating in the following DOE nuclear-related program activities: (1) University Nuclear Engineering Research Program; (2) Nuclear Engineering Education Support; (3) The University Role in the DOE Environmental Remediation and Waste Management Program; and (4) University Nuclear Research Reactors

  10. Asia's changing role in global climate change.

    Siddiqi, Toufiq A

    2008-10-01

    Asia's role in global climate change has evolved significantly from the time when the Kyoto Protocol was being negotiated. Emissions of carbon dioxide, the principal greenhouse gas, from energy use in Asian countries now exceed those from the European Union or North America. Three of the top five emitters-China, India, and Japan, are Asian countries. Any meaningful global effort to address global climate change requires the active cooperation of these and other large Asian countries, if it is to succeed. Issues of equity between countries, within countries, and between generations, need to be tackled. Some quantitative current and historic data to illustrate the difficulties involved are provided, and one approach to making progress is suggested.

  11. Digital Parenting and Changing Roles

    Işıl KABAKÇI YURDAKUL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies are developing rapidly. Developing technologies are integrated in many fields of life. This situation facilitated almost all fields of life. Owing to integration process, children’s technology use and adaption is easy compare to their parents. But technology use and adaption brings several disadvantages for children. Computer and the Internet have been used nearly all home in about last five years. Parents who were worried about their children when they played outside are worried about their children when they are on net at home. Due to these developments, parenting notion has gain new different dimensions and parenting roles are changed. Parents should now be digital parent, the Internet Parent or online parent. In this paper Digital Parenting is examined and described in additon to thisdigital parenting roles are determined. Based on these roles recommendations are presented for future studies and practices

  12. Time change and universality in turbulence

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    of the probability densities of turbulent velocity increments. Furthermore, the application of a time change in terms of the scale parameter δ of the normal inverse Gaussian distribution results in a collapse of the densities of velocity increments onto Reynolds number independent distributions. We discuss this kind...... experiment. Taylor Reynolds numbers range from Rλ = 80 for the wind tunnel experiment up to Rλ = 17000 for the atmospheric boundary layer experiment. Empirical findings strongly support the appropriateness of normal inverse Gaussian distributions for a parsimonious and universal description...

  13. The human role in changing river channels

    Gregory, K. J.

    2006-09-01

    Direct consequences of the human role, where human activity affects river channels through engineering works including channelization, dam construction, diversion and culverting, have been long recognised [Marsh, G.P., 1864. Man and Nature or Physical Geography as Modified by Human Action. Charles Scribner, New York; Thomas Jr., W.L., (ed.) 1956. Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.]. The less obvious indirect effects of point and reach changes occurring downstream and throughout the basin, however, are much more recently appreciated, dating from key contributions by Strahler [Strahler, A.N., 1956. The nature of induced erosion and aggradation. In W. L. Thomas (Ed.), Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 621-638.], Wolman [Wolman, M.G., 1967. A cycle of sedimentation and erosion in urban river channels. Geografiska Annaler 49A, 385-95.], Schumm [Schumm, S.A., 1969. River metamorphosis. Proceedings American Society of Civil Engineers, Journal Hydraulics Division 95, 255-73.], and Graf [Graf, W.L., 1977. The rate law in fluvial geomorphology. American Journal of Science, 277, 178-191.]. These are complemented by effects of alterations of land use, such as deforestation, intensive agriculture and incidence of fire, with the most extreme effects produced by building activity and urbanisation. Changing river channels are most evident in the channel cross-section where changes of size, shape and composition are now well-established, with up to tenfold increases or decreases illustrated by results from more than 200 world studies. In addition the overall channel planform, the network and the ecology have changed. Specific terms have become associated with changing river channels including enlargement, shrinkage and metamorphosis. Although the scope of adjustment has been established, it has not always been possible to predict what will happen in a particular location

  14. Structural changes, roles and challenges

    2000-01-01

    Statnett is facing great challenges in a Nordic and European integrated power market, with increasingly mighty commercial players. In a competing market there are conflicts between the socio-economic targets for Statkraft's activities and the commercial interests of Statnet's customers and other players in the power market. In the light of development, the connection lines between the customers and Statnett should be changed. Another problem is the legal competence problem that arises when the Oil and Energy Department (OED) works out the general policy at the same time as it owns Statkraft and Statnett and is the appellate body for the development decisions taken by the NVE (the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate). When comprehensive changes in Statkraft's company organisation and ownership are considered, special attention must be paid to the competence problem and to the risk of the commercial producers increasing their impact on how Statnett manages its role as a systems operator

  15. Family Roles in Transition. In a Changing Military.

    1981-06-18

    and Management and Department of Psychology Dr. Larry Cummings College Park MD 20742 University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School of Business Dr. D...Graduate School of Management and Business University of Oregon Eugene OR 97403 Dr. James R. Terborg University of Houston Department of Psychology Houston...AD-A107 348 UNdITED STATES INTERNATIONAL UNIV SAN DIEGO CA FAMILY --ETC PIG 5/1l FAMILY ROLES IN TRANSITION IN A CHANGING MILITARY (U) JUN 81 E J

  16. Change in the pace of universe expansion

    Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Yeche, C.

    2016-01-01

    During the first 8 billion years the universe expansion was slowed down by gravity, at that time the universe was made up mostly of ordinary matter. The accelerating expansion phase we know dates back to 6 billion years ago and now the content of the universe can be divided into: dark energy (73%), dark matter (23%), gas (3.6%) and stars, planets... (0.4%). Quasars which are among the most luminous objects of the universe and whose light can be detected even after having travelled through the universe for 12 billion years, can be used as markers of the matter all along the history of the universe. 3 international projects (SDSS, DESI and LSST) will study, in a complementary way, the period when dark energy overtook ordinary matter. (A.C.)

  17. The Role of Rationality in University Budgeting.

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle

    1983-01-01

    Although empirical accounts of organizational decision making often show that the process is not a rational one, a study of budgeting at Stanford University during the 1970s, while not conclusive or comprehensive, supported the claim that the institution's process was rational and provided a procedure for testing a decision-making model. (MSE)

  18. Changing concerns of beginning Dutch university teachers

    van den Bos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to address the concerns of beginning university teachers about learning to teach in the context of an induction programme. Design/methodology/approach: The author asked 162 beginning teachers at Dutch universities of applied sciences to express their concerns

  19. Publication Services at the University Library Graz: A New Venture, a New Role

    Ginther, Clara; Lackner, Karin; Kaier, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Establishing Publication Services in the library at the University of Graz did more than broaden the service portfolio of the library. A convergence of expertise at the library, needs of researchers at the university, and ongoing changes in scholarly communication also contributed to the evolution of the library's role and profile. The new…

  20. Understanding a Resistance to Change: A Challenge for Universities

    Caruth, Gail D.; Caruth, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Change is inevitable. Today more than ever the pace of change is accelerating. Where there is organizational change there will be resistance to this change. To deal with the resistance effectively university administrators must understand the nature and causes of resistance to change. Only by dealing effectively with resistance to change can…

  1. What Does "International University" Mean at a European Bilingual University? the Role of Languages and Culture

    Doiz, Aintzane; Lasagabaster, David; Sierra, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Internationalisation has brought about remarkable changes at universities all over the world. In the case of the University of the Basque Country (Spain) this is reflected in the increasing presence of English-medium instruction. This paper examines two issues: the university community's perception of (1) the term "international…

  2. The role of social networking in the effectiveness of university ...

    The role of social networking in the effectiveness of university education: exploratory ... new facts came to light, as it made people communicate in a virtual world. ... Keywords: social networks; e-Learning; online learning; Facebook; Web 2.0; ...

  3. Challenges of Universal Basic Education Programme: The Role of ...

    Toshiba

    Counsellors roles for effective implementation of Universal Basic. Education. Recommendations ... In the Nigerian context, basic education includes primary, junior. Secondary and .... Infrastructural facilities, especially in rural areas. 3.75. 8th. 9.

  4. Universities' Intermediary Role in the "Design for Sustainability" Field

    Küçüksayraç, Elif; Wever, Renee; Brezet, Han

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the intermediary role of universities in spreading design for sustainability into industry. Design/methodology/approach: Three case studies were undertaken on Delft University of Technology, Design for Sustainability Program from The Netherlands; a center on sustainable consumption and production; and Prof.…

  5. Personal Learning Environments and University Teacher Roles Explored Using Delphi

    Shaikh, Zaffar Ahmed; Khoja, Shakeel Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research using an online Delphi method, which aimed to explore university teacher roles and readiness for learner-centred pedagogy, driven by personal learning environments (PLEs). Using a modified Policy Delphi technique, a group of researchers worked with 34 international experts who are university teachers by…

  6. Homesickness in University Students: The Role of Multiple Place Attachment

    Scopelliti, Massimiliano; Tiberio, Lorenza

    2010-01-01

    The transition to college or university can lead to the challenge of adapting to a new setting. Homesickness has been frequently investigated as a potential negative consequence of relocation. This study analyzed the role of multiple place attachment in the development of homesickness among university students. The study used a multicausal…

  7. Are Universities Role Models for Communities? A Gender Perspective

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE; Octavian MOLDOVAN

    2012-01-01

    The present paper explores the degree in which universities could/should serve as role models for communities from the perspective of gender integration. Although the theoretical/ moral answer would be affirmative (universities should be in such a position that would allow local communities to regard them as role models of gender integration), the primary empirical analysis leads to another conclusion. A brief theoretical review (that connects gender discrimination, sustainable development, u...

  8. The changing role of the subject specialist

    Michael Cotta-Schønberg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As we all know, libraries are these years rapidly undergoing change on unparalleled scale. Evidently, this applies to librarians, too, and not the least to that important category of library staff, the subject specialist. As recruiting and education of library workers differ from country to country it is difficult to give a detailed, generally valid description of the subject librarian in libraries, but I believe that you can describe an ideal model of subject librarianship as follows: Within each of the major subject disciplines covered by the library, the library should have a subject specialist preferably with a master degree or at least a bachelor degree in the particular subject discipline. The role of the subject specialist is to perform four basic functions where extensive subject knowledge is considered to be necessary: selecting and classifying books, assisting users with advanced subject inquiries, giving subject-specific courses in information retrieval, and maintaining liaison with relevant academic departments and centres. Personally, I know this system very well since I got employment in the Royal Library in Copenhagen as a subject specialist in psychology in the very month I finished my degree in psychology from the University of Copenhagen, back in 1973. The subject librarian system at the Royal Library in Copenhagen was patterned on the ideal model, as I just described it, and it was closely paralleled in the other academic libraries in Denmark, also the new university libraries which were founded in the seventies.

  9. Advertising and Women's Changing Work Roles.

    Rutz, Linda Robinson

    A study was conducted to determine how well the advertising industry portrays the changing work roles of women. Four advertising executives were interviewed to find out their feelings about the changes in women's work roles and what action they were taking to adapt advertising to these changes, while 11 women were interviewed with similar…

  10. Leading Change with Slogans: Border University in Transition

    Gonzales, Leslie D.; Pacheco, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors problematize the use of slogans when it comes to leading major organizational change. Specifically, they outline the slogans that Border University leaders used to explain and justify the university's transition from a regional, primarily teaching-focused university to an aspiring nationally recognized, Tier One research…

  11. Changing scene highlights III. [Iowa State University

    Fassel, V. A.; Harl, Neil E.; Legvold, Sam; Ruedenberg, Klaus; Swenson, Clayton A.; Burnet, George; Fisher, Ray W.; Gschneidner, Karl A.; Hansen, Robert S.; Kliewer, Kenneth L.; Wildman, Ruth

    1979-01-01

    The research programs in progress at Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, are reviewed: hydrogen (storage), materials, catalysts, TRISTAN (their laboratory isotope separator), coal preparation, coal classification, land reclamation (after surface mining, nitinol, neutron radiography, grain dust explosions, biomass conversion, etc). (LTC)

  12. Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family

    Nikunen, Minna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

  13. The changing role of the quality professional

    Thompson, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the historic role of the quality professionals in a Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) contractor's organization. The quality professional's changing role is presented

  14. Are Universities Role Models for Communities? A Gender Perspective

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the degree in which universities could/should serve as role models for communities from the perspective of gender integration. Although the theoretical/ moral answer would be affirmative (universities should be in such a position that would allow local communities to regard them as role models of gender integration, the primary empirical analysis leads to another conclusion. A brief theoretical review (that connects gender discrimination, sustainable development, universities and local communities is followed by an empirical analysis that compares the management structures of 12 Romanian Universities of Advanced Research and Education (the best Romanian universities according to a national ranking with those of four local communities where they are located (as geographic proximity would lead to a better diffusion of best practices. Contrary to initial expectations, even in higher education institutions, women are underrepresented both in executive and legislative positions. Since universities are subject to the same major patterns of gender discrimination (such as role theory, glass ceiling and glass elevator as private and public organizations, they lose the moral high ground that theory would suggest. However, medicine and pharmacy universities that can be connected with the traditional roles attributed to women provide better gender integration, but glass escalator phenomena remain present even in these limited fields.

  15. Radioastronomy changes our picture of the universe

    Schwartz, R.; Witzel, A.

    1982-01-01

    Since the first operation of the 100 m-Radiotelescope in Bad Muenstereifel-Effelsberg in 1972, this instrument has contributed to a better understanding of the structure of the universe. The flexibility of the telescope, e.g. the use of different detection systems, has proved to be decisive for the scientific success of the instrument. With these detection systems the wavelength region between 90 cm and 7 mm could be studied. (orig.) [de

  16. Ethics Centers' Activities and Role in Promoting Ethics in Universities

    Safatly, Lise; Itani, Hiba; El-Hajj, Ali; Salem, Dania

    2017-01-01

    In modern and well-structured universities, ethics centers are playing a key role in hosting, organizing, and managing activities to enrich and guide students' ethical thinking and analysis. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of the goals, activities, and administration of ethics centers, as well as their role in promoting ethical thinking…

  17. Reforming the University: The Role of the Research Center.

    Sieber, Sam D.; Lazarsfeld, Paul F.

    The authors seek to show the potentiality of research organizations for the achievement of basic university goals, and to isolate the conditions that impede or promote the success of these integrative agencies. In addition, they examine the role of the managerial scholars who are in the positions of leadership since they believe this role is vital…

  18. The University of Oporto and the process of urban change: an ambiguous relationship

    Alves, Sonia; Vázquez, Isabel; Conceição, Paulo

    2008-01-01

    relationships and capacities. This argument emphasizes the ambiguous and contingent role played by the university in the process of urban development and recognizes that this role is not always explicitly incorporated into the strategy of the main urban agents, such as the local authority or the university......, the specific relationship between the University and the city of Oporto cannot be separated from the process of change taking place in the University itself, or the process of change in urban planning in the city. The relationship between the university, the state and the city therefore provides the backdrop...... of institutional relations in understanding these difficulties. The theme of the ambiguous relationship between the university and the city that emerges from these two case studies is examined in greater depth in the final section of the chapter....

  19. Radical change of the university classroom: The views of some ...

    With recent changes in higher education policies, the concept of the university classroom is undergoing change. This article explores the various aspects that make up the university classroom: the physical space, the resources available, the use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) and the type of intellectual ...

  20. Strategies for university improvement: The research profile change ...

    Universities worldwide experience continual change in order to achieve what is perceived as improvement. In these changes, there is usually an emphasis on the research function of a university, and the literature contains a number of themes in this regard. We contribute by presenting a detailed case study of a ...

  1. The University Immune System: Overcoming Resistance to Change

    Gilley, Ann; Godek, Marisha; Gilley, Jerry W.

    2009-01-01

    A university, similar to any other organization, has an immune system that erects a powerful barrier against change. This article discusses the university immune system and what can be done to counteract its negative effects and thereby allow change to occur.

  2. Changing Teacher Roles in the Foreign-Language Classroom.

    Johnson, Francis; Delarche, Marion; Marshall, Nicholas; Wurr, Adrian; Edwards, Jeffery

    This paper examines trends reflecting changes in the role of the classroom foreign language teacher, particularly as these trends affect English-as-a-Second-Language instruction. This study is based on relevant literature and research being carried out in the English Language Institute at Kanda University of International Studies (Japan). Past and…

  3. Changing Instructor's Roles in Virtual Worlds

    Berge, Zane L.

    2008-01-01

    Berge's Instructor's Roles Model categorized the instructor's roles as pedagogical, social, managerial, and technical. Developed more than a decade ago, this model described changing roles for instructors as they transitioned from in-person classrooms to teaching online. Today, as virtual worlds emerge and are being used as educational platforms,…

  4. The Changing Purposes of University Libraries

    Evans, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores recent developments in national policy for academic libraries. It considers the shift from traditional to managerial academic librarianship; the move to "social space" and multi-use systems; changes in the balance between meeting teaching and research needs and in public funding priorities; the difficulty of making…

  5. Role of the ocean in climate changes

    Gulev, Sergey K.

    1992-01-01

    The present program aimed at the study of ocean climate change is prepared by a group of scientists from State Oceanographic Institute, Academy of Science of Russia, Academy of Science of Ukraine and Moscow State University. It appears to be a natural evolution of ideas and achievements that have been developed under national and international ocean research projects such as SECTIONS, WOCE, TOGA, JGOFS and others. The two primary goals are set in the program ROCC. (1) Quantitative description of the global interoceanic 'conveyor' and it's role in formation of the large scale anomalies in the North Atlantic. The objectives on the way to this goal are: to get the reliable estimates of year-to-year variations of heat and water exchange between the Atlantic Ocean and the atmosphere; to establish and understand the physics of long period variations in meridianal heat and fresh water transport (MHT and MFWT) in the Atlantic Ocean; to analyze the general mechanisms, that form the MHT and MFWT in low latitudes (Ekman flux), middle latitudes (western boundary currents) and high latitudes (deep convection) of the North Atlantic; to establish and to give quantitative description of the realization of global changes in SST, surface salinity, sea level and sea ice data. (2) Development of the observational system pointed at tracing the climate changes in the North Atlantic. This goal merges the following objectives: to find the proper sites that form the inter annual variations of MHT; to study the deep circulation in the 'key' points; to develop the circulation models reflecting the principle features of interoceanic circulation; and to define global and local response of the atmosphere circulation to large scale processes in the Atlantic Ocean.

  6. Universities Potential Role in Local and Regional Development

    Moesby, Egon; Rolim, Cassio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The paper will describe experiences from Aalborg University in Denmark on ways to support cooperation between the University and regional civic/business. Design/Methodology: Regional development is exceedingly focused in the world; and as growth is dependent on specialised knowledge...... and highly skilled and competent staff, it could be anticipated that universities should play a key role in facilitating such growth and development. At Aalborg University, such cooperation is taking place, and this paper sums up the practices and experiences gained therefrom. Findings: Universities have...... been and maybe still are seen as bodies focusing on know-how; however, they are now focusing on technology transfer, knowledge transfer and knowledge exchange, and maybe also on co-designing. From such beginnings co-operation can, and in many cases has, further developed into formal partnerships...

  7. Autonomy or Oligarchy? The Changing Effects of University Endowments in Winner-Take-All Markets

    Meyer, Heinz-Dieter; Zhou, Kai

    2017-01-01

    This paper directs attention to important changes in the role and funding of elite private universities in the USA. At the center of these changes is the private endowment--an institution that has for much of its history been a pivotal element of innovation and autonomy, but which is recently tilting towards the production and reproduction of…

  8. Valuing the Leadership Role of University Unit Coordinators

    Pepper, Coral; Roberts, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the experiences of 64 unit coordinators across 15 Australian universities, gathered during 2011/2012 as part of an Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) project. Our intention was to gain insight into how unit coordinators (academics who coordinate a discrete unit of study) perceive their role as leaders of learning in…

  9. Role of the University in Information and Communication for ...

    Role of the University in Information and Communication for Development ... To date, most attention in the higher education sector has focused on distance learning, e-learning, and other ... the reach of education to remote locations and non-traditional students. ... Asian outlook: New growth dependent on new productivity.

  10. The role of universities in the US nuclear research enterprise

    Taylor, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The vitally important role of the universities in nuclear research is embodied in the three functions of education, research, and policymaking. These three functions are discussed from the perspective of nuclear power's unique demands for quality and its pioneering interface with societal and environmental aspirations

  11. The Role of History and Philosophy of in University Mathematics

    Kjeldsen, Tinne Hoff; Carter, Jessica M H Grund

    2014-01-01

    uses of history and the research direction in philosophy of mathematics denoted ‘Philosophy of Mathematical Practice’. We link history and philosophy of mathematical practices to recent ideas in mathematics education in order to identify different roles history and philosophy can play in the learning...... of mathematics at university level. We present, analyse and discuss different examples of inclusions of history and philosophy in university programmes in mathematics. These presentations are divided into courses in history and philosophy, respectively, since this is the main way they are organised...... at the universities. We shall see, however, that the history courses address philosophical questions and that the philosophy courses employ historical material. The chapter ends with comments on how mathematics educations at university level can benefit from history and philosophy of mathematics...

  12. Managing change : Case study: HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Valkeakoski

    Chau Thi Tra, Mi

    2012-01-01

    In response to changes imposed by the Finnish government on the Univer-sities of Applied Sciences system in the near future, HAMK has proactive-ly adopted several programmes to prepare for future challenges and rein-force the organization’s competitiveness. However, organizational change has never been an easy, straightforward issue and how to manage change effectively has become an interest to the organization. The study aims at providing suggestions for a more successful change im-pleme...

  13. Leadership in the Reform of Malaysian Universities: Analysing the Strategic Role of the Malaysian Qualifications Agency

    Bajunid, Ibrahim Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the contemporary development and reform challenges in tertiary education in Malaysia in both national and global contexts. The critical role exercised by the Malaysian Qualifications Agency in driving strategic change in higher education cultures, both in public and private universities is described and analysed. The paper…

  14. ROLE OF THE CLASSICAL UNIVERSITY IN ELITE REPRODUCTION

    N. G. Osipova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines problems concerning the modernization of the higher education in Russia and training of highly intellectual, elite persons for managing the country.The author concludes that the hasty steps taken in the course of reforming the Russian system of higher education at the end of the first decade of the 21st century led to a specific situation. This situation is characterized by a policy of accelerated reorganization of education, primarily aimed at accepting the dogmatized models and tools for educational institutions management, which were imposed by the West and initially designed for underdeveloped backward countries.Unfortunately, this situation has determined many dysfunctions in education, concerning foremost classical university education. Completely predictably, it led to disorientation of student youth that began focusing on narrowly applied aspects of future professional activity, which are secondary in terms of social significance.The article emphasizes the importance of preserving the best traditions of the Russian higher education within the framework of classical universities, which have always played a leading role in the reproduction of the elite of the society. Key points are identified that make it possible to specify the essence of the elite reproduced by classical universities.The author demonstrates that the future presidents and prime ministers, Nobel laureates, internationally renowned writers graduated from the most famous universities in the world, with the Lomonosov Moscow State University preserving a leading place among them. For example, when Russian science was living through its historical rise, it was led by the Moscow University graduates, including S.I. Vavilov, A.N. Nesmeyanov, M.V. Keldysh.Overcoming the populist approaches to contemporary education, return to the fundamentality and breadth of domestic education, focus on the traditional “scientific education”, as well as the intellectual

  15. Role of Corporate Social Responsibility Practices in Saudi Universities

    Bandar Khalaf Alharthey

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many researchers focus on the relocation of the government in the transformation of The purpose of this study is to examine the role of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR practices in higher education of Saudi Arabia. The growing importance of CSR has made it necessary for every university to use international benchmarks as standard to devise their CSR practices accordingly. This realization has shifted focus of CSR practices of Saudi universities towards every dimension of CSR. The study collected secondary data through 120 advertisements published from 2012 to 2015 and found out that CSR practices of universities of Saudi Arabia remain focused on social dimension of CSR because Saudi culture and religion had profound impact on business laws and eventually on CSR practices.

  16. Corporate Universities and Corporation- University Partnerships in Thailand: Complimenting Education in Learning, Leadership and Change

    Oliver S. Crocco

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With an estimated workforce of 285 million and the establishment of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN Economic Community in 2015, ASEAN faces vast challenges in human resource development (HRD and higher education. These challenges in Thailand have resulted in the rise of corporate universities and corporation-university partnerships. Corporate partnerships in education adapt quickly to industry needs and are increasingly popular and complimentary to traditional higher education. This research looks at one corporate university and one corporation-university partnership to investigate how, if at all, corporate universities and partnerships address HRD issues such as adult learning, leadership development, organisational change, corporate social responsibility (CSR, as well as ethical and global issues. This research finds initial evidence that corporate educational strategies address a variety of HRD issues and have the potential to revolutionise and compliment higher education in Thailand in a way that drives the nation toward a more sustainable future.

  17. Changing and Changed Stance toward Norm Selection in Philippine Universities: Its Pedagogical Implications

    Bernardo, Alejandro S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey which involved College English teachers from three leading universities in the Philippines. The results point to one conclusion--College English teachers now have a changing and changed stance toward norm selection in Philippine Universities. The results give the impression that a good number of College…

  18. Changing University Students’ Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Zalkida Hadžibegović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the truly impressive implementation results of theSCALE-UP learning environment suggest that such beliefs are false (Beichner et al., 2000. In this study, we present a design of an active learning environment with positive effect on students. The design is based on the following elements: (1 helping students to learn from interactive lecture experiment; (2 guiding students to use justified explanation and prediction after observing and exploring a phenomenon; (3 developing a conceptual question sequencedesigned for use in an interactive lecture with students answering questions in worksheets by writing and drawing; (4 evaluating students’ conceptual change and gains by questions related to light reflection, refraction, and image formation in an exam held a week after the active learning session. Data were collected from 95 science freshmen with different secondary school backgrounds. They participated in geometrical optics classes organized for collecting research results during and after only one active learning session.The results have showed that around 60% of the students changed their initial alternative conceptions of vision and of image formation. It was also found that a large group of university students is likely to be engaged in active learning, shifting from a passive role they usually play during teacher’s lectures.

  19. The Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Changes in Young People's Expectations of Applying to University

    Anders, Jake

    2017-01-01

    A much larger proportion of English 14-year-olds expect to apply to university than ultimately make an application by age 21, but the proportion expecting to apply falls from age 14 onwards. In order to assess the role of socioeconomic status in explaining changes in expectations, this paper applies duration modelling techniques to the…

  20. The changing role of the Maltese CFO

    Baldacchino, Peter J.; Buttigieg, Anne Colette;

    2014-01-01

    The recent past has been characterised by advances in technology, continuous changes in the environment and also added regulatory requirements, mostly as a consequence of both corporate governance scandals and a challenging recession. This has induced changes in the role of most business professionals, among whom the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of Maltese Listed companies. The objective of this article, which builds on a recent MBA dissertation by Ms Buttigieg, is to an...

  1. Changing Role of the Personnel Manager

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1975-01-01

    Arguing that the personnel manager will increasingly have to become a change agent and process consultant, the author discusses tasks involved and skills required for the new role. A shift in focus toward top management as the primary client and utilization of more flexible intervention into organizational processes are predicted. (JT)

  2. Changing the Business Model of a Distance Teaching University

    Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Reference: Koper, E.J.R. (2014) Changing the Business Model of a Distance Teaching University. In R. Huang, Kinshuk, Price, J.K. (eds.), ICT in Education in Global Context: emerging trends report 2013-2014, Lecture Notes in Educational Technology, Heidelberg: Springer Verlag, pp. 185-203 ISBN

  3. Marine Structures: Future Trends and the Role of Universities

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2015-01-01

    the analysis tools that are most needed to enable sustainable designs for future ships and offshore structures.The last section of the paper contains thoughts on the role of universities in education, research, and innovation regarding marine structures. It discusses curriculum requirements for maritime-technology......This paper emphasizes some of the challenges and trends associated with the future development of marine structures. Its main focus is onways to improve the efficiency of energy-consuming ships, and on design challenges related to energy-producing offshore structures. This paper also discusses...... education, basic research activities, and international cooperation....

  4. Marine Structures: Future Trends and the Role of Universities

    Preben Terndrup Pedersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper emphasizes some of the challenges and trends associated with the future development of marine structures. Its main focus is on ways to improve the efficiency of energy-consuming ships, and on design challenges related to energy-producing offshore structures. This paper also discusses the analysis tools that are most needed to enable sustainable designs for future ships and offshore structures. The last section of the paper contains thoughts on the role of universities in education, research, and innovation regarding marine structures. It discusses curriculum requirements for maritime-technology education, basic research activities, and international cooperation.

  5. [The role of university hospital executive board members].

    Debatin, J F; Rehr, J

    2009-09-01

    Demographic changes and medical progress in combination with vastly altered regulatory and economic environments have forced considerable change in the structure of German university hospitals in recent years. These changes have affected medical care as well as research and medical school training. To allow for more flexibility and a higher level of reactivity to the changing environment German university hospitals were transferred from state agencies to independent corporate structures. All but one remains wholly owned by the respective state governments. The governing structure of these independent medical hospitals consists of an executive board, generally made up of a medical director, a financial director, a director for nursing, and the dean of the medical faculty. In most hospitals, the medical director serves as chief executive officer. The regulations governing the composition and responsibility of the members of the executive board differ from state to state. These differences do affect to some degree the interactive effectiveness of the members of the executive boards. Modalities that stress the overall responsibility for all board members seem to work better than those that define clear portfolio limits. Even more than organizational and regulatory differences, the effectiveness of the work of the executive boards is influenced by the personality of the board members themselves. Success appears to be a clear function of the willingness of all members to work together.

  6. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam

    Ruitenberg EJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder. From 1999 to 2006, eight medical schools in Vietnam worked together to change the curriculum and teaching for general medical students to make it more community oriented. This paper describes the factors that motivated the different stakeholders to participate in curriculum change and teaching in Vietnamese medical schools and the activities to address those factors and have sustainable contributions from all relevant stakeholders. Methods Case study analysis of contributions to the change process, using reports, interviews, focus group discussions and surveys and based on Herzberg's Motivation Theory to analyze involvement of different stakeholders. Results Different stakeholders were motivated by selected activities, such as providing opportunities for non-university stakeholders to share their opinions, organizing interactions among university stakeholders, stimulating both bottom-up and top-down inputs, focusing on learning from each other, and emphasizing self-motivation factors. Conclusion The Herzberg Motivation theory helped to identify suitable approaches to ensure that teaching topics, materials and assessment methods more closely reflected the health care needs of the community. Other medical schools undertaking a reform process may learn from this experience.

  7. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam.

    Luu, Ngoc Hoat; Nguyen, Lan Viet; van der Wilt, G J; Broerse, J; Ruitenberg, E J; Wright, E P

    2009-07-24

    Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder. From 1999 to 2006, eight medical schools in Vietnam worked together to change the curriculum and teaching for general medical students to make it more community oriented. This paper describes the factors that motivated the different stakeholders to participate in curriculum change and teaching in Vietnamese medical schools and the activities to address those factors and have sustainable contributions from all relevant stakeholders. Case study analysis of contributions to the change process, using reports, interviews, focus group discussions and surveys and based on Herzberg's Motivation Theory to analyze involvement of different stakeholders. Different stakeholders were motivated by selected activities, such as providing opportunities for non-university stakeholders to share their opinions, organizing interactions among university stakeholders, stimulating both bottom-up and top-down inputs, focusing on learning from each other, and emphasizing self-motivation factors. The Herzberg Motivation theory helped to identify suitable approaches to ensure that teaching topics, materials and assessment methods more closely reflected the health care needs of the community. Other medical schools undertaking a reform process may learn from this experience.

  8. The Role of Continuous Education Programs Organized by Saudi Universities in Literacy--A Case Study of King Saud University

    Al Rawaf, Haya Saad Abdulla; Fattah, Azza Khalil Abdel; Megeid, Fadia Yousif Abdel; Nazmy, Rania Mohammed Aziz; Alarifi, Sarah Nasser; Al Sulaihm, Hind Sulaiman

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at highlighting the role of Continuous Education Programs at the Saudi Universities in Religious, Social, and Health Literacy; King Saud University was taken as an example. To achieve the goals of the study two questionnaires were distributed among two samples from King Saud University; (101) of students, and (9) of continuous…

  9. Accreditation Role of the National Universities Commission and the Quality of the Educational Inputs into Nigerian University System

    Ibijola; Yinka, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation role of the National Universities Commission (NUC) and the quality of the educational inputs into Nigerian university system was investigated in this work, using a descriptive research of survey design. The population consisted of public Universities in South-West, Nigeria. The sample was made up of 300 subjects, consisting of 50…

  10. Shape changing collisions of optical solitons, universal logic gates ...

    communication via optical fibers [1] and the observation of self trapping of optical beams ... From a theoretical point of view, in the context of intense optical pulse ...... play a pivotal role in the shape changing collision process. ...... [1] See for example, several articles in the Focus Issue on “Optical Solitons - Perspectives and.

  11. Universities in change managing higher education institutions in the age of globalization

    Ebersberger, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Universities find themselves in dynamic change. They are confronted with growing expectations from their stakeholders, increasing international competition, and new technological challenges.  Featuring insights and in-depth case studies from leading researchers and university decision makers from around the world, this book argues that institutions of higher education, in order to be successful, have to actively reflect on circumstances, visions, and strategies to master the future.    Drawing from their experiences across a diverse array of institutions in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, the authors explore the pressures on today’s universities and the opportunities for excelling in the contest for resources.  They discuss operational issues, such as strategic management, IT governance, leadership development, and entrepreneurial culture, and broader concerns, such as the roles and responsibilities of universities in promoting technology transfer and economic and social development.  The result is a ...

  12. The role sports volunteering in the life of university students

    Anastasia Bondar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: identify the role sports volunteering in the life of university students. Material and Methods: 256 students of the Kharkov state academy of physical culture took part in research. The analysis of literary sources and documents was utillized; questioning (questionnaire, methods of the mathematical processing of data. Conclusions: sports volunteering is inalienable part of life of modern students and the 35% polled already were in a position to prove as helpers of organizers of sporting competitions of different level. In opinion of students, volunteering enables them to purchase experience of public activity, so the 25% polled consider, to find new friends – 20,8%, realized themselves – 18,3%. 34,5% respondents consider it-volunteering perspective direction the volunteers activity, the here 32,4% polled would like to prove as counsels of all of sporting volunteers work assignments

  13. The role of university research in primary and secondary education

    Redondo, A.; Llopart, M.; Ramos, L.; Roger, T.; Rafols, R.; Redondo, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the most important roles of educators at all levels(transversally and inter-generationally between adult education, university and the primary schools, specially in sciences is to estimulate the quest for new knowledge and to help to provide the basic thinking tools of the proper scientific method. An innovative plan has been set up though the Campus Universitari de la Mediterrania that integrates the UPC, the local Education authorities and the local governement in Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona. To coordinate university professors invited to lecture in summer courses, so their research and lecturing materials may be used as school level material (as a CD collection) and to help younger students to iniciate their own research proyects. During 2006-2008 a series of Environmental science seminars, group proyects decided by the students or proposed jointly by the CUM were started. Examples of these works, such as Cetacean comunication (with the help of the Laboratory of Bioacustic Applications of the UPC), Shapes and patterns in the environment (Cosmocaixa Science Museum), the Rainbow, Waves and Tides, Turbulence, The growth of snails and the Fibonacci sequence, etc... will be presented, showing the importance of comunicating scientific interest to the younger generations.

  14. Change, Technology and Higher Education: Are Universities Capable of Organisational Change?

    Marshall, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Technology and change are so closely related that the use of the word innovation seems synonymous with technology in many contexts, including that of higher education. This paper contends that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organisational change. In the…

  15. The Role of Social Networking Sites in Creating Moral Crisis and the Role of the University in Confronting It from the View Point of Qassim University Faculty Members

    Al-Smadi, Hend Sam'an Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed at recognizing the effect of the social networking sites (henceforth snss) in creating moral crisis and the role of the university in its confrontation from the view point of faculty members at Qassim University. Two tests were constructed; the first included (29 items) developed to identify the role of snss in creating moral…

  16. Change, technology and higher education: are universities capable of organisational change?

    Stephen Marshall

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology and change are so closely related that the use of the word innovation seems synonymous with technology in many contexts, including that of higher education. This paper contends that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organisational change. In the absence of strong leadership, technologies are simply used as vehicles to enable changes that are already intended or which reinforce the current identity. These contentions are supported by evidence from e-learning benchmarking activities carried out over the past five years in universities in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

  17. Changing family roles and marital instability.

    Kharchev, A G; Matskovskii, M S

    1981-01-01

    The causes of divorce and its social and ethical consequences in Socialist and capitalist societies are examined in an attempt to improve the effectiveness of research on divorce, with a focus on changes in the family structure and the role of women. The impact of divorce on the institution of marriage, the lives of the divorced partners, the upbringing and character of children, and the reproductive processes of society is explored. Traditional notions and expectations of marriage and of duties within the family are identified. The possibility of changing attitudes in order to adapt to conditions resulting from scientific and technological progress is considered, with emphasis on ways of combining women's employment and the performance of household functions. Problems associated with the application of data obtained in foreign empirical studies to situations in the Soviet Union are addressed, and Western sociological approaches to the study of family dynamics are critically examined.

  18. Sex, gender roles and sexual attitudes in university students.

    García-Vega, Elena; Rico, Rosana; Fernández, Paula

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies usually refer to a greater repertoire of sexual behav-iors and a higher level of erotophilia in men than in women. The main goal of this work is to relate sex, gender roles and sexual attitudes to sexual behavior. 411 un-dergraduate students (218 women and 193 men) at theof University of Oviedo (Spain) completed the following instruments: the Bem Sex Roles Inventory to operationalize the variable gender, the Sexual Inventory which reflects sexual behaviors, and the Sexual Opinion Survey about sexual attitudes. 27% of the sample was typified as an-drogynous. There are were no differences in attitudes, either by sex (p= .50) or by gen-der (p= .77). Sexual behaviors depended on the degree of erotophilia (p= .000). the results suggest that, although regarding sex, the fact that women’s erotophilic attitudes have increased their erotophilic attitudes, although they refer to more conventional sexual behaviors than mens’s attitudes. With regard to gender, a tendency towards androgyny is observed, androgynous women and men report positive attitudes towards sexuality. Gender could act as a mediator of sexual behavior through the attitudinal component.

  19. Discovering the quantum universe the role of particle colliders

    2006-01-01

    What does "Quantum Universe" mean? To discover what the universe is made of and how it works is the challenge of particle physics. "Quantum Universe" defines the quest to explain the universe in terms of quantum physics, which governs the behavior of the microscopic, subatomic world. It describes a revolution in particle physics and a quantum leap in our understanding of the mystery and beauty of the universe.

  20. Changing Roles of Librarians and Library Technicians

    Norene James

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available What significant changes are librarians and library technicians experiencing in their roles? A survey put forward across Canada to librarians and library technicians addressing this question was conducted in February 2014. Eight hundred eighty-two responses were obtained from librarians, defined as MLIS graduates, and library technicians, defined as graduates from a two-year library diploma program. Respondents needed to have been employed in the last two years in these roles and students of either an MLIS or LIT program were also welcome to participate. The results suggest that both librarians and library technicians perceive their roles as growing in scope and complexity and that the lines of responsibility are blurring. A majority of respondents indicated that they perceive a change in their roles in the past five years and commented on what the perceived changes were. Librarian and library technician roles may be shifting away from what may be viewed as traditional or clearly defined responsibilities and both librarians and library technicians may be taking on new tasks as well as experiencing task overlap. All library staff will need to be fluid, adaptable, and open to change. Library school curricula and workplace training need to incorporate the development of these competencies. Quels sont les changements importants éprouvés par les bibliothécaires et les bibliotechniciens dans leurs rôles? Un sondage mené en février de 2014 a posé cette question aux bibliothécaires et aux bibliotechniciens dans tout le Canada. On a reçu huit-cent quatre-vingt-deux réponses des bibliothécaires, définis comme étant diplômés en MSIB, et les bibliotechniciens, définis comme étant diplômés d’un programme de deux ans en bibliotechnique. Les sondés devaient avoir travaillé au cours des deux dernières années dans ces fonctions et les étudiants d’un programme MSIB ou de bibliothéconomie/ sciences de l’information pouvaient aussi y

  1. Universities between Traditional Forces and Modern Demands: The Role of Imprinting on the Missions of German Universities

    Oertel, Simon; Söll, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Universities find themselves faced with the conflicting institutional demands of being cathedrals of learning and research as well as introducing managerial and corporate-like structures. Despite many studies in higher education research that focus on how this situation affects the mission of universities, the role of imprinting has not received…

  2. Universal role of correlation entropy in critical phenomena

    Gu Shijian; Sun Changpu; Lin Haiqing

    2008-01-01

    In statistical physics, if we divide successively an equilibrium system into two parts, we will face a situation that, to a certain length ξ, the physics of a subsystem is no longer the same as the original one. The extensive property of the thermal entropy S(A union B) = S(A) + S(B) is then violated. This observation motivates us to introduce a concept of correlation entropy between two points, as measured by the mutual information in information theory, to study the critical phenomena. A rigorous relation is established to display some drastic features of the non-vanishing correlation entropy of a subsystem formed by any two distant particles with long-range correlation. This relation actually indicates a universal role played by the correlation entropy for understanding the critical phenomena. We also verify these analytical studies in terms of two well-studied models for both the thermal and quantum phase transitions: the two-dimensional Ising model and the one-dimensional transverse-field Ising model. Therefore, the correlation entropy provides us with a new physical intuition of the critical phenomena from the point of view of information theory

  3. Change and obduracy in university teaching practices: tracing agency in professional development

    John Hannon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research into effectiveness of teaching practices and professional development invites questions of teaching and learning change: how it takes effect and is accounted for, and where its agency is claimed and contested across a range of institutional, disciplinary and pedagogical actors. This article investigates change in teaching practices and professional development through the notion of obduracy (Law, 2003: ordered arrangements that persist in the background and surface in a process of change. In focussing on practice as the object of inquiry, this study is part of a shift away from the study of professional learning drawing on individualist, cognitive traditions towards practice-oriented understandings of change and agency as an effect of social and material arrangements. The setting for this study of teaching practice is two disciplinary academic collectives, or workgroups, in one Australian university. Rather than approaching change as a human-centred and intentional process, the method of sociomaterial tracing was applied to teaching practice undergoing an institutional change process. The study highlights the process in which change is assembled, resisted or accomplished through heterogeneous networks of curriculum, discourses, technologies, and policies. Teaching and learning change, it is argued, involves recognising how obduracy is embedded in distinct networks across the university. The contribution of this study is to draw attention to the agentic role of materials and spaces in the negotiation and stabilisation of teaching practices and in approaches to professional development.

  4. The Strategically Manageable University: Perceptions of Strategic Choice and Strategic Change among Key Decision Makers

    Frølich, Nicoline; Stensaker, Bjørn; Scordato, Lisa; Bótas, Paulo Charles Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    One common way of conceptualising recent changes in university governance is by stating that the universities are being pushed towards a market-like setting where the uniqueness of each university's strategy and capacity for introducing organizational change is seen as necessary to improve the functioning of the university. We argue that the…

  5. The Changing Role of School Leadership Preparation.

    Wilmore, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    Many U.S. universities are restructuring their administrator-education programs to produce a new breed of principal. The University of Texas at Arlington, Texas A&M, Tarleton State, a Texas A&M-Commerce joint venture, and a regional alternative certification program offer five examples. (Contains 41 references.) (MLH)

  6. The changing role of nuclear materials accounting

    Gibbs, P.W.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear materials accounting and accounting systems at what have been DOE Production sites are evolving into management decision support tools. As the sites are moving into the mode of making decisions on how to disposition complex and varied nuclear material holdings, the need for complete and many times different information has never been greater. The artificial boundaries that have historically been established between what belongs in the classic material control and accountability (MC and A) records versus what goes into the financial, radiological control, waste, or decommissioning and decontamination records are being challenged. In addition, the tools historically used to put material into different categories such as scrap codes, composition codes, etc. have been found to be inadequate for the information needs of today. In order to be cost effective and even, more importantly to effectively manage -our inventories, the new information systems the authors design have to have the flexibility to serve many needs. In addition, those tasked with the responsibility of managing the inventories must also expand beyond the same artificial boundaries. This paper addresses some of the things occurring at the Savannah River Site to support the changing role of nuclear materials accounting

  7. Newton's Path to Universal Gravitation: The Role of the Pendulum

    Boulos, Pierre J.

    2006-01-01

    Much attention has been given to Newton's argument for Universal Gravitation in Book III of the "Principia". Newton brings an impressive array of phenomena, along with the three laws of motion, and his rules for reasoning to deduce Universal Gravitation. At the centre of this argument is the famous "moon test". Here it is the empirical evidence…

  8. The role of socially accountable universities in improving the ...

    2015-05-02

    May 2, 2015 ... the output of rural-origin graduates in required fields such as healthcare.[16]. Stellenbosch University, in response to the inadequate preparation of rural students for university, implemented school interventions to improve learners' grades in mathematics and science in preparation for tertiary education.

  9. The Future Role of Publishing Services in University Libraries

    Walters, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    This study explores possible futures for university-based library publishing services (LPS) and uses scenario planning as its research method. The study posits that the major force in developing LPS is the level of funding from the host university, with the most uncertain factor being whether faculty will adopt LPS. The study participants…

  10. Internationalisation at South African universities: The role of a ...

    Many South African universities have not developed effective and efficient internal administrative organisational structures to enable them to address the current internationalisation challenges. How should South African universities develop internal structures to internationalise their campuses? Drawing from the U.S. ...

  11. Empowered but Not Equal: Challenging the Traditional Gender Roles as Seen by University Students in Saudi Arabia

    Al-bakr, Fawziah; Bruce, Elizabeth R.; Davidson, Petrina M.; Schlaffer, Edit; Kropiunigg, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    This study examines perspectives of Saudi university students regarding changing gender roles as affected by women's rights, education, employment, and activity in the public sphere. Results from a questionnaire distributed among 4,455 male and female students indicate students are confident and optimistic about improving gender equity, however…

  12. Student and teacher. New roles in the university

    Emilio Crisol Moya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The main consequence of the convergence of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA, or also known as "Bologna Process", derives in shaping a new university, which is necessary to meet the new needs of students, attending to their personal, professional and social (Romero, Gijon and Crisol, 2010. European convergence process has been a deep shift in the approach to teaching that is being developed in universities. There is a sort of speech of a new university-based on continuing education of the subject throughout its life. Now it is generating a new university student profile, which it is characterized by: having a close knowledge of technologies, use of new communication habits, and interest in new forms of education and self-learning, developing new skills, and so on. We are talking about a modern university system, quality, focusing on training of the student, where the university professor has to do more than teach, must promote creative learning by the student to think for himself. Now the priority is no longer teaching and university is the protagonist.

  13. Improving Innovation in University Spin-Offs. The Fostering Role of University and Region

    Antonio Prencipe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available University spin-offs (USOs are companies created to commercialize knowledge or technology developed in academia; thus, their major contribution to the knowledge economy is their ability to generate innovation. Following the Resource-Based View of the Firm and the Knowledge Spillover Theory of Entrepreneurship, it was stated that fostering mechanisms at university level and at regional level may positively influence the USOs innovation. Based on a sample of 621 Italian USOs, we show that the positive impact of the university context is more crucial compared with those of the regional context. In particular, the university affiliated business incubators and Science Parks, jointly with the university financial resources, seem to promote the innovation efforts of USOs. These evidences rise the need of a resilient partnership among all the contextual players involved in the spillover processes, mainly at regional level, in order to effectively exploit the potential innovative efforts of the university start-ups.

  14. Longitudinal changes in extended roles in radiography

    Price, R.C.; Miller, L.R.; Mellor, F.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify the extent and scope of changes to radiography practice. Method: Questionnaires were sent to radiology managers at acute National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in 2000 as a follow-up to an initial survey conducted in 1998. Information was sought on region, teaching/non-teaching status, the nature of extended role tasks undertaken and the year in which these tasks were first undertaken. Results: Some 172 questionnaires were returned from a total of 253 dispatched (68%). In 161 hospitals radiographers administered intravenous injections and performed barium enemas in 119 hospitals, while a red-dot system was in operation in 141 hospitals. Reporting by radiographers had increased since 1998. Replies indicated that, at 124 hospitals, radiographers were reporting in ultrasound. Skeletal reporting was the second most-frequently-reported activity, with 63 hospitals indicating that radiographers reported in this modality, while barium enemas were reported by radiographers in 34 hospitals. Reporting was also undertaken by radiographers in mammography, nuclear medicine, paediatrics and chest radiography in a small minority of hospitals. There was no statistically significant difference between the adoption of tasks in non-teaching and teaching hospitals with the exception of radiographer-performed barium enemas (P=0.014) and red-dot systems (P=0.05). Radiographers were more likely to undertake both of these activities at non-teaching hospitals than in teaching hospitals. Regional differences were apparent in reporting, with a greater prevalence in the English regions than Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Conclusion: The study provided data that demonstrated the extent to which hospitals are utilizing the developing skills of radiographers. This has important implications for future education and training needs for radiographers and for delivery of imaging services

  15. A Global Change in Higher Education: Entrepreneurial University Model

    Süreyya SAKINÇ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Universities are affected by the social and economic diversity stemmed from globalization and internationalization, and its functions, area of responsibility, organizational structure, funding capability respond this diversity. In today's knowledge society, different new concepts regarding the university education system such as Entrepreneur University, Corporation University, virtual university etc. have been emerged with wave of globalization effect. The rising competition in academic education and the mass demands for education prompt to universities to get seeking new funds for fixing their financial situation, and hit them transforming into entrepreneurial identity. The reflections of neoliberal approach in education have transformed the universities into the corporations which are much more focused on entrepreneurial, student-oriented and aimed to appropriate education and producing creative human resources for global development. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation will be carried on regarding the entrepreneur university model through the litterateur research to investigate its causes and factors that impact and improve it. The aim of the paper is to generate a framework that identifies dynamic processes of entrepreneur university model, dependently the litterateur syntheses. The contribution of the paper will depend on its consequent argument that entrepreneur university model is viable for Turkey. In this paper, the entrepreneur university model will be analyzed by Triple Helix phenomenon with the comparative approach.

  16. The Role of Universities in Preparing Graduates to Use Software in the Financial Services Workplace

    Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim; Wood, Leigh N.

    2014-01-01

    The role of universities in preparing students to use spreadsheet and other technical software in the financial services workplace has been investigated through surveys of university graduates, university academics, and employers. It is found that graduates are less skilled users of software than employers would like, due at least in part to a…

  17. A Study on the Role of Web Technology in Enhancing Research Pursuance among University Academia

    Hussain, Irshad; Durrani, Muhammad Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of web technologies in promoting research pursuance among university teachers, examine the use of web technologies by university teachers in conducting research and identify the problems of university academia in using web technologies for research. The study was delimited to academia of social…

  18. Competencies, Roles and Effective Academic Leadership in World Class University

    Elham Shahmandi; Abu Daud Silong; Ismi Arif Ismail; Bahaman Bin Abu Samah; Jamilah Othman

    2011-01-01

    How an academic leader can become more effective? This research question is examined in the context of middle level leadership in research universities that includes the Deans and Head of Departments. It is based on a review of literature that focuses on the investigation of effective academic leadership. In the present situation of globalization, academic excellence is often related to being World Class University. Leadership effectiveness is more related to situational leadership style in r...

  19. The role of leadership in bridging the cultural divide within university-industry cooperative research centres

    Mahdad, Maral; Bogers, Marcel; Piccaluga, Andrea

    The purpose of this study is to understand the role of leadership in bridging the cultural gap within university-industry cooperative research centres. Many different aspects of university-industry collaborations have been researched, but the role of leadership in such organizations has not been...... and employees representatives from both the company and the university within eight joint laboratories of Telecom Italia. We find that leadership theories help to shed light on the performance of university-industry collaboration. We specifically identify charismatic leadership at the individual level followed...... provide specific insights that advance the literature in management of university-industry collaborations as well as leadership theories....

  20. Rationality and the Role of the University: A Response to Philip Higgs.

    Waghid, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Challenges Higgs'"ambivalent" position about the role of the university (presented in a previous article), contending that the university can still retain its character as "a community of reason" (Higgs' main argument) without abandoning its social role vis-a-vis nation building. (EV)

  1. "The 400-Pound Gorilla": The Role of The Research University in City Development

    Holley, Karri A.; Harris, Michael S.

    2018-01-01

    In cities across the United States higher education institutions exist in tandem with a range of other socio-cultural and economic organizations, such as businesses, nonprofits, and government agencies. The role of colleges and universities in city development is important, and empirical examination of universities' role in and relationship with…

  2. The Role of Universities in the Education of Japanese Teachers: A Distant Perspective.

    Hawley, Carolyn A.; Hawley, Willis D.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the role of Japanese universities in educating Japan's teachers. After an overview of the teacher-certification and professional-development processes in Japan, the paper identifies several propositions that might explain why Japanese universities play a relatively small role in preservice and inservice opportunities and suggests three…

  3. University students with learning disabilities advocating for change.

    Roer-Strier, D

    2002-11-20

    In recent decades Western psychology has conceptualized learning disabilities (LD) in terms of deficits and such related 'social emotional issues' as insecurity, low self-esteem and social isolation that can be rehabilitated through combined remedial teaching and psychological intervention. With increasing advocacy and legislation on behalf of people with disabilities in the US, UK and Australia, more resources are being made available to students with LD in institutions of higher education. Due to this increase in the quantity of services, written programmes and accommodations made to their needs, increased numbers of students with LD have been graduating successfully from institutions of higher education. This paper describes an option for treating students with LD that is based on a theoretical perspective that understands these students as an excluded population and emphasizes the importance of their empowerment. A project involving social work students with LD at Hebrew University in Jerusalem is presented as a case study. Case-study investigation, one of the common methods of qualitative research, explores social and human problems in their natural context. A 6-year evaluation of this project was conducted based on questionnaires, focus groups, documentation of all activities related to the project, in-depth interviews and outcome measures. The results suggest that the project developed in three stages: raising awareness, building partnerships, and lobbying for rights and services. Outcome measures indicate that the project was successful in lowering dropout rates and improving students' academic achievement. Analysis of interviews with students suggests that the project positively affected the students' perceptions by helping them reframe the social and emotional connotations of their learning disability. Students reported marked social and emotional change, including reduced stress and anxiety levels and increased self-esteem. Empowerment practices that are

  4. Changes in economic activity: The role of age and education

    Elke Loichinger

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Between 2000 and 2010, the labor force participation (LFP of European men stayed mostly constant, whereas the participation of women continued to increase. Participation rates of people close to normal retirement ages rose almost universally. At the same time, the education composition shifted toward higher levels of educational attainment and education-specific differentials in economic activity persisted. Objective: The aim of the paper is to understand the extent to which developments of LFP rates between 2000 and 2010 in selected European countries can be explained by age-specific and education-specific changes in participation rates, as compared to changes in populations' structural composition by age and education. Methods: We apply a decomposition methodology that allows us to disentangle changes in age- and education-specific LFP rates from changes in the age and educational structure of the population. Results: Our results show that LFP rates of adult women would have increased even more, had it not been for the downward pressure from the shift in the age composition toward older age groups with relatively lower levels of participation. This downward pressure also depressed male participation. The increase in participation among older people is mainly explained by participation increases among those with nontertiary education and is reinforced by a general shift toward higher levels of educational attainment. Contribution: Beyond changes in the age structure, we quantify the role of compositional changes by educational attainment. Our results indicate that labor supply may not decrease to the extent expected due to population aging, given educational expansion and education-specific patterns of economic activity.

  5. University Start-up Companies as a Response to Changing Federal Funding

    Dehn, J.; Webley, P.

    2013-12-01

    In challenging financial times, science funding is often one of the first casualties in a federal budget. In some cases the unfunded research has market potential and many universities are adopting policies to allow faculty and staff to form companies to support continuing research. Though this is clearly not a replacement for federal support for basic science, it can augment science funding and support the university missions of education, research and service. When federal support for volcano remote sensing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute as part of the Alaska Volcano Observatory after 25 years, the PIs started a company called V-ADAPT (Volcanic-Ash Detection, Avoidance and Preparedness for Transportation). This presented a variety of challenges and changing relationships within the volcanic monitoring community. It also raised a series of important questions: (1) What is the role of a private company in providing something that was once publically available? (2) How will the marketplace influence the directions of the research at a university? (3) How can the restrictions placed on federal employees allow effective collaboration? (4) Can the Bayh-Dole and Stafford Acts exist in harmony in this environment? There are many successful examples of start-up companies working well within this environment, but much of this is dependent on the laws and regulations in each state, that vary widely. In addition, many universities have policies in place that are not always compatible with model. A flexible approach is needed to ensure that university missions are not compromised and that an effective business model can support research. Few scientists are not business-savvy, so utilizing the other expertise at a university in schools of business, finance, management and political science is recommended.

  6. ROLE AND PLACE OF THE UNIVERSITY IN INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF THE REGION

    O.A. Kozlova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the place and a role of university in regional social and economic development reveal. External functions, the purposes and problems of regional university, and also the requirement to an orientation of its development are certain. The role of university is considered at its occurrence in segments. As the form of interaction the method of «joint projects», assuming definition of crossing of interests of the given group of partners and structures is offered.

  7. The role of Stakeholders on implementing Universal Services in Vietnam

    Do Manh, Thai; Falch, Morten; Williams, Idongesit

    2015-01-01

    This paper looks at the universal services policy in Vietnam (interval 2005-2010) via analysing stakeholders in order to clarify how they exerted influence and how they implemented the policy. The stakeholder theory is employed to identify and categorize the stakeholders who participated in perfo......This paper looks at the universal services policy in Vietnam (interval 2005-2010) via analysing stakeholders in order to clarify how they exerted influence and how they implemented the policy. The stakeholder theory is employed to identify and categorize the stakeholders who participated...... in performing the policy. The authors are to examine the stakeholders such as the national government, international organizations, policy intermediaries, companies, and customers/citizens via applying the qualitative method to gather data and analyse the secondary document. The qualitative approach...... of interviews on some officials was also conducted. The results demonstrate that stakeholders had a huge impact on the success of the universal service policy....

  8. Universities in Transition: The Changing Role and Challenges for ...

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... This evolution is also putting new and urgent demands on academic ... of higher education and research in developed economies to find and affirm ... Call for new OWSD Fellowships for Early Career Women Scientists now open ... There is no doubt that Canada is tying its future growth prospects to Asia.

  9. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  10. The role of guidance counsellors in universal basic education school

    Emeka Egbochuku

    of Universal Basic Education explored the counselling features of the 6:3:3:4 curriculum such as ... assessment; the difference between it and the current concept of continuous ... individual and brings it to bear on the present of the same individual in order to .... domain, observe and rate their attitude to work, group relations,.

  11. Equality and Education: The Role of Universities and Schools.

    Fensham, Peter J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses equal education issues in Victoria, Australia, summarizing the expansion of secondary and higher education since the 1940s. Explores transition problems between school and university furthering social inequalities. Views educational structures from abundancy and scarcity perspectives, cautioning that limited resources will maintain the…

  12. The role of simulation in designing for universal access

    Keates, Simeon; Looms, Peter

    2014-01-01

    the difficulty of finding and recruiting suitable participants. Simulation aids offer a potentially cost-effective replacement or complement to participatory design. This paper examines a number of the issues associated with the use of simulation aids when designing for Universal Access. It concludes...

  13. Enhancing employability through university education: the role of ...

    Over 80% of graduates in Nigeria are unemployed in spite of their qualifications, they are employable yet they are not employed. The inability of the university education to meet the needs of these graduates as well as promotion of economic, self reliance and self sufficiency has resulted into youth joblessness ...

  14. Sharing University Intellectual Capital: The Role of Continuing Education

    O'Neill, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    New England's research universities are widely recognized as major contributors to the region's economy. In many of the communities in which they are located, they rank among the largest employers. They purchase goods and services from New England companies, and are often among the leading procurers of construction activity. Each year, they bring…

  15. The Role of Universities in International Response to Pandemic Threats

    Chapman, David W.; Errecaborde, Kaylee Myhre

    2016-01-01

    Faced with increasing pressure to generate more of their own budgets, universities in low and middle income countries are increasingly banding together as country and regional-level networks to bid on and subsequently implement externally funded development projects (a pattern already seen in high income countries). While working as a network may…

  16. Roles of Technology in Student Learning of University Level Biostatistics

    Xu, Weili; Zhang, Yuchen; Su, Cheng; Cui, Zhuang; Qi, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    This study explored threshold concepts and areas of troublesome knowledge among students enrolled in a basic biostatistics course at the university level. The main area of troublesome knowledge among students was targeted by using technology to improve student learning. A total of 102 undergraduate students who responded to structured…

  17. Future and Changing Roles of Staff in Distance Education: A Study to Identify Training and Professional Development Needs

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The roles of distance education teaching staff are changing, necessitating role clarity and the development of appropriate competency frameworks. This article investigates the perceptions of the teaching and research staff at the University of South Africa, regarding the current and future roles of distance educators, their own competencies in…

  18. The Changing Role of the Enterprise Architect

    Gøtze, John

    2013-01-01

    Enterprise architecture is practiced in different ways, and there are different types of enterprise architects with quite different roles. This paper looks closer at the role of enterprise architects and the importance of the enterprise architects’ understanding of boundary issues in their practice....... The paper suggests that enterprise architects must focus on problem-finding more than problem-solving, and should develop not just more dialectic skills, but also dialogic skills. The paper also argues that the enterprise architects must gain a deeper understanding of the enterprise, and need to start...... working with other enterprise disciplines....

  19. Towards sustainable adaptation to climate change: The role of ...

    Towards sustainable adaptation to climate change: The role of indigenous ... From the short to the long term, climate change and variability threaten human and ... to food insecurity, lack of potable water and poor health, but also the cultural ...

  20. The Role of an Academic Development Unit in Supporting Institutional VET Learning and Teaching Change Management

    Fotinatos, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the role and impact of a central academic development unit (ADU) within an institutional strategic and operational change management project. The primary goal of this project was to improve vocational education and training (VET) learning and teaching practice in an Australian dual-sector regional university.…

  1. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam.

    Luu, H.N.; Nguyen, V.L.; van der Wilt, G.J.; Broerse, J.E.W.; Ruitenberg, E.J.; Wright, E.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder.

  2. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam

    Lu, H.; Nguyen, V; van der Wilt, G.J.; Broerse, J.E.W.; Ruitenberg, E.J.; Wright, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder.

  3. THE ROLE OF UNIVERSITIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF BUSINESS TOURISM

    Gabriela Arionesei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the relationship between business tourism and universities, as important factors in the development of a country’s economy. Even though in Romania, business tourism takes place at a slower pace than in other European states, being at an incipient level, it represents a good opportunity for development, since it is the one of the growing and efficient component in the tourism industry, based on the income of urban hotels. Our case-study presents Suceava County having “Stefan cel Mare” University as a research pole that attracts tourists from different countries. The S.W.O.T. analysis we realized gave us the possibility to match strengths and weaknesses against the real threats and recommend some directions for the organization of impact events in the tourism sector.

  4. Universities and national laboratory roles in nuclear engineering

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Engineering Education is being significantly challenged in the United States. The decline in enrollment generally and the reduction of the number of nuclear engineering departments has been well documented. These declines parallel a lack of new construction for nuclear power plants and a decline in research and development to support new plant design. Precisely at a time when innovation is is needed to deal with many issues facing nuclear power, the number of qualified people to do so is being reduced. It is important that the University and National Laboratory Communities cooperate to address these issues. The Universities must increasingly identify challenges facing nuclear power that demand innovative solutions and pursue them. To be drawn into the technology the best students must see a future, a need and identify challenges that they can meet. The University community can provide that vision with help from the National Laboratories. It has been a major goal within the reactor development program at Argonne National Laboratory to establish the kind of program that can help accomplish this

  5. Universities' Role in Regional Development: A Case Study of University for Development Studies, Ghana

    Abonyi, Usman Kojo

    2016-01-01

    This study, employing an interpretive research paradigm, sought to investigate into how University for Development Studies (UDS) is responding to its regional development mandate with a specific focus on how it is responding to human capital development, innovation capabilities, and social and environmental development in northern Ghana. A study…

  6. Emerging Entrepreneurial Universities in University Reforms: The moderating role of personalities and the social/economic environment

    József Berács

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available University education, research and other services are increasingly becoming private goods as opposed to the traditional public goods concept. This trend is a highly debated process, and its consequences for universities are unquestionable. One of the consequences may be the diffusion of entrepreneurship in the higher education sector. The aim of the present paper is to highlight some of the characteristics of this process. Starting with the classics of entrepreneurship literature, Schumpeter defined the entrepreneur as somebody who goes against the stream. A new combination of production factors is the soul of entrepreneurship, and of any changes such as university reforms. Earlier research by Clark shed light on the environment of emerging entrepreneurial universities, which happened to be mainly new, relatively small universities. He found five indicators that are components of entrepreneurial universities. Taking this concept as a point of departure, we extended it in two directions. First, we go back to the economics literature and collect several other indicators/statements about entrepreneurship that are also worth considering in higher education. Second, we present a number of successful entrepreneurial cases of large top universities, looking for other indicators. Summarising these indicators in a table, two reforms of the Corvinus University of Budapest and its predecessors are discussed. Both of the reform processes lasted about five years, and there was a gap of approximately 20 years between the two processes. We would expect this to be successful, as a university needs to be reformed every 20 years, but this was not the case. We come to the surprising conclusion that, at least in case of the Corvinus University of Budapest, the two reforms in the socialist period were more entrepreneurial than the reforms we are experiencing now in a market economy environment. The explanation for this situation is twofold: the general socioeconomic

  7. The changing role of disabled children benefits

    Richard V. Burkhauser; Mary C. Daly

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. federal government’s program that provides cash benefits to low-income families with a disabled child has grown rapidly over the past 25 years. This growth reflects changes in the implementation of the program rather than declines in children’s health or family income. Unfortunately, most disabled children from families that receive such benefits do not become employed when they grow up, so these policy changes may relegate these children to lifetime government support—probably near ...

  8. The Process of Change in University Management: From the "Ivory Tower" to Entreprunialism

    Emerson Wagner MAINARDES

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to provide a retrospective overview of the changes experienced by the management of universities in their recent histories. In describing this type of organization, it was possible to understand the complexity inherent to universities. After briefly detailing the more traditional university management models, we proceed to discuss the need for organizational change based upon the most recent management approaches. Among the new types of university, the entrepreneurial university stands out as a good option for changing university organizations worldwide. However, university management has yet to be subject to sufficient research since there are a series of shortcomings that need answering. Finally, we set out a list of future research options with the objective of completing those answers as well as stimulating research on this theme important to the university itself or to society in general.

  9. A Profession Without Limits: The Changing Role of Reference Librarians.

    Sullo, Elaine; Gomes, Alexandra W

    2016-01-01

    Reference librarians, specifically those working in academic health sciences environments, have expanded their roles and taken on new and unique responsibilities. While librarians at The George Washington University's Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library continue to provide traditional reference services, they have gone beyond their comfort zone in many cases to become involved in activities that are outside of the librarian's established role. This article describes the current roles of Himmelfarb's reference librarians, as well as the way these librarians prepared for these roles and addressed the associated challenges.

  10. The role of universities in preparing graduates to use software in the financial services workplace

    Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim; Wood, Leigh N.

    2014-02-01

    The role of universities in preparing students to use spreadsheet and other technical software in the financial services workplace has been investigated through surveys of university graduates, university academics, and employers. It is found that graduates are less skilled users of software than employers would like, due at least in part to a lack of structured formal training opportunities in the workplace, and a lack of targeted, coherent learning opportunities at university. The widespread and heavy use of software in the workplace means that there is significant potential for productivity gains if universities and employers address these issues.

  11. University's role in research on superconducting power transmission

    Forsyth, E.B.

    1974-01-01

    Power transmission by superconducting cables appears to have enormous potential for the utility industry. It has still to be demonstrated that it will become a viable and economically competitive technology, however, development aimed at this goal by major research establishments has already exposed numerous research problems suitable for investigation by well qualified university departments without requiring large expenditures for equipment. What is missing in an organizational structure to relate work to the primary goals, monitor progress and influence the funding decisions of the major agencies. This does not seem difficult to set up, but continued success will require a long-term commitment from the participants

  12. Rethinking managerial roles in change initiatives

    B.A.S. Koene (Bas)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractOrganisational change that is initiated by middle management rather than top management is more likely to gain employee support. This is the conclusion of a recent study co-authored by Bas Koene, assistant professor in RSM’s Department of Organisation and Personnel Management.

  13. Job Satisfaction and Role Clarity Among University and College Faculty.

    Locke, Edwin A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A study of faculty job satisfaction concerned with work achievement, work role clarity, superordinates, co-workers, pay promotions, and facilities is described. Results show that faculty are most dissatisfied with pay, promotions and administration; faculty with higher pay scales are more satisfied than those with lower pay scales. (Author/MLW)

  14. Changing Family Roles - Across the Deployment Cycle

    2017-09-01

    initiated developed syntax files to organize and cross-link data from the task interviews. Our initial presentation of these data will be at the NCFR...higher levels of warmth and lower levels of agonism also reported lower levels of externalizing behavior in their children . When at-home partners...reported their children’s relationship changed over the course of the study, so did their reports of externalizing behavior in their children . 15. SUBJECT

  15. : Their role in choice of major and success at university

    Nagy, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Student interests and abilities are crucial to career-related transitions (Swanson & Fouad, 1999): they are key determinants of individual choices (Humphreys & Yao, 2002), and the fit between abilities and demands as well as interest congruence (i.e., the fit between individual interests and environmental opportunities) contribute to the success of the career paths chosen (Lubinski & Benbow, 2000). The aim of the present research was to investigate the role of vocational interests (based ...

  16. Environmental Empowerment - the role of Co-operation between Civil Society, Universities and Science Shops

    Brodersen, Søsser; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Hansen, Anne Grethe

    2006-01-01

    The University based Science Shops were established in the 1970s in the Netherlands, and in Denmark and other countries in the 1980s and 1990s. The aim was to give civil society organisations access to scientific knowledge and to empower citizen participation regarding environmental and social...... improvements. It has recently been suggested that the role of Science Shops should change as a consequence of the stated increasing professionalisation of the Non Governmental Organisations and Civil Society Organisations, and of industry’s increasing interest in introducing environmental management measures....... Increasing internationalisation of the environmental agenda has contributed to this as well as a general acceptance of environmental considerations in industry policy and strategy. However, with departure point in three different Science Shop projects, the article proposes that Science Shops are still...

  17. The changing role of the petroleum geologist

    Bookout, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the past, present and future roles of the geologist are represented. It sometimes appears as though the glory days are behind us, since exploration activity peaked a few years ago. Yet, for most of our industry's history, the future has been regarded as uncertain; and in those moments when the future was not regarded as uncertain, maybe it should have been. The author is optimistic about the future because of the way technological advances have revolutionized this industry and this profession on many occasions. Geologists have seen their profession transformed into a hi-tech business. Along the way, the wonder of our science has always been that technology breakthroughs come as new thoughts and concepts that can be put to work immediately

  18. Entrepreneurship Education and the Role of Universities in Entrepreneurship: Introduction to the Special Issue

    Davey, Todd; Hannon, Paul; Penaluna, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable political and academic interest in concepts such as the triple helix of government, business and higher education as well as entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial universities, relatively little has been written about the role of the university in developing entrepreneurship. More specifically, the questions of how the…

  19. The Role of the University in the Development Process of Less Developed Countries

    Tinbergen, J.

    1978-01-01

    The role of the university in the development process must be dealt with in an environment of widespread great poverty characteristic of the larger part of the developing world. Focuses on development policy and the satisfaction of human basic needs as the highest priority for the university. (Author/RK)

  20. The Role of Universities and Other Institutions in Successful Entrepreneurship: Some Insights from a Literature Review

    Zarate-Hoyos, German A.; Larios-Meoño, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of universities and other institutions in successful entrepreneurship. Insights are obtained following a literature review approach. Case studies from the United States (New York startup), Spain (Mondragon), and Germany provide strong evidence that universities are very instrumental in the creation,…

  1. The Role of Basic Needs Fulfillment in Prediction of Subjective Well-Being among University Students

    Turkdogan, Turgut; Duru, Erdinc

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the role of fulfillment level of university students' basic needs in predicting the level of their subjective well being. The participants were 627 students (56% female, 44% male) attending different faculties of Pamukkale University. In this study, subjective well being was measured with Life Satisfaction Scale…

  2. Scientific Journals of Universities of Chile, Colombia, and Venezuela: Actors and Roles

    Delgado, Jorge Enrique

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative study was carried out to identify the roles of actors associated with the publication of scientific journals in Chilean, Colombian, and Venezuelan universities. Twenty-four semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with journal editors, university authorities, and other experts. The categories of analysis included university…

  3. Supporting Academic Literacies: University Teachers in Collaboration for Change

    Bergman, Lotta

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with an action research project, where a group of university teachers from different disciplines reflected on and gradually extended their knowledge about how to support students' academic literacy development. The project was conducted within a "research circle" [Bergman, L. 2014. "The Research Circle as a…

  4. Making Sense of Academic Life: Academics, Universities and Change.

    Taylor, Peter G.

    Universities and academics today are facing challenges that require more active and self-interested management. The book argues that higher education in the future will not become any more ordered, but will actually become more complex, more fractured and less bounded, and that academics will have to respond with new ways of thinking. The book…

  5. Intrinsic Changes: Energy Saving Behaviour among Resident University Students

    Black, Rosemary; Davidson, Penny; Retra, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that explored the effectiveness of three intervention strategies in facilitating energy saving behaviour among resident undergraduate university students. In contrast to a dominant practice of motivating with rewards or competition this study sought to appeal to students' intrinsic motivations. An…

  6. The University Model and Educational Change. SSEC Publication No. 130.

    Ford, Richard B.

    In the sixties the crisis of the credibility and competence of schools resulted in the funding of programs to remedy school problems. The model for curriculum reform came from the university and, more particularly, from liberal arts departments having the capacity to improve curriculum content and teacher expertise. In a few instances attempts…

  7. Accounting for change: the micropolitics of university restructuring ...

    This second article in a three-part series published in the South African Journal of Higher Education, describes the various ways in which "academic identity" informed the politics and shaped the outcomes of "restructuring" at the University of Durban Westville (UDW) in the late 1990s. The authors argue that while ...

  8. The role of refrigerants in climate change

    Wuebbles, D.J.

    1992-06-01

    The primary chemicals used as refrigerants, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and the compounds being considered as their replacements (HCFCs and HFCs) have been intensely studied because of concerns about chlorine chemistry effects on stratospheric ozone. Increasing attention is being given to the potential effects of these compounds in concerns about global warming. CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs absorb infrared radiation and thus are greenhouse gases that can influence radiative forcing on climate. The purpose of this paper is to describe the current understanding of the role of refrigerants in affecting climate. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of CFCs have accounted for about 24 % of the direct increase in radiative forcing from greenhouse gases over the last decade. However, observed decreases in stratospheric ozone, thought to be connected to increasing stratospheric chlorine from CFCs, suggests a cooling tendency over the last decade. This cooling tendency has strong latitudinal gradients, but is, when globally averaged, about comparable in magnitude and opposite in sign to the radiative forcing from CFCs over this period. Because of their shorter atmospheric lifetimes, the direct radiative influence on climate from the replacement compounds should generally be much smaller than the CFCs

  9. The role of architectural research centers in addressing climate change

    John Carmody

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: It is clear that an urgent, major transformation needs to happen in the design of the built environment to respond to impending climate change and other environmental degradation. This paper will explain the potential role of architectural research centers in this transformation and provide examples from the Center for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR at the University of Minnesota. A research center can become a regional hub to coordinate and disseminate critical information. CSBR is leading the establishment of Architecture 2030 standards in Minnesota, assisting local governments in writing green building policy, providing design assistance to local government, developing tools to assist design decision making, providing technical assistance to the affordable housing community inMinnesota, and establishing a regional case study database that includes actual performance information. CSBR is creating a publicly accessible, credible knowledge base on new approaches, technologies and actual performance outcomes. Research centers such as CSBR can be a critical component of the necessary feedback loop often lacking in the building industry. A research center can also fill major gaps in providing in depth professional education as well as be a catalyst for demonstration projects and public education.

  10. Role of Bioethanol in Global Climate Change

    Sheehan, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has supported a research and development program for the establishment of renewable, biomass-derived, liquid fuels for the better part of the last twenty years. These 'biofuels' represent opportunities to respond to uncertainties about our energy security and the future health of our environment. Throughout its history, the Biofuels program has experienced an ongoing fiscal 'roller coaster'. Funding has ebbed and flowed with changing political and public attitudes about energy. The program was initiated in a flood of funding in the late 1970s related to the energy shortages experienced in that period. The flooding turned rapidly to drought as falling oil prices dissipated public concern about energy supplies. In the late 1980s, funding for the program slowly increased, driven by national security issues.

  11. Fostering Sustainable Development and Entrepreneurship: The New Role of University

    Cristina MITITELU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a global objective to overcome the economic, environment and society crises worldwide. The research aims are twofold: (i Explores the proactive and dynamic model of the university’s education system, focusing on the new role played by the School of Economics in the promotion of economic, social and environmental sustainability, and how this goes beyond, in stimulating bottom–up social entrepreneurship ideas through students engagement; (ii Provides a descriptive analysis of innovative laboratories modules, by studying and mapping the best project proposals initiated by the student. Finally, it presents a case study analysis on waste management (UniRecycling project, scaling up objectives, stakeholder mapping, activities and the expected results. The findings show the new role played by School of Economics, along with other partner institutions, in supporting the student’s engagement in practice-oriented workshops that enable the transfer of knowledge, skills, and self – development. The implications of the research to be developed show that a dynamic bottom-up model of learning and dissemination of sustainable and entrepreneurial should aim to sensitise students to be active and create project ideas for social and environmental entrepreneurship and build and strengthen the local territorial networks, to contribute to the creation of a system of services attentive to responsible and sustainable entrepreneurial development.

  12. The science behind Kyoto: the role of universities

    O`Keefe, W.F. [American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Part two of a series advocates the need for continuing scientific research into climate change to reduce the level of uncertainty. With a background in economics, business and policy, the Executive Vice President of the American Petroleum Institute suggests that there is no need to react quickly to the problem of climate change and that nothing the USA can do during the next decade will have much of an impact on the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the year 2020. Decisions on accelerated reductions in emissions can, he says, be safely postponed. He puts forward other rules to adapt under such conditions of uncertainty: to invest in information; to adapt no regrets principles; and to consider alternatives. The scientific community must hold firm to scientific habits of mind in addressing the climate issue.

  13. Stories of Change: The University of Zurich, Switzerland

    Schiedt, Eva Seiler

    The University of Zurich (UZH) is the largest university with the broadest range of courses in Switzerland. The number of students in the Autumn Semester 2008 was 24,788, out of which, 56% students were women. They were studying at the Faculty of Theology (246), the Faculty of Law (3,519), the Faculty of Economy (3,055), the Faculty of Medicine (2,397), the Vetsuisse-Faculty (veterinary medicine, 650), the Faculty of Arts (12,015), and the Faculty of Science (2,906). The staff consists of 463 professors, 2,559 assistants and senior scientists, and 1,696 administrative and technical staff. They work in 160 institutes, seminars, and clinics in and around the city of Zurich, most of them concentrated on three main campuses.

  14. Radiology – Changing Role in Healthcare

    Md Khalilur Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In November 1895, X-rays were inadvertently discovered by the German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. Roentgen provisionally named the new rays as X-rays using the mathematical label for something unidentified. Roentgen's initial manuscript, "On A New Kind of Rays" (άber eine neue Art von Strahlen, was published two months later and in 1901, he received the first ever Nobel Prize in Physics “in recognition of the extraordinary services he has rendered by the discovery of the remarkable rays" subsequently named after him. He himself refused to take out patents, intending to the free use of X-rays for the benefit of mankind. Today, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen is honoured as the father of diagnostic radiology.1,2 Since the inadvertent discovery of X-rays, conventional radiography has developed greatly and mostly has been replaced by digital radiography equipments which convert X-ray images to electronic data that can be studied using a monitor and archived on a computer disk. Digital techniques permit the radiographs to be viewed instantaneously, additionally allow specific areas of the image to be enlarged, and the contrast of the images can be manipulated to provide greater visibility of the abnormality.1 The anatomical details and sensitivity of the newer modalities is now of a high order and the use of imaging for ultrastructural diagnostics nanotechnology, functional and quantitative diagnostics and molecular medicine is steadily increasing. Most recently the improved imaging clarity and tissue differentiation in a number of clinical situations has dramatically increased the spectrum of the diagnostic information and even in many cases revealing the pathology without the requirement of invasive tissue sampling.3 Eventually radiology is now the prime diagnostic aid for many diseases and also has a vital role in monitoring treatment and predicting outcome. Recent advancements in this field bring a number of imaging modalities which have

  15. Addressing Climate Change and the Role of Technological Solutions

    Stephen Axon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As far as sustainability is concerned, the role of technology has always been contested. With regard to environmental degradation, technology is either perceived to be part of the problem or part of the solution. To combat the complex issues of the present time, technological solutions are expected to play a key role towards mitigating and adapting to the negative impacts of climate change. The paper also discusses the role of the 2009 Copenhagen Conference towards addressing climate change. Although the Copenhagen Accord is not a legally binding agreement, it is seen as a necessary first step towards a protocol that will effectively address the issue of climate change.

  16. Change Management A Tricky' Task in University Context: An Experience of a Mid-size Private University in Indonesia

    Abraham Simatupang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid change of social, political and economic aspects in the national, regional and global context, universities must emphasize more the quality and the ability to adapt to the change. This paper discusses how UKI was imposed to the change through the process of developing and implementing of strategic planning and the changes that were instigated directly or indirectly. The dialogues among the faculty members apparently give a mutual benefit for all stakeholders to have a shared-vision and shared-mission.

  17. Change Management in Universities: More a Question of Balance than a Pathway

    Rebora, Gianfranco; Turri, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on assessing possible levers in the hands of a university's top management team for inducing or managing change when faced with environmental drives. The topic is discussed after analysing change in a university over a 20-year period. The case study underlines the opportunities and difficulties of linking external environmental…

  18. Capacity for teaching climate change adaptation in the university ...

    The teaching materials employed included textbooks (83.3%), journal (78.3%), conference proceedings (66.7%), articles on Climate Change and agricultural adaptation (80.8%) and lectures/teaching notes (44.2%). The major teaching methods used to communicate climate change concepts were lecture (63.3%) and field ...

  19. Perceptions of Tutoring Roles and Psychological Distance among Instructors, Tutors and Students at a Korean University

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Hong, Youngil; Choi, Hyoseon

    2017-01-01

    This study explores issues related to the tutor's role when initiating tutoring as an institutional strategy at a conventional university. Based on a pilot tutoring program implemented in four college courses, we investigated the perceptions of instructors, tutors and students regarding the role of tutoring and whether it affected the…

  20. Loneliness among University Students: Predictive Power of Sex Roles and Attachment Styles on Loneliness

    Ilhan, Tahsin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the predictive power of sex roles and attachment styles on loneliness. A total of 188 undergraduate students (114 female, and 74 male) from Gazi University completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory, UCLA Loneliness Scale, and Relationship Scales Questionnaire. Hierarchic Multiple Regression analysis and t-test were used to test…

  1. University role in nuclear power program in developing countries

    Notea, A.

    1977-01-01

    The academic education in nuclear engineering should be considered as a subsystem within the general nuclear program of the country as well as within the educational structure of the university. The academic trained personnel are of major importance as future participants in decisional and planning steps of the program. Hence, the ''production'' of academic manpower in this field should be started at the earliest steps. The nuclear engineering curriculum should be planned in accordance with the objectives stated by the power program and the challenges foreseen. Obviously, the objectives in a developing country are considerably different from those of developed countries highly advanced in the nuclear power field. The paper analyzes possible objectives in a developing country which intends to implement nuclear power program. In view of these objectives curricula planning for the undergraduate and graduate levels are presented and explained. The courses for undergraduates intend to provide basic information to relatively large numbers of students from various faculties, as they are expected to join the program at various constructional stages. Major emphasise is given to graduates as they will act in the cadre of senior engineers and officials of the country. The research works for theses in developed countries may be highly technical, dealing with crumbs of huge development project carried out on national or international level. Such research works are hardly justified in countries not involved in the project. In developing countries the problems to be confronted with are mainly licensing and siting and to much less extent nuclear power technology. Hence the choice of subjects for theses should be coherent with these directions. Obviously, the subjects are bound to the department manpower and budgetary limitations. As a demonstration two fields were analysed under our local constraints and objectives. Subjects suitable for theses are pointed out. The fields dealt

  2. Change in the University: A Result of Travelling Ideas?

    Bundgaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the introduction of a “common market” of education, a large-scale institutional reform process that has influenced the organisation of teaching at the University of Copenhagen (KU) since 2009. The “common market” policy, I argue, is a result of intense negotiations between key...... players, their specific positions, and their interests rather than an example of a “travelling idea” (Czarniawska and Joerges 1996). Ideas travel only if and when someone has a vested interest in them....

  3. Public transportation's role in responding to climate change

    2010-01-01

    This paper details the role public transportation has in responding to the challenge of climate change. It collects and analyzes data from across the country on public transportation fuel use, vehicles deployed, rides taken, and other key metrics, dr...

  4. Climate Change Mitigation: The Role of Agriculture | Obiora ...

    Climate Change Mitigation: The Role of Agriculture. ... rises which affect both crop and animal production, rising sea levels which causes farm land ... be encouraged (iii) extension services should promote awareness-raising about sustainable ...

  5. Social change and traditional gender roles in Lagos State, Nigeria ...

    Social change and traditional gender roles in Lagos State, Nigeria. ... twenty seven respondents consisted of 135 Females (59.5%) and 92 Males (40.5%) participated in the survey. The study adopted descriptive method of research design.

  6. An anisotropic universe due to dimension-changing vacuum decay

    Scargill, James H.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the question of observational signatures of a false vacuum decay event in the early universe followed by a period of inflation; in particular, motivated by the string landscape, we consider decays in which the parent vacuum has a smaller number of large dimensions than the current vacuum, which leads to an anisotropic universe. We go beyond previous studies, and examine the effects on the CMB temperature and polarisation power spectra, due to both scalar and tensor modes, and consider not only late-time effects but also the full cosmological perturbation theory at early times. We find that whilst the scalar mode behaves as one would expect, and the effects of anisotropy at early times are sub-dominant to the late-time effects already studied, for the tensor modes in fact the the early-time effects grow with multipole and can become much larger than one would expect, even dominating over the late-time effects. Thus these effects should be included if one is looking for such a signal in the tensor modes

  7. Changing role of management accounting : Lithuanian experience case studies

    Valančienė, Loreta; Gimžauskienė, Edita

    2007-01-01

    Concepts and methods used in management accounting are similar all over the world. However, national studies suggest that a variable environment of organization has a direct impact on changes in management accounting. The aim of the article was to show how the role of management accounting changed in Lithuanian organizations after the implementation of systems for activity based cost management (ABCM) and balanced scorecard (BSC). The study results obtained suggest that the role of management...

  8. Spinning-out university technologies: a role for students in the commercialization process

    Murdock, Karen; Johnsen, Lasse Emil; Ølund, Michael

    2015-01-01

    , which compared to licensing create advantages both for the university and the academic inventor. Although universities generally struggle to successfully commercialize research results as new firms, some universities are much better than others at spinning out companies. The research has not identified...... a singular formula to increase university spin-outs. A common theme in much of the empirical evidence is that academics/university researchers lack knowledge related to market development which must be supplemented for successful commercialization. This study analyses the role of non-research students...... in developing knoweldege about markets to supplement the knowledge–gap among academics, which as far as we know have not been widely explored. The analysis is based in the context of a technical university which provides a unique opportunity to explore how students working to fulfil academic requirements can...

  9. The Role of Mobility and Employee-Driven Relations for University-Industry Collaboration on Innovation

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Drejer, Ina

    This paper analyzes the role of mobility and employee-driven relations for firms' collaboration on innovation with specific universities. It is argued that personal employee-driven relations and geographical proximity are important determinants for which universities firms decide to collaborate...... with. Therefore, hiring and mobility of employees can help explain why firms collaborate with specific universities or discontinue collaboration. It is argued that the university of graduation and the field of study of a firm's employees help explain why it collaborate with a specific university....... Furthermore, the paper also addresses the importance of developing relations and collaborative experience over time for university-industry collaboration by studying employee-driven relations and collaboration patterns for a large sample of firms over two consecutive Community Innovation Surveys covering...

  10. The role of college and university faculty in the fossil fuel divestment movement

    Jennie C. Stephens

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Colleges and universities have played a critical role in the growing social movement to divest institutional endowments from fossil fuels. While campus activism on fossil fuel divestment has been driven largely by students and alumni, faculty are also advocating to their administrators for institutional divestment from fossil fuels. This article characterizes the role of faculty by reviewing signatories to publicly available letters that endorse fossil fuel divestment. Analysis of 30 letters to administrators signed by faculty at campuses throughout the United States and Canada reveals support for divestment from 4550 faculty across all major fields of inquiry and scholarship, and all types of faculty positions. Of these signers, more than 225 have specific expertise in climate change or energy. An in-depth analysis of 18 of these letters shows that a significantly greater proportion of tenured faculty sign open letters of support for divestment than do not-yet-tenured tenure-track faculty (15.4% versus 10.7%, perhaps reflecting concerns among not-yet-tenured faculty that such support might jeopardize their career advancement. This analysis suggests that faculty support for the divestment movement is more widespread than commonly recognized; this movement is more mainstream, and broader-based, than is often recognized. Revealing the scope and scale of faculty support for fossil fuel divestment may encourage additional faculty to engage, support and endorse this growing social movement that highlights the social impact of investment decisions, and calls upon colleges and universities to align their investment practices with their academic missions and values.

  11. MANAGING CHANGE IN ACADEMIC LIBRARY: THE CASE OF VILNIUS UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

    Marija Prokopčik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose: The main objective of this article is to ascertain some most significant fields of the academic library activities, which have (or could have an impact on strengthening the library’s role as a partner in academic community, as well as to perform assessment of Vilnius University Library (thereinafter VUL capacities in order to see what kind of current or future activities performed by the library may contribute to the building-up of such role in Vilnius University (thereinafter VU community.Methodology/approach: Analysis of LIS professional literature of the latter five years reveals the key trends in development of academic libraries, their innovative change and challenges – partnerships of open access, managing of research data; research support; research assessment, Library scientific research, as well as allows to perform situation analysis of one particular library in order to see if and at what scale these identified trends can be traced in VUL.Results: It was established that VUL contributes to the idea and practical implementation of open access, collaborates with VU and Lithuania’s academic community in the projects of research data management, takes an active part in carrying out bibliometric research, helps to form a range of research support services, promotes the Library’s scholarly research and contributes to formation of the institution’s research potential.Research limitation: This article focuses on analysis of one academic library (VUL and its activities. Such issues like studies support, library as a space for communication, professional assistance in research events organization, improvement of information and media literacy were deliberately not covered.Originality/practical implications: Identification of common trends and measures of their practical implementation in one particular institution may be useful for other libraries planning the strategy of change and (or implementing selected solutions.

  12. Perceptions of the News Media's Societal Roles: How the Views of U.K. Journalism Students Changed during Their Education

    Hanna, Mark; Sanders, Karen

    2012-01-01

    A longitudinal study of U.K. journalism undergraduates records how their attitudes on societal roles of the news media changed during university education. Students became more likely to endorse an adversarial approach toward public officials and businesses as extremely important. Yet students did not support these roles as strongly as an older…

  13. Implementing Change from within Universities and Colleges: 10 Personal Accounts. Managing Innovation and Change in Universities and Colleges Series.

    Slowey, Maria, Ed.

    This book presents the personal accounts and reflections of 10 individuals who were given leadership responsibility for the implementation of certain aspects of change in institutions of higher education in Great Britain. The contributions illustrate key dimensions of these changes--the development of strategies aimed at widening access, the…

  14. ROLE OF BEST PRACTICES IN ENTREPRENORIAL INITIATION OF STUDENTS ILUSTRATIVE CASE: WEST UNIVERSITY OF TIMISOARA

    Abrudan Denisa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In a competitive and dynamic international context, investment in education and training must take into account the new demands of knowledge based society. Education institution is the organization which, “teaches and produces knowledge" and the role and responsibilities of education are fundamental. Rethinking the way of doing business, reinventing our own business that allows the exploitation of opportunities and constraints of the economic environment can not be achieved without entrepreneurial education, without adaptive and responsive approach to changes in economic environment and beyond. This paper aims to present the role and impact of good practice in creating a culture and entrepreneurial education in Romanian higher education system. Research is a descriptive and analytical one, the conclusions drawn are important as they constitute a starting point in identifying and implementing solutions to reconfigure higher education system so as to meet the challenges of today's economic environment. Personal contribution lies in identifying the multiple ways of expressing entrepreneurship and business culture embodied in innovative projects initiated and implemented in the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration from West University of Timisoara.

  15. Leading Change: An Organizational Development Role for Educational Developers

    Weston, Cynthia; Ferris, Jennie; Finkelstein, Adam

    2017-01-01

    While educational development has long been aligned with organizational development in the literature (Berquist & Phillips, 1975; Gaffe, 1975), in practice this link has faded with time. Schroeder (2011) has recently asserted that given the broad-based changes in teaching and learning that are taking place at universities, it is important that…

  16. Two decades of change in Dutch university art libraries

    Versteeg, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1987 Chris Smeenk wrote in this journal about the libraries of the Dutch art historical institutes. In the 22 years that have since passed many changes have occurred, perhaps most notably the merging of the many autonomous institute libraries into larger ones. Has this led to a more professional

  17. 1 Change and obduracy in university teaching practices: tracing ...

    use the sociomaterial notion of obduracy to argue against the presumption that change is a coordinated ... outcomes tends to bracket out both local practices and the meso-level of institutional systems, with the ... student information and learning technology systems, as well as networks around policy and governance, and ...

  18. The Role Of Urban Forestry In Mitigating Climate Change And ...

    The possibility of global climate change, due to increasing levels of CO2 concentrations is one of the key environmental concerns today, and the role of terrestrial vegetation management has received attention as a means of mitigating carbon emissions and climate change. In this study tree dimensions and assessment of ...

  19. The Changing Role of the Reading Specialist: A Case Study

    Ginsburg, Victoria Elaine

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive qualitative case study explored the changing role of the reading specialist through various perceptions of professionals in the Neon Shadow School District. The purpose of the study was to explore what, how, and why the duties and responsibilities of the reading specialist have changed since first employed as an…

  20. Women's role in adapting to climate change and variability

    Carvajal-Escobar, Y.; Quintero-Angel, M.; García-Vargas, M.

    2008-04-01

    Given that women are engaged in more climate-related change activities than what is recognized and valued in the community, this article highlights their important role in the adaptation and search for safer communities, which leads them to understand better the causes and consequences of changes in climatic conditions. It is concluded that women have important knowledge and skills for orienting the adaptation processes, a product of their roles in society (productive, reproductive and community); and the importance of gender equity in these processes is recognized. The relationship among climate change, climate variability and the accomplishment of the Millennium Development Goals is considered.

  1. Innovation System Reform in Indonesia and Vietnam: A new Role for Universities?

    Erik Baark

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the importance of the role of universities in emerging economies such as Indonesia and Vietnam, underscoring the need for universities to contribute more extensively to the dynamic development of innovation systems. The theoretical approach is a functional analysis of innovation systems, identifying essential issues that call for recognition among policymakers and in society generally. Innovation systems in Indonesia and Vietnam share some weaknesses, particularly in comparison with innovation systems in more advanced countries. There is limited ability to mobilize the resources required for innovation, as the investment in research and development as percentage of GDP is relatively low and dominated by public funding with little contribution from private sources. Financial regulation for universities seriously hampers the development of university–industry linkages. It is essential that universities gain more autonomy in order to move beyond their current role in training of skilled human resources to providers of innovation.

  2. Universities as corporate entities: the role of social responsibility in their strategic management

    Ramos Monge, Elva Lizeth; Llinàs Audet, Francisco Javier; Barrena Martínez, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Universities, as educational institutions, play a vital role in the development and improvement of the society, contributing to the welfare of citizens. Considering the social responsibility of universities with a large number of stakeholders (students, institutions, government, employees, companies, local community, etc.), this chapter aims to examine how these institutions establish the mission, objectives and strategic actions oriented at meeting these expectations. In this line, universit...

  3. The importance of role sending in the sensemaking of change agent roles.

    Tucker, Danielle A; Hendy, Jane; Barlow, James

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate what happens when a lack of role-sending results in ambiguous change agent roles during a large scale organisational reconfiguration. The authors consider the role of sensemaking in resolving role ambiguity of middle manager change agents and the consequences of this for organisational restructuring. Data were collected from a case study analysis of significant organisational reconfiguration across a local National Health Service Trust in the UK. Data consists of 82 interviews, complemented by analysis of over 100 documents and field notes from 51 hours of observations collected over five phases covering a three year period before, during and after the reconfiguration. An inductive qualitative analysis revealed the sensemaking processes by which ambiguity in role definition was resolved. The data explains how change agents collectively make sense of a role in their own way, drawing on their own experiences and views as well as cues from other organisational members. The authors also identified the organisational outcomes which resulted from this freedom in sensemaking. This study demonstrates that by leaving too much flexibility in the definition of the role, agents developed their own sensemaking which was subsequently very difficult to manipulate. In creating new roles, management first needs to have a realistic vision of the task and roles that their agents will perform, and second, to communicate these expectations to both those responsible for recruiting these roles and to the agents themselves. Much of the focus in sensemaking research has been on the importance of change agents' sensemaking of the change but there has been little focus on how change agents sensemake their own role in the change.

  4. ROLE OF SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS OF SATISFACTION WITH EDUCATION IN THE QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF UNIVERSITY

    Veronika Sharok

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to evaluate role of socio-psychological factors of satisfaction with university education. Study was conducted in 2 stages. On the first stage data were obtained from 350 respondents, on the second stage from 127 respondents. Sample was divided into four groups: satisfied and dissatisfied with university education students; satisfied and dissatisfied with future profession students. The main factor contributing to students' adaptation to the university, and, consequently, indirectly affecting the satisfaction with educational process is a factor of interpersonal communication: relationship with other students, professors and curator of the group, satisfaction with surroundings and emotional acceptance of other people, social status in the group. Emotional sphere, motivation and socio-psychological adaptation besides methodological aspect are the main factors of satisfaction with university education. Satisfied with university education and future profession individuals are characterized by psychological well-being, while for dissatisfied individuals indifference, renunciation and negation are typical. Conscious choice of university and future profession are also preconditions of satisfaction with education. Results of this study make it possible to expand the existing ideas about components of satisfaction with education at the university. Thus, knowing the possible causes of students' dissatisfaction, we can eliminate negative factors and thereby improve not only satisfaction with university, but university rating, which is very important in today's world.

  5. THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY IN FOSTERING ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENTION AMONG STUDENTS

    PEREZ Lucía

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurial intention among university students may be conditioned by following training activities related to entrepreneurship during the course of their degree studies. There has clearly been an increase in the number of university graduates who become entrepreneurs, so it is necessary to determine the services that should be offered by the university as a platform to support university entrepreneurship. This research examines this issue through the use of statistical analyses. The main objective of this research is to determine the different types of entrepreneurial training offered to students and the services they think the university should establish as a platform to support entrepreneurship, thereby enabling a comparison of current and desired practices. The study determines whether access to training activities conditions the entrepreneurial intention of university students. Descriptive statistics have been used to conveniently present the information and to identify behavioral patterns of the variables analyzed. Data have thus been examined using frequency analysis, contingency tables and independence tests. The variables used in this survey are designed to represent the role of the university in fostering entrepreneurial culture and the intention among the university community to start their own business, having first extensively analyzed the concept of an entrepreneurial university

  6. Sex-related dietary changes of Portuguese university students after migration to London, UK

    Santos, S.; Vilela, S.; Padrão, P.; Caraher, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the changes in eating habits and food choice motives of Portuguese university students after migration to London, according to sex.\\ud \\ud Methods: Fifty-five Portuguese university students (52.7% female) from 12 randomly selected London universities underwent a face-to-face interview. Trained interviewers administered a structured questionnaire comprising questions on socio-demographic characteristics, the frequency of consumption of selected food and beverage items, and the m...

  7. Identification during imposed change: the roles of personal values, type of change, and anxiety.

    Sverdlik, Noga; Oreg, Shaul

    2015-06-01

    Using a person-situation perspective, we explain what happens to individuals' identification with a collective in the context of a change. We propose that given the anxiety that often emerges during change, individuals' personal values (conservation and openness to change) interact with type of change (imposed vs. voluntary) in predicting identification following change. In a pilot, longitudinal field study (N = 61, 67% female) of an imposed university campus relocation, we measured employees' values and identification with the university before and several months after the relocation. In two lab experiments (Study 1: N = 104, 91.3% female; Study 2: N = 113, 75.2% female), we manipulated a change to be either imposed or voluntary and compared the relationships between values and identification across types of change. In Study 2, we also measured anxiety from the change. When change was imposed (all three studies), but not when voluntary (Studies 1 and 2), individuals' conservation was positively, and openness negatively, related to individuals' post-change identification. The effects emerged only for individuals who experienced change-related anxiety (Study 2). Our findings demonstrate that individuals' identification with a changing collective depends on the amount of anxiety change elicits and on the particular combination of their values and type of change. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Credit-Based Systems as Vehicles for Change in Universities and Colleges. Managing Innovation and Change in Universities and Colleges.

    Allen, Robert; Layer, Geoff

    This book discusses organizational, management and professional dimensions of change as credit-based systems are introduced in higher education institutions in the United Kingdom. Credit-based systems are taken to mean the flexible academic structures based around the parallel but interrelated concepts of credit and modularity. They are being…

  9. THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY IN ENSURING THE INFORMATION OF SCIENCE

    Silvia GHINCULOV

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the importance and the role of a well-equipped library in the university and academic environment. In order to explore the data and to have an academic research we need to understand the role of the library for a university that why the scientific development concept of ASEM library is based on the idea that the library should become a real support for the teaching, research and continuing education system. Editorial and publishing activity of the Scientific Library ASEM focuses on continuous updating of information on the library's website, publications publishing process integration ASEM their digital collection, editing materials for organizing cultural and scientific activities.

  10. Entrepreneurialism at the University of Zagreb: Managing the Sustainability of Change

    Vidovic, Vlasta Vizek; Bjelis, Aleksa

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a study of the different aspects of entrepreneurialism at the University of Zagreb in the context of Croatian higher education. The recent history of changes at the University of Zagreb is described using a temporal perspective from the beginning of the development of the European Higher Education Area to the implementation…

  11. Change Management at a Danish University: The Introduction of a Common Market for Education

    Bundgaard, Helle

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the approach to the management of change taken by a Danish university when introducing a university-wide market for education and it explores the different positions taken by some of the central stakeholders in one of the faculties involved. I argue that neither the inadequacies of a popular management model nor insufficient…

  12. The University in Periods of Technological Change: A Historically Grounded Perspective

    Amirault, Ray J.; Visser, Yusra L.

    2009-01-01

    The University has a remarkably enduring history that is due in no small part to its ability to adapt itself whenever intellectual, political, or technological change has occurred. Today's technology revolution, however, presents the University with one of the greatest adaptation challenges it has ever faced in its lengthy history, and the…

  13. Acts of Reciprocity: Analyzing Social Exchange in a University Theater for Social Change Project

    Cloeren, Nicole Birgit

    2010-01-01

    In this study I sought to understand the complexities of the processes of reciprocity within a theater for social change service-learning project. My sample included three university students, one university faculty member, four high school students, one high school principal, and one high school teacher. As a participant- observer, I conducted an…

  14. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  15. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  16. The Mediator Role of Change Self-Efficacy in Relationship between Psychological Capital and Commitment to Change

    adel zahed babalan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the mediator role of change self-efficacy in relationship between psychological capital and commitment to change in Mohaghegh Ardebily University employment. The study is applied and the research method was descriptive correlational (sem. According to sampling morgan table and using available sampling method, 180 persons (136 males and 44 females were selected. Participants responded to, Luthans Psychological Capital Questionnaire, Chen, Guly, Eden Change Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, and Meyer, Herscovitch Commitment to Change Questionnaire. The results were analyzed by structural equation modeling. The results showed that psychological capital and change self-efficacy had direct effects on the employee commitment to change. Also psychological capital had direct effects on change self-efficacy. Moreover the psychological capital showed indirect effect on commitment to change. In general, hypothetical model showed good fit. Therefore, it can be concluded that psychological capital and change self-efficacy may be taken into account as one of the important factors leading commitment to change

  17. The construction of teaching roles at Aalborg university centre, 1970–1980

    F. C. Servant-Miklos, Virginie; Spliid, Claus Christian Monrad

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a historical analysis of the development of teaching roles at Aalborg University Centre in its first 10 years. The research highlights three processes through which the interpretation of the new ‘supervisor’ roles was constructed within the problem-oriented, project-based educ...... disciplines. The paper closes with a reflection on the implications of these findings for the more general context of higher education.......-based educational model of AUC. First, the authors show that the institutional framework for teaching roles was deliberately left open to significant interpretation from the various faculties of the university; second, the critical theoretical model that had served as a guideline for the inception of project work...... in Roskilde failed to make an impact in Aalborg, whereas teachers from AUC were more receptive to constructivist psychology as a theoretical framework for practice; third, through community-building and negotiation within the faculties, different interpretations of teaching roles emerged in the different...

  18. Return migration: changing roles of men and women.

    Sakka, D; Dikaiou, M; Kiosseoglou, G

    1999-01-01

    This article addresses changes in gender roles among returning migrant families. It focuses on Greek returnees from the Federal Republic of Germany and explores changes in task sharing behavior and gender role attitudes resulting from changes in the sociocultural environments. A group of return migrants was compared with a group of non-migrants, both living in villages in the District of Drama, Greece. Groups were interviewed to investigate the extent to which each spouse shared house tasks, as well as their attitudes towards sharing and gender role in the family. The t-test for independent samples was used to determine mean differences between the two groups. In addition to demographic variables, those concerning the "time lived abroad" and the "number of years in Greece" after return were inserted into a series of regression analyses. Findings showed that migrants' task sharing and gender role attitudes were influenced differently by the migration-repatriation experience and subsequent cultural alternation. Results also suggest that migrant couples either take on new patterns of behavior or maintain traditional ones only when these were congruent with the financial aims of the family or can be integrated into living conditions in Greece upon return. Furthermore, migrants seem to adopt a more "traditional" attitude than non-migrants toward the participation of women in family decision making. From the study, it is suggested that gender role change is an on-going process influenced by the migration-repatriation experience, as well the factors, which accompany movement between the two countries.

  19. A Random Walk Down University Avenue: Life Paths, Life Events, and Personality Trait Change at the Transition to University Life

    Lüdtke, Oliver; Roberts, Brent W.; Trautwein, Ulrich; Nagy, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relation between continuity and change in the Big Five personality traits and life events. Approximately 2,000 German students were tracked from high school to university or to vocational training or work, with 3 assessments over 4 years. Life events were reported retrospectively at the 2nd and 3rd assessment. Latent curve analyses were used to assess change in personality traits, revealing 3 main findings. First, mean-level changes in the Big Five factors over the 4 years were in line with the maturity principle, indicating increasing psychological maturity from adolescence to young adulthood. Second, personality development was characterized by substantive individual differences relating to the life path followed; participants on a more vocationally oriented path showed higher increases in conscientiousness and lower increases in agreeableness than their peers at university. Third, initial level and change in the Big Five factors (especially Neuroticism and Extraversion) were linked to the occurrence of aggregated as well as single positive and negative life events. The analyses suggest that individual differences in personality development are associated with life transitions and individual life experiences. PMID:21744977

  20. Comparison of Communal Sex Roles of Female Sports Students Studying in Different Universities in Turkey

    Gerek, Zinnur

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether doing sports has any effect on the androgynous characteristics of women. In 15 universities from different regions of Turkey, a questionnare was administered to 341 students (170 elite sportlers from nine sport categories and 171 sedantary controls) during the 2012-2013 study period. The Bem sex role inventory was used to…

  1. The Role of Health Education on Breast Cancer Awareness among University of Calabar Female Undergraduates

    Asuquo, I. M.; Olajide, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to determine the role of health education on breast cancer awareness among University of Calabar female undergraduates. To achieve the purpose of the study, three hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. Related literature was reviewed, while a survey research design was adopted for the study. Appropriately develop and…

  2. The Role of the Chief Student Affairs Officer in Promoting the Jesuit Mission of the University

    Reiter, Lisa Rose

    2012-01-01

    "The Role of the Chief Student Affairs Officer in Promoting the Jesuit Mission of the University" is a qualitative comparative case study of three lay (non-cleric, non-Jesuit) chief student affairs officers employed in three U.S. Jesuit higher educational institutions. As the number of Jesuits decreases, a significant question is how the…

  3. The Symbolic Role of Academic Boards in University Academic Quality Assurance

    Rowlands, Julie

    2013-01-01

    While much research on quality assurance in higher education has centred on issues related to the impact on teaching and learning and academic staff, there is a significant gap in the area of quality assurance and academic governance. Within Australia the roles of university academic boards (also known as academic senates or faculty senates) have…

  4. The role of entrepreneurship education in university students' entrepreneurial intentions in China

    Zhang, Y.; Duysters, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have updated Shapero’s intention-based model by embedding entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurship knowledge. We analyzed 494 questionnaires received from 10 Chinese universities, and we have six major findings: (1) Entrepreneurship education plays a more important role than

  5. What Is the Public Role of the University? A Proposal for a Public Research Agenda

    Biesta, Gert; Kwiek, Marek; Locke, Grahame; Martins, Herminio; Masschelein, Jan; Papatsiba, Vassiliki; Simons, Maarten; Zgaga, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    With a view to meeting the demands of the knowledge economy and taking up a leading role in its further development, Europe and its member states are urging universities and institutions for higher education more generally to innovate and modernise themselves. Organisational structures, governance and management systems, curricula and teaching…

  6. Presidential Succession: The Role of the President in Succession Planning at Baptist Colleges and Universities

    Wright, Adam C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to examine the role of the president in succession planning at Baptist colleges and universities. Purposeful, criterion sampling yielded twelve presidents to participate in this study. They ranged in years of service from one to 13 years of experience as a president. Data collection…

  7. Universal Service Obligations: The Role of Subsidization Schemes and the Consequences of Accounting Separation

    Mirabel, F.; Poudou, J.C.; Roland, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper (i) highlights the role that unit subsidies can play in the compensation scheme of a Universal Service Obligation (USO), and (ii) shows that welfare may be reduced when regulation requires accounting separation of network activities for vertically integrated USO providers. This suggests that accounting separation should be avoided when a USO is implemented. (authors)

  8. The Incidence and Types of Occupational Role Stress among University Research Administrators

    Katsapis, Christine C. A.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the types of stressors prevalent in the self-reports of university research administrators (URAs) and examined whether or not the degree or type of role stress was influenced by: a) the affiliation of their office unit within their institution, or b) their type. Randomly selected members of NCURA were invited via e-mail to…

  9. The role of interpartner dissimilarities in Industry-University alliances : Insights from a comparative case study

    Estrada Vaquero, Isabel; Faems, Dries; Martin-Cruz, Natalia; Perez-Santana, M Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Based on a comparative study of two alliances, this paper provides an in-depth examination of the role of interpartner dissimilarities in Industry-University (IU) alliances. We make a conceptual distinction between routine-based dissimilarities (differences in partners' behavior) and

  10. Strengthening the University Executive: The Expanding Roles and Remit of Deputy and Pro-Vice-Chancellors

    Shepherd, Sue

    2018-01-01

    Deputy and pro-vice-chancellors (DVCs and PVCs) are core members of the executive team and play a pivotal role in university management. Nevertheless, they have rarely been the subject of empirical investigation. This study addresses this research gap, utilising a census to examine the size and remit of the DVC and PVC cohort in English pre-1992…

  11. Foreign-Born Women Faculty Work Roles and Productivity at Research Universities in the United States

    Mamiseishvili, Ketevan

    2010-01-01

    Using the data from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) survey, the study examined foreign-born women faculty members' work roles and productivity in the areas of teaching, research, and service in comparison with their US-born counterparts at research universities in the US. The findings provided some evidence to suggest…

  12. Community Service and University Roles: An Action Research Based on the Philosophy of Sufficiency Economy

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart; Chansirisira, Pacharawit

    2012-01-01

    This study employs action research to develop community service through university roles by applying the philosophy of sufficiency economy of His Majesty the King Bhumibol Adulyadej to fulfill villagers' way of life. Participatory learning, seminar, field trip and supervision were employed for strategic plan. Data were collected by participatory…

  13. Which educational role can Libraries play in a University learning environment?

    Alexandra Angeletaki

    2010-07-01

    • • Classroom instruction and observation of skills and technology application proficiencies • Face to face conversation with the students and the faculty members involved in the program. • Web-organised library survey. Project coordinator: Alexandra Angeletaki, University library of Trondheim Email: alexandra.angeletaki@ub.ntnu.no Description: The traditional way of assessing library service quality is to measure the numbers of users and resource materials purchased each year by the library users (Quantitative. But can this type of information help the Library to establish itself as an important educational component, meeting its role in the digital information world with a high academic standard that can influence the research outcome of the faculty it serves. What will the future Library environment be, if one takes in consideration the technological change of the library in place to the library in “Space”? The aim should be to maximise not only the services in numbers as they are easy numeric figures to measure, but in quality that meets the academic requirements of a research Library with educational programs exerting influence on the learning experience of its users. It is consequent then that such a measurement will have to be empowered in order to increase academic literacy and research competence. The University Library of Trondheim has been working the last 2 years in collecting data about the learning process of archaeology students trained in Information literacy workshops in collaboration with the Institute of Archaeology from the University of Trondheim. In 2010 our department introduced the use of reading devices for first year students of two different curriculums Archaeology and Chemistry. Three reading devices were filled up with the texts of the subjects taught and the students that were chosen to participate in the program will be giving at the end of the Spring semester 2010 an account of the use of the reading devices. The overall

  14. Roles and Domains to Teach in Online Learning Environments: Educational ICT Competency Framework for University Teachers

    Guasch, Teresa; Alvarez, Ibis; Espasa, Anna

    This chapter is aimed at presenting an integrated framework of the educational information and communications technology (ICT) competencies that university teachers should have to teach in an online learning environment. Teaching through ICT in higher education involves performing three main roles - pedagogical, socialist, and design/planning - and also two cross-cutting domains that arise from the online environment: technological and managerial. This framework as well as the competencies for university teachers associated with it were validated at a European level by a dual process of net-based focus groups of teachers and teacher trainers in each of the participating countries in a European Project (Elene-TLC) and an online Delphi method involving 78 experts from 14 universities of ten European countries. The competency framework and the examples provided in the chapter are the basis for designing innovative professional development activities in online university environments.

  15. The Role of Foundation Universities in the Higher Education Policy After 1980

    G. Ozdem

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The higher education system which entered a new period with the 1980s has in the last five years entered a phase of numerical enlargement and structural transformation. Having only 19 public universities in the early 1980s, the higher education system today have turned into a broad system with 85 public and 30 foundation universities. The research aims to discuss the role of foundation universities in the higher education policies implemented between the years 1980-2007. Among the five development plans prepared between 1980 and 2008, it was suggested for the first time with the sixth five-year development plan that foundations should be supported to establish private universities and policies was formulated accordingly. Mesut Yılmaz was the prime minister and Süleyman Demirel was the president who opened the highest number of foundation universities between 1980 and 2008. While the number of students between 1986-1987 was 426 in foundation universities, this number in foundation universities reached 109.903 in the 2006-2007 aca-demic year. The annual growth rate of the number of students in foundation universities within the twenty-year period is 32%. In the 2006-2007 academic year, the number of academic staff in foundation universities is 7766, of academic fellows is 2502, and of students is 109,903. The number of students per academic staff in foundation universities in the 2006-2007 academic year is 21, whereas the number of students per academic fellow is 44.

  16. The Role of Information Literacy in Higher Education: An Initiative at Al Akhawayn University in Morocco.

    Aziz El Hassani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper, part of which was presented at the 12th annual AMICAL conference at the American University in Bulgaria held in Blagoevgrad, on 29 May 2015, reports on a doctoral research project which explores the meaning and role of information literacy in higher education and lifelong learning. It also highlights an information literacy initiative at a Moroccan university, namely Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, and how its academic library strives to promote it. Living in an age of information tsunami and technological advancement, issues of information access, evaluation, retrieval and effective use, have become significantly critical in our societies. Directing the attention to the issue of information literacy and framing the best practices on how they can be best blended into the learning process of students are of paramount importance. Like other libraries across the globe, Mohammed VI Library at Al Akhawayn University in Morocco has realized the importance of information literacy and has worked in various ways to address this issue. This paper will describe the university strategy of teaching Information Literacy to graduate and undergraduate students in a number of ways. Recommendations to improve and support this initiative, including incorporating information literacy and skills across the university's curriculum, and fostering more effective partnerships between the Al Akhawayn university library and the teaching faculty, will be also discussed in this paper.

  17. The changing roles of pharmacists in hospital and community ...

    Dr Patrick O Erah

    Available online at http://www.tjpr.freehosting.net. Editorial. The changing roles of pharmacists in hospital and community pharmacy practice in Nigeria. The profession and practice of pharmacy did not start in Nigeria as a well defined health care area of specialization as it is today. Rather, pharmaceutical training was borne.

  18. Changing roles of academic societies due to globalization.

    Ehara, Shigeru; Aoki, Shigeki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Because of the globalization of environment around the academic society, the expected roles have changed significantly. In this short communication, we present the current situation in our international activities of the Japan Radiological Society, particularly in the academic activities and clinical practice. Establishing and reinforcing international network is one process of their promotion.

  19. The role of leadership in regional climate change adaptation

    Meijerink, Sander; Stiller, Sabina; Keskitalo, E.C.H.; Scholten, Peter; Smits, Robert; Lamoen, van Frank

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to better understand the role of leadership in regional climate change adaptation. We first present a framework, which distinguishes five functions of leadership within inter-organizational networks: the connective, enabling, adaptive, political–administrative and dissemination

  20. The Normative Dimension in Transdisciplinarity, Transition Management, and Transformation Sciences: New Roles of Science and Universities in Sustainable Transitioning

    Roland W. Scholz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the role normative aspects play in different approaches of science–practice collaboration, in particular as action research, (Mode 2 Transdisciplinarity (Td, Transition Management (TM, and Transformative Science (TSc. We elaborate on the different roles that scientists in these processes play. They work as facilitators (or contribute to a facilitated Td process, as activists (i.e., activist researchers in TM projects, and as catalysts in TSc. Td processes develop socially robust solutions for sustainable transitioning and impacts on the science system through mutual learning and by integrating epistemics (i.e., ways of knowing from science and practice and focusing on the empowerment of stakeholders. Science is viewed as a public good aiming to serve all key stakeholders. Researchers involved in TM projects strive to influence ongoing transition processes by actively engaging and participating in them, including lobbying for and empowering transformative changes toward sustainability based upon the researchers’ own analyses and world views. The TSc approach takes a catalyst perspective of the scientist’s role in inducing processes of strategic (societal transition when including certain stakeholder groups. The paper focuses on what roles normative aspects play in the different approaches and new societal demands imposed on science and universities. Based on this, we conclude that a new order of universities, public knowledge institutions, and boundary institutions is forthcoming.

  1. Change in University Teachers' Elearning Beliefs and Practices: A Longitudinal Study

    Scott, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Little longitudinal research has examined change in university teachers' elearning beliefs and practices after their initial experience with elearning. This study addresses this gap by focusing on six teachers who developed and implemented an elearning resource, and the changes they made to the resource and its implementation over two years. A…

  2. Uncovering changes in university teachers' professional networks during an instructional development program

    Van Waes, Sara; Van den Bossche, Piet; Moolenaar, Nienke M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304352802; Stes, Ann; Van Petegem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (1) the extent to which university teachers' networks changed while they participated in an instructional development program, (2) which mechanisms supported or constrained network change, and (3) the extent to which value was created through networks. Longitudinal social network

  3. Changes and Emerging Trends in the CE Function on University Campuses.

    Einsiedel, Albert A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews global changes and the following strategies changing the definition of university extension and continuing education: (1) cost-recovery entrepreneurial model; (2) emphasis on professional continuing education; (3) diminishing focus on traditional service; (4) distance education; and (5) global marketing. (SK)

  4. Organizational transformation and scientific change the impact of institutional restructuring on universities and intellectual innovation

    Glaser, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes to the funding and governance of higher education and scientific research systems are affecting both the organisation of the sciences and the nature of universities as strategic actors in many countries. Transforming the organisational contexts in which research is carried out has altered the dynamics of scientific change through shifts in the authority relations that influence the development and implementation of organisational strategies. The first part of this book deals with the transformation of universities as strategic organisational actors - in some cases creating them as such - while the second shows how governance and authority shifts are affecting the kinds of research goals being pursued by academics in different public science systems. By bringing together the analysis of organisational change in universities with that of how institutional changes are affecting intellectual innovation in different fields, this volume integrates work in the sociology of organisations, science polic...

  5. The role of universities in promoting social entrepreneurship in South Africa

    Lawrence Mpele Lekhanya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Social entrepreneurship can help to reduce socio-economic problems facing many countries including South Africa. Also it can be used as a strategic tool in building social cohesion in country. This paper aimed to examine the role of Universities in promoting social entrepreneurship in South Africa. The study also look assess the support that universities are providing to social entrepreneurship and to evaluate the extend of the support. The paper also analyses most strategies used by South African universities to help the development of social entrepreneurship. Mix approaches of qualitative and quantitative techniques were employed for data collection. The primary data was collected from six universities in South Africa where two comprehensive universities, two universities of Technologies from KwaZulu -Natal province and two comprehensive universities in Gauteng province were chosen for sample for this study. The sample consisted of 40 respondents made up of deans of faculties, heads of departments, and director of social entrepreneurship and head of social entrepreneurship department respectively according to structure of each university. Combination of structured qualitative and five –point Likert scale questionnaire were emailed to the respondents to complete. The results reveal that most of respondents are not involved in social entrepreneurship activities, or any entrepreneurship development programs. The findings also indicate that some respondents they had no clue about social entrepreneurship that their universities are involved in. the study was limited by exploratory nature. Therefore, generalization must be done with care. Further research should aim to target large sample and include other academic staff rather than focusing only on the deans and heads of departments.

  6. Visions for change - the role of the industrial engineer in a changing society

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the sixth national conference of the South African Institute of Industrial Engineers are presented. The theme of the conference was V isions for change - the role of the industrial engineer in a changing society . Two of the papers presented have been indexed separately for INIS. The remaining papers were considered outside the INIS subject scope

  7. Role of the cosmological constant in the holographic description of the early universe

    Myung, Yun Soo

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the role of the cosmological constant in the holographic description of a radiation-dominated universe C 2 /R 4 with a positive cosmological constant Λ. In order to understand the nature of cosmological term, we first study the Newtonian cosmology. Here we find two aspects of the cosmological term: entropy (Λ→S Λ ) and energy (Λ→E Λ ). Also we solve the Friedmann equation parametrically to obtain another role. In the presence of the cosmological constant, the solutions are described by the Weierstrass elliptic functions on torus and have modular properties. In this case one may expect to have a two-dimensional Cardy entropy formula but the cosmological constant plays a role of the modular parameter τ(C 2 ,Λ) of torus. Consequently, the entropy concept of the cosmological constant is very suitable for establishing the holographic entropy bounds in the early universe. This contrasts to the role of the cosmological constant as a dark energy in the present universe

  8. The Impact of Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Organizational Climate on the Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Research-Intensive Universities in the UK

    Schulz, John

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on academics in research-intensive universities in the UK and explores their perceptions of organizational climate, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. The findings suggest that the universities have multiple organizational climates. Three organizational climate types -- the Clan, the Hierarchy and the Adhocracy…

  9. Exploring the Changing Roles of Western Subsidiaries in China

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi; Slepniov, Dmitrij; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 30 years of economic development, the role of subsidiaries in China has changed. China has become an important host country for subsidiaries of western multinational companies seeking cost advantages and/or access to the emerging market potential. The objective of this paper...... and level of process optimization are suggested as other dimensions determining the roles of subsidiaries and consequently their capabilities in an emerging market. These dimensions are established through literature review and validated by case studies of four Chinese subsidiaries of Danish industrial...

  10. Changing Trends in Nutritional Behavior among University Students in Greece, between 2006 and 2016

    Kyrkou, Charikleia; Tsakoumaki, Foteini; Fotiou, Maria; Dimitropoulou, Aristea; Symeonidou, Maria; Menexes, Georgios; Biliaderis, Costas G.; Michaelidou, Alexandra-Maria

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present survey was to study the dietary behavior of university students residing away from the family home. In this context, we (a) compared their dietary habits in two time periods, namely 2006 and 2016; and (b) explored the possible impact of gender on the behavioral changes in nutritional choices. A total of four hundred and five university students (2006, n = 242; 2016, n = 163) participated in the study. Dietary assessment was carried out using a qualitative Food Fre...

  11. Organizational Change and the Role and Use of Management Controls

    Rikhardsson, Pall; Rohde, Carsten; Christensen, Leif

    countries. The paper identifies and explains the roles of different management controls in the organizational change processes initiated after an economic crisis. It shows how management control elements were used to change interpretive schemes and control archetypes to reflect a new operating environment....... The findings show that use of management controls in organizational change is critical. The type and severity of crisis influences what elements of the management control package are used, how they are coupled together and characteristics of the resulting control archetypes. In one context the organizations...... moved from result based management controls archetype to an action based management controls archetype. Other management controls like budgeting remained unchanged to provide stability when going through turbulent change....

  12. The Academic Profession and University Governance Participation in Japan: Focusing on the Role of Kyoju-kai

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The dominant role of Kyoju-kai (the professoriate) in university governance in Japan is now facing a critical examination as part of university reforms in response to global competition. What are the determinants of the characteristics of participation in university governance by individual faculty members? In what way does the organizational…

  13. Building low carbon communities in China: The role of individual’s behaviour change and engagement

    Jiang, Ping; Chen, Yihui; Xu, Bin; Dong, Wenbo; Kennedy, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Low carbon sustainability has been addressed in China’s national development strategies. This research explores individual behaviour change and engagement in building low carbon communities in China through a case study looking at the building of a low carbon campus at Fudan University, Shanghai. Individual behaviour directly influences the overall energy consumption and carbon emissions on Fudan University’s campus. Even though relevant polices have been issued for energy conservation, the energy consumption increased by 5% every year, which suggests that the “top-down” approach telling students and staff “what to do” does not work effectively. Based on a comprehensive method which includes the individual and social aspects related to the energy behaviour, the research analyses the promotion of individual engagement in building a low carbon campus through behaviour change based on four main aspects: (1) awareness raising and behaviour forming; (2) approaches to encourage behaviour change; (3) beyond the barriers and the constraints; and (4) systems and mechanisms for the long-term engagement. A low carbon management system is proposed for not only addressing management and technical solutions at the university level, but also based on the contributions from behaviour changes in establishing a low carbon campus at Fudan University at the individual level. - Highlights: • The “top-down” approach is not an effective way to building low carbon communities in China. • Individuals’ behaviour change and engagement play a key role in low carbon sustainability. • Awareness raising, proper approaches and sound mechanisms are necessary to encourage long-term behaviour changes. • An integrated management system is developed for comprehensibly establishing a low carbon campus at Fudan University

  14. The roles of natural areas in a changing climate

    Pollard, D.F.W.

    1991-01-01

    Natural areas are protected sites which are integral parts of a systematic network representing the diversity of natural environments. They are relatively undisturbed by man, selected according to ecological criteria, have assured permanency, are set aside mainly for scientific and educational purposes, and harbor genetic materials of value to society. In the Pacific Northwest, natural areas have been established by the United States Forest Service and the British Columbia Ministry of the Environment and include national parks, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, and wild rivers. A change in climate will undoubtedly create a mismatch between climatic regions and vegetation and wildlife occupying them. The distribution of plant and animal species will change. Species and communities that will be most affected by climatic change include those at the contracting periphery of the species range, genetically impoverished or highly sensitive species, annual plants, and Arctic and coastal communities. Most species will disperse from existing locations, with variable and unpredictable results. It is conceivable that natural areas will evolve from their current role as refuges to a new role as centers of diversity from which genes migrate into a changing world. Natural areas also serve as a base for biomonitoring of long-term environmental changes and for assessing effects of interventions such as acid precipitation. 32 refs

  15. The role of responsiveness within the self in transitions to university

    Marsico, Giuseppina; Gomes, Ramon; Dazzani, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    Entering university is a complex psychosocial phenomenon that can create several new stressful situations that students need to face. The transition into university may be accompanied by some psychosocial problems such as reduced self-esteem and academic achievement, increased social anxiety......, and a critical rise in the probability of dropout. How does a person use cultural elements to cope with stress? Responding to this question requires an understanding of the multivocal and ambivalent self. The paper aims at introducing and discussing the concept of Educational Self and the role...... of the responsiveness for explaining the complexity of the transition to a new educational context in Cultural Psychology perspective. The notion of responsiveness plays a crucial role in the ‘‘reconfiguration’’ of the multivocal and ambivalent self in transition....

  16. Sedentary risk factors across genders and job roles within a university campus workplace: preliminary study.

    Alkhatib, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether sedentary job role and gender are reflected by sedentary risk factors within a university campus. Following institutional ethical approval, 80 U.K. university campus employees were recruited, and 34 of them (age 47.8 ± 11.9 years, height 169 ± 1.0 cm, body mass 72.0 ± 14.1 kg) were measured for their systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), blood glucose (Glu), total serum blood cholesterol (Cho), dominant (DHG) and nondominant handgrip strength (NHG), body fat percentage (Fat%), trunk flexibility (Flex), peak cardiorespiratory capacity (V.O2max), and answered a physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ). The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA with job role and gender as independent factors, and each measured risk as a dependent factor. Gender had significant effects (pworkplace.

  17. A University Libraries Faculty Perspective on the Role of the Department Head in Faculty Performance: A Grounded Theory Approach. Revised.

    Boden, Dana W. R.

    This qualitative study examined the perceptions that university library faculty members hold regarding the role of the department head in promoting faculty growth and development. Four faculty members at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln were interviewed. Axial coding of the individuals' perceptions revealed six categories of perceived roles for…

  18. Enabling universal memory by overcoming the contradictory speed and stability nature of phase-change materials.

    Wang, Weijie; Loke, Desmond; Shi, Luping; Zhao, Rong; Yang, Hongxin; Law, Leong-Tat; Ng, Lung-Tat; Lim, Kian-Guan; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Chong, Tow-Chong; Lacaita, Andrea L

    2012-01-01

    The quest for universal memory is driving the rapid development of memories with superior all-round capabilities in non-volatility, high speed, high endurance and low power. Phase-change materials are highly promising in this respect. However, their contradictory speed and stability properties present a key challenge towards this ambition. We reveal that as the device size decreases, the phase-change mechanism changes from the material inherent crystallization mechanism (either nucleation- or growth-dominated), to the hetero-crystallization mechanism, which resulted in a significant increase in PCRAM speeds. Reducing the grain size can further increase the speed of phase-change. Such grain size effect on speed becomes increasingly significant at smaller device sizes. Together with the nano-thermal and electrical effects, fast phase-change, good stability and high endurance can be achieved. These findings lead to a feasible solution to achieve a universal memory.

  19. Bellona and hydrogen - the role of mediation in technical change

    Kristiansen, Beate

    2001-01-01

    The energy production and consumption is a major contributor to our environmental problems. The energy carrier hydrogen can be a part of the solution. In the thesis the Bellona Foundation's role in the process of technical change towards utilisation of hydrogen in Norway is investigated. Its role is analysed through the concept of mediation, which is based on seeing technical change as a social process. Mediators connect, or build bridges between, different actors, as well as between different types of knowledge. They establish new kinds of links and create new arenas of interaction for previously separated units. In addition, or through their work, they translate knowledge from one context or domain to another. They are also processing, interpreting and combining knowledge in new ways. Mediators bring together people with different competencies, and orchestrate their efforts often on a consensus basis. Bellona combines the different kinds of mediations, to influence the process of technical change at various levels and steps. They mediate mainly within the industry and between the industrial- and governmental domain. To some degree they also mediate between the experts and the public. But the direct contact with the public seems to be more or less absent in their hydrogen work. It seems like Bellona's mediator role fills an open space in the realm of technology policy making. Environmental oriented NGOs will perform or combine various mediating roles differently. To be able to make socially appropriate and sustainable technical change, probably other actors than the established traditional ones should be more involved. The possibilities for public participation should be strengthened, as well as the possibilities for mediation. (Author)

  20. Organizational learning, entrepreneurial orientation, and the role of university engagement in SMEs

    Dada, Lola; Fogg, Helen

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses the effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on organizational learning (OL) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the role of business/university engagement on the relationship between these two constructs. A cross-sectional research design, drawing upon a postal questionnaire survey, was employed to collect data from a sample of 206 UK SMEs. The results obtained from both the regression and moderated regression analyses revealed that EO positively impacts ...

  1. THE ROLE OF UNIVERSITIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS OF STUDENTS

    Evgeniy A. Deviatkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the conceptual issues of formation of the competence approach, foreign experience of study competencies, the introduction of competence-based approach in the Russian universities in the transition to the GEF, presented requirements of the labor market to a graduates , found the place and role of entrepreneurial competencies of students in the recruitment process, shown teaching methods forming entrepreneurial skills.

  2. Forest Owners' Response to Climate Change: University Education Trumps Value Profile.

    Blennow, Kristina; Persson, Johannes; Persson, Erik; Hanewinkel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Do forest owners' levels of education or value profiles explain their responses to climate change? The cultural cognition thesis (CCT) has cast serious doubt on the familiar and often criticized "knowledge deficit" model, which says that laypeople are less concerned about climate change because they lack scientific knowledge. Advocates of CCT maintain that citizens with the highest degrees of scientific literacy and numeracy are not the most concerned about climate change. Rather, this is the group in which cultural polarization is greatest, and thus individuals with more limited scientific literacy and numeracy are more concerned about climate change under certain circumstances than those with higher scientific literacy and numeracy. The CCT predicts that cultural and other values will trump the positive effects of education on some forest owners' attitudes to climate change. Here, using survey data collected in 2010 from 766 private forest owners in Sweden and Germany, we provide the first evidence that perceptions of climate change risk are uncorrelated with, or sometimes positively correlated with, education level and can be explained without reference to cultural or other values. We conclude that the recent claim that advanced scientific literacy and numeracy polarizes perceptions of climate change risk is unsupported by the forest owner data. In neither of the two countries was university education found to reduce the perception of risk from climate change. Indeed in most cases university education increased the perception of risk. Even more importantly, the effect of university education was not dependent on the individuals' value profile.

  3. Forest Owners' Response to Climate Change: University Education Trumps Value Profile.

    Kristina Blennow

    Full Text Available Do forest owners' levels of education or value profiles explain their responses to climate change? The cultural cognition thesis (CCT has cast serious doubt on the familiar and often criticized "knowledge deficit" model, which says that laypeople are less concerned about climate change because they lack scientific knowledge. Advocates of CCT maintain that citizens with the highest degrees of scientific literacy and numeracy are not the most concerned about climate change. Rather, this is the group in which cultural polarization is greatest, and thus individuals with more limited scientific literacy and numeracy are more concerned about climate change under certain circumstances than those with higher scientific literacy and numeracy. The CCT predicts that cultural and other values will trump the positive effects of education on some forest owners' attitudes to climate change. Here, using survey data collected in 2010 from 766 private forest owners in Sweden and Germany, we provide the first evidence that perceptions of climate change risk are uncorrelated with, or sometimes positively correlated with, education level and can be explained without reference to cultural or other values. We conclude that the recent claim that advanced scientific literacy and numeracy polarizes perceptions of climate change risk is unsupported by the forest owner data. In neither of the two countries was university education found to reduce the perception of risk from climate change. Indeed in most cases university education increased the perception of risk. Even more importantly, the effect of university education was not dependent on the individuals' value profile.

  4. Changing the role of the traditional birth attendant in Somaliland.

    Pyone, Thidar; Adaji, Sunday; Madaj, Barbara; Woldetsadik, Tadesse; van den Broek, Nynke

    2014-10-01

    To explore the feasibility of changing the role of the traditional birth attendant (TBA) to act as birth companion and promoter of skilled birth attendance. Between 2008 and 2012, 75 TBAs received 3days of training and were paid US $5 for each patient brought to any of five healthcare facilities in Maroodi Jeex, Somaliland. Health facilities were upgraded (infrastructure, drugs and equipment, staff training, and incentivization). Eight key informant interviews (KIIs) and 10 focus group discussions (FGDs) involving 32 TBAs and 32 mothers were conducted. A framework approach was used for analysis. TBAs adopted their new role easily; instead of conducting home births and referring women to a facility only at onset of complications, they accompanied or referred mothers to a nearby facility for delivery, prenatal care, or postnatal care. Both TBAs and mothers accepted this new role, resulting in increased deliveries at health facilities. Facilitating factors included the creation of an enabling environment at the health facility, acceptance of the TBA by health facility staff, and monetary incentivization. Changing the role of the TBA to support facility-based delivery is feasible and acceptable. Further research is needed to see whether this is replicable and can be scaled-up. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Changing Role of ENGOs in Water Governance: Institutional Entrepreneurs?

    Davidson, Seanna L.; de Loë, Rob C.

    2016-01-01

    The changing role of the state in the last quarter century has been an important contemporary concern for policy makers, scholars, and the public. Equally, there is increasing recognition among governance scholars that nongovernment actors are exerting new kinds of influence over governance systems and contributing in novel ways to governance processes. The role of environmental nongovernmental organizations (ENGOs) is particularly pertinent given the continued involvement of ENGOs within collaborative, adaptive, and co-management governance, across several contexts and regions. This paper uses an analytical framework derived from recent studies on institutional entrepreneurs, to examine the skills ENGOs are applying in order to orchestrate change. An empirical case of governance for water in Canada's Lake Simcoe region provides the foundation for the research. Drawing on a mixed methods approach, the research finds that ENGOs in Lake Simcoe have taken on a role as an institutional entrepreneur, and thereby have altered the relationship between governance actors in this setting. A key outcome of their actions is a more dominant, engaged, and influential role for ENGOs in a critical, regional governance system.

  6. The changing roles of natural resource professionals: providing tools to students to teach the public about fire

    Pat Stephens Williams; Brian P. Oswald; Karen Stafford; Justice Jones; David. Kulhavy

    2011-01-01

    The Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture (ATCOFA) at Stephen F. Austin State University is taking a proactive stance toward preparing forestry students to work closely with the public on fire planning in wildland-urban interface areas. ATCOFA's incorporation of the "Changing Roles" curriculum provides lessons on how natural resource managers...

  7. The changing role of veterinary expertise in the food chain.

    Enticott, Gareth; Donaldson, Andrew; Lowe, Philip; Power, Megan; Proctor, Amy; Wilkinson, Katy

    2011-07-12

    This paper analyses how the changing governance of animal health has impacted upon veterinary expertise and its role in providing public health benefits. It argues that the social sciences can play an important role in understanding the nature of these changes, but also that their ideas and methods are, in part, responsible for them. The paper begins by examining how veterinary expertise came to be crucial to the regulation of the food chain in the twentieth century. The relationship between the veterinary profession and the state proved mutually beneficial, allowing the state to address the problems of animal health, and the veterinary profession to become identified as central to public health and food supply. However, this relationship has been gradually eroded by the application of neoliberal management techniques to the governance of animal health. This paper traces the impact of these techniques that have caused widespread unease within and beyond the veterinary profession about the consequences for its role in maintaining the public good of animal health. In conclusion, this paper suggests that the development of the social sciences in relation to animal health could contribute more helpfully to further changes in veterinary expertise.

  8. CHANGES IN HIGHER EDUCATION: A COMPARISON OF KEY FACTORS CONCERNING UNIVERSITIES IN AUSTRIA AND SWITZERLAND

    Robert Rybnicek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Society has changed sustainably and universities have thus faced new requirements. As a result of competition and globalization, education and knowledge management had to be adapted. Universities were forced to establish a modern management system primarily known from the private sector and governments had to reconsider their legal and economic relationship to universities. In recent years, many countries have implemented new rules for their universities. Two of these countries were Austria and Switzerland. But even when they pursued the same goals, they have chosen quite different approaches and as a matter of fact achieved very differing results. The objective of this study was twofold. Firstly, we analyzed the challenges and contradictions when implementing a modern university model. Secondly, we investigated specific characteristics of the university systems of Austria and Switzerland to identify factors that may have impacted the performance and success of the universities. Referring to our first objective, a literature review has revealed severe contradictions between modern university management and the traditional understanding of it. While the traditional scheme has focused mainly on research, teaching is becoming more relevant in the new demand orientated university. Also, the freedom of science and teaching is limited by the strong orientation on goals that have been agreed upon with the government. Further contradictions can be identified in autonomy, budgeting, leadership, hierarchy, and employee participation. To examine the second research aim, we reviewed national and international databases and reports. Our results emphasize the importance of monetary aspects, the student-teacher-ratio, autonomy, and the relevance of the universities’ reputation and acceptance within society and politics. Our findings can help to understand the different approaches which have been chosen to cope with global changes in higher education. They

  9. The Role of Natural Resource Professionals in Addressing Climate Change

    Shorna B. Allred

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural resource professionals, ranging from forest managers and educators to floodplain managers, play a critical role in implementing and conducting outreach with regards to climate mitigation and adaptation appropriate to local and regional scales. Natural resource professionals can also pave the way by adopting actions that serve as demonstrations of efforts to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions or adapt natural systems for the future. A web survey of 1488 natural resource professionals across New York State (NYS was conducted to assess their attitudes toward climate change, views toward climate change mitigation and adaptation priorities, actions taken to address climate change, and barriers faced as they relate to their professional responsibilities. The majority of natural resource professionals believe that climate change is happening, but there was slightly less agreement about human causes of climate change. Most natural resource professionals (69% see evidence of how climate change is impacting natural resources in NYS, but few (17% believed that there was sufficient information about how to address climate impacts at the local level. Nearly 60% of natural resources professionals undertook climate mitigation or adaptation actions in their work. Prominent influencing factors for action were proactive leadership and local impacts. Barriers to taking action on climate change were a lack of human and financial resources, the nature of costs relative to benefits, and lack of perceived threat. As managers and educators responsible for local water, land, and wildlife resources, natural resource professionals witness changes resulting from climate change first-hand. This paper will be useful to decision-makers at state and federal government levels regarding policies, incentives, and guidance that can be created with the goal of promoting a sound natural resource strategy in support of climate change readiness.

  10. Social roles among recruits in Switzerland: Do social roles relate to alcohol use and does role change have an impact?

    Kuntsche, Sandra; Astudillo, Mariana; Gmel, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    Young men are likely to report high levels of alcohol use. Previous studies found a reduction in alcohol use when adopting adult social roles. This study examines the frequency of parenthood, partnership and stable employment among young men in Switzerland. It tests whether the alcohol use of those with adult social roles differs from those without and whether changes in social roles relate to changes in alcohol use. Data was available from 5025 men (20.0 years) at baseline (August 2010 to November 2011) and 15 months later. Changes in social roles and their impact on alcohol use were examined in multiple regression models. At baseline, 15.8% had a job and 4.9% a stable partner, and 1.5% had a child or were expecting one (30.5%, 6.1% and 2.2% at follow-up). Having a partner was associated with a significant decrease in annual frequency of drinking and weekly risky single-occasion drinking (RSOD) at follow-up. A higher number of social roles at follow-up was associated with a significant decrease in weekly RSOD. Apart from a significant decrease in weekly RSOD among those remaining in a stable partnership, role development was not found to have significant effects on alcohol use between baseline and follow-up. In Switzerland, an early engagement in permanent social roles is uncommon. Nevertheless, holding single or multiple social roles was commonly associated with reduced alcohol use, although not always significantly so. In western European countries, the engagement in adult social roles is postponed to later ages. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. University research reactors in the United States: Their role and value

    1988-01-01

    This report is primarily addressed to the people who make decisions affecting the levels of future university reactor programs URR: university administrators, department heads, federal policy makers, state and local policy makers, those in industry and government who depend upon a supply of nuclear-trained personnel, and those who are concerned with the future of the many sciences that benefit from the unique capabilities of nuclear-based techniques as well as from the nuclear sciences themselves. The major thrust of this report is to illustrate the scientific and social benefits and contributions associated with well-managed and well-funded university reactor programs. The intent is to help a decision maker gain a perspective and appreciation of the scientific, academic, social, and technical values of URR programs. The report also examines the role of university-like reactors in Europe, where a productive community of researchers is apparently served in an exemplary manner. The committee, assesses the security and safeguard needs at small reactors in a university setting in order to help gain a perspective on the potential hazards and relative risks involved. The last chapter discusses the kind of commitment and support needed if a significant population of URRs is to remain productive. 83 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Awareness of Climate Change and Sustainable Development among Undergraduates from Two Selected Universities in Oyo State, Nigeria

    Agboola, Omowunmi Sola; Emmanuel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated awareness of climate change and sustainable development among undergraduates in two universities: University of Ibadan, Ibadan and Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso in Oyo State of Nigeria. This was aimed at increasing the knowledge of undergraduates on climate change and sustainable development. The study…

  13. [Eating habits and attitudes towards change in Spanish university students and workers].

    Zazpe, Itziar; Marqués, María; Sánchez-Tainta, Ana; Rodríguez-Mourille, Ana; Beunza, Juan-José; Santiago, Susana; Fernández-Montero, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Universities and workplaces are important targets for the promotion of the nutritional interventions in adult population. The aim of this study was to assess the dietary habits and attitudes towards change in workers and university students from different academic fields. The study data came from a cross-sectional study of a Spanish University population of 1,429 participants. We analyzed the dietary habits and the attitudes toward dietary change. The mean age of workers and students was 37 and 23 years, respectively. Both groups reported eating four meals per day. Among students, the consumption of vegetables, wine, fish and nuts was less frequent whereas carbonated beverages, commercial bakery, fast food and red meat was higher. On the other hand, overall dietary pattern of science students was healthier than other students. Although no significant differences were found between students and workers in attitudes towards change, 32% of employees and 39% of students said they were seriously considering changing them. The dietary pattern was healthier among workers than among students, particularly those participants that studied social sciences degrees. They constituted the most vulnerable segment of the university population from a nutritional point of view. About a third of workers and students considered changing their habits. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. Building an Entrepreneurial University in Brazil: The Role and Potential of University-Industry Linkages in Promoting Regional Economic Development

    Amaral, Marcelo; Ferreira, Andre; Teodoro, Pitias

    2011-01-01

    This study is part of a broader research project, conducted by the Triple Helix Research Group--Brazil, focusing on university-industry-government linkages in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The case study reported here is that of the Regional University of Volta Redonda: the aim was to develop an understanding of how a regional university can be…

  15. Japanese experience of evolving nurses' roles in changing social contexts.

    Kanbara, S; Yamamoto, Y; Sugishita, T; Nakasa, T; Moriguchi, I

    2017-06-01

    To discuss the evolving roles of Japanese nurses in meeting the goals and concerns of ongoing global sustainable development. Japanese nurses' roles have evolved as the needs of the country and the communities they served, changed over time. The comprehensive public healthcare services in Japan were provided by the cooperation of hospitals and public health nurses. The nursing profession is exploring ways to identify and systemize nursing skills and competencies that address global health initiatives for sustainable development goals. This paper is based on the summary of a symposium, (part of the 2015 annual meeting of the Japan Association for International Health) with panel members including experts from Japan's Official Development Assistance. The evolving role of nurses in response to national and international needs is illustrated by nursing practices from Japan. Japanese public health nurses have also assisted overseas healthcare plans. In recent catastrophes, Japanese nurses assumed the roles of community health coordinators for restoration and maintenance of public health. The Japanese experience shows that nursing professionals are best placed to work with community health issues, high-risk situations and vulnerable communities. Their cooperation can address current social needs and help global communities to transform our world. Nurses have tremendous potential to make transformative changes in health and bring about the necessary paradigm shift. They must be involved in global sustainable development goals, health policies and disaster risk management. A mutual understanding of global citizen and nurses will help to renew and strengthen their capacities. Nursing professionals can contribute effectively to achieve national and global health goals and make transformative changes. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  16. THE ROLE OF STUDENT-CENTERED EDUCATION IN STIMULATING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT OF UNIVERSITY GRADUATES

    Rosca Remus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship plays a major role in the economic growth and development of most modern economies. Measures are being taken by most governments in order to stimulate entrepreneurship, however even more can be done by promoting entrepreneurship in the educational context. According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Global Report (2013 Romania is performing slightly under the average of similar countries when it comes to entrepreneurial activity, is above the average at necessity-driven entrepreneurship and low at innovation driven entrepreneurship. Under these circumstances, a focus on entrepreneurship in higher education is required in order to help Romania bridge the gap to the other efficiency-driven economies. Our study aims to assess the impact of the university level education on the career choices of present entrepreneurs in the Bihor county of Romania. 30 university graduates that are currently running a business have been interviewed regarding the reasons for starting their companies as well as the relationship that they had and have with the university from which they graduated. While some of the entrepreneurs claim that their education had little impact on the decision to become an entrepreneur, most of them believe that it played a big role on their performance and it prepared them somewhat for the challenges they faced once they opened their businesses. Also a large portion of them report being involved in the activity of the university. The participants offered valuable feedback regarding their experience with the university. They also provided considerable information regarding the improvement that they would like to see in the future and how a more student-centered education process could positively impact the development of entrepreneurial spirit and better prepare future graduates to start and run a business. We further discuss the means through which this could be achieved in the context of our institution and other

  17. How Nan Keohane Is Changing Duke: With a Focus on Building Consensus, She Is Transforming the University.

    Basinger, Julianne

    2000-01-01

    Nannerl Keohane became president of Duke University in 1993, one of the first women to lead a top research university. This article details some of the changes that have taken place during her tenure as president. (JM)

  18. "Somehow, I Don't Think 'They' Were Expecting 'Us'": The Changing Religious Landscapes for Universities

    Cooper Nelson, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    The sacred contours of the nation's colleges and universities changed dramatically since their founding--new human architecture and vocabulary compelled radical reformation of curriculum, policy, and accommodation. But institutional histories and culture remain eloquent and powerful. New competences in religious literacy and convictional identity…

  19. Change in Language Policy in Malaysia: The Reality of Implementation in Public Universities

    Gill, Saran Kaur

    2006-01-01

    In Malaysia, a sudden change in language policy, from Bahasa Melayu to English, has been instituted for the disciplines of science and technology at varying levels of the educational system. For this paper, it will be the domain of higher education that will be focused on. In 2005, the students who had their pre-university courses in English would…

  20. Management and Leadership in UK Universities: Exploring the Possibilities of Change

    Waring, Matt

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers the case for reform of management structures in UK universities and offers proposals for change. The model of top-down, performance-led management that characterises many institutions is both outmoded and ill-suited to the challenges of an increasingly turbulent higher education sector. Drawing on the experiences of a…

  1. Changes in Academic Entrepreneurship among Japanese University Bioscientists, 1980-2012

    Kameo, Nahoko

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation examines how Japanese university scientists in the biosciences responded to legal and institutional changes in academic entrepreneurship. Beginning in the 1990s, the Japanese government initiated a series of policy initiatives that attempted to imitate the U.S. academic environment's approach to promoting entrepreneurship. Using…

  2. Agility: A Crucial Capability for Universities in Times of Disruptive Change and Innovation

    Mukerjee, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Government funding cuts have provided a new impetus to Australian universities to re-examine their value proposition and corporate focus. While the sector has gone through waves of change in recent times, institutions are now scrambling for their place in a highly competitive market. Institutions explore new revenue opportunities and digital…

  3. An Investigation on Changing Behaviours of University Students Switching from Using Classical Cell Phones to Smartphones

    Arslan, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was tried to comprehend whether there occur any changes in behaviours of university students switching from classical cell phones to smartphones. The investigation was carried out according to quantitative research method. Questionnaire was employed as data collection tool. The datum of the study was limited with the information…

  4. Change of "Habitus": The Young People and the Free Public University in Northeast of Brazil

    Bandeira de Melo, Patricia; Romani Campos, Luís Henrique; Zarias, Alexandre; Gonçalves Ferreira, Suzy Luna Nobre

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the results of the research "A interiorização recente das Instituições públicas e gratuitas de ensino superior no Nordeste: efeitos e mudanças" [The recent implementation of new federal universities in the Northeast of Brazil: effects and changes], performed by the Joaquim Nabuco Foundation. One of its main mottos is…

  5. Commentary: Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University--1998

    Byrne, John V.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, author John Byrne reflects on his 1998 "Journal of Public Service & Outreach" article, "Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University" reprinted in this 20th anniversary issue of "Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement." Byrne's 1998 article was a call to modify…

  6. University-Level Teaching of Anthropogenic Global Climate Change (AGCC) via Student Inquiry

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews university-level efforts to improve understanding of anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC) through curricula that enable student scientific inquiry. We examined 152 refereed publications and proceedings from academic conferences and selected 26 cases of inquiry learning that overcome specific challenges to AGCC teaching.…

  7. A Study of Changes in German Learning Motivation by Chinese University Learners

    Liu, Meihua; Li, Mingming

    2018-01-01

    The present research examined the changes in Chinese university students' motivation to learn German during a 16-week semester. Analyses of the data showed that both at the beginning and toward the end of the semester, the participants held (fairly) positive attitudes towards German, were motivated to learn the language mainly for integrative and…

  8. The Change of Attitude to the Profession of University Graduates and Young Specialists

    Sarsenova, Assel Berikovna; Sadyrova, Mansya Sapargalievna; Montayev, Ardak Bazarbekovich; Imanbekova, Bibigul Iliyasovna

    2016-01-01

    The article studies the problem of attitude change towards the profession of university graduates and young specialists in Kazakhstan. The attitude to profession and professional motivation of students is considered as a form of human opportunities in the field of labor relations which is shaped only as a result of study in high education…

  9. Changing State-University Relations: The Experiences of Japan and Lessons for Malaysia

    Sirat, Morshidi; Kaur, Sarjit

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the changing state-university relations in Japan and Malaysia. Its main objective is to identify and examine possible lessons for Malaysia, based on the Japanese experience. Notably, since the late 1970s, Malaysia has been looking towards Japan as a model for socio-economic development (the "look-east" Policy)…

  10. Knowledge Management as a Mechanism for Technological and Organizational Change Management in Israeli Universities

    Shoham, Snunith; Perry, Milly

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade, the higher education sector has experienced many pressures and changes (Hanna, "Educause Review, 38"(4), 25-34, 2003; Scott, "Educause Review, 38", 64-80, 2003; Waterhouse, "The power of e-learning: The essential guide for teaching in the digital age", 2005). Universities around the world are…

  11. The role of forests in climate change: Nordic experience

    Portin, A.; Barua, S.; Clarke, M.; Camargo, M.; Viding, J.; Pekkanen, M.

    2013-08-15

    The objective of this project is to discuss the role of forests in Nordic countries in climate change mitigation and discuss the possible roles of forests as a part of a cost-effective climate policy. The report aims to provide a comprehensive and easily digestible way to better understand the issue. The report includes a discussion on the role of forests for enhancing carbon stocks and carbon sinks in the Nordic countries. The extent of above- and below-ground biomass and their role as forests carbon sinks in Nordic forests is analysed. The use of wood in products, buildings and as bioenergy is examined. Finally the report presents emissions trading schemes from around the globe that allow offsets and credits from forest projects on them and provides an analysis on the feasibility of such a scheme for the Nordic region. The report has been commissioned by the Working Group on Environment and Economics under the Nordic Council of Ministers. The study was carried out by Indufor. (Author)

  12. Universe

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  13. Engaging with change in a post-Bologna teaching university in the Netherlands

    B.A.,P.G.C.E., M.A. N.H. Helen Renou-Kirby

    2011-01-01

    Change is endemic in modern society, and the educational systems that operate in it. In Higher Education societal trends such as globalization and economic rationalism are impacting on teachers. Changes in the student population, new educational methods derived from shifting perspectives on the role

  14. Leading organizational change; The role of top management and supervisors in communicating organizational change

    Hansma, L.; Elving, W.J.L.; Podnar, K.; Jancic, Z.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper two studies on the role of top management and direct supervisors on communicating organizational change are presented. The importance of leadership at all organizational levels is demonstrated and published in numerous studies, but empirically hardly tested. In this paper we will

  15. The role of accounting practices in a radical change process : towards a comprehensive change framework

    Meer-Kooistra, Jeltje van der

    2001-01-01

    This paper is concerned with investigating the role of accounting practices in radical change processes. The institutional framework has been taken as a starting point in investigating these processes. The research has been carried out at the Dutch Railways. This company was forced by the Dutch

  16. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised.

  17. The role of the library in scholarly publishing: The University of Manchester experience

    Simon Bains

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of networked digital methods of scholarly dissemination has transformed the role of the academic library in the context of the research life cycle. It now plays an important role in the dissemination of research outputs (e.g. through repository management and gold open access publication processing as well as more traditional acquisition and collection management. The University of Manchester Library and Manchester University Press have developed a strategic relationship to consider how they can work in partnership to support new approaches to scholarly publishing. They have delivered two projects to understand researcher and student needs and to develop tools and services to meet these needs. This work has found that the creation of new journal titles is costly and provides significant resourcing challenges and that support for student journals in particular is mixed amongst senior academic administrators. Research has suggested that there is more value to the University in the provision of training in scholarly publishing than in the creation of new in-house journal titles. Where such titles are created, careful consideration of sustainable business models is vital.

  18. The Role of Employee-Driven Relations and Persistence in University-Industry Collaboration on Regional Innovation

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Drejer, Ina

    important driving factor for current collaboration than the existence of employee-driven relations. This suggest that firms’ hiring a university graduate is important for establishing a university connection, but once they have initiated a collaboration, then collaboration patterns tend to persists. However...... in the innovation literature about drivers of and persistence in university-industry collaborations. More specifically, it explores the role of employee-driven relations and persistence for firms’ collaboration on innovation with specific universities. The existing studies of university-industry interaction based......Promoting university-industry collaboration on innovation has an important role in regional innovation policy. Despite apparent advantages of such collaborations, several studies have shown that most innovative firms do not collaborate with universities. The paper addresses the dearth of knowledge...

  19. The Changing Roles and Changing Discourse of the Management Accountant: 1980-2008

    Baldvinsdottir, Gudrun; Burns, John; Nørreklit, Hanne

    to be concerned with enhancing the competitiveness and profitability of the business through a discourse of logical analysis and rational decision-making. However, the way in which this discourse is conceived has changed over the period we studied - from the presentation of relevant information in the 1980s......, through working with managers to find the information they need in the 1990s, to disciplining the business through performance measurement systems in the 2000s. The use of discourse analysis enabled us to explore the relationship between the role of management accounting and the wider social praxis......This paper explores the changing roles of management accountants over the last three decades drawing on a unique database of tape recordings of interviews with management accountants from the early 1980s to the present time. It uses discourse analysis to see more clearly the way in which the roles...

  20. The role of academic institutions in leveraging engagement and action on climate change

    Hill, T. M.; Palca, J.

    2016-12-01

    Growing global concern over the impact of climate change places climate scientists at the forefront of communicating risks, impacts, and adaptation strategies to non-scientists. Academic institutions can play a leadership role in providing support, incentives, and structures that encourage scientific engagement on this, and other, complex societal and scientific issues. This presentation will focus on `best practices' in supporting university scientists in communicating their science and engaging in thoughtful dialogue with decision makers, managers, media, and public audiences. For example, institutions that can provide significant administrative support for science communication (press officers, training workshops) may decrease barriers between academic science and public knowledge. Additionally, financial (or similar) support in the form of teaching releases and institutional awards can be utilized to acknowledge the time and effort spent in engagement. This presentation will feature examples from universities, professional societies and other institutions where engagement on climate science is structurally encouraged and supported.

  1. University implementing its community service role through curriculum development in a regional college

    Anne Keerberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The three roles of a higher education institution are teaching, research and community service. The objective of the article is to analyse how a university regional college can implement the task of community service via its curriculum development. The theoretical base lies on the positions of internationally recognised scientists of education policy as well as OECD definitions and clarifications that are compared to the cases of the regional colleges (in Narva and Kuressaare of two universities (respectively University of Tartu and Tallinn University of Technology. The set task enables to study as a whole such components as the content and design of curricula, teaching and assessment methods, extracurricular activities, topics and supervision of students’ research works, cooperation with partners. A comprehensive approach is a precondition of a well-functioning curriculum, with community service being the unifying aspect. The results of current study are applicable in case of the analysed curricula and colleges, they partly applicable in case of any other similar curricula and units. Prerequisites of the colleges' network evolvement, holistic impact and compliance with the region-specific needs is a significant topic the additional study of which has already begun.

  2. Changing Roles of a University Cooperative Extension Service in Response to Social Change

    Barnes, Thelma C.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have acknowledged that cooperative extension organizations should rethink dominant agricultural foci and be more inclusive of nontraditional audiences. An extension organization in the southeastern United States has experienced declining workshop participation, requests for technical assistance, and local office visits. These declines…

  3. The Role of Romanian Universities in Increasing Graduates’ Employability. Curriculum Management and Development of Competences Required by the Labor Market

    Lavinia Cornelia BUTUM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  IT&C instruments have been introduced in teaching and learning in order to facilitate the acquisition of competences and develop abilities for using new media and technologies. They lead to creating the competences which are necessary for a well-trained workforce. The results of a previous study where we wanted to identify the students’ main requests regarding development needs by using new teaching/learning technologies have highlighted the support that students want to receive from universities in finding a workplace. Thus, “84% of students want universities to establish partnerships with private institutions or ask for their support in developing projects in which students could participate as volunteers. 64% of students want the curriculum to be adapted to the employers’ requests and 59% consider it is necessary to include new teach/learn tools in the process of adapting the curriculum” (Butum, Stan & Zodieru, 2015. The present paper develops the idea that students are very demanding with the quality of their studies and they are focusing to obtain “right” skills for the labor market. We want to develop this analysis by approaching the change/adaptation of the curriculum in concordance to the market needs. We also intend to identify the employers’ requests about the young graduates’ competences and abilities and the way the employers perceive the role of universities in building human capital.

  4. Rising stakeholder expectations and the changing role of public relations

    Grossberndt, D. [BP Canada Energy Company, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The role of public relations is changing along with growing public awareness of stakeholder's ability to intervene in the development of energy projects. Public relations and community consultation departments must work closely together to ensure that consistent messages are being delivered to the public. This presentation explained how to develop a successful public relations strategy ranging from environmental risk assessment to community consultation. It also discussed the degree to which effective and ongoing communication with stakeholders prevents opposition and negative media coverage.

  5. The changing role of ornamental horticulture in alien plant invasions.

    van Kleunen, Mark; Essl, Franz; Pergl, Jan; Brundu, Giuseppe; Carboni, Marta; Dullinger, Stefan; Early, Regan; González-Moreno, Pablo; Groom, Quentin J; Hulme, Philip E; Kueffer, Christoph; Kühn, Ingolf; Máguas, Cristina; Maurel, Noëlie; Novoa, Ana; Parepa, Madalin; Pyšek, Petr; Seebens, Hanno; Tanner, Rob; Touza, Julia; Verbrugge, Laura; Weber, Ewald; Dawson, Wayne; Kreft, Holger; Weigelt, Patrick; Winter, Marten; Klonner, Günther; Talluto, Matthew V; Dehnen-Schmutz, Katharina

    2018-03-05

    The number of alien plants escaping from cultivation into native ecosystems is increasing steadily. We provide an overview of the historical, contemporary and potential future roles of ornamental horticulture in plant invasions. We show that currently at least 75% and 93% of the global naturalised alien flora is grown in domestic and botanical gardens, respectively. Species grown in gardens also have a larger naturalised range than those that are not. After the Middle Ages, particularly in the 18th and 19th centuries, a global trade network in plants emerged. Since then, cultivated alien species also started to appear in the wild more frequently than non-cultivated aliens globally, particularly during the 19th century. Horticulture still plays a prominent role in current plant introduction, and the monetary value of live-plant imports in different parts of the world is steadily increasing. Historically, botanical gardens - an important component of horticulture - played a major role in displaying, cultivating and distributing new plant discoveries. While the role of botanical gardens in the horticultural supply chain has declined, they are still a significant link, with one-third of institutions involved in retail-plant sales and horticultural research. However, botanical gardens have also become more dependent on commercial nurseries as plant sources, particularly in North America. Plants selected for ornamental purposes are not a random selection of the global flora, and some of the plant characteristics promoted through horticulture, such as fast growth, also promote invasion. Efforts to breed non-invasive plant cultivars are still rare. Socio-economical, technological, and environmental changes will lead to novel patterns of plant introductions and invasion opportunities for the species that are already cultivated. We describe the role that horticulture could play in mediating these changes. We identify current research challenges, and call for more

  6. Challenges and Changes in University Organization: Towards a New Model of Teaching and Learning

    Carlos Gómez Bahillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalization is producing a new world order that is affecting political, economic, social, cultural and educational institutions. Universities need to be the engine of this social change and to provide a dynamic, flexible and stable educational model which can generate a skilled workforce ready to face the new challenges of the information and knowledge society. The university must provide not only basic and specific knowledge that prepares students to embark upon a given profession but should develop students’ social and technical skills to facilitate their subsequent employment in a competitive and innovative production system that demands a skilled workforce.

  7. Changing dietary behaviour: the role and development of practitioner communication.

    Whitehead, Kirsten

    2015-05-01

    The need to support people to change diet-related behaviour is widely advocated and how to do this effectively in practice is an expanding area of research. Important factors to consider are how healthcare practitioners communicate with their patients and how that communication may affect diet-related behaviour change and subsequent outcomes. The aim of the present paper is to discuss communication skills for behaviour change (CSBC), focusing predominantly on registered dietitians who are required to communicate effectively and have an important role in supporting patients to change diet-related behaviour. The views of dietitians in relation to CSBC have been investigated and respondents have consistently reported that they perceive these skills to be of vital importance in practice. Patient views have reiterated the importance of good CSBC in one-to-one consultations. However, pre-qualification training of dietitians is thought to deliver practitioners who are competent at a minimum level. The need for ongoing continuous professional development (CPD) in relation to CSBC has been recognised but currently most CPD focuses on updating knowledge rather than improving these essential skills. Measuring CSBC in a consistent and objective manner is difficult and an assessment tool, DIET-COMMS, has been developed and validated for this purpose. DIET-COMMS can be used to support CSBC development, but concerns about logistical challenges and acceptability of implementing this in practice have been raised. Although a suitable assessment tool now exists there is a need to develop ways to facilitate assessment of CSBC in practice.

  8. How change information influences attitudes toward change and turnover intention : The role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment, and trust

    van den Heuvel, Sjoerd; Freese, Charissa; Schalk, René; van Assen, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how the quality of change information influences employees’ attitude toward organizational change and turnover intention. Additionally, the role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment and trust in the relationship between change information

  9. How change information influences attitude toward change and turnover intention : The role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment, and trust

    van den Heuvel, S.R.H.; Schalk, R.; Freese, C.; van Assen, M.A.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how the quality of change information influences employees’ attitude toward organizational change and turnover intention. Additionally, the role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment and trust in the relationship between change information

  10. How Change Information Influences Attitudes towards Change and Turnover Intention: The role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment, and trust

    Sjoerd van den Heuvel; Charissa Freese; René Schalk; Marcel van Assen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how the quality of change information influences employees’ attitude toward organizational change and turnover intention. Additionally, the role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment and trust in the relationship between change information

  11. Emerging Entrepreneurial Universities in University Reforms: The Moderating Role of Personalities and the Social/Economic Environment

    Berács, József

    2014-01-01

    University education, research and other services are increasingly becoming private goods as opposed to the traditional public goods concept. This trend is a highly debated process, and its consequences for universities are unquestionable. One of the consequences may be the diffusion of entrepreneurship in the higher education sector. The aim of…

  12. Redefining University Roles in Regional Economies: A Case Study of University-Industry Relations and Academic Organization in Nanotechnology

    Sa, Creso M.

    2011-01-01

    The emerging field of nanotechnology has created a new frontier for the convergence of university and industrial research. In the United States, major federal investments provided a massive boom for this field over the decade. This paper reports on a case study of how the University at Albany came to establish the first college of nanotechnology…

  13. An Examination of the Opinions of the University Students About Feminism and Gender Roles

    Ayşegül UNUTKAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gender discrimination adversely affected women in all areas of social life, especially in the fields of education, work, marriage and family life. Feminism has emerged to draw attention to the these impacts of gender discrimination and to reduce it's negative consequences. Social transformation is necessary to ensure gender justice. One of the important steps for achieving this transformation is to educate the youth and increase their awareness. This study was conducted with the aim to determine Dumlupinar University, School of Health students' opinions on feminism and gender roles. The population of this study consists of 1293 students. Sample is comprised of 846 students who accepted to enrolled in the study. Data have been collected with using a questionnaire and assessed with percentiles, Kruskal-Walls and Mann-Whitney U-Tests. 43.3% of students defined feminism as “a style of thought that advocates women are more superior than men” and 31.9% of them as “a style of thought that advocates the equity of social opportunity”. It was identified that male students have more traditional opinions on gender roles related to work, social, marriage and family life. This study has revealed that male students have more conventional opinions in the fields of in working and married life, while the male and female students have egalatirian opinions in the propositions about social life and family life. Besides, the results of the study have revealed that opinions of students on gender roles related to work, social, marriage and family life exhibit statistically significant differences among the departments for all of the statements given. It was observed that midwifery students have more egalitarian views. Also, it was determined that upper class students have more egalitarian opinions. As a result of our study, it has been seen that university students still have a traditional perspective on social gender roles. According to the results of the

  14. Role of Saudi universities in achieving the solar potential 2030 target

    Alyahya, Sulaiman; Irfan, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, domestic consumption of fossil fuel is expected to grow from 3.4 MBOE (Million Barrels of Oil Equivalent) to 8.3 MBOE by 2028; peak power demand from 55 GW to 121 GW by 2030. About 61 GW of demand appears unmet by the output of planned projects. In response, KACARE (King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy, the nation’s energy policy maker) has announced the target of installing 41 GW of solar capacity by 2030 (24 GW by 2020). Deployment of so much solar power requires a substantial, locally trained, technical workforce. A lower bound estimate of 8.9 persons/MW of Solar PV and 3.04 persons/MW of Solar Thermal can be taken for manufacturing, operations and maintenance. This conservative figure would mean employment for 218,650 workers by 2030. This would require the 24 local universities to graduate 14,577 technically qualified workers annually for the next 15 years (607 graduates per year per university). Even assuming a 50% import of technical manpower, the above estimate can be revised as 303 graduates per university per year. The need for so many technical workers makes it imperative for local universities to immediately ramp up their capacity to graduate technical workforce. - Highlights: •A review was made for manpower requirement of solar projects. •Manpower requirement was suggested for the Solar Target 2030 of 41 GW for Saudi Arabia. •Role of universities was elaborated in achieving tis manpower requirement.

  15. Are Universities Aware of the Changes that are Occurring in Higher Education?

    Francisco José GARCÍA PEÑALVO

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The editorial of this last issue of volume 17, corresponding to 2016, reflects about the vertiginous changes that are taking place in higher education, with management and business models based on online education and a labour market orientation that challenge the traditional concept of University. The underlying question is whether the University, as an institution, is aware of all these movements and is prepared to give a qualified response that allows it to adapt to the new realities of a Digital Society, without losing its hegemony as universal guarantor of the generation and transmission of scientific and humanistic knowledge; or, on the contrary, faithful to its more conservative tradition, it continúes to reinforce the scaffolding of its ivory tower, moving further and further from this reality, secure from a position of social privilege that it understands immovable.

  16. Community-University Partnerships: Achieving continuity in the face of change

    Linda Silka

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A challenge that community-university partnerships everywhere will face is how to maintain continuity in the face of change. The problems besetting communities continually shift and the goals of the university partners often fluctuate. This article describes a decade-long strategy one university has successfully used to address this problem. Over the past ten years, a community-university partnership at the University of Massachusetts Lowell has used summer content funding to respond creativity to shifting priorities. Each summer a research-action project is developed that targets a different content issue that has emerged with unexpected urgency. Teams of graduate students and high school students are charged with investigating this issue under the auspices of the partnership. These highly varied topics have included immigrant businesses, youth asset mapping, women owned businesses, the housing crisis, social program cutbacks, sustainability, and economic development and the arts. Despite their obvious differences, these topics share underlying features that further partnership commitment and continuity. Each has an urgency: the information is needed quickly, often because some immediate policy change is under consideration. Each topic has the advantage of drawing on multiple domains: the topics are inherently interdisciplinary and because they do not “belong” to any single field, they lend themselves to disciplines pooling their efforts to achieve greater understanding. Each also has high visibility: their salience has meant that people were often willing to devote scarce resources to the issues and also that media attention could easily be gained to highlight the advantages of students, partners, and the university working together. And the topics themselves are generative: they have the potential to contribute in many different ways to teaching, research, and outreach. This paper ends with a broader consideration of how partnerships can

  17. Mainstreaming climate adaptation in the Asia-Pacific: Role of networks and universities in promoting climate literacy

    Ling, F. H.; Yasuhara, K.; Tamura, M.; Tabayashi, Y.; Mimura, N.

    2011-12-01

    As the international climate regime continues to evolve, adaptation has emerged as a key component of responding to climate change. Due to limited scientific, financial, and institutional capacities, as well as perceived competition with multiple priorities, strategies for adaptive measures are not being implemented at the pace needed to address current and future climate risks. Adaptation networks, both global and in the Asia-Pacific region, have formed to overcome the lack of sufficient communication and collaboration among different stakeholders and domains of expertise. In this presentation, we discuss various efforts at Ibaraki University in Japan to integrate technical and social aspects of adaptation into a multidisciplinary effort, to foster synergies among various networks, to clarify the roles of developed and developing countries, and to develop a standard for assessing vulnerability and adaptability across various geographical contexts.

  18. Bacoside A: Role in Cigarette Smoking Induced Changes in Brain

    G. Vani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking (CS is a major health hazard that exerts diverse physiologic and biochemical effects mediated by the components present and generated during smoking. Recent experimental studies have shown predisposition to several biological consequences from both active and passive cigarette smoke exposure. In particular, passive smoking is linked to a number of adverse health effects which are equally harmful as active smoking. A pragmatic approach should be considered for designing a pharmacological intervention to combat the adverse effects of passive smoking. This review describes the results from a controlled experimental condition, testing the effect of bacoside A (BA on the causal role of passive/secondhand smoke exposure that caused pathological and neurological changes in rat brain. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke induced significant changes in rat brain histologically and at the neurotransmitter level, lipid peroxidation states, mitochondrial functions, membrane alterations, and apoptotic damage in rat brain. Bacoside A is a neuroactive agent isolated from Bacopa monnieri. As a neuroactive agent, BA was effective in combating these changes. Future research should examine the effects of BA at molecular level and assess its functional effects on neurobiological and behavioral processes associated with passive smoke.

  19. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D.; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K.; Martin, James D.; Moldwin, Mark B.; O’Dowd, Diane K.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Smith, Tobin L.; Miller, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of undergraduate teaching across all disciplines, not only STEM fields, requires creating an environment wherein continuous improvement of teaching is valued, assessed, and rewarded at various stages of a faculty member’s career. This requires consistent application of policies that reflect well-established best practices for evaluating teaching at the department, college, and university levels. Evidence shows most teaching evaluation practices do not reflect stated policies, even when the policies specifically espouse teaching as a value. Thus, alignment of practice to policy is a major barrier to establishing a culture in which teaching is valued. Situated in the context of current national efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education, including the Association of American Universities Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, this essay discusses four guiding principles for aligning practice with stated priorities in formal policies: 1) enhancing the role of deans and chairs; 2) effectively using the hiring process; 3) improving communication; and 4) improving the understanding of teaching as a scholarly activity. In addition, three specific examples of efforts to improve the practice of evaluating teaching are presented as examples: 1) Three Bucket Model of merit review at the University of California, Irvine; (2) Evaluation of Teaching Rubric, University of Kansas; and (3) Teaching Quality Framework, University of Colorado, Boulder. These examples provide flexible criteria to holistically evaluate and improve the quality of teaching across the diverse institutions comprising modern higher education. PMID:29196430

  20. Strategies for Faith Engagement within One's Career: The Role of Uganda Christian University in Preparing Students for Postgraduation Life

    Rugyendo, Medard

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of Uganda Christian University (UCU) in devising strategies for the sustenance of Christian faith in one's career for the betterment of the society despite its social ills. The current theme of UCU is "A Complete Education for a Complete Person." As a Christian university, UCU seeks to provide a positive…

  1. Grammar Is the Heart of Language: Grammar and Its Role in Language Learning among Finnish University Students

    Saaristo, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    This article presents and discusses views on grammar and its role in formal language learning amongst Finnish university students. The results are based on a questionnaire which was distributed to students at the University of Jyväskylä as part of institutional action research. The background to the project was a feeling amongst some teachers of…

  2. Alcohol Use among Italian University Students: The Role of Sensation Seeking, Peer Group Norms and Self-Efficacy

    Cicognani, Elvira; Zani, Bruna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the role of sensation seeking, peer group drinking and self-efficacy in refusing to drink alcohol in influencing alcohol consumption of a sample of 588 Italian university students. Results confirmed that heavy drinkers are typically males living in university residences. Alcohol use is more frequent among students with…

  3. Considering the Role of Tutoring in Student Engagement: Reflections from a South African University

    Faroa Brendon Duran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Student engagement has been defined as the extent to which students are engaged in activities that higher education research has shown to be linked with high-quality learning outcomes. The ubiquitous influence of the term ‘student engagement’ has been felt throughout the higher education landscape.  This is especially true for South African higher education where student success has been poor. South African universities have been tasked to improve the student learning experience as a component of improving success. Some of the innovative teaching and learning practices often highlighted by research which are thought to improve student engagement include: having students adopt teaching roles such as peer assessment, tutoring and mentoring. These practices are thought to promote student engagement, leading to greater student academic success. Tutoring can therefore be seen as one of the key strategies to facilitate student engagement in order to achieve academic success. The following paper considers the role of tutoring in student engagement while reflecting on strategies used at a South African university to address the challenges associated with student success.

  4. Governance and Higher Education in Pakistan: What Roles Do Boards of Governors Play in Ensuring the Academic Quality Maintenance in Public Universities versus Private Universities in Pakistan?

    Usman, Sidra

    2014-01-01

    There are major structural issues in the higher education system in Pakistan leading to poor governance of institutions and questionable quality of education. This paper looks at the differences in the role of boards of governors in maintaining quality of education in both the public and the private sector universities in Pakistan. After having…

  5. Serious Simulation Role-Playing Games for Transformative Climate Change Education: "World Climate" and "Future Climate"

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Sterman, J.; Sawin, E.; Jones, A.; Merhi, H.; Hunt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change, its mitigation, and adaption to its impacts are among the greatest challenges of our times. Despite the importance of societal decisions in determining climate change outcomes, flawed mental models about climate change remain widespread, are often deeply entrenched, and present significant barriers to understanding and decision-making around climate change. Here, we describe two simulation role-playing games that combine active, affective, and analytical learning to enable shifts of deeply held conceptions about climate change. The games, World Climate and Future Climate, use a state-of-the-art decision support simulation, C-ROADS (Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support) to provide users with immediate feedback on the outcomes of their mitigation strategies at the national level, including global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and concentrations, mean temperature changes, sea level rise, and ocean acidification. C-ROADS outcomes are consistent with the atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMS), such as those used by the IPCC, but runs in less than one second on ordinary laptops, providing immediate feedback to participants on the consequences of their proposed policies. Both World Climate and Future Climate role-playing games provide immersive, situated learning experiences that motivate active engagement with climate science and policy. In World Climate, participants play the role of United Nations climate treaty negotiators. Participant emissions reductions proposals are continually assessed through interactive exploration of the best available science through C-ROADS. Future Climate focuses on time delays in the climate and energy systems. Participants play the roles of three generations: today's policymakers, today's youth, and 'just born.' The game unfolds in three rounds 25 simulated years apart. In the first round, only today's policymakers make decisions; In the next round, the young become the policymakers and inherit the

  6. Ethical concerns and contributions in response to climate change and the links to well-being: a study of university students in The Netherlands.

    El Zoghbi, Mona Betour; El Ansari, Walid

    2014-06-01

    This study explored the concerns and contributions of university students in response to the ethical dimensions of climate change, and the implications for their well-being. The study focused on university students as leaders of future society while facing complex environmental and socio-economic challenges. A total of 8 focus groups (FG) were conducted (66 participants from over 10 different universities across The Netherlands). In addition, 9 in-depth interviews with Dutch university students from different academic backgrounds, and 16 interviews with Dutch key informants in the environment, youth and public health fields were undertaken. The first author also attended (as participant-observer) three major events themed around youth and environmental issues across different regions in The Netherlands. University students in the Netherlands are mostly concerned about the increasing social and economic inequalities between the global North and South, and the implications for impoverished and uneducated communities. Participants raised concerns over the transfer of materialistic value systems and unsustainable practices from developed to developing countries. The participants' main contributions in response to climate change were largely driven by feelings of guilt and responsibility, an ecological worldview, and desire to play a positive role in society. Establishing formal youth platforms across academic, civic and political institutions could provide legitimate and empowering opportunities for university students to participate in consultations and debates of future environmental policies and development strategies. Such platforms could enhance the agency and well-being of university students for addressing their concerns over existing climate inequalities and other ethical dilemmas.

  7. The changing role of health care professionals in nursing homes: A systematic literature review of a decade of change

    van Stenis, A.R. (Arend R.); J. Van Wingerden (Jessica); Tanke, I.K. (Isolde Kolkhuis)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAlthough, the role of health care professionals is known to have changed over the last years, few formal efforts have been made to examine this change through means of a scientific review. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to investigate the changing role of health care professionals

  8. Design of intense neutron source for fusion material study and the role of universities

    Ishino, Shiori

    1993-01-01

    Need and requirement for the intense neutron source for fusion materials study have been discussed for many years. Recently, international climate has been becoming gradually maturing to consider this problem more seriously because of the recognition of crucial importance of solving materials problems for fusion energy development. The present symposium was designed to discuss the problems associated with the intense neutron source for material irradiation studies which will have a potential for the National Institute for Fusion Science to become one of the important future research areas. The symposium comprises five sessions; first, the role of materials research in fusion development strategies was discussed followed by a brief summary of current IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) activity. Despite the pressing need for intense fusion neutron source, currently available neutron sources are reactor or accelerator based sources of which FFTF and LASREF were discussed. Then, various concepts of intense neutron source candidates were presented including ESNIT, which are currently under design by JAERI. In the fourth session, discussions were made on the study of materials with the intense neutron source from the viewpoint of materials scientists and engineers as the user of the facility. This is followed by discussions on the role of universities from the two stand points, namely, fusion irradiation studies and fusion materials development. Finally summary discussions were made by the participants, indicating important role fundamental studies in universities for the full utilization of irradiation data and the need of pure 14 MeV neutron source for fundamental studies together with the intense surrogate neutron sources. (author)

  9. Strategic Actions and Strategy Changes in European Universities: Clues from Institutional Evaluation Reports of the European University Association

    Uslu, Baris

    2018-01-01

    This research examined strategic actions in European universities through the institutional evaluation reports of the EUA. EUA reports for 21 universities from seven European countries were included in the data set. Qualitative inquiry was carried out and six sub-sections in the reports were used as established themes. The findings were then…

  10. Roles of University Support for International Students in the United States: Analysis of a Systematic Model of University Identification, University Support, and Psychological Well-Being

    Cho, Jaehee; Yu, Hongsik

    2015-01-01

    Unlike previous research on international students' social support, this current study applied the concept of organizational support to university contexts, examining the effects of university support. Mainly based on the social identity/self-categorization stress model, this study developed and tested a path model composed of four key…

  11. Profiles of Change in Motivation for Teaching in Higher Education at an American Research University

    Gunersel, Adalet B.; Kaplan, Avi; Barnett, Pamela; Etienne, Mary; Ponnock, Annette R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study employed an emergent theoretical model of teaching role identity and motivation to investigate the change in conception of and motivation for teaching in higher education of research graduate students who teach in the United States. Fifteen participants took a graduate-level seminar as part of a two-course teaching professional…

  12. RESISTANCE TO CHANGE AND ERP IMPLEMENTATION SUCCESS: THE MODERATING ROLE OF CHANGE MANAGEMENT INITIATIVES

    Zafar U. Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP is a useful tool that builds strong capabilities, improves performance, supports better decision making, and provides competitive advantage for businesses. ERP aims to help the management by setting better business practices and equipping them with the right information to take timely decision. In any new technology implementation, one of the issues that need to be addressed is the resistance to change. Many implementations have failed due to strong resistance from the end users. Thus, the main purpose of this paper is to test the impact of resistance to change on ERP's implementation success and how change management initiatives acts in the capacity of a moderating role. Using data collected from 69 manufacturing organizations through a mail survey, it was found that resistance to change is negatively related to achievement of predetermined goals (b = –0.930, p < 0.01 and usersatisfaction (b = –0.952, p < 0.01. Further, change management initiatives did not moderate the relationship between resistance and predetermined goals but it moderated the relationship between resistance and user satisfaction. In addition, change management initiatives have a direct positive impact on user satisfaction. This research concludes that the human factor is very important in ERP's implementation.

  13. Exploration of priority actions for strengthening the role of nurses in achieving universal health coverage

    Rowaida Al Maaitah

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to explore priority actions for strengthening the role of Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs towards the achievement of Universal Health Converge (UHC as perceived by health key informants in Jordan. Methods: an exploratory qualitative design, using a semi-structured survey, was utilized. A purposive sample of seventeen key informants from various nursing and health care sectors was recruited for the purpose of the study. Content analysis utilizing the five-stage framework approach was used for data analysis. Results: the findings revealed that policy and regulation, nursing education, research, and workforce were identified as the main elements that influence the role of APNs in contributing to the achievement of UHC. Priority actions were identified by the participants for the main four elements. Conclusion: study findings confirm the need to strengthen the role of APNs to achieve UHC through a major transformation in nursing education, practice, research, leadership, and regulatory system. Nurses should unite to come up with solid nursing competencies related to APNs, PHC, UHC, leadership and policy making to strengthen their position as main actors in influencing the health care system and evidence creation.

  14. The role of China in mitigating climate change

    Paltsev, Sergey; Morris, Jennifer; Cai, Yongxia; Karplus, Valerie; Jacoby, Henry

    2012-01-01

    We explore short- and long-term implications of several energy scenarios of China's role in efforts to mitigate global climate risk. The focus is on the impacts on China's energy system and GDP growth, and on global climate indicators such as greenhouse gas concentrations, radiative forcing, and global temperature change. We employ the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework and its economic component, the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. We demonstrate that China's commitments for 2020, made during the UN climate meetings in Copenhagen and Cancun, are reachable at very modest cost. Alternative actions by China in the next 10 years do not yield any substantial changes in GHG concentrations or temperature due to inertia in the climate system. Consideration of the longer-term climate implications of the Copenhagen-type of commitments requires an assumption about policies after 2020, and the effects differ drastically depending on the case. Meeting a 2 °C target is problematic unless radical GHG emission reductions are assumed in the short-term. Participation or non-participation of China in global climate architecture can lead by 2100 to a 200–280 ppm difference in atmospheric GHG concentration, which can result in a 1.1 °C to 1.3 °C change by the end of the century. We conclude that it is essential to engage China in GHG emissions mitigation policies, and alternative actions lead to substantial differences in climate, energy, and economic outcomes. Potential channels for engaging China can be air pollution control and involvement in sectoral trading with established emissions trading systems in developed countries. - Highlights: ► It is essential to engage China in GHG emissions mitigation policies. ► China's mitigation actions proposed for 2015 and 2020 are reachable at modest costs. ► Meeting 2 °C target is problematic without radical GHG emissions reductions.

  15. Smoking restrictions on campus: changes and challenges at three Canadian universities, 1970-2010.

    Procter-Scherdtel, Amy; Collins, Damian

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the restriction of smoking on university campuses in the Canadian context. Indoor smoking on campus is now completely prohibited by law, and universities are increasingly moving to restrict, or prohibit, outdoor smoking on their grounds. The research focuses on three case studies to identify changes in spatial restrictions on campus smoking over the last four decades (1970-2010), and to determine the challenges involved in establishing bans in outdoor areas of campus. The three universities were selected for their different approaches to the issue of outdoor smoking. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews with 36 key informants, conducted from September 2010 to January 2011, supplemented by documentary information. Interview data were analysed thematically. Protection against environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on campus proceeded incrementally, via policy-making at the provincial, municipal and institutional levels. Historically, institutional bans on indoor smoking were particularly significant, but their health benefits could be limited by the presence of private property on campus. Universities continue to initiate smoking restrictions today, with respect to outdoor bans. However, respondents reported myriad challenges in developing, implementing and maintaining such bans. Five principal concerns were articulated: the need for ongoing policy communication; management of community relations as smokers are displaced from campus; enforcement to ensure that the policy has practical effect; safety concerns; and difficulties relating to campus layout. Because challenges are diverse and contextual, effective protection against outdoor ETS on campus is likely to require an ongoing commitment on the part of administrators. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Changes in abdominal obesity in Chilean university students stratified by body mass index.

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco; Vilchez-Avaca, Catalina; Contreras-Mellado, Victor; Andruske, Cynthia Lee; Gómez-Campos, Rossana

    2016-01-13

    Studies based on Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) are generally used to examine the prevalence and tendency of overweight and obesity. These studies help determine the socioeconomic development of a country and improve public health policies. Therefore, the goal of this research was to determine the trend of change in abdominal obesity of Chilean university students according to the Body Mass Index (BMI) measured in intervals of three and six years. For this study, a total of 1598 students of both sexes ranging in age from 18 to 26 from a Chilean university were evaluated. Students were assessed commencing in 2007 (372 males and 315 females), 2010 (250 males and 330 females), and ending in 2013 (153 males and 178 females). During the three transversal assessments, weight, height, and waist circumference were evaluated. BMI was calculated for both sexes. No significant differences were found in age and BMI during the three years evaluated (2007, 2010, and 2013). In 2013, waist circumference (WC) increased significantly (p obese), the university students showed significant increases in WC (Females: p = 0.004; Males: p = 0.035) whereas in 2007 and 2010, the values remained relatively stable. BMI remained constant during 2007, 2010, and 2013. However, the university students of both sexes showed greater risk of abdominal obesity as a result of increased WC in 2013.

  17. Developing educational leaders: A partnership between two universities to bring about system-wide change

    Suraiya R Naicker

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated a system-wide change strategy in a South African school district, which sought to build the leadership capacity of principals and district officials to improve instruction. The three-year venture was called the Leadership for Learning Programme (LLP. A distinctive feature of the LLP was that it was based on a partnership between two universities, a local one with understanding of the local context of schools, and an international institution, which brought international expertise, experience and repute/branding. Both universities had a shared vision to contribute to the ailing South African school landscape by using leadership development to leverage change. The LLP was implemented in a single school district, where the overall learner performance was unsatisfactory. A qualitative approach was used to research this change intervention. One of the main findings was that collaboration between principals collectively and district officials, as well as among principals, was lacking. It is recommended that collaborative structures such as professional learning communities, networks and teams are established to reduce isolation and fragmented work practices in the school district. This may speed up system-wide change towards improved learner performance.

  18. A University-Level Curriculum in Climate Change for SE Asia and the Asian Pacific

    Furniss, M. J.; Saah, D. S.; Hines, S. J.; Radel, C. A.; McGroddy, M. E.; Ganz, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    A university-level curriculum has been developed for the SE Asia and Asia Pacific region and is currently being implemented by 12+ universities; in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia, and Papua New Guinea. The curriculum is supported by USAID (U.S. Agency for International Development) through the LEAF program (Lowering Emissions in Asian Forests), under the technical leadership of the U.S. Forest Service. Four modules have been developed: Basic Climate Change, Low-Emissions Land Use Planning, Social and Environmental Soundness, and Carbon Measurement and Monitoring. This presentation will focus on the Basic Climate Change module. This is a survey course that covers a wide range of climate change topics, including causes, effects, and responses. The level of detail in each of the covered topics is calibrated to current issues in the region. The module is elaborated in English and will be translated into the national language of the participating countries. The module is designed to be flexible and can be tailored to both degree and non-degree programs; as well as for trainings for natural resources professionals and policy-makers. Important training topics can be selected as short course trainings for practitioners and leaders working on climate change.

  19. Servant Leadership in Alabama's Regional Public Universities: The President's Role in Fostering Job Satisfaction

    Farris, Jimmy D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between two variables, "servant leadership" and "job satisfaction," among management, executive staff, and faculty at Alabama's five regional universities: Jacksonville State University, Troy University, the University of Montevallo, the University of North Alabama,…

  20. The Role of Electronic Reserves in Serving and Shaping New Teaching and Learning Environments in UK Universities.

    Dugdale, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Describes the ResIDe Electronic Reserve at the University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol, an example of an electronic reserve that has been addressing many access problems and supporting different teaching/learning initiatives. Discusses new roles for the ResIDe electronic library, electronic information management, new librarian roles, and…

  1. Bringing together the work of subscription and open access specialists: challenges and changes at the University of Sussex

    Eleanor Craig

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The rise in open access (OA publishing has required library staff across many UK academic institutions to take on new roles and responsibilities to support academics. At the same time, the long-established work of negotiating with publishers around journal subscriptions is changing as such deals now usually include OA payment or discount plans in many different forms that vary from publisher to publisher. This article outlines some of the issues we encountered at the University of Sussex Library whilst trying to pull together the newer strand of OA advocacy and funder compliance work with existing responsibilities for managing subscription deals. It considers the challenges faced in effectively bringing together Library staff with knowledge in these areas, and outlines the steps we have taken so far to ensure OA publishing is taken into account wherever appropriate.

  2. Energy Choices and Climate Change: A New Interactive Feature on Windows to the Universe

    Gardiner, L. S.; Russell, R. M.; Ward, D.; Johnson, R. M.; Henderson, S.; Foster, S. Q.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a new, self-paced online module to foster understanding of how choices made about energy production and energy use affect greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. The module, entitled “Energy Choices and Climate Change” is available on Windows to the Universe (www.windows.ucar.edu), an extensive educational Web site used by over 20 million people each year. “Energy Choices and Climate Change” provides a new way to look at issues related to energy and climate change, emphasizing the climate implications of the choices we make. “Energy Choices and Climate Change” allows users to explore two different scenarios through which they make decisions about energy production or use. In the “Ruler of the World” scenario, the user is given the authority to make decisions about the mix of energy sources that will be used worldwide with the aim of reducing emissions while meeting global energy demand and monitoring costs and societal implications. In “The Joules Family” scenario, the user makes decisions about how to change the way a hypothetical family of four uses energy at home and for transportation with the aim of reducing the family’s carbon emissions and fossil fuel use while keeping costs less than long-term savings. While this module is intended for a general public audience, an associated teacher’s guide provides support for secondary educators using the module with students. Windows to the Universe is a project of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Education and Outreach. Funding for the Energy Choices and Climate Change online module was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  3. The Role of Discussion Boards in a University Blended Learning Program

    Rosa Isabel González Moreno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussion boards as tools in blended English language learning programs have unique characteristics when compared to other synchronous and asynchronous communication tools that are different. Therefore, it is important to investigate the way they operate, their role within a given program and the students', teachers' and tutors' attitudes towards them. This paper contains the report of a study that took place in an English virtual program of a public university in Colombia. Students' surveys and reflections, the tutor's and teachers' interviews and reflections were used to collect data. The results showed the main advantages and disadvantages of the use of the tool as well as ideas for new proposals to improve their use and, therefore, increase the students' performance in the program.

  4. THE ROLE OF DUST IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE. I. PROTOGALAXY EVOLUTION

    Yamasawa, Daisuke; Habe, Asao; Kozasa, Takashi; Nozawa, Takaya; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    We develop one-zone galaxy formation models in the early universe, taking into account dust formation and evolution by supernova (SN) explosions. We focus on the time evolution of dust size distribution, because H 2 formation on the dust surface plays a critical role in the star formation process in the early universe. In the model, we assume that star formation rate (SFR) is proportional to the total amount of H 2 . We consistently treat (1) the formation and size evolution of dust, (2) the chemical reaction networks including H 2 formation both on the surface of dust and in gas phase, and (3) the SFR in the model. First, we find that, because of dust destruction due to both reverse and forward shocks driven by SNe, H 2 formation is more suppressed than in situations without such dust destruction. At the galaxy age of ∼0.8 Gyr, for galaxy models with virial mass M vir = 10 9 M sun and formation redshift z vir = 10, the molecular fraction is 2.5 orders of magnitude less in the model with dust destruction by both shocks than that in the model without dust destruction. Second, we show that the H 2 formation rate strongly depends on the interstellar medium (ISM) density around SN progenitors. The SFR in higher ISM density is lower, since dust destruction by reverse shocks is more effective in higher ISM density. We conclude that not only the amount but also the size distribution of dust related to star formation activity strongly affects the evolution of galaxies in the early universe.

  5. NASA's Universe of Learning: The Integral Role of Research Astronomers and Other Subject Matter Experts

    Lee, Janice; Universe of Learning Team

    2018-01-01

    Astronomy seeks to understand the workings of the Universe on its largest scales, and to answer fundamental questions about the story of our origins. The science of astronomy thus naturally lends itself to informal education and public outreach activities, as it broadly captures the human imagination. There are at least three overall goals for investment of resources in Astronomy E/PO: to interest students in pursuing STEM education and careers; to develop Astronomy as context for teaching more basic physical and computer science in service of US National Education Goals; to help motivate continued public support of federally funded Astronomy research and technology development. Providing a full spectrum of opportunities for the public to learn about recent Astronomy discoveries is key to achieving these societal goals. Thus, the E/PO professional community must have an understanding of recent scientific/technological results, and engage with the researchers who are creating new knowledge to explicate that knowledge to the public. It stands to reason that researchers (or “subject matter experts, SMEs”) must be involved in and remain connected to the E/PO endeavor. In this talk, I will describe how research astronomers and other SMEs play an integral role in a full range of informal education programming developed by the NASA Universe of Learning collaboration, and opportunities to get involved.

  6. Lifetime Traumatic Experiences and Disordered Eating among University Students: The Role of Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms

    Vilija Malinauskiene

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The associations between lifetime traumatic events (TEs, posttraumatic stress (PTS symptoms, and disordered eating (DE were studied in a sample of 614 university students (mean age 20 years. An anonymous questionnaire included 32 lifetime TEs, IES-revised measured PTS symptoms, and EAT-26 evaluated DE symptoms. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlations and structural equation models (SEM with bootstrapping method. Findings reveal the prevalence of DE in 8.1% of participants, while 73.9% of students experienced at least one lifetime TE. 52.0% of students with DE had PTS symptoms (p<0.0001 and 30.8% of students with lifetime TEs had PTS symptoms (p<0.001. In SEM, direct paths from lifetime TEs to PTS symptoms (0.38, p<0.0001 and from PTS symptoms to DE (0.40, p<0.0001 were observed. The final SEM confirmed the mediating role of PTS symptoms in the path between some TEs (traffic accident and seriously injured and DE among the university students. If PTS symptoms are associated with DE, then addressing PTS symptoms in the context of DE treatment may improve treatment efficacy.

  7. Change theory for accounting system reform in health sector: a case study of kerman university of medical sciences in iran.

    Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein; Emami, Mozhgan

    2013-11-01

    Change theories provide an opportunity for organizational managers to plan, monitor and evaluate changes using a framework which enable them, among others, to show a fast response to environmental fluctuations and to predict the changing patterns of individuals and technology. The current study aimed to explore whether the change in the public accounting system of the Iranian health sector has followed Kurt Lewin's change theory or not. This study which adopted a mixed methodology approach, qualitative and quantitative methods, was conducted in 2012. In the first phase of the study, 41 participants using purposive sampling and in the second phase, 32 affiliated units of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (KUMS) were selected as the study sample. Also, in phase one, we used face-to-face in-depth interviews (6 participants) and the quote method (35 participants) for data collection. We used a thematic framework analysis for analyzing data. In phase two, a questionnaire with a ten-point Likert scale was designed and then, data were analyzed using descriptive indicators, principal component and factorial analyses. The results of phase one yielded a model consisting of four categories of superstructure, apparent infrastructure, hidden infrastructure and common factors. By linking all factors, totally, 12 components based on the quantitative results showed that the state of all components were not satisfactory at KUMS (5.06±2.16). Leadership and management; and technology components played the lowest and the greatest roles in implementing the accrual accounting system respectively. The results showed that the unfreezing stage did not occur well and the components were immature, mainly because the emphasis was placed on superstructure components rather than the components of hidden infrastructure. The study suggests that a road map should be developed in the financial system based on Kurt Lewin's change theory and the model presented in this paper underpins the change

  8. Change Theory for Accounting System Reform in Health Sector: A Case Study of Kerman University of Medical Sciences in Iran

    Mohammad Hossein Mehrolhasani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundChange theories provide an opportunity for organizational managers to plan, monitor and evaluate changes using a framework which enable them, among others, to show a fast response to environmental fluctuations and to predict the changing patterns of individuals and technology. The current study aimed to explore whether the change in the public accounting system of the Iranian health sector has followed Kurt Lewin’s change theory or not. MethodsThis study which adopted a mixed methodology approach, qualitative and quantitative methods, was conducted in 2012. In the first phase of the study, 41 participants using purposive sampling and in the second phase, 32 affiliated units of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (KUMS were selected as the study sample. Also, in phase one, we used face-to-face in-depth interviews (6 participants and the quote method (35 participants for data collection. We used a thematic framework analysis for analyzing data. In phase two, a questionnaire with a ten-point Likert scale was designed and then, data were analyzed using descriptive indicators, principal component and factorial analyses. ResultsThe results of phase one yielded a model consisting of four categories of superstructure, apparent infrastructure, hidden infrastructure and common factors. By linking all factors, totally, 12 components based on the quantitative results showed that the state of all components were not satisfactory at KUMS (5.06±2.16. Leadership and management; and technology components played the lowest and the greatest roles in implementing the accrual accounting system respectively. ConclusionThe results showed that the unfreezing stage did not occur well and the components were immature, mainly because the emphasis was placed on superstructure components rather than the components of hidden infrastructure. The study suggests that a road map should be developed in the financial system based on Kurt Lewin’s change theory and

  9. The Role of the Internet in Changing Knowledge Ecologies

    Kalantzis, Mary

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available To a greater extent than is often acknowledged, the modern scientific and university-based knowledge system is a creature of the society of the printing press. Until the turn of the twentyfirst century, print was the medium of scholarly communication. Then, quite suddenly at the turn of the twenty-first century, digital text begins to displace print as the primary means of access to the knowledge of academicians. This article explores some of the consequences of this change. To what extent do digital technologies of representation and communication reproduce the knowledge systems of the half-millennium long history of the modern university or do they disrupt and transform them? To answer this question, this article will explore key aspects of contemporary transformations, not just in the textual forms of digital representation, but the emerging social forms that digitisation reflects, affords and supports. This we call the “social web”, a term we use to describe the kinds of relationships to knowledge and culture that are emerging in the era of pervasively interconnected computing. What, then, are the impacts and potentials of these changes on the processes of formation of new knowledge?Más allá de lo que suele admitirse, el moderno sistema de conocimiento científico y universitario es una creación de la sociedad de la imprenta. Antes de llegar el siglo XXI, la imprenta era el canal de comunicación académica. Entonces, de manera bastante repentina con el cambio de siglo, los textos digitales empezaron a sustituir a la imprenta como el medio principal por el que los académicos acceden al conocimiento. Este artículo analiza algunas de las consecuencias de este cambio. ¿Hasta qué punto las tecnologías digitales de representación y comunicación reproducen los sistemas de conocimiento utilizados en el último medio milenio de historia de la moderna universidad? ¿O quizás la interrumpen y la transforman? Para responder a esta

  10. Exploration of priority actions for strengthening the role of nurses in achieving universal health coverage.

    Maaitah, Rowaida Al; AbuAlRub, Raeda Fawzi

    2017-01-30

    to explore priority actions for strengthening the role of Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) towards the achievement of Universal Health Converge (UHC) as perceived by health key informants in Jordan. an exploratory qualitative design, using a semi-structured survey, was utilized. A purposive sample of seventeen key informants from various nursing and health care sectors was recruited for the purpose of the study. Content analysis utilizing the five-stage framework approach was used for data analysis. the findings revealed that policy and regulation, nursing education, research, and workforce were identified as the main elements that influence the role of APNs in contributing to the achievement of UHC. Priority actions were identified by the participants for the main four elements. study findings confirm the need to strengthen the role of APNs to achieve UHC through a major transformation in nursing education, practice, research, leadership, and regulatory system. Nurses should unite to come up with solid nursing competencies related to APNs, PHC, UHC, leadership and policy making to strengthen their position as main actors in influencing the health care system and evidence creation. analisar as ações prioritárias para o fortalecimento do papel da enfermeira em prática avançada na Cobertura Universal de Saúde , segundo a percepção dos informantes-chave na Jordânia. foi utilizado desenho qualitativo exploratório, com um questionário semiestruturado. A amostra intencional de dezessete informantes-chave de vários setores de enfermagem e de saúde foi recrutado para o propósito do estudo. A análise de conteúdo utilizando a abordagem do quadro de cinco estágios foi utilizada para a análise de dados. os resultados revelaram que as políticas e regulações, educação em enfermagem, pesquisa e força de trabalho foram identificados como os principais elementos que influenciam o papel da enfermeira em prática avançada em contribuir para a realização da

  11. The changing roles of community nurses: the case of health plan nurses in Israel.

    Nissanholtz-Gannot, Rachel; Rosen, Bruce; Hirschfeld, Miriam

    2017-12-23

    In Israel, approximately one-third of the country's nurses work in community settings - primarily as salaried employees in Israel's four non-profit health plans. Many health system leaders believe that the roles of health plan nurses have changed significantly in recent years due to a mix of universal developments (such as population aging and academization of the profession) and Israel-specific changes (such as the introduction of extensive quality monitoring in primary care). The main objectives of the study were to identify recent changes in the roles of health plan nurses and their current areas of activity. It also explored the experience of front-line nurses with regard to autonomy, work satisfaction, and barriers to further role development. The study integrated interviews and surveys of nurses and other professionals conducted across 4 years. Data generated from earlier study components were used to guide questions and focus for later components. In 2013, in-depth interviews were held with 55 senior nursing and medical professionals supplemented by interviews in mid-2017 with the head nurses in the four health plans. In addition, a national survey was conducted in 2014-5 among a representative sample of 1019 community nurses who work for the health plans and who are engaged in direct patient care. Six hundred ninety-two nurses responded to the survey, yielding a response rate of 69%. The survey sample consisted of an equal number of nurses from each health plan, and the observations were weighted accordingly. Senior professionals identified general themes associated with a shift in nursing roles, including a transition from reactive to initiated work, increased specialization, and a shifting of tasks from hospitals to community settings. They identified the current main areas of activity in the health plans as being: routine care, chronic care, health promotion, quality monitoring and improvement, specialized care (such as wound care), and home care. In

  12. Investigation of Exercise Self - Efficacy and Stage of Exercise Behavior Change in University Students

    Celal ORAL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to investigate self - efficacy and stage of exercise behavior change in students who were studying in school of physical education and sport (PES and students who were studying in other faculty and departments (OFD in Akdeniz University and to evaluate their sport participation habits. Par ticipants were 360 students who were studying in Akdeniz University. Stage of Exercise Behavior Change Questionnaire and Exercise Self - Efficacy Questionnaire were applied to the participants in classroom environment. Results: Results of statistical analyse s revealed that , 27.5 % of men and 19.2% of women were in preparation stage of exercise behavior. There were no significant differences between genders ( p>.05. According to the result of exercise self - efficacy analyses, there were no significant differen ces between male and female students ( p>.05. When examining exercise self - efficacy in student studying different department, there were significant differences between the PES and OFD students (p<.05. Discussion and According to the results o f present study, it was conclude that there were no significant gender differences in both exercise self - efficacy and stage of exercise behavior change. It was found that, PES students had significantly higher score in exercise self - efficacy and in highe r stage of exercise behavior than OFD students.

  13. Leadership lessons from curricular change at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine.

    Loeser, Helen; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Irby, David M

    2007-04-01

    After successive Liaison Committee on Medical Education accreditation reports that criticized the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine for lack of instructional innovation and curriculum oversight, the dean issued a mandate for curriculum reform in 1997. Could a medical school that prided itself on innovation in research and health care do the same in education? The authors describe their five-phase curriculum change process and correlate this to an eight-step leadership model. The first phase of curricular change is to establish a compelling need for change; it requires leaders to create a sense of urgency and build a guiding coalition to achieve action. The second phase of curriculum reform is to envision a bold new curriculum; leaders must develop such a vision and communicate it broadly. The third phase is to design curriculum and obtain the necessary approvals; this requires leaders to empower broad-based action and generate short-term wins. In the fourth phase, specific courses are developed for the new curriculum, and leaders continue to empower broad-based action, generate short-term wins, consolidate gains, and produce more change. During the fifth phase of implementation and evaluation, leaders need to further consolidate gains, produce more change, and anchor new approaches in the institution. Arising from this experience and the correlation of curricular change phases with leadership steps, the authors identify 27 specific leadership strategies they employed in their curricular reform process.

  14. A las puertas del cambio en la Formación Universitaria On the verge of change in University Education

    Ana María Escayola Maranges

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Los cambios sociales conducen a un nuevo planteamiento en la docencia universitaria. Es necesario un modelo educativo abierto para formar nuevos profesionales competentes, basado en la capacidad de aprender del alumno, de obtener información y de adaptarse a las situaciones de cambio que presenta la profesión. La planificación de programas educativos plantea nuevos roles en la función del docente y del alumno, exige cambios metodológicos en el proceso de aprendizaje, conllevando cambios en las estrategias educativas. La nuevas tecnologías de la información y comunicación son un elemento indispensable para promover el cambio, aunque no suficientes. El aprendizaje basado en problemas (ABP ha resultado un elemento innovador en el ámbito universitario, demostrando un aumento de la motivación para aprender, potenciando el trabajo grupal, incentivando la búsqueda de información, aumentado la comprensión y la memorización del conocimiento. A su vez, el ABP pone énfasis en la interdisciplinariedad, aumenta el espíritu de colaboración del estudiante y su nivel de responsabilidad en el aprendizaje. En el ámbito de las Ciencias de la Salud, los métodos de aprendizaje son claves en el proceso formativo de profesionales competentes, dada la estrecha vinculación entre el ámbito laboral y formativo.Changes in society as a whole oblige University education to introduce changes as well. In order to train well-equipped professionals, an open educational model is necessary, based on the ability of the student to learn, to obtain information, and to adapt to the changes inside the profession. The planning of learning programs involves new roles for the teacher and new functions for the student. It requires changes in methodology and in educational strategies. The new information and communication technologies are indispensable instruments for promoting these changes, but they are not enough in isolation. Problem-based learning (PBL is an

  15. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities.

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K; Martin, James D; Moldwin, Mark B; O'Dowd, Diane K; Posey, Lynmarie A; Smith, Tobin L; Miller, Emily R

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of undergraduate teaching across all disciplines, not only STEM fields, requires creating an environment wherein continuous improvement of teaching is valued, assessed, and rewarded at various stages of a faculty member's career. This requires consistent application of policies that reflect well-established best practices for evaluating teaching at the department, college, and university levels. Evidence shows most teaching evaluation practices do not reflect stated policies, even when the policies specifically espouse teaching as a value. Thus, alignment of practice to policy is a major barrier to establishing a culture in which teaching is valued. Situated in the context of current national efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education, including the Association of American Universities Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, this essay discusses four guiding principles for aligning practice with stated priorities in formal policies: 1) enhancing the role of deans and chairs; 2) effectively using the hiring process; 3) improving communication; and 4) improving the understanding of teaching as a scholarly activity. In addition, three specific examples of efforts to improve the practice of evaluating teaching are presented as examples: 1) Three Bucket Model of merit review at the University of California, Irvine; (2) Evaluation of Teaching Rubric, University of Kansas; and (3) Teaching Quality Framework, University of Colorado, Boulder. These examples provide flexible criteria to holistically evaluate and improve the quality of teaching across the diverse institutions comprising modern higher education. © 2017 M. Dennin et

  16. Capturing Tweets on Climate Change: What is the role of Twitter in Climate Change Communication?

    Ngo, A. M.; McNeal, K.; Luginbuhl, S.; Enteen, J.

    2015-12-01

    events and interpreted why these tweets may have persisted in the twitter space. From our observations, we provide some best practices in how to create climate messages that have high reach and longevity in order to assist climate change communicators in understanding the role Twitter plays in regard to climate change discourse and how to most efficiently utilize it.

  17. Beliefs of Chilean University English Teachers: Uncovering Their Role in the Teaching and Learning Process

    Díaz Larenas Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Beliefs continue to be an important source to get to know teachers’ thinking processes and pedagogical decisions. Research in teachers’ beliefs has traditionally come from English-speaking contexts; however, a great deal of scientific work has been written lately in Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, and Argentina. This study elicits 30 Chilean university teachers’ beliefs about their own role in the teaching and learning of English in university environments. Through a qualitative research design, the data collected from interviews and journals were analyzed, triangulated, and categorized based on semantic content analysis. Results of the study indicate that university teachers reveal challenging and complex views about what it is like to teach English as a foreign language in a university context in Chile. The article concludes with a call to reflect on the importance of beliefs unravelling in teacher education programmes.Las creencias continúan siendo una fuente de importancia para conocer los procesos de pensamiento y los estilos pedagógicos de los docentes. Los estudios sobre las creencias docentes provienen en su mayoría de contextos angloparlantes; sin embargo, en los últimos años se ha escrito una gran cantidad de trabajos científicos en Brasil, México, Colombia y Argentina. Este estudio recoge las creencias de treinta docentes universitarios chilenos sobre su papel en la enseñanza y aprendizaje del inglés en ambientes universitarios. A partir de un diseño de investigación cualitativo, los datos recolectados por medio de entrevistas y diarios personales fueron analizados, triangulados y categorizados según el análisis de contenido semántico. Los resultados indicaron que los docentes de educación superior tienen visiones desafiantes y complejas sobre lo que significa enseñar inglés como lengua extranjera en un contexto universitario en Chile. El artículo concluye con una invitación a reflexionar sobre la importancia de

  18. Facilitating the Concept of Universal Design Among Design Students - Changes in Teaching in the Last Decade.

    Vavik, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This short paper describes and reflects on how the teaching of the concept of Universal Design (UD) has developed in the last decade at the Institute of Design at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO). Four main changes are described. Firstly, the curriculum has evolved from teaching guidelines and principles to focusing on design processes. Secondly, an increased emphasis is put on cognitive accessibility. Thirdly, non-stigmatizing aesthetics expressions and solutions that communicate through different senses have become more important subjects. Fourthly the teaching of UD has moved from the second to the first year curriculum.

  19. The moderating role of emotional competence in suicidal ideation among Chinese university students.

    Kwok, Sylvia Y C L

    2014-04-01

    To explore the relationship among perceived family functioning, emotional competence and suicidal ideation and to examine the moderating role of emotional competence in suicidal ideation. Previous studies have highlighted that poor family relationships and emotional symptoms are significant predictors of suicidal ideation. However, the roles of perceived family functioning and emotional competence in predicting suicidal ideation have not been given adequate attention. A cross-sectional survey using convenience sampling. A questionnaire was administered to 302 university students from February-April in 2011 in Hong Kong. The means, standard deviations and Cronbach's alphas of the variables were computed. Pearson correlation analyses and hierarchical regression analyses were performed. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that perceived high family functioning and emotional competence were significant negative predictors of suicidal ideation. Further analyses showed that parental concern, parental control and creative use of emotions were significant predictors of suicidal ideation. Emotional competence, specifically creative use of emotions, was found to moderate the relationship between perceived family functioning and suicidal ideation. The findings support the family ecological framework and provide evidence for emotional competence as a resilience factor that buffers low family functioning on suicidal ideation. Suggested measures to decrease suicidal ideation include enhancing parental concern, lessening parental control, developing students' awareness, regulation and management of their own emotions, fostering empathy towards others' emotional expression, enhancing social skills in sharing and influencing others' emotions and increasing the positive use of emotions for the evaluation and generation of new ideas. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Role of climate change in reforestation and nursery practices

    Mary I. Williams; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystems have been adjusting to changes in climate over time, but projections are that future global climate will change at rates faster than that previously experienced in geologic time. It is not necessarily the amount of change, but rather this rate of change that is most threatening to plant species - the climate appears to be changing faster than plants can...

  1. View changes and educational demands on sexual/reproductive health of students at Shanghai Jiaotong University.

    Wang, Hongxiang; Chen, Bin; Xu, Yong; Miao, Qing; Wu, Zhenming; Ju, Qiang; Huang, Yiran

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the attitudes to sexual and reproductive health of a cohort of university students had changed from 2005 to 2013. Questionnaires (1,000) on sexual and reproductive health attitudes were randomly distributed to students at Shanghai Jiaotong University in May 2013. All participants volunteered for the study and their answers were anonymous. The questionnaire contents included personal information and 72 MCQs, which covered four categories: knowledge about sexual/reproductive health and STDs; attitude to sexual behavior; attitudes to pornographic books/movies; desire of the participants for education on sexual/reproductive health. The participants had not received sexual/reproductive health education since their admission to the university. Their study majors were broadly similar to those participants in the April 2005 survey. The high sensitivity of the content of the questionnaire made it imperative to maintain anonymity and high security of the collected data. The return rate of questionnaires were 98% (request age from 19~21 years). Personal hygiene was much greater in females than in males. The proportion of females and males who held a positive attitude to premarital sexual behavior was significantly increased (P education should be based on the actual needs of young people, teaching reforms, and special attention paid to practical teaching.

  2. Cognitive Investments in Academic Success: The Role of Need for Cognition at University

    Julia Grass

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that Need for Cognition (NFC, the individual tendency to engage in and enjoy cognitive endeavors, contributes to academic performance. Most studies on NFC and related constructs have thereby focused on grades to capture tertiary academic success. This study aimed at a more comprehensive approach on NFC's meaning to success in university. We examined not only performance but also rather affective indicators of success. The current sample consisted of 396 students of different subjects with a mean age of 24 years (139 male. All participants took part in an online survey that assessed NFC together with school performance and further personality variables via self-report. Success in university was comprehensively operationalized including performance, satisfaction with one's studies, and thoughts about quitting/changing one's major as indicators. The value of NFC in predicting tertiary academic success was examined with correlation analyses and path analysis. NFC significantly correlated with all success variables with the highest correlation for study satisfaction. Path analysis confirmed the importance of NFC for study satisfaction showing that NFC had a significant direct effect on study satisfaction and via this variable also a significant indirect effect on termination thoughts. This study clearly indicates that NFC broadly contributes to the mastery of academic requirements and that it is worthwhile to intensify research on NFC in the context of tertiary education.

  3. The role of expectations in patients' hospital assessments: a Turkish university hospital example.

    Bakar, Coskun; Akgün, H Seval; Al Assaf, A F

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to conduct a preliminary assessment of patient attitudes regarding important aspects of service dimensions using SERVQUAL. The SERVQUAL scale is routinely used at the Baskent University Hospitals Network, Turkey. The study consisted of 550 randomly chosen patients who presented to any member of the hospital network during January and February 2006 and received treatment as inpatients or outpatients at those healthcare facilities. The patients' perceived scores were higher than expected for an ordinary hospital but lower than expected for a high-quality hospital. Young patients had a high-expected service score gap and a low adequate service score difference. Highly educated patients had a high-expected service score difference. Uninsured patients had a low adequate service score difference. Baskent University multidisciplinary healthcare teams have performed periodic patient satisfaction surveys in order to identify strengths and problem areas, formulate the quality improvement objectives and monitor progress towards achieving these objectives. However, patient satisfaction survey results are often highly positive. In these cases, improving care is not easy because measures are not sensitive enough to changes. Therefore a more sensitive measurement tool based on the SERVQUAL scale was developed. The authors believe that patient opinions are extremely important because they provide information that is not necessarily emphasized by managers or health care professionals, resulting in a more complete assessment of past performance and a clearer road map for future action.

  4. Role of social science in global environmental change: case of urbanisation

    Njiro, E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available the role of social scientists in global environmental change by examining urbanisation and other environmental changes as suggested in the science plan of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP 2005)...

  5. Frequency of employer changes and their financial return: gender differences amongst German university graduates.

    Wieschke, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    Gender differences in the frequency of employer changes and their financial return were examined in a sample of Bavarian university graduates. The search and matching theories were used to develop hypotheses which were then tested against each other. The results show that in the first few years after graduation women change employer more frequently than men. In large part this can be explained by gender differences in labor market structures, in particular the fact that a woman's first job is less likely to be in a large company, in an executive position or on a permanent contract and women tend to be less satisfied with their first job. After controlling for variance in these factors the coefficient changes sign, indicating that under similar circumstances men change employer more often. Furthermore, both men and women benefit financially from changing employer. The absolute return is higher for men, but as men tend to have a higher starting salary there is no gender difference in the relative return and hence no effect on the gender gap. The results are also discussed in the light of the specifics of the structure of the German labor market.

  6. Longitudinal changes in extended roles in radiography: A new perspective

    Price, R.C. [School of Paramedic Sciences, Physiotherapy and Radiography, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: r.c.price@herts.ac.uk; Le Masurier, S.B. [University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to update data on the scope of changes to radiographic practice since the principal author's last survey in 2000. The study also sought to identify any regional patterns in the adoption and diffusion of extended roles and to map the implementation of the 4-tier structure. Method: Structured questionnaires were sent to radiology managers at acute National Health Service (NHS) trusts across the United Kingdom. Information sought included region, teaching/non-teaching status, the nature of extended role tasks undertaken and the year in which these tasks were adopted, numbers of radiographers and radiologists in post. Information was also sought on the implementation of the '4-tier structure'. Results: Some 177 questionnaires were returned from a total of 258 dispatched giving a 68.6% response rate. In 166 trusts, radiographers administered intravenous injections; they performed barium enemas in 147 trusts and barium meals in 19 trusts, while a red dot system was in operation in 143 trusts. Each category showed an increase from that reported in 2000. Likewise reporting by radiographers had increased since 2000. Responses indicated that at 146 trusts, radiographers were reporting in ultrasound; reporting of the appendicular skeleton was undertaken at 81 trusts and axial skeletal reporting at 70 trusts. Barium enemas were reported by radiographers in 78 trusts. Reporting was also undertaken by radiographers on barium meals, mammography, nuclear medicine, paediatric and chest radiography; and all showed an increase in frequency since 2000. Regional differences were again apparent in reporting, with a greater prevalence in the English regions, with the exception of London. In respect of the 4-tier structure, 59% of the sample employed assistant practitioners, 47% advanced practitioners and 3% employed consultants. The numbers reported in each category (excluding practitioners) were 158 assistants, 623 advanced

  7. Longitudinal changes in extended roles in radiography: A new perspective

    Price, R.C.; Le Masurier, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to update data on the scope of changes to radiographic practice since the principal author's last survey in 2000. The study also sought to identify any regional patterns in the adoption and diffusion of extended roles and to map the implementation of the 4-tier structure. Method: Structured questionnaires were sent to radiology managers at acute National Health Service (NHS) trusts across the United Kingdom. Information sought included region, teaching/non-teaching status, the nature of extended role tasks undertaken and the year in which these tasks were adopted, numbers of radiographers and radiologists in post. Information was also sought on the implementation of the '4-tier structure'. Results: Some 177 questionnaires were returned from a total of 258 dispatched giving a 68.6% response rate. In 166 trusts, radiographers administered intravenous injections; they performed barium enemas in 147 trusts and barium meals in 19 trusts, while a red dot system was in operation in 143 trusts. Each category showed an increase from that reported in 2000. Likewise reporting by radiographers had increased since 2000. Responses indicated that at 146 trusts, radiographers were reporting in ultrasound; reporting of the appendicular skeleton was undertaken at 81 trusts and axial skeletal reporting at 70 trusts. Barium enemas were reported by radiographers in 78 trusts. Reporting was also undertaken by radiographers on barium meals, mammography, nuclear medicine, paediatric and chest radiography; and all showed an increase in frequency since 2000. Regional differences were again apparent in reporting, with a greater prevalence in the English regions, with the exception of London. In respect of the 4-tier structure, 59% of the sample employed assistant practitioners, 47% advanced practitioners and 3% employed consultants. The numbers reported in each category (excluding practitioners) were 158 assistants, 623 advanced practitioners and six

  8. The role of large-scale, extratropical dynamics in climate change

    Shepherd, T.G.

    1994-02-01

    The climate modeling community has focused recently on improving our understanding of certain processes, such as cloud feedbacks and ocean circulation, that are deemed critical to climate-change prediction. Although attention to such processes is warranted, emphasis on these areas has diminished a general appreciation of the role played by the large-scale dynamics of the extratropical atmosphere. Lack of interest in extratropical dynamics may reflect the assumption that these dynamical processes are a non-problem as far as climate modeling is concerned, since general circulation models (GCMs) calculate motions on this scale from first principles. Nevertheless, serious shortcomings in our ability to understand and simulate large-scale dynamics exist. Partly due to a paucity of standard GCM diagnostic calculations of large-scale motions and their transports of heat, momentum, potential vorticity, and moisture, a comprehensive understanding of the role of large-scale dynamics in GCM climate simulations has not been developed. Uncertainties remain in our understanding and simulation of large-scale extratropical dynamics and their interaction with other climatic processes, such as cloud feedbacks, large-scale ocean circulation, moist convection, air-sea interaction and land-surface processes. To address some of these issues, the 17th Stanstead Seminar was convened at Bishop's University in Lennoxville, Quebec. The purpose of the Seminar was to promote discussion of the role of large-scale extratropical dynamics in global climate change. Abstracts of the talks are included in this volume. On the basis of these talks, several key issues emerged concerning large-scale extratropical dynamics and their climatic role. Individual records are indexed separately for the database

  9. Village midwives and their changing roles in Brunei Darussalam: A qualitative study.

    Abdul-Mumin, Khadizah Haji

    2016-10-01

    There are lay midwives worldwide, interchangeably and universally called traditional birth attendants or traditional midwives by organisations such as the World Health Organization and the International Confederation of Midwives. This study aimed to explore the history of lay midwives (village midwives) in Brunei, describe the evolution from their previous to current roles and determine if they are still needed by women today. This qualitative, descriptive study included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with eight women who had received care from village midwives. Data analysis was based on the principles underpinning thematic analysis and used a constant comparative method. Village midwives have been popular in Brunei since the 1900s, with their major role being to assist women with childbirth. However, since the 1960s, their roles and practices have changed to focus on pre-conception, antenatal, postnatal and women's general healthcare. Traditional practices were influenced by religion, culture and the social context of and within Brunei. The major changes in village midwives' roles and practices resulted from the enforcement of the Brunei Midwives' Act in 1956. Village midwives' traditional practices became juxtaposed with modern complementary alternative medicine practices, and they began charging a fee for their services. Brunei village midwives are trusted by women, and their practices may still be widely accepted in Brunei. Further research is necessary to confirm their existence, determine the detailed scope and appropriateness of their practices and verify the feasibility of them working together with healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of large-scale, extratropical dynamics in climate change

    Shepherd, T.G. [ed.

    1994-02-01

    The climate modeling community has focused recently on improving our understanding of certain processes, such as cloud feedbacks and ocean circulation, that are deemed critical to climate-change prediction. Although attention to such processes is warranted, emphasis on these areas has diminished a general appreciation of the role played by the large-scale dynamics of the extratropical atmosphere. Lack of interest in extratropical dynamics may reflect the assumption that these dynamical processes are a non-problem as far as climate modeling is concerned, since general circulation models (GCMs) calculate motions on this scale from first principles. Nevertheless, serious shortcomings in our ability to understand and simulate large-scale dynamics exist. Partly due to a paucity of standard GCM diagnostic calculations of large-scale motions and their transports of heat, momentum, potential vorticity, and moisture, a comprehensive understanding of the role of large-scale dynamics in GCM climate simulations has not been developed. Uncertainties remain in our understanding and simulation of large-scale extratropical dynamics and their interaction with other climatic processes, such as cloud feedbacks, large-scale ocean circulation, moist convection, air-sea interaction and land-surface processes. To address some of these issues, the 17th Stanstead Seminar was convened at Bishop`s University in Lennoxville, Quebec. The purpose of the Seminar was to promote discussion of the role of large-scale extratropical dynamics in global climate change. Abstracts of the talks are included in this volume. On the basis of these talks, several key issues emerged concerning large-scale extratropical dynamics and their climatic role. Individual records are indexed separately for the database.

  11. CHANGES OF LEARNERS’ SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONTEXT AFTER COMPLETING A PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FROM BANGLADESH OPEN UNIVERSITY

    A. K. M. Iftekhar KHALID

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Creating same opportunity in term of social and economic context for the learners of distance education as the students from conventional education is a challenging task since professional education through distance method is a new genre in Bangladesh. This genre of professional education starts successfully with the establishment of the Bangladesh Open University (BOU in 1992. The university creates immense opportunities to study anytime and anywhere. This paper explains what social and economic changes happened to the students who completed a professional programme like B.Ag.Ed, MBA, CEMBA and CEMPA at the Bangladesh Open University. As BOU is the first and pioneer organization, which provides education in distance mode, a study has been necessary for BOU to know what contribution it provides to the nation in social and economic aspects. This paper should be able to elevate the morale of the organizations like BOU in involving more effort for expanding the organization and also to understand how successful these organization in imparting the knowledge and skill and how effectively the students are able to use those knowledge and skill in their professional life which in turn affects the learners’ income and social esteem. The university has been established with aims to raise the standard of education and to give the people educational opportunities by democratizing education and to create a class of competent people by raising the standard of education of the people generally. The paper also shows how the professional programmes of BOU supports to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in Bangladesh.

  12. Moses as a role model in the Serbia charters after 1371 changing patterns

    Vujošević Žarko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aspects of the Old Testament figure of Moses highlighted in the charters of post-Nemanjić Serbia, or under the Lazarević and Branković dynasties (1371-1459, testify to a changed attitude towards Old Testament role models. While members of the Nemanjić house such as the archbishop Sava I and the rulers Stefan of Dečani and Dušan look up to Moses as a "religious leader", a prayerful intercessor before God and a victorious warrior, all of that for the sake of the "chosen" people, the role he is assigned in the arengae of the charters issued by prince Lazar and despots Stefan Lazarević and Đurađ Branković is completely different. In the universal Christian context of the post-1371 arengae Moses figures as a "prophet" and the builder of the Tabernacle - a prefiguration of the Church, thereby epitomizing a major stage in the salvation history of humankind. The role of Moses, as well as that of David, the only other Old Testament figure still referred to in the charters of the period, has a universal ecclesiologically interpreted, significance. This new pattern of interpreting Moses implies that the ruler’s main virtue now becomes his concern for the "true faith" and the houses of God. The practice of the Nemanjićs as regards selection and interpretation of Old Testament themes is reestablished by the titular despots of the Branković dynasty. In their charters, the first part of the Bible with Moses as a popular leader reassumes a "national" character and becomes part of the ideological apparatus intended to posit the Serbs as a "New Israel".

  13. Psychologicai study on independence consciousness of chinese female university students : Applying Cinderella Complex Scales and of Women's Social Roles

    鄭, 艶花; Zheng, Yanhua

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze and clarify the independence consciousness of female university students of China applying psychological research methods. In the course of the study a questionnaire research was conducted on eighty three Chinese female university students with regard to the scales of Cinderella complex and the social role attitudes. Firstly the results indicate positive correlations between the independent variable of "defend-family-traditionalism factor" with three fa...

  14. The role of grasslands in food security and climate change.

    O'Mara, F P

    2012-11-01

    Grasslands are a major part of the global ecosystem, covering 37 % of the earth's terrestrial area. For a variety of reasons, mostly related to overgrazing and the resulting problems of soil erosion and weed encroachment, many of the world's natural grasslands are in poor condition and showing signs of degradation. This review examines their contribution to global food supply and to combating climate change. Grasslands make a significant contribution to food security through providing part of the feed requirements of ruminants used for meat and milk production. Globally, this is more important in food energy terms than pig meat and poultry meat. Grasslands are considered to have the potential to play a key role in greenhouse gas mitigation, particularly in terms of global carbon storage and further carbon sequestration. It is estimated that grazing land management and pasture improvement (e.g. through managing grazing intensity, improved productivity, etc) have a global technical mitigation potential of almost 1·5 Gt CO(2) equivalent in 2030, with additional mitigation possible from restoration of degraded lands. Milk and meat production from grassland systems in temperate regions has similar emissions of carbon dioxide per kilogram of product as mixed farming systems in temperate regions, and, if carbon sinks in grasslands are taken into account, grassland-based production systems can be as efficient as high-input systems from a greenhouse gas perspective. Grasslands are important for global food supply, contributing to ruminant milk and meat production. Extra food will need to come from the world's existing agricultural land base (including grasslands) as the total area of agricultural land has remained static since 1991. Ruminants are efficient converters of grass into humanly edible energy and protein and grassland-based food production can produce food with a comparable carbon footprint as mixed systems. Grasslands are a very important store of carbon, and

  15. Changing Structures and Women’s Role as Labor Force

    Lena Gonäs

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze changes in the development of women’s role as labor force over a 40-year period. This is done by presenting research results that concern the restructuring of the labor market over different time periods. The empirical material is from the 1960s, the heyday of the Swedish model; from the 1980s, the period that economic historians label the third industrial revolution; and from the 1990s, a period labeled the new working life that is covering the reorganization of the public sector. For the first period results from restructuring in the shipyard industry are presented as well as employment outcomes for single individuals. This industry was male dominated with very few women employed, but regional policy measures were implemented to reach a latent female labor force. The second period is covered by a study of closures and cutbacks in different industries in Sweden during 1982–1983. The proportion of women employed in the industries studied was around one third and employment outcomes had a specific gendered pattern. Women did to a lower extent than men get new permanent jobs. Permanent temporariness was introduced as a concept to describe their labor market situation. The recession that one decade later hit both female- and male-dominated sectors is illustrated by a study of the relations between labor market attachment, working life, and family conditions. The material comes from a regional research program based on a questionnaire and on register data on incomes from 1990 to 1999. The paper analyzes several areas related to work and outside of work that indicate a gendered pattern of multidimensional subordination and an increased polarization in terms of both gender and class. In conclusion, the 40 years has been a period of dramatic change in women’s situation as labor force. In times of restructuring they often entered into precarious job situations or unemployment. Women’s double burden

  16. View changes and educational demands on sexual/reproductive health of students at Shanghai Jiaotong University

    Wang, Hongxiang; Chen, Bin; Xu, Yong; Miao, Qing; Wu, Zhenming; Ju, Qiang; Huang, Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether the attitudes to sexual and reproductive health of a cohort of university students had changed from 2005 to 2013. Methods: Questionnaires (1,000) on sexual and reproductive health attitudes were randomly distributed to students at Shanghai Jiaotong University in May 2013. All participants volunteered for the study and their answers were anonymous. The questionnaire contents included personal information and 72 MCQs, which covered four categories: knowledge about sexual/reproductive health and STDs; attitude to sexual behavior; attitudes to pornographic books/movies; desire of the participants for education on sexual/reproductive health. The participants had not received sexual/reproductive health education since their admission to the university. Their study majors were broadly similar to those participants in the April 2005 survey. The high sensitivity of the content of the questionnaire made it imperative to maintain anonymity and high security of the collected data. Results: The return rate of questionnaires were 98% (request age from 19~21 years). Personal hygiene was much greater in females than in males. The proportion of females and males who held a positive attitude to premarital sexual behavior was significantly increased (P < 0.0001). 80% of the participants understood the need to use condoms with strangers; however, still high proportion of participants lacked of this knowledge (P = 0.142). About one third of the participants still did not believe that unmarried pregnancy was acceptable (no significant change from 2005 to 2013). There was significantly improved knowledge about the way in which AIDS spreads. Conclusions: College students are more open today compared to the 2003 survey. A higher level of sexual knowledge has been achieved but there scope for further improvement. Sex education should be based on the actual needs of young people, teaching reforms, and special attention paid to practical teaching. PMID

  17. Changing Trends in Nutritional Behavior among University Students in Greece, between 2006 and 2016

    Tsakoumaki, Foteini; Fotiou, Maria; Dimitropoulou, Aristea; Symeonidou, Maria; Menexes, Georgios; Biliaderis, Costas G.; Michaelidou, Alexandra-Maria

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present survey was to study the dietary behavior of university students residing away from the family home. In this context, we (a) compared their dietary habits in two time periods, namely 2006 and 2016; and (b) explored the possible impact of gender on the behavioral changes in nutritional choices. A total of four hundred and five university students (2006, n = 242; 2016, n = 163) participated in the study. Dietary assessment was carried out using a qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaire, while data about demographic and lifestyle factors were also collected. Students’ dietary habits have been modified in a generally desirable direction, as reflected, e.g., in the elevated consumption of several plant-based foods. Gender was also significantly associated with Body Mass Index (BMI) and changes in dietary attitudes. Possible reasons for the transition towards healthier and more balanced dietary habits could involve the budgetary constraints facing Greece in the last decade, as well as increasing nutritional awareness and other socio-cultural factors characterizing this target group. A deeper understanding of these relations would be crucial to foster nutritional education and further enhance the effectiveness of health promotion campaigns. PMID:29320449

  18. Dynamic Undergraduate Climate Change Affinity Program: University of Delaware Climate Program for Undergraduates (CPUG)

    Merrill, J.

    2017-12-01

    Multidisciplinary undergraduate climate change education is critical for students entering any sector of the workforce. The University of Delaware has developed a new interdisciplinary affinity program—UD Climate Program for Undergraduates (CPUG)—open to undergraduate students of all majors to provide a comprehensive educational experience designed to educate skilled climate change problem-solvers for a wide range of professional careers. The program is designed to fulfill all General Education requirements, and includes a residential community commitment and experiential learning in community outreach and problem solving. Seminars will introduce current popular press and research materials and provide practice in confirming source credibility, communications training, and psychological support, as well as team building. As undergraduates, members of the UD CPUG team will define, describe, and develop a solution or solutions for a pressing local climate challenge that has the potential for global impact. The choice of a challenge and approach to addressing it will be guided by the student's advisor. Students are expected to develop a practical, multidisciplinary solution to address the challenge as defined, using their educational and experiential training. Solutions will be presented to the UD community during the spring semester of their senior year, as a collaborative team solution, with enhancement through individual portfolios from each team member. The logic model, structure, curricular and co-curricular supports for the CPUG will be provided. Mechanisms of support available through University administration will also be discussed.

  19. The role of lifestyle change in health promotion

    Mirela Manuela GHEORGHE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are experiencing a period where we are faced with rising healthcare costs, as well as an increased disease impact on the entire population of the country. Although the slogan “prevention is cheaper than cure” may seem old-fashioned, however, it is more true than ever. It is necessary to offer health education and also to promote health care in Romania, in accordance with the international standards, as adopted by the European Union. Health Promotion is the art and science of helping people change their lifestyle in order to achieve a state of optimal health, restoring the harmony at all levels of human existence. Promoting a lifestyle which given certain conditions maximizes health, welfare and human fulfilment represents a goal that does not belong exclusively to the health sector; all fields of activity, all those sectors that define the life of an individual or a community are essential parts of achieving a healthy lifestyle. Modern men adopt a lifestyle where sedentary life, overeating, smoking, erratic working hours and alcohol use are common behaviours. Therefore, they become vulnerable to a new class of diseases of multi-factorial aetiology where the lifestyle plays a prominent role. Although the lifestyle may be complex, it is still under personal control and lead by the ability to choose extensively, which can be of benefit to the person's life and health. Choices regarding health involve more than objective information. Health education should be an ongoing concern for health professionals and health educators, psychologists, sociologists, family, for those who through effective collaboration contribute to ensuring physical and mental health in the community, in the increasingly demanding conditions of the modern life, which raise difficult issues regarding human adaptability.

  20. Mitigating climate change: Decomposing the relative roles of energy conservation, technological change, and structural shift

    Mishra, Gouri Shankar; Zakerinia, Saleh; Yeh, Sonia; Teter, Jacob; Morrison, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    We decompose the contribution of five drivers of energy use and CO 2 emissions reductions in achieving climate change goals over 2005–2100 for various climate policy scenarios. This study contributes to the decomposition literature in three ways. First, it disaggregates drivers of energy demand into technological progress and demand for energy services, represented in terms of useful energy, allowing us to estimate their contributions independently — an improvement over other economy-wide decomposition studies. Secondly, this approach reduces the ambiguity present in many previous measures of structural change. We delineate structural shifts into two separate measures: changes in fuel mix within a given resource or service pathway; and changes in mix among distinct energy resources or end-use services. Finally, this study applies decomposition methods to energy and emission trajectories from two mutually informing perspectives: (i) primary energy resources — crude oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and renewables; and (ii) end-uses of energy services — residential and commercial buildings, industry, and transportation. Our results show that technological improvements and energy conservation are important in meeting climate goals in the first half of the coming century; and that nuclear and renewable energy and CCS technology are crucial in meeting more stringent goals in the second half of the century. We examine the relative roles of the drivers in reducing CO 2 emissions separately for developed and developing regions. Although the majority of energy and emission growth – and by extension the greatest opportunities for mitigation – will occur in developing countries, the decomposition shows that the relative roles of the five drivers are broadly consistent between these two regions. - Highlights: • We decompose the contribution of five drivers of energy use and CO2 emissions reductions in achieving climate change goals • We analyze differences

  1. The role of critical thinking skills and learning styles of university students in their academic performance

    GHAZIVAKILI, ZOHRE; NOROUZI NIA, ROOHANGIZ; PANAHI, FARIDE; KARIMI, MEHRDAD; GHOLSORKHI, HAYEDE; AHMADI, ZARRIN

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Current world needs people who have a lot of different abilities such as cognition and application of different ways of thinking, research, problem solving, critical thinking skills and creativity. In addition to critical thinking, learning styles is another key factor which has an essential role in the process of problem solving. This study aimed to determine the relationship between learning styles and critical thinking of students and their academic performance in Alborz University of Medical Science. Methods: This cross-correlation study was performed in 2012, on 216 students of Alborz University who were selected randomly by the stratified random sampling. The data was obtained via a three-part questionnaire included demographic data, Kolb standardized questionnaire of learning style and California critical thinking standardized questionnaire. The academic performance of the students was extracted by the school records. The validity of the instruments was determined in terms of content validity, and the reliability was gained through internal consistency methods. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.78 for the California critical thinking questionnaire. The Chi Square test, Independent t-test, one way ANOVA and Pearson correlation test were used to determine relationship between variables. The Package SPSS14 statistical software was used to analyze data with a significant level of pcritical thinking of the students showed that the mean of deductive reasoning and evaluation skills were higher than that of other skills and analytical skills had the lowest mean and there was a positive significant relationship between the students’ performance with inferential skill and the total score of critical thinking skills (pcritical thinking had significant difference between different learning styles. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the learning styles, critical thinking and academic performance are significantly associated

  2. The role of Decentralized Distributed Generation in achieving universal rural electrification in South Asia by 2030

    Narula, Kapil; Nagai, Yu; Pachauri, Shonali

    2012-01-01

    This study is motivated by the goal of achieving ‘Universal Energy Access’ by 2030 and looks at electricity access for rural households in the South Asian region. The ‘MESSAGE-Access’ model is employed to assess the cost effectiveness of centralized and Decentralized Distributed Generation (DDG) technologies. Delivery mechanisms are modelled to include mini-grid and stand-alone systems and the analysis includes an estimation of rural household electricity demand from lighting and appliances. We assume two future demand scenarios with a ‘minimum threshold’ and a ‘higher threshold’ of electricity consumption of 65 and 420 kW h per household per year, respectively. We find that the cost of delivering electricity by centralized generation and grid distribution is up to four times the cost of stand-alone and mini-grid DDG options in the case of ‘minimum threshold’ demand scenario. These results are robust to alternate assumptions regarding costs of technologies. We also estimate that public subsidy bill for kerosene can be substantially reduced if all households switch to electricity as their primary source of lighting. Thus, promoting DDG options can reduce capital investments needed to meet access goals significantly and have an important role to play, in meeting the goal of universal electrification by 2030. - Highlights: ► We model and assess DDG options for rural electrification in South Asia. ► Particularly, when demand is low, off-grid and mini-grid are least cost options for electrification. ► DDG options can be 3–4 times cheaper than extending a central grid. ► Kerosene lighting is up to 6 times as expensive as electric lighting. ► If electricity replaces kerosene for lighting, large subsidy savings can be realized.

  3. Surgical management of diabetic foot and role of UT (University of Texas) classification

    Mishwani, A.H.; Kiyani, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of University of Texas Classification in the management of Diabetic foot. Design: Descriptive study Place and Duration of Study: Surgical unit II Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi (2003 to 2008) and Department of Surgery Combined Military Hospital Peshawar (July 2008 to Jan 2010). Patients and Method: A total of 300 patients who reported to Surgical Department with a foot ulcer or infection and diagnosed to have Diabetes Mellitus were studied. Patients of both gender and age >12 years were included. Patients of end stage renal disease, compromised immunity or on steroid therapy were excluded. Detailed history and clinical examination were recorded. Routine investigations including complete blood examination, urine routine examination, renal function tests, x-ray foot, chest x-ray, ECG and pus for culture and sensitivity were recorded. Lesions were classified according to University of Texas classification and treated accordingly. Results: Majority of the patients were of 50 to 70 years age group. Male to female ratio was 4:1. Big toe was the commonest site followed by fore foot and heel. Patients were classified according to UT classification. Patients were managed with antibiotics, dressings, incision and drainage, debridement, vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with or without skin grafting and amputations of different types. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest isolate. Conclusion: Our study has shown that UT classification is an effective system of assessing the severity of Diabetic foot at the time of presentation and planning its management. Amputation rates, time of healing and morbidity increases with increasing stage and grade. (author)

  4. The Role of University Partners in the Innovation Adoption Process to Rice Seed Farmers in Aceh Province

    Setia Budi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of university partners in the innovation adoption process in the implementation of agricultural extension is very necessary to get attention to realize the success of empowering rice seed farmers. The purpose of this research is (1 to know the role of universities in the process of adopting innovation in IPB 3S seedling in Aceh Province, (2 to know the perception of farmers toward the characteristics of the innovation of IPB 3S varieties, and (3 to know the role of universities in the implementation process of extension agriculture to rice seed farmers. This research uses qualitative descriptive approach with data measurement using Likert scale. The results showed that in general the universities play significant role in innovation adoption process to rice seed farmers. The role is arranged by sequence; (1 implementing cultivation skill (2 strengthening farmer institution, (3 liaison with the government (4 guidance of transfer of technology, and (5 liaison with production market. Farmers perception on the characteristics of innovation optimum production technology package (IPB-Prima IPB 3S (1 has a relative profitability, (2 easy to try, (3 conformity, (4 observable, and (5 innovation subtly level. The role of partners in the implementation of agricultural extension in sequence (1 conformity of extension materials, (2 intensity of extension, (3 appropriateness of extension method and (4 accuracy of media usage. The university should pay attention on the mechanism of facilitating technology transfer with the use of media and appropriate extension methods to rice seed farmers. The university also should build good communication with private organizations to help farmers in terms of seed price certainty produced by rice seed farmers in Aceh Province, Indonesia.

  5. The (non)sense of organizational change : An Essai about universal management hypes, sick consultancy metaphors, and healthy organization theories

    Sorge, A; van Witteloostuijn, A

    The global business world is infected by a virus that induces a permanent need for organizational change, which is fed by the management consultancy industry. The nature of the organizational change hype changes colour frequently, through the emergence of new universal management fashions. An urge

  6. The provincial health office as performance manager: change in the local healthcare system after Thailand's universal coverage reforms.

    Intaranongpai, Siranee; Hughes, David; Leethongdee, Songkramchai

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the implementation of Thailand's universal coverage healthcare reforms in a rural province, using data from field studies undertaken in 2003-2005 and 2008-2011. We focus on the strand of policy that aimed to develop primary care by allocating funds to contracting units for primary care (CUPs) responsible for managing local service networks. The two studies document a striking change in the balance of power in the local healthcare system over the 8-year period. Initially, the newly formed CUPs gained influence as 'power followed the money', and the provincial health offices (PHOs), which had commanded the service units, were left with a weaker co-ordination role. However, the situation changed as a new insurance purchaser, the National Health Security Office, took financial control and established regional outposts. National Health Security Office outposts worked with PHOs to develop rationalised management tools-strategic plans, targets, KPIs and benchmarking-that installed the PHOs as performance managers of local healthcare systems. New lines of accountability and changed budgetary systems reduced the power of the CUPs to control resource allocation and patterns of services within CUP networks. Whereas some CUPs fought to retain limited autonomy, the PHO has been able to regain much of its former control. We suggest that implementation theory needs to take a long view to capture the complexity of a major reform initiative and argue for an analysis that recognises the key role of policy networks and advocacy coalitions that span national and local levels and realign over time. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Educational Innovation: A Study of Differential Changes among Teachers at the University of Malaga

    Antonio Matas Terrón

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Educational innovation is a factor that has been highlighted in the last years as a developmental element in classroom life. This study is an attempt to identify possible differences in different settings, among teachers who had launched an innovation project, and others who had not. For that purpose, a questionnaire was distributed among the faculty of the University of Malaga. The sample consisted of 112 teachers, 29 of whom had undertaken projects of innovation. The results show that significant differences exist between the two groups of teachers in relation to pupils, other teachers, resources, and use of aids and educational programming. The paper concludes with a profile of innovative teachers and some reflections on the importance of innovation and its role in the educational reforms currently taking place.

  8. The role of critical thinking skills and learning styles of university students in their academic performance

    ZOHRE GHAZIVAKILI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The current world needs people who have a lot of different abilities such as cognition and application of different ways of thinking, research, problem solving, critical thinking skills and creativity. In addition to critical thinking, learning styles is another key factor which has an essential role in the process of problem solving. This study aimed to determine the relationship between learning styles and critical thinking of students and their academic performance in Alborz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-correlation study was performed in 2012, on 216 students of Alborz University who were selected randomly by the stratified method. The data was obtained via a three-part questionnaire included demographic data, Kolb standardized questionnaire of learning style and California critical thinking standardized questionnaire. The academic performance of the students was extracted by the school records. The validity of the instruments was determined in terms of content validity, and the reliability was gained through internal consistency methods. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.78 for the California critical thinking questionnaire. The Chi Square test, Independent T-test, one way ANOVA and Pearson Correlation test were used to determine relationship between variables. The Package SPSS14 statistical software was used to analyze data with a significant level of p<0.05. Results: Our findings indicated the significant difference of mean score in four learning style, suggesting university students with convergent learning style have better performance than other groups. Also learning style had a relationship with age, gender, field of study, semester and job. The results about the critical thinking of the students showed that the mean of deductive reasoning and evaluation skills were higher than that of other skills and analytical skills had the lowest mean and there was a positive significant

  9. Private Universities in Kenya Seek Alternative Ways to Manage Change in Teacher Education Curriculum in Compliance with the Commission for University Education Reforms

    Amimo, Catherine Adhiambo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated management of change in teacher education curriculum in Private universities in Kenya. The study employed a concurrent mixed methods design that is based on the use of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. A multi-stage sampling process which included purposive, convenience, cluster, and snowball sampling methods…

  10. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  11. Eating behaviour of university students in Germany: Dietary intake, barriers to healthy eating and changes in eating behaviour since the time of matriculation.

    Hilger, Jennifer; Loerbroks, Adrian; Diehl, Katharina

    2017-02-01

    A healthy diet plays a key role in preventing obesity and non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes. This is true for all age groups, including young adults. While unhealthy eating habits among young adults, in particular university students, have been identified in former studies, this group has been neglected in existing health promotion strategies. Our aim was to explore baseline dietary intake, common barriers to healthy eating, and changes in eating behaviour among university students since the time of matriculation. We used data from the quantitative part of the Nutrition and Physical Activity Study (NuPhA), a cross-sectional online survey (data collection: 2014/10/31-2015/01/15). Students were recruited from all over Germany. Overall, 689 university students (30.5% male; mean age: 22.69) from more than 40 universities across Germany participated. We found that there is room for improvement with regard to the consumption of specific food groups, for example, fruits and vegetables. The main barriers to healthy eating were lack of time due to studies, lack of healthy meals at the university canteen, and high prices of healthy foods. Cluster analysis revealed that barriers to healthy eating might affect only specific subgroups, for instance freshmen. Changes in eating behaviour since matriculation were found in the consumption of meat, fish, and regular meals. Future qualitative studies may help to explore why university students change their eating behaviour since the time of matriculation. Such knowledge is necessary to inform health promotion strategies in the university setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification

    De Maayer Pieter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of a large plasmid common to all sequenced Pantoea spp. Results and discussion The Large PantoeaPlasmids (LPP-1 of twenty strains encompassing seven different Pantoea species, including pathogens and endo-/epiphytes of a wide range of plant hosts as well as insect-associated strains, were compared. The LPP-1 plasmid sequences range in size from ~281 to 794 kb and carry between 238 and 750 protein coding sequences (CDS. A core set of 46 proteins, encompassing 2.2% of the total pan-plasmid (2,095 CDS, conserved among all LPP-1 plasmid sequences, includes those required for thiamine and pigment biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these plasmids have arisen from an ancestral plasmid, which has undergone extensive diversification. Analysis of the proteins encoded on LPP-1 also showed that these plasmids contribute to a wide range of Pantoea phenotypes, including the transport and catabolism of various substrates, inorganic ion assimilation, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, colonization and persistence in the host and environment, pathogenesis and antibiosis. Conclusions LPP-1 is universal to all Pantoea spp. whose genomes have been sequenced to date and is derived from an ancestral plasmid. LPP-1 encodes a large array of proteins that have played a major role in the adaptation of the different Pantoea spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents or benign saprophytes found in many diverse

  13. Instability-induced ordering, universal unfolding and the role of gravity in granular Couette flow

    Alam, Meheboob; Arakeri, V. H.; Nott, P. R.; Goddard, J. D.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Linear stability theory and bifurcation analysis are used to investigate the role of gravity in shear-band formation in granular Couette flow, considering a kinetic-theory rheological model. We show that the only possible state, at low shear rates, corresponds to a "plug" near the bottom wall, in which the particles are densely packed and the shear rate is close to zero, and a uniformly sheared dilute region above it. The origin of such plugged states is shown to be tied to the spontaneous symmetry-breaking instabilities of the gravity-free uniform shear flow, leading to the formation of ordered bands of alternating dilute and dense regions in the transverse direction, via an infinite hierarchy of pitchfork bifurcations. Gravity plays the role of an "imperfection", thus destroying the "perfect" bifurcation structure of uniform shear. The present bifurcation problem admits universal unfolding of pitchfork bifurcations which subsequently leads to the formation of a sequence of a countably infinite number of "isolas", with the solution structures being a modulated version of their gravity-free counterpart. While the solution with a plug near the bottom wall looks remarkably similar to the shear-banding phenomenon in dense slow granular Couette flows, a "floating" plug near the top wall is also a solution of these equations at high shear rates. A two-dimensional linear stability analysis suggests that these floating plugged states are unstable to long-wave travelling disturbances.The unique solution having a bottom plug can also be unstable to long waves, but remains stable at sufficiently low shear rates. The implications and realizability of the present results are discussed in the light of shear-cell experiments under "microgravity" conditions.

  14. Disordered eating attitudes among University students in Kuwait: The role of gender and obesity

    Abdulrahman O Musaiger

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: About one third of university students in Kuwait had disordered eating attitudes. There is an urgent need to prevent and treat disordered eating attitudes in university students in Kuwait.

  15. The Emerging Roles Of HR Professionals In Driving Organizational Change

    Md. Mamin Ullah

    2012-01-01

    To remain competitive in this global business world, organizations often find it necessary to undertake major changes that affect their processes and people. Therefore, change management is seen as a permanent business function to improve efficiency and keep organizations adaptable to the competitive marketplace. Many organizations strategically use change to improve organizational effectiveness. But bringing about successful change in today’s competitive environment requires thoughtful plann...

  16. The Postgraduate Chameleon. Changing Roles in Doctoral Education

    Harland, Tony; Plangger, Gabi

    2004-01-01

    This article is based on the experiences of 25 PhD students at a New Zealand university who came to do research and soon found themselves taking on substantial teaching loads. Teaching was highly valued and it helped students develop their professional identity as they broadened their subject knowledge and practised a disciplinary research…

  17. The changing role of agriculture and tomorrow's weed research agenda

    Kropff, M.J.; Bastiaans, L.; Kempenaar, C.; Weide, van der R.Y.

    2008-01-01

    With the changing position of agriculture in the world the challenges for weed management and weed science are changing as well. In this paper recent developments in weed science with respect to several aspects of weed management are discussed in relation to those changes. Developments in cultural

  18. The role of iconic memory in change-detection tasks.

    Becker, M W; Pashler, H; Anstis, S M

    2000-01-01

    In three experiments, subjects attempted to detect the change of a single item in a visually presented array of items. Subjects' ability to detect a change was greatly reduced if a blank interstimulus interval (ISI) was inserted between the original array and an array in which one item had changed ('change blindness'). However, change detection improved when the location of the change was cued during the blank ISI. This suggests that people represent more information of a scene than change blindness might suggest. We test two possible hypotheses why, in the absence of a cue, this representation fails to produce good change detection. The first claims that the intervening events employed to create change blindness result in multiple neural transients which co-occur with the to-be-detected change. Poor detection rates occur because a serial search of all the transient locations is required to detect the change, during which time the representation of the original scene fades. The second claims that the occurrence of the second frame overwrites the representation of the first frame, unless that information is insulated against overwriting by attention. The results support the second hypothesis. We conclude that people may have a fairly rich visual representation of a scene while the scene is present, but fail to detect changes because they lack the ability to simultaneously represent two complete visual representations.

  19. About the role of Higgs boson in the evolution of the early universe

    Jegerlehner, Fred

    2014-06-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs particle the most relevant structures of the SM have been verified and for the first time we know all parameters of the SM within remarkable accuracy. Together with recent calculations of the SM renormalization group coefficients up to three loops we can safely extrapolate running couplings high up in energy. Assuming that the SM is a low energy effective theory of a cutoff theory residing at the Planck scale, we are able to calculate the effective bare parameters of the underlying cutoff system. It turns out that the effective bare mass term changes sign not far below the Planck scale, which means that in the early universe the SM was in the symmetric phase. The sign-flip, which is a result of a conspiracy between the SM couplings and their screening/antiscreening behavior, triggers the Higgs mechanism. Above the Higgs phase transition the bare mass term in the Higgs potential must have had a large positive value, enhanced by the quadratic divergence of the bare Higgs mass. Likewise the quartically enhanced positive vacuum energy density is present in the symmetric phase. The Higgs system thus provides the large dark energy density in the early universe, which triggers slow-roll inflation, i.e. the SM Higgs is the inflaton scalar field. Reheating is dominated by the decay of the heavy Higgses into (in the symmetric phase) massless top/anti-top quark pairs. The new scenario possibly could explain the baryon-asymmetry essentially in terms of SM physics.

  20. Contextualising change through a common strategy: Lecturers' perceptions and key role in supporting academic reform

    Kindelan, Paz; Martin, Ana

    2014-05-01

    European universities are currently going through a process of change in order to meet the common goals set for higher education by the European Commission. They are revising their educational models to adjust them to the guidelines of the "Bologna Process" and are devising an institutional strategy for its implementation. In practical terms, this means aligning former national degrees and diplomas to standard European Bachelor and Masters degrees and PhD doctorates, by creating acknowledged professional qualification benchmarks that also include adjusted course lengths and contents. This process, in the end, mostly affects academic staff members who have a fundamental role to play in carrying out the pedagogical reforms on the teaching front. Besides presenting a commentary on the institutional approach of one particular technical university in Spain, the purpose of this paper is to propose, from the authors' point of view as lecturers, a strategy which has the potential to create a favourable atmosphere for carrying out such a reform. The article's main objective is to highlight a series of action points which may serve to reinforce and advance the main institutional strategy by relying on the powerful influence of its academic staff members.

  1. Universal Connection through Art: Role of Mirror Neurons in Art Production and Reception.

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Boller, François; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2017-05-05

    Art is defined as expression or application of human creative skill and imagination producing works to be appreciated primarily for their aesthetic value or emotional power. This definition encompasses two very important elements-the creation and reception of art-and by doing so it establishes a link, a dialogue between the artist and spectator. From the evolutionary biological perspective, activities need to have an immediate or remote effect on the population through improving survival, gene selection, and environmental adjustment, and this includes art. It may serve as a universal means of communication bypassing time, cultural, ethnic, and social differences. The neurological mechanisms of both art production and appreciation are researched by neuroscientists and discussed both in terms of healthy brain biology and complex neuronal networking perspectives. In this paper, we describe folk art and the issue of symbolic archetypes in psychoanalytic thought as well as offer neuronal mechanisms for art by emphasizing mirror/neurons and the role they play in it.

  2. Gambling behaviors among university youth: does one's religious affiliation and level of religiosity play a role?

    Ghandour, Lilian A; El Sayed, Donna S

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the association between religion, religiosity, and gambling using a cross-sectional sample of 570 American University of Beirut students, who self-filled an anonymous English questionnaire. About half (55%) were lifetime gamblers, of which 12% screened as problem/pathological gamblers. Controlling for other demographics and lifetime substance use, Christian students (vs. Muslims) had higher odds of lifetime gambling [6.6 (3.6, 12.2)], any strategic gambling [2.7 (1.2, 5.9)], social nonproblem gambling (SNPG) [7.6 (4.6, 12.3)], and problem/pathological gambling (PG) [6.8(1.8, 26.5)]. Students who never/rarely practiced their faith were 3.6 times as likely [95% CI: 1.5, 8.7] to report lifetime gambling, 3.7 times as likely to report SNPG (vs. NG) [95% CI: 1.3, 10.6], and 7 times as likely to screen for PG (vs. NG) [95% CI: 1.8, 27.4]. Decreased religious importance was associated with greater odds of lifetime gambling, SNPG and PG (vs. nongambling). Stronger associations were observed among Muslims. Religion and religiosity seem to play a protective role, particularly among Muslims whose faith strictly prohibits gambling. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Role of obesity and media in body weight concern among female university students in Kuwait.

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Mannai, Mariam

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the association of media and obesity status with body weight concern among female university students in Kuwait. 228 female students, aged 19-25 years, were selected at convenience from the Women's College in Kuwait. A previously validated questionnaire was used to collect information on the role of media in body concern and how parents, peers and the girls themselves perceived girls' body shapes. Weight and height were gathered by self-reporting. Use of internet and reading women's magazines had a significant impact on dieting by the girls to lose weight (Pobese girls than non-obese girls. Only watching television had a significant impact on girls' body shape concern (Pobese and 81% of obese girls were dissatisfied with their current weight. There were significant differences between obese and non-obese girls regarding the girls' views and the views of their peers and parents about the body weight of the girls (P<0.000 for all). The pressure from peers and parents, in addition to the mass media, may lead to disturbed attitudes towards eating among Kuwaiti girls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students

    Denise Hollanda Iunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC for TMDs (RDC/TMDs, and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA group (n=31 and an AA sham group (n=13. The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week. Results. Anxiety (p<0.01 was significantly reduced in the AA group. This group also showed a decrease in tender points in the mandibular posterior region (p=0.04 and in the right side of the submandibular region (p=0.02. Complaints of bilateral pain were reduced in the temporal tendon (p≤0.01 and in the left side of the ATM (p<0.01. In addition, electromyographic (EMG activity was reduced during temporal muscle contraction (p=0.03.  Conclusion. Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs.

  5. Focused development of advanced practice nurse roles for specific patient groups in a Swiss university hospital

    Spichiger, Elisabeth; Zumstein-Shaha, Maya; Schubert, Maria; Herrmann, Luzia

    2018-02-01

    Background: To cover future health care needs of the population, new care models are necessary. The development of advanced nursing practice (ANP) offers the opportunity to meet these challenges with novel services. At the Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, ANP services and corresponding advanced practice nurse (APN) roles have been developed since 2011. Purpose: The aim is to develop innovative and evidence based ANP services to supplement health care for specific patient groups and their family members with the goal to improve safety and achieve better outcomes. Methods: Project-based ANP services are developed in close collaboration of clinical departments and the Nursing Development Unit (NDU) of the Directorate of Nursing. Structure, process and outcome data are collected for evaluation. Findings: Currently, five ANP services are established and running, eight more are in the developmental phase. Most services address the long term care of patients with chronic illnesses and their family members. Ten APNs work between 10 % and 80 %, three are leading an ANP-team. APNs work over 50 % in direct clinical practice, primarily in counselling. An ANP network connects APNs and NDU, promoting synergy and exchange. Conclusions: The available resources often constitute a challenge for the development of ANP services. Vital for the long-term success are an adequate extent of the position, the support by department directorate, the conceptual framework that is implemented across the whole hospital, and the development within project structures.

  6. The Roles of a University Professor in a Teacher Study Group

    Yeh, Hui-Chin; Hung, Hsiu-Ting; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The opportunities in which university professors collaborate with the practicing school teachers in a teacher study group are few. This study investigated how a university professor facilitated a collaborative teacher study group to enhance teachers' professional growth. Five primary school teachers and a university professor collaborated on…

  7. University Lawyers: A Study of Legal Risk, Risk Management and Role in Work Integrated Learning Programmes

    Cameron, Craig; Klopper, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Work integrated learning (WIL) is in growing demand by multiple stakeholders within the higher education sector in Australia. There are significant and distinct legal risks to universities associated with WIL programmes. University lawyers, along with WIL administrators and university management, are responsible for managing legal risk. This…

  8. Thoughts on the Role of Government in the Development of World-Class Universities in China

    Guangcai, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Looking at the rise of world-class universities through history, creating an institutional environment in which universities are relatively autonomous, while also ensuring effective material support from the government is essential for the formation of world-class universities. It is worth examining the deteriorating academic environment in China…

  9. The role and responsibility of teachers and students in university studies: A comparative analysis of the views expressed by pedagogy students

    Šteh Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and analyses the results of the empirical research basically intended to determine how students understand the main role of teachers and their own role and to find out what they consider as their significant learning experience during the studies. We were interested in whether their conceptions of teachers’ and students’ roles had changed during the studies and whether they had approached modern scientific concepts on active and constructive learning. The research was carried out during the winter semester of the 2012/13 academic year on the sample of first- and third-year students, enrolled at the first level of the pedagogy study programme at the Faculty of Philosophy in Belgrade and pedagogy and andragogy at the Faculty of Arts in Ljubljana. The results from comparing the first and the third year have shown that third-year students demonstrate a shift to higher conceptions of students’ and teachers’ roles, which is more likely to lead to a deeper approach to learning. Modifications towards higher conceptions of students’ and teachers’ roles can thus indicate the quality of studies, since they clearly demonstrate that students are prepared to adopt a more responsible and autonomous role in their studies. In the efforts to achieve the high quality of university studies, the above-mentioned perspectives serve as pieces of information important for the reform of study programmes and introduction of changes in the study process.

  10. The role of feedbacks in Antarctic sea ice change

    Feltham, D. L.; Frew, R. C.; Holland, P.

    2017-12-01

    The changes in Antarctic sea ice over the last thirty years have a strong seasonal dependence, and the way these changes grow in spring and decay in autumn suggests that feedbacks are strongly involved. The changes may ultimately be caused by atmospheric warming, the winds, snowfall changes, etc., but we cannot understand these forcings without first untangling the feedbacks. A highly simplified coupled sea ice -mixed layer model has been developed to investigate the importance of feedbacks on the evolution of sea ice in two contrasting regions in the Southern Ocean; the Amundsen Sea where sea ice extent has been decreasing, and the Weddell Sea where it has been expanding. The change in mixed layer depth in response to changes in the atmosphere to ocean energy flux is implicit in a strong negative feedback on ice cover changes in the Amundsen Sea, with atmospheric cooling leading to a deeper mixed layer resulting in greater entrainment of warm Circumpolar Deep Water, causing increased basal melting of sea ice. This strong negative feedback produces counter intuitive responses to changes in forcings in the Amundsen Sea. This feedback is absent in the Weddell due to the complete destratification and strong water column cooling that occurs each winter in simulations. The impact of other feedbacks, including the albedo feedback, changes in insulation due to ice thickness and changes in the freezing temperature of the mixed layer, were found to be of secondary importance compared to changes in the mixed layer depth.

  11. English faculty' s perception of their role in ICT-Oriented classroom at Majma'ah University

    El-Sadig Yahya Ezza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The teacher was once considered “an educational authority”, “a dispenser of knowledge”, “someone in charge of telling”, etc. However, with the integration of information and communication technology (ICT in the classroom, knowledge resources have become accessible to the student in ways that are beyond teacher’s control. This fact has led to a new perception of teachers' roles among educational researchers. In other words, teachers have come to be conceived as facilitators, learners, collaborators, etc. In the light of these developments, the present study attempts to investigate English faculty’s view on the possible impact that ICT could have on their role at Majma’ah University. A questionnaire comprising sixteen traditional and ICT-oriented roles was administered to thirty participants in different campuses of Majma’ah University to collect data to verify two research hypotheses: (1 Most EFL faculty at Majma'ah University (MU favour ICT-oriented roles over traditional roles. (2 All ICT-oriented roles are equally valuable to EFL faculty at MU in enhancing teaching practices. Statistical analysis of the study data confirmed the first hypothesis but rejected second one.

  12. SuBSENSE: a universal change detection method with local adaptive sensitivity.

    St-Charles, Pierre-Luc; Bilodeau, Guillaume-Alexandre; Bergevin, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Foreground/background segmentation via change detection in video sequences is often used as a stepping stone in high-level analytics and applications. Despite the wide variety of methods that have been proposed for this problem, none has been able to fully address the complex nature of dynamic scenes in real surveillance tasks. In this paper, we present a universal pixel-level segmentation method that relies on spatiotemporal binary features as well as color information to detect changes. This allows camouflaged foreground objects to be detected more easily while most illumination variations are ignored. Besides, instead of using manually set, frame-wide constants to dictate model sensitivity and adaptation speed, we use pixel-level feedback loops to dynamically adjust our method's internal parameters without user intervention. These adjustments are based on the continuous monitoring of model fidelity and local segmentation noise levels. This new approach enables us to outperform all 32 previously tested state-of-the-art methods on the 2012 and 2014 versions of the ChangeDetection.net dataset in terms of overall F-Measure. The use of local binary image descriptors for pixel-level modeling also facilitates high-speed parallel implementations: our own version, which used no low-level or architecture-specific instruction, reached real-time processing speed on a midlevel desktop CPU. A complete C++ implementation based on OpenCV is available online.

  13. State-level changes in US racial and ethnic diversity, 1980 to 2015: A universal trend?

    Barrett Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have examined long-term changes in ethnoracial diversity for US states despite the potential social, economic, and political ramifications of such changes at the state level. Objective: We describe shifts in diversity magnitude and structure from 1980 through 2015 to determine if states are following identical, parallel, divergent, or convergent paths. Methods: Decennial census data for 1980‒2010 and American Community Survey data for 2015 are used to compute entropy index (E and Simpson index (S measures of diversity magnitude based on five panethnic populations. A typology characterizes the racial/ethnic structure of states. Results: While initial diversity level and subsequent pace of change vary widely, every state has increased in diversity magnitude since 1980. A dramatic decline in the number of predominantly white states has been accompanied by the rise of states with multigroup structures that include Hispanics. These diverse states are concentrated along the coasts and across the southern tier of the country. Differences in panethnic population growth (especially rapid Hispanic and Asian growth coupled with white stability drive the diversification trend. Conclusions: The diversity hierarchy among states has remained relatively stable over the past 35 years in the face of universal gains in diversity magnitude and the increasing heterogeneity of racial/ethnic structures. Contribution: We document ethnoracial diversity patterns at an understudied geographic scale, the state level, where diversity may have important consequences across a range of institutional domains.

  14. The changing role of botanic gardens and the experience from ...

    An attempt is here made to review the origin, role and status of botanic gardens ... The published literature on gardens is enormous and begins with what are known ... Key words/phrases: Botanic Garden, Ethiopia, Gullele, History, Importance, ...

  15. Changes in University Students’ Perceptions towards a Two-Week Summer English Immersion Program

    Meihua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research examined how university students perceived a 2-week summer English immersion program organized and designated by Chinese teachers of English in a highly prestigious university in Beijing and whether their perceptions changed during the period. Data included 208 surveys and 19 informal interviews in week 1 and 207 surveys and 19 interviews in week 2 (the participants were largely the same in both weeks. Analyses of the data showed that in both weeks, most students considered the courses interesting and liked most of them for similar reasons (e.g., being interesting and having much participation, that the program improved students’ English abilities in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as overall English proficiency, and that the program enhanced students’ interpersonal communication ability, confidence in using English, knowledge of the culture of English-speaking countries, interest in and motivation to learn English. The results also revealed that the participants tended to become more positive about the program, have a more comprehensive view of the program and assess it more objectively toward the end of the program. Evidently, the program helped the students in various aspects. To better help students, it is useful to do needs analyses prior to the program so that more acceptable courses and activities can be designed and offered.

  16. How changes to Irish healthcare financing are affecting universal health coverage.

    Briggs, Adam D M

    2013-11-01

    In 2010, the World Health Organisation (WHO) published the World Health Report - Health systems financing: the path to universal coverage. The Director-General of the WHO, Dr Margaret Chan, commissioned the report "in response to a need, expressed by rich and poor countries alike, for practical guidance on ways to finance health care". Given the current context of global economic hardship and difficult budgetary decisions, the report offered timely recommendations for achieving universal health coverage (UHC). This article analyses the current methods of healthcare financing in Ireland and their implications for UHC. Three questions are asked of the Irish healthcare system: firstly, how is the health system financed; secondly, how can the health system protect people from the financial consequences of ill-health and paying for health services; and finally, how can the health system encourage the optimum use of available resources? By answering these three questions, this article argues that the Irish healthcare system is not achieving UHC, and that it is unclear whether recent changes to financing are moving Ireland closer or further away from the WHO's ambition for healthcare for all. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of figure-ground segregation in change blindness.

    Landman, Rogier; Spekreijse, Henk; Lamme, Victor A F

    2004-04-01

    Partial report methods have shown that a large-capacity representation exists for a few hundred milliseconds after a picture has disappeared. However, change blindness studies indicate that very limited information remains available when a changed version of the image is presented subsequently. What happens to the large-capacity representation? New input after the first image may interfere, but this is likely to depend on the characteristics of the new input. In our first experiment, we show that a display containing homogeneous image elements between changing images does not render the large-capacity representation unavailable. Interference occurs when these new elements define objects. On that basis we introduce a new method to produce change blindness: The second experiment shows that change blindness can be induced by redefining figure and background, without an interval between the displays. The local features (line segments) that defined figures and background were swapped, while the contours of the figures remained where they were. Normally, changes are easily detected when there is no interval. However, our paradigm results in massive change blindness. We propose that in a change blindness experiment, there is a large-capacity representation of the original image when it is followed by a homogeneous interval display, but that change blindness occurs whenever the changed image forces resegregation of figures from the background.

  18. Minority Pre-service Teachers' and Faculty Training on Climate Change Education in Delaware State University

    Ozbay, G.; Fox-Lykens, R.; Veron, D. E.; Rogers, M.; Merrill, J.; Harcourt, P.; Mead, H.

    2015-12-01

    Delaware State University is working toward infusing undergraduate education with climate change science and enhancing the climate change learning content of pre-service teacher preparation programs as part of the MADE-CLEAR project (www.madeclear.org). Faculty development workshops have been conducted to prepare and educate a cadre of faculty from different disciplines in global climate science literacy. Following the workshops, the faculty participants have integrated climate literacy tenets into their existing curriculum. Follow up meetings have helped the faculty members to use specific content in their curriculum such as greenhouse gases, atmospheric CO2, sea level rise, etc. Additional training provided to the faculty participants in pedagogical methods of climate change instruction to identify common misconceptions and barriers to student understanding. Some pre-service teachers were engaged in summer internships and learned how to become messenger of climate change science by the state parks staff during the summer. Workshops were offered to other pre-service teachers to teach them specific climate change topics with enhanced hands-on laboratory activities. The participants were provided examples of lesson plans and guided to develop their own lesson plans and present them. Various pedagogical methods have been explored for teaching climate change content to the participants. The pre-service teachers found the climate content very challenging and confusing. Training activities were modified to focus on targeted topics and modeling of pedagogical techniques for the faculty and pre-service teachers. Program evaluation confirms that the workshop participant show improved understanding of the workshop materials by the participants if they were introduced few climate topics. Learning how to use hands-on learning tools and preparing lesson plans are two of the challenges successfully implemented by the pre-service teachers. Our next activity includes pre

  19. Spurring climate-friendly behaviour change: a case study of the university of Grenoble

    Blanchard, Odile

    2016-01-01

    % of energy consumption. 'Energy vampires' at home (i.e. the standby power of all electric and electronic devices) represent almost 11% of US energy use. Two similar daily diets in terms of energy intake may differ by a factor of four in terms of life-cycle energy inputs, depending on the content of the diet. Although the cumulative potential gains drawn from individual actions are substantial, they may be hard to reach in reality, because barriers are numerous for individuals to change their behaviour and actually reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Even individuals with positive attitudes may show much reluctance to behave in a climate-friendly way. Against this background, our paper aims to investigate how these barriers can be overcome so that individuals take action. The investigation that we carry out relies on a climate-friendly initiative that has been going on at the university of social sciences of Grenoble, France, for six years. The goal of the initiative is to stabilize the greenhouse gas emissions of the university in 2010 relative to 1999. Various actions have been taken, such as building a greenhouse gas emissions inventory to monitor those emissions, improving the efficiency of the heating system, organizing internal communication campaigns to help people reduce their carbon footprint. Only a few people are currently acting, although all members of the university could be contributing to reducing the university's emissions. Various barriers prevent them from acting. The first part of the paper presents the university actors, and their mission in the climate-friendly initiative. The second part identifies the university members' main motivations and barriers to a climate-friendly behaviour. Finally, the third part discusses potential ways of overcoming those barriers, calls for an inter-disciplinary research program to successfully address the issue. It should be noted that the methodology adopted in the paper, the barriers

  20. Creation, Phase Change and Evolution of the Universe Based on the "Convection Bang Hypothesis"

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Amirshahkarami, Abdolazim; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2016-04-01

    In our vision, it is believed that creation and phase change of universe and their coupling began by the gigantic Large Scale Forced Convection System (LSFCS) in very high temperature including a swirling wild wind and energetic particles like gravitons. That wind as the creator of the inflation process was carrying many Quantum Convection Loops (QCLs). Those QCLs have been transformed to black holes as the cores of galaxies. Convection Bang (CB) Model for creation, phase change and evolution of the Universe is constituted based on three assumptions as follows: The first is: "Gravity Hypothesis" that describes the gravity fields generation by the LSFCSs of the heat and mass inside the planets, stars, galaxies and clusters. The LSFCS changes the material properties of the domain and produces coupling of the matched electromagnetic and gravity fields. Gravity hypothesis is a new way to understand gravitation phenomenon which is different from the both Newton's law of gravity and Einstein's theory of general relativity approaches [Gholibeigian et. al, AGU Fall Meeting 2015, P11A-2056 ]. The second is: "Substantial Motion" theory of Iranian philosopher, Mulla Sadra (1571/2-1640), which describes space-time, time's relativity for all atoms (bodies) which are different from each other [Gholibeigian, APS April Meeting 2015, abstract #L1.027], atom's (body) volume squeezing, black hole's mass lightening while increases the velocities of its involved masses inward (a paradox with general relativity), and changes of material properties and geometries in speed of near light speed [Gholibeigian, APS March Meeting 2016, abstract #]. The third is: "Animated Sub-particles" model. These sub-particles (sub-strings) are origin of life and creator of the momentums of the fundamental particles and forces, and basic link of the information transfer to them, [Gholibeigian, APS April Meeting 2015, abstract #L1.027]. In this model, there are four proposed animated sub-particles of mater

  1. The Role of NASA Observations in Understanding Earth System Change

    Fladeland, Matthew M.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation will introduce a non-technical audience to NASA Earth science research goals and the technologies used to achieve them. The talk will outline the primary science focus areas and then provide overviews of current and planned missions, in addition to instruments, aircraft, and other technologies that are used to turn data into useful information for scientists and policy-makers. This presentation is part of an Earth Day symposium at the University of Mary.

  2. Role of Social Networks in Developing Religious and Social Values of the Students of the World Islamic Sciences & Education University

    Al-Mosa, Nosiba Ali

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the role of Social Networks in the social and religious values of The World Islamic Sciences & Education University students. The study applied the survey and descriptive Approach. The population of the study represents all BA students who enrolled in the first academic semester for the year 2014-2015. The sample of…

  3. "And Never the Two Shall Meet?" Comparing Chinese and Dutch University Teachers about the Role of Research in Teaching

    Hu, Yanjuan; van der Rijst, Roeland; van Veen, Klaas; Verloop, Nico

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, university teachers from both the East and the West have been increasingly called to involve their students in research, therefore they have to rethink not only their research and teaching practices but re-evaluate the role of research in their ongoing teaching. Thus, a survey was conducted to explore (1) what Chinese and…

  4. Teachers as Researchers: A Discovery of Their Emerging Role and Impact through a School-University Collaborative Research

    Chow, Ken Chi Kin; Chu, Samuel Kai Wah; Tavares, Nicole; Lee, Celina Wing Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the impact of the role of teacher-researchers on in-service teachers' professional development, as well as the reasons behind the lack of a teacher-as-researcher ethos in schools. In the study, teachers from four Hong Kong primary schools participated in a school-university collaborative research project that promotes…

  5. Visions of Vision: An Exploratory Study of the Role College and University Presidents Play in Developing Institutional Vision

    McWade, Jessica C.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research explores how college and university presidents engage in the process of developing formal institutional vision. The inquiry identifies roles presidents play in vision development, which is often undertaken as part of strategic-planning initiatives. Two constructs of leadership and institutional vision are used to examine…

  6. The Role of Second Language in Higher Education: A Case Study of German Students at a Dutch University

    Zijlmans, Lidy; Neijt, Anneke; van Hout, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of the challenges and benefits of university students taking a degree course in a language other than their mother tongue. Our study was conducted from the point of view of the non-native students themselves, and our primary concern was the role of language. We investigated the academic achievement of…

  7. Optimism and Psychological Resilience in Relation to Depressive Symptoms in University Students: Examining the Mediating Role of Self-Esteem

    Kapikiran, Sahin; Acun-Kapikiran, Necla

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the role of self-esteem as a mediator in the relationships between optimism and psychological resilience on depressive symptoms in university students. A total of 494 undergraduate students, comprising of 253 female and 241 male participated in this study. Participants' ages ranged from 18 to 30 (M = 20.85, SD = 1.57).…

  8. External Stakeholders' Roles and Factors Influencing Their Participation in Developing Generic Skills for Students in Vietnamese Universities

    Nghia, Tran Le Huu

    2018-01-01

    External stakeholders have increasingly participated in instructional and training activities in higher education; however, their contribution has not yet been adequately documented, especially in non-Western university contexts. This article reports a study that examined external stakeholders' roles and factors influencing their participation in…

  9. On the Role of Discipline-Related Self-Concept in Deep and Surface Approaches to Learning among University Students

    Platow, Michael J.; Mavor, Kenneth I.; Grace, Diana M.

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined the role that students' discipline-related self-concepts may play in their deep and surface approaches to learning, their overall learning outcomes, and continued engagement in the discipline itself. Using a cross-lagged panel design of first-year university psychology students, a causal path was observed in which…

  10. An Examination of Gender Role Identity, Sexual Self-Esteem, Sexual Coercion and Sexual Victimization in a University Sample

    Kelly, Theresa C.; Erickson, Chris D.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between gender role identity, sexual self-esteem and sexual coercion was examined through a questionnaire. Participants were 84 undergraduate students from a university in Washington, DC. Contrary to what has been found in the literature, there were weak relationships between sexual coercion and masculinity, and sexual coercion…

  11. Marketing the University: The Subjective Perceptions of Israeli Academics of Their Role in Attracting New Students to Their Institution

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Israeli academics' perceptions of the introduction of educational markets and, particularly, their attitudes towards academics' roles and responsibilities in the new marketing-led university, as well as to obtain a greater understanding of their actual patterns of involvement in the marketing of…

  12. Pomp and Circumstance: University Presidents and the Role of Human Capital in Determining Who Leads U.S. Research Institutions

    Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Tang, Hui-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    While there is wide agreement that leaders matter, little is known regarding the role that human capital plays in determining who becomes one. We exploit unique attributes of the higher education industry to examine if training and academic ability affect the placement of university presidents within the research hierarchy of U.S. institutions.…

  13. Climate Change Modelling and Its Roles to Chinese Crops Yield

    JU Hui; LIN Er-da; Tim Wheeler; Andrew Challinor; JIANG Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Climate has been changing in the last fifty years in China and will continue to change regardless any efforts for mitigation. Agriculture is a climate-dependent activity and highly sensitive to climate changes and climate variability. Understanding the interactions between climate change and agricultural production is essential for society stable development of China. The first mission is to fully understand how to predict future climate and link it with agriculture production system. In this paper, recent studies both domestic and international are reviewed in order to provide an overall image of the progress in climate change researches. The methods for climate change scenarios construction are introduced. The pivotal techniques linking crop model and climate models are systematically assessed and climate change impacts on Chinese crops yield among model results are summarized. The study found that simulated productions of grain crop inherit uncertainty from using different climate models, emission scenarios and the crops simulation models. Moreover, studies have different spatial resolutions, and methods for general circulation model (GCM) downscaling which increase the uncertainty for regional impacts assessment. However, the magnitude of change in crop production due to climate change (at 700 ppm CO2 eq correct) appears within ±10%for China in these assessments. In most literatures, the three cereal crop yields showed decline under climate change scenarios and only wheat in some region showed increase. Finally, the paper points out several gaps in current researches which need more studies to shorten the distance for objective recognizing the impacts of climate change on crops. The uncertainty for crop yield projection is associated with climate change scenarios, CO2 fertilization effects and adaptation options. Therefore, more studies on the fields such as free air CO2 enrichment experiment and practical adaptations implemented need to be carried out.

  14. The role of critical thinking skills and learning styles of university students in their academic performance.

    Ghazivakili, Zohre; Norouzi Nia, Roohangiz; Panahi, Faride; Karimi, Mehrdad; Gholsorkhi, Hayede; Ahmadi, Zarrin

    2014-07-01

    The Current world needs people who have a lot of different abilities such as cognition and application of different ways of thinking, research, problem solving, critical thinking skills and creativity. In addition to critical thinking, learning styles is another key factor which has an essential role in the process of problem solving. This study aimed to determine the relationship between learning styles and critical thinking of students and their academic performance in Alborz University of Medical Science. This cross-correlation study was performed in 2012, on 216 students of Alborz University who were selected randomly by the stratified random sampling. The data was obtained via a three-part questionnaire included demographic data, Kolb standardized questionnaire of learning style and California critical thinking standardized questionnaire. The academic performance of the students was extracted by the school records. The validity of the instruments was determined in terms of content validity, and the reliability was gained through internal consistency methods. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.78 for the California critical thinking questionnaire. The Chi Square test, Independent t-test, one way ANOVA and Pearson correlation test were used to determine relationship between variables. The Package SPSS14 statistical software was used to analyze data with a significant level of pstudents with convergent learning style have better performance than other groups. Also learning style had a relationship with age, gender, field of study, semester and job. The results about the critical thinking of the students showed that the mean of deductive reasoning and evaluation skills were higher than that of other skills and analytical skills had the lowest mean and there was a positive significant relationship between the students' performance with inferential skill and the total score of critical thinking skills (pskills and deductive reasoning had significant

  15. How federal government and university policies need to change to achieve more and better research and education

    Wieman, Carl

    2011-04-01

    The Obama administration has repeatedly emphasized that the economic future of the country will depend heavily on the future success of both its scientific research and its science education. Research universities play a vital role in both of these activities. Unfortunately, universities are facing increasing difficulties in maintaining and enhancing the quality of their research and educational activities. There are some particularly notable unmet opportunities for improving science education. I will offer some ideas for how federal and university policies on research funding and education might be modified in tandem to enhance both research and educational outputs.

  16. The Role of Social Factors in Iranian University Students' Predispositions towards Autonomous Language Learning

    Sara Kashefian Naeeini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the demands of the changing world, students should become endowed with the ability to learn perpetually and regard learning as a life-long enterprise. This study investigated those learners belief which showed learners’ predispositions toward autonomy  and some social factors such as gender, academic achievement, marital status and age were taken into consideration. All BA and MA students majoring in English Literature at the department of Foreign Languages of Shiraz University of Iran were involved. The data were collected through a questionnaire the items of which were obtained from two questionnaires by Cotterall (1995 and Cotterall (1999 which were incorporated into a five-point Likert-type rating scale. Factor analysis of responses of students revealed the existence of five underlying factors for learner autonomy which were learner independence, dependence on the teacher, learner confidence, attitudes towards language learning and self-assessment. Based on t-test for independent samples and Analysis of Variance it came to light that age and gender did not have impact on students’ readiness for autonomy while martial statues influenced students’  self-assessment. Moreover, good academic achievement positively influenced their predispositions towards autonomous language learning.

  17. Climate Change Education at the University of Washington: Bridging Academic Degrees, Departments and Disciplines

    Thompson, L.; Bertram, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Education on climate change occurs in many departments at large research universities, but providing a coordinated educational experience for students in this topic is challenging. Departmental boundaries, accounting for student credit hours, and curricula inertia create roadblocks to the creation of interdisciplinary curriculum for both graduate and undergraduate students. We describe a hierarchy of interdisciplinary programs that reach students from seniors in high school to graduate students, targeting students from a variety of disciplines. The UWHS (University of Washington in the High School) program allows high school teachers to be trained to teach UW courses to their own high school students at their own school. The students who enroll receive a UW grade and credit for the course (as well as high school credit). A UWHS course on Climate and Climate Change (Atmospheric Sciences 211) was created in 2011 supported by training to high school science teachers on the fundamentals of climate science. For the 2012-13 academic year we anticipate at least 5 schools in Washington State will be offering this course. Once students matriculate at UW, 211 serves as a prerequisite for the Climate Minor that began in 2011. The minor is hosted by the departments of Atmospheric Sciences, Earth and Space Sciences and Oceanography, offering instruction in three focus areas: climate chemistry and biology, the physical climate, and past climate and ice. Students also take an integrative seminar where they are required to communicate to both scientific and non-scientific audiences some topic in climate science. Students enrolled in graduate programs at UW can participate in the Graduate Certificate in Climate Science that began 2008. The certificate gives students instruction in climate science covering the same topic areas as the minor and with a capstone project where student communicate some aspect of climate science to a non-physical science audience. Projects have included

  18. The role of leaders' paradigm in construction industry change

    Pries, Frens; Doree, Andries G.; van der Veen, Bas; van der Veen, Bas; Vrijhoef, Ruben

    2004-01-01

    As in other industries, firms in the construction industry need to become more client- and market-oriented. In the last decade, several initiatives have been taken to change the construction industry in that direction. The changes, however, seem to be slower than other industries and less

  19. Attitudinal and sociostructural factors and their role in dialect change

    Kammacher, Louise; Stæhr, Andreas; Jørgensen, J. Normann

    2011-01-01

    The causation of language change is a problem with a high profile in sociolinguistics. This paper presents two contrasting models of language change: one that is based on sociopsychological factors (Kristiansen & Jørgensen, 2005) and one that rejects them (the Napoleon Principle, Brink & Lund, 19...

  20. Corporate responses to climate change: the role of partnerships

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.; Hull van Houten, L.; Martens, P.; Chang, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter relates to the NWO-funded research project "‘Getting down to business’: Economic responses to climate change," which studied the (potential) contribution of business to climate change mitigation and adaptation. After an introductory overview of the overall project and its main findings,

  1. Environmental education in an Egyptian university: The role of teacher educators

    Goueli, Solafa

    Drawing on a holistic critical paradigm of ecological sustainability, this study examined the role of teacher educators in environmental education in the Faculty of Education of one Egyptian university. The study sought to critically and collaboratively explore with a sample of six teacher educators their answers, perceptions and perspectives in relation to their knowledge and understanding of environmental problems in local/global contexts and their meanings of curriculum and pedagogical practices for fostering environmental education in their teacher education programs. The participants generally demonstrated a considerable amount of knowledge of the environmental realities and problems facing Egypt encompassing air, water and solid waste sectors. Their views concurred with national and official studies identifying these issues as the most pressing environmental problems in the country. The exploration of the institutional, social and cultural causes and developmental and/or global causes of environmental problems in Egypt led us to articulate different themes relating environmental crisis in Egypt to different issues. These issues included poverty, education, religion and development. One of the major findings of the study was the participants' view that development was the major contributor to the environmental crisis in Egypt. They all stressed that, in its pursuit of economic growth, the government did not pay due attention to the environmental costs. Sharing perspectives from a critical paradigm of ecological sustainability, the participants felt that the government needed to clearly address the economic and ecological dimensions of development. In addition, a few participants affirmed that development is the thread that ties all the different factors together bringing into the conversations other dimensions of development like the social, values, and political dimensions. Addressing the future dimension of development, all of them expressed the need for a

  2. The Impediments to the Change to UK University Accounting Education, a Comparison to the USA Pathways Commission

    Ellington, Peter

    2017-01-01

    There is much debate in the literature concerning the changes necessary for university accounting education to meet the needs of the business environment and broader society. In the USA the Pathways Commission has responded by implementing a programme of evaluation and improvement. In the UK there is no formal agenda for change. This paper…

  3. Political Change and the Federal Role in Education.

    Florio, David H.

    1978-01-01

    The shift in domestic politics away from federal prescriptions is unlikely to have an immediate, radical influence on education policies. The shift is not so much a diminution of the federal role in education as it is a recognition of constraints on the power and influence of federal policy. (DS)

  4. Generating Change from Below: What Role for Leadership from Above?

    King, Fiona; Stevenson, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In recent years the benefits of distributed leadership have often assumed the status of an unchallengeable orthodoxy. There is a general acceptance that leadership is best when it is dispersed. In reality this is often little more than a form of "licensed leadership" in which those working in subordinate roles can only exercise…

  5. Distributed but Undefined: New Teacher Leader Roles to Change Schools

    Margolis, Jason; Huggins, Kristin Shawn

    2012-01-01

    This article examines teacher leader role development and definition by looking at one emergent model of distributed leadership: the hybrid teacher leader (HTL). HTLs are teachers whose official schedule includes both teaching K-12 students and leading teachers in some capacity. Participants included six HTLs across four school districts over 2…

  6. The Middle Ages: Change in Women's Personalities and Social Roles

    Newton, Nicola; Stewart, Abigail J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that the predominant focus of midlife personality development is generativity; other research has found that social roles influence both its onset and its expression. In this article, we examine women's midlife personality development and its relationship to career and family commitments. Results for a sample of 90 women…

  7. Symposium 19: Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul: its Role in the Biochemistry Teaching in the Southernmost Brazilian States

    Clóvis M.D. Wannmacher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available K-Education(Portuguese Chair: V. Trindade Bayardo Torres; Clovis Wannmacher; Denise Macedo  Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul: its Role in the Biochemistry Teaching in the Southernmost Brazilian States. Wannmacher, C.M.D. Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.   At present, most Biochemistry teaching in Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina has its origin in the Department of Biochemistry of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. In the 70’s, all the teachers of the Department wrote a book together: “Fundamental Biochemistry”. This book was always used in the classes by groups of students of different careers supervised by the respective teacher. At the same time, this methodology was not used by pharmaceutical teachers, but they recommended the Department’s book to their students. Along the next years, Biochemistry teaching was adapted according to the professional course and to the teacher’s personal characteristics. Today, there are two extremes strategies again: one traditional for the most basic biochemistry student’s formation (including theoretical, laboratorial, seminars and informatics classes and the other, experimental-clinical, for physician’s formation (including seminars of molecular approach to the most prevalent diseases, mainly, those leading to failure of organs/systems and the interaction with patients from HCPA by the interpretation of their biochemical data. On the other hand, the Post Graduation Program, at first, emphasized biochemistry teaching in a traditional form, but gradually changed the emphasis to investigation, and most classes changed to scientific paper reports. To stimulate the teaching formation, two activities were offered to post-graduation students: Biochemistry Teaching Methodology and Teaching Practice in Biochemistry. These activities promote opportunity for the students to

  8. The changing role of the hospital chief financial officer.

    Freitag, T R; Freitag, W

    1980-01-01

    Things are changing. That statement is obviously true of things political, economic and scientific. Not surprisingly, therefore, the statement applies to the activities, responsibilities, qualifications and, ultimately, status of the hospital chief financial officer (CFO).

  9. The Role of Communication in Ensuring Sustained Behavior Change

    Webinar series on communications strategies and methods addresses how communications tools can be used throughout the implementation of climate and clean energy programs to achieve behavior change and ensure sustained.

  10. Climate Change and Food Security: the role of Biotechnology

    Robert M. Yawson

    2012-08-05

    Aug 5, 2012 ... rainfall patterns and outbreak of pests and diseases negatively affect ... Potential effects of changes in climate on crop yields have been assessed by ... supply programs, and the capacity of emerging technologies to deal with ...

  11. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  12. Universities as Inclusive Learning Organizations for Women?: Considering the Role of Women in Faculty and Leadership Roles in Academe

    Gouthro, Patricia; Taber, Nancy; Brazil, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of the learning organization, first discussed by Senge (1990), to determine if it can work as a model in the higher education sector. Design/methodology/approach: Using a critical feminist framework, this paper assesses the possibilities and challenges of viewing universities as…

  13. The Role of the Jesuit University in the Evolving “Innovation Triangle” of Business, Government, and Academia

    Roberto Brancatelli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to suggest a role for Jesuit universities to play in the evolving collaboration among business, government, and academia. Specifically, this paper will identify an “innovation triangle” whose aim is the creation of innovative ways to meet the challenges of a global economy. For purposes of the International Association of Jesuit Business Schools 2015 Conference in Montevideo, Uruguay, the subject area is “Jesuit inspiration at the university level: business challenges.” Our methodology consists of evaluating the role of Jesuit universities through the case study of a conference organized by the presenters of this paper. Although not actually held, the conference was scheduled to take place at Unisinos Business School in São Leopoldo, Brazil. Entitled “Doing Brazil in Brazil,” it involved a new structure in which participants were to work alongside government officials, university faculty, and students while exploring the ethical dimensions of foreign investment and business in Brazil. This was to have been done in conjunction with a techpark adjacent to the university.

  14. The role of university hospitals as centers of excellence for shared health-care-delivery of in- and outpatients

    Adelhard, K.; Matzko, M.; Bruening, R.; Holzknecht, N.; Stark, V.; Reiser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Problem. Health care delivery in Germany has to face severe challenges that will lead to a closer integration of services for in- and out-patients. University hospitals play an important role due to their activities in research, education and health care delivery. They are requested to promote and evaluate new means and ways for health care delivery. Methods. The Institute of Clinical Radiology at the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University started teleradiological services for hospitals and general practices in January 1999 in the framework of the ''Imaging services - teleradiological center of excellence''. Legal, technical and organizational prerequisites were analyzed. Results. Networks between university hospitals and general practices are not likely to solve all future problems. They will, however, increase the availability of the knowledge of experts even in rural areas and contribute to a quality ensured health care at the patients home. Future developments may lead to international co-operations and such services may be available to patients abroad. Conclusion. Legal, technical and organizational obstacles have to be overcome to create a framework for high quality telemedical applications. University hospitals will play an important role in promoting and evaluating teleradiological services. (orig.) [de

  15. The role of the University in relation to the nuclear industry is apparently very different in the U.S. and U.K. - is this appropriate

    Hall, R.S.; Young, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    We do not set out to provide answers but hope to stimulate discussion in those areas where we think that there could be a change in the role of the University in relation to the Nuclear Industry. The development of the U.S. and U.K. Nuclear Industries is briefly reviewed to illustrate differences in the funding, organisation and implementation of the research, design and construction, operation and regulation functions in the two countries. The centralised British scene contrasts strongly with the American one, and it is suggested that in limited but important technical areas there is scope for significantly closer association between the Industry and the Universities in the country. This would lead to a broader based national framework with which to meet the growing pressures for independent assessment, comment and advice. There are potential dangers in an indiscriminate or unbalanced association, and these are identified. (author)

  16. Religious and Non-religious Activity Engagement as Assets in Promoting Social Ties Throughout University: The Role of Emotion Regulation.

    Semplonius, Thalia; Good, Marie; Willoughby, Teena

    2015-08-01

    Emerging adulthood is a time of many changes. For example, one change that occurs for a subset of emerging adults is leaving home and starting university. Importantly, the creation of social ties can aid in promoting positive adjustment during university. This study investigated whether involvement in religious activities promotes social ties among university students directly and/or indirectly through emotion regulation. Importantly, involvement in religious activities may promote self-regulatory skills, and the ability to effectively regulate emotions can aid in navigating social interactions. To rule out potentially important confounding variables, spirituality and involvement in non-religious clubs were statistically controlled in all analyses. The participants included 1,132 university students (70.5 % female) from a university in Ontario, Canada who were surveyed each year over a period of 3 years. The results indicated that involvement in religious activities indirectly predicted more social ties over time through emotion regulation. Spirituality did not predict social ties or emotion regulation. Furthermore, non-religious clubs directly predicted more social ties over time. Thus, although involvement in religious and non-religious activities both predicted more social ties in a university setting over time, the mechanism by which these activities promote social ties differed.

  17. Innovation and Change in State Colleges and Universities. The G. Theodore Mitau Award, 1985.

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

    An award winning program, the Teacher-Research Institute of the Maryland Writing Project at Towson State University, is described, along with six other state college programs that received special commendations by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU). Towson State University won AASCU's G. Theodore Mitau Award for…

  18. Provocative Encounters Reflecting Struggles with Change: Power and Coercion in a Japanese University Situation

    Toh, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    This article examines a case of what Olssen et al. (2004) call "managerial oppression" set in a faculty of international studies of a Japanese university. Japanese universities have, in recent times, been facing the financial pressures of a falling birthrate and dwindling enrolments. To remain solvent, some universities have had to…

  19. Fostering Organizational Change through Deliberations: The Deliberative Jury in a University Setting

    Lindell, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Universities in Europe face a variety of reform initiatives, and university reform can be seen as a wicked problem that should be resolved through collaborative efforts. In Finland, there has been considerable resistance to proposed reforms, with university personnel complaining that they have not been heard. Students, on the other hand, seem…

  20. University Teachers' Perspectives on the Role of the Laplace Transform in Engineering Education

    Holmberg, Margarita; Bernhard, Jonte

    2017-01-01

    The Laplace transform is an important tool in many branches of engineering, for example, electric and control engineering, but is also regarded as a difficult topic for students to master. We have interviewed 22 university teachers from five universities in three countries (Mexico, Spain and Sweden) about their views on relationships among…

  1. Mobile Student to Mobile Worker: The Role of Universities in the "War for Talent"

    Li, Zhen; Lowe, John

    2016-01-01

    Universities, as part of the neoliberal regime imposed on them, are being co-opted into a "war for talent", in which national economic success is heavily invested. We examine part of this "war" that affects universities directly--the recruitment of "the brightest and the best" internationally mobile students and their…

  2. Foundations for the Future: The Fundraising Role of Foundation Boards at Public Colleges and Universities

    Worth, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In the face of rising costs and a prolonged economic downturn, public colleges and universities are being challenged to increase their sources of private support and philanthropy. Drawing on the findings of a recent AGB survey of public college- and university-affiliated foundation board chairs and chief executive officers, Foundations for the…

  3. Coaching from the Sidelines: A Comparative History of the Role of University Presidents in Intercollegiate Football

    Kolb, Carole

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation follows the trajectory of two football programs, the University of Wisconsin and the University of Pennsylvania, primarily from the perspective of administrators. It spans roughly forty years, from 1930 to the early 1970s. At first glance, these two schools may seem unlikely points of comparison, but viewed together they provide…

  4. Role of energy conservation and vacuum energy in the evolution of the universe

    Greben, JM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available accommodates the notion of dark energy and proposes a possible explanation for dark matter. It leads to a dual description of the universe, which is reminiscent of the dual theory proposed by Milne in 1937. On the one hand one can describe the universe in terms...

  5. Role and Responsibility of Board of Governors [BOG] in Ensuring Educational Quality in Colleges & Universities

    Naik, B. M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents in brief the need and importance of effective, imaginative and responsible governing boards in colleges and universities, so as to ensure educational quality. BOG should engage fruitfully with the principal and activities in college/ university. UGC, AICTE have now prescribed creation of effective boards for both government and…

  6. Student Co-Creation Behavior in Higher Education: The Role of Satisfaction with the University Experience

    Elsharnouby, Tamer H.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what constitutes students' satisfaction with university experience and examines the influence of overall satisfaction with the university experience on students' co-creation behavior-- namely, participation behavior and citizenship behavior. Drawing upon a sample of 379 students and using structural equation modeling, the…

  7. Exploring the Multiple Roles of Lund University in Strengthening Scania's Regional Innovation System: Towards Institutional Learning?

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Coenen, Lars; Moodysson, Jerker; Asheim, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Universities are increasingly seen as potential contributors to regional innovative capacity by serving as local knowledge conduits, bringing global state-of-the-art science and technology into the region. In practice, however, more active university engagement with their regional innovation systems

  8. Criticism in izibongo zamakhosi : The changing role of the modern ...

    The imbongi was free in the times of the really powerful Zulu kings to pass any criticism he saw fit within the ambit of the king's praises, in order to alert the king to his peoples' opinions as well as caution him on certain actions. Today the role of the imbongi is far more tenuous. In times gone by, this man not only played a ...

  9. The role of Canada's national parks in a changed climate

    Lopoukhine, N.

    1991-01-01

    There is a requirement to manage national parks for completeness or wholeness, to maintain a functional ecosystem with all its parts, including processes, and to maintain biological diversity. Climate change has the potential to affect vegetation distribution, and will not merely manifest itself as a change in zones, but will be characterized by a flora with new dominants. Canadian national parks within the Prairie provinces are on or near ecotones, the transition from forest to tundra and grasslands. Forest fire frequency and severity is likely to increase, with the potential of transforming the boreal forest into remnant units. A flexible national system of designating areas must be devised to provide protection for the ephemeral biological systems which will be transformed and moved in response to climatic change. The adoption of adaptive management is critical, and should include monitoring, communication, protection through networks, and park service leadership. Benign neglect management must be replaced with management for wilderness. 15 refs

  10. The climate change convention: What role can business play?

    Zammit Cutajar, M.

    1994-01-01

    The development, content, and some implications of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change are treated briefly. The Climate Change Convention commits those developed countries which have ratified it to limit their emissions of greenhouse gases. While this Convention is an agreement among Governments, and is not directly binding on companies, individuals or organizations, business people and others need to understand it and be prepared for the national initiatives that will follow its ratification. New opportunities are being created for energy-efficient firms, and for new technologies and products. (author)

  11. The role of biotechnology in combating climate change

    Aerni, Philipp; Gagalac, Florabelle; Scholderer, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    on biotechnology and climate change was conducted with 55 representatives of 44 institutions. The results of a perception pattern analysis show that the majority of stakeholder representatives had a neutral or positive attitude towards the use of biotechnology and regarded its potential to address climate change...... problems as significant. The survey results further reveal a significant relationship between a representative’s institutional and disciplinary background and his or her attitude. The respective background appears to determine to a considerable extent whether biotechnology is framed as a risk...

  12. Role of resolution in regional climate change projections over China

    Shi, Ying; Wang, Guiling; Gao, Xuejie

    2017-11-01

    This paper investigates the sensitivity of projected future climate changes over China to the horizontal resolution of a regional climate model RegCM4.4 (RegCM), using RCP8.5 as an example. Model validation shows that RegCM performs better in reproducing the spatial distribution and magnitude of present-day temperature, precipitation and climate extremes than the driving global climate model HadGEM2-ES (HadGEM, at 1.875° × 1.25° degree resolution), but little difference is found between the simulations at 50 and 25 km resolutions. Comparison with observational data at different resolutions confirmed the added value of the RCM and finer model resolutions in better capturing the probability distribution of precipitation. However, HadGEM and RegCM at both resolutions project a similar pattern of significant future warming during both winter and summer, and a similar pattern of winter precipitation changes including dominant increase in most areas of northern China and little change or decrease in the southern part. Projected precipitation changes in summer diverge among the three models, especially over eastern China, with a general increase in HadGEM, little change in RegCM at 50 km, and a mix of increase and decrease in RegCM at 25 km resolution. Changes of temperature-related extremes (annual total number of daily maximum temperature > 25 °C, the maximum value of daily maximum temperature, the minimum value of daily minimum temperature in the three simulations especially in the two RegCM simulations are very similar to each other; so are the precipitation-related extremes (maximum consecutive dry days, maximum consecutive 5-day precipitation and extremely wet days' total amount). Overall, results from this study indicate a very low sensitivity of projected changes in this region to model resolution. While fine resolution is critical for capturing the spatial variability of the control climate, it may not be as important for capturing the climate response to

  13. An Exploratory Case Study Examining Transformational Leadership and Organizational Change within the Presidency of a Small, Four-Year University

    Filer, Daniel Matthew

    2013-01-01

    As both internal and external threats continue to arise and challenge the traditional mold of higher education, the role of the university president is becoming more and more important. The position is being required to serve in an ever-growing number of capacities in addition to steering the direction of the institution. The purpose of the…

  14. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  15. The Changing role of agriculture in Dutch society

    Meerburg, B.G.; Korevaar, H.; Haubenhofer, D.K.; Blom, M.; Keulen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch agriculture has undergone significant changes in the past century, similar to many countries in the European Union. Due to economies of scale and in order to remain economically profitable, it became necessary for farmers to increase farm size, efficiency and external inputs, while minimizing

  16. The role of learning and social interaction for changing practices

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    The paper presents initial theoretical suggestions on how practice theory might be combined with understandings of learning as an experiential and social activity. The aim is to inspire to further thinking about how to make practice theory more “applicable” for designing changes towards a low...

  17. Japanese anime and women's gender-role changing

    Yu, Shunyao

    2015-01-01

    Feminism is a fast growing phenomenon in recent years. This paper started with the historical conflict of marriage and feminism, then researched the connection between anime and gender-role. Since Japanese anime was imported to China in 1980s, it has influenced the generation born in 1980s and 1990s in many aspects of their growth. These well-educated people perceived the Japanese culture and values through anime. This study connected gender stereotypes and marriage, and how Chinese well-educ...

  18. Neoliberal Policy in the Higher Education Sector in Bangladesh: Autonomy of Public Universities and the Role of the State

    Kabir, Ariful Haq

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1990s, enormous changes have been made in the higher education sector in Bangladesh. The government promulgated the Private University Act in 1992, and formulated a 20-year Strategic Plan for Higher Education: 2006-2026 (SPHE). A critical review shows that the objective of the plan is to connect education with market-driven economic…

  19. Role of University-Industry-Government Linkages in the Innovation Processes of a Small Catching-Up Economy

    Varblane, Urmas; Mets, Tonis; Ukrainski, Kadri

    2008-01-01

    During the transformation process from a command economy, the extraordinary statist university-industry-government (UIG) linkages model was replaced by an extreme version of laissez-faire relationships. A more modern interaction-based UIG model could be implemented only by changing the whole national innovation system of catching-up economies. The…

  20. The Development of Teacher educators' role as Researcher in New Universities

    dr. Gerda Geerdink; dr. Fer Boei; dr.ir. Quinta Kools; dr. Martijn Willemse; drs. Haske van Vlokhoven

    2013-01-01

    Abstract At this international symposium on the professionalism of teacher educators an extensive review study on the roles, accompanying behavior and the factors that support the development of these roles and behavior will be presented. Six roles of teacher educators were distinguished, from which

  1. Predicting Role Conflict, Overload and Contagion in Adult Women University Students with Families and Jobs.

    Home, Alice M.

    1998-01-01

    Data from 443 women combining work, family, and schooling showed that lower income increased their vulnerability to role conflict. Perceived intensity of student demands was the strongest predictor of role conflict, overload, and contagion (preoccupation with one role while performing another). Conflict and overload were eased somewhat by distance…

  2. SEA Change: Bringing together Science, Engineering and the Arts at the University of Florida

    Perfit, M. R.; Mertz, M. S.; Lavelli, L.

    2014-12-01

    A group of interested and multifaceted faculty, administrators and students created the Science, Engineering, Arts Committee (SEA Change) two years ago at the University of Florida (UF). Recognizing that innovative ideas arise from the convergence of divergent thinkers, the committee seeks to bring together faculty in Science, Engineering, the Arts and others across campus to develop and disseminate innovative ideas for research, teaching and service that will enhance the campus intellectual environment. We meet regularly throughout the year as faculty with graduate and undergraduate students to catalyze ideas that could lead to collaborative or interdisciplinary projects and make recommendations to support innovative, critical and creative work. As an example, the Department of Geological Sciences and the School of Art and Art History collaborated on a competition among UF undergraduate painting students to create artistic works that related to geoscience. Each student gathered information from Geological Sciences faculty members to use for inspiration in creating paintings along with site-specific proposals to compete for a commission. The winning work was three-story high painting representing rock strata and the Florida environment entitled "Prairie Horizontals" that is now installed in the Geoscience building entrance atrium. Two smaller paintings of the second place winner, depicting geologists in the field were also purchased and displayed in a main hallway. Other activities supported by SEA Change have included a collaborative work of UF engineering and dance professors who partnered for the Creative Storytelling and Choreography Lab, to introduce basic storytelling tools to engineering students. A campus-wide gathering of UF faculty and graduate students titled Creative Practices: The Art & Science of Discovery featured guest speakers Steven Tepper, Victoria Vesna and Benjamin Knapp in spring 2014. The Committee plans to develop and foster ideas that will

  3. Cross-Sector Social Partnerships for Social Change: The Roles of Non-Governmental Organizations

    Xinya Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex social and environmental issues call for broader collaboration across different sectors so as to instigate transformative social change. While previous scholars have emphasized the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs in facilitating social change, they have not provided a nuanced assessment of NGOs’ different roles. We use the Poverty and Employment Precarity in Southern Ontario (PEPSO research partnership as a study case and explore NGO partners’ different roles in a large cross-sector social partnership (CSSP. By interviewing 12 NGO partners and 4 non-NGO partners involved in the PEPSO research partnership, our research results show that NGOs primarily have 10 roles in a CSSP. They include enabling roles such as consultant, capacity builder, analyst, and funder; coordinating roles such as broker and communicator; and facilitating roles such as initiator, leader, advocate, and monitor. These roles allow NGOs to fulfil their duties to make substantial contributions to a CSSP.

  4. The role of phase change materials for the sustainable energy

    Kuta Marta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unceasing global economic development leads to continuous increase of energy demand. Considering the limited conventional resources of energy as well as impact on the environment associated with its use, it is important to focus on the rational management of energy resources and on supporting the development of new technologies related to both conventional and renewable energy resources. In a number of cases the use of phase change materials (PCMs turns out to be a reasonable solution. This paper contains a summary of well-studied and known, previously used solutions based on phase change materials as well as novel possibilities, which are under development. It has been decided to investigate this topic due to the wide range of highly effective solutions. The review is focused on selected applications of PCMs for technologies which are designed to improve energy efficiency and on PCMs used in technologies based on renewable energy sources.

  5. The dwindling role of population pressure in land use change

    Birch-Thomsen, Torben; Reenberg, Anette

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores a contemporary coupled human-environmental system on a small island in the South West Pacific. It describes the historical change of the resource management strategies, notably the agricultural land use, in this former subsistence system. Our conceptual mindset draws on Boserup......’s classic theories of land use intensification as well as on her more recently proposed heuristic framework to describe development processes that underpin land use system change. We illustrate how land use has become partially disconnected from the local population pressure and therefore remains relatively...... stable while the larger livelihood portfolio has undergone significant diversification. At present, the agricultural system is a supplement to a range of strategies that support the increasing number of people on the island. This explains why land use patterns continue relatively unchanged while...

  6. University-Level Teaching of Anthropogenic Global Climate Change (AGCC) via Student Inquiry

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews university-level efforts to improve understanding of anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC) through curricula that enable student scientific inquiry. We examined 152 refereed publications and proceedings from academic conferences and selected 26 cases of inquiry learning that overcome specific challenges to AGCC teaching. This review identifies both the strengths and weaknesses of each of these case studies. It is the first to go beyond examining the impact of specific inquiry instructional approaches to offer a synthesis of cases. We find that inquiry teaching can succeed by concretising scientific processes, providing access to global data and evidence, imparting critical and higher order thinking about AGCC science policy and contextualising learning with places and scientific facts. We recommend educational researchers and scientists collaborate to create and refine curricula that utilise geospatial technologies, climate models and communication technologies to bring students into contact with scientists, climate data and authentic AGCC research processes. Many available science education technologies and curricula also require further research to maximise trade-offs between implementation and training costs and their educational value.

  7. The Role of Labor Markets in Structural Change.

    Miguel Ricaurte

    2010-01-01

    Why did services become the dominant sector in industrialized economies? While abundant literature exists on the transition from agriculture to industry (i.e., the industrial revolution), there is no consensual explanation for the second wave of structural change. I argue that sectoral differences in regulation affecting the degree of competition in labor and goods markets explain: (a) the rise in the services sector share of output and employment, (b) international differences in cross-secto...

  8. The Role of the Modern University in Supporting the Entrepreneurial Ecosystem

    Mihaela DIACONU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current market conditions of high education, the university must assume besides teaching and research functions, also the contributor function to performing the economic areas. The article is based on the premise that the university's orientation towards innovative entrepreneurship and support of entrepreneurial ecosystem will ensure the increase of competitiveness of the university and stakeholders confidence. The literature review addresses new concepts in the field of entrepreneurship and studies done at European and international level which refer to the need to promote innovative entrepreneurship which was integrative approach. Based on the literature, we developed a methodological framework on what to do in a university for it to become capable of successfully fulfil the tasks of the new economic and social context.

  9. Role of Transformational Leadership on Employee’s Job Satisfaction: the Case of Private Universities in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Hamidullah Bayram

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact and type of effective leadership has a significant role in the improvement of organizational performance. This study has been conducted to indicate the importance of transformational leadership style on employees’ job satisfaction. The aim of this study is to describe the relationship between transformational leadership and employees’ job satisfaction at private universities in Bosnia and Herzegovina. A sample of 150 employees responded to a three-part instrument from two private universities in Sarajevo, the capital city of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Factor analysis, means, standard deviations, correlation and regression analysis were used to analyze the data. The findings determined that a moderate, positive and significant relationship exists between the dimensions transformational leadership and employees’ job satisfaction for both work of nature and operating condition. This study suggests that leaders at the private universities should pay more attention to findings new analytical ways for old problems and describing the demand of followers.

  10. ROLE OF PROFESSIONAL SELF-EXPRESSION OF HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS IN DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN UNIVERSITY

    Tarasova, Irina Vladimirovna

    2017-01-01

    The article is devoted to studying the problem of professional self-expression of university teacher. Thesis about the existence of 6 cognitive attributes of the university teacher’s self expression was theoretically identified and empirically acknowledged as a concept: 1) representation of a particular level of people’s self-conscience including professional; 2) describing method, by which a person shows, regulates his activity during objectivation in professional work; 3) acting as the cogn...

  11. The role of responsiveness within the self in transitions to university

    Marsico, Giuseppina; Gomes, Ramon; Dazzani, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    Entering university is a complex psychosocial phenomenon that can create several new stressful situations that students need to face. The transition into university may be accompanied by some psychosocial problems such as reduced self-esteem and academic achievement, increased social anxiety, and a critical rise in the probability of dropout.How does a person use cultural elements to cope with stress? Responding to thisquestion requires an understanding of the multivocal and ambivalent self. ...

  12. Ethics, transplantation, and the changing role of anatomists.

    Satyapal, K S

    2005-03-01

    Anatomists are regarded as custodians of cadaveric material donated to science. Almost every facet of medical science has experienced explosive advances. This has impacted directly on anatomists and their role. Increasingly, anatomists are raising concerns with regard to the treatment of human tissue (Jones,2002, Clin. Anat. 15:436-440). The Korperwelten (Bodyworlds) of Gunther von Hagens et al. (1987, Anat. Embryol. 175:411-421) has evoked considerable debate about the treatment of human cadavers. Thus far clinical anatomists have had little role to play in policy formulation, legislation, and ethical imperatives as applied to cadaveric donation for organ transplantation. Anatomists play an even more negligible role in the raging ethical controversy around live related/unrelated organ transplantation. Due to the critical international shortage of cadaveric donors, boundaries are being pushed to meet the needs of potential recipients (Ohler,2001, Prog. Transplant. 11:160-161). Constant reappraisal of these ethical and moral issues is therefore appropriate. Issues that relate to cultural and economic imperialism and pronouncements of international transplant societies may also require re-evaluation. The legislature governing the donation of human tissue in various countries is usually governed by a Human Tissue Act or its equivalent. In general, such acts are congruent with the Human Tissue Act (South Africa: Government Gazette 9, November 2001; No. 22824) that states "It is an offense to charge a fee in relation to the donation of human organs." In many countries, however, various lay press report that "the sale of body parts is now coming of age." Terms such as "rewarded gifting" and "donors" being transformed into "vendors" are opening a Pandora's Box (Nelson et al.,1993, "Financial incentives for organ donation: a report on the UNOS ethics committee payment subcommittee"). Cameron and Hoffenberg (1999, Kidney Int. 55:724-732) feel strongly that arguments in

  13. The role and the place of the Institute of Culture within a classical university structure

    Petrova Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern culture, having refused the generality of culture norms and ideals and offering plurality of their samples, confronts social institutes with a problem of choosing the ones, which they are intended to serve. Uppermost, this concerns such a social and educational institute as a university. Where, to what norms and ideals does the modern university lead the student if by opening the world in front of them, it offers a reality of cultural pluralism? How to show the truth if it is seen in its heterogeneous state? What culture and truth does the professor choose to orientate himself/herself in his/her teaching path? May the Institute/ Department of Culture help answer all these questions as being the one that started the history of university? To answer these questions the comparative-historical method of research has been used: the contradiction has been displayed against the background of culture problem solving in the history of the university. The article justifies the need for the development of the philosophical-culturological concept of forming and keeping culture values performed by the institutionalized organizations of the university. The problem of replacing the concept of ‘the graduate model’ with that of ‘the profession model’ as a goal of innovative university education has been justified.

  14. Role of the future creative universities in the triple helix of science and technology corridors

    Iraj nabipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The science and technology corridor is a complex cluster containing universities, science parks, research centers, high-tech companies, venture capital, institutional and physical infrastructures, and human capital in a defined geography with its unique management and legal structure in association with the business space and knowledge-based products. In fact, the science and technology corridor reflects the concept of development based on the knowledge region (the especial region for science and technology. The knowledge region is clearly a triple helix phenomenon par excellence: universities, governments and businesses combine their efforts to construct a common advantage which they would not be able to offer on their own. The future creative universities in connection with the knowledge city-regions not only will deal with innovation and entrepreneurial training but also produce a competitive, vibrant environment with high indices for quality of life and full of green technologies. In this article, we will present functional interactions of the creative universities in the triple helix, particularly the missions for the Iranian universities of medical sciences. As a theoretical model, the complex interactions of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences and Health Services with Bushehr Science and Technology Corridor will be discussed.

  15. Exploring the Role of Human Capital Management on Organizational Success: Evidence from Public Universities

    Odunayo Paul SALAU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The demand for higher education in Nigeria has been considered as not only an investment in human capital, but also a pre-requisite for economic development. Consequent upon the expansion of higher education in Nigeria, quite a number of institutions have suffered decay due to poor work environments, inadequate educational facilities and poor funding which have resulted into unabated brain drain, strike and turnover. However, the need to develop talents is no longer hidden, what remains controversial is knowing the best method for managing human capacity especially in Nigerian State owned universities. Thus, this study examined the relationship between human capital management and organizational success using three State owned universities in Southwest, Nigeria. These universities (Ekiti State University (EKSU, Lagos State University (LASU, Tai Solarin University of Education (TASUED were chosen for their uniqueness. Survey research design was adopted with 398 respondents (staff. Self-administered questionnaire was adopted and analyzed with the adoption of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. However, the results indicated that adequate leadership practices; learning capacity; workforce optimization; knowledge accessibility; workplace culture and; mentorship are significant predictors of organizational success in higher education.

  16. The Natural Science Program at the University of New Mexico: Geosciences Play a Central Role in Preservice Teacher Training

    Nyman, M. W.; Ellwein, A. L.; Geissman, J. W.; McFadden, L. D.; Crossey, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    An important component for future directions of geoscience departments is public education. The role of geoscience departments in the preparation and professional development of K-12 teachers is particularly critical, and merges with other teaching missions within the University. The importance of geoscience content for teachers (and the general public) is evident in the numerous earth science related public policy issues that are the subject of ever-increasing attention (climate change, energy resources, water utilization, etc.). The earth and space sciences are not only included in both state and federal science content education standards but are also inherently interesting to students and therefore provide an important gateway to foster interest in science as well as other scientific disciplines. For over 10 years, the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS) at the University of New Mexico (UNM) has housed and supported the Natural Science Program (NSP), which provides science content courses and numerous programs for K-12 pre- and in-service teachers. Classes and laboratories are integrated, and are capped at 21 students in the 200-level courses, assuring an active and supportive learning environment for students who are typically science-phobic with negative or no experiences with science. Enrollments are maintained at ~150 preservice teachers per semester. The program is staffed by two lecturers, who have advanced degrees in the geosciences as well as K-12 teaching experience, and several part time instructors, including graduate students who gain valuable teaching experience through teaching in the NSP. With continued support from the department, the NSP has expanded to develop robust and functional relationships related to science teacher professional development with Sandia National Laboratories and local school districts, initiated development of a graduate certificate in science teaching and, advanced a proposal for the development of an Energy

  17. Stories of Change: e/merge @ the University of Cape Town

    Carr, Tony

    The Center for Educational Technology (CET) is located at the University of Cape Town, which is a leading South African research and teaching university. This implies great opportunities and challenges since we are poised between the experience of and conditions faced by colleagues in other parts of Africa and those of the colleagues in first-world countries. We have access to the intellectual and professional networks of the first world and our university features on global rankings, yet our resourcing, while generous in terms of most other universities in our continent, is a fraction of that enjoyed by first-world universities of similar size and scope. Both globalization and developmental imperatives require us to rapidly extend the effective use of educational technology in our university for teaching and learning. The received models of e-Learning integration developed mostly in first-world countries need to be adapted for contexts with scarce resources.

  18. Gender role attitudes, awareness and experiences of non-consensual sex among university students in Shanghai, China.

    Zuo, Xiayun; Lou, Chaohua; Gao, Ersheng; Lian, Qiguo; Shah, Iqbal H

    2018-03-15

    Non-consensual sex (NCS) among young people, an important subject with public health and human rights implications, was less studied in China. This study is to investigate the NCS awareness and victimization of university students in Shanghai, China and whether they were associated with adolescent gender-role attitudes. Gender-role attitudes, awareness and victimization of different forms of NCS were examined among 1099 undergraduates (430 males and 669 females) in four universities in Shanghai using computer-assisted self-interview approach. University students held relatively egalitarian attitude to gender roles. Gender difference existed that girls desired to be more equal in social status and resource sharing while more endorsed the submissiveness for women in sexual interaction than boys. They held low vigilance on the risk of various forms of NCS, with the mean score on perception of NCS among boys (5.67) lower than that among girls (6.37). Boys who adhered to traditional gender norms were less likely to aware the nature of NCS (β = - 0.6107, p = 0.0389). Compared with boys, higher proportion of girls had been the victims of verbal harassment, unwanted touch, fondling, and penetrative sexual intercourse. Multivariable analysis revealed that girls who held more traditional gender-role attitudes were more vulnerable to physical NCS (OR = 1.41, p = 0.0558). The weakening but still existing traditional gender norms had contributions in explaining the gender difference on the low vigilance of NCS and higher prevalence of victimization among university students in Shanghai, China. Interventions should be taken to challenge the traditional gender norms in individual and structural level, and promote the society to understand the nature of NCS better as well as enhance negotiation skills of adolescents and young people that prevent them from potentially risky situations or relationships.

  19. A 10-year case study on the changing determinants of university student satisfaction in the UK.

    Adrian Burgess

    Full Text Available Higher Education (HE, once the prerogative of a tiny elite, is now accessible to larger numbers of people around the world than ever before yet despite the fact that an understanding of student satisfaction has never been more important for today's universities, the concept remains poorly understood. Here we use published data from the UK's National Student Survey (NSS, representing data from 2.3 million full-time students collected from 2007 to 2016, as a case study of the benefits and limitations of measuring student satisfaction that might have applicability for other countries, particularly those that, like the UK, have experienced significant growth in student numbers. The analyses showed that the factor structure of the NSS remained generally stable and that the ability of the NSS to discriminate between different subjects at different universities actually improved over the ten-year sample period. The best predictors of overall satisfaction were 'Teaching Quality' and 'Organisation & Management', with 'Assessment & Feedback' having relatively weak predictive ability, despite the sector's tangible efforts to improve on this metric. The tripling of student fees in 2012 for English students (but not the rest of the UK was used as a 'natural experiment' to investigate the sensitivity of student satisfaction ratings to the real economic costs of HE. The tuition fee increase had no identifiable negative effect, with student satisfaction steadily improving throughout the decade. Although the NSS was never designed to measure perceived value-for-money, its insensitivity to major changes in the economic costs of HE to the individual suggest that the conventional concept of student satisfaction is incomplete. As such we propose that the concept of student satisfaction: (i needs to be widened to take into account the broader economic benefits to the individual student by including measures of perceived value-for-money and (ii should measure students

  20. A 10-year case study on the changing determinants of university student satisfaction in the UK.

    Burgess, Adrian; Senior, Carl; Moores, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Higher Education (HE), once the prerogative of a tiny elite, is now accessible to larger numbers of people around the world than ever before yet despite the fact that an understanding of student satisfaction has never been more important for today's universities, the concept remains poorly understood. Here we use published data from the UK's National Student Survey (NSS), representing data from 2.3 million full-time students collected from 2007 to 2016, as a case study of the benefits and limitations of measuring student satisfaction that might have applicability for other countries, particularly those that, like the UK, have experienced significant growth in student numbers. The analyses showed that the factor structure of the NSS remained generally stable and that the ability of the NSS to discriminate between different subjects at different universities actually improved over the ten-year sample period. The best predictors of overall satisfaction were 'Teaching Quality' and 'Organisation & Management', with 'Assessment & Feedback' having relatively weak predictive ability, despite the sector's tangible efforts to improve on this metric. The tripling of student fees in 2012 for English students (but not the rest of the UK) was used as a 'natural experiment' to investigate the sensitivity of student satisfaction ratings to the real economic costs of HE. The tuition fee increase had no identifiable negative effect, with student satisfaction steadily improving throughout the decade. Although the NSS was never designed to measure perceived value-for-money, its insensitivity to major changes in the economic costs of HE to the individual suggest that the conventional concept of student satisfaction is incomplete. As such we propose that the concept of student satisfaction: (i) needs to be widened to take into account the broader economic benefits to the individual student by including measures of perceived value-for-money and (ii) should measure students' level of