WorldWideScience

Sample records for university art museum

  1. Presenting Cultural Artifacts in the Art Museum: A University-Museum Collaboration

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2009-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on multicultural art education and integrative pedagogy, educators have incorporated community resources, such as cultural artifacts exhibited in art museums, to enrich their programs. Cultural artifacts are human-made objects which generally reveal historic information about cultural values, beliefs, and traditions.…

  2. Active Art Education in a University Museum: The Example of the Barber Institute

    Şehnaz Yalçın Wells

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Museums provide individuals with access to a variety of artworks at a quality and quantity that is not possible any other way. Museum education is of great importance to get effective benefit from museums. Nowadays museum education starts at an early age, and is simultaneously given in appropriate subjects of different lessons. Turkey has made important progresses in museum education and museum studies in recent years, but clearly there is much more to do when compared to more developed countries. These steps can be summarised (a increasing research into museum education and museology, (b staff training, (c creation of social awareness, (d development and application of new projects. Managing all these is not possible with the state’s efforts. Private entrepreneurs and civil society should take the initiative and contribute towards museum education and museology. The aim of this research is to determine the potential and function of art education, and to introduce the museum/art activities made in this context in the Barber Museum of Fine Arts Institute at Birmingham University, England. In line with these aims the answers to these questions are being sought: 1. How was Barber Institute Museum been established and developed? a What is the history of the museum’s foundation? b In the context of the development of museology and art, how can the establishment of the museum by a person/family be evaluated? 2. What are the institutional features of the Barber Institute Museum? a What are the administrative features of the museum? b What are the spatial features and importance of the museum? c What is the artistic significance of its collections? 3. How is museum/art education applied at the Barber Institute Museum? 4. How can the example of the Barber Institute be assessed in terms of museology and museum/art education? Method: This is a qualitative research study, and the case study method is used accordingly. This method foresees the portrayal

  3. The Rose Art Museum Crisis

    Dillon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    On January 26, 2009, the Brandeis University Board of Trustees voted unanimously to close the Rose Art Museum (Waltham, Massachusetts). The proceeds from the subsequent auction were to be reinvested in the university to ensure its long-term financial health. The reaction to the decision by campus constituencies provides a case study to show the…

  4. Physics in the Art Museum

    Dale, Daniel A.; Bailey, Brenae L.

    2003-02-01

    Parisian artist Paul Signac met the impressionists Claude Monet and Georges Seurat in 1884. Their influence spurred his work in pointillism (or, where the juxtaposition of small dots of color in conjunction with the limited resolving power of the human eye lead to the impression of color coalescence).1-4 To stimulate a cross-disciplinary appreciation of science and art, we used the University of Wyoming Art Museum's Signac painting "Barques de Pêche à Marseilles" (see Fig. 1) to explore diffraction theory and the anatomical limitations to our vision during an optics exercise done in the museum.

  5. Sustainability in Modern Art Museums

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyzes the concept of sustainability in European governmental museum policies. It takes into consideration great modern art museums, particularly Tate Modern. On the one hand, the issue of sustainability is linked to art museums inasmuch these institutions operate for the sustainable...... to their eligibility for funding and it is indeed an economic rather than a cultural issue. Though, modern art museums’ sustainability relies not only in developing economic and environmental strategies but mostly in creating cultural policies that favor art museums in accomplishing same tasks but from different...... curatorial and managerial perspectives. A long-term sustainable museum model steps beyond Foucault’s notion that art museums are “heterotopy”, i.e. spaces that present art as an alternative phenomenon outside reality. On the contrary, a sustainable model for museums acts as “archètopy”, i.e. a space (tòpos...

  6. NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale | Art Museum in Fort Lauderdale

    NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Visit Admissions Hours & Admission Policies & Accessibility Airports Shop & Dine About the Café & Store Store Café Menu Art Exhibitions Currently on View Thursday 2-for-1 specials on wine and craft beer in the Museum Café, and hands-on art projects for all

  7. The Ecology of Arts and Humanities Education: Bridging the Worlds of Universities and Museums

    Salazar-Porzio, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, colleges and universities have been talking seriously about civic learning, but other stakeholders, particularly public arts, culture, and humanities institutions, must be part of the conversation in order to create a context for learning that develops the skills of graduates in robust ways that reflect the full promise of liberal…

  8. Enhancing Science Literacy and Art History Engagement at Princeton Through Collaboration Between the University Art Museum and the Council on Science and Technology

    Riihimaki, C. A.; White, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of innovative science education for social science and humanities students is often under-appreciated by science departments, because these students typically do not take science courses beyond general education requirements, nor do they contribute to faculty research programs. However, these students are vitally important in society—for example as business leaders or consultants, and especially as voters. In these roles, they will be confronted with decisions related to science in their professional and personal lives. The Council on Science and Technology at Princeton University aims to fill this education gap by developing and supporting innovative programs that bring science to cross-disciplinary audiences. One of our most fruitful collaborations has been with the Princeton University Art Museum, which has an encyclopedic collection of over 92,000 works of art, ranging from antiquity to the contemporary. Our work includes 1) bringing introductory environmental science courses to the Museum to explore how original works of art of different ages can serve as paleo-environmental proxies, thereby providing a means for discussing broader concepts in development of proxies and validation of reconstructions; 2) sponsoring a panel aimed at the general public and composed of science faculty and art historians who discussed the scientific and art historical contexts behind Albert Bierstadt's Mount Adams, Washington, 1875 (oil on canvas, gift of Mrs. Jacob N. Beam, accession number y1940-430), including the landscape's subjects, materials, technique, and style; and 3) collaborating on an installation of photographs relevant to a freshman GIS course, with an essay about the artwork written by the students. This first-hand study of works of art encourages critical thinking and an empathetic approach to different historical periods and cultures, as well as to the environment. Our collaboration additionally provides an opportunity to engage more students in

  9. What is Sustainability in Modern Art Museums?

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    aspects this value brings in management. However, art museums have left beside the analysis of sustainability in regards to their cultural policies and internal managerial organization. Though European museums have proposed sustainability strategies in the collection management (brand franchising...

  10. Forgery at the Snite Museum of Art? Improving AMS Radiocarbon Dating at the University of Notre Dame

    Troyer, Laura; Bagwell, Connor; Anderson, Tyler; Clark, Adam; Nelson, Austin; Skulski, Michael; Collon, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    The Snite Museum of Art recently obtained several donations of artifacts. Five of the pieces lack sufficient background information to prove authenticity and require further analysis to positively determine the artwork's age. One method to determine the artwork's age is radiocarbon dating via Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) performed at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory. Samples are prepared by combustion of a small amount of material and subsequent reduction to carbon into an iron powder matrix (graphitization). The graphitization procedure affects the maximum measurement rate, and a poor graphitization can be detrimental to the AMS measurement of the sample. Previous graphitization procedures resulted in a particle current too low or inconsistent to optimize AMS measurements. Thus, there was a desire to design and refine the graphitization system. The finalized process yielded physically darker samples and increased sample currents by two orders of magnitude. Additionally, the first testing of the samples was successful, yet analysis of the dates proved inconclusive. AMS measurements will be performed again to obtain better sampling statistics in the hopes of narrowing the reported date ranges. NSF and JINA-CEE.

  11. Art, the Natural Sciences and a Museum.

    Unterberg, Adele Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    Described is a school-museum program which linked art and science through the study of small mammals and birds in relation to color, form, and communication. Art, audiovisual aids, research, readings, language, and communication were combined in this interdisciplinary program. (KC)

  12. Contemporary collaborations between museums and universities

    Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Simonsen, Celia Ekelund

    2017-01-01

    Numerous new types of cross-institutional collaborations have been conducted recently at the intersection between museums and universities. Museums of all subject areas have collaborated with university researchers, just as scholars from a broad range of disciplines including communications, media...... studies, IT and performance design and tourism increasingly collaborate with museums. Based on qualitative evaluation material and autobiographical experiences, this article analyzes a large Danish research project in which collaborations between several museums and universities took place. We investigate...

  13. Communicating the Value of Cartoon Art across University Classrooms: Experiences from the Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

    McGurk, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    This article is an exploration of the varying applications of comics and cartoon art as primary resources and pedagogical tools within the university setting. Following some background information on cartoon art forms including early American newspaper comics, nineteenth century humor serials, political cartoons and manga, the article explores how…

  14. From interventions to interactions: Science Museum Arts Projects’ history and the challenges of interpreting art in the Science Museum

    Hannah Redler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hannah Redler’s paper examines the 13 year history of Science Museum, London’s contemporary art programme and explores how changing cultural conditions and the changing function of museums are making the questions raised by bringing art into the Science Museum context increasingly significant. It looks at how Science Museum Arts Projects started as a quirky, experimental sideline aimed at shaking up the Museum and its visitors’ assumptions, but has now become a fundamental means by which the Science Museum chooses to represent the impact of science, medicine, engineering and technology on peoples’ everyday lives.

  15. Museums USA: Art, History, Science, and Other Museums.

    National Endowment for the Arts, Washington, DC.

    The results and analysis of an earlier museum survey, presented in "Museum U.S.A.: Highlights" (ED 093 777), are given in this document. The purpose is to present a comprehensive picture of museums in the United States--their numbers and locations, types and functions, facilities and finances, personnel and trustees, and activities and attendance.…

  16. Museums and art galleries as partners for public health interventions.

    Camic, Paul M; Chatterjee, Helen J

    2013-01-01

    The majority of public health programmes are based in schools, places of employment and in community settings. Likewise, nearly all health-care interventions occur in clinics and hospitals. An underdeveloped area for public health-related planning that carries international implications is the cultural heritage sector, and specifically museums and art galleries. This paper presents a rationale for the use of museums and art galleries as sites for public health interventions and health promotion programmes through discussing the social role of these organisations in the health and well-being of the communities they serve. Recent research from several countries is reviewed and integrated into a proposed framework for future collaboration between cultural heritage, health-care and university sectors to further advance research, policy development and evidence-based practice.

  17. How Some Art Museums Can Appeal to Teenagers

    Striepe, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study that explores the question of how some art museums can appeal to teenagers. The significance of teenagers as the most underrepresented age demographic to visit museums is relevant to current museum practice where visitor studies have assumed increasing importance. As teenagers mature into adults, the long-term…

  18. Building the image of modern art : the rhetoric of two museums and the representation and canonization of modern art (1935-1975) : the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York

    Leigh, Nana

    2008-01-01

    The Rhetoric of Two Museums and the Representation and Canonization of Modern Art (1935-1975): The Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York Museums of modern art have determined the course of modern art history. Their contributions to the representation and

  19. Multicultural University Education and Museum Pedagogy

    Melnikova, G. F.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The specifics of the educational process in the museum are revealed. The experience of using the multicultural educational space of the museum for developing non-humanitarian directions of the university of general cultural competencies is expounded. The emphasis is on the formation of the ability to tolerate social, ethnic, confessional and cultural differences.

  20. 77 FR 68827 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of...

    2012-11-16

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Indian Arts... Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a...

  1. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  2. Art expertise and attribution of museum porcelain and faience

    Revenok N.N.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available the article considers problems of research of museum art porcelain and faience of the XIX – the beginning of the XX century in the process of carrying out fine art expertise and also reveals the main criteria of Museum attribution. An important part of the examination methodology of thin-ceramic products is the development of special methods for their study in the conditions of modern laboratories on the latest-generation devices. The results presented in the article can contribute to the practical application of the proposed methods in conducting art criticism of art porcelain and faience in the museum research and restoration work.

  3. Constructing museum learning at the university level

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2011-01-01

    in a museum environment. How can museums be implemented at the university level and become part of a curriculum that demands high academic standards while at the same time exploiting and benefitting from the complexity and aesthetically determined learning potentials offered by museums? Following George A....... Hein’s notion of a ‘constructivist museum’ the purpose of the article is to suggest and demonstrate a learning strategy that focuses on the learner’s consideration of his or her own learning but elaborates on Hein’s general view of the physical surroundings and deals with the question of how exhibition...

  4. University museums: problems, policy and progress

    Nick Merriman

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available There are some 400 university museums and collections in the United Kingdom. During the 1990s their often neglected state came under close scrutiny and as a result their future role is now being re-assessed. A member of the Institute's staff has recently been appointed to the new position of Curator of UCL Museums and Collections, and he comments here on the national situation and describes some of the initiatives under way at UCL.

  5. 75 FR 58424 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    2010-09-24

    ... Museum of Arts & Culture, aka Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the... Eastern Washington State Historical Society (now Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture), University of...

  6. Curating Performance on the Edge of the Art Museum

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Schwarzbart, Judith

    two-day festival offers a format that vary considerable from the exhibition series the museum puts on most of the time. The performance program includes artists such as composers usually working with contemporary music, electronic music composers, as well as performance artists working from......Since the Intermedia and Fluxus movements a variety of timebased artforms have been contained within visual art contexts. The performative works draw often as much on the tradition of theatre, music, dance, and poetry reading as fine art. Although the institutional context plays a role...... art institution. Our research relates specifically to a festival for performative art, ACTS 2014, which we co-curate for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Roskilde. Having grown out of a Fluxus spirit, the museum is not foreign to time-based practices like many museums are. Nevertheless, the intensive...

  7. Modern Masters from the Smithsonian American Art Museum

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    A new traveling exhibition and catalogue produced by the Smithsonian's American Art Museum features works by 31 artists from the United States who came to maturity in the mid-20th century. These artists have become the most significant and influential artists over the past 50 years as their works adorn the modern galleries of hundreds of museums.…

  8. Art Museum Education in Transition: Moderna Galerija in Slovenia

    Zeleznik, Adela

    2012-01-01

    This essay examines the educational practices at the Moderna galerija, a national museum of modern and contemporary art in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in the last twenty years. Its aim is to reflect on the museum education in relation to broader historical context, of the former Yugoslavia (the country Slovenia was a part of until 1991) and discuss how…

  9. Locally-sourced: How climate science can collaborate with arts & humanities museums to achieve widespread public trust and communication

    Walker, C. G.

    2017-12-01

    Local history, art and culture museums have a large role to play in climate science communication. Unfortunately, in our current society, scientific evidence and logic is not universally accepted as truth. These messages can be dispersed through trusted institutional allies like humanities and arts museums. There are many reasons for scientific institutions to work with humanities and arts museums of all sizes, especially local museums that have personal, trusted relationships with their communities. First, museums (by definition) are public educators; the work that they do is to disperse challenging information in an understandable way to a wide array of audiences. Museums are located in every state, with over 35,000 museums in the nation; 26% of those are located in rural areas. These museums serve every demographic and age range, inspiring even those with difficulty accepting climate change information to act. Second, in a recent public opinion survey commissioned by the American Alliance of Museums, museums - especially history museums - are considered the most trustworthy source of information in America, rated higher than newspapers, nonprofit researchers, the U.S. government, or academic researchers. Scientific institutions must collaborate with local museums to improve science communication going forward. Not only will important climate and sustainability research be dispersed via trusted sources, but the public will engage with this information in large numbers. In 2012 alone, over 850 million people visited museums - more than the attendance for all major league sports and theme parks combined. A recent impact study shows that history and art museums, especially, are not seen as "having a political agenda," with over 78% of the public seeing these museums as trusted institutions. There are many ways in which the scientific community can collaborate with "the arts." This presentation will speak to the larger benefit of working with sister arts & humanities

  10. Case Studies of Three Midwestern Art Museums as They Function as Adult Education Institutions, with an Introductory History of Adult Education in American Art Museums.

    Furstenberg, James Henry

    The study describes current art museum adult education programs and objectives in three art museums. Data were gathered through interviews with museum staffs, from current publications and records, and from clipping files and historical documents. Each museum sponsors training for volunteer guides and a yearly show for collectors, and provides…

  11. Teen Artists: Impact of a Contemporary Art Museum

    Erickson, Mary; Hales, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the effects of a yearlong, multivisit teen program in a contemporary art museum on adolescents' reflections about art. Our purpose was to discover whether this program, focused on experiences with contemporary art and artists with its metacognitive approach, affected students' thinking about their own artmaking. The…

  12. Engaging Strangeness in the Art Museum: an audience development strategy

    Jane Deeth

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available What is the public art museum’s role in enhancing hesitant viewers’ engagement with contemporary art, especially its more challenging and conceptual aspects? In considering this question, the notion that contemporary art is too difficult for general audiences to engage with directly is refuted. It is suggested that the capacity for viewers to make sense of contemporary art, understood as the discursive practices that have come to the fore since the 1960s, is hindered not by the art but by the art theory that hesitant viewers employ. As representational and formalist aesthetic codes remain the dominant modes of responding to art, for the art museum to become more inclusive, there needs a greater emphasis on discursive approaches to experiencing art. From an examination of claims made across disciplines that advocate discursive practice, including George Hein’s constructivist museum, Helen Illeris’s performative museum and Jacques Lacan’s psychoanalytic conversation, a strategy for the enhancement of the experience of contemporary art for the hesitant or disconnected viewer is proposed that involves reorienting the role of the public art museum from expert speaker to expert listener.

  13. Education at the Dittrick Museum of Medical History, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

    Edmonson, James M

    2009-01-01

    The Dittrick Museum of Medical History pursues an educational mission as being part of a major research university. While the Dittrick dates to 1899 as a historical committee of the Cleveland Medical Library Association, it first affiliated with Case Western Reserve University in 1966, and became a department of the College of Arts and Sciences of CWRU in 1998. The Dittrick maintains a museum exhibition gallery that is open to the public free of charge, and museum staff provide guided tours on appointment. Much of the teaching and instruction at the Dittrick is conducted by university professors; their classes meet in the museum and use museum resources in the form of artifacts, images, archives, and rare books. Class projects using Dittrick collections may take the form of research papers, exhibitions, and online presentations. Dittrick staff assist in these classes and are available to help researchers use museum resources.

  14. Frames of References – Art Museums as Unique Visual Media

    Aneta Hristova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The age old activity of collecting arts is not intrinsically dependent on the art museum as separate architectural type. How was the art museum as an independent structure conceptualized and why? What was the idea behind that concept? Was it created as a medium consciously and what kind of messages was it supposed to deliver? What kind of unique “textual” overlaps the various disciplines of archaeology, art history, politics, literature, science and architecture created in order to produce what we today recognize as art museum space? This study focuses on the crucial historical moments of the late 17th century when such questions were posed for the first time within the classical discourse of the French architectural theory which followed the consolidation of French absolutism and the foundation of the Royal academies of arts and sciences, until the mid 19th century when the answers to those questions were finally exemplified in built architecture. The study gives a comprehensive overview of the cultural context art museums as public institutions emerged from and became new spatial models for collective cultivation.

  15. Why Does the Buddha Have Long Ears? A North Carolina Museum Educator Invites Students To Explore Religious Diversity through Art.

    Bullard, Sara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Five Faiths Project, a children's program of storytelling, photography workshops, museum exhibits, classroom projects, and community performances developed by the curator of education of the Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina. Activities, which have focused on Hinduism and Judaism so far, will eventually explore…

  16. appropriate strategies for designing contemporary art museums

    2016-07-16

    Jul 16, 2016 ... such as (aesthetic style designed for the set, easy access to the collections and availability of educational .... Thus, any decisions to encounter different cultures can help the ... effect of museum attraction on cultural tourism status in the ..... Making the space dynamic and attractive by providing adequate ...

  17. The Art of Playful Mobility in Museums

    Froes, Isabel Cristina G.; Walker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Many of us interact with other people in online games and social networks, through multiple digital devices. But harnessing playful and mobile activities for museum learning is mostly undeveloped. In this chapter we explore play as a structure to support visitor learning, drawing from internation...

  18. Speaking absence. Art museums, representation and knowledge creation

    Tali, M.

    2014-01-01

    In my dissertation I investigate multiple absences that are at work in art museums. My understanding of absence is informed by postcolonial theory, gender studies and memory studies. Museal absence involves material and immaterial sides that are based on excluded objects and certain unwanted social

  19. Main Street as Art Museum: Metaphor and Teaching Strategies

    Vallance, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    A walk down Main Street can be very much like a stroll through a museum gallery--visually rich, inviting unexpected choices, aesthetically rewarding. This article explores the concept of shop windows as visually ordered compositions, much like paintings and other art objects, and suggests some approaches to applying this concept in teaching a…

  20. Communicating Art through Interactive Technology: New Approaches for Interaction Design in Art Museums

    Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses new approaches to interaction design for communication of art in the physical museum space. In contrast to the widespread utilization of interactive tech­nologies in cultural heritage and natural science museums it is generally a challenge to introduce technology in art museums...... without disturbing the domain of the art works. To explore the possibilities of communicating art through the use of technology, and to minimize disturbance of the artworks, we apply four main approaches in the communication: 1) gentle audio augmentation of art works; 2) conceptual affinity of art works...... and remote interactive installations; 3) using the body as an interaction device; 4) consistent audio-visual cues for interaction opportunities. The paper describes the application of these approaches for communication of inspira­tional material for a Mariko Mori exhibition. The installations are described...

  1. 77 FR 34987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

    2012-06-12

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of... of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in..., University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, 3260 South...

  2. Investigate and educate from the museum of contemporary art

    Juan David Quintero Arbeláez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper talks about the stake and lines of action in which the Museum of Contemporary Art of Uniminuto works regarding education and research. It presents the Museum as a promoter of experiences to stimulate the artistic and social development of the community. The text also mentions that these processes must be integrated with the real context of the community in order to have a great impact and challenge in their tasks. The intention with the community and the spreading of its heritage make part of an integral educational role of the museum. The most important tools from this project are the education and research in order to promote a sense of belonging, responsibility, own criteria and personal development in the community.

  3. Young Children's Learning in Art Museums: A Review of New Zealand and International Literature

    Terreni, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    In order to examine the existing literature in relation to the benefits of art museum education for the young, as well as to emphasise the literature gap in early childhood education research pertaining to access to and use of art museums by young children, a review of literature that discussed museum education for young children was undertaken. A…

  4. TOWARDS A VIRTUAL MUSEUM OF PUBLIC ART AND URBAN DESIGN

    Antoni Remesar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article comes from the communication that the authors presented at the International Seminar on “Public Art and Urban Design” held in Almada (Portugal in 2006 and later in Barcelona, 2007. Through a series of questions, the authors raise the issues of production, management and dissemination of public art in the context of Urban Design. These questions arise from the analysis carried out on a series of manuals of “good practice” disseminated by several municipalities and public agencies devoted to the Public Art. Finally, the authors outline the open possibilities for a Virtual Museum of Public Art and Urban Design, based on the existence of Public Art Information Systems that have cities like Barcelona and Saragossa and that are being developed in Lisbon and Almada

  5. 76 FR 28072 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    2011-05-13

    ...: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park... in the possession of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology... remains was made by University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology professional staff...

  6. 77 FR 46120 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2012-08-02

    ... Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA... Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated..., Repatriation Coordinator, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue...

  7. In the white cube: museum context enhances the valuation and memory of art.

    Brieber, David; Nadal, Marcos; Leder, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Art museum attendance is rising steadily, unchallenged by online alternatives. However, the psychological value of the real museum experience remains unclear because the experience of art in the museum and other contexts has not been compared. Here we examined the appreciation and memory of an art exhibition when viewed in a museum or as a computer simulated version in the laboratory. In line with the postulates of situated cognition, we show that the experience of art relies on organizing resources present in the environment. Specifically, artworks were found more arousing, positive, interesting and liked more in the museum than in the laboratory. Moreover, participants who saw the exhibition in the museum later recalled more artworks and used spatial layout cues for retrieval. Thus, encountering real art in the museum enhances cognitive and affective processes involved in the appreciation of art and enriches information encoded in long-term memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pictures in Pictures: Art History and Art Museums in Children's Picture Books

    Yohlin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Children's picture books that recreate, parody, or fictionalize famous artworks and introduce the art museum experience, a genre to which I will refer as "children's art books," have become increasingly popular over the past decade. This essay explores the pedagogical implications of this trend through the family program "Picture Books and Picture…

  9. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  10. The four cultures: Public engagement with science only, art only, neither, or both museums.

    Shein, Paichi Pat; Li, Yuh-Yuh; Huang, Tai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    This study uses an art-and-science comparative lens to understand the science culture, particularly the public engagement with science museums. A representational Taiwanese sample of 1863 subjects was categorized into "four cultures," who visit science only, art only, neither, or both museums, resulting in six multivariate logistic regression models. Knowledge of science, interests in scientific and social issues, and socio-demographic variables were considered in the models. Adults with children and males prefer science museums, females prefer art museums, and the young and urban intellects show no strong preference, appearing to be open to both science and art museums. The findings show the complex decisions the public make in visiting museums. It is no longer a strictly science or art decision, as framed by Snow's "The Two Cultures" argument; rather, the possibility of visiting both museums has emerged, a phenomenon we describe as cognitive polyphasia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. 76 FR 62842 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2011-10-11

    ...: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... the human remains may contact the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

  12. 75 FR 52023 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2010-08-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington...

  13. 75 FR 36672 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2010-06-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington...

  14. Field Studies for Key Stage 4 on Mine Water Pollution: A University and Museum Collaboration

    Hopwood, Jeremy D.; Berry, Stuart D.; Ambrose, Jayne L.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how a university and a museum have worked together to create a "How science works" workshop entitled "What's in our water?" The workshop teaches students about the continuing pollution from a disused coal mine, how the pollution is cleaned up using a state-of-the-art treatment works and how scientists…

  15. Exploring Classical Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

    Burchenal, Margaret; Foote, Allison

    This resource packet is designed to help teachers incorporate the study of ancient Greek and Roman art into junior and senior high school classrooms. The packet consists of four curriculum units based upon aspects of classical life or culture. These units are: "Daily Life; Mythology"; "Images of Power"; and "Echoes of…

  16. The Variable and Changing Status of Performance Art Relics and Artifacts in Museum Collections

    Cone, Louise

    2017-01-01

    The status of an artwork in a museum collection is variable and contingent upon factors and parameters that are specific not only to the logic of the museum world but also to factors extrinsic to the museum. In particular older performance art 'relics' are subject to contextual interpretations...

  17. Teens, New Media and Contemporary Art: Expanding Authority in the Museum Context

    Hill, Ryan; Douillette, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the impact of technology on contemporary art museums using case studies of teen media programs from the Hirshhorn Museum and the ICA Boston. Teens, as "digital natives," help to define the use of technology in museums. Responding to their needs opens up an institutional dialogue concerning issues of expertise,…

  18. 76 FR 73663 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State University, Museum of...

    2011-11-29

    ... below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Mary Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum of... ethnographic collection from the Conner Museum to the Museum of Anthropology. In June of 2011, the curator of collections at the Conner Museum found four unassociated funerary items in the museum storage area and...

  19. Going Public: Conservation of Contemporary Artworks. Between Backstage and Frontstage in Contemporary Art Museums

    Saaze, Vivian van

    2011-01-01

    In museum studies and history of art, what happens behind the scenes of museums stays relatively unseen and unspoken about. In the arts, generally speaking, what is dismissed as irrelevant (e.g. the realm of practices) is deliberately detached from what is thought to really matter; theory, discourse, content and meaning. Up till recently, backstage activities such as conservation practices are merely discussed among specialists and museum professionals. Only the outcomes of these discussions ...

  20. Impacts of Art Museum-Based Dementia Programming on Participating Care Partners

    Lamar, Katherine L.; Luke, Jessica J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the impacts of art museum-based dementia programming on participating care partners (CPs). Data were collected through telephone interviews with 29 caregivers who participated in one of three dementia programs: "here: now" at The Frye Art Museum, Seattle; "Meaningful Moments" at the…

  1. 78 FR 72710 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO

    2013-12-03

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Art Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in...

  2. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Bassett, B A

    2005-01-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  3. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  4. Self in Art/Self As Art: Museum Selfies As Identity Work.

    Kozinets, Robert; Gretzel, Ulrike; Dinhopl, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Selfies, digital images characterized by the desire to frame the self in a picture taken to be shared with an online audience, are important reflections of the contemporary self. Much extant psychological research on selfies has taken a pathologizing view of the phenomenon, focusing on its relationship to narcissism. Our investigation seeks to contribute to a holistic, contextualized and cultural perspective. We focus on the context of museums, places where art, history, education, and culture merge into the selfie taking behaviors of patrons. First, we explore theory salient to our topic of selfie taking, finding selfies to be an important way to construct ongoing series of narratives about the self. We use concepts of identity work, dramaturgy, and impression management to understand it in this light. We relate embodiment within the museum to the selfie's performative acts and expand upon notions that emphasize and distinguish the aesthetic elements present in many aspects of everyday life. We also question the ability of the museum selfie to destabilize. We also explore the contextual effects of mimicry and social norms. After describing our ethnographic and netnographic method, we investigate the museum selfie phenomenon. We begin with some observations on the extent of selfie-taking in contemporary culture as well as its evolution. Then, we consider selfies as a type of dynamic art form. Our analysis identifies a range of different types of museum selfies: art interactions, blending into art, mirror selfies, silly/clever selfies, contemplative selfies, and iconic selfies. Considered and studied in context, the museum selfie phenomenon reveals far more than the narcissism of the sort explored by past psychological research. The museum provides a stage for identity work that offers an opportunity for the selfie to be used not only for superficial performances but also in the pursuit of more profound self-reflection and its communication. Our ethnographic

  5. Self in Art/Self As Art: Museum Selfies As Identity Work

    Robert Kozinets

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Selfies, digital images characterized by the desire to frame the self in a picture taken to be shared with an online audience, are important reflections of the contemporary self. Much extant psychological research on selfies has taken a pathologizing view of the phenomenon, focusing on its relationship to narcissism. Our investigation seeks to contribute to a holistic, contextualized and cultural perspective. We focus on the context of museums, places where art, history, education, and culture merge into the selfie taking behaviors of patrons. First, we explore theory salient to our topic of selfie taking, finding selfies to be an important way to construct ongoing series of narratives about the self. We use concepts of identity work, dramaturgy, and impression management to understand it in this light. We relate embodiment within the museum to the selfie’s performative acts and expand upon notions that emphasize and distinguish the aesthetic elements present in many aspects of everyday life. We also question the ability of the museum selfie to destabilize. We also explore the contextual effects of mimicry and social norms. After describing our ethnographic and netnographic method, we investigate the museum selfie phenomenon. We begin with some observations on the extent of selfie-taking in contemporary culture as well as its evolution. Then, we consider selfies as a type of dynamic art form. Our analysis identifies a range of different types of museum selfies: art interactions, blending into art, mirror selfies, silly/clever selfies, contemplative selfies, and iconic selfies. Considered and studied in context, the museum selfie phenomenon reveals far more than the narcissism of the sort explored by past psychological research. The museum provides a stage for identity work that offers an opportunity for the selfie to be used not only for superficial performances but also in the pursuit of more profound self-reflection and its communication

  6. Self in Art/Self As Art: Museum Selfies As Identity Work

    Kozinets, Robert; Gretzel, Ulrike; Dinhopl, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Selfies, digital images characterized by the desire to frame the self in a picture taken to be shared with an online audience, are important reflections of the contemporary self. Much extant psychological research on selfies has taken a pathologizing view of the phenomenon, focusing on its relationship to narcissism. Our investigation seeks to contribute to a holistic, contextualized and cultural perspective. We focus on the context of museums, places where art, history, education, and culture merge into the selfie taking behaviors of patrons. First, we explore theory salient to our topic of selfie taking, finding selfies to be an important way to construct ongoing series of narratives about the self. We use concepts of identity work, dramaturgy, and impression management to understand it in this light. We relate embodiment within the museum to the selfie’s performative acts and expand upon notions that emphasize and distinguish the aesthetic elements present in many aspects of everyday life. We also question the ability of the museum selfie to destabilize. We also explore the contextual effects of mimicry and social norms. After describing our ethnographic and netnographic method, we investigate the museum selfie phenomenon. We begin with some observations on the extent of selfie-taking in contemporary culture as well as its evolution. Then, we consider selfies as a type of dynamic art form. Our analysis identifies a range of different types of museum selfies: art interactions, blending into art, mirror selfies, silly/clever selfies, contemplative selfies, and iconic selfies. Considered and studied in context, the museum selfie phenomenon reveals far more than the narcissism of the sort explored by past psychological research. The museum provides a stage for identity work that offers an opportunity for the selfie to be used not only for superficial performances but also in the pursuit of more profound self-reflection and its communication. Our ethnographic

  7. The art of observation: impact of a family medicine and art museum partnership on student education.

    Elder, Nancy C; Tobias, Barbara; Lucero-Criswell, Amber; Goldenhar, Linda

    2006-06-01

    Compared to verbal communication, teaching the skill of observation is often shortchanged in medical education. Through a family medicine-art museum collaboration, we developed an elective course for second-year medical students titled the "Art of Observation" (AOO). To evaluate the course's effect on clinical skills, we performed a qualitative evaluation of former students during their clinical rotations. In the spring of 2005, all students who had completed the AOO course in 2003 or 2004 were invited to take part in an online evaluation consisting of eight journaling survey questions. Students were instructed to answer the survey questions with specific examples. Question areas included the most memorable experience, the course's influence on the doctor-patient relationship, usefulness during clinical years of medical school, and skills unique to AOO. The anonymous data were analyzed qualitatively, coding the responses to categories derived from the data, leading to the formation of themes. Of the 19 students eligible, 17 participated. We found three important themes: (1) the AOO positively influenced clinical skills, (2) both art museum exercises and a clinical preceptorship were necessary to achieve those skills, and (3) the AOO led to a sense of personal development as a physician. In addition, students told us that the training in observation and description skills they learned were unique to the AOO. This collaboration between a department of family medicine and an art museum produced a course that facilitated observational skills used in successful doctor-patient relationships.

  8. 78 FR 64006 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-10-25

    ... inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum. The human remains were removed from Island....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of... Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an inventory of...

  9. 78 FR 59955 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-09-30

    ... completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum, Seattle, WA. The human....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of... Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an inventory of...

  10. DIORAMA ART – A POTENTIAL MEDIUM FOR MUSEUM ...

    User

    The study recognizes the traditional role diorama plays as an effective medium for museum edu- cation and employed both ... Keywords: Diorama, Museum, Education, Aperture, Assemblage. ... velopment of the modern world. Aside the open ...

  11. Mobile Learning and Art Museums: A Case Study of a New Art Interpretation Approach for Visitor Engagement through Mobile Media

    Benito, Victoria López

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays Mobile technologies in Museums and especially in Art Museums are a popular way of communication with their audiences. These kinds of technologies have a high communicative potential and also could be a tool for marketing, information, engagement and learning as well. However with regards how these resources explain the meaning of works of…

  12. From the galleries to the clinic: applying art museum lessons to patient care.

    Miller, Alexa; Grohe, Michelle; Khoshbin, Shahram; Katz, Joel T

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly, medical educators integrate art-viewing into curricular interventions that teach clinical observation-often with local art museum educators. How can cross-disciplinary collaborators explicitly connect the skills learned in the art museum with those used at the bedside? One approach is for educators to align their pedagogical approach using similar teaching methods in the separate contexts of the galleries and the clinic. We describe two linked pedagogical exercises--Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) in the museum galleries and observation at the bedside--from "Training the Eye: Improving the Art of Physical Diagnosis," an elective museum-based course at Harvard Medical School. It is our opinion that while strategic interactions with the visual arts can improve skills, it is essential for students to apply them in a clinical context with faculty support-requiring educators across disciplines to learn from one another.

  13. The Impact of Ubiquitous Technologies on the Art Museum as Urban [Political] Space

    Jacobsen, Mogens; Søndergaard, Morten

    art practice. Our hypothesis is that these new domains have a more general existence and ’profile’ in the paradigm of media art – even though the following is based on the process of creating the ‘MAP – Media Art Platform’ at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MFSK) in Roskilde, Denmark, between 2005...... and 2008, a process in which we both were involved as media artist and media art curator, respectively. Our focus in this article is to investigate further the status of these new competencies and roles, and to ask: what are these new domains that emerge with regard to the artist, the software developer......The Museum is part of a ubiquitous framing of cultural production and a common, urban (political) space. In later years, technology has enhanced the ubiquity, as well as challenged the foundation of, the Museum. From this enhancement and challenge, which is transforming the museum itself, new...

  14. THE HERPETOLOGICAL COLLECTION OF ZOOLOGY MUSEUM, ISTANBUL UNIVERSITY

    Nilgün Kaya; Oya Özuluğ

    2017-01-01

    Amphibia and Reptilia collections at the Zoological Museum, University of Istanbul (ZMUI) were studied and revised. The samples were collected from 1921 until today. The localities of most species are found in the diffrent regions of Turkey. The collection have 74 species of which 20 species are amphibia and 54 species are reptiles.

  15. Art Perception in the Museum: How We Spend Time and Space in Art Exhibitions.

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2017-01-01

    Aesthetics research aiming at understanding art experience is an emerging field; however, most research is conducted in labs without access to real artworks, without the social context of a museum and without the presence of other persons. The present article replicates and complements key findings of art perception in museum contexts. When observing museum visitors ( N  = 225; 126 female, M (age) = 43.3 years) while perceiving a series of six Gerhard Richter paintings of various sizes (0.26-3.20 sq. m) in a temporary art exhibition in January and February 2015 showing 28 paintings in total, we revealed patterns compatible to previous research. The mean time taken in viewing artworks was much longer than was mostly realized in lab contexts, here 32.9 s ( Mdn  = 25.4 s). We were also able to replicate visitors spending more time on viewing artworks when attending in groups of people. Additionally, we uncovered a close positive relationship ( r 2  = .929) between canvas size and viewing distance, ranging on average between 1.49 and 2.12 m ( M  = 1.72 m). We also found that more than half of the visitors returned to paintings, especially those people who had not previously paid too much attention at the initial viewing. After adding the times of returning viewers, each picture was viewed longer than had been estimated in previous research ( M  = 50.5 s, Mdn  = 43.0 s). Results are discussed in the context of current art perception theories, focusing on the need for the ecologically valid testing of artworks in aesthetics research.

  16. Art Perception in the Museum: How We Spend Time and Space in Art Exhibitions

    Claus-Christian Carbon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetics research aiming at understanding art experience is an emerging field; however, most research is conducted in labs without access to real artworks, without the social context of a museum and without the presence of other persons. The present article replicates and complements key findings of art perception in museum contexts. When observing museum visitors (N = 225; 126 female, M(age = 43.3 years while perceiving a series of six Gerhard Richter paintings of various sizes (0.26–3.20 sq. m in a temporary art exhibition in January and February 2015 showing 28 paintings in total, we revealed patterns compatible to previous research. The mean time taken in viewing artworks was much longer than was mostly realized in lab contexts, here 32.9 s (Mdn = 25.4 s. We were also able to replicate visitors spending more time on viewing artworks when attending in groups of people. Additionally, we uncovered a close positive relationship (r2 = .929 between canvas size and viewing distance, ranging on average between 1.49 and 2.12 m (M = 1.72 m. We also found that more than half of the visitors returned to paintings, especially those people who had not previously paid too much attention at the initial viewing. After adding the times of returning viewers, each picture was viewed longer than had been estimated in previous research (M = 50.5 s, Mdn = 43.0 s. Results are discussed in the context of current art perception theories, focusing on the need for the ecologically valid testing of artworks in aesthetics research.

  17. 78 FR 45964 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA

    2013-07-30

    ... projectile points, 38 pendants or beads, 3 fire-starters, 4 hand tools, 6 fishing weights, 37 carvings, 1... stone. In the 1978 Deed of Gift to the Monterey Museum of Art, Mr. Holman notes that the objects were...

  18. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan...

    2011-05-13

    ... Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service... Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, that meet the definition of unassociated... funerary objects should contact Carla Sinopoli, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor...

  19. 76 FR 56468 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    2011-09-13

    ...: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico has... contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico. Repatriation of the human remains to...

  20. 76 FR 73664 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA

    2011-11-29

    ...: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology (WSU) has completed an... University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA 99164-4910, telephone (509) 335-4314. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  1. 78 FR 45962 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    2013-07-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology... funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no...

  2. 76 FR 48179 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    2011-08-08

    ... Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound has completed an... contact the Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound. Disposition of the human remain...

  3. The Art of Perception: Museums Breaking Ground in Law Enforcement Training

    Herman, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    The Art of Perception is a professional development program that uses the analysis of works of art to help participants re-examine their responsibilities in various agencies of law enforcement, refresh their sense of inquiry, and reinvigorate the language they use to communicate on the job. "The Art of Perception: Museums Breaking Ground in Law…

  4. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    Rajka Bračun Sova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires “knowledge”. The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three adults were recruited and accompanied during their visit to the museum. Participants were requested to “think out loud”, which meant to talk about what they saw, thought, and felt about the artworks. There was a short interview conducted with each participant before entering the museum to gain insight into their art-related and museum-visiting experience. The analysis of the data revealed that some processes of art appreciation were similar within the two groups. Both art specialists and art non-specialists interact with museum objects physically and intellectually; they see contents and formal qualities as a whole; they respond emotionally to artworks; appreciation includes their personal experience; they search museum interpretation/information for their understanding. Some noticeable differences were found. Art specialists respond to artworks with more understanding and are willing to put more effort into art appreciation, whereas art non-specialists respond with less understanding and put less effort into art appreciation. This paper focuses on the differences between the two groups; reflective and spontaneous appreciation of art, objective and subjective appreciation of art and the effort put into art appreciation. The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of the study for the teaching of art and museum education.

  5. The Art of Copying: Five strategies for Transforming Originals in the Art Museum

    Hans Dam Christensen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses copies within the field of art museums by way of mapping strategies for copy practices. This mapping leans heavily towards parts of the wri-tings of Jacques Derrida (1930-2004. Against the backdrop of this theoretical premise, the article distinguishes five main strategies. Firstly, the copies which of-ten are considered to be typical museum copies, characterize the strategy for the disseminating relation between original and copy, that is, reproductions, magnets, etc. This strategy implies how copy practices are closely integrated into museum practices in general. Secondly, the supplementing relation between original and copy will be introduced. This strategy frames, for example, artists' citations of other works and forgeries. Both show that copy practices often lead to new originals, in principle, ad infinitum. Thirdly, this leads to the strategy for the displacing relation between original and copy which encompasses, for example, artistic reworkings of other artists' originals and conservatorial restorations. This approach partly ex-cludes the copy and partly displaces the original, while still, unavoidably, referring to the latter. In general, this strategy signifies the latent instability of the origi-nal. Fourthly, the strategy for the informational relation between original and copy will be discussed as it has a vital function in terms of talking about museum originals and copies. This is the strategy which grants the original artifacts their status as museum objects. An informational copy is just as unique as an original object of art, and at the same time, it defines the original and is itself defined by this opposition. Lastly, the strategy for the imagined relation between original and copy follows. This strategy is dependent upon several of the previous approaches, and, in addition, handles signs that exist without explicit originals, as the strategy covers copies referring to originals which have disappeared

  6. The Affects of Museum Architecture: Louvre-Lens and Museu de Arte de São Paulo

    Jakobsen, Annette Svaneklink

    2014-01-01

    and context. Inside, visitors are invited to co-create the museum experience by moving freely through the exhibited art works in a setting that seems to re-actualise an experimental exhibition space, which was originally designed by Lina Bo Bardi for Museu de Arte de São Paulo. Through on-site observations...... of art institutions to the museum experience. Keywords: Art Museum, Architecture, Affect...

  7. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-Based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    Bracun Sova, Rajka

    2015-01-01

    Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires "knowledge". The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three…

  8. AN ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS: THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, TEHRAN, IRAN

    Kambiz Navai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kamran Tabatabai Diba is one of Iranian Architects, whose works during 60’s and 70’s are well-known among architects and scholars. His works are mostly considered as examples of Modern Style, scented by Iranian Architecture. His efforts on creating public, socio-cultural centers in Iran was a result of his concern about social matters, as well as seeking for a national, contemporary Architecture. Tehran’s Museum of Contemporary Art is one of the most popular and well-known Diba’s works. In this article an effort has been made to get a better understanding of this remarkable piece of work, and to light up the Architect’s intents and the architectural methods he used to express them. The critique is concentrated mostly on two mentioned aspects of Diba’s works: “Integrating Modern Style and traditional Iranian Architecture”, and “Creating socio-cultural centers and institutions well related to society.” The Analysis is based on the most important features of every work of Architecture: “Space” and “Form”. The author seeks for the meaning by “watching” the whole complex carefully, “giving descriptive information” about it, and in the meantime “analyzing data” with the help of “basic design methods” together with the knowledge of “Modern Style”, “Characteristics of Late Modern Movement” and “Traditional Iranian Architecture.” Text is accompanied by drawings and figures, which help for better knowing the complex. The effort is made to use a simple language, understandable not only by Architects or scholars, but by every other interested non-specialist reader.

  9. 77 FR 65403 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    2012-10-26

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human..., Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001...

  10. 77 FR 65404 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    2012-10-26

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Correction... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human..., Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001...

  11. 77 FR 74871 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    2012-12-18

    ... Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology has completed an... objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. Repatriation of the human...

  12. 78 FR 2432 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    2013-01-11

    ... Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology has completed an... objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. Repatriation of the human...

  13. 78 FR 59964 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-09-30

    ....S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of... Washington (Burke Museum), and Central Washington University have completed an inventory of human remains, in...

  14. Legacy of the Ancient World: An Educational Guide. Understanding Ancient Culture through Art at the Tampa Museum of Art.

    Whitelaw, R. Lynn

    Among the many contributions made by Ancient Greeks and Romans to contemporary life, are those which influence art, architecture, literature, philosophy, mathematics and science, theater, athletics, religion, and the founding of democracy. The Tampa Museum of Art's classical collection offers a unique opportunity to learn about Ancient Greeks and…

  15. An Art Museum in the Interest of Publicness: A Discussion of Educational Strategies at Tate Exchange

    Christensen-Scheel, Boel

    2018-01-01

    Influenced by needs to legitimise large collections and the position as public institutions, art museums today are searching to develop rigorous public strategies in order to increase numbers of visitors and public impact. Education is part of those strategies, and the need to discuss art education in relation to publicness and criticality arises.…

  16. American Business Meets American Gothic: Professional Development in the Art Museum

    Sullivan, Brendan; Morse, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Professional development in the art museum setting represents an opportunity for corporate and for-profit enterprises to enhance employees' skills in observation, creative thinking, teamwork, and sensitivity in diversity. Using original works of art as a point of departure for in-depth discussion of what appears as narrative content, participants…

  17. Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum. Learning from Exhibitions.

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the exhibition "Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum" that explores the four major periods of Egyptian history. Provides background information on ancient Egypt and describes the art that was present in each of the four kingdoms. (CMK)

  18. The Effects of a Museum Art Program on the Self-Concept of Children

    Kaufman, Ryan; Rinehardt, Eric; Hine, Hank; Wilkinson, Berney; Tush, Peter; Mead, Bethany; Fernandez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that art programs have positive therapeutic effects on children, including improved self-concept. This pretest/posttest intervention study examined changes in self-concept in children (N = 176) who participated in an art program at the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. Results indicated significant, positive increases in…

  19. Museums and Philosophy--Of Art, and Many Other Things. Part 2.

    Gaskell, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This two-part article examines the very limited engagement by philosophers with museums, and proposes analysis under six headings: cultural variety, taxonomy, and epistemology in Part I, and teleology, ethics, and therapeutics and aesthetics in Part II. The article establishes that fundamental categories of museums established in the 19th century – of art, of anthropology, of history, of natural history, of science and technology – still persist. Among them, it distinguishes between hegemonic...

  20. Management of small digital collections with Omeka: the MoRE experience (A Museum of REfused and unrealised art projects

    Alberto Salarelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the main features of Omeka, a free and open source CMS (Content Management System for online digital collections developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Omeka presents very interesting features: first, a remarkable ease of use that, however, does not affect its multiple functions; secondly, it provides tools to create, in an innovative way, virtual exhibitions for archives, libraries and museums in order to promote their collections on the web; thirdly, its extreme adaptability to collection size: in fact Omeka is used by large and celebrated institutions such as the New York Public Library and Europeana, but also by many small initiatives including MoRE (A Museum of REfused and unrealized art projects. Specifically, the second part of the article describes, in brief, the objectives and characteristics of this virtual museum dedicated to contemporary unrealized artworks; it is an experimental project, still under development, devised by a working group of the University of Parma (Italy, who found in Omeka the most suitable IT solution to collect and expose these unique museum materials.

  1. Museu de Artes e Ofícios, Belo Horizonte: afinal, como nascem os museus? Belo Horizonte's Museum of Arts and Trades: after all, how are museums born?

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Responsável pela concepção do projeto do Museu de Artes e Ofícios de Belo Horizonte, o museólogo francês Pierre Catel discorre sobre sua experiência profissional, iniciada na década de 1970. Discute conceitos de museus, a evolução da formação neste campo multidisciplinar. Sobre o projeto de museu a ser montado no metrô da capital de Minas Gerais, ele diz que seu objetivo é promover o encontro entre a cultura das profissões e peças de uma coleção de arte popular brasileira com cerca de um milhão de pessoas a caminho de casa ou do trabalho.Responsible for the concept behind Belo Horizonte's Museum of Arts and Trades project, the French museologist Pierre Catel talks about his professional experience, which began in the 1970s. He discusses museum concepts and the evolution and shaping of this multidisciplinary field. In regard to the museum that will be installed inside the subway of Minas Gerais' state capital, Catel says his aim is to foster an encounter between the culture of professions and pieces from a collection of popular Brazilian art, where around one million people pass by on their way to work or home.

  2. Critical Adult Education and the Art Gallery Museum

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2018-01-01

    Although burdened by legacies of elitism, exclusion and paternalism, some public museums are attempting to respond to the socio-environmental problems currently facing our planet by developing critical non-formal educational activities to foster consciousness and change. This article explores one such response; a six-week non-formal course…

  3. 76 FR 80392 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI

    2011-12-23

    ...: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Michigan officials and its Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives... accessioned into the Museum of Anthropology. Between 2007 and 2009 the remains were inventoried at the...

  4. 77 FR 52058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    2012-08-28

    ... Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Longyear Museum of Anthropology has completed an... cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Longyear Museum of Anthropology at the...

  5. 76 FR 48178 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    2011-08-08

    ...: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Longyear Museum of Anthropology has completed an inventory of a human remain... human remain should contact the Longyear Museum of Anthropology at the address below by September 7...

  6. 78 FR 19301 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    2013-03-29

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology... Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in... Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  7. 77 FR 46116 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    2012-08-02

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology has completed... has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at...

  8. 78 FR 19308 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology...

    2013-03-29

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology... Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the... Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural...

  9. 77 FR 51564 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2012-08-24

    ... Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington... of human remains under the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum...

  10. Web-Based Museum Trails on PDAs for University-Level Design Students: Design and Evaluation

    Reynolds, R.; Walker, K.; Speight, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of web-based museum trails for university-level design students to access on handheld devices in the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London. The trails offered students a range of ways of exploring the museum environment and collections, some encouraging students to interpret objects and…

  11. A study of grandparents and grandchildren as visitors to museums and art galleries in the UK

    Ela Beaumont

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses one aspect of a major research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of family group visitors to museums and galleries in the UK. Grandparents visiting with their grandchildren are a little understood phenomenon in terms of visitor research and this paper aims to address that balance. The research project focuses on three art galleries and museums in the UK where 44 sets of grandparents were interviewed during the initial stages of the research. Findings have shown a number of interesting facets, some of which are presented in this paper. Grandparents are motivated to visit the museum with their grandchildren in the main because they are seeking an entertaining visit, a day out that is also educational and linked to school projects. They are likely to be the children’s primary carers as parents are out to work and the destination might not link with their own interests but those of the parents. They have social roles to play in their grandchildren’s lives. They often seek activity or workshops in the museum/art gallery that will be of benefit for their grandchildren and encourage them to explore the activities provided. These and other aspects are discussed within the paper. We conclude by suggesting how the findings can be used to inform more sophisticated approaches to ‘family friendly’ initiatives in museums and art galleries.

  12. Triumphs Show: What Makes Art History? Year 7 Exploit the Resources of the Victoria and Albert Museum's Medieval Gallery to Create and Curate Their Own Answer

    Copsey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    What do 14 Year 7 students, an art teacher, a history teacher and the Victoria and Albert Museum have in common? They are all part of the "Stronger Together" Museum Champion project run by The Langley Academy and the River & Rowing Museum and supported by Arts Council England, designed to engage students, teachers and museum staff…

  13. When a Body Meets a Body: An Exploration of the Negative Impact of Social Interactions on Museum Experiences of Art

    Pelowski, Matthew; Liu, Tao; Palacios, Victor; Akiba, Fuminori

    2014-01-01

    We consider the phenomenon of social interactions within the art museum, arguing that even the bare possibility of meeting others or intruding into their gaze can have a profoundly detrimental effect on art experience. This is done by tracing a finding from our previous studies in which we considered three museum galleries--each with the same…

  14. ‘Aimless and Absurd Wanderings’? Children at the Museum of Old and New Art (Mona

    Adrian Franklin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis article reports on the experience of children at the Museum of New and Old Art (Mona in Hobart, Tasmania.  Referred to by its innovative owner as a ‘subversive adult Disneyland’, Mona went further than most new contemporary art galleries in designing a radically new experience of art.  It captured the imagination of people new to art in its own locality as well as a global art public.  Favoured by leading international contemporary artists for the freedom it gave art unmediated by art history, Mona also seemingly captured the imagination of children. Through an ethnographic approach in which five young children’s visits were documented in great detail, the article considers these in the light of children’s experiences of previous exhibitionary platforms and the relevance of Mona’s museological interventions for building their dispositions to art and broadening art publics.

  15. Art for Whose Sake? Modern Art Museums and their Role in Transforming Societies: The Case of the Guggenheim Bilbao

    Evdoxia Baniotopoulou

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades the industrial decline of many western economies has forced them to turn towards the tertiary sector in order to diversify their infrastructure and find new sources of income. One of the characteristics of this process was the development of urban regeneration plans, which recognised the potential of the cultural sector for economic development. Central to this approach was the use of modern art museums as magnets for tourism and inward investment. This practice has produced a number of examples, the most famous being the Guggenheim Bilbao. The phenomenal success of this museum has caused it to become a model and this is why it ought to be examined critically. The creation of the museum is initially considered in the framework of particular historical and political circumstances. It is then placed in the context of the local cultural policy, a combination of theory and local political aspirations. The involvement of the external factor – the Guggenheim Foundation – is considered next, followed by an assessment of the museum in both quantifiable and non-quantifiable terms. Lastly, the preference shown in modern art museums to play this role is discussed. It is concluded that the Guggenheim Bilbao is the outcome of special political and socioeconomic circumstances, which renders it a unique case that should not be replicated uncritically.

  16. Contemporary Adult Education Philosophies and Practices in Art Galleries and Museums in Canada and the UK

    Clover, Darlene E.; Bell, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Public art galleries and museums have been mandated to become more relevant and useful to the lived experiences of the broad communities they claim to serve. Adult education has long been part of the work of these institutions, although historically the relationship has been uneasy, and they seldom feature in the adult education literature. To…

  17. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

    Miller, Naomi J.

    2011-09-01

    The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

  18. EXPERIENCE-BASED ART EDUCATI ON: HOW PREJUDICES ABOUT CONTEMPORARY ART CAN LEAD TO ENRICHED EDUCATION IN MUSEUMS

    Eva Van MOER

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Every form of communication, even every culture , is depending on the interaction between expectation and perception. Every perception is related to anticipations and therefore to comparisons. What we understand or see is not simply a given, but is the product of past experiences and future expecta tions. When understanding fails, expectations become prejudices. A big stumbling-block in interpreting artworks in a museum of contemporary art is having confidence in the concept of multiple interpreta tions. Because contemporary art is characterised as ‘open-ended’, understanding does not always occur and viewers are confused or even disappointed. In this study we investigate the process of understanding contemporary art and focus especially on the formulation of prejudices during a museum visit. We underline that the prejudiced nature of understanding does not have to lead to negative or empty experiences but creates openness to future experiences. Prejudices send people back to re -inspect the initial experience. It is important to bring museum visitors to understand their own constructed meanings by reinvestigating their initial interpretation through inquiring. Museum educators should develop tools which allow visitors to position themselves and make them think from various contexts. This kind of education leads to enriched (reinte rpretation and experiences.

  19. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q3

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  20. Museum Universe Data File FY 2014 Q3

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2014. This list contains descriptive information about...

  1. 78 FR 34129 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology...

    2013-06-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13042; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology... County, MI. In 1924, these items were sold to the University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology, by Rev...

  2. 78 FR 64007 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    2013-10-25

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology has corrected an inventory of human remains and...

  3. 78 FR 45961 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    2013-07-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology... Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian...

  4. 77 FR 23502 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    2012-04-19

    ...: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, has completed an inventory of human [[Page 23503

  5. 78 FR 59963 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-09-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13770; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of..., Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

  6. Integrated Conservation of the Cantonese Opera Art Museum and Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Q. Guo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cantonese Opera, as the sole cultural heritage of Guangdong Province of China so far, which was included in the World Intangible Cultural Heritage List by the UNESCO, bears the cultural memory of the Lingnan region and as well as the overseas Chinese worldwide. Located in the core historic urban area – Enning Road of Guangzhou, the Cantonese Opera Art Museum is designed in Lingnan traditional garden manner, through going deep into the Cantonese opera culture, Lingnan traditional garden culture and Lingnan cultural spirit. The design highlights the integrated conservation of tangible and intangible cultural heritage, to protect living history and build the historical environment and place spirit for the intangible cultural heritage. The Cantonese Opera Art Museum is not only a tangible space for exhibition, study, education and display of the Cantonese Opera art, but also a cultural space with the Lingnan cultural memory, gathering the Lingnan intangible heritage and closely linked with current life of successors and ordinary people.

  7. Other People’s Stories: Bringing Public-Generated Photography into the Contemporary Art Museum

    Areti Galani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Constituting the ‘defining other’ of art photography, amateur photographic practices have long been neglected or specifically excluded from official histories of photography. Even the term ‘amateur’ has historically been characterized by semantic ambiguity. In recent years, however, contemporary amateur photographs have been capturing the art curatorial imagination. This is often motivated by the institutional and political impetus to engage with personal, local stories, rather than official, national narratives alone. Amateur photographs, with their apparent rawness and immediacy may afford the art museum with a more credible record of ‘real life’ and enable the display of polyvocal narratives. Furthermore, the changing digital media landscape has opened up opportunities for art museums to reach new audiences through public-contributed content. In response to these developments, this article asks: How has amateur photography acquired a protagonist role in contemporary art museum displays? Drawing on contrasting case studies of exhibitions in the US and Europe, which have incorporated user-contributed photographic content in their displays, this article discusses how everyday photographic creativity and the raw materials of people’s stories serve as a means to interact with institutionally constructed histories of photography.

  8. Lifelong learning for active ageing in nordic museums; archives and street art

    Fristrup, Tine; Grut, Sara

    2016-01-01

    to lifelong learning as a way to conceptualise activities for older adults’ in museums, as we emphasise an approach to adult education for active ageing articulated as ‘lifelong learning for active ageing’. To illustrate this framing, we outline a number of activities taken from publications, cultural sites...... and conferences in which we have been involved over the last decade in the context of the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity in Östersund, Sweden. We argue that lifelong learning for active ageing in cultural heritage institutions can contribute to the development of older adults’ civic......In this article, we develop a framework that demonstrates how older adults need to develop diverse capabilities in relation to their educational life course through engagements in Nordic museums, archives and street art activities. We discuss how European museums have taken up UNESCO’s approach...

  9. "Mother's Musuem": The Emancipation of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller through Modern Art Matronage and Museum Building

    Condas, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    So much of the time, the significance of non-artists in making modern art possible is all too rarely acknowledged, and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller is no exception. The crucial role Abby played and the obstacles she overcame are significant, and my research considers the far-reaching impact she had on the institutionalization and legitimization of modern art in New York in the 1920s and 1930s. Without her involvement, New York's premier museum for Post-Impressionist, progressive, and modern art,...

  10. 76 FR 54485 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of...

    2011-09-01

    ... A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University... associated funerary objects may contact the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of...

  11. 76 FR 44947 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann...

    2011-07-27

    ... Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with... contact the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that...

  12. Enhancing User Experience through Emotional Interaction: Determining Users' Interests in Online Art Collections Using AMARA (Affective Museum of Art Resource Agent)

    Park, S. Joon

    2013-01-01

    The need for emotional interaction has already influenced various disciplines and industries, and online museums represent a domain where providing emotional interactions could have a significant impact. Today, online museums lack the appropriate affective and hedonic values necessary to engage art enthusiasts on an emotional level. To address…

  13. 76 FR 73670 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI

    2011-11-29

    ...: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Museum of Anthropology NAGPRA collections staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills... Anthropology purchased the human remains from Reverend L. P. Rowland in November of 1924 as part of a larger...

  14. History and highlights of the teratological collection in the Museum Anatomicum of Leiden University, The Netherlands

    Boer, Lucas L.; Boek, Peter L. J.; van Dam, Andries J.; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2018-01-01

    The anatomical collection of the Anatomical Museum of Leiden University Medical Center (historically referred to as Museum Anatomicum Academiae Lugduno-Batavae) houses and maintains more than 13,000 unique anatomical, pathological and zoological specimens, and include the oldest teratological

  15. Museum-University Partnerships as a New Platform for Public Engagement with Scientific Research

    Bell, Jamie; Chesebrough, David; Cryan, Jason; Koster, Emlyn

    2016-01-01

    A growing trend in natural history museums, science museums, and science centers is the establishment of innovative new partnerships with universities to bring scientific research to the public in compelling and transformative ways. The strengths of both kinds of institutions are leveraged in effective and publicly visible programs, activities,…

  16. 76 FR 58033 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  17. 76 FR 58034 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  18. 76 FR 58039 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  19. 78 FR 78379 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA

    2013-12-26

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology at... Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation...

  20. Interview with Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, Director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA, Santa Fe, NM, USA, October 28, 2000 Entretien avec Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, directrice, Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA, Santa Fe, NM, États-Unis

    Gérard Selbach

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available ForewordJoanna Bigfeather was appointed director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in April 1999. A Western Cherokee brought up in New Mexico, Joanna Osburn Bigfeather graduated from IAIA in 1987 and moved to the University of California at Santa Cruz to study for a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Then she attended the State University of New York in Albany, where she obtained a Master in Fine Arts. While exhibiting extensively prints, ceramics and installations...

  1. Tropical veterinary parasites at Harvard University's Museum of Comparative Zoology.

    Conn, David Bruce

    2008-12-01

    Tropical veterinary parasites have been maintained by the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) at Harvard University since the mid 1800s. Most of these are maintained by the Department of Invertebrate Zoology, but many vectors and intermediate hosts are maintained by the Departments of Entomology and Malacology. The largest collections are of avian and mammalian ticks (Acarina) that are important as both parasites and vectors. Nematodes are second in numbers, followed by cestodes, trematodes, and several minor helminth groups, crustacean parasites of fish, and protozoan parasites of various hosts. The MCZ directed or participated in several major expeditions to tropical areas around the globe in the early 1900s. Many of these expeditions focused on human parasites, but hundreds of veterinary and zoonotic parasites were also collected from these and numerous, smaller, tropical expeditions. Host sources include companion animals, livestock, laboratory species, domestic fowl, reptiles, amphibians, exotics/zoo animals, commercially important fishes, and other wildlife. Specimens are curated, either fixed whole in vials or mounted on slides as whole mounts or histopathological sections. The primary emphasis of MCZ's current work with tropical veterinary parasites is on voucher specimens from epidemiological, experimental, and clinical research.

  2. Modern Art as Public Care: Alzheimer's and the Aesthetics of Universal Personhood.

    Selberg, Scott

    2015-12-01

    This article is based on ethnographic research of the New York Museum of Modern Art's influential Alzheimer's access program, Meet Me at MoMA. The program belongs to an increasingly popular model of psychosocial treatment that promotes art as potentially therapeutic or beneficial to people experiencing symptoms of dementia as well as to their caregivers. Participant observation of the sessions and a series of interviews with museum staff and educators reveal broader assumptions about the relationship between modern art, dementia, and personhood. These assumptions indicate a museological investment in the capacity and perceived interiority of all participants. Ultimately, the program authorizes a narrative of universal personhood that harmonizes with the museum's longstanding focus on temporal and aesthetic modernism. © 2015 by the American Anthropological Association.

  3. Annotated catalogue of the types of Braconidae (Hymenoptera) in the Oxford University Museum

    Achterberg, van C.; O'Toole, C.

    1993-01-01

    An annotated catalogue of the types of Braconidae in the Hope Entomological Collections, University Museum, Oxford, is given. The following new combinations are proposed: Aleiodes rothneyi (Shenefelt, 1975); Aniphiaulax agraensis (Cameron, 1897); Balcemena ruficollis (Cameron, 1899); Bicarinibracon

  4. 76 FR 36151 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    2011-06-21

    ... made by Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, professional staff in consultation with... picked up on the plains near Fort Rice Dakota.'' No known individual was identified. No associated...

  5. Beyond the Museum Walls : Situating Art in Virtual Space (Polemic Overlay and Three Movements

    Vince Dziekan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recognition of digital communication’s profound effects on social relations and institutions, this paper explores the influence of digitisation on our notions of art through the design of its institutions. No longer can the museum, as the primary technology of art, be viewed as just a physical container. With the additional of the hidden infrastructure of electronic and multimedia technologies that are to be found “behind the walls”, as it were, the architectural issues of negotiating spaces and manipulating locative settings for displaying artworks are as much virtual as physical.As a contribution to the negotiation of a distributed aesthetics, this paper entertains the possibility that transplanting art to the virtual site of the Internet disrupts our understanding of art itself. From presence on the gallery wall to the plane of the screen, if this translation offers an alternative way of seeing, then what does the Web offer to a different apperception of art? How to position the digital in the discourse surrounding art and the role it plays within contemporary cultural practice?In an attempt to ground these concerns, I will frame the subsequent discussion by focussing my attention upon one particularly representative instance: The National Gallery of Victoria’s Ian Potter Gallery of Australian Art; recognising in this localised, site-specific experience a microexample of a much more ubiquitous phenomenon.

  6. 77 FR 19697 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    2012-04-02

    ... Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... with the cultural items may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any...

  7. 78 FR 45963 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    2013-07-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian... Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item...

  8. 75 FR 58431 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2010-09-24

    ... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service... in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge... was a project of Harvard University faculty in 1972. No known individuals were identified. No...

  9. Interpreting indigenous art in university collections

    Tyler, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Debates on the representation of indigenous cultures in museums have come to the fore in the past thirty years. This paper examines the context for the opening of Waipapa Marae at the University of Auckland in 1988. It outlines a history of Māori meeting houses used for teaching and learning in a specifically Māori context in the New Zealand tertiary sector. The challenge for the university curator with a marae as part of the collection is how to interpret it for the 21st century. Facilitatin...

  10. Authentication at a small museum: the kindness of strangers

    Hyland, Douglas K. S.

    2000-03-01

    Over the last twenty years, I have served as curator and director of several small and medium size museums including the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee; the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama; the San Antonio Museum of Art, San Antonio, Texas, and most recently, the Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, Massachusetts. The largest budget approached three million dollars, minute in comparison with the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the National Gallery. Our resources were limited and the demands of building maintenance, programs, acquisitions and conservation far outstripped the amount of money available to be spent. Each museum housed between five and thirty thousand art works and generally speaking the collections were eclectic. It is not unusual at these city museums to find extraordinary oddities ranging from the finest Wedgwood collection in the world in Birmingham to the most extensive group of Latin American folk art objects to be found anywhere in San Antonio. Each year museums of comparable size are offered thousands of art works on all shapes and sizes form all periods and cultures. Only rarely does the staff have the expertise to evaluate and determine the authenticity of the eclectic group of objects both in the collection and being offered. With few curators and in many cases even fewer local experts to call upon, the museum professional must be both bold and creative.

  11. Telerobotic Haptic Exploration in Art Galleries and Museums for Individuals with Visual Impairments.

    Park, Chung Hyuk; Ryu, Eun-Seok; Howard, Ayanna M

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a haptic telepresence system that enables visually impaired users to explore locations with rich visual observation such as art galleries and museums by using a telepresence robot, a RGB-D sensor (color and depth camera), and a haptic interface. The recent improvement on RGB-D sensors has enabled real-time access to 3D spatial information in the form of point clouds. However, the real-time representation of this data in the form of tangible haptic experience has not been challenged enough, especially in the case of telepresence for individuals with visual impairments. Thus, the proposed system addresses the real-time haptic exploration of remote 3D information through video encoding and real-time 3D haptic rendering of the remote real-world environment. This paper investigates two scenarios in haptic telepresence, i.e., mobile navigation and object exploration in a remote environment. Participants with and without visual impairments participated in our experiments based on the two scenarios, and the system performance was validated. In conclusion, the proposed framework provides a new methodology of haptic telepresence for individuals with visual impairments by providing an enhanced interactive experience where they can remotely access public places (art galleries and museums) with the aid of haptic modality and robotic telepresence.

  12. [Human remains in museums: research, preservation and communication. The experience of Turin University Museum of Anthropology and Etnography].

    Boano, Rosa; Grilletto, Renato; Rabino Massa, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The creation of large scientific collections has been an important development for anthropological and paleopathological research. Indeed the biological collections are irreplaceable reference systems for the biological reconstruction of past population. They also assume the important role of anthropological archives and, in the global description of man, permit the integration of historical data with those from bio-anthropolgical research. Thinking about the role of mummies and bones as scientific resources, best practice of preservation of ancient specimens should be of high priority for institution and researchers. By way of example, the authors mention their experience regarding ancient human remains preserved in the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography at the University of Turin.

  13. 78 FR 19299 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    2013-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-12395; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound... History, University of Puget Sound, has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the...

  14. The Effect of Active Learning Techniques on Class Teacher Candidates' Success Rates and Attitudes toward Their Museum Theory and Application Unit in Their Visual Arts Course

    Dilmac, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect that using active learning techniques during museum and gallery visits has on teacher candidates' academic success rates in and attitudes toward their Visual Arts Course. In this study, the importance and requirement of education to take place in museums and art galleries is emphasized. The…

  15. Designing an Earthquake-Proof Art Museum: An Arts- and Engineering-Integrated Science Lesson

    Carignan, Anastasia; Hussain, Mahjabeen

    2016-01-01

    In this practical arts-integrated science and engineering lesson, an inquiry-based approach was adopted to teach a class of fourth graders in a Midwest elementary school about the scientific concepts of plate tectonics and earthquakes. Lessons were prepared following the 5 E instructional model. Next Generation Science Standards (4-ESS3-2) and the…

  16. Subjective Experiences of an Art Museum Engagement Activity for Persons with Early Alzheimer’s disease and their Family Caregivers

    Flatt, Jason D.; Liptak, Amy; Oakley, Mary Ann; Gogan, Jessica; Varner, Tresa; Lingler, Jennifer H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the subjective experiences of older adults with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease or related cognitive disorders (ADRD) and their family caregivers who participated in an art museum engagement activity. Methods Four focus groups were conducted with 10 persons with ADRD and 10 family caregivers following the completion one-time, three hour engagement activity. Participants also completed a brief satisfaction survey, and associations were examined using nonparametric statistics. Results Three key themes were identified: cognitive stimulation, social connections, and a sense of self. In addition, we identified programmatic issues such as activity-specific concerns and program logistics that could help improve future art program offerings. Past experience with art and perceived social cohesion were correlated with participants’ overall satisfaction with the program. Discussion Efforts aimed at improving the quality of life of those with Alzheimer’s and their family caregivers should consider the potential role of art museums. PMID:25216658

  17. An Insurgent Curatorial Strategy: Using Dialogue and Collaboration to Create Meaning in Public Art Galleries and Museums

    Marsden, Scott

    2018-01-01

    My insurgent curatorial strategy incorporates theory around dialogue and is used to develop a participatory and collaborative process that gives voice to those who are marginalised and/or disfranchised and are suppressed by dominant social narratives. My strategy demonstrates how art galleries and museums can function as sites for community…

  18. The Art of ATLAS; multimedia installation by Neal Hartman and Claudia Marcelloni at Thinktank science museum in Birmingham, UK.

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2010-01-01

    The Art of ATLAS is an multimedia installation, developed by Neal Hartman and Claudia Marcelloni about the physicists, engineers and technicians behind the ATLAS Experiment. The installation will been shown at Planetarium entrance of the Thinktank science museum in Birmingham, UK from October 2010 until January 2011.

  19. Adult Education for Social and Environmental Change in Contemporary Public Art Galleries and Museums in Canada, Scotland and England

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, pubic art galleries and museums have a well-deserved reputation for elitism, colonialism and exclusion and they are, therefore, frequently omitted from the discourse of adult education. However, the escalating social, cultural and ecological problems of this new century have placed pressure on these public institutions to change and…

  20. Picture This: The Art of Using Museum and Science Collaborations to Teach about Climate Change

    Fiondella, F.; Fowler, R.; Davi, N. K.; Gawthrop, E.

    2015-12-01

    Connecting scientists and their research to photography galleries and museums is an effective way to promote climate literacy among a new, diverse audience. This approach requires creativity and a willingness to reach out to and work with staff unfamiliar with scientific institutions, but can result in broad exposure and understanding of the impacts of climate change. In this presentation we highlight the successful science-art collaboration among the International Center of Photography, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the International Research Institute for Climate and Society. The collaboration revolved around ICP's 2014-2015 exhibition of renowned photographer Sebastiao Salgado's Genesis, an eight-year worldwide survey of wildlife, landscapes, seascapes and indigenous peoples. Salgado's photographs acted as a springboard for a unique public education program based at ICP and aimed at raising awareness of the urgent issue of climate change. Over the course of six months, Lamont and IRI scientists with expertise in climatology, dendrochronology, seismology and glaciology led gallery tours for the public, making links between their research and the places and people of Salgado's photography. Lamont and IRI staff also gave talks throughout the exhibition period on topics ranging from climate change adaptation to the use of photography to help the public visualize the impacts of Earth's changing climate. The research institutions also took over ICP's Instagram feed for a week, showcasing the climate-related field work of more than a dozen scientists. All three institutions, the participating scientists and program attendees deemed the collaboration a success. We'll explain what made this collaboration successful and provide tips on how scientists and their institutes can form similar collaborations with museums and other arts-based organizations.

  1. The debate over the creation of a Museum of Modern Art in Paris between the wars and the shaping of an evolutionary narrative for French art

    Chara Kolokytha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper comments on the state policies towards modern art throughout the interwar period identifying the private initiatives that sought to precipitate the creation of a museum of contemporary art in Paris. It seeks to discuss the debate over the necessity for the creation of a Museum of Modern Art in Paris that was initiated in the Parisian press shortly after the controversial “Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes”, in 1925, and was perpetuated with the re-organisation of the collections of the Louvre, the Luxembourg museum, and the Jeu de Paume in the late 1920s. The offi cial announcement, in 1934, of the creation of a museum of modern art in Paris, in 1937, initiated a new debate that concerned its collections. A series of exhibitions organised on the occasion of  the “Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques”, in 1937, served as a model for the shaping of an evolutionary narrative for French art in which modern art that emerged from 1905 to 1925 appeared as the culmination of the French art tradition. However, the infl uence of foreign artists over French modern art was largely contested, while the discussion initiated by the champions of an international school added a nonconformist nuance to a nationally-oriented dialogue. L’articolo affronta le politiche statali nei confronti dell’arte moderna nel periodo compreso tra le due guerre, individuando anche le iniziative private che hanno cercato di spingere verso la creazione di un museo di arte contemporanea a Parigi. Esso cerca di ricostruire il dibattito avviato sulla stampa parigina poco dopo la controversa “Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes” del 1925, proseguito con la riorganizzazione delle collezioni del Louvre, del museo del Luxembourg e del Jeu de Paume alla fine degli anni Venti. L’annuncio uffi ciale della creazione di un museo d’arte moderna a Parigi, nel 1934, avvia un nuovo

  2. 76 FR 28079 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    2011-05-13

    ... Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meet the definitions of unassociated... 4 eagle feathers, 1 stone purifying bowl, 3 medicine man's baskets, 1 medicine basket lid, 4 medicine man's basket fragments, 1 animal bone, 2 carved animal effigies, 1 carved human effigy, 1 feather...

  3. 77 FR 34991 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI...

    2012-06-12

    ... administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native... affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of...

  4. 78 FR 45958 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-07-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13406; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke...

  5. 77 FR 46117 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2012-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-10823; 2200-1100-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington...

  6. 78 FR 11675 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-02-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-12080;2200-1100-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington...

  7. 75 FR 36671 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2010-06-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Correction AGENCY: National Park... human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington...

  8. 78 FR 44595 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    2013-07-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13407; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke...

  9. Palaeontological collections at the Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen: from Cabinet of Curiosities to databases

    Harper, D.A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Geological collections were established in the University of Copenhagen during the early 1700s with the presentation of fossil, mineral and rock collections by Count A.G. Moltke, mainly assembled by Ole Worm (1588-1654) in his Museum Wormianum. Currently the palaeontological collections in the

  10. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    2012-08-02

    ... Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico... Anthropology, in consultation with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico, has determined that a collection of... cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the...

  11. Practical Study on Treatment of Selected Decorated Tapestry in Applied Art Museum, Cairo

    Neven Kamal FAHIM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method of treatment of tapestry textile, that considers the most common technique used in decoration of textile since the new kingdom until now, it is called Kabaty. The paper deals with selected piece of museum of Applied Art Faculty in Cairo. Treatment procedure was performed by several stages; firstly, Dating by comparing the decoration technique, the type of material and the decorative motifs existed in the object with another one known its date. Then samples taken from object were examined by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope to identify type of fibers and surface morphology .x-ray analysis was performed to identify mordant and dust. FTIR analysis to identify dyes in dyed samples. Then, the paper deal with the treatment of tapestry pieces by testing sensitive of fiber to water, mechanical cleaning and chemical cleaning to remove stain, washing stage using distilled water, and finally consolidation the object by fixed on support of natural linen which was stretched on wooden frame treated by anti-fungal substance.

  12. Genetic Drift. The ancient Egyptian dwarfs of the Walters Art Museum.

    Kozma, Chahira

    2010-10-01

    The ancient Egyptians left an impressive artistic legacy documenting many aspects of their society including the existence of dwarfs as highly valued members. In previous publications in the Journal, I discussed dwarfs and skeletal dysplasia in ancient Egypt. In this study, I examined the ancient Egyptian representations of dwarfs of the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. One of the highlights of the collection is a group of five ivory figurines from Predynastic Times (pre 3500-3100 BCE) depicting a couple, a man with a child, and two females. Representations from other periods include ordinary as well as dwarf deities. The dwarf gods, Bes and Ptah, are frequently depicted holding or biting snakes or standing on crocodiles symbolizing their ability to ward off dangers. A couple of statuettes from the Greco-Roman Period that, in contrast to earlier Egyptian Periods, depict harsh physical anomalies, twisted bodies, and facial pain. The artistic impression can be interpreted as either tragic or humorous. The grotesque depiction of dwarfs during the Greco-Roman Period in ancient Egypt is believed to be due to a greater infusion of Hellenistic influence. This study provides a microcosm of the legacy of dwarfs in ancient Egypt and supports the premise that dwarfs were accepted and integrated in the ancient Egyptian society, and with a few exceptions, their disorder was not depicted as a physical handicap. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. University Students and Local Museums: Developing Effective Partnerships with Oral History

    Jane Eva Baxter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive paper that details the collaboration between a group of twenty-one DePaul University students and the Exhibitions Committee of the Chinese American Museum of Chicago (CAMOC in the spring of 2010.  The students were all junior and senior Anthropology Majors participating in a course on applied-anthropology, or the applications of anthropological methods and perspectives outside of an academic setting.  CAMOC is a significant, volunteer-driven Chicago museum devoted to the collection, study, and exhibition of materials relating to the Chinese-Americans and Chinese-Canadians who settled in the regions between the coasts of these nations.  The museum first opened its doors in 2005, and in 2008 suffered a devastating fire resulting in the loss of most of the collections and exhibits.  DePaul students partnered with the Exhibitions Committee to collect, archive, and display oral histories of community members to assist in their rebuilding efforts.  The presentation of this particular project focusing on three significant ideas: (1 The importance of developing a project that can be brought to fruition in the course of a single collaborative episode, (2 The types of infrastructure that should be provided by the partners in such a collaboration, and (3 The necessity of creating a project that can simultaneously address the needs of a small museum and the educational goals for student participants.

  14. Museums and Their Enemies.

    Haskell, Francis

    1985-01-01

    Since the eighteenth century, both artists and art historians have received educational benefits from public art museums. The main function of public museums, however, has usually been the improvement or refinement of public taste. But in addition to education and pleasure, another museum objective is that of moral improvement. (RM)

  15. Arte Juntos/Art Together: Promoting School Readiness among Latino Children through Parent Engagement and Social Inclusion in a Suburban Museum

    Zoila Tazi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Census data reveal that suburban communities are becoming increasingly diverse. Once considered affluent and predictable places, American suburbs are now confronting increasing poverty rates as well as ethnic, racial and linguistic diversity. Currently, more than half of US Latinos live in the suburbs. Schools and public institutions such as museums are challenged to provide programming that meets the needs of Latinos, who are disproportionately poor (Ackerman and Tazi 2015:3. Promoting school readiness among Latino children is an important effort in maximizing the potential and educational attainment of this growing population. In one suburban community, a school-museum collaboration resulted in a bilingual parent-child program promoting school readiness and social inclusion for Latino families. Arte Juntos/Art Together engaged parents and children using art andculture-based activities that developed observation skills, creativity, critical thinking, vocabulary, and aesthetic appreciation. Celebrating diverse perspectives and self-expression, the program provided access to museums as enriching spaces for informal learning, personal empowerment and social inclusion

  16. Présence Commune, Museum Mohammed VI for Modern and Contemporary Arts (MMVI, Rabat, Morocco, 28.03.2017 - 31.09.2017.

    zineb Bahji Bahji

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the temporary exhibition Presence Commune that was held at Museum Mohammed VI for Modern and Contemporary Arts (MMVI of Rabat, Morocco, from 28 March to 31 September 2017. The review contextualizes the exhibition Presence Commune and examines the communicative strategies it used to convey its messages. It also explains how this artistic event adds to the various artistic and cultural programmes and events that the Moroccan National Foundation of Museums organizes in the course of democratizing access to culture and promoting harmony and tolerance through the universal language of art. The review also shows how the exhibition reflected the role of MMVI in initiating dialogues among artists and visitors from different ethnicities, religions, and African countries, and how it supportedMorocco’s new cultural agenda.Morocco has made cultural diplomacy a priority after the uprisings of the Arab Spring and the rise of religious and ethnic conflicts in the region of North Africa and theMiddle East.

  17. PROFESSOR ZDZISŁAW ŻYGULSKI JR.: AN OUTSTANDING PERSON, A GREAT PERSONALITY, A MUSEUM PROFESSIONAL, A RESEARCHER ON ANTIQUE WEAPONS, ORIENTAL ART AND EUROPEAN PAINTING (1921–2015

    Teresa Grzybkowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Professor Zdzisław Żygulski Jr. (1921–2015 was one of the most prominent Polish art historians of the second half of the 20th century. He treated the history of art as a broadly understood science of mankind and his artistic achievements. His name was recognised in global research on antique weapons, and among experts on Rembrandt and Leonardo da Vinci. He studied museums and Oriental art. He wrote 35 books, about 200 articles, and numerous essays on art; he wrote for the daily press about his artistic journeys through Europe, Japan and the United States. He illustrated his publications with his own photographs, and had a large set of slides. Żygulski created many exhibitions both at home and abroad presenting Polish art in which armour and oriental elements played an important role. He spent his youth in Lvov, and was expatriated to Cracow in 1945 together with his wife, the pottery artist and painter Eva Voelpel. He studied English philology and history of art at the Jagiellonian University (UJ, and was a student under Adam Bochnak and Vojeslav Molè. He was linked to the Czartoryski Museum in Cracow for his whole life; he worked there from 1949 until 2010, for the great majority of time as curator of the Arms and Armour Section. He devoted his whole life to the world of this museum, and wrote about its history and collections. Together with Prof. Zbigniew Bocheński, he set up the Association of Lovers of Old Armour and Flags, over which he presided from 1972 to 1998. He set up the Polish school of the study of militaria. He was a renowned and charismatic member of the circle of international researchers and lovers of militaria. He wrote the key texts in this field: Broń w dawnej Polsce na tle uzbrojenia Europy i Bliskiego Wschodu [Weapons in old Poland compared to armaments in Europe and the Near East], Stara broń w polskich zbiorach [Old weapons in Polish armouries], Polski mundur wojskowy [Polish military uniforms] (together with H

  18. BOOK REVIEW: The Artful Universe Expanded

    Bassett, B. A.

    2005-07-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music—a new type of `cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson,\\endcolumn hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature’s code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one’s mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  19. Entrepreneurial pedagogies in the Arts @ Aarhus University

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Robinson, Sarah

    The booklet presents a hands-on approach for teachers to what entrepreneurship might look like in the Arts. It provides practical examples and exercises for use in university teaching. It does not give a one-size-fits-all recipe for teaching entrepreneurship. Instead this booklet endeavours...... listening and questioning techniques in the classroom. These techniques are explained and examples are given. The second presents a selection of the material available on collaborative learning and peer feedback. Finally we present and discuss the use of software tools for teaching and learning. In addition...... we make some suggestions for links to resources for entrepreneurship education and provide a list of references for the material mentioned in the booklet. Before we present any tools or exercises we need to define what we mean by entrepreneurship. Over the last decade, university education has become...

  20. Adding life to your years: Transformative learning for older people at the Irish Museum of Modern Art.

    Fleming, Dr Ted

    2000-01-01

    Life expectancy has increased by 30 years during the past century. By 2150 the percentage of the world’s population over 65 will be 30%, up from 7% at present. A high percentage of older people are actively involved in adult education (Lamdin and Fugate, 1997, p. 85). During the United Nations International Year of Older Persons (1999) the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA), with EU SOCRATES funding, undertook a study of its education work with members of St. Michael's Parish Active ...

  1. NASA’s Universe of Learning: Engaging Subject Matter Experts to Support Museum Alliance Science Briefings

    Marcucci, Emma; Slivinski, Carolyn; Lawton, Brandon L.; Smith, Denise A.; Squires, Gordon K.; Biferno, Anya A.; Lestition, Kathleen; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Lee, Janice C.; Rivera, Thalia; Walker, Allyson; Spisak, Marilyn

    2018-06-01

    NASA's Universe of Learning creates and delivers science-driven, audience-driven resources and experiences designed to engage and immerse learners of all ages and backgrounds in exploring the universe for themselves. The project is a unique partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University and is part of the NASA SMD Science Activation Collective. The NASA’s Universe of Learning projects pull on the expertise of subject matter experts (scientist and engineers) from across the broad range of NASA Astrophysics themes and missions. One such project, which draws strongly on the expertise of the community, is the NASA’s Universe of Learning Science Briefings, which is done in collaboration with the NASA Museum Alliance. This collaboration presents a monthly hour-long discussion on relevant NASA astrophysics topics or events to an audience composed largely of informal educators from informal learning environments. These professional learning opportunities use experts and resources within the astronomical community to support increased interest and engagement of the informal learning community in NASA Astrophysics-related concepts and events. Briefings are designed to create a foundation for this audience using (1) broad science themes, (2) special events, or (3) breaking science news. The NASA’s Universe of Learning team engages subject matter experts to be speakers and present their science at these briefings to provide a direct connection to NASA Astrophysics science and provide the audience an opportunity to interact directly with scientists and engineers involved in NASA missions. To maximize the usefulness of the Museum Alliance Science Briefings, each briefing highlights resources related to the science theme to support informal educators in incorporating science content into their venues and/or interactions with the public. During this

  2. The Promotion of Peace Education through Guides in Peace Museums. A Case Study of the Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University

    Tanigawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how peace education at a peace museum is promoted by a volunteer guide service for visitors. Peace museums are places where many materials related to war and peace history are on display. To support the learning experience of museum visitors, many peace museums in Japan provide a volunteer guide service. The Kyoto Museum for…

  3. THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS OF ASTURIAS AS AN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE FROM A GENDER PERSPECTIVE

    Ángel de la Fuente Martínez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The museum as an educational resource is a proposal to make teachers reflect on the availability of media in the near environment regardless of the distance from the school to the museum. This gallery can work the general objectives in different educational stages, knowing the enhancement of historic buildings for activities of this type, the key work skills and promote the presence of women within the museum as an icon through different themes and artist. Our goal is to recover in perspective the presence of women sharing the same space and time with the man. The analysis of the trades, real social division of labor that this prefixed men do, that women, allows us to better understand the evolution of society. On the other hand, the postponement of the woman as artist, being supplanted by other painters, see Sofonisba Anguissola, it is another area in which it affects this article. Finally, different museums in which the woman is the protagonist in our country as an initiative to regain the role that women have played throughout the spatial and temporal coordinates, which are defining the development of the actions listed beings humans.

  4. Producing access for the elderly to territories of culture: an experience of occupational therapy in an art museum

    Ana Tereza Costa Galvanese

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available From 1996 to 2009, the Laboratory for Studies and Research in Art, Body and Occupational Therapy established a cooperation with the Museum of Contemporary Art of USP (MAC USP, working in partnership with the Leisure and Art to the Elderly Program of the Education and Technical-Scientific Division of MAC USP. The program offers an introduction in contemporary artistic practice to the elderly. This paper presents the interdisciplinary experience developed in this partnership in 2006. The method adopted in the program is referenced in the Triangular Approach to Teaching Art. Therefore, the appreciation of works of art and the contextualization of selected artists formed the basis on which participants developed their own poetics. The preparatory work was developed in group dynamics, including activities of body awareness and conversation circles coordinated by occupational therapists and students. They also accompanied the participants in their demands related to the challenges of constructing access to socio-cultural territories. The relevance of this living process was evident in the topics proposed by participants in conversations, or arisen during the body work. The aesthetic quality of the participants’ production resulted in personal and collective satisfaction and provoked admiration of the public who visited the workshop and exhibition, organized from this production.

  5. The indoor environment of a modern museum building, the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, Norwich, UK.

    Brimblecombe, P; Blades, N; Camuffo, D; Sturaro, G; Valentino, A; Gysels, K; Van Grieken, R; Busse, H J; Kim, O; Ulrych, U; Wieser, M

    1999-09-01

    A multi-disciplinary approach was used to investigate the indoor environment of a modern museum building, and its suitability for the conservation of the collection therein. Climate, gaseous and particulate pollution and the concentrations of bacteria were measured in summer and winter campaigns. While the environment overall was found to be an acceptable one, a number of drawbacks were highlighted, the most serious of these being the large temperature and humidity fluctuations that occurred in the summer.

  6. Muzejní marketing: komunikační aktivity Victoria and Albert Museum v Londýně v akademickém roce 2011/2012

    Freitagová, Martina

    2013-01-01

    After an extensive museum boom in the 1980s and 1990s marked by the construction of numerous new museums, there is now a growing debate about selling museum items and even a complete closure of some institutions. Also the function attributed to art in the museum context has changed the purpose of these institutions in society. Museums turned into socializing platforms and their collections became subjects of universal conversations. Their role has been fully reoriented towards serving the pub...

  7. 78 FR 21412 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    2013-04-10

    ..., has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of unassociated... the control of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition... material culture are consistent with the Hohokam archaeological tradition and indicate occupation between...

  8. [Surgical Roman instruments in the Museum of History of Medicine of the University of Rome "La Sapienza"].

    Gazzaniga, V; Serarcangeli, C

    1999-01-01

    The Museum of History of Medicine at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" keeps numerous roman surgical instruments, dating from the 1st century A.D. This article offers a short review of the critical literature existing on the topic, together with a temporary catalogue of the instruments.

  9. Reducing Medical Students' Stigmatization of People with Chronic Mental Illness: A Field Intervention at the "Living Museum" State Hospital Art Studio

    Cutler, Janis L.; Harding, Kelli J.; Hutner, Lucy A.; Cortland, Clarissa; Graham, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors designed an intervention to reduce beginning medical students' stigmatization of people with chronic mental illness (CMI). Methods: Pre-clinical medical students visited a state psychiatric facility's "Living Museum," a combination patient art studio/display space, as the intervention. During the visit, students interacted…

  10. When HVAC design becomes reality: investigating the impact of floor heating on the indoor climate risks in a contemporary art museum

    Verberne, F.; Neuhaus, E.; Ankersmit, H.A.; Schellen, H.L.

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of installing underfloor heating in a contemporary art museum for the presentation and conservation of artworks are addressed in this paper. The subsequent relative humidity (RH) and temperature gradients are identified and analyzed. The research results show that above floor level,

  11. Art museum-based intervention to promote emotional well-being and improve quality of life in people with dementia: The ARTEMIS project.

    Schall, Arthur; Tesky, Valentina A; Adams, Ann-Katrin; Pantel, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    ARTEMIS (ART Encounters: Museum Intervention Study) is an art-based intervention designed especially for people with dementia and their care partners that involves a combination of museum visits and artistic activity. This paper reports the results of a randomized wait-list controlled study on the influence of the ARTEMIS intervention on the emotional state, well-being, and quality of life of dementia patients. People with mild-to-moderate dementia (n = 44) and their care partners (n = 44) visited the Frankfurt Städel Museum once a week on six pre-arranged occasions. The intervention consisted of six different guided art tours (60 minutes), followed by art-making in the studio (60 minutes). Independent museum visits served as a control condition. A mixed-methods design was used to assess several outcomes including cognitive status, emotional well-being, self-rated aspects of quality of life, and subjective evaluations by informal caregivers. In a pre-post-assessment, we found significant improvements in participants' self-rated quality of life (t = -3.15, p life in people with dementia. This promising psychosocial approach deserves further attention in future studies and consideration in community-based dementia care programs.

  12. Orientalist Imaginations and Touristification of Museums

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws inspiration from Edward Said's orientalism, and examines how the three National Museums of Singapore - the Singapore History Museum, the Singapore Art Museum and the Asian Civilizations Museums - are orientalized. The process is mediated through the museums' close links to touris...

  13. Expanding Our Vision of Museum Education and Perception: An Analysis of Three Case Studies of Independent Blind Arts Learners

    Hayhoe, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Simon Hayhoe investigates the experiences of blind museum visitors in the context of the relationships between the artworks they learned about in museums, those they experienced when younger, and the social, cultural, and emotional influences of their museum experiences. The three case studies he presents support his hypothesis…

  14. Arts and science under the sign of Leonardo. The case of the National Museum of Science and Technology ‘Leonardo da Vinci’ of Milan (Italian original version

    Claudio Giorgione

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the example of Leonardo da Vinci, who was able to combine arts and science in his work, the National Museum of Science and Technology of Milan has always pursued the blending and the dialogue of humanistic and scientific knowledge. It has employed this approach in all of its activities, from the set design of exhibition departments to the acquisition of collections and, more recently, in the dialogue with the public. Now more than ever, following a renewal path for the Museum, these guidelines are being subject to research to achieve a new and more up-to-date interpretation.

  15. Arts and science under the sign of Leonardo. The case of the National Museum of Science and Technology ‘Leonardo da Vinci’ of Milan

    Claudio Giorgione

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the example of Leonardo da Vinci, who was able to combine arts and science in his work, the National Museum of Science and Technology of Milan has always pursued the blending and the dialogue of humanistic and scientific knowledge. It has employed this approach in all of its activities, from the set design of exhibition departments to the acquisition of collections and, more recently, in the dialogue with the public. Now more than ever, following a renewal path for the Museum, these guidelines are being subject to research to achieve a new and more up-to-date interpretation.

  16. Installation Art and the Museum. Presentation and Conservation of Changing Artworks

    van Saaze, V.E.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Installation art has become mainstream in artistic practices. However, acquiring and displaying such artworks implies that curators and conservators are challenged to deal with obsolete technologies, ephemeral materials and other issues concerning care and management of these artworks. By analysing

  17. The Library and Museum for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center

    Sperber, Ann

    1972-01-01

    The Lincoln Center Library offers a variety of services, including circulating collections, art galleries, a bookstore, free movies, a children's room, special exhibits, and a small, neat auditorium that features everything from community drama to film retrospectives. (Author/NH)

  18. Interactive spatial multimedia for communication of art in the physical museum space

    Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2008-01-01

    of the artworks we apply three spatial multimedia techniques where the only interaction device needed is the human body. The three techniques are: 1) spatially bounded audio; 2) floor-based multimedia; 3) multimedia interior. The paper describes the application of these techniques for communication of information...... without disturbing the art works. This has usually been limited to individual audio guides. In our case we strive to achieve holistic and social experiences with seamless transitions between art experience and communication related to the artworks. To reach a holistic experience with minimal disturbance...... in a Mariko Mori exhibition. The multimedia installations and their implementation are described. It is argued that the utilization of the spatial multimedia techniques support holistic and social art experience. The multimedia installations were in function for a three and a half month exhibition period...

  19. MFA Connections: Three Themes for Teacher-Guided Visits to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

    Foote, Allison; And Others

    This teacher resource packet encourages exploration of history and culture through art images. The packet consists of three units: "Daily Life around the World," which explores the rituals of daily life in ancient Egypt, China, and Greece, as well as colonial and turn-of-the-century America. "Images of Power," examines the…

  20. Museum Studies: Connecting the Elementary and Secondary Experience

    Martin, Kachina; Yoder, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Museum studies will certainly reinforce students' appreciation of art history and art production. A student's understanding of a museum's function will deepen with each museum visit. Students will recognize that a museum can be organized around materials and kinds of art, periods of art history and cultures, and the works of an individual artist.…

  1. Wastewater treatment by artificial wetlands in the Museum of Popular Culture of the National University

    Carolina Alfaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals in terms of sustainable access to sanitation requires increasing the development of research programs that promote simple and low cost technological options, appropriate to the social, economic, and environmental conditions of each population. These processes must be accompanied by actions of environmental and sanitation education, which allow appropriation of these systems by the communities. In this sense, there are two projects in the National University converging on this subject. The Museum of Popular Culture together with the Public Service Company of Heredia develop an environmental education project that promotes the protection of water, from an historical perspective of its management, which has an artificial wetland as the main teaching unit. On the other hand, the Waste Management Laboratory at the School of Chemistry evaluates the performance of this artificial wetland as part of a research project that promotes this type of alternative sanitation. This paper presents results of the monitoring of this artificial wetland, showing average removal percentages of 93% BOD5,20 , 95% COD, 73% P-PO4, and 95% for SS.

  2. Cross Fertilization between Museums and Schools, Science and Art, History and Multimedia

    Falomo Bernarduzzi, Lidia; Albanesi, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In 2011 Pavia University celebrated its 650th birthday. This provided the opportunity to propose the Neverland project whose purpose was to overcome the division between formal and informal science education. A number of classes (various age groups) from a group of schools in the province of Pavia took part in the project. The University Museums…

  3. From idol to art : African 'objects with power': a challenge for missionaries, anthropologists and museum curators

    Leyten, H.

    2015-01-01

    After his theological studies, Harrie Leyten (1935) worked as a missionary in Ghana for ten years. He studied social anthropology at Oxford University and became Africa curator of the Tropenmuseum in Amsterdam in 1975, and taught at the University of Amsterdam and the Reinwardt Academy in Amsterdam.

  4. Italy: An Open Air Museum

    Pizzorusso, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Imagine if you could see the River Styx, bathe in the Fountain of Youth, collect water which enhances fertility, wear a gem that heals bodily ailments, understand how our health is affected by geomagnetic fields, venture close to the flames of Hell on Earth and much, much, more. Know something? These things exist - on Earth - today - in Italy and you can visit them because Italy is an open air museum. Ann C. Pizzorusso, in her recent book, reveals how Italy's geology has affected its art, literature, architecture, religion, medicine and just about everything else. She explores the geologic birth of the land, describing the formation of the Alps and Apennines, romantic bays of Tuscany and Lazio, volcanoes of the south and Caribbean-like beaches of Puglia. But that's not all, from the first pages of this visually stunning book, the reader has the impression of being in an art museum, where one can wander from page to page to satisfy one's curiosity-- guided from time to time by the Etruscan priests, Virgil, Dante, Goethe or Leonardo da Vinci himself. Pizzorusso stitches together widely diverse topics - such as gemology, folk remedies, grottoes, painting, literature, physics and religion - using geology as a thread. Quoting everyone from Pliny the Elder to NASA physicist Friedemann Freund, the work is solidly backed scholarship that reads as easily as a summer novel. Wonderfully illustrated with many photos licensed from Italian museums, HRH Elizabeth II and the Ministero Beni Culturali the book highlights the best works in Italian museums and those outside in the "open air museums." This approach can be used in any other country in the world and can be used for cultural tourism (a tour following the book has been organized for cultural and university groups), an ideal way of linking museums to the surrounding landscape.

  5. Promoting Diversity in Creative Art Education: The Case of Fine Art at Goldsmiths, University of London

    Hayton, Annette Ruth; Haste, Polly; Jones, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Students studying art at university in the United Kingdom tend to be female, from higher social classes and from majority ethnic groups. This paper considers some of the complex and deeply-rooted social and economic factors that militate against wider participation in the arts and describes how we started to tackle under-representation at…

  6. 76 FR 36146 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    2011-06-21

    ... ``unknown/is possibly the Creswell burial excavated by Peterson.'' Based on museum records, the remains may have been recovered from Creswell, Lane County, OR. Elsewhere, the remains are cataloged as ``unknown...

  7. The Hans Gross Museum of Criminology at the Karl-Franzens-University Graz

    Christian, Bachhiesl

    2008-01-01

    The Hans Gross Museum of Criminology combines scientific research and academic activity with a wide range of public events, such as crime thriller readings and stage plays, connecting the campus with the wider community.

  8. Art History in the University II: Ernst Guhl

    Eric Garberson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay continues the examination, begun in volume five of this journal, of the training, appointment, and teaching careers of nineteenth-century art historians at the Friedrich-Wilhelms University in Berlin. It examines the extensive but little studied documentation for Ernst Guhl (1819-1862, the only new instructor with a primary focus on the history of art to join the university between the early 1840s and the later 1860s. After standard training in philology and archaeology, an extended stay in Italy, and several years teaching as Privatdozent, he applied four times for an extraordinary professorship (1851, 1854, twice in 1858. The successive reports assessing his qualifications demonstrate that while the historical study of art was becoming more sharply defined as a specific discipline, it continued to be assigned a minor role in the intellectual and pedagogical structures of the university. They also provide insight into the contested relationship between archaeology and art history.

  9. Japanese Modernism at a "Branch Point": On the Museum of Modern Art, Hayama’s "1937" Exhibition

    Kevin Michael Smith

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article frames the Museum of Modern Art, Hayama’s 2017 exhibition on Japanese modernism during the simultaneously vibrant and tumultuous 1930s through the lens of Japan’s uneven capitalist development and wartime mobilization. The author suggests that the exhibition’s unique international scope, rich selection of figurative and abstract modernist works, and emphasis on the year 1937 as a nexus through which the decade’s competing tendencies can be reevaluated readily disclose the constitutive, dialectical relationships between historical difference, total war, and modernist form in imperial Japan and its colonies. The exhibition’s featured works and curator Asaki Yuka’s direction together emphasized the inseparability of Japanese modernism from the encroaching conditions of world war during the late 1930s, thereby contributing to a growing body of scholarship and series of exhibitions challenging the received oppositions between autonomous modernism, proletarian realism, and wartime propaganda. After introductory remarks on the reassessment of 1930s-era Japanese avant-garde aesthetics, the article provides a series of close readings of significant paintings included in the exhibition, including Murai Masanari’s 1937 Urban, Matsumoto Shunsuke’s 1935 Building, and Uchida Iwao’s 1937 Port. These formal readings explore how the year 1937 marked a pivotal “branch point” for Japanese society, not only in terms of the confluence of various artistic trends but also in terms of the fierce opposition between socialism and fascism that bifurcated potentialities for Japan’s future.

  10. Drawing after the Antique at the British Museum, 1809–1817: “Free” Art Education and the Advent of the Liberal State

    Martin Myrone

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available From 1808 the British Museum in London began regularly to open its newly established Townley Gallery so that art students could draw from the ancient sculptures housed there. This article documents and comments on this development in art education, based on an analysis of the 165 individuals recorded in the surviving register of attendance at the Museum, covering the period 1809–17. The register is presented as a photographic record, with a transcription and biographical directory. The accompanying essay situates the opening of the Museum’s sculpture rooms to students within a far-reaching set of historical shifts. It argues that this new museum access contributed to the early nineteenth-century emergence of a liberal state. But if the rhetoric surrounding this development emphasized freedom and general public benefit in the spirit of liberalization, the evidence suggests that this new level of access actually served to further entrench the “middle-classification” of art education at this historical juncture.

  11. Reducing medical students' stigmatization of people with chronic mental illness: a field intervention at the "living museum" state hospital art studio.

    Cutler, Janis L; Harding, Kelli J; Hutner, Lucy A; Cortland, Clarissa; Graham, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    The authors designed an intervention to reduce beginning medical students' stigmatization of people with chronic mental illness (CMI). Pre-clinical medical students visited a state psychiatric facility's "Living Museum," a combination patient art studio/display space, as the intervention. During the visit, students interacted with artist-guides who showed their work and discussed their experiences creating art. Students completed a self-assessment survey developed to measure attitudes and feelings toward people with CMI after half of the class visited the Living Museum, constituting a Visit/No-Visit cross-sectional comparison. Students who visited the Living Museum (N=64), as compared with those who did not visit (N=110), endorsed more positive attitudes toward people with CMI. Among the students who visited, however, those who reported having spoken individually with a patient-artist (N=44), paradoxically, indicated less-positive feelings toward people with CMI. An intervention in which pre-clinical medical students visited patient-artist guides in an art-studio setting generally improved students' attitudes toward people with CMI. Thus, nontraditional psychiatric settings offer a valuable adjunct to more traditional clinical settings to reduce stigma when introducing medical students to the field of psychiatry.

  12. Helmet "tang" from the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City, United States. Features of Construction, Design and Operational Use

    Leonid A. Bobrov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses iron helmet (No. 36.25.115, which is stored in the Metropolitan Museum of art (New York City, United States. For the first time this helmet was published and analyzed by American scientists G. C. Stone and D.G. Alexander. The analysis showed that the Bowl was made by Turkish masters of the XVII century and backplate and the hoop is added to the helmet in 1781–1782 D.G. Alexander speculated that the helmet belonged to the Warrior of the Crimean Khanate. Dating the helmet does not raise objections. However, the attribution of a helmet requires some clarification. Analysis of the design of the helmet and decoration revealed that backplate, hoop and Aventail from iron rings added to Bowl in 1781–1782, were manufactured by Circassian craftsmen living in the Northern Caucasus or in Crimea. For the decoration of the helmet has been used typical Circassian ornaments: "sieve", cherkessian floral pattern, geometric shapes, triangular in shape, "gear", etc. During Assembly of the helmet were applied characteristic of Circassian gunsmiths technological solutions: using as a basis the bowl old-style helmet, tapered Finial with a ring for a decorative plume, hoop with four plates, ringed with aventail lip to protect the forehead, etc. In Circassia similar headgear worn were known as tang (from the Arabic. "Taj", i.e., the "Crown". In the XVII–XVIII centuries. they willingly purchased representatives of Crimean Tatar nobility. Similar in design and system design helmets Circassian production belonged to the highest aristocracy of the Crimean Khanate, are stored in Museum and private collections in Poland, Turkey and the United States. The inscription "Bekmurun" on the hoop from the Metropolitan helmet suggests that it was manufactured on request of Kabardian Bekmur princely heir (Bekmurziny, which moved from Circassia in Crimea, 1737. The popularity of tang type helmets among the aristocracy of North Caucasus and Crimea were due not

  13. Monuments devoted to artists in public spaces around museums: A nineteenth-century strategy to enhance the urban space of art districts

    Lorente, J. Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Monuments to kings or military heroes have always been positioned in main squares and avenues, whilst those erected to famous cultural figures were a novelty introduced in the Enlightenment and Romanticism, placing busts or sitting monuments to writers or musicians in secluded gardens and in the surroundings of libraries, theatres, etc. During the nineteenth century, monuments to artists became also a common feature in many cities, where a most likely emplacement for them was in front of some art museum. In a way, they were a complement to the ornaments of such building, usually decorated with portraits and inscriptions glorifying great artists; but the monument to Murillo erected in 1863 by public subscription in Seville's Plaza del Museo was also an urban milestone, catching the attention of promenading public passing along a lateral street. Later, the monuments erected in the piazzas around the Prado Museum in Madrid, or in gardens outside the Louvre, became a popular prototype, emulated in many other cities up to the early 20th century. Their role as interfaces between public spaces and museum sites would thereafter be taken over by other kinds of artistic landmarks: not monuments to artists, but monumental artworks, often owned by the museum itself, thus bringing part of its collection outside, as a welcome starter to prospective cultural consumers.

  14. Museum of Comparative Zoology Library--The Agassiz Library: Harvard University.

    Jonas, Eva S.; Regen, Shari S.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the Museum of Comparative Zoology Library reflects the union between the nineteenth century natural history values of Louis Agassiz and the twentieth century library and information science methodology. Special collections, records, cataloging and classification, serials and their classification, policies, services, and procedures are…

  15. 75 FR 28648 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of... Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of... finding a copper vessel and other ``small articles'' with the human remains. However, these items were not...

  16. 77 FR 32986 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL

    2012-06-04

    ... notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the... than 2,032 glass beads, 1 lot of more than 17 shell beads, 1 unidentified bead, 1 gun lock, 1 gun butt plate, 1 gun stock, 2 gun barrels, 1 brass ramrod support, 8 musket balls, 2 iron buckles, 1 iron handle...

  17. "Carol I" Central University Library Continuous Training Program through Documentary Visits. A Documentary Visit to Cotroceni Museum

    Emanuela Florea-Paraipan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this essay we aim to emphasize the role of documentary visits in continuous training programs of library professionals. As alternative form of continuous training, the "Carol I" Central University Library runs an annual program of documentary visits to Bucharest museums, in order to identify from the historical, biographical, literary, artistic and scientific perspective, the manner in which evolved Romanian spirituality nationally and beyond. As a form of initial training for national inheritance understanding, the professional visits to cultural institutions allows the discovery of the categories of collections, the structure and their pedagogical value in learning, teaching and training.

  18. Art history in the university: Toelken – Hotho – Kugler

    Eric Garberson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay offers a contextual reading of the extensive but little studied documentation for the education and subsequent university careers of E. H. Toelken (1785-1864, Gustav Heinrich Hotho (1802-1873 and Franz Kugler (1808-1858, three of the earliest art historians to earn doctoral degrees. Spanning about three decades, from 1804 to 1833, their training occurred during a period of rapid disciplinary specialization within the university. Examination of that training, and the teaching careers built on it, contributes to the larger investigation of how existing university structures and procedures accommodated but also informed emerging disciplines in early nineteenth-century Germany. The essay sets out the relevant academic policies and procedures and gives an overview of those trained and appointed in the historical study of art in Berlin between 1810 and 1840. Documents for Toelken and Kugler are then presented through narrative case histories.

  19. The collection of the Herpetological Museum of the University of Antioquia (northwestern Colombia)

    Ortiz-Yusty,Carlos; Daza,Juan; Paez,Vivian; Bock,Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Northwestern South America harbors one of the richest herpetofauna in the world. The connection among several biogeographic provinces along with climatic and orographic complexity makes this region an important contributor to the Neotropical biodiversity. Despite of this importance, the amphibian and reptile fauna in this area remains largely unknown as few herpetological collections has been made in recent decades. Motivated by this, the Herpetological Museum at the Universidad de A...

  20. The good field trip: How elementary students from diverse socio-economic backgrounds learn science, art, and technology at a museum

    Martell, Sandra Toro

    The Good Field Trip is a study that uses an ethnographic approach to answer the question of what learning looks like during a field trip to a museum. The study uses the Contextual Model of Learning (Falk & Dierking, 2000) to investigate elementary students' personal, physical, and sociocultural contexts of learning as well as how time affects students' thoughts and feelings about the experience. The author accompanied a group of eight students on a three and a half day camp-like experience to a museum that promotes environmental stewardship and the integration of art, science, and technology use and learning. The author videotaped the students' conversations and experiences and interviewed students before, during, and after the trip. Analyses of the videotapes were supplemented with student documents, including comic books, journal notes, and reflective essays about the trip. Findings include that not all experiences are marked as science, art, and technology; technology use does not occur; art is presented in a more formalized manner than science, which is composed of observation and the acquisition of knowledge about plants and animals; and conversations and activities resemble traditional modes of learning in school settings.

  1. Learning to Be: The Modelling of Art and Design Practice in University Art and Design Teaching

    Budge, Kylie

    2016-01-01

    Learning to be an artist or designer is a complex process of becoming. Much of the early phase of "learning to be" occurs during the time emerging artists and designers are students in university art/design programmes, both undergraduate and postgraduate. Recent research reveals that a critical role in assisting students in their…

  2. The School Museum as a Catalyst for a Renewal of the Teaching of History of Education. Practices and Experiences from the University of Macerata, Italy

    Brunelli, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the educational activities that, since its establishment, the Museum of the School of the University of Macerata has developed with particular attention to university and school students. As a result of a fruitful synthesis of the most recent trends in History of Education, Heritage Education and finally in History Teaching,…

  3. The Herbert Virtual Museum

    Panagiotis Petridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, virtual reality and augmented reality have emerged as areas of extreme interest as unique methods for visualising and interacting with digital museum artefacts in a different context, for example, as a virtual museum or exhibition, particularly over the Internet. Modern cultural heritage exhibitions have evolved from static to dynamic exhibitions and challenging explorations. This paper presents two different applications developed for the Herbert Museum and Art Gallery that make the user’s experience more immersive, engaging, and interactive. The first application utilizes mobile phone devices in order to enrich the visitors experience in the museum, and the second application is a serious game for cultural heritage and in particular for museum environments focusing on the younger visitors.

  4. Analysis of an Unusual Mirror in a 16th-Century Painting: A Museum Exercise for Physics Students

    Swaminathan, Sudha; Lamelas, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Physics students at Worcester State University visit the Worcester Art Museum (WAM) at the end of a special 100-level course called Physics in Art. The students have studied geometrical optics, and they have been introduced to concepts in atomic physics. The purpose of the museum tour is to show how physics-based techniques can be used in a nontraditional lab setting. Other examples of the use of museum-based art in physics instruction include analyses of Pointillism and image resolution, and of reflections in soap bubbles in 17- and 18th-century paintings.

  5. Universal Connection through Art: Role of Mirror Neurons in Art Production and Reception.

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Boller, François; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2017-05-05

    Art is defined as expression or application of human creative skill and imagination producing works to be appreciated primarily for their aesthetic value or emotional power. This definition encompasses two very important elements-the creation and reception of art-and by doing so it establishes a link, a dialogue between the artist and spectator. From the evolutionary biological perspective, activities need to have an immediate or remote effect on the population through improving survival, gene selection, and environmental adjustment, and this includes art. It may serve as a universal means of communication bypassing time, cultural, ethnic, and social differences. The neurological mechanisms of both art production and appreciation are researched by neuroscientists and discussed both in terms of healthy brain biology and complex neuronal networking perspectives. In this paper, we describe folk art and the issue of symbolic archetypes in psychoanalytic thought as well as offer neuronal mechanisms for art by emphasizing mirror/neurons and the role they play in it.

  6. Another New Museum?

    Michels, Christoph; Beyes, Timon; Steyaert, Chris

    2014-01-01

    city is at work in the planning of a new art museum in a medium-sized Swiss city. The analysis shows how the entrepreneurial rationale is contested and re-appropriated through the use of classic and situational modes to organize this cultural institution. The ways of imagining the museum are described...... as the effects of these three modes of ordering – entrepreneurial, classic, and situational – as well as their hybridization. The authors conclude that by attending to the multiple layers of urban life, which unfold in and around museums, we can imagine other ‘new museums’ than those of the entrepreneurial city....

  7. 77 FR 23499 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Indian Arts & Culture/Laboratory of...

    2012-04-19

    ... tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and... definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the... associated human remains are in the custody of the San Diego Museum of Man. Based on material culture...

  8. Restoran Museum = Museum Restaurant

    2009-01-01

    Tallinnas Vana-Viru 14 asuva restorani Museum sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekt Toomas Korb, tema tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Varem paiknes nendes ruumides tuletõrjemuuseum, endiseid asukaid meenutavad raamitud mustvalged fotod. Ruumi ilmestavad Tom Dixoni loodud kuulvalgustid

  9. ‘The prehistory of Asian collections in Paris’: Ting Chang, Travel, Collecting, and Museums of Asian Art in Nineteenth-Century Paris, Aldershot: Ashgate 2013

    Partha Mitter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The work deals with three major collectors of Asian art in Paris in the 19th century. Enrico Cernuschi and Émile Guimet (founder of Musée Guimet acquired their substantial collection through travelling abroad while Edmond Goncourt amassed his collection at home through dealers. As the author argues, the influential postcolonial critiques of museum collections as instruments of power and authority do not take into account labour and social relations, and somatic experiences of travels to Asia. Cross-cultural encounters between Europe and Asia led to subtle inversions of power, undermining European sense of superiority. Additionally, she throws light on extensive networks and complex political, commercial, monetary relations, especially bimetallism, as well as the material conditions that affect art collection.

  10. The collection of the Herpetological Museum of the University of Antioquia (northwestern Colombia).

    Ortiz-Yusty, Carlos E; Daza, Juan M; Paez, Vivian P; Bock, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Northwestern South America harbors one of the richest herpetofauna in the world. The connection among several biogeographic provinces along with climatic and orographic complexity makes this region an important contributor to the Neotropical biodiversity. Despite of this importance, the amphibian and reptile fauna in this area remains largely unknown as few herpetological collections has been made in recent decades. Motivated by this, the Herpetological Museum at the Universidad de Antioquia (Medellín, Colombia) has been increasing the collection in the last 16 years to better understand the herpetofaunal diversity and thus contribute to ecological, systematic, biogeographic and conservation research in the Neotropics. Here, we present the results of this effort and highlight how future collection will impact our understanding of the Neotropical herpetofauna.

  11. The collection of the Herpetological Museum of the University of Antioquia (northwestern Colombia

    Carlos Ortiz-Yusty

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Northwestern South America harbors one of the richest herpetofauna in the world. The connection among several biogeographic provinces along with climatic and orographic complexity makes this region an important contributor to the Neotropical biodiversity. Despite of this importance, the amphibian and reptile fauna in this area remains largely unknown as few herpetological collections has been made in recent decades. Motivated by this, the Herpetological Museum at the Universidad de Antioquia (Medellín, Colombia has been increasing the collection in the last 16 years to better understand the herpetofaunal diversity and thus contribute to ecological, systematic, biogeographic and conservation research in the Neotropics. Here, we present the results of this effort and highlight how future collection will impact our understanding of the Neotropical herpetofauna.

  12. The art and science of prognostication in early university medicine.

    Demaitre, Luke

    2003-01-01

    Prognosis occupied a more prominent place in the medieval curriculum than it does at the modern university. Scholastic discussions were rooted in the Hippocratic Aphorisms and shaped by Galen's treatises On Crisis and On Critical Days. Medical prediction, as an art dependent on personal skills such as memory and conjecture, was taught with the aid of the liberal arts of rhetoric and logic. Scientific predictability was sought in branches of mathematics, moving from periodicity and numerology to astronomy. The search for certitude contributed to the cultivation of astrology; even at its peak, however, astrological medicine did not dominate the teaching on prognostication. The ultimate concern, which awaits further discussion, was not even with forecasting as such, but with the physician and, indeed, the patient.

  13. MUSEUMS AS CULTURAL TOURISM ATTRACTIONS IN UBUD

    Ida Bagus Kade Subhiksu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a shift in the attributes of several museums in Ubud in order to attract more tourists to visit museums as cultural tourism attractions. Some museums have expanded their collections and add other attributes to complement their main collections, which as the potential to alter the idealism, functions, and roles of museums. Another challenge faced by museum operators is the development of other tourist attractions, such as the addition of tourism destination attributes in Ubud, which was initially known as tourism destinations that offered art and culture such as dance performances and museums, and now have expanded into yoga destination, adventure destination, and so on. Based on these factors, the problem statements in this research are formulated as follows: (1 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of operators? (2 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of visitors? (3 How is the relationship between museums and other tourism components when examined from the role of museums as cultural tourism attractions in Ubud area?. This research on museums was conducted in the Ubud area because Ubud has made museums as the cultural tourism attractions in the area, which include the Blanco Museum, Museum Puri Lukisan, Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA, the Rudana Museum, and Neka Art Museum. This research is based on the theories of museum management, marketing, and theories on cultural tourism attraction. The research involved the participation of 82 foreign visitors and 79 domestic visitors as respondents, in addition to five museum owners and two museum professionals as informants. The conclusion of this research are as follows: (1 From the perspective of museum operators, museums function as cultural tourism attractions, as sources of historical information, as the media for cultural preservation, and the actualization of the noble objective of the museum

  14. Climate Museum and Garden

    Gregg, Jay; Bille, Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    The Climate Museum and Garden is conceived as a cross-disciplinary experience, where the arts and sciences link together to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and its relevance to our fate as a species. This would be a place of inspiration. The Climate Museum and Garden would merge concepts of modern art museums and modern science museums, with exhibitions, live music and theater performances, visitor interaction, unique discoveries and reflection. It would be a place where visitors are immersed in experiences, lingering indoors and out in quiet consideration and gratitude for our planet's atmosphere. The story of climate change is compelling in its own right; theories of the greenhouse effect go back over century and climate policy has stretched back a few decades. Whereas scientific researchers have been contributing to understanding the mechanisms and impacts of climate change for many decades; whereas researchers have participated in climate summits and informed policy makers; whereas researchers have taught classes of gifted students; in all of this, the public has mostly missed out. This public relations gap has been unfortunately filled by those that would seek to politicize and mislead the public, leading to an engagement gap among the general public. Now we stand on a precipice. Therefore we see a ripe opportunity to reach out and inspire the population. We build off of current pedagogic research that shows that experienced-based learning is more impactful when it engages the senses and elicits an emotional response. People understand what they experience, what they feel, and this serves as the basis for personal reflection. In this sense the visitor experience is generative, in that it promotes further personal investigation and interaction. The Climate Museum and Garden would be a start. In the future, we envisage a future network of climate museums in all major cities. It would be a flagship attraction for any city, along with their art

  15. Museum Learning.

    Black, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Virtual museums focus on a specific curriculum theme and showcase electronic museum-type collections such as artifacts, paintings, photographs, numerous databases, and Web links to resources around the world. Museums of all types include vital teaching tools that help students make discoveries and form connections with the past, present, and…

  16. Raising private investment funds for museums

    van der Burg, Tsjalle; Dolfsma, W.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors propose the notion of an "arts fund", a publicly traded investment fund for the purpose of acquiring increasingly costly art works to be displayed in museums. Public as well as private museums stand to benefit greatly from such an approach to financially supporting the arts. A

  17. 75 FR 33328 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    2010-06-11

    ... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service..., Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard [[Page 33329

  18. The museum as information space

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2016-01-01

    space to being outside the museum in the online information space of the Internet. This has fundamental implications for the institutional role of museums, our understanding of metadata and the methods of documentation. The onsite museum institution will, eventually, not be able to function...... as an institutional entity on the Internet, for in this new information space, objects, collections and museums, all function as independent components in a vast universe of data, side by side at everyone’s disposal at anytime. Potentially, users can access cultural heritage anytime, anywhere and anyhow. © The Author......Although museums vary in nature and may have been founded for all sorts of reasons, central to all museum institutions are the collected objects. These objects are information carriers organized in a catalogue system. In this chapter, the museum will be conceived as an information space, consisting...

  19. Visiting the cinema, concerts, museums or art exhibitions as determinant of survival: a Swedish fourteen-year cohort follow-up.

    Konlaan, B B; Bygren, L O; Johansson, S E

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the possible influence of attending various kinds of cultural events or visiting cultural institutions as a determinant of survival. A cohort of individuals aged 25-74 years from a random sample were interviewed by trained non-medical interviewers in 1982 and 1983. The interviews covered standard-of-living variables. Our independent variables covered visiting cultural institutions and attendance at cultural events, reading books or periodicals, and music making. The non-response rate was about 25%. The cohort was followed with respect to survival for 14 years up to 31st December 1996. The background covariates that were used for control purposes were age, sex, cash buffer, educational standard, long-term disease, smoking, and physical exercise. Our setting was the Swedish survey of living conditions among the adult Swedish population aged 25-74 years. About 10,609 individuals were interviewed in 1982 and 1983. The outcome measure was survival until 31st December 1996. In all, 916 men and 600 women died during this period. We found a higher mortality risk for those people who rarely visited the cinema, concerts, museums, or art exhibitions compared with those visiting them most often. The significant relative risks ranging between RR 1.14 (95% CI. 1.01-1.31) of attending art exhibitions, and RR 1.42 (CI. 1.25-1.60) of attending museums, when adjusting for the nine other variables. Visits to the cinema and concerts gave significant RR in between. We could not discern any beneficial effect of attending the theatre, church service or sports event as a spectator or any effect of reading or music making. Our conclusion is that attendance at certain kinds of cultural events may have a beneficial effect on longevity.

  20. PROFESSOR ZDZISŁAW ŻYGULSKI JR.: AN OUTSTANDING PERSON, A GREAT PERSONALITY, A MUSEUM PROFESSIONAL, A RESEARCHER ON ANTIQUE WEAPONS, ORIENTAL ART AND EUROPEAN PAINTING (1921–2015)

    Teresa Grzybkowska

    2017-01-01

    Professor Zdzisław Żygulski Jr. (1921–2015) was one of the most prominent Polish art historians of the second half of the 20th century. He treated the history of art as a broadly understood science of mankind and his artistic achievements. His name was recognised in global research on antique weapons, and among experts on Rembrandt and Leonardo da Vinci. He studied museums and Oriental art. He wrote 35 books, about 200 articles, and numerous essays on art; he wrote for the daily press about h...

  1. Myths, Mummies and Museums.

    Norby, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Greek mythology, Egyptian mummies, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City are the focus of a one-semester course given at the Sea Girt (New Jersey) Elementary School. It is an interdisciplinary program wherein students (grade 8) study ancient civilizations and do projects related to their studies. (KC)

  2. Building Staff Capacity to Evaluate in Museum Education

    Kubarek, Joy

    2015-01-01

    For years, museums of all varieties, including art museums, science centers, history museums, zoos, and aquariums, have conducted education evaluation. However, museums are all too often faced with the challenge of allocating staff time, expertise, and other resources toward conducting evaluation, particularly evaluation that moves beyond program…

  3. IBA in the museum

    Menu, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Research Laboratory of the Museums of France (LRMF) has been a part of the Louvre Museum since 1931. At the beginning, paintings were only examined by means of optical microscopy, under UV or IR light, or by X-ray radiography. With the development of archaeometry in the early 1960s, different spectrometric techniques have been applied to the analysis of works of art and archaeological objects: UV spectrometry, XRF, and even SEM coupled to an X-ray Si(Li) detector. Crystalline objects were investigated with XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR); organic matter with gas chromatography, FTIR, UV and visible spectrophotometry. Thus the principal aim of the LRMF is to characterize the materials and the techniques involved in the creation of art and archaeological objects, for example, methods of production, provenance studies, authentication, and conservation. (The problem of dating is for the time being only a minor subject of research at the LRMF). Because of the valuable nature of such objects, nondestructive methods of analysis have been developed, and consequently the results have to be more and more accurate to answer the questions put to us by the art historian. Moreover, the works of art must stay inside the security area of the museum. Therefore, it was decided in 1982 to install within the Louvre an accelerator dedicated solely to museum problems. The installation of AGLAE, begun in 1984, has now been completed. The accelerator system, a Pelletron 6SDH2 from NEC, was rendered operational in June 1988. A general consensus with regard to the applications of the ion beam techniques in art and archaeology was arrived at during the International Workshop held in Pont-a-Mousson, France in 1985, which brought together museum scientists as well as IBA physicists who had applied these techniques to archaeology, geology and metallurgy. (orig./WL)

  4. Research of Fine Art Management Based on the International Network of Fine Arts Universities: Report of the Exhibition "FINE ART / UNIVERSITY SELECTION" under the Sponsorship of Agency of Cultural Affairs, Government of Japan, Fiscal Year 2013-2017

    HOSHI, Mika

    2017-01-01

    Art and Design Research for the Future: Innovation and Art & Design ; September 26, 2017Conference: Tsukuba Global Science Week 2017Date: September 25-27, 2017Venue: Tsukuba International Congress CenterSponsored: University of Tsukuba

  5. SMART SfM: SALINAS ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

    L. Inzerillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  6. Smart SfM: Salinas Archaeological Museum

    Inzerillo, L.

    2017-08-01

    In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions) offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  7. 75 FR 8139 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    2010-02-23

    ... policies with respect to the duties, powers, and authorities related to Museum and Library Services. If you... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and...

  8. La Gestión de la Comunicación Externa Online con los Visitantes en los Museos y Centros de Arte en Málaga / The Online External Communication Management with the Visiting Public in Museums and Art Centers in Málaga

    Ana Soler Humanes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La siguiente investigación analiza la gestión de la comunicación externa online con el público visitante en los museos y centros de arte malagueños, centrándose en el uso de páginas web y plataformas 2.0 para cumplir sus objetivos. La muestra abarca a los tres museos más visitados de Málaga: Museo Picasso, Museo Carmen Thyssen y Centro de Arte Contemporáneo (CAC. Los resultados obtenidos prueban que la comunicación de los museos en internet continúa manteniendo un carácter tradicional, si bien se observan claros avances en la adaptación al entorno digital. / The following research analyses the management of the online external communication with the visiting public in museums and art centers in Málaga, focusing on the use of web pages and 2.0 platforms to attain their objectives. The sample includes the three most visited museums in Málaga: Picasso Museum, Carmen Thyssen Museum and the Contemporary Art Center (CAC. The results show that communication online of the museums keeps being traditional, although there is a clear progress in adapting to the digital environment.

  9. The Tedeschi collection: A collection of documented and undocumented human skeletal remains at the Museum of Anthropology, Padua University (Italy).

    Carrara, Nicola; Scaggion, Cinzia; Holland, Emily

    2018-04-01

    Documented and undocumented skeletal collections offer unique windows into life in the past and are integral for research in biological anthropology. The objective of this article is to describe the documented and undocumented collections curated by the Museum of Anthropology at Padua University (Italy) to demonstrate their potential for research and encourage researchers to consider them for future projects. The collection was established by Prof. Enrico Tedeschi at the beginning of 20th century, and dates to the late 19th and early 20th century. The collection consists primarily of individuals excavated from cemeteries, ossarios, or unclaimed individuals donated by hospitals or other institutions. Both documented and undocumented human skeletal remains are included in the collection, totalling 1,580 individuals. Associated documented information including age at death, date of death, sex, occupation, and cause of death is available in different combinations for 293 individuals of varying completeness (188 crania only, 93 crania and postcranial, 12 postcranial only). Origin and chronological period are known for the remaining 1,287 individuals. Overall, this little studied collection could be particularly useful for researchers interested in craniometrics, dentition, and 19th and 20th century health and demography in Italy. The documented skeletons will be especially useful for forensic anthropological research. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Carnegie Mellon's STUDIO for Creative Inquiry [and] The Interdisciplinary Teaching Network (ITeN) [and] Interactive Fiction [and] The Networked Virtual Art Museum.

    Holden, Lynn; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Explains the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, an interdisciplinary center at Carnegie Mellon University that supports experimental activities in the arts, and its Interdisciplinary Teaching Network. Three STUDIO projects are described: the Ancient Egypt Prototype application of the network; an interactive fiction system based on artificial…

  11. Mathematical models from the collections of universities and museums : photograph volume and commentary

    2017-01-01

    This book presents beautiful photos of mathematical models of geometric surfaces made from a variety of materials including plaster, metal, paper, wood, and string. The construction of these models at the time (of Felix Klein and others) was not an end in itself, but was accompanied by mathematical research especially in the field of algebraic geometry. The models were used to illustrate the mathematical objects defined by abstract formulas, either as equations or parameterizations. In the second part of the book, the models are explained by experts in the field of geometry. This book is a reprint thirty years after the original publication in 1986 with a new preface by Gert-Martin Greuel. The models have a timeless appeal and a historical value. The Editor Prof. Dr. Gerd Fischer, Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Munich.

  12. The Hidden Topography of Australia's Arts Nation: The Contribution of Universities to the Artistic Landscape

    Wilson, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    In "Arts Nation" 2015, the Australia Council documented the current landscape of artistic endeavour in Australia, acknowledging that there are still gaps that need to be filled to build a greater public understanding of the arts in Australia. The contribution of Australian universities to the arts is one such lacuna. This paper seeks to…

  13. Styding of meteorites of Geological museum (Kazan Federal University): magnetic properties and elemental composition

    Kuzina, D.; Nourgaliev, D. K.; Gareev, B. I.; Batalin, G. A.; Silantiev, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Investigations of different types meteorites were performed by non-destructive method using polycapillary Micro X-ray Fluorescence spectrometer M4 Tornado (Bruker). Analysis conditions were chosen individually, depending on a sample. Maximum possible current is 600mkA, voltage - up to 50 kV, minimum size of X-ray point from 25 micron. Result of the measurements is elements distribution on the surface of meteorites. Obtained data used for analyzing conclusions in chondrites, find out iron, nickel distribution in the sample (for comparison with thermomagnetic data), studying secondary alterations such as melting, diffusion. Meteorites which have small amount of material after preparing exhibition samples were studied using thermomagnetic analysis among them: Brownfield-iron (IID), Ochansk - ordinary chondrite (H4), Murchison - carbonaceous chondrite (CM2), Kainsaz - carbonaceous chondrite (CO3.2) and others. Thermomagnetic analysis shows us magneto-mineralogical composition. It makes reliably detection of pure Fe, Ni or their alloys. Measurements were carried out on express Curie balance, constructed in Laboratory of magnetism and paleomagnetism of Kazan Federal University [1]. We measured induced magnetization as a function of temperature in a constant magnetic field - 400 mT. The heating rate is 100°C/min. Thermomagnetic curves measured twice - first and second heating up to 800°C. The weight of the sample is maximum 0.1 gram. Results shows that all samples contain Fe-Ni alloys and according [2] it corresponds to Ni concentration between 4-10%. [1] Burov B.V. et al. 1986. Kazan: Publishing house of KSU, 167 p. (In Russian). [2] Cacciamani C. et al. 2006. Intermetallics, 14. 1312-1325

  14. The Museum Library in the United States: A Sample

    Hull, David; Fearnley, Henry D.

    1976-01-01

    A statistical survey was made of the general condition and problems of the museum library, using a questionnaire sent to a random sample of 856 historical, art, science, and other museum libraries. (Author)

  15. Assessing the Impact of Arts and Humanities Research at the University of Cambridge. Technical Report

    Levitt, Ruth; Celia, Claire; Diepeveen, Stephanie; Chonaill, Siobhan Ni; Rabinovich, Lila; Tiessen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This project for the University of Cambridge and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) assesses the impacts of arts and humanities research at the University of Cambridge. Evidence from interviews, a survey of research staff and detailed case studies indicates that these disciplines already have a broad range of impacts. Many of these…

  16. Research on the development of high-level martial-art teams of universities in Shanghai

    MING Lei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Five Universities with high level martial art sport teams in Shanghai have been chosen for research to initiate a comprehensive investigation and analysis for following aspects during establishment and development of the martial-art teams: status of athletes and coachers, status of learning and training of martial-art teams, martial-art team stimulating system and logistic support by using documentary, questionnaire survey, interview and mathematic survey, so as to find existing disadvantages and their relevant solutions.

  17. The Great Southwest of the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railway, edited by Marta Weigle and Barbara A. Babcock. The Heard Museum, Pheonix (printed by The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, for The Heard Museum, 1996

    Douglas R. Givens

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the more colorful eras in American Southwestern archaelogy is reflected in The Great Southwest of the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railway. Marta Weigle and Barbara A. Babcock, editors of the volume, have done a superb job weaving in early Southwestern archaeological activities with the role of the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railway in bring the American Southwest to those "east of the Mississippi River". Many early Southwestern archaeologists made their way throughout the Southwest on the Santa Fe Railway while the "outposts of civilization" that the Fred Harvey Company provided in many railroad stations served as a " bit of home" to the traveler. This book describes the collaboration of both Fred Harvey and the Santa Fe Railroad tourism in the American Southwest and provides an excellent look into the Native American artists and their comumnities which were transformed on a massive scale by the Fred Harvey Company as it bought, sold, and popularized Native American art. Also part of the volume is an excellent discussion of the network of major museums that hold art collections which were purchased through the Harvey Company's Indian Department.

  18. Museum as spacecraft: a building in virtual space

    Aguilera, Julieta C.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents several immersion and interaction related visualizations that engage visitors in the context of an astronomy museum in order to help them build a mental model of the building as a whole, corresponding to the body of a spacecraft, and its parts considered individually, corresponding to the knowledge articulated from different scales in the Universe. Aspects of embodiment are utilized to find parallels with current trans-disciplinary theoretical developments in media arts.

  19. Museopathy: Exploring the Healing Potential of Handling Museum Objects

    Helen Chatterjee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To coincide with emerging arts and health practices, University College London Museums & Collections and University College London Hospitals Arts partnered to create a pilot project, entitled “Heritage in Hospitals”, which sought to assess whether handling museum objects has a positive impact on patient wellbeing. Quantitative data from 32 sessions conducted with patients in May through July (inclusive of 2008 demonstrated, on average, an increase in self-reported measures of life satisfaction and health status after handling museum objects. Constant comparative analysis of the qualitative data collected from the sessions revealed two major recurring themes: “impersonal/educational” and “personal/reminiscence”. The first theme included instances where handling museum objects allowed patients to access truths about the objects ascertainable solely through touch (such as gauging weight, texture, temperature, and spatial relation to the body, to verify what was seen, to facilitate an intimate and imaginative connection with the museum objects and their origins, to investigate and explore the objects, to permit an interaction with the “rare” and “museum-worthy”, and to assist with aesthetic appreciation. The second theme illustrated the project’s potential to assist with counselling on issues of illness, death, loss and mourning, and to help restore dignity, respect and a sense of identity (particularly among elderly patients by providing a springboard for reminiscing and the telling of life stories in a highly institutionalized setting. This paper contextualizes the project, explores the implications of the project’s methodology and its findings, and provides questions for future research.

  20. The Kaleidoscope of Culture: expanding the museum experience and the museum narrative by inviting visitors into the curatorial process

    Kirsten Jensen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional art museum exhibitions are planned according to art-historical elements. At Trapholt – a museum of modern Danish art, design and applied art in Denmark, we are interested in exploring what happens when ordinary visitors are invited to curate personal exhibitions in the museum space. This paper analyses the project The Kaleidoscope of Culture, where people with no art historical background were invited to curate exhibitions based on the Trapholt collection of art and their own cultural backgrounds and experiences. The main argument is that, by allowing these personal voices in the museum space, new museum narratives are established. But to make the museum a truly transformative space the art- historical knowledge and methods must also be activate.

  1. 75 FR 58433 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo, UT

    2010-09-24

    .... Charles Lang and Mr. Platte Lyman donated the human remains to the Deseret Museum, Salt Lake City, UT... Saints in Salt Lake City, UT. The collection became known as the Lang-Lyman Collection, and was acquired... of human hair, 1 mug, 1 leather pouch, 1 piece of buckskin, 1 gourd container, 60 feathers, 1 bone...

  2. Martial Arts: A Discussion of the Feasibility of a University Martial Arts Program.

    Hamada, Hiroshi; Tow, Patrick

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of some of the martial arts is provided along with some discussion of the feasibility of offering one or more of these disciplines as part of the college physical education program. (JMF)

  3. An excellence initiative in liberal arts and science education: the case of Amsterdam University College

    van der Wende, Marijk; Wang, Q; Cheng, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Amsterdam University College (AUC) was established in 2009 as an excellence initiative jointly undertaken by the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and VU University Amsterdam (VU). AUC is a selective and residential honours college that offers an international liberal arts and sciences bachelor

  4. Universities: Engaging with Local Communities

    Universities UK, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet illustrates the many ways in which universities impact on the local area. Universities are a major contributor to the economy in their own right, both as employers and purchasers of goods. Their social and cultural influence is also felt through their provision of: (1) art galleries, museums and exhibitions; (2) cinemas and theatres;…

  5. The Concept of Islamic Art: Inherited Discourses and New Approaches’, in Benoît Junod, Georges Khalil, Stefan Weber and Gerhard Wolf, eds, Islamic Art and the Museum, London: Saqi, 2012. Reproduced by permission of the author and publishers

    Gülru Necipoğlu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the shift in the field, since the 1970s, from a predominant focus on the early period of Islamic art and architecture in the ‘central zone’ of the Fertile Crescent to a broader chronological and geographical scope. This shift has contributed, among other things, to a change of emphasis from artistic unity to variety, accompanied by an increasing diversification of concepts and approaches including dynastic, regional, media-based, textual, theoretical, critical, and historiographical inquiries. The article seeks to address the unresolved methodological tensions arising from the expanded scope of the field, along with concomitant anxieties over the fragmentation of its traditional ‘universalism’. It begins by outlining the premises of still prevalent approaches inherited from the construction of the field during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a field rooted in the entangled legacies of Orientalism, nationalism, and dilletantism. The article then reviews the statements of some scholars on the state and future of the field before turning to personal reflections on challenges posed by its expanding horizons and its relationship to the Museum.

  6. Two decades of change in Dutch university art libraries

    Versteeg, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1987 Chris Smeenk wrote in this journal about the libraries of the Dutch art historical institutes. In the 22 years that have since passed many changes have occurred, perhaps most notably the merging of the many autonomous institute libraries into larger ones. Has this led to a more professional

  7. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Freeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition," is a co-production with the Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts (MIDEA), and examines six emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in education and interpretation within the museum environment: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), crowdsourcing, electronic…

  8. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  9. IN A PARALLEL UNIVERSE: HOW ART EXPLOITS TECHNOLOGY

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Technical innovation in the arts creates new opportunities for perceptual shifts that lead to lasting achievements. One of the most important events took place in the 15th century not far from CERN on the other side of the Alps in Venice. Titian, in one life time, exploited these new material developments to expand the range of expression like no other artist of his generation. Titian was able to harness these new innovations to emerge as the supreme competitor and hustler, a notion that seems very much a part of the modern promotion of art as exemplified by Warhol , Jeff Koons and Damian Hirst. The language of science and technology has created social networks, changed the mediums and the subject of fine art. Fast forward to CERN 2012, the most expensive experiment in the history of science. The knowledge of dark matter will either help confirm, or not, the Standard Model. This information will be part of what Michel Foucault calls "epistemological breaks", shifts in consciousness that change our p...

  10. 75 FR 63516 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    2010-10-15

    ...: Elizabeth Lyons, Director of Special Events and Board Liaison, Institute of Museum and Library Services... and Library Services, related to museum and library services. If you need special accommodations due... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services...

  11. 75 FR 32818 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    2010-06-09

    ... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the agenda of...

  12. Tables for ‘Art History in the University II: Ernst Guhl’

    Eric Garberson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay continues the examination, begun in volume five of this journal, of the training, appointment, and teaching careers of nineteenth-century art historians at the Friedrich-Wilhelms University in Berlin. It examines the extensive but little studied documentation for Ernst Guhl (1819-1862, the only new instructor with a primary focus on the history of art to join the university between the early 1840s and the later 1860s. After standard training in philology and archaeology, an extended stay in Italy, and several years teaching as Privatdozent, he applied four times for an extraordinary professorship (1851, 1854, twice in 1858. The successive reports assessing his qualifications demonstrate that while the historical study of art was becoming more sharply defined as a specific discipline, it continued to be assigned a minor role in the intellectual and pedagogical structures of the university. They also provide insight into the contested relationship between archaeology and art history.

  13. Paradigma Baru Dalam Museum Seni dan Budaya Jawa Ullen Sentalu

    Amarena Nediari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The existence of the museum building as  conservation collection of historic objects often give the impression that the museum is an ancient building, dark and disheveled. While the new paradigm in the management of the museum is a museum not only as a place to store historical objects, but need to present the collection in an attractive package so that visitors interested in coming back again to the museum. Museum of art and culture of Java Ullen Sentalu, in Kaliurang has provided a new insight to the culture, especially Javanese culture in the family palace of Yogyakarta and Solo Palace. The main attraction of this Sentalu Ullen is to deliver information about the historic collection from the family palace is presented as a whole, so that leaves a deep impression for visitors. This museum has given the world a new concept in museums in Indonesia, which certainly can be applied to other museums in Indonesia.  

  14. Engaging Experiences in Interactive Museum Exhibitions

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja; Langballe, Line; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    and history museums. There is considerable potential in the development of experiences and in the communication of information customized to visitors in the museum apart from personally held information devices. The paper will present background research for developing solutions to a new media museum......The aim of the present paper is to outline possibilities for the development of combined IT and architectural concepts supported by joint engaging experiences for visitors to the room of the museum of the future. Focus is upon a joint experience, as many existing IT-systems designed for museums...... primarily appeal to a strong individualised experience where the visitor views a PDA or similar, rather than experience the atmosphere and interaction of the room. In this context, there are several examples from practice and in the research literature of IT-systems for science centres, art museums...

  15. The Materiality of Museum Politics

    Bjerregaard, Peter

    on the agency of objects that assert that ‘art objects' (in a wide definition of the concept) are not simply materialisation of culture or identity, but deliberate attempts to change the social world. Furthermore, empirical examples of community ownership, and reinterpretation of museum collections may cause...

  16. Mathematical E-Learning: State of the Art and Experiences at the Open University of Catalonia

    Juan, A.; Huertas, A.; Steegmann, C.; Corcoles, C.; Serrat, C.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we present a review of the state of the art in mathematical e-learning and some personal experiences on this area developed during the last eleven years at the Open University of Catalonia (UOC), a completely online university located in Spain. The article discusses important aspects related to online mathematics courses offered in…

  17. Body-art practices among undergraduate medical university students in dar es salaam, Tanzania, 2014.

    Chacha, Chacha Emmanuel; Kazaura, Method R

    2015-01-01

    Body-art practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. Although substantial data are available in developed countries, little has been documented about body-art practices in developing countries. To determine the magnitude, types and reasons for practicing body-art practices among undergraduate medical University students in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducteed among undergraduate University students in Dar es Salaam involving 536 respondents from two Universities. We used a self-administered questionnaire to collect data. Analyses were based on summary measures and bivariate analyses. While 7.5% of undergraduate students reported having tattoos, 20% reported having body puncturing or piercing. Body piercing is reported more among female university undergraduate students than their male counterparts. Reported main reasons for undergoing body-art include "a mark of beauty," 24%, "just wanted one," 18% and "a mark of femininity or masculinity," 17%. The majority (98%) of students were aware that unsafe body-art practices may lead to contracting HIV and more than half (52%) reported awareness of the risk of Hepatitis B infection. Despite high awareness of the potential risks involved in unsafe body arts that include tattoo and piercing, these practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. There is need to have educational and counseling efforts so as to minimize associated health risks.

  18. Body-art practices among undergraduate medical university students in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014

    Chacha Emmanuel Chacha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Body-art practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. Although substantial data are available in developed countries, little has been documented about body-art practices in developing countries. Objective: To determine the magnitude, types and reasons for practicing body-art practices among undergraduate medical University students in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducteed among undergraduate University students in Dar es Salaam involving 536 respondents from two Universities. We used a self-administered questionnaire to collect data. Analyses were based on summary measures and bivariate analyses. Results: While 7.5% of undergraduate students reported having tattoos, 20% reported having body puncturing or piercing. Body piercing is reported more among female university undergraduate students than their male counterparts. Reported main reasons for undergoing body-art include "a mark of beauty," 24%, "just wanted one," 18% and "a mark of femininity or masculinity," 17%. The majority (98% of students were aware that unsafe body-art practices may lead to contracting HIV and more than half (52% reported awareness of the risk of Hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Despite high awareness of the potential risks involved in unsafe body arts that include tattoo and piercing, these practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. There is need to have educational and counseling efforts so as to minimize associated health risks.

  19. 77 FR 68851 - Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board

    2012-11-16

    ... Coordinator for Special Events and Board Liaison, Institute of Museum and Library Services, 1800 M Street NW... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and...

  20. 78 FR 23311 - Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board

    2013-04-18

    ... policies with respect to the duties, powers, and authority of the Institute relating to museum, library and... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and...

  1. Finding Sustainability: University-community collaborations focused on arts in health

    Mike White

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a number of community-based arts in health projects in schools and disadvantaged communities in Northern England that connect with the interdisciplinary research interests of the Centre for Medical Humanities at Durham University (www.dur.ac.uk/cmh. It examines issues about what makes for sustainability in both practice and research of arts in health when operating from a university base and stresses the importance of relationship-based work in health promotion interventions in communities. It attempts to set arts development work in the policy context of how community health has been addressed over the last decade. It provides both practical and metaphorical illustrations of how community cohesion and emotional literacy can be developed and recognised in schools and communities when supported by ethnographic research that is underpinned by theories of social capital, resilience and participatory arts practice. The significance that the artwork can attain as a social gift, with a special meaning for its creators, is examined from an anthropological perspective. Looking historically and comparatively at some longitudinal projects in community-based arts in health, the article assesses what makes for both success and failure in practice, and looks particularly at the significance of the arts in helping to deliver strategies for improving child health and education. In a strategic development context, explanation is given of several strands of university-community collaboration in arts in health, with interlinked project examples drawn from Tyneside and West Yorkshire. Finally, the article looks at the prospects for sustaining arts in health within the coming transfer of the public health function to local government. Keywords Sustainability, arts in community health, resilience, child mental health, social capital

  2. Artfulness

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children.......a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children....

  3. At the Crossroads of Art and Science: A New Course for University Non-Science Majors

    Blatt, S. Leslie

    2004-03-01

    How much did Seurat know about the physics, physiology, and perceptual science of color mixing when he began his experiments in pointillism? Did Vermeer have a camera obscura built into his studio to create the perfect perspective and luminous effects of his canvases? Early in the 20th century, consequences of the idea that "no single reference point is to be preferred above any other" were worked out in physics by Einstein (special and general relativity), in art by Picasso (early cubism), and in music by Schoenberg (12-tone compositions); did this same paradigm-shifting concept arise, in three disparate fields, merely by coincidence? We are developing a new course, aimed primarily at non-science majors, that addresses questions like these through a combination of hands-on experiments on the physics of light, investigations in visual perception, empirical tests of various drawing and painting techniques, and field trips to nearby museums. We will show a few examples of the kinds of art/science intersections our students will be exploring, and present a working outline for the course.

  4. When Curriculum Meets Art

    Giardina, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    A three-year grant program at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City encourages teachers to draw connections between curricular topics and works of art. In this article, museum educator Nicola Giardina describes how the program uses inquiry-based lessons to create meaningful learning experiences for underserved students. She highlights…

  5. Contemporary Danish book art

    Larsen, Poul Steen

    the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library, Helge Ernst, illustrator, Poul Kristensen, printer, Ole Olsen, bookbinder, exhibition catalog......the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library, Helge Ernst, illustrator, Poul Kristensen, printer, Ole Olsen, bookbinder, exhibition catalog...

  6. Technology Museums in Denmark

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an exhibit review of some of the major technology museums in Denmark. First comes an introduction to the Danish museum ”landscape”. Second a total of six museums and their technology focused exhibits are presented. Among the museums are the Fisheries and Maritime Museum...... in Esbjerg, housing one of the most impressive and representative exhibitions on the technology behind the strong Danish maritime sector. Another museum being mentioned is the Energy Museum, which covers the background for some of the major breakthroughs performed in Denmark within this area; particularly...... within wind power technology. Finally special attention is devoted to the Danish Technological Museum. A museum which is the oldest and most elaborate of all the technology museums. The museum covers virtually every technological breakthrough with any relevance in a Danish section, with a special focus...

  7. New Designs in the Museums

    Nuri Özer Erbay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Architectural structure of the museum shall be designed in an accessible way regarding safety. In these designs special needs of visitors shall be taken into consideration according to types thereof.  Architectural structure, topography and natural presence of the museum increase visitor accessibility.  Exhibition venue, showcases and platforms, staircases providing access to upstairs, stairs, slippery rugged surfaces and entrance and exit to the exhibition venue from the same door form inaccessible areas.   It mustn't be forgotten that special disabled visitors can create an unsafe environment for others. Existing designs in museums shall be redesigned to be made accessible by disabled persons.  Museum venues must be redesigned ad made accessible by disabled persons. All characteristics of visitors in museums should be taken into consideration and universal living spaces addressing integral attitude should be designed.  Museum environment designs with regard to visitor safety must be steady.  Ramps shouldn't be unnecessarily steep and slippery.  Floor tiles, carpets or other ground coatings must be attached each other in a safe way. Gaps in ground coating shouldn't exceed the radius of13 mm. Grounds with different colors should be used for highlighting the ground odds and drawing visitors' attention. A distinctive environment requirement should be provided for visitors especially who use walking sticks, crutches and wheelchairs and warning signs shouldn't be forgotten.

  8. Understanding Instructor Nonverbal Immediacy, Verbal Immediacy, and Student Motivation at a Small Liberal Arts University

    Furlich, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Instructor communication behaviors and student motivation to learn relationships were studied at a small liberal arts university. Specifically, relationships between instructor nonverbal immediacy, verbal immediacy behaviors and student motivation to learn were measured. Only instructor verbal immediacy behaviors had a significant linear…

  9. Building Social Inclusion through Critical Arts-Based Pedagogies in University Classroom Communities

    Chappell, Sharon Verner; Chappell, Drew

    2016-01-01

    In humanities and education university classrooms, the authors facilitated counter-narrative arts-based inquiry projects in order to build critical thought and social inclusion. The first author examines public performance installations created by graduate students in elementary and bilingual education on needs-based and dignity-based rights of…

  10. Taking Up Space: Museum Exploration in the Twenty-First Century

    Sutton, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Museums have become a crucible for questions of the role that traditional art and art history should play in contemporary art. Friedrich Nietzsche argued in the nineteenth century that museums can be no more than mausoleums for effete (fine) art. Over the course of the twentieth century, however, curators dispelled such blanket pessimism by…

  11. The Museum and the Gifted Child.

    Rogers, Karen B.

    1985-01-01

    The article presents questioning strategies that can be used when introducing gifted children to the art museum. The strategies utilize eight creative processes and seventeen content, process, and product modifications, based on the differentiation models of Frank Williams and June Maker. A single work of art is used and examples of questions…

  12. [Engineering education reform plan created by Prof. Dr. Shimizu and establishment of Nagoya Municipal Science Museum--regarding cooperative education between universities and industries in Japan after the Second World War].

    Mabuchi, Koichi

    2014-07-01

    This paper gives an account of Prof. Dr. Kinji Shimizu, the first president of Nagoya Institute of Technology, and his establishment of Nagoya Municipal Science Museum. After graduating from the Electrical Engineering Department of Kyoto Imperial University in 1923, Shimizu was impressed by the German Museum in Munich during his stay there as a student in 1932. It's the first time that he learned the education in cooperation with industries. Just after the Second World War, he became director general of the Ministry of Education. However, new education system given by the United States focused not on developing practical ability but on gaining the basic knowledge, which is contrary to what he expected. Then, he contributed to the establishment of the Japanese Society for Engineering Education, besides working as the president of Nagoya Institute of Technology in the earlier 1950s. His idea was supported by industries for the economic growth. Throughout his career, Prof. Dr. Shimizu was convinced that practical engineering education would benefit Japan, and wanted to introduce cooperative education between universities and industries, along the lines of the same system in Germany and the United States. With this vision he founded Nagoya Municipal Science Museum in cooperation with local industries and local government as his final achievement. The museum was completed in 1964.

  13. Tables for 'Art history in the university: Toelken – Hotho – Kugler'

    Eric Garberson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay offers a contextual reading of the extensive but little studied documentation for the education and subsequent university careers of E. H. Toelken (1785-1864, Gustav Heinrich Hotho (1802-1873 and Franz Kugler (1808-1858, three of the earliest art historians to earn doctoral degrees. Spanning about three decades, from 1804 to 1833, their training occurred during a period of rapid disciplinary specialization within the university. Examination of that training, and the teaching careers built on it, contributes to the larger investigation of how existing university structures and procedures accommodated but also informed emerging disciplines in early nineteenth-century Germany. The essay sets out the relevant academic policies and procedures and gives an overview of those trained and appointed in the historical study of art in Berlin between 1810 and 1840. Documents for Toelken and Kugler are then presented through narrative case histories.

  14. Radiation preservation of cultural and museum objects

    Urban, J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibilities are summed up of using ionizing radiation for the treatment of museum collections, namely the biocidal effect of radiation on living organisms. An approximate assessment is made of the extent of damage to art and book collections by biological pests. Radiation preservation is compared with conventional methods which are unsatisfactory, because they do not affect deeper layers of materials. Experience is summed up with the use of radiation preservation in the Central Bohemian Museum in Roztoky. (J.C.)

  15. Entrepreneurship in Culinary Arts: The Costa Rica experience with university students

    Juan Antonio Aguirre G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tourism industry of Costa Rica represents 7.5% of GNP, 21% of total exports earning and of that contribution the food and beverages subsector represents 28%. The purpose of this research was to indentify, potential elements and obstacles in young university culinary arts students in Costa Rica, largest culinary arts students. The study was conducted among culinary arts students at the Universidad Interamericana de Costa Rica, the interviews conducted were 237 the entire enrollment of the culinary arts school. The findings indicate that .Absence of tradition, culture among the young students and need of family and peers supports appear to be relevant and a source of need by the group. Lack of general business and entrepreneurship training is recognize by both groups a weakness and as a need. Coaching and support for women entrepreneurs is very relevant in both theadministrative and technical aspects of the young students of culinary arts The consideration of this information is important if we are to create with culinary arts training , the new breed of professional chefs entrepreneurs needs for the industry expansion in the years to come in Costa Rica and the region

  16. Misdiagnosed HIV infection in pregnant women initiating universal ART in South Africa.

    Hsiao, Nei-Yuan; Zerbe, Allison; Phillips, Tamsin K; Myer, Landon; Abrams, Elaine J

    2017-08-29

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are the primary diagnostic tools for HIV used in resource-constrained settings. Without a proper confirmation algorithm, there is concern that false-positive (FP) RDTs could result in misdiagnosis of HIV infection and inappropriate antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation, but programmatic data on FP are few. We examined the accuracy of RDT diagnosis among HIV-infected pregnant women attending public sector antenatal services in Cape Town, South Africa. We describe the proportion of women found to have started on ART erroneously due to FP RDT results based on pre-ART viral load (VL) testing and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We analysed 952 consecutively enrolled pregnant women diagnosed as HIV infected based on two RDTs per local guideline and found 4.5% (43/952) of pre-ART VL results to be HIV RDT diagnoses were found to be FP. We estimate that using ELISA to confirm all positive RDTs would cost $1110 (uncertainty interval $381-$5382) to identify one patient erroneously initiated on ART, while it costs $3912 for a lifetime of antiretrovirals with VL monitoring for one person. Compared to the cost of confirming the RDT-based diagnoses, the cost of HIV misdiagnosis is high. While testing programmes based on RDT should strive for constant quality improvement, where resources permit, laboratory confirmation algorithms can play an important role in strengthening the quality of HIV diagnosis in the era of universal ART.

  17. Museums Connect: Teaching Public History through Transnational Museum Partnerships

    Richard J. W. Harker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums Connect is a program funded by the US Department of State and administered by the American Alliance of Museums that sponsors transnational museum partnerships. This program provides one model for teaching public history in a transnational context, and this article analyzes the experiences of two university-museums—the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE in the United States and the Ben M’sik Community Museum (BMCM in Morocco—during two grants between 2009 and 2012. In exploring the impact of the program on the staff, faculty, and students involved and by analyzing the experiences and reflections of participants, I argue that this program can generate positive pedagogical experiences. However, in addition to the successes of the MHHE and BMCM during their two grants, the participants encountered significant power differentials that manifested themselves in both the processes and products of the grants. It is the conclusion of this article that both partners in a public history project need to address and confront potential power issues at the outset in order to achieve a more balanced, collaborative partnership.

  18. The museum as heritage, the republic as memory:art and colleting in Belém do Pará (1890-1940

    Aldrin Moura de Figueiredo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyze the art collection of Museu de Arte de Belém as historical and cultural heritage of the city of Belém, State of Pará, Brazil. This collection also initiated in the Empire of Brazil, was strengthened during the early Republic as part of a political exercise that took the art and history as formative elements of nationality.

  19. Evaluating Art Studio Courses at Sultan Qaboos University in Light of the Discipline Based Art Education Theory

    Al-Amri, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Discipline-Based Art Education (DBAE), a theory developed in the USA, has been influential but also used in Art Education institutions world-wide. One of its stated goals was to develop the quality of teaching art education. Today, it is used as a theory for identifying and assessing good practices in the field of Art Education. The purpose of…

  20. New Mexico Museums and Cultural Centers

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of museums and cultural centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using...

  1. iMuseumA: An Agent-Based Context-Aware Intelligent Museum System

    Inmaculada Ayala

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, museums provide their visitors with interactive tour guide applications that can be installed in mobile devices and provide timely tailor-made multimedia information about exhibits on display. In this paper, we argue that mobile devices not only could provide help to visitors, but also to museum staff. Our goal is to integrate, within the same system, multimedia tour guides with the management facilities required by museums. In this paper, we present iMuseumA (intelligent museum with agents, a mobile-based solution to customize visits and perform context-aware management tasks. iMuseumA follows an agent-based approach, which makes it possible to interact easily with the museum environment and make decisions based on its current status. This system is currently deployed in the Museum of Informatics at the Informatics School of the University of Málaga, and its main contributions are: (i a mobile application that provides management facilities to museum staff by means of sensing and processing environmental data; (ii providing an integrated solution for visitors, tour guides and museum staff that allows coordination and communication enrichment among different groups of users; (iii using and benefiting from group communication for heterogeneous groups of users that can be created on demand.

  2. Portable technologies at the museum

    Svabo, Connie

    2011-01-01

    A topic of interest in contemporary museum studies is how digital technologies contribute to museum visitor experiences. Building on insights from media and technology studies that new media should be understood for how they overlap with old media, the article reports an ethnographic study...... of the intersections between the exhibition at a modern museum of natural history and three portable technologies – one of which is digital. Mobile phone cameras, exercise pamphlets and dress-up costumes link visitors with an exhibition, but they simultaneously shape this relation in their own specific directions....... This is shown by drawing on the concept of mediation as it is developed by philosopher Michel Serres and philosopher of technology Bruno Latour. The article is based on the Ph.D. thesis entitled “Portable Objects at the Museum”, defended at Roskilde University on 22 September 2010....

  3. The Awareness of Baba Nyonya Food amongst Culinary Arts Students in Management and Science University

    Ahmad R. Albattat; Liyana Asmara; Nur Aainaa Bakri; Nur Syazwani Norzaman

    2017-01-01

    Baba Nyonya food is a wonderful combination of Malay and Chinese cuisine with influences from Indonesia, Thailand, India, Holland, Portugal and England. Nyonya food presents the unique identity which combined culture and heritage, adapting ingredients and recipes. The purpose of this study is to find out awareness among Culinary Art students in the Management and Science University (MSU), Shah Alam about Baba Nyonya food, and to identify the uniqueness of Baba Nyonya’s food. In this study, re...

  4. The Institute for Southern Contemporary Art (ISCA

    João Enxuto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available João Enxuto and Erica Love are artists and writers living in New York City. Their writing has appeared in Art in America, Mousse Contemporary Art Magazine, Wired, and X-TRA Contemporary Art Quarterly. They have given talks and exhibited work at the Centre Pompidou, Whitney Museum of Art, the New Museum, Anthology Film Archives, Walker Art Center, Yossi Milo Gallery, Carriage Trade, Louisiana Museum in Denmark, ArtCenter/South Florida, and the Tamayo Museum in Mexico City.

  5. Issue 7: Museum Attendance, Population Shifts, and Changing Tastes

    Haselhoff, Kim; Ong, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    SCS Fact Sheet no. 7 looks at the extent to which Southern California residents attend art and cultural museums. The findings are consistent with other studies, which have found differences in museum attendance based on ethnic and socioeconomic characteristics. We also found similarities in the general rate of museum attendance in the region over the past twenty years, as well as some changes in attendance rates among groups over the past two decades.

  6. Science, Art and Sports School at Sinop Children’s University: Its Effects on Children’s Perceptions

    Eş, Hüseyin; Öztürk Geren, Nurhan; Bozkurt Altan, Esra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the children’s perceptions about the Entertaining Science, Art and Sports School at Sinop Children’s University, which is a project including various science, art and sports activities carried out at Children’s University of Sinop University.  All the processes of the study from data collection to data analysis were conducted through qualitative research paradigm. The data of the study were collected by means of poster and interview techniques. ...

  7. ARTS

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Virk, Kashif M.; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    and load conditions, consequences of different task mappings to processors (software or hardware) including memory and power usage, and effects of RTOS selection, including scheduling, synchronization and resource allocation policies. We present the application and platform models of ARTS as well...

  8. COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTIC OF TOURIST POTENTIAL OF MUSEUMS OF KRASNODAR REGION

    Svetlana V. Kirilicheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The article describes the tourist potential of two large museums of the Krasnodar Territory, the Krasnodar State Historical and Archaeological Museum-Reserve named after E.D. Felitsyn and Krasnodar Regional Art Museum named after F.A. Kovalenko. Much attention is paid to the classification of museums in the Krasnodar Territory. Methods. In the study were used a comparative-geographical method, a systematic approach, an analysis of statistical-mathematical materials and an analysis of the leisure profile of citizens. Findings. A comparative assessment of the potential of two large museums of the region is given. We also conducted an analysis of the survey data of the leisure profile among the townspeople in the city of Krasnodar in order to identify which of the museums is more popular. The main indicators such as the number of storage units, the total exposition and exhibition area, the number of sightseeing visits and mass events, the number of educational programs and exhibitions, the number of employees were examined and analyzed. Distinctions between museums are also noted. Conclusions. An analysis of these data showed that both museums have sufficient tourist potential to represent the city and get acquainted with the city through museums. The results of an analysis of events held in museums to attract visitors are presented. The sufficient tourist potential of two large museums for representation of the city and region is defined. The directions for their development as objects of tourism are proposed.

  9. Museums and Their Functions.

    Osborne, Harold

    1985-01-01

    Historical background concerning the nature and function of museums is provided, and the aesthetic functions of museums are discussed. The first major aesthetic function of museums is to preserve the artistic heritage of mankind and to make it widely available. The second major function is patronage. (RM)

  10. 75 FR 36666 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    2010-06-28

    ... and 1941, the Works Progress Administration/Indian Arts Project paid members of the Tonawanda Seneca..., director, Rochester Museum of Arts & Science (now Rochester Museum & Science Center), with the intent of... medicine faces were also created under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration/Indian Arts...

  11. Gold Museum

    Efraín Sánchez Cabra

    2003-01-01

    On 22 december 1939, the Banco de la República, the Central Bank of Colombia, purchased a 23.5 centimetres high pre-Columbian gold arte fact weighing 777·7 grams that was to become the Gold M useum's foundation stone. Described as a Quimbaya poporo, it is a masterpiece of pre-Hispanic goldwork, an object of beauty whose brightly burnished body and neck, crowned with four sphere-like or naments, rest on an exquisite cast metal tiligree base and which seems to ftoat in a space of its own. The b...

  12. Visualizing, clustering, and predicting the behavior of museum visitors

    Martella, Claudio; Miraglia, Armando; Frost, Jeana; Cattani, Marco; van Steen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Fine-arts museums design exhibitions to educate, inform and entertain visitors. Existing work leverages technology to engage, guide and interact with the visitors, neglecting the need of museum staff to understand the response of the visitors. Surveys and expensive observational studies are

  13. The British Museum: An Imperial Museum in a Post-Imperial World

    Emily Duthie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the British Museum’s imperialist attitudes towards classical heritage. Despite considerable pressure from foreign governments, the museum has consistently refused to return art and antiquities that it acquired under the aegis of empire. It is the contention of this article that the British Museum remains an imperialist institution. The current debates over the British Museum’s collections raise profound questions about the relationship between museums and modern nation states and their nationalist claims to ancient heritage. The museum’s inflexible response to repatriation claims also encapsulates the challenges inherent in presenting empire and its legacy to contemporary, post-imperial audiences.

  14. The art of scent

    Stenslund, Anette

    2017-01-01

    At the Museum of Art and Design in New York the The Art of Scent (1889–2012) exhibition announced its declared aim of bringing to the forefront of the arts what has long been considered the fallen angel of the senses: it would inscribe scent into fine art through a display characterised by its ex...... of art, this paper argues that scent that is not of high culture may yet, phenomenologically speaking, be considered great art....

  15. Learning in third spaces: community art studio as storefront university classroom.

    Timm-Bottos, Janis; Reilly, Rosemary C

    2015-03-01

    Third spaces are in-between places where teacher-student scripts intersect, creating the potential for authentic interaction and a shift in what counts as knowledge. This paper describes a unique community-university initiative: a third space storefront classroom for postsecondary students in professional education programs, which also functions as a community art studio for the surrounding neighborhood. This approach to professional education requires an innovative combination of theory, methods, and materials as enacted by the professionals involved and performed by the students. This storefront classroom utilizes collaborative and inclusive instructional practices that promote human and community development. It facilitates the use of innovative instructional strategies including art making and participatory dialogue to create a liminal learning space that reconfigures professional education. In researching the effectiveness of this storefront classroom, we share the voices of students who have participated in this third space as part of their coursework to underscore these principles and practices.

  16. The works of Bologna’s Institution of Artistic Exhibitions (Ente Bolognese Manifestazioni Artistiche rediscovered in the archives of the Museum of Modern Art, in Bologna.

    Grazia Maria Restuccia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to reconstruct and investigate the work done by the Ente Bolognese Manifestazioni Artistiche. Its activity, from 1964 to 1993, has proven to enhance the art history of the territory, with a view to framing national and international level.

  17. Art and Architectural Space

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    and its content. The urban and spatial question goes far beyond museums and other buildings for art: how in democratic societies should public spaces be supported by art and how can public art support ´cityness´ and meaning versus spaces of consumerism. Famous but egocentric buildings with the main......art and architectural space museums and other exhibition spaces or how artists learn to love architects Over the last two decades, innumerable new museums, art galleries and other exhibition spaces have been built and opened all over the globe. The most extreme growth happened in China, where...... historically considered even the mother of all arts) - but more relevant: what are appropriate architectural spaces for presenting, exhibiting, contemplating, reflecting, meditating, discussing, enjoying, dissenting, debating creations of art. Simplified, this is a question about the relation between package...

  18. Art and Architectural Space

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    the number of museums went up from 300 by 1980 to estimated 3000 museums by 2015. In urban discourses, new museums and buildings for art have been considered as drivers for ´cultural sustainability´ of cities. The notion is diffuse and the reality is more an economic centred ´city branding´ to help...... the promotion of tourism. What surprises: in many cities, the buildings for art are better known and more published and discussed than the art they accommodate. A lot of them are considered as art objects. This raises two questions: How much is architecture itself a form of arts? (in Western architecture...... historically considered even the mother of all arts) - but more relevant: what are appropriate architectural spaces for presenting, exhibiting, contemplating, reflecting, meditating, discussing, enjoying, dissenting, debating creations of art. Simplified, this is a question about the relation between package...

  19. SEA Change: Bringing together Science, Engineering and the Arts at the University of Florida

    Perfit, M. R.; Mertz, M. S.; Lavelli, L.

    2014-12-01

    A group of interested and multifaceted faculty, administrators and students created the Science, Engineering, Arts Committee (SEA Change) two years ago at the University of Florida (UF). Recognizing that innovative ideas arise from the convergence of divergent thinkers, the committee seeks to bring together faculty in Science, Engineering, the Arts and others across campus to develop and disseminate innovative ideas for research, teaching and service that will enhance the campus intellectual environment. We meet regularly throughout the year as faculty with graduate and undergraduate students to catalyze ideas that could lead to collaborative or interdisciplinary projects and make recommendations to support innovative, critical and creative work. As an example, the Department of Geological Sciences and the School of Art and Art History collaborated on a competition among UF undergraduate painting students to create artistic works that related to geoscience. Each student gathered information from Geological Sciences faculty members to use for inspiration in creating paintings along with site-specific proposals to compete for a commission. The winning work was three-story high painting representing rock strata and the Florida environment entitled "Prairie Horizontals" that is now installed in the Geoscience building entrance atrium. Two smaller paintings of the second place winner, depicting geologists in the field were also purchased and displayed in a main hallway. Other activities supported by SEA Change have included a collaborative work of UF engineering and dance professors who partnered for the Creative Storytelling and Choreography Lab, to introduce basic storytelling tools to engineering students. A campus-wide gathering of UF faculty and graduate students titled Creative Practices: The Art & Science of Discovery featured guest speakers Steven Tepper, Victoria Vesna and Benjamin Knapp in spring 2014. The Committee plans to develop and foster ideas that will

  20. Marketing Management and Cultural Learning Center: The Case Study of Arts and Cultural Office, Suansunandha Rajabhat University

    Pirada Techaratpong

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research has 2 objectives: to study marketing management of the cultural learning center in Suansunandha Rajabhat University and to suggest guidelines to improve its marketing management. This research is based on a case study of the Arts and Culture Office in Suansunandha Rajabhat University, Bangkok. This research found the Art and Culture Office has no formal marketing management. However, the marketing management is partly covered in the overall bu...

  1. Art Animates: Ideas Inspired by a University-Sponsored Summer Arts Academy for Middle and High School Students

    Danker, Stephanie; French, Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Art can provide a vehicle for animating learning. Teachers bring ideas to life through curriculum, while artists realize their ideas through images, often translating between forms, media and spaces. This paper describes the context, content and format of a residential Summer Arts Academy for gifted and talented middle and high school students,…

  2. A New World for Museum Marketing? Facing the Old Dilemmas while Challenging New Market Opportunities

    Tanja Komarac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums are part of a wider cultural and entertainment environment, which is ruled by highly demanding visitors who seek immersive experiences (edutainment and time-saving arrangement. This has encouraged and, in some opinions, forced museums to turn their focus from collections to visitors. In addition, museums have faced competition and new technologies in the form of virtual museums and virtual reality. This has emphasized the need to accept marketing as a survival tool and to make it into a link between museums and visitors. This article attempts to give current insights into museum marketing as part of the arts marketing field. Its aim is also to identify and explain some of the major challenges and opportunities facing everyday museum business, in order to provide insight into the complex world of museum marketing. Former findings about the development of museum marketing and its biggest changes and challenges are presented, summarized and analyzed.

  3. Community projects based on Art & Health: A collaboration between the Faculty of Fine Arts at the Complutense University of Madrid and Madrid city council's Madrid Salud Service

    Ávila, Noemí; Orellana, Ana M.; Claver, María Dolores; Borrego Hernando, Olga; Antúnez, Noelia; García Cano, Marta; Segura del Pozo, Javier; Belver, Manuel H.; Martínez Cortés, Mercedes; Martínez, Catalina; Jambers, Brigitte; Cortés, Fátima; Yeves, Laura; Soto, María del Carmen; Saavedra Macías, Francisco Javier (Coordinador)

    2017-01-01

    In 2011 the Faculty of Fine Arts at the Complutense University of Madrid, and Madrid City Council's Health Promotion and Prevention Service (Madrid Salud Service) signed a collaboration agreement for developing joint projects and activities. This mutual collaboration agreement has generated an extremely active working network, in which university students supported by health service professionals plus Faculty academics and researchers have designed, and developed, community projects based on ...

  4. Recommendations based on semantically enriched museum collections

    Wang, Y.; Stash, N.; Aroyo, L.M.; Gorgels, P.; Rutledge, L.W.; Schreiber, G.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the CHIP demonstrator1 for providing personalized access to digital museum collections. It consists of three main components: Art Recommender, Tour Wizard, and Mobile Tour Guide. Based on the semantically enriched Rijksmuseum Amsterdam2 collection, we show how Semantic Web

  5. Prague: The City Is the Museum.

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2001-01-01

    States that Prague, the capital of the Czech-Republic, is a virtual art museum because of the number of architectural styles and other artworks throughout the city. Explores the various architectural styles that are present in the city from the Gothic monasteries and churches to examples of contemporary styles. (CMK)

  6. The Awareness of Baba Nyonya Food amongst Culinary Arts Students in Management and Science University

    Ahmad R. Albattat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Baba Nyonya food is a wonderful combination of Malay and Chinese cuisine with influences from Indonesia, Thailand, India, Holland, Portugal and England. Nyonya food presents the unique identity which combined culture and heritage, adapting ingredients and recipes. The purpose of this study is to find out awareness among Culinary Art students in the Management and Science University (MSU, Shah Alam about Baba Nyonya food, and to identify the uniqueness of Baba Nyonya’s food. In this study, resource based theory has been exploited for developing conceptual research framework. Data collected using self–administered questionnaire among 110 respondents involving students of Culinary Arts through convenience sampling method. The data analysis has been conducted using frequency, descriptive statistic as well as Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS16. Results clarified that the culinary art students are aware about the uniqueness of Baba Nyonya food and the average ratio of students who know is overwhelming. The study concluded that the establishment of awareness among students about Baba Nyonya food is crucial related to the fact that Baba Nyonya food has been gradually forgotten.

  7. AN APPLICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION IN NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY OF ARTS E-LEARNING PLATFORM

    Sheng-Feng Lin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the development of the course ―Education for Environmental Sustainability‖ by using the Learning Content Management System (LCMS in National Taiwan University of Arts (NTUA E-learning platform. There are three segments for this article. First, it discusses the characteristics of the NTUA E-learning platform, which is based on the theory of E-learning, and to discern the differential function of authorization between teachers and students. Second, it analyzes how the E-learning version of ―Education for Environmental Sustainability‖ course is planned and developed. This course is an outgrowth of Blending Learning, which is the integration of Classroom Learning and Electronic Learning. The course development theory is based on the process of five stages: A (Analysis, D (Design, D (Development, I (Implement and E (Evaluation. Third, it concerns the usage of, and the suggestion for, the platform. With students as the end users, it should be designed in a student-oriented way, especially when the learning achievement of NTUA students originated mainly from presenting their individual talent (i.e., their artwork pictures or performance videos. Hence, the students‘ performance talent and comments will be significant references for future development of e-contents, e-services, and e-technical in art universities.

  8. A Collaborative Disability Studies-based Undergraduate Art Project at Two Universities

    John Derby

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we discuss research findings from a collaborative visual arts curricular unit on ableism, which we implemented in non-Disability Studies undergraduate courses at two universities during the 2012-2013 academic year. Our project builds on previous research in which we (Derby, 2015, in press; Karr & Weida, 2013 began adding Disability Studies arts pedagogy to our undergraduate coursework. For this project, we developed a shared unit, which we implemented in a general freshman seminar course, an introductory art teaching methods course, and an upper level art education course on applied technology. Utilizing a pedagogy of transformation, we engaged students with shared resources, including lectures, readings, and videos on Disability Studies and ableism; the project culminated with each student producing and exhibiting both an artwork and an artist's statement. After reviewing the literature and describing the project and research methods, we provide a nuanced discussion of the data, especially the artwork. The data indicate that our students, who were previously unexposed to ableism, conceptualized ableism at least on an elementary level, with many students demonstrating advanced conceptualization of ableism in one or more of three categories. Our findings suggest that integrating Disability Studies into non-Disability Studies curricula on a small scale can be useful, but that results are limited by the complexities of disability. The success of the project indicates that incorporating Disability Studies into standard curricula through a pedagogy of transformation can reach typical college students who are unfamiliar with Disability Studies concepts.

  9. An annotated catalogue of Recent Pectinoidea (Mollusca, Pectinidae and Propeamussiidae) type material in the Museum of Natural History, Humboldt University, Berlin

    Dijkstra, H.H.; Köhler, F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper lists 22 pectinoid types (21 primary and one secondary) and three potential syntypes in the Museum of Natural History (ZMB) in Berlin. Eight lectotypes are designated herein for the stabilization of taxonomic names: Pecten aequatorialis, Pecten australis, Pecten clathratus, Camptonectes

  10. The birds in the collection of the Zoological Museum of the University of Liège: diversity and interest, a first approach

    Loneux, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Most birds in the Liège Museum of Zoology have been collected during the 19th century. Between 1835 and 1871, Theodore Lacordaire acquired skins from South-East Asia through Francis Laporte Comte de Castelnau. Later, between 1872 and 1910, Edouard Van Beneden bought Belgian birds. At present, some

  11. CyberArts Showcase features artistic exploration of CAVE technology, live web cast

    Watson-Bloch, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Experience a 21st-century exploration of the place where art and science/technology meet, where reality and cyber worlds collide. The CyberArts Showcase, an innovative, virtual art museum of student works that uses technology to create inventive, interactive worlds of digital art, will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, April 15, at Torgersen Hall on Virginia Tech's campus. Roberto Bocci, multimedia artist and professor of digital art at Georgetown University will open the event.

  12. Statistical Image Properties in Large Subsets of Traditional Art, Bad Art, and Abstract Art.

    Redies, Christoph; Brachmann, Anselm

    2017-01-01

    Several statistical image properties have been associated with large subsets of traditional visual artworks. Here, we investigate some of these properties in three categories of art that differ in artistic claim and prestige: (1) Traditional art of different cultural origin from established museums and art collections (oil paintings and graphic art of Western provenance, Islamic book illustration and Chinese paintings), (2) Bad Art from two museums that collect contemporary artworks of lesser importance (© Museum Of Bad Art [MOBA], Somerville, and Official Bad Art Museum of Art [OBAMA], Seattle), and (3) twentieth century abstract art of Western provenance from two prestigious museums (Tate Gallery and Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen). We measured the following four statistical image properties: the fractal dimension (a measure relating to subjective complexity); self-similarity (a measure of how much the sections of an image resemble the image as a whole), 1st-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how uniformly different orientations are represented in an image); and 2nd-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how independent edge orientations are across an image). As shown previously, traditional artworks of different styles share similar values for these measures. The values for Bad Art and twentieth century abstract art show a considerable overlap with those of traditional art, but we also identified numerous examples of Bad Art and abstract art that deviate from traditional art. By measuring statistical image properties, we quantify such differences in image composition for the first time.

  13. Archaeology, museums and virtual reality

    Laia Pujol

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the idea that the virtual archaeological reconstructions seen in museums cannot be considered Virtual Reality (VR as they are based on an artistic conception of the discipline. The cause is to be found in the origins of Archaeology, which began in the 18th century and was closely linked to the History of Art. In the era of New Technologies, this concept has become both the cause and the consequence: determining the characteristics of VR from within the discipline, whilst simultaneously reinforcing the virtual reconstructions.To assess the relationship between VR and Archaeology, we must first establish a definition of Virtual Reality. Subsequently, we can take a brief look at the history so as to be able to understand the evolution of Archaeology and museums. This leads us to the analysis of some examples of VR in museums, from which we can gain conclusions on the current use of VR. Finally, we look at the possibilities for VR in terms of publicising Archaeology.

  14. A forgotten collection: the Libyan ethnobotanical exhibits (1912-14 by A. Trotter at the Museum O. Comes at the University Federico II in Naples, Italy

    De Natale Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ethnobotanical Collection from the Libyan territories of the botanist Alessandro Trotter is included in the Oratio Comes Botanical Museum at the Faculty of Agraria at the University Federico II in Naples. Trotter explored different territories of Libya, mainly Tripolitania, between 1912-1924, collecting plant specimens and the drugs most frequently sold in the markets. The Libyan herbarium currently includes over 2300 sheets of mounted and accessioned plants. The drugs, mostly acquired by Trotter from Tripolitanian markets, were identified and packed in 87 paper sheets or boxes. Trotter added ethnobotanical information for each species when available. Methods A database of the herbarium species and the drugs has been carried out, after a taxonomic update. Nomenclature has been revised according to the African flowering plants database and the World Checklist of selected plant families, and a comparison with currently available ethnopharmacological data from North African has been attempted. Results In this study, ethnopharmacological data related to about 80 species of flowering plants and to 4 lichens are presented. The plants are mainly from Mediterranean or Sub-Saharan habitats and belong to 37 different families; Lamiaceae was the most cited family, with 10 accessions. Generally, the aerial parts of the plants are the most frequently used (28 species, followed by leaves (15 species, flowers and seeds (9 species, fruits (7 species and hypogean organs (roots, rhizomes, tubers: 5 species. Plants were generally processed in very simple ways: infusion or decoction of the plants were prepared and orally administered or used for topical applications. A wide range of conditions was treated, ranging from mental disorders to skin affections. All the organs of human body are considered, but the pathologies of gastro-intestinal tract, respiratory system and those related to traumatic accidents were the most frequently mentioned

  15. Pièces liturgiques médiévales moldaves – objets d’art au musée du Monastère de Putna / Moldavian Medieval Liturgical Pieces – Art Objects at the Museum of Putna Monastery

    Emilian Adrian Gavrilean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Located at 72 km from Suceava Fortress, Putna Monastery Church (1466-1469 dedicated to the,,Assumption of the Virgin” is the first and most important foundation of Stephen the Great and the Saint (1457-1504, built as a princely necropolis. Built in the Moldavian style, with Byzantine, Gothic and Renaissance architectural elements, purpose of this foundations was first of all liturgical, to celebrate The Seven Daily Prayers unto God by the hierarchy church (bishops, priests, deacons, in the center of which is until today the most important mystery of the Christianity - the Eucharist. But the Monastery of Putna was not just a spiritual center of Moldavian Christianity, it was one of the most important centers of medieval art and culture from the Romanian Principalities, here there are significant workshops for embroidery and iconography and a famous school of calligraphers and miniaturists. Most of the objects made here were destined of the religious cult of the monastery as well as Prince donations made of orthodox monasteries. As time passes many of liturgical objects from the altar of Putna have been deposited in the Thesaurus Tower (1481 and then exposed to the general public in the monastery museum which was inaugurated in 1976. Refurbished in 2004, the Putna Monastery Museum, located in the west section of the precinct is perhaps the most rich and valuable in the country, with many objects of the time Stephen the Great and from the period his direct descendants. Here are part of artistic and historical treasure of the monastery, consisting of the manuscripts (Tetraevanghelii, Psalter, educational books, Leastviţe, Psaltichii and embroidery made in the monastery workshops (epitaphs, coverings for holy vessels, procovete, dvere, waves of temples, tombs coverings, priestly vestments, religious books, religious objects (sacred vessels, crosses, icons, censers, candles, ceramics, etc. Spiritual value of liturgical of the objects the Putna

  16. Art and Architectural Space

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    art and architectural space museums and other exhibition spaces or how artists learn to love architects Over the last two decades, innumerable new museums, art galleries and other exhibition spaces have been built and opened all over the globe. The most extreme growth happened in China, where...... purpose of ´uniqueness´ often fail to be a ´home´, a large scale ´picture frame´ or a productive space for communicating art and even do not fulfil basic technical aspects in terms of a consistent indoor climate, optimized lighting or safety. The lecture will focus on inspiring examples of spaces for art...

  17. 76 FR 14045 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    2011-03-15

    ...: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA, that meets the definition of..., a copper pendant was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University for intended...

  18. Female science faculty in liberal arts colleges and research universities: A case study of building careers

    McCartney, Kerry Michelle

    2001-07-01

    This study investigates the lives of twelve female science faculty in higher education, in both the Liberal Arts College and the Research University environments. The study focuses on two areas---the gender issue and women's positive experiences in being science faculty. The methods used are qualitative, including interviews and self-esteem, achievement-motivation, and self-descriptive word ranking scales, which were used to determine success and determination to understand the desire to continue in the field of academic science. The central findings of the study focused on the rampant gender and sexual discrimination that was apparent at the Liberal Arts College science department, and the desire to balance a family with a career. The common misperception that a woman cannot be an academic science and have a family appeared to have troubled most of the subjects in the study. It appeared that the support of a spouse and family are two factors that have led to the continuation of the majority of the women to want to remain in academic science. The issue of gender touched on the lack of financial compensation among some of the female science faculty in the study, as well as the need for more institutional and structural support for human relations within the science departments.

  19. University of Maryland Wall Washer Retrofit - LED Modules Replace Halogen Lamps in a Performing Arts Center

    Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abell, Thomas C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Perrin, Tess E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The University of Maryland (UMD) began retrofitting halogen wall washers in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center (CSPAC) in April 2014. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting (SSL) GATEWAY program documented this process through the final installation in March 2015, summarized in this report. The wall washers illuminate hallways lining the atrium, providing task illuminance for transitioning between spaces and visual interest to the atrium boundaries. The main goals of the retrofit were to maintain the visual appearance of the space while reducing maintenance costs – energy savings was considered an additional benefit by UMD Facilities Management. UMD Facilities Management is pleased with the results of this retrofit, and continues to initiate LED retrofit projects across the UMD campus.

  20. Corporate Training in Museums

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  1. I musei e la valutazione ANVUR della terza missione universitaria: un potenziale ancora inespresso/Museums and ANVUR evaluation of the third university mission: as yet an unexpressed potential

    Federica Maria Chiara Santagati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italia la valutazione ANVUR della terza missione dell’università, applicata ai beni culturali universitari – e quindi anche ai musei - ha avuto due fasi: 2004-2010, 2011-2014. Tale valutazione si è basata su criteri che mal si adattavano al settore beni culturali, perché lontani dai concetti di welfare culturale, di fruizione della cultura intesa come diritto dei cittadini e servizio irrinunciabile, e di status giuridico dei musei, da cui derivano atti normativi e precise pratiche gestionali. I parametri della valutazione non hanno rispettato «l’istituzione museo» cogliendone il valore di polo “culturale” (come invece il modello del museo didattico che ha avuto origine dalla rivoluzione francese testimonia da qualche secolo, né si è ritenuto opportuno soffermarsi sulle implicazioni dei sistemi museali degli atenei, né tanto meno si è fatto riferimento agli studi sui fruitori effettivi e potenziali dei musei, che invece tanto interesserebbero la terza missione. Ancora una volta, dunque, emergono fragilità del sistema di valutazione ANVUR, che sembra tuttora in fase di rodaggio e di modifica. Nel presente contributo si suggeriscono alcune linee interpretative di carattere museologico da seguire nel futuro per valutare i musei universitari, considerandoli nella loro complessità e in rapporto con la comunità sociale.     In Italy the evaluation made by ANVUR (Agenzia Nazionale di Valutazione del Sistema Universitario e della Ricerca [National Agency for Evaluation of the University and Research System] of the universities’ third mission applied to university cultural heritage, and thus also to museums, has had two phases (2004–2010, 2011–2014. This evaluation is based on criteria that are not very appropriate for the cultural heritage sector because they are distant from the concepts of cultural welfare, of use of culture as an indispensable right of the citizens and service, and of the juridical status of museums

  2. The first book museums in Italy

    Andrea De Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Just before the advent of Fascism, in Turin, in the nearby town of Carmagnola and in Florence were born the first Italian examples of book museums. It was early and exceptional experiments of valorizing of book history and of the ancient techniques of manufacturing manuals in a time of great innovation. The first, called the National Museum of the book, was opened in 1913 as a result of the exhibition of the history of printing held during the Universal Exhibition of 1911; the second, created in 1921, was the result of collecting a notable family that took up the typographic tradition of Carmagnola old more than 4 centuries; the third, said Museum of books and illumination, was the result of the exploitation of the extraordinary collections of the Medici library and of the policy pursued by the Director Guido Biagi. Of such museums, outlining the events that led to their creation, only the museum in Carmagnola has come to this day, while the others for various reasons, were closed and never reconstituted. The contribution also provides an opportunity to reflect on the creation of a new museum of the book in Italy at a time when libraries lack visibility into the organization of the Ministry of cultural heritage, which could be distributed and polycentric in the offices of the State libraries in Rome, with its hub at the National Central Library.

  3. Anniversary celebrations at the National Museum of History

    Elena Ploşniţa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available December 21, 2013 we celebrated 30 years since the founding of the National Museum of History of Moldova. On this occasion the museum has organized several events. Program of the day began with a Round Table “Policies for conservation and restoration of the museum heritage in the Republic of Moldova”. Then, the general director of the museum Eugen Sava opened a solemn assembly in the museum’s Blue Room. During the meeting there were presented congratulatory words addressed to the participants, public figures, university professors, researchers, and museum professionals. Among the activities celebrating the establishment of this prestigious museum on December 21, 1983, there was held the presentation of the second volume of “Studies on Museology” published in Chisinau in 2013. This volume on different aspects of museum work brings knowledge and encourages activities, and practical use of its publication is undeniable. Written in a clear and sober style, it will take an important place among the works devoted to this field of science. The proceedings were inspired by respect for the museum and museology and are a continuation of the tradition of museological research in the National Museum of History of Moldova. In honor of the anniversary there was organized a temporary exhibition “National Museum of History of Moldova: A Brief Illustrated History” aimed to reflect the history of the museum and some parts of its activities during the 30 years by means of photos and documents. The exhibition was divided into several compartments: “Establishment of the Museum”, “The Museum Building” “Exhibition Activities”, “Educational Activities”, “Promotion of the Museum”, “Scientific Development of Cultural and Historical Heritage”, “The Museum’s Publications”. All the events organized on the occasion of the anniversary were attended by a large audience that through its presence and laudatory responses recognized and

  4. The Organization of Museums: Practical Advice. Museums and Monuments, IX.

    Adams, Philip R.; And Others

    This manual deals with the organization of museums. The manual includes 10 chapters written by different people involved in museum work in various parts of the world. Chapter I, The Museum and Its Functions, deals with such topics as definition, collecting, identifying, and recording. Chapter II considers the administration of museums. Chapter…

  5. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a

  6. Flowers behind the back of the universe: A cosmic art project exploring the invisible

    Tanaka, Yuri; Doser, Michael; Sakurai, Ryu; Shimoyama, Hajime; Takahashi, Ryo

    2018-05-01

    What can be seen within this universe? Since humans are not instinctively aware of the limitations of their sensorium, what is being missed is not immediately obvious. Aiming to explore with our imagination the invisible elements in the universe, we created an interactive cosmic art project in collaboration with the Gunma Astronomical Observatory, and the Polytech Festival in Moscow. In this paper, we firstly address the topic of dark matter, from the physics point of view, the concept in our project touching upon the invisible beauty in the universe, and then discuss the practical methodology for the process of making the installation. This installation was laid out based on a map of constellations from where people were able to see the antipode of Moscow, an opposite point from the venue where the installation was set, in analogy to illustrating what exists, but can not be seen. Using origami flowers - made in the course of a workshop by the visitors of the festival - as a metaphor of the beauty and transience of life, the installation seeks to deepen the awareness of participants about the numerous invisible structures in the universe. Placing them within reflective structures underlines both our reliance on technology to make the invisible visible, and the influence of the point of view on how we perceive and interpret the resulting representations. In their various forms and colors, these flowers can be seen as metaphorical mirror images of that which lies at the antipodes of our awareness: of colorful gas glowing in radio waves, supernovas in their many x-ray hues, dark matter, neutrinos, gravitational waves, dark energy. Considering both the invisible scenery of the sky and the invisible elements of beauty in the universe as lying behind the 'back' of the universe, hidden to our senses, this project explores a new way of communication between humans and the ubiquitous invisible in an artistic manner. Finally, the whole process of this project is summarized

  7. El Museo de la Educación de la Universidad de La Laguna: Recordar el pasado para valorar el presente. // Education Museum of the University of La Laguna Remembering the past to value the present.

    Ana Vega Navarro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available (ES La creación del Museo de la Educación de La Universidad de La Laguna (MEDULL es la respuesta a la inquietud por recuperar, conservar y dar a conocer el patrimonio histórico educativo de Canarias. El MEDULL cuenta desde sus inicios con el apoyo del Vicerrectorado de Relaciones Universidad y Sociedad, que lo incorpora dentro de su organigrama como Aula Cultural, así como de la Dirección General de Patrimonio Histórico del Gobierno de Canarias. Su exposición permanente está ubicada en la Facultad de Educación. La exposición se organiza en torno a dos aulas (una de los años 40-50 y otra de los años 70 y permite a los visitantes conocer no sólo los materiales de enseñanza utilizados en esas décadas, sino también diferentes aspectos de la vida del alumnado y de los docentes. Las actividades del Museo forman parte de la formación del alumnado de la Facultad de Educación, y son el objeto de proyectos de trabajo del alumnado de Educación Primaria. y Secundaria que nos visita. // (EN The foundation of the Education Museum of La Laguna University (MEDULL is a response to the desire to recover, preserve and show the general public the educational heritage of the Canary Islands. The MEDULL has been supported from its beginnings by the Vice-Rector’s Office for University-Society relations, which has included the museum in its organizational chart as Cultural Classroom. The MEDULL is also supported by the General Directorate of Historical Heritage of the Canary Government. The permanent exhibition of the museum is in the Faculty of Education. The exhibition is organized around two classrooms (one from the 1940s and 1950s and the other from the 1970s and allows visitors not only to know the teaching materials used in those times, but also different aspects of the life of students and teachers. The activities of the museum are part of the training of the Faculty of Education students, and are the subject of work projects of the primary

  8. Building Maintenance Management System for Heritage Museum

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investment in the building maintenance aspect is massive throughout the world. In most of the countries, it signifies approximately 50% of the entire revenue of the construction industry. The value of buildings depends on the eminence of the maintenance invested in them. Maintenance management engages obtaining utmost advantage from the investment made on the maintenance activities. At the moment, maintenance in buildings in Malaysia is on the increase in spite of size, category, location, and ownership. This study focuses on Building Maintenance Management System for Heritage Museum, which consists of two case studies in Penang State Museum and Art Gallery, Malaysia and Museum of Perak, Malaysia. The aim of this study is to propose methods to improve the maintenance management system for heritage museum. From the results, the common problem occurs during the implementation for the maintenance of each building is the budget for the maintenance and worker’s skill. The department of each museum must have their own maintenance unit to keep an eye on the maintenance activities for their buildings in order to improve the maintenance management system in their building.

  9. Popularization and Teaching of the Relationship between Visual Arts and Natural Sciences: Historical, Philosophical and Didactical Dimensions of the Problem

    Arapaki, Xenia; Koliopoulos, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    The need for a convergence of the visual arts and the natural sciences within the framework of both formal (schools, universities) and non-formal education (museum) at the level of dissemination and popularization of this knowledge is something that has preoccupied the communities of artists, scientists and educators. In the present work we aim to…

  10. "Where art thou Sesotho?": Exploring the linguistic landscape of Wits University

    Kadenge, Maxwell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article seeks to examine if the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits’s language policy on paper is visually reflected on the linguistic landscape of the institution. The objective of this policy is to promote multilingualism, especially the status elevation of Sesotho to become a medium of instruction alongside English and a field of academic study and research. Masoke-Kadenge and Kadenge (2013 note that conceptual flaws within the policy, financial constraints and lack of political will were some of the challenges that militated against the successful implementation of this policy. Today, twelve years after the adoption of this policy, Wits is largely monolingual. This article adopts an expanded view of language policy and explores the linguistic landscape of Wits with the goal of providing invaluable insights into the sociolinguistic situation at the institution. The main focus is on language visibility on public signage in the form of names of buildings like libraries, lecture venues and laboratories, warning notices and directions, among others, and important documentation like employment contracts, e-mails and newsletters at the Braamfontein East campus. The analysis also extends to the university’s website. The findings from this study show that the linguistic landscape of Wits is largely a reflection of the failed institutional language policy. It symbolically reproduces an old language ideology of a monolingual – English-based –university, which goes against the spirit of the National Language Policy Framework (Department of Arts and Culture, 2002 which compels South African universities to transform and develop language policies that accommodate linguistic, cultural and racial diversity.

  11. A comparative sociological study of peace museums and military museums

    Murakami, Toshifumi

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares peace museums and military museums in Japan and foreign countries. It analyses the features, social functions of both peace and military museums, and considers the social influence on both museums. A public relations facility of the Self Defense Forces is regarded as a military museum in Japan, so the development and contents of the exhibition of such public relations facilities are analyzed. A half of them were established in a period between 1964 and 1969. Three new larg...

  12. Virtual Museums as Educational Tool

    2007-01-01

    Virtual Museums as Educational Tool On this web site you will find a collection of resources on virtual museums. The web site is meant to be a knowledge base for people with interest in museums, virtuality and education, and how virtual museums may contribute to adult education and lifelong...

  13. Environmental monitoring in four European museums

    Camuffo, Dario; Van Grieken, Rene; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Sturaro, Giovanni; Valentino, Antonio; Bernardi, Adriana; Blades, Nigel; Shooter, David; Gysels, Kristin; Deutsch, Felix; Wieser, Monika; Kim, Oliver; Ulrych, Ursula

    In a European multidisciplinary research project concerning environmental diagnostics, museums have been selected, having different climate and pollution conditions, i.e.: Correr Museum, Venice (Italy); Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (Austria); Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp (Belgium); Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, Norwich (UK). Some field tests investigated the microclimate, the gaseous and particulate air pollution and the biological contamination to suggest mitigative techniques that may reduce the potential for damage in the long run. Potential risk factors are generated by imbalance in temperature and humidity, generated by heating, air conditioning or ventilating system (HVAC), or the building structures, exchange of outside air, or large visitor numbers. HVAC may also enhance indoor gaseous pollution. Plants and carpets represent potential niches for bacterial colonisation. Pollutants and particles have been recognised having partly external and partly internal origin. Tourism has a direct negative impact, i.e. transport of external particles, release of heat, vapour and CO 2, as well as generation of turbulence, which increases the deposition rate of particulate matter. However, the main problem is that the microclimate has been planned for the well being of visitors during only the visiting time, disregarding the needs of conservation that requires a constant climate by day and by night. In some of these cases, better environmental niches have been obtained with the help of showcases. In other cases, showcases worsened the situation, especially when incandescent lamps were put inside.

  14. DIGITALISATION IN FINNISH MUSEUMS

    Magdalena Laine-Zamojska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available W artykule omówiono generalny obraz digitalizacji w fińskim sektorze muzealnym. Przedstawiono szacunkowe liczby dotyczące digitalizacji dziedzictwa kulturowego na podstawie przeprowadzonych statystycznych badań, oraz zaprezentowano wiele projektów związanych z ucyfrowieniem fińskich muzeów.\tFiński sektor muzealny jest niezwykle zróżnicowany, podobnie jak stopień skatalogowania i zdigitalizowania kolekcji. W projektach rozwojowych aktywnie uczestniczy cały sektor muzealny. W ostatnich latach, dzięki wielu inicjatywom i badaniom udało się uzyskać szczegółowy obraz fińskiego sektora muzealnego. Największą inicjatywą jest projekt utworzenia Narodowej Biblioteki Cyfrowej, podlegający Ministerstwu Edukacji i Kultury. Celem projektu jest połączenie i udostępnienie zasobów z instytucji pamięci (bibliotek, archiwów i muzeów. Towarzyszą mu rozległe projekty digitalizacji.\tW związku z ogromną różnorodnością systemów do zarządzania kolekcją i praktykami katalogowymi w muzeach, w 2011 r. Państwowy Urząd Muzealny (Museovirasto / National Board of Antiquities, Fiński Związek Muzeów (Suomen museoliitto / Finnish Museums Association i Państwowa Galeria Sztuki (Valtion taidemuseo / Finnish National Gallery zainicjowały projekt Muzeum2015 (Museo2015 / Museum2015. Jego głównymi celami są: unifikacja procesów związanych z zarządzaniem kolekcją, stworzenie architektury korporacyjnej dla zarządzania muzealną kolekcją, stworzenie modelu zarządzania dla architektury korporacyjnej, oraz określenie i stworzenie warunków do zakupu i implementacji ogólnofińskiego systemu zarządzania kolekcją.\tRozwój cyfrowych narzędzi dla najmniejszych, prowadzonych przez wolontariuszy, muzeów lokalnych jest jednym z celów projektu badawczego ViMuseo, prowadzonego na Uniwersytecie w Jyväskylä (Jyväskylän yliopisto / University of Jyväskylä.

  15. Analysis of the crime scene model using three objects from the collection of the Hans Gross Museum of Criminology of the University of Graz.

    Elek, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    As part of the collection in the Hans Gross Museum of Criminology in Graz there are still three crime scene reliefs; two of which were made by Hans Gross himself. The practical purpose of these criminal landscape models is something one could speculate about, but such models may have been useful in two fields: in the criminal lab and in the courtroom. To see the reliefs in a scientific experimental context as well as under the aspects of artwork and topography is as essential as emphasizing their genuine military character.

  16. Art, clinical moral perception, and the moral psychology of healthcare professionalism.

    Rentmeester, Christy A; Severson, Susie

    2014-01-01

    This essay describes an example of how we-one professor of the elective course Art, Medicine, and Clinical Moral Perception at Creighton University School of Medicine, one Director of Adult Programs at the Joslyn Museum of Art in Omaha, Nebraska, and fourth year medical students-practice perception skills using art objects. This essay presents one example of the journal assignments to which students respond in written narratives about their own perception habits. We also share questions any health professions educator can use to guide students' study of their habits of perception using art objects.

  17. Cultural property, museums and Tourism: analysis of the public factor in the Museum of Caceres (Spain

    Javier Marcos Arévalo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work exposes the interim analysis of the results obtained so far on the ongoing research carried on over the Social Anthropology final Master´s degree project at the University of Extremadura entitled "Analysis of public factor at the Cáceres’ Museum". The research aims to establish a profile of each one of the Caceres Museum Visitors and also to aknowledge the perceptions, representation and the connection the Museum neighborhood residents have towards the institution with the idea of using this previously mentioned gathered information in order to contribute to the planification of activities and to generate links between the Museum and its public. In order to accomplish this objective, Anthropology own data recollection techniques such as the participant observation and surveys have been used at the first instance and in-depth interviews at the later stage.

  18. The BCLA Minor: Business, Communication, and Liberal Arts Minor at Towson University

    Mahin, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a cross-disciplinary minor that combines elements of business, communication, and the liberal arts. The BCLA Minor enhances employment opportunities and cultural awareness for students with majors in the Colleges of Business and Economics, Fine Arts and Communication, and Liberal Arts by integrating the…

  19. Old Wine in New Skins: The University of Benin Art Department and ...

    In Nigeria, many artists, critics and scholars of art have been quick to justify the preoccupation of Nigerian tertiary institutions Art Departments with the quest for an identity. Some Art Departments of Nigerian higher institutions have since been identified with one trait or the other and are also classified with one trait or the ...

  20. Unforgettable art

    Iván Moratilla Pérez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Humanity and Art make an indissoluble marriage, it is impossible to comprehend one without the other. Even before producing the first musical instrument, humanity already sang; before using a canvas, humans painted on the walls of a cave. Creative manifestations invariably take place in “poverty and wealth”, but also in “sickness and health”. In this article we introduce the reader to the subject of art and dementia, highlighting the creative potential of patients, and including examples of educational programmes that some museums develop for people with this condition.

  1. The effects of the Dutch museum pass on museum visits and museum revenues

    van der Werff, S.; Koopmans, C.; Boyer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch museum pass gives unlimited access for a year to most major Dutch museums and around the half of all Dutch museums for a fixed fee. The fee revenues are distributed among participating museums in proportion to the amount of visits by pass holders and their ticket prices. In this paper, it

  2. Facing Sound - Voicing Art

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art, with a special focus on the Tony Oursler exhibition Face to Face at Aarhus Art Museum ARoS in Denmark in March-July 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audience´s...... interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics and phenomenology and inspired by newer writings on sound, voice and listening....

  3. Exploring the Convergence of the Liberal Arts Model and the Ecuadorian Culture in a Latin American University

    Santana Paredes, Matias

    2013-01-01

    The replication of the U.S. cultural models in business and social organizations is a common practice in Latin America. In Ecuador, a university operates under the liberal arts model, understanding it as a replication of an U.S. cultural model, in an environment where the Ecuadorian cultural beliefs and values constitute the national cultural…

  4. Museums of Poland: ways of exploiting the National Heritage

    Violeta Tipa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the fellowship Thesaurus Poloniae provided by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage of Poland and the International Cultural Centre Krakow I was able to visit a number of museums in the cities of Warsaw, Krakow, Lodz, and Poznan. The innovative method of using audiovisual media has especially attracted my attention. Visiting Polish museums, I concluded that the country's history, its past hasn't remained in archives, in documents hidden from the public eye and accessible only to specialists in the field. By possibilities of museums upgraded the past comes alive as a page in the life of Poles. The national heritage, studied and carefully preserved, is passed on to the younger generation through the most advanced methods. Today, digital techniques increasingly penetrate into all spheres of art and culture. Museums also look for non-trivial ways to demonstrate the most valuable objects from their collections through the latest information methods. The use of audiovisual media in various forms is an ideal opportunity to immerse visitors in the distant past, help them survive dramatic historical events in a dynamic, penetrate the spirit of patriotism. The screen (monitor has become a traditional element in Polish museums and exhibition halls equipped with touch screens allowing guests to browse and receive a variety of available information in international communication languages (English, French, German and, of course, Polish. On the screens placed in the exhibition halls, documents are displayed non-stop either completely or in fragments, a visual picture sends visitors to real museum exhibits. Museums opened after 2000 are equipped with cinema halls (National Museum, The Warsaw Rising Museum and POLIN Museum, Rynek Underground Museum and Oscar Schindler’s Enamel Factory in Krakowб etc., some of them are equipped for films in 3D, with panoramic projection. Expressive audiovisual entourage is created by playing light and shadow

  5. Data and interpretation: enhancing conservation of art and cultural heritage through collaboration between scientist, conservator, and art historian

    Huang, Jo-Fan

    2012-01-01

    Conservation practices can be greatly enhanced and influenced by scientific analysis and art historical insights. In the same respect, scientific data can be contextualized and substantiated by findings from visual examination and historical research. Such collaboration can contribute to the field of conservation in multiple ways: by assisting the conservator to investigate treatment options, discover artists' materials and techniques, determine date of manufacture, and investigate conservation treatment materials. Several technical studies conducted by the author and her collaborators employed micro-x-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), Raman Spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). These techniques were used on the following previously published projects such as a Japanese painting at the Museum of Fine Arts at Boston, Thai manuscripts at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum at Harvard University, and Chinese export paintings on pith at the Winterthur Museum. Although these studies have been published in the past, they are worthy examples to illustrate how collaborations between conservator, scientist, and art historian complement one another. This presentation will also touch upon ethics in sampling of fine art materials and several online databases such as Infrared and Raman User Group (IRUG) and Conservation and Art Materials Encyclopedia Online (CAMEO), which have proven to be very helpful in the field of conservation.

  6. Det medialiserede museum

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, digital technologies have gained a greater and more important role in communication and dissemination of knowledge by museums. This article argues that the digitization of museum communication can be viewed as a result of a mediatization process that is connected...... to a cultural-political and museological focus on digital dissemination, in which user experience, interactivity, and participation are central concepts. The article argues that the different forms of communication, representation, and reception offered by digital media, together with the interactive and social...... of museum visiting has been transformed and somewhat adapted to new media-created forms of communication and action. From a more general perspective, the article may be regarded as a contribution to a continuous discussion of the role museums must play in a mediatized society....

  7. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    2011-05-13

    ... Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park... possession of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA, that meets the... notice. One lot of stone, bone, and glass beads was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington...

  8. On the Making of One's Art

    Ruchika Wason Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruchika Wason Singh holds degrees in B.F.A., Painting (1997 and M.F.A., Painting, (1999 from College of Art, New Delhi, India. In 2008 she received a degree for Doctoral Research on the sociological frameworks in Indian Contemporary Art, as a U.G.C. Junior Research Fellow at the University of Delhi. Ruchika has had two Solo Exhibitions Yesterday Once More, Triveni Gallery (2002 and Transit Spaces, Lalit Kala Akademi (2007 New Delhi. She has participated in international platforms such as Shanti-Sadhana–Sunyata-Contemporary Indian Art, Wilhelm Lehmbruck Museum, Germany (2001-02; Theertha International Painters' Residency, Sri Lanka (2007; Third Beijing International Art Biennale, China (2008; 11th Asia Arts Festival, Ordos, China (2009 and Experiences: Asian Women in Global Culture, Book-Project of the IWAB, Korea (2011. She has had slide presentations at Tsinghua University, China (2009 and Anadolu Universities, Turkey (2014 and is the recipient of the Travel Grant from Arts Network Asia (2008. Ruchika is currently Assoc. Professor (Contractual, BFA Dept. of Painting, College of Art, New Delhi.

  9. The Function of Museum Pedagogy in the Development of Artistic Appreciation

    Matjaž Duh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary museum pedagogy is located spatially in museums and galleries, which represent an authentic space for art. Artistic artefacts on display constitute an excellent basis for the development of art appreciation among children and young people. This means that the role of museum educators is not limited merely to classification, managing and presentation of art collections, but is also focused on in-depth educational work. Museum pedagogy must follow the guidelines of contemporary art-pedagogical practice, based on the development of productive and receptive skills among pupils and students. The simultaneous development of both skills is a prerequisite for discussing the development of artistic abilities. In the perception and reception of works of art, participants reach their own individual artistic interpretations of the given works of art. The method of aesthetic transfer emerges as the most appropriate didactic approach.

  10. The value of art-oriented pedagogical approaches to the teaching of optics and photonics

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Regens, Nancy L.

    2017-08-01

    Art-oriented pedagogical approaches have been successfully applied to optics and photonics education. We will describe how art-based programs that incorporate a Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) approach can be used by optics and photonics educators. VTS encourages both a deep appreciation of the content of optics images and phenomena and a highly participatory approach to understanding them. This type of approach has been used by the authors in a variety of educational settings including teacher professional development workshops, museum and science center-based programs, after school programs and in two-week intensive summer academies for students. These approaches work well with multiple age groups including primary and secondary grade students, university students, and adults who may have little apparent connection to optics and photonics. This art-science hybrid approach can be used by university professors, optics/photonics professionals who do public programs, museum educators, and classroom science teachers.

  11. Teaching about the Global Environment at a Jesuit Liberal Arts University

    Dahl, E. E.

    2012-12-01

    Teaching about global environmental issues is often reserved to courses in environmental and/or geoscience departments. Universities that do not have departments that fall into these categories may be missing out on educating both science and non-science students about these important and timely issues. Loyola University Maryland is a private Jesuit liberal arts University with no environmental or geoscience department and prior to 2008 had no courses that focused on the science of global environmental issues. Global Environment in a course offered by the Chemistry Department that fills this niche. The course is designed for a general non-science audience, though the course content is also appropriate for science students. The primary goal of the course is for students to learn the basics about how the Earth system works and how our changing climate is related to biodiversity, pollution, water availability and society. The course is designated a diversity course which is a course that fulfills the University's call "to prepare students … to pursue justice by making an action-oriented response to the needs of the world." All students at Loyola University Maryland are required to take one diversity course. For this class, the diversity focus is environmental justice which is brought into the course through lectures, discussions and student projects. By bringing societal impacts into a science course the students can better understand why the environment is important and our actions affect both ourselves and others. The course has also evolved over four iterations into a course that maximizes student involvement while minimizing student angst. One way that this is accomplished is by eliminating tests and substituting daily quizzes using a student response system (clickers). Clickers are also used to poll students and to review what information the students are retaining. Students are able to self-guide their own learning in the course by creating a portfolio

  12. Sacred and the Profane in Advertising Art.

    Zuk, Bill; Dalton, Robert

    This paper examines the arguments for and against inclusion of advertising art in art education programs, and presents a case for the educational benefits of critically examining advertising art based on museum masterpieces. A search for examples of fine art masterpieces used in advertising art examined which masterpieces are commonly used in…

  13. Study on Teaching Reformation of Contemporary Art Teaching to University Students on Corel Painter Software

    Xiong Mei Ni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary art education started late in China on the basis of western teaching theories formed its own unique system, which has a great influence on Corel Painter software. This paper explores that contemporary art education is analyzed advantages and disadvantages of the influence on the development of Chinese painting, and the solutions are found out to the existing problems, summed up the reality enlightenment of that the contemporary art on the impact of education on Chinese painting development.

  14. An annotated catalogue of the type material of Elateroidea Leach, 1815 (Coleoptera) deposited in the Coleoptera collection of the Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Ferreira, Vinicius De Souza

    2015-03-25

    The Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo (MZSP) houses one of the most important Coleoptera collections of Brazil and Neotropical Region with nearly 900,000 adult mounted material and about 1,500,000 specimens to be mounted. The superfamily Elateroidea Leach, 1815 (including Cantharoidea) comprises about 24,077 described species in 17 families. The MZSP owns type material of Brachypsectridae LeConte & Horn, 1883, Cantharidae, 1856 (1815), Cerophytidae Latreille, 1834, Elateridae Leach 1815, Eucnemidae Eschscholtz, 1829, Lampyridae Rafinesque, 1815, Lycidae Laporte, 1836, Phengodidae LeConte, 1861 and Rhinorhipidae Lawrence, 1988. This catalogue includes type material of 166 species distributed in 69 genera. Among 1,223 type specimens, are 86 holotypes, 1,133 paratypes, 2 allotypes, 1 lectotype and 1 paralectotype.

  15. Visual art and visual perception

    Koenderink, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Visual art and visual perception ‘Visual art’ has become a minor cul-de-sac orthogonal to THE ART of the museum directors and billionaire collectors. THE ART is conceptual, instead of visual. Among its cherished items are the tins of artist’s shit (Piero Manzoni, 1961, Merda d’Artista) “worth their

  16. The Art of Video Games

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    The Smithsonian American Art Museum has created and will tour an exhibition on a most unusual but extremely popular art form--"The Art of Video Games." As one of the largest and first of its type, this exhibition will document and explore a 40-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, with a focus on striking visual effects and the…

  17. Universality of rank-ordering distributions in the arts and sciences.

    Gustavo Martínez-Mekler

    Full Text Available Searching for generic behaviors has been one of the driving forces leading to a deep understanding and classification of diverse phenomena. Usually a starting point is the development of a phenomenology based on observations. Such is the case for power law distributions encountered in a wealth of situations coming from physics, geophysics, biology, lexicography as well as social and financial networks. This finding is however restricted to a range of values outside of which finite size corrections are often invoked. Here we uncover a universal behavior of the way in which elements of a system are distributed according to their rank with respect to a given property, valid for the full range of values, regardless of whether or not a power law has previously been suggested. We propose a two parameter functional form for these rank-ordered distributions that gives excellent fits to an impressive amount of very diverse phenomena, coming from the arts, social and natural sciences. It is a discrete version of a generalized beta distribution, given by f(r = A(N+1-r(b/r(a, where r is the rank, N its maximum value, A the normalization constant and (a, b two fitting exponents. Prompted by our genetic sequence observations we present a growth probabilistic model incorporating mutation-duplication features that generates data complying with this distribution. The competition between permanence and change appears to be a relevant, though not necessary feature. Additionally, our observations mainly of social phenomena suggest that a multifactorial quality resulting from the convergence of several heterogeneous underlying processes is an important feature. We also explore the significance of the distribution parameters and their classifying potential. The ubiquity of our findings suggests that there must be a fundamental underlying explanation, most probably of a statistical nature, such as an appropriate central limit theorem formulation.

  18. Terra e Arte Project: Soils connecting Art and Education

    Muggler, Cristine Carole; Rozenberg, Bianca; de Cássia Francisco, Talita; Gramacho de Oliveira, Elisa

    2015-04-01

    The "Terra e Arte" project was designed to combine science and art by approaching soil contents in basic education schools in Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The project was developed to awake, sensitize and create awareness about soils and their importance to life and environment within school communities. It was proposed and realized by the Earth Sciences Museum Alexis Dorofeef (MCTAD) of the Federal University of Viçosa (UFV), as part of the celebrations of its 20th anniversary. Since all the schools of the town visit the museum at least once a year and most of them have received and carried out pedagogic projects on soil themes in the last 20 years, it was proposed to them to develop a soil subject with any of their groups and combine it with painting using soil materials. Each group interested in joining the project received a basic set of material to produce soil paints. They were expected to develop a soil theme and its contents for a few weeks and to finalize it with a figurative and textual collective creation that synthetized their learning. 16 of the 24 visited schools joined the project and realized it for an average of two months. During this time, the school groups visited the museum and/or borrowed the itinerant exposition on soils from the museum to work with in in the school community. At the end of the projects, the productions were presented at the Knowledge Market (Feira do Conhecimento) that happens every year in the central square of the town, as part of the National Week of Science and Technology. At the event, 58 works were presented by 14 schools, involving directly 700 pupils and their teachers. They approached themes from soil formation and properties to agroecology and urban occupation and impacts on the soils. 30 of the works were selected for a commemorative exposition and 12 were chosen for a table calendar 2014. The movement created around the project mobilized many people and had strong impact on the school communities, especially

  19. Teaching science in museums

    Tran, Lynn Uyen

    Museums are free-choice, non-threatening, non-evaluative learning and teaching environments. They enable learners to revisit contents, authentic objects, and experiences at their own leisure as they continually build an understanding and appreciation of the concepts. Schools in America have used museums as resources to supplement their curriculum since the 19 th century. Field trip research is predominantly from the teachers' and students' perspectives, and draws attention to the importance for classroom teachers and students to prepare prior to field trips, have tasks, goals, and objectives during their time at the museum, and follow up afterwards. Meanwhile, museum educators' contributions to field trip experiences have been scantily addressed. These educators develop and implement programs intended to help students' explore science concepts and make sense of their experiences, and despite their limited time with students, studies show they can be memorable. First, field trips are a break in the usual routine, and thus have curiosity and attention attracting power. Second, classroom science teaching literature suggests teachers' teaching knowledge and goals can affect their behaviors, and in turn influence student learning. Third, classroom teachers are novices at planning and implementing field trip planners, and museum educators can share this responsibility. But little is reported on how the educators teach, what guides their instruction, how classroom teachers use these lessons, and what is gained from these lessons. This study investigates two of these inquiries. The following research questions guided this investigation. (1) How do educators teaching one-hour, one-time lessons in museums adapt their instruction to the students that they teach? (2) How do time limitations affect instruction? (3) How does perceived variability in entering student knowledge affect instruction? Four educators from two museums took part in this participant observation study to

  20. Reception of the Baroque in US university textbooks in art history

    Carol Herselle Krinsky

    2016-01-01

    Using American textbooks as examples, and drawing from 51 years of teaching American undergraduates, as well as from consultation for textbook publishers, this essay offers reasons why the American approach to art history of the baroque era has excluded the art history of Eastern Europe.

  1. Reception of the Baroque in US university textbooks in art history

    Carol Herselle Krinsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using American textbooks as examples, and drawing from 51 years of teaching American undergraduates, as well as from consultation for textbook publishers, this essay offers reasons why the American approach to art history of the baroque era has excluded the art history of Eastern Europe.

  2. Nation Building at the Museum of Welsh Life

    Rhiannon Mason

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the representational problems inherent in one museum’s attempt to tell a ‘national story’. The museum in question started life as the ‘Welsh Folk Museum’ but in 1995 became the much broader ‘Museum of Welsh Life’. This article examines how and why this change occurred and the challenges produced by this shift in remit. The article also illustrates the processes of selection and revision which occur within museum representations and considers how these relate to competing versions of ‘the national story’ present within Wales. I argue that such revisions are inevitable in national museums which, by their very nature, aim to tell a universal story and that, as a consequence, these museums function both as a catalyst for discussion and a public forum within which debates over the accepted nature of national identity and history will occur.

  3. The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education. The Benaki Museum, Athens, 17 October 2013

    Dimitra Christidou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of 'The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education 'conference, third in a series of conferences organised by the Benaki Museum in partnership with the American Embassy and the British Council in Greece, was the use of technology and social media as means of transforming museum education and, sometimes, funding museum exhibitions and educational programmes. Among others, the conference aimed to discuss the use of digital applications such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Kickstarter by museums in order to attract a wider audience, interpret their collections and even fund their programmes.

  4. Ethics in Community-University-Artist Partnered Research: Tensions, Contradictions and Gaps Identified in an 'Arts for Social Change' Project.

    Yassi, Annalee; Spiegel, Jennifer Beth; Lockhart, Karen; Fels, Lynn; Boydell, Katherine; Marcuse, Judith

    Academics from diverse disciplines are recognizing not only the procedural ethical issues involved in research, but also the complexity of everyday "micro" ethical issues that arise. While ethical guidelines are being developed for research in aboriginal populations and low-and-middle-income countries, multi-partnered research initiatives examining arts-based interventions to promote social change pose a unique set of ethical dilemmas not yet fully explored. Our research team, comprising health, education, and social scientists, critical theorists, artists and community-activists launched a five-year research partnership on arts-for-social change. Funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council in Canada and based in six universities, including over 40 community-based collaborators, and informed by five main field projects (circus with street youth, theatre by people with disabilities, dance for people with Parkinson's disease, participatory theatre with refugees and artsinfused dialogue), we set out to synthesize existing knowledge and lessons we learned. We summarized these learnings into 12 key points for reflection, grouped into three categories: community-university partnership concerns ( n  = 3), dilemmas related to the arts ( n  = 5), and team issues ( n  = 4). In addition to addressing previous concerns outlined in the literature (e.g., related to consent, anonymity, dangerous emotional terrain, etc.), we identified power dynamics (visible and hidden) hindering meaningful participation of community partners and university-based teams that need to be addressed within a reflective critical framework of ethical practice. We present how our team has been addressing these issues, as examples of how such concerns could be approached in community-university partnerships in arts for social change.

  5. SEMIOTIC MODELS IN MUSEUM COMMUNICATION

    Plokhotnyuk Vladimir

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a way of formalizing the description of various types of relations between the elements of museum communication based on the semiotic approach and the concepts introduced by F. de Saussure, C.S. Pierce and C.W. Morris. Semiotic models can be used to explain the specifics of museum communication for museum studies and as a methodological basis for developing various versions of databases or other software for museum affairs.

  6. The Contemporary Museum as a Site for Displaying Values

    Mare Kõiva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums constitute an important cultural and social resource. The main objective of museums is making certain objects in the collection visible or, on the contrary, leaving them invisible. In contemporary society the institution serves many important roles, being a place for displaying historical and contemporary values, an institution for preserving and displaying personal and collective memory, cultural values, for collecting tangible and intangible values, an institution for creating identity and ethnic kudos, a work place, an educational environment, a framework for promoting ethnic handicraft and art, a place for integrating different folklore festivals, exhibitions, shows; they are connected to tourism patterns and museum business. The article reflects the changes in the development of museums in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century, focusing on the main key words being multifunctional museum, the museum as an open classroom, presentation of tangible and intangible history, the relation and mergence of permanent and temporary exhibitions. The issues of digitalization and preservation and the role of the exhibition curator and the person represented on displays have increased in the museology of the past few decades. The museums’ tradition of self-replication and an increased interest in museological anthropology indicate that museums fulfil an important role in society.

  7. The Contemporary Museum as a Site for Displaying Values

    Mare Kõiva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Museums constitute an important cultural and social resource. The main objective of museums is making certain objects in the collection visible or, on the contrary, leaving them invisible. In contemporary society the institution serves many important roles, being a place for displaying historical and contemporary values, an institution for preserving and displaying personal and collective memory, cultural values, for collecting tangible and intangible values, an institution for creating identity and ethnic kudos, a work place, an educational environment, a framework for promoting ethnic handicraft and art, a place for integrating different folklore festivals, exhibitions, shows; they are connected to tourism patterns and museum business. The article reflects the changes in the development of museums in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century, focusing on the main key words being multifunctional museum, the museum as an open classroom, presentation of tangible and intangible history, the relation and mergence of permanent and temporary exhibitions. The issues of digitalization and preservation and the role of the exhibition curator and the person represented on displays have increased in the museology of the past few decades. The museums’ tradition of self-replication and an increased interest in museological anthropology indicate that museums fulfil an important role in society.

  8. "I love Skagen Museum"

    Laursen, Ditte; Hviid Mortensen, Christian; Olesen, Anne Rørbæk

    2017-01-01

    this gap by investigating empirically how one type of institution, namely museums, and their Facebook followers, actually communicate. Our approach is innovative in combining analytical tools from speech act theory and Conversation Analysis (CA) to a corpus of activities from the Facebook pages of nine...... Danish museums of different types and sizes collected during eight consecutive weeks in 2013. This approach enables us to both investigate communicative actions as isolated speech acts and the micromechanics of the interaction that potentially arise from these actions. Our findings indicate that certain...

  9. Creative Change: Art, Music, and Climate Science

    Dahlberg, R. A.; Hoffman, J. S.; Maurakis, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    As part of ongoing climate science education initiatives, the Science Museum of Virginia hosted Creative Change in March 2017. The event featured multidisciplinary programming created by scientists, artists, and students reacting to and interpreting climate change and resiliency through a variety of artistic mediums and informal science education. Creative Change was developed in consideration of studies conducted at Columbia University that indicate traditional educational approaches, which rely heavily on scientific information and data literacy, fail to engage and inspire action in a majority of people. Our informal science education programming developed for Creative Change, by contrast, is inclusive to all ages and backgrounds, integrating scientific data and an artistic human touch. Our goal was to increase public awareness of climate change and resiliency through the humanities in support of the Museum's mission to inspire Virginians to enrich their lives through science. Visitors were invited to attend Coral Reef Fever, a dance performance of coral bleaching; high school and university art exhibitions; climate data performed by a string quartet; poetry, rap, and theater performances; and a panel discussion by artists and scientists on communicating science through the arts and humanities. Based on 26 post- event survey results, we found as a result that visitors enjoyed the event (mean of 9.58 out of 10), learned new information (9.07), and strongly agreed that the arts and humanities should be used more in communicating science concepts (9.77). Funded in part by Bond Bradley Endowment and NOAA ELG Award #NA15SEC0080009.

  10. Curriculum Transformation in a Post-Apartheid South African University: The Arts Faculty, Tshwane University of Technology

    Ebewo, Patrick J.; Sirayi, Mzo

    2018-01-01

    During the apartheid rule in South Africa, established universities and other tertiary institutions were forcibly segregated to serve particular racial groups. Some critics have stated that the apartheid regime in South Africa supported an exclusively Western model of education, and that university education was based on a mono-cultural approach…

  11. Is Museum Education "Rocket Science"?

    Dragotto, Erin; Minerva, Christine; Nichols, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The field of museum education has advanced and adapted over the years to meet the changing needs of audiences as determined by new research, national policy, and international events. Educators from Chicago's Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum provide insight into a (somewhat) typical museum education department, especially geared for readers…

  12. How to Visit a Museum.

    Rebetez, Pierre

    The primary aim of this study is to encourage schools and museums to unite their efforts to further the use of the museum for teaching purposes and to promote the full development of creative faculties. The educational function of the museum is explored in consideration of the thirteen to eighteen year old age group. A recurring theme throughout…

  13. The Development of Museology in Turkey, a Spatial Analysis of Museums and their Contribution to Tourism in Turkey

    Ismail Kervankiran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cultural attractions include museums, art galleries, festivals, ancient structures, historical and architectural monuments, heritage sites, artistic activities and demonstrations as well as religious trips, language characteristics, local and authentic values, olimpiads, clothing style, traditions, and food culture. As being one of the most important components of cultural tourism, the museums in recent years have experienced a change in their functions, increased the number of tourists and provided economic benefits in their regions by creating alternative destinations for tourism. For this reason the museums, the integral part of tourism, receive increasing investments and new museums are constructed with different functions and the presentation of different products to attract more visitors. This study was conducted to evaluate the development of the museums, to spatially analyze the number of museums, their visitor numbers and incomes by province, and to determine the contribution of museums to tourism in Turkey. The number of museums in Turkey obtained from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, TÜRSAB and TÜİK, the number of artifacts in these museums, the number of visitors to these museums and the subsequent revenues according to the spatial distribution in the provinces have been mapped with the Geographical Information Systems (GIS and the spatial analysis (Standard Deviation Ellipse, Moran’s I, LISA of the museum indicators has been carried out and the results evaluated. Although museums have long been studied in Turkey with their different characteristics, the studies concerning the use of museums for tourism are quite new. As seen from the number of museums and their visitors, the museums are not being used sufficiently in Turkey. Apart from a very limited number of examples such as Topkapı Palace, Hagia Sophia Museum, Konya Museum, and Anıtkabir, the museums in Turkey are not sufficient in terms of their qualifications and the

  14. Frames as visual links between paintings and the museum environment: An analysis of statistical image properties

    Christoph eRedies

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Frames provide a visual link between artworks and their surround. We asked how image properties change as an observer zooms out from viewing a painting alone, to viewing the painting with its frame and, finally, the framed painting in its museum environment (museum scene. To address this question, we determined three higher-order image properties that are based on histograms of oriented luminance gradients. First, complexity was measured as the sum of the strengths of all gradients in the image. Second, we determined the self-similarity of histograms of the orientated gradients at different levels of spatial analysis. Third, we analyzed how much gradient strength varied across orientations (anisotropy. Results were obtained for three art museums that exhibited paintings from three major periods of Western art. In all three museums, the mean complexity of the frames was higher than that of the paintings or the museum scenes. Frames thus provide a barrier of complexity between the paintings and their exterior. By contrast, self-similarity and anisotropy values of images of framed paintings were intermediate between the images of the paintings and the museum scenes, i.e., the frames provided a transition between the paintings and their surround. We also observed differences between the three museums that may reflect modified frame usage in different art periods. For example, frames in the museum for 20th century art tended to be smaller and less complex than in the two other two museums that exhibit paintings from earlier art periods (13th-18th century and 19th century, respectively. Finally, we found that the three properties did not depend on the type of reproduction of the paintings (photographs in museums, scans from books or images from the Google Art Project. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the relation between frames and paintings by measuring physically defined, higher-order image properties.

  15. Bringing New Families to the Museum One Baby at a Time

    Herman, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    "Bring Your Baby to the Danforth Museum of Art" is a program for mothers. Unlike other museum programs that focus on the needs of children, Bring Your Baby caters to the intellectual interests of the adult parent. Parents learn about artworks, play with babies in a beautiful environment, and socialize with other families. The program is…

  16. The World Soil Museum: education and advocacy on soils of the world

    Mantel, Stephan; Land, Hiske

    2013-04-01

    The World Soil Museum (WSM) in Wageningen, is part of ISRIC World Soil Information and was founded in 1966 on request of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the International Soil Science Society. The World Soil Museum has a collection of over 1100 soil profiles from more than 70 countries. This soil profiles are vertical sections and show the composition, layering and structure of the soil. The collection is unique in the world and includes a significant number of soil profiles from the Netherlands. The Dutch soil collection is important for serving broader visitor groups, as some visitors, such as secondary school classes, are specifically interested in the Dutch landscape and soils. Broadly speaking, the World Soil Museum has five functions: (i) education and courses, (ii) research, (iii) information and edutainment, (iv) social function, and (v) a real museum function (Art). The World Soil Museum (World Soil Museum) is well known in national and international circles soil and the English name has almost 1,000 references on the Internet. The World Soil Museum is visited by about 1000 people a year, mainly university and college students from Western Europe. Other visitor groups that have found their way to the museum are students from disciplines broader then soil science, such as geography and rural development. Secondary school classes visit the museum for geography classes. The uniqueness and the value of the collection of soil profiles (soil monoliths) and associated collections, such as soil samples, hand pieces, thin sections, slides, is emphasized by the fact ISRIC is the only World Data Centre for Soils (WDC-Soils) within the World Data System of the International Council of Science (ICSU). The collection provides an insight in and overview of the diversity of soils in the world, their properties and their limitations and possibilities for use. A new building is under construction for the WSM, which is

  17. Museums, Environments, Information

    Koutamanis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern digital media already permeate the physical world. The portability of information devices and the ubiquity of networks allow us to access information practically anyplace, creating digital overlays on reality. This also allows us to bring information we routinely archive in museums and

  18. Aboriginal Art: Who was interested?

    Daniel Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the common assumption that Aboriginal art has been absent from Australian art histories and demonstrates how this is not so. It criticises the notion that art history should be represented by specialised art-history books and argues for the important of art museum displays as texts. It also examines the ways in which Aboriginal art has been examined in literature devoted to Australian history and anthropology. It foregrounds the idea that arts history is not necessarily best represented by official art historical texts.

  19. FOR MUSEUM WORK

    Margherita Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of museums in society has expanded significantly in the last decades: from temples of knowledge to forums for debate and discussion, from repositories of objects to people-centred institutions with social responsibilities and functions. This shift reflects an ongoing trend to democratise museums and make them more accessible to wider audiences and responsive to the public’s changing needs, in particular the interests of local communities, whose composition has changed in recent years to include migrants and people of different ethnic backgrounds. With annual migration flows to the EU as a whole projected to increase from about 1 043 000 people in 2010 to 1 332 500 by 2020, the question of how cultural institutions can contribute to effective integration and dialogue has become more relevant than ever. Funders and society at large expect museums to play their part in facilitating the integration and peaceful coexistence of newcomers, with financial resources being made available, also at the EU level, to support them in this effort. Many questions can be raised as to whether it is right and appropriate to charge museums with these responsibilities and whether this would push the boundaries of their work too far and give the social function an exceedingly prominent role over the traditional conservation and educational tasks museums already fulfil. But this discussion seems to be already obsolete in the light of the growing body of evidence on good practices available at the European level. This essay aims to illustrate some of them, as well as to discuss some underpinning theoretical issues and methodological approaches.

  20. REAL MUSEUM, IMAGINARY MUSEUM: REFLECTIONS ON THE CONCEPT OF THE MUSEUM AS A STAGE FOR METAMORPHOSIS = MUSEO REAL, MUSEO IMAGINARIO: REFLEXIONES EN TORNO AL CONCEPTO DE MUSEO COMO ESCENARIO DE METAMORFOSIS

    Elena Marcén Guillén

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ever since its inception as public institution in the 18th century, the museum has favoured several interpretations of the work of art, alterations that imply both a change in its semantic and a revision of the very same concept of art. These metamorphoses take place not only within the confined walls of the traditional museum but also in many wall-less museums. Approaches such as the imaginary museum, virtual and endless repertoire of pieces of art, open countless perspectives to how the museums are perceived as containers of the western memory. This paper focuses on the role of the museum as metamorphosis scenery through the thoughts of artists, writers and intellectuals that have felt attracted to this question since the dawn of the museum.Desde sus inicios como institución pública en el siglo XVIII, el museo ha propiciado diversas interpretaciones de la obra de arte, que entrañan tanto un cambio en la semántica del objeto artístico como una revisión del concepto mismo de arte. Estas metamorfosis se producen no solo en el ámbito físico del museo tradicional sino también en las múltiples variedades del museo sin muros. Planteamientos como el del museo imaginario, repertorio virtual e inacabable de obras de arte, abren innumerables perspectivas en lo que se refiere a la institución museística como receptáculo de la memoria occidental. El presente artículo plantea un recorrido por el papel del museo como escenario de metamorfosis a través de las reflexiones de artistas, literatos e intelectuales que se han sentido atraídos por esta sugerente cuestión desde los albores de la institución museística.

  1. The Role of Museums in Recovery From Disaster: The Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami

    Sudo Ken‘ichi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Museum of Ethnology (Minpaku was founded in 1974 as an Inter-University Research Institute housing a museum and graduate school. A museum is more than a place to store intangible and tangible heritage. Along with its responsibility for conserving and passing on cultural materials, it also creates new culture. On March 11, 2011, Japan was struck by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented proportions. From one month after the disaster, conservation experts from Minpaku participated in the rescue of tangible cultural resources for the period of eight months. At the same time, our disaster response team worked with village residents in damaged localities, assisting their efforts to replace costumes and ornaments for traditional performing arts that had been washed out to sea, or to repair damaged lion heads, to aid in reviving traditional performing arts. We had thought that, in the process of revival and recovery, the re-launch of festivals and traditional performing arts would come later than the construction of the homes and livelihoods of the local people. In one case, Minpaku, based on its research, was able to provide deer antlers for the headdresses needed to revive the deer dance, an intangible cultural heritage of a village in Iwate Prefecture. Village elders worked the antlers we donated, restored the costumes, and within a year were able to produce ten full sets of costumes. Subsequently, the deer dance was performed in village after village to calm the spirits of the dead, ward off evil spirits, and restore the confidence of people afflicted by the disaster. In this way, a traditional performing art contributed to the revival and rebuilding of the affected communities. In another village the repair and restoration of stone lions’ heads and providing aid for refugees from the disaster were further other examples of organized activity carried out in connection with the traditional performing arts. In sum, our experience

  2. Entrepreneurship in Culinary Arts: The Costa Rica experience with university students

    Juan Antonio Aguirre G.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La industria del turismo de Costa Rica representa 7,5% de PNB, 21% de las exportaciones totales y de esa contribución el subsector de alimento y bebidas representa 28%. El propósito de esta investigación fue el de identifi car, elementos y obstáculos potenciales en jóvenes estudiantes de artes culinarias de universidades en Costa Rica. El estudio fue realizado entre estudiantes de artes culinarias en de la Universidad Interamericana de Costa Rica, las entrevistas realizadas fueron 237 todos los matriculados en artes culinarias. Ausencia de tradición, la falta de cultura empresarial entre los jóvenes estudiantes y la necesidad de apoyos de la familia y amigos parecen ser pertinente y una necesidad sentida por el grupo. La falta de instrucción general en negocio y la falta de iniciativa empresarial se reconoce por ambos grupos como una debilidad y necesidad. El "coaching" y el apoyo para mujeres empresarios es muy pertinente, en especial en los aspectos administrativos y técnicos en los jóvenes estudiantes de artes culinarias. La información generada por este estudio es importante si en verdad queremos entrenar con los programas en artes artes culinarias , la nueva casta de chef/empresarios necesarios para la expansión de la industria de la gastronomía en los próximos años para Costa Rica y la región.

  3. A museum for German-speaking citizens in the Czech lands

    Hnídková, Vendula

    -, č. 42 (2011), s. 10 ISSN 1573-3815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : Czech contemporary architecture * Projektil * Museum for German -speaking citizens Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  4. Neoliberal Universities and the Education of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences in Bangladesh

    Anwaruddin, Rdar M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the neoliberal impacts on higher education in Bangladesh, how market-driven policies might limit the education of arts, humanities and social sciences, and whether or not this phenomenon may have consequences for the future of democracy in the country. First, the author focuses on the privatisation of higher…

  5. The Museum of New Mexico and energy management

    Johnson, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    There are unique indoor conditioning and energy management challenges in museums. In Santa Fe, the Museum of New Mexico (MNM) is located in a unique climate and must stay within utility expenditure limits allocated through the State government budget process, while handling valuable collections with specific environmental requirements. Adequate humidity for indoor exhibitions is the top priority for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Energy management systems (EMS) implemented by the Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department (EMNRD) in two MNM exhibition facilities avoid energy costs, but must be maintained regularly. Energy savings goals must yield priority in favor of maintaining proper indoor conditions. MNM is one of six Divisions within the State of New Mexico's Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA). The mission of OCA is to foster, preserve, and protect current and past expressions of culture and the arts, which are determined to be in the best interests of New Mexico. As a part of their mission, OCA is well-known for excellence in cultural collections, through MNM. MNM is comprised of the Museum of Fine Arts Museum of Southwest History Museum of International Folk Art Laboratory of Anthropology Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. There are eight separate physical facilities that house these operations, including administration. Behind the scenes, there are operational costs that must be managed carefully; the costs of heating, cooling, arid lighting the buildings that MNM uses are a part of this. EMNRD has assisted OCA in meeting its mission through the expertise of the Energy Conservation and Management Division (ECMD). ECMD is designated by the Governor as the State Energy Manager agency

  6. The Tools, Approaches and Applications of Visual Literacy in the Visual Arts Department of Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria

    Ecoma, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The paper reflects upon the tools, approaches and applications of visual literacy in the Visual Arts Department of Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria. The objective of the discourse is to examine how the visual arts training and practice equip students with skills in visual literacy through methods of production, materials and…

  7. 529 Museums and Development in Africa (Pp.529-538)

    User

    2010-10-17

    Oct 17, 2010 ... economic aspects of the evolution of African societies. ... economists see development as economic growth measured ... The experience of a member of developing countries in these ... museums came later, inspired by Europe's emerging interests in ... effects of colonial education system on local art.

  8. The Democratic Horizons of the Museum : Citizenship and Culture

    Peter Dahlgren; Dr. Joke Hermes

    2013-01-01

    This multi-volume reference work provides a state-of-the-art survey of the burgeoning field of museum studies. Showcasing the best of theory, practice, history, controversies, and the ways technology impacts the way we view, think about, and institultionalize objects, The International Handbooks of

  9. A Survey of Teen Museum Education Participants and Their Parents

    Hornby, Jenny; Bobick, Bryna

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a museum program for teens located in an urban environment. The participants were high school students from public, private, religious and home schools. The program allowed learning to occur in an informal setting and united teens from one city through a common interest in visual art. Also, it was an opportunity for the…

  10. Communicative Functions of the Museum Lobby

    Mortensen, Christian Hviid; Rudloff, Maja; Vestergaard, Vitus

    2014-01-01

    In a time with a heightened focus on how museum architecture and exhibition design shapes the museum visit, the entrance space of museums, the museum lobby, is remarkably absent from the museum literature and research. Still, the museum lobby is the first encounter visitors have with the museum...... and the last impression that they take home and share with others. This article analyzes museum lobbies as communication spaces in order to identify the different functions afforded by such spaces. In an explorative study of five Danish museum lobbies, we offer a preliminary categorization of these functions...

  11. The advantages and disadvantages of Art History to Life: Alois Riegl and historicism

    Diana Reynolds Cordileone

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alois Riegl was one of the seminal art historians of the early twentieth century, but very little is known about his career as adjunct-curator of textiles at the Austrian Museum for Art and Industry. He worked at the Museum from 1884 and combined this position with University teaching until he left this post to become a full Professor of Art History at the University of Vienna in 1897. While interest in Riegl has shown no signs of abating in recent years, most scholars continue to debate Riegl’s theories and methods. The aim of this paper, however, is to demonstrate just how much of Riegl’s theorizing was brought into focus by practical issues at the Museum for Art and Industry. As recent studies have indicated, Riegl was much more than an ivory tower theoretician; his work reverberated with the type of cross-disciplinary cultural criticism we associate with the intellectual life of fin-de-siècle Vienna. Another goal of this paper is to contribute to our expanding understanding of Riegl in his social and institutional contexts. Finally, it traces ways in which Riegl used his early exposure to Nietzsche, particularly Nietzsche’s second Untimely Meditation (The advantages and disadvantages of History to life to craft his responses to contemporary artistic and social crises in the final decade of the nineteenth century.

  12. Who Matters to Universities? A Stakeholder Perspective on Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Valorisation

    Benneworth, Paul; Jongbloed, Ben W.

    2010-01-01

    Valorisation is at the centre of many debates on the future of academic research. But valorisation has largely become narrowly understood in terms of universities' economic contributions through patenting, licensing, spin-off formation and technology transfer. This emergent restrictive definition of universities' societal impacts is a worrying…

  13. "Quid dant artes nisi luctum?": Learning, Ambition, and Careers in the Medieval University.

    Ferruolo, Stephen C.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing on the medieval university during its formative years (late 1100s and early 1200s), the author addresses questions such as "How did the ambitions of students and masters influence the organization and curriculum of these new institutions?" Concludes that society was served by these universities despite the indication that the…

  14. British Museum paintings

    Edmonds, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Frances Edmonds is one of a group of artists selected for the show ‘Territories’ taking place at Galerie Windkracht 13 in Den Helder, Holland this July 2012. This exhibition is curated by Sharon Beavan and Gethin Evans. The artists represented work across the boundaries of two and three-dimensional and time based form. The brief – to interrogate and explore the notion of territories. Frances will be showing several paintings from the British Museum series, based on imagery collected ...

  15. Can Virtual Museums Motivate Students? Toward a Constructivist Learning Approach

    Katz, James E.; Halpern, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the effectiveness of immersive environments that have been implemented by museums to attract new visitors. Based on the frameworks introduced by telepresence and media richness theories, and following a constructivist-based learning approach, we argue that the greater the similarity of an online museum experience is to its physical counterpart, the more positive will be the observer's perception of the collection. We reason that the similarity would lead online visitors to develop greater cognitive involvement which in turn will produce more positive attitudes toward the collection. In support of this argument, we present the results of a comparative study in which 565 participants were exposed randomly to four different exhibitions: two-dimensional collections of art and aircraft museums and three-dimensional tours of similar museums. Results indicate that whereas 3D tours have a strong effect on users' intentions to visit the real museum, cognitive involvement and sense of presence mediate the association between these variables. In terms of managerial implications, our study shows that if educational professionals want to stimulate their students to visit museums, 3D tours appear to be more effective for engaging learners through a realistic-looking environment. By offering richer perceptual cues and multimodal feedback (e.g., users can view 3D objects from multiple viewpoints or zoom in/out the objects), the study suggests that participants may increase their reasoning process and become more interested in cultural content.

  16. RESOURCE CENTRE AT THE SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM

    ciunl ictlt.P cnnipc;. Material from other museums. Worksheets, activity books, guides, pamp~lets and other educational material from museums 1n Southern. Africa and overseas are kept in the museum education section of the Resource Centre. General infonnation on museums and museum technology are also collected.

  17. Monitoring Of Pollutants In Museum Environment

    Ana-Maria Budu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Art works are affected by environmental factors as light, temperature, humidity. Air pollutants are also implicated in their degradation. The pollution in museums has two sources: the air from outside, which brings usually dust and inorganic particles, and the inside sources – the materials used for casings (sealants, textiles placed on the display cases, varnishes, wood that emanate organic compounds. The dust is composed of particles with a diameter of approximately 2µm or higher, which come from soil (silica or animal and vegetal residues (skin cells, pollen. They facilitate water condensation on objects surface and biologic attack. The inorganic compounds are a result of materials combustion (SO2, NO2, NO and in presence of water they form acidic compounds which affect the museum objects. The organic compounds are usually peroxides, acids, phthalates, formaldehyde. The effects of these pollutants are: soiling, surface discolouration, embrittlement, corrosion. Therefore, conservators are interested in monitoring the pollution degree in the display cases or in the museum air and in analyzing the effects of pollutants on the exhibited objects. They use different methods for pollutants identification, like direct reading devices based on colorimetry, that can be read after few minutes and hours (they interact with the pollutants in atmosphere, or indirect reading samples that require a laboratory. The information gathered is used for the identification of pollution source and to analyze the concentration of pollutants needed to provoke damages on the surfaces of art objects. This paper is a review of pollutants that affect the art objects and of the monitoring systems used for their identification and measuring.

  18. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Sandra Medić; Nataša Pavlović

    2014-01-01

    In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of t...

  19. Can museums survive the postmodern?

    Suzanne Keene

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Although archaeologists regard museums as vital repositories of important research materials, museum professionals take a broader view of their role in not only preserving natural and cultural heritage but also of how they could or should be presented, or interpreted, to the public. In this personal view, issues of what museums should be, or seek to be, in a postmodern world are explored.

  20. The cost of a visit to the museum: Analysis of a survey

    Elena Ploşniţa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Author of the article “The cost of a visit to the museum: Analysis of a survey” analyzes the results of a survey of visitors conducted from July 26 to August 15, 2012 at three national museums – the National Museum of Ethnography and Natural History, the National Museum of Fine Arts, and the National Museum of History of Moldova, as well as at the Natural and Cultural Reserve “Old Orhei” and the Pushkin House Museum in Chisinau. There has been used a questionnaire consisting of 12 questions. After analyzing the social status and occupation of the respondents, after determination of the reason for visiting the museum, systematization of data on the degree of satisfaction and the views on the entrance fees, the authors of the study concluded that these five museums’ visitors willing to pay for access to the museum from 13 to 28 MDL, but only if this visit can meet their informational and emotional needs. The public requires a high standard of information, a lot of respect from museum staff, a certain atmosphere of relaxation and a treatment that satisfies all expectations. Regardless of social class, occupation, age, way of perceiving the museum institution, and the level of satisfaction, all respondents consider that the price of the entrance ticket should be increased. The survey results show that the museums do not attract tourist groups, indicating that the organizers of tours do not include museums in tourist routes. The authors consider that research to the public should be on the agenda of each museum in order to discover the needs and wishes of their visitors and to meet these requirements as best as possible.

  1. The Art of John Biggers

    Coy, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In their 2005 exhibit of John Biggers' work, the New Orleans Museum of Art described it as being inspired by "African art and culture, the injustices of a segregated United States, the stoic women in his own family, and the heroes of everyday survival." In this article, the author describes how her students reinterpreted Biggers' work.…

  2. Pedagogy, or martial arts - the rivalry in quality, examples of Kazimierz Wielki University publications

    Małgorzata Pujszo

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: The result of the study of the scientific rivalry should be a source of discussion on ways and possibilities of improving the quality of emitted publications of scientists of Kazimierz Wielki University.

  3. Organisational Art

    Ferro-Thomsen, Martin

    creation of a practical utopia (?heterotopia?) in the organisational context. The case study makes use of both art- and organisational theory. The thesis concludes with an outline of a framework for OA that is derived from contemporary theory of mainly Relational Aesthetics (Bourriaud), Conceptual Art......University of Copenhagen / Learning Lab Denmark. 2005 Kort beskrivelse: Organisational Art is a tentative title for an art form that works together with organisations to produce art. This is most often done together with non-artist members of the organisation and on-site in their social context. OA...... is characterised as socially engaged, conceptual, discursive, site-specific and contextual. Abstract: This investigation is about Organisational Art (OA), which is a tentative title for an art form that works together with organisations (companies, institutions, communities, governments and NGOs) to produce art...

  4. Museum metamorphosis à la mode

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2014-01-01

    museum practices correspond to the logic of fashion. Where Foucault once described museums as heterochronias; places representing an ’other-time’, museums now strive to be both of their time and in time with the Zeitgeist. As a consequence, they must keep up with the speedy cycles of technological...... advancements and cultural change, and not only deliver, but also stoke the desire for, novel experiences. The paper explores the current vogue for fashion exhibitions as a case in point, arguing that this trend serves to promote the museum as fashionably current, but can also support novel formats for cultural...

  5. Are Shaman Paintings Material Religion or Religious Art?

    Jong-chun Park

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Laurel Kendall, Jongsung Yang, and Yul Soo Yoon. God Pictures in Korean Contexts: The Ownership and Meaning of Shaman Paintings. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2015. God Pictures in Korean Contexts: The Ownership and Meaning of Shaman Paintings is a pioneering work, one that explores the proverbial “road not taken” by previous research on the subject. The authors situate “the lives of Korean shaman paintings [musindo] in a complex South Korean world; in shaman shrines, private collections, and museums." Incorporating their vivid experiences in the field, authors Laurel Kendall, anthropologist and curator at the American Museum of Natural History; Jongsung Yang, collector and director of the Museum of Shamanism in Seoul; and Yul Soo Yoon, art historian and director of the Gahoe Museum in Seoul, investigate not merely the religious meanings and functions of shaman paintings, but how these meanings and functions are accepted, appropriated, and even created, depending on the interests of various participants—shamans, painters, collectors of shaman paintings, and so on—who are relevant to these visual forms of expressive culture.

  6. MUSEUM TARI DI MAKASSAR DENGAN PENDEKATAN EKSPOSE STRUKTUR PADA FASAD BANGUNAN DAN PENERAPAN TEORI FRAKTAL

    Taufik Arfan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak—Pentingnya museum tari di Makassar adalah untuk memperkenalkan budaya yang dimiliki di Sulawesi Selatan yang dapat dikenal oleh seluruh manca negara, serta parawisatawan dan semua orang untuk berkunjung. Tujuan penelitian non arsitektural ini adalah menampilkan unsur kebudayaan, sejarah serta memperkenalkan Tari Tradisional yang ada di Sulawesi Selatan, sedangkan tujuan arsitekturalnya adalah menentukan lokasi yang sesuai dengan keberadaan museum tari, merancang ruang-ruang yang dibutuhkan sesuai dengan standar Museum serta kebutuhan ruang untuk Museum seni tari, merancang museum tari yang dikaitkan dengan ekspos struktur pada fasad dan penggabungannya dengan teori fraktal, merancang penggunaan fasad bangunan,struktur, utilitas, penampilan bangunan, serta tranformasi bentuk pada museum tari dan merancang tata massa pada museum tari. Hasil laporan ini adalah mendesain bangunan museum tari di Makassar dengan pendekatan ekspos pada struktur fasade bangunan dan penerapan teori fraktal yang disesuaikan dengan standar dan kebutuhan ruang. Kata Kunci :Museum tari, struktur, fasad, fractal Abstract-The importance of dance in Makassar museum is to introduce a culture held in South Sulawesi, which can be known by all foreign countries, as well as parawisatawan and everyone to visit. The research objective non architecturally it is featuring elements of culture, history and introduce Traditional Dance in South Sulawesi, while the purpose of the architectural is to determine the location that corresponds to the existence of the museum of dance, designing spaces required in accordance with the standards Museum as well as the need for space for art museum dance, design a museum of dance that is associated with exposure to the facade structure and merger with fractal theory, designing the use of facades of buildings, structures, utilities, appearance of the building, as well as the transformation of the museum forms of dance and design the masses on

  7. Museums as Spaces for Cultural Citizenship

    Sattrup, Lise; Lejsgaard Christensen, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums.......Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums....

  8. Equipping Liberal Arts Students with Skills in Data Analytics: Drake University Partners with Regional Businesses to Offer New Programs in a Rapidly Growing Field. A BHEF Case Study

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This case study examines how Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) member Drake University, a private university with a strong liberal arts tradition, is equipping its students to become data-enabled professionals. Through the collaboration of its business and higher education members, BHEF launched the National Higher Education and Workforce…

  9. ART AND ENGINEERING IN METAL SCULPTURES

    COSTIN Georgiana Alexandra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how engineering and art are combined in making metal sculptures, referring to artistic creations exhibited in the “Dunărea de Jos” University campus in Galați, in the tradition existing between the Faculty of Engineering and the Visual Art Museum of Galați, with a significant contribution of prestigious artists of Galaţi and beyond. In this context, in order to develop the conception and design of some artistic products, many 2D and 3D graphical representation systems of information have appeared in a virtual environment, in which shaping using dedicated software applications, required that these artworks can be described by a series of shaping operation sequences, package design tools Autodesk Inventor CAD being such a solution.

  10. The art of compromise: the founding of the National Gallery of British Art, 1890-1892

    Amy Woodson-Boulton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the press played a key role in defining the Tate Gallery by facilitating a national debate about the siting, nature, and purpose of the proposed National Gallery of British Art. Art critics, politicians, journalists and a variety of newspaper editors weighed in on whether Britain should create a museum of modern art, a museum of national art, or both. The understanding of British art as quintessentially modern at the time of the founding of the Gallery meant that from the beginning the Tate Gallery was founded as both the National Gallery of British Art and a museum of modern art. The changing definition of modern art in the twentieth century, however, created fractures between these two identities that eventually led to the split between Tate Britain and Tate Modern.

  11. Interdisciplinary New University: A New Model for Faculties of Arts and Sciences in Turkey

    Simsek, Hasan; Hacifazlioglu, Ozge

    2012-01-01

    The concept of new university reduces the depth of disciplinary understanding at the undergraduate level. Instead, interdisciplinary understanding has been put forward, where room is provided for the broader development of student. Receiving training from multiple perspectives will provide students with the skills necessary in an era of present…

  12. Medical instruments in museums

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand....

  13. Rancang Bangun Aplikasi Augmented Reality Museum Bali Berbasis Android Studi Kasus Gedung Karangasem dan Gedung Tabanan

    I Gede Aditya Nugraha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Museum Bali is one of the museum which is located in Denpasar City that established since 1910. The Museum collections consist of items such as living equipment, art, religion, handwriting, and other things that show the situation and the development of the Balinese culture. Augmented Reality is a technology which combines two-dimensional virtual objects or three-dimensional virtual objects into the real environment. Museum Bali has decreased the amount of visitors in recent years and requires an innovation to promote Museum Bali. One innovation that is expected to promote the Museum Bali is to create an augmented reality application that called Augmented Reality Museum Bali in Android platform. Utilizing augmented reality technology that works by detecting the marker then it show up the 3D object and the information from one of the objectsin Museum Bali. Markerless method used in detection marker that make this application moreattractive and expected to be a new experience for the people who want to know more about Museum Bali.

  14. Fantastic art, Barr, surrealism

    Tessel M. Bauduin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1936 Alfred Barr, jr., curator-director of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, organised the first large-scale American show about dada and surrealism, which he named Fantastic Art, Dada, Surrealism. This show would have a considerable impact, not least because of its introduction of ‘fantastic’ as a category of visual art closely related to surrealism. But how and why did Barr arrive at this label? This article explores several sources, including surrealist lectures, early twentieth-century Belgian art history and art criticism, and art historical debates about form vs. content, south vs. north, and reason vs. fantasy. Some suggestion are made as to why Barr considered ‘fantastic’ relevant at that time, including to set it against Cubism and Abstract Art and to make a—partly political—point about the form/content-dichotomy and the validity of romanticism, sentiment and the fantastic.

  15. National Museum of Military History

    A Nicolaides

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Attractions such as military history museums which exhibit a wide range of important historical artefacts are fundamental sub-elements in any tourism systems, and yet their study suffers from lack of theoretical depth. Military history is an integral element of the history of any nation and countless varieties of tourists both local and international, visit military museums whenever the opportunity presents itself because museums are generally stimulating places of interest. This article focuses predominantly on international tourists visiting the Ditsong National Museum of Military History. In addition to the interest that such museums generate, they play a key role as the organizational foundation stones of modernity. It is via their many interesting exhibits that museums enlighten us about the past that intrinsically highlights its distance from the present era. Museums also selectively reconstitute aspects of history and in so doing alienate many artefacts from their original context and yet manage to impart deep understanding of events that shaped the modern world. Museums of all types thus impart knowledge and have a wide range of tales to tell concerning the many and diverse assortments of objects they hold. National pride is an obvious reason for having a military museum where the comprehensive display of military equipment is exceptionally unique while exhibition halls also offer an educational narrative of a nation’s history. What is also of interest to many visitors is the type of research that is carried out in a multiplicity of ways. The huge global growth in tourism in recent years has contributed to many museums radically altering their exhibits in both content and manner of exhibition. This is significant given the reciprocal impact that museums and tourism have on one another. The attractions in museums are regarded by many to be central to the tourism process and these are very often the main reason for many tourists visiting

  16. Performativity Double Standards and the Sexual Orientation Climate at a Southern Liberal Arts University.

    Byron, Reginald A; Lowe, Maria R; Billingsley, Brianna; Tuttle, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    This study employs quantitative and qualitative methods to examine how heterosexual, bisexual, and gay students rate and describe a Southern, religiously affiliated university's sexual orientation climate. Using qualitative data, queer theory, and the concept tyranny of sexualized spaces, we explain why non-heterosexual students have more negative perceptions of the university climate than heterosexual male students, in both bivariate and multivariate analyses. Although heterosexual students see few problems with the campus sexual orientation climate, bisexual men and women describe being challenged on the authenticity of their orientation, and lesbian and, to a greater extent, gay male students report harassment and exclusion in a number of settings. These distinct processes are influenced by broader heteronormative standards. We also shed much-needed light on how gendered sexual performativity double standards within an important campus microclimate (fraternity parties) contribute to creating a tyrannical sexualized space and negatively affect overall campus climate perceptions.

  17. Mindfulness in Art Contemplation. The Story of a Rothko Experience

    Echarri, Fernando; Urpi, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    The nature and scope of the experiences offered to museum visitors are varied and changing, given that museums make it possible to explore new methodologies for unleashing and transmitting meaning during visits. In this regard, at the University of Navarra Museum, we researched the possibilities for mindfulness as a contemplative technique to…

  18. Cultural mediation in museums

    Gherghina Boda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available If we perceive the museum not only as a place of storing and conserving the patrimony, but also of transmitting it, then we can also see it as a mediator through which cultures can become collective patrimony. Tightly connected to patrimonial appropriation, mediation appears from this perspective as a process and not an end, as it manifests itself in animation, communication and making knowledge popular in relation to a precise patrimony. That is why we can see cultural mediation as a transmission, as a transformation, as an action or social project which aims at creating social bonds, the museum thus being not only a place of meeting for the public with the objects exposed, but also as a place of meeting between different cultures. Thus, cultural mediation presents itself as the most efficient means for access to culture of all categories of the public, situated as the crossroads of culture, continuous education and entertainment and is inscribed in the field of informal education.

  19. Children Ask Questions about West African Art.

    Abercrombie, Denice; Cochran, Mathilda; Mims, Margaret

    1997-01-01

    Presents a collection of questions that fifth-grade students asked about African artwork and answers provided by staff from the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas. Observes that students' interest in important visual aspects of the art creates lead-ins to more detailed discussions of West African art and culture. (DSK)

  20. Staroegyptské měděné a bronzové artefakty v Egyptském muzeu Lipské univerzity. Průběžná zpráva o projektu // Ancient Egyptian copper and bronze artefacts in the Egyptian Museum of Leipzig University. Preliminary report on the project

    Martin Odler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a preliminary report on the first results of the interdisciplinary project Early copper metallurgy in Ancient Egypt- a case study of the material from Agyptisches Museum - Georg Steindorff - der Universitat Leipzig, in cooperation of the Czech Institute of Egyptology, Faculty of Arts, Charles University in Prague, Institute of Chemistry and Technology in Prague and the Egyptian Museum in Leipzig. The project is focused on the analysis of a selected corpus of artefacts from ancient Egyptian and Nubian sites (fig. 1 . The analysed material was found in greatest part at the Egyptian sites of Abusir, Abydos and Giza and at the Nubian site of Aniba (fig. 2. The artefacts represent an outline of the development of ancient Egyptian metallurgy over more than one and half millennia, from the First Dynasty (ca 3100 - 2900 BC until almost the end of the New Kingdom (ca 1200 BC. The selected corpus of artefacts has been documented by X-ray radiography and computer tomography last year at the Institute of Mineralogy, Crystallography and Material Science of the Leipzig University. ln all, 86 artefacts were then sampled and a I most 100 samples obtained. The results of a metallography and SEMIEDS analysis of five selected artefacts, representing five different chronological stages of the corpus, are discussed in this article (Table 1 . The first one is a Dynasty 1 vessel from Abusir South (AMUL 2162; Fig. 3. This bowl was hammered out of copper sheet, with high contents of Ni, As and Fe. Non-metallic admixtures of copper sulfides are present in the inner structure, which is highly deformed by the hammering. The second is an Old Kingdom vessel from Giza made of arsenical copper, hammered and annealed (AMUL 2169; Figs. 4-5. The third is a lugged and decorated Middle Kingdom axe blade, hammered and annealed and made of copper with admixtures of As, Fe and S (AMUL 3952; Fig. 6. The fourth is a pair of tweezers from a C-Group tumulus N83 at

  1. Appreciation of Authenticity Promotes Curiosity: Implications for Object-Based Learning in Museums

    Bunce, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Museum professionals suppose that interacting with authentic objects promotes curiosity and engagement, but this has not been tested. In this research, children and adults visiting the Oxford University Museum of Natural History were shown a taxidermied rabbit or rabbit skeleton. They were asked "Is it real?," "Why?" and were…

  2. 76 FR 58031 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

  3. Factors Influencing Museum Sustainability and Indicators for Museum Sustainability Measurement

    Izabela Luiza Pop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to identify the factors upon which museum sustainability depends and the way in which this can be measured. Methodologically, we applied a qualitative research approach, using semi-structured interviews with experts from the Romanian museum sector, complemented by an in-depth study of the literature in this field. Results indicated that any objective measuring of sustainability must take into account the size of a museum’s collections and its organizational structure. It was also found that museum type can affect sustainability via its competitive advantage. However, the sustainability of a museum is not strictly determined by these factors, but also by the management and marketing strategies applied. Based on analysis of literature- and respondent-based factors influencing sustainability, this article proposes a set of 33 indicators that can be used by museums to measure their sustainability, as well as a model that enables evaluation of the sustainability levels of various museums comparatively, regardless of their type, size or importance (e.g., national, regional and local. The results obtained are useful both from a theoretical point of view, given that there are few writings on this topic, and from a practical point of view, as they provide a basis for a clear, objective model of museum sustainability measurement.

  4. Activities on archaeology, art and cultural heritage conservation at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA), State University of Londrina (UEL)

    Appoloni, Carlos R.; Parreira, Paulo S.; Lopes, Fabio [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada]. E-mails: appoloni@uel.br; parreira@uel.br; bonn@uel.br

    2007-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics from the State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) introduced Archaeometry and related issues pioneeringly among its main research lines in 1994. The current work aims at presenting an overview of the evolution of such activities and the development of human resources up to the present time. The activities related to Archaeology, Art and Cultural Heritage Conservation at the LFNA can be divided into five levels, as follows. (1) Study and implementation of experimental methodologies. (2) Related Basic Research - Physics issues involved in archaeometric applications have led to the need to conduct interesting specific basic research. (3) Works with specific materials - Among the several analysis conducted, the following should be mentioned: ceramics from the archaeological site Tupi Guarani Fazenda Sta. Dalmacia, PR; two archaeological sites in the Amazon Forest; objects from the MAE/USP collection; wall paintings in Imaculada Conceicao Church, SP; coins and other objects from the MHN/RJ; obsidians from Ecuador; etc. (4) Development of Human Resources. In this item there are two components: tutoring of scientific initiation students, Master's and Doctorate in atomic-nuclear methodologies applied to Archaeometry and a course of non-destructive nuclear techniques for the characterization of archaeological and art materials aimed at archaeologists and conservators, given since 1997. (5) Scientific collaborations - the construction of a common language between physicists and archeologists, conservators and other professionals involved in this area is an endeavor of mutual continuous learning and necessary conditions for the success of the projects. (author)

  5. Activities on archaeology, art and cultural heritage conservation at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA), State University of Londrina (UEL)

    Appoloni, Carlos R.; Parreira, Paulo S.; Lopes, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics from the State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) introduced Archaeometry and related issues pioneeringly among its main research lines in 1994. The current work aims at presenting an overview of the evolution of such activities and the development of human resources up to the present time. The activities related to Archaeology, Art and Cultural Heritage Conservation at the LFNA can be divided into five levels, as follows. (1) Study and implementation of experimental methodologies. (2) Related Basic Research - Physics issues involved in archaeometric applications have led to the need to conduct interesting specific basic research. (3) Works with specific materials - Among the several analysis conducted, the following should be mentioned: ceramics from the archaeological site Tupi Guarani Fazenda Sta. Dalmacia, PR; two archaeological sites in the Amazon Forest; objects from the MAE/USP collection; wall paintings in Imaculada Conceicao Church, SP; coins and other objects from the MHN/RJ; obsidians from Ecuador; etc. (4) Development of Human Resources. In this item there are two components: tutoring of scientific initiation students, Master's and Doctorate in atomic-nuclear methodologies applied to Archaeometry and a course of non-destructive nuclear techniques for the characterization of archaeological and art materials aimed at archaeologists and conservators, given since 1997. (5) Scientific collaborations - the construction of a common language between physicists and archeologists, conservators and other professionals involved in this area is an endeavor of mutual continuous learning and necessary conditions for the success of the projects. (author)

  6. The Social Impact of the Offer of Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) in a University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro.

    Costa, Tonia; Corrêa, Marilena C D V

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to report the procedures undertaken in the laboratory of semen of a university hospital specialized in human reproduction in Rio de Janeiro, principally Homologous Artificial Insemination (HAI) taking into account a more social aspect. This descriptive and retrospective study was based on documentary research. The source of information included medical records and registers containing the procedures performed in the laboratory of semen and the HAI. Testimonies, questionings and suggestions given by the couples during the process were also registered. The couples were clearly informed about the techniques and many times they externalized their demands, doubts and desires in relation to the procedures, treatment and issues concerning their wish to have children and start a family. The discussion shows concerns over the techniques and theories used in this context when performing procedures in the laboratory of semen. The bond to the service remains based on the idea that "now my dream of having kids will come true". Nevertheless, for the operationalization of the access to ARTs, at the public sector of medicine, we should count on the implementation of the National Politics in Assisted Reproduction. It did not take place and today it has even been removed, no longer being in force. It makes very clear the distance between the "accomplishment of the desire for children" and the reality of the provision of means and resources for ART at the medical public level in Brazil.

  7. Coherence in the Argumentative Essays of First Year College of Liberal Arts Students at De La Salle University

    Alphie G. Garing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates five textual features of coherence in the students’ argumentative essays for text comprehensibility and overall writing quality. Specifically, it examines how comprehensible the students’ argumentative essays considering the following: focus, organization, cohesion, support and elaboration, and conventions; and the relationship between the textual features and the comprehensibility of the students’ argumentative essays. The data consists of 13 argumentative essays written in ENGLCOM class first year College of Liberal Arts students of De La Salle University. Two techniques were used to analyze the data. First, an analytic and holistic scorings using a four-point writing rubric were used to evaluate each of the textual features of coherence and comprehensibility, respectively. Second, correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between the coherence features and the comprehensibility of the students’ texts and between the comprehensibility of the students’ argumentative essays.

  8. Using Formal Concept Analysis to Create Pathways through Museum Collections

    Wray, Tim; Eklund, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents A Place for Art - an iPad app that allows users to explore an art collection via semantically linked pathways that are generated using Formal Concept Analysis. The app embraces the information seeking approach of exploration and is based on the idea that showing context...... and relationships among objects in a museum collection augments an interpretive experience. The fundamental interaction metaphor inherent in A Place for Art relies on Formal Concept Analysis so the interface has embedded within it the semantic clustering features of machine learning in artificial intelligence....

  9. The art of improvisation: the working process of administrators at a Federal University Hospital.

    Littike, Denilda; Sodré, Francis

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the working process of administrators at a Federal University Hospital (HUF). It includes research with a qualitative approach conducted through interviews with twelve administrators. The work process, the work tools and the human activity per se are understood to be under scrutiny. Work is acknowledged as a category that analyzes the management methods used by professional health workers. The HUFs are responsible for two social policies, namely education and health. The aim of the administrators' work is an organizational issue, and the administration tools used are bureaucratic and out-of-date for the current political context of hospital management. The most significant feature of this hospital administration is improvisation, which reduces the potential of the administrators in such a way that, instead of introducing innovative changes into their work process, they prefer to leave their jobs. Improvisation is caused by the production of sequential obstacles in management decision-making at this teaching hospital. In short, the transfer of administration at the HUF, from direct government administration by the University to the Brazilian Company of Hospital Services (EBSERH), was analyzed on the grounds that this would establish a "new" management model.

  10. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...... on physical objects, but is unique in focusing on fusing the projection and the object in an engaging approach to communicating information at a cultural heritage museum. The Mejlby stone installation is now a permanent installation at a cultural and historical museum, and, based on observation as well...

  11. Fusion of Library, Archive, Museum, Publisher (LAMP: the NTNU Library Experience

    Ke, Hao-Ren

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs has garnered attention in recent years. Extending the tendency further, National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU fuses the library, archive, museum, and publisher (LAMP functionality together in its library. This article elaborates on the LAMP practices of the NTNU Library, which indicates that without creating new units in a university, its library can play a good role of curating invaluable university assets.

  12. The Conference in the Moscow Kremlin State Museums “Historical Weapons in Museums and Private Collections”

    Sergey P. Orlenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In November 2016 in the Moscow Kremlin State Historical and Cultural Museum and Heritage Site in the framework of events dedicated to the 210th anniversary of the Armoury Chamber museum, an international conference “Historical weapons in museums and private collections”. This scientific forum continued the tradition of conferences held in the Moscow Kremlin Museums in 1999-2007. The participants of this forum discussed a number of priority topics for the studies of the weapon collection history in the Kremlin. These topics were relevant to the national and world studies of weaponology as a whole. In addition to general issues of the history of arms and armour, a number of reports were devoted to the functioning of the historical centers of arms production, weapons collections in Russia and abroad, particular items, as well as the activities of gunsmiths, designers of weapons. The conference was attended by representatives of more than 20 Russian and foreign museums, 14 academic and university research centers and institutions, private collectors and lovers of ancient weapons. During the three days of the conference 36 reports were presented and discussed. Organizers of the conference highlighted a number of reports including new attributions of the items from the Kremlin collections. The conference program is available on the official website of the Moscow Kremlin State Museums. The conference results were published as a collection of proceedings. The weaponology forum in the Kremlin will be held annually. The Moscow Kremlin Museums invite researchers of historical weapons, museum employees and collectors to the active cooperation.

  13. Online Astronomy Resources from the American Museum of Natural History

    Steiner, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, one of the world's largest natural history museums, is the locus of a rich array of scientific research, exhibition and educational resources through its Department of Astrophysics, its Rose Center for Earth and Space and its Hall of Meteorites. For the past decade, the Museum's National Center for Science Literacy, Education and Technology has leveraged these assets to create a panoply of web-based resources for students, teachers and the general public. This session will review several of these resources, including the Digital Universe (a three-dimensional mapping of the Universe); The Solar System (an online graduate course for K-12 teachers); multimedia highlighting searches for exoplanets and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays; Journey to the Stars (a DVD version of the current planetarium show); and the astronomy section of Ology (a website for children ages 7 and up). A copy of the Journey to the Stars DVD will be provided to all attendees. )

  14. L’Italia e l’Europa negli anni Trenta. Musei, storia dell’arte, critica e restauro nei documenti dell’inchiesta internazionale sulla formazione dei restauratori (1932 / Italy and Europe during the 1930s. Museums, art history, art criticism and restoration in the documents of the international survey about the training of restorers (1932

    Silvia Cecchini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chi all’interno dell’Offi ce International des Musées (OIM, all’indomani della prima guerra mondiale, lavorava alla ridefi nizione del ruolo dei musei, ripensandoli come luoghi di dialogo interculturale e di incontro della società presente con il proprio passato, considerava il ruolo sociale del museo e la sua funzione conservativa come parte della stessa riforma culturale. In questo scenario l’inchiesta condotta nel 1932 dall’OIM è stata occasione di confronto tra paesi membri della Società delle Nazioni sulla fi gura di ‘restauratore di opere d’arte’. Se ne considerano i percorsi formativi, fi no ad arrivare alla regolamentazione della concorrenza, valutando aspetti metodologici, critici, etici. Le posizioni che emergono dai documenti dell’Archivio dell’OIM mostrano le intersezioni tra scelte culturali e processi storico-politici, rivelano signifi cative differenze sul ruolo attribuito alla diagnostica e alla critica dalle diverse culture nazionali. L’analisi di quanto emerge da quei documenti offre l’occasione per rifl ettere su alcuni percorsi storici che hanno costituito le radici dell’attuale cultura italiana del restauro, permette di soffermarsi sul rapporto dell’Italia con gli specifi ci percorsi della cultura internazionale. Ne emergono elementi utili a considerare da un punto di vista storico i processi di trasformazione ora in atto proprio nell’ambito della formazione dei restauratori di beni culturali. In the aftermath of WW1, those working in the Offi ce International des Musées (OIM to redefi ne the role of museums – rethinking them as intercultural dialogue and meeting places of the society with its own past – considered the social role of the museum and its conservative mission as part of the same cultural reform. In this scenario the survey conducted in 1932 by the OIM was an opportunity for discussion between members OIM of the League of Nations countries on the fi gure of ‘restorer of

  15. LED Lighting in a Performing Arts Building at the University of Florida

    Miller, Naomi J.; Kaye, Stan; Coleman, Patricia; Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Perrin, Tess E.; Sullivan, Gregory P.

    2014-07-01

    The U.S. DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with the in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. This report describes the process and results of the 2013 - 2014 GATEWAY demonstration of SSL technology in the Nadine McGuire Theatre and Dance Pavilion at the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. The LED solutions combined with dimming controls utilized in four interior spaces - the Acting Studio, Dance Studio, Scene Shop, and Dressing Room - received high marks from instructors, students/performers, and reduced energy use in all cases. The report discusses in depth and detail of each project area including specifications, energy savings, and user observations. The report concludes with lessons learned during the demonstration.

  16. 75 FR 8190 - Art Advisory Panel of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue Service

    2010-02-23

    ... function, Panel records and discussions must include tax return information. Therefore, the Panel meetings... balanced between museum directors and curators, art dealers and auction representatives to afford differing...

  17. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  18. Pedagogy and Practice in Museum Online Learning

    Din, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    How best might museums harness the interactive capabilities of online environments to provide active teaching and learning experiences for diverse learners and communities? How can museums engage learners in ways that encourage them to visit the museum in person and/or further explore online resources? What should be the role of the museum in…

  19. Predictors of Survival among Adult Ethiopian Patients in the National ART Program at Seven University Teaching Hospitals: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Fekade, Daniel; Weldegebreal, Teklu; Teklu, Alula M; Damen, Melake; Abdella, Saro; Baraki, Nega; Belayhun, Bekele; Berhan, Eyoel; Kebede, Amha; Assefa, Yibeltal

    2017-02-01

    In Ethiopia, the publicly funded antiretroviral treatment (ART) program was started in 2005. Two hundred seventy-five thousand patients were enrolled in the national ART program by 2012. However, there is limited data on mortality and predictors of death among adult patients in the ART program. The study aimed to estimate mortality and risk factors for death among adult, ART-naïve patients, started in the national ART program from January 2009 to July 2013. Multi-site, prospective, observational cohort study of adult, age > 18 years, ART-naïve patients, started in the national ART program at seven university-affiliated hospitals from January 2009 - July 2013. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to estimate survival and determine risk factors for death. A total of 976 patients, 594 females (60.9 %), were enrolled into the study. Median age of the cohort was 33years. The median CD4 count at start of ART was 144 cells/µl (interquartile range (IQR) 78-205), and 34.2% (330/965) had CD4 ART. Cox regression analyses showed that the following measures independently predicted mortality: age >51 years, (Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR) 4.01, P=0.003), WHO stages III&IV, (AHR 1.76, p = 0.025), CD4 count, 5 log copies /ml (CHR 1.71, p = 0.037). There is high early on- ART mortality in patients presenting with advanced immunodeficiency. Detecting cases and initiating ART before onset of advanced immunodeficiency might improve survival.

  20. Features of cadets’ adaptation universities Ukrainian Interior Ministry to study the art of sambo

    V.V. Serebryak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to study the problem of adaptation of students to the study of throwing techniques Sambo in the educational process of professional orientation. Material : the study involved 53 first-year cadet. Also 8 teachers - experts. Results : the initial study of the features of self-defense techniques without weapons in the universities of the Interior Ministry of Ukraine. The factors that impede the development of technical action: lack of preparedness of students on basic psychophysical parameters, the desire to avoid pain when you fall; big breaks between classes. Developed a set of special exercises aimed at improving the mental and physical qualities of the future police officers. Complex promotes adaptation to the study of self-defense techniques without weapons. An efficiency of specific exercises to improve motor skills formation and neutralization of negative factors. Conclusions : recommend the use in the educational process special physical training specific exercises. Exercises gradually become more complex in structure as close as possible to the difficult coordination in unarmed combat.

  1. Health and mood among HIV-positive outpatients attending an ART Clinic of a University Hospital.

    Costa, Dilar; Mendes, Aida; Abreu, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate how individuals at different stages of infection with HIV perceive their health status and its association with mood states. With the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in 1996, the quality of life of people living with HIV has improved. However, the literature emphasises the negative effects of the disease on the mental health of individuals suffering from this condition and the high incidence of depression among infected individuals. Although people diagnosed and living with HIV are overwhelmed by emotions, we found that various emotional manifestations are understudied within this group of patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in an outpatient unit of a University Hospital (antiretroviral therapy clinic), with a consecutive sample composed of 152 patients. Data were collected through a questionnaire used to assess the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, the Short Form (36) Health Survey, and the Profile of Mood States scale. The health status negatively affects the role at the emotional and mental health dimensions. The participants showing a worse health condition than in the previous year had higher levels of tension/anxiety, depression/dejection, fatigue/inertia and confusion/bewilderment. The stage of disease and the profile of mood state emerged as independent phenomena. The results of this study indicate that nurses worldwide should be aware of the emotional aspects (negative emotions strongly impact health) related to the subjective perception of a worsening health status, regardless of the stage of the disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Objects of utility: cultural responses to industrial collections in municipal museums 1845-1914

    Robert Snape

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Between 1845 and 1914 several municipal museums in Great Britain established an industrial collection of objects relevant to local manufacture. The origins of these collections are found in the 1830s and the reform of design education. Industrial collections assigned an economic function to museums and were contested by critics who maintained that museums should be concerned primarily with fine rather than applied art. It is argued that curatorial decisions on the adoption of industrial collections can be evaluated with reference to contemporary debates on art, design education and the relative values of liberal and applied knowledge. Through case studies of the municipal museums of Birmingham and Preston, this paper assesses contrasting curatorial responses to industrial collections. Adopting Matthew Arnold’s categories of Hebraism and Hellenism as an exploratory framework, it concludes that industrial collections represented materialistic values associated with Hebraism that were directly opposed to the spiritual values associated with Hellenism.

  3. Emerging opportunities: the internet, marketing and museums

    Richani Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous impact of applying new technologies is obvious when it comes to museums. Internet forms an integral part of museums everyday life and decision making. Websites, online communities, social media, and mobile applications comprise elements of the modern museum’s digital self, which complements the real museum of permanent and temporary exhibitions, storage rooms, visitors’ facilities, laboratories and, most important, museum objects. This environment inevitably affects museum marketing strategies and creates relevant opportunities.

  4. Cultural minorities in Danish museums

    Kjørup, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Artikel om den forbløffende mangel på bevidsthed om minoriteter i danske museer, samt en diskussion af Dansk Jødisk Museum, specielt spillet mellem arkitekten Daniel Libeskinds koncept og museets egen meddelelse...

  5. Development of a Virtual Museum Including a 4d Presentation of Building History in Virtual Reality

    Kersten, T. P.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Deggim, S.

    2017-02-01

    In the last two decades the definition of the term "virtual museum" changed due to rapid technological developments. Using today's available 3D technologies a virtual museum is no longer just a presentation of collections on the Internet or a virtual tour of an exhibition using panoramic photography. On one hand, a virtual museum should enhance a museum visitor's experience by providing access to additional materials for review and knowledge deepening either before or after the real visit. On the other hand, a virtual museum should also be used as teaching material in the context of museum education. The laboratory for Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning of the HafenCity University Hamburg has developed a virtual museum (VM) of the museum "Alt-Segeberger Bürgerhaus", a historic town house. The VM offers two options for visitors wishing to explore the museum without travelling to the city of Bad Segeberg, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Option a, an interactive computer-based, tour for visitors to explore the exhibition and to collect information of interest or option b, to immerse into virtual reality in 3D with the HTC Vive Virtual Reality System.

  6. The National Cryptologic Museum Library

    2010-09-01

    telegrams. Modern communications and encryption methods have made them obsolete and mainly of historical interest. The library is also home to a...interpretations. Cross References The National Cryptologic Museum Library Eugene Becker Last year, a widely published German technical author, Klaus...Schmeh, e-mailed the library of the National Cryptologic Museum from his home in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. He needed information for an article on the

  7. " … but We Are Academics!" A Reflection on Using Arts-Based Research Activities with University Colleagues

    Burge, Amy; Godinho, Maria Grade; Knottenbelt, Miesbeth; Loads, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Arts-based practices, although familiar in some areas of educational research have the capacity to surprise and to shock: they hold promise but also pose risks. In this essay we introduce arts-based research practices and in particular cut-up and collage. We invite readers to reflect on our experiences of arts-based educational research activities…

  8. The Role of Contextualism in Architectural Design of Museums

    Muhammad Ali Tabarsa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The early generator tool designs of architects in the design process are architectural context and design data, and they define the main approach of the design; this approach has led to extensive expressions of design options and ultimately they are followed by more successful assessment of solutions and more complete design. The study implements descriptive and historical analysis (using the data of ancient city and define a new set for reviving the identity and analyzing the new process. There is no doubt that the museum as a cultural institution in community is vital because the culture of a society is a general concept and it includes all the spiritual values of that community. Thus, culture is the heritage of every people, which is taken from his or her predecessors, and it has been changed and shifted to the next generation. Whenever a decision is taken to build a museum the preliminary basic problem that must be dealt with is choosing the location, a place with various facilities and each one of them need to be examined carefully. Now we should decide whether it should be in the downtown or in the suburb. But with the gradual speed increase and ease of use of public and private vehicles to get from one place to another, it was realized that a location of a museum in a downtown is not a priority anymore. A museum should be accessible from all parts of the city by public transport, and possibly by walking, and as much as possible they should be in the vicinity of schools, colleges, universities and libraries. Today, museums are seen as cultural centers more than past. But it should be noted that not only students visit them, but people who have different socio-economic background visit them. Visiting of museums are more likely if the museum is close and accessible, and coming these kinds of people even for spending their free time is an education hobby.

  9. Liberal Arts and Sciences Education for the 21st Century Knowledge Economy : A Case Study of Amsterdam University College, The Netherlands

    van der Wende, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes how Amsterdam University College (AUC), a liberal arts and science honours college in The Netherlands, promotes internationalization and adopts a global approach in its curriculum and academic community. It shows how global learning outcomes and 21st century skills can be

  10. Liberal Arts and Sciences Education for the 21st Century Knowledge Economy: A Case Study of Amsterdam University College, The Netherlands

    Klein Bog, Deirdre; van der Wende, Marijk; Jung, Insung; Nishimura, Mikiko; Sasao, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes how Amsterdam University College (AUC), a liberal arts and science honours college in The Netherlands, promotes internationalization and adopts a global approach in its curriculum and academic community. It shows how global learning outcomes and 21st century skills can be

  11. Archaeological, art-historical, and artistic approaches to classical antiquity. Viccy Coltman (ed., Making Sense of Greek Art, University of Exeter Press, 2012

    Carol C. Mattusch

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Making sense of Greek Art is a Festschrift in memory of John Betts containing papers by ten of his students and colleagues. Their papers on Greek, Etruscan, Roman, and nineteenth-century topics reveal a wide range of methodologies. Two papers focus on subjects that might be covered in a course on Greek art and archaeology: one evaluates votive offerings in the sanctuary of Artemis Orthia at Sparta (Nicki Waugh; and the other compares archaeological and art-historical approaches to the study of Greek vases (Zosia Archibald. Three are concerned with Etruscan and Roman works: an Etruscan reinterpretation of a Greek myth (Vedia Izzet; Hellenistic and Roman versions of Aphrodite holding a mirror (Shelley Hales; and early Augustan uses of Archaistic art (Christopher H. Hallett. The other five papers illustrate the uses of classical artefacts during the nineteenth century: classical elements in Jacques-Louis David’s paintings (Ed Lilley; display of antiquities in the library of an English country house (Viccy Coltman; Tanagra figurines in paintings by Lawrence Alma-Tadema and Jean-Léon Gérôme (Genevieve Liveley; Alma-Tadema’s drawings for a theatrical production of Hypatia (Michael Liversidge; and plaster casts of the Elgin marbles exhibited in the Greek court of the Crystal Palace (Kate Nichols.

  12. Early East Asian art history in Vienna and its trajectories: Josef Strzygowski, Karl With, Alfred Salmony

    Julia Orell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1912 Josef Strzygowski founded the ‘Section for East Asian Art History’ at the University of Vienna, which attracted many students who would continue their careers in museums and at universities and thus established East Asian art history as an academic field. This paper examines these early art historical engagements with East Asian art: First, I discuss the role of East Asian art in Strzygowski’s agenda of broadening art history’s geographical scope beyond Europe and in his argument about the dominance of ‘Nordic’ artistic traditions in Europe and in Asia. Secondly, I introduce the work of two early students at the ‘Section for East Asian Art History’ in Vienna, Karl With and Alfred Salmony. Their respective approaches to East Asian art exemplify a range of methodological concerns of their time, from stylistic narratives, the concept of ars una, comparative frameworks, to ideas about cultural or national ‘purity’ in the arts, and an interest in cross-cultural adaption and transformation of motifs and symbolism.

  13. Contributions of a Science Museum for the Initial Training

    Azizi Manuel Tempesta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present some results obtained in a master’s research which aimed to evaluate what are the contributions that the acting as Physical monitor in a Science Museum has for the initial training and the beginning of the teaching career. Basing our analysis, we have adopted as theoretical assumptions the Teachers Knowledge and the Training Needs. We interviewed a group of ten teachers who played the function of Physics mediator in the Interdisciplinary Dynamic Museum (MUDI of the State University of Maringá, and submit to the Textual Analysis Discursive process. The results allowed us to realize that the contributions go beyond the expected, revealing the great potential of the Science museums of as an aid to initial training, contributing to the development of competencies and abilities that today is required of the teacher, and them providing experiences load which otherwise would not be reached.

  14. Treasure Transformers: Novel Interpretative Installations for the National Palace Museum

    Hsieh, Chun-Ko; Liu, I.-Ling; Lin, Quo-Ping; Chan, Li-Wen; Hsiao, Chuan-Heng; Hung, Yi-Ping

    Museums have missions to increase accessibility and share cultural assets to the public. The National Palace Museum intends to be a pioneer of utilizing novel interpretative installations to reach more diverse and potential audiences, and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) technology has been selected as the new interpretative approach. The pilot project in partnership with the National Taiwan University has successfully completed four interactive installations. To consider the different nature of collections, the four systems designed against different interpretation strategies are uPoster, i-m-Top, Magic Crystal Ball and Virtual Panel. To assess the feasibility of the project, the interactive installations were exhibited at the Taipei World Trade Center in 2008. The purpose of this paper is to present the development of the "Treasure Transformers" exhibition, design principles, and effectiveness of installations from the evaluation. It is our ambition that the contributions will propose innovative media approaches in museum settings.

  15. Hydrodynamic and morphological processes in Yangtze Estuary: State-of-the-art research and its applications by Hohai University

    Jin-hai Zheng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of the state-of-the-art research and its applications developed at Hohai University relating to the hydrodynamic and morphological processes in the Yangtze Estuary. Longitudinal, lateral, and horizontal flow circulations have been revealed based on the measurements with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP. The hydrodynamic mechanism at diversion points as well as the changing patterns of flow and sediment flux in the Yangtze Estuary has been investigated through long-term data analysis. A field survey has been carried out to detect the saltwater intrusion from the North Branch to South Branch. Different numerical models of flow motion, sediment transport, and saltwater intrusion have been developed to simulate the complicated processes and to evaluate the effects of engineering projects. The morphological processes of wetlands over a time scale of decades have been analyzed with an established database. Ideas for further research on the bio-geomorphological model system and long-term evolution mechanisms are put forward.

  16. Implementation of accessible tourism concept at museums in Jakarta

    Wiastuti, R. D.; Adiati, M. P.; Lestari, N. S.

    2018-03-01

    Accessibility, sustainability and equitable participation by all makeup what is known as Tourism for All. Tourism product must be designed for all people despite the age, gender and ability as one of the requirements to comply the accessible tourism concept. Museum as one of the elements of tourism chain must adhere to accessible tourism concept thus able to be enjoyed for everyone regardless of one’s abilities. The aim of this study is to identify the implementation of accessible tourism concept at the museum in Jakarta and to provide practical accessibility- improvement measures for the museum in Jakarta towards accessible tourism concept. This research is qualitative- explorative research. Jakarta Tourism Board website was used as the main reference to obtain which museum that was selected. Primary data collect from direct field observations and interview. The results outline museum implementation of accessible tourism that classified into five criteria; information, transport, common requirements, universal design, and accessibility. The implication of this study provides recommendations to enhance museums’ accessibility performance expected to be in line with accessible tourism concept.

  17. Museums as spaces and times for learning and social participation.

    César M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A museum is valued according to its collections, communication and knowledge exchange with visitors (Primo, 1999. Museums should be in dialogue with the public, contributing to their development (Skramstad, 2004 and collective memory (Wertsch, 2004. Social interactions and working in participants’ zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1934/1962 play an important role in non-formal learning opportunities that take place at museums. The National Museum of Natural History and Science (Lisbon University offers weekly holiday programmes for children and teenagers, aiming at developing scientific literacy in intercultural and inclusive spaces and times, facilitating knowledge appropriation and social participation. We studied these programmes, assuming an interpretive approach (Denzin, 2002 and developing an intrinsic case study (Stake, 1995. The main participants were these children and teenagers, their parents, and museum educational agents. Data collecting instruments included observation, interviews, questionnaires, children and teenagers’ protocols and tasks inspired in projective techniques. Data treatment and analysis was based on a narrative content analysis (Clandinin & Connelly, 1998 from which inductive categories emerged (Hamido & César, 2009. Some examples illuminate participants’ expectancies, their engagement in activities, and the contributions of social interactions and non-formal education to the development of scientific literacy.

  18. Musei, raccolte e collezioni in Puglia / Museums and collections in Puglia

    Francesca Imperiale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Il lavoro illustra un’indagine sui musei di Puglia, come conseguenza delle lacune normative e conoscitive esistenti sul tema e della recente estensione del fenomeno a livello locale. Ci si interroga in particolare se tutte le realtà promosse come istituti museali siano dei musei secondo gli standard prevalentemente conosciuti ed applicati. In tale direzione, il lavoro, articolato in quattro paragrafi, approfondisce dapprima il significato del concetto di museo, a livello normativo e dottrinale, contrapposto a quello di raccolta o collezione. Successivamente, dopo una breve descrizione sulle origini, normativa regionale e stato dell’arte dei musei di Puglia, espone il modello di analisi sviluppato per distinguere i “veri” musei dalle “semplici” raccolte o collezione. In conclusione riporta i risultati conseguiti dall’analisi di 85 musei pugliesi ed alcune osservazioni sullo scenario emerso e sul modello di analisi sviluppato.   This paper has, as starting point, a survey about museums of Puglia. The main question is if all these museum institutions are real museums or not. With this purpose, this research deepens two main aspects. The first one is to understand the meaning of the museum concept, focusing on normative and doctrinal levels, and the differences between a museum institution and a collection. Then, after a brief description about the museum origins, the regional normative, and the museums of Puglia state of the art, the paper presents the analysis model developed in order to distinguish between “real” museums and “mere” collections. The conclusion of this research shows the analysis results of 85 museums of Puglia and some observations based on the emerging context and the analysis model.

  19. Postmodern Exhibition Discourse: Anthropological Study of an Art Display Case.

    Marta Wieczorek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article studies tendencies in contemporary museum exhibitions and art display trends. While analysing current status quo of art in the museum context, it discusses the limitations of curatorial impact on the audience perception of the displayed objects. The paper presents a case study of a permanent museum exhibition with an added performance element. As argued in the article, such approach allows a stratified narrative and provokes a dialogue between the audience, performers, and curators, fully reflecting postmodern polyphonic tendency. The aim of the article is to comment on postmodern trends in museology, the status of the displayed art (object, and contemporary exhibition identity.

  20. Young people’s own museum views

    Drotner, Kirsten; Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Mortenesen, Christian Hviid

    2017-01-01

    Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning-making practi......Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning...

  1. [The collections of the museum and archives of the German Society of Urology. Reflections on objects in the museum].

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2012-09-01

    Objects in a museum that were used by urologists are part of the history of urology. If we know how to look at them they can be sources for a better understanding of the history of urology. In a museum visitors are confronted with objects during exhibitions which are the stage on which one possible interpretation of the history of urology is displayed. Objects have become"carriers of symbols" between the past and present (Pomian). Collections from medical societies which are not connected with a university or another public institution cannot be legitimized on the basis of the argument of conserving historical heritage only. The museum itself with its many tasks and as a classical site of scientific communication should be seen as a topic of scientific interest.

  2. Arts Entrepreneurship

    Gartner, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the opinion series “Perspectives” on arts entrepreneurship; how arts entrepreneurship is situated in relation to other disciplines or fields; what problems we are grappling with as scholars, practitioners, teachers, and artists; and what are the research questions we are attempting...... to answer individually or as a field. Under the headline “Perspectives on Arts Entrepreneurship, part 2”, are responses from: William B. Gartner, Professor of Entrepreneurship at Copenhagen Business School and California Lutheran University; Joseph Roberts, Director of the Coleman Fellows Program, Associate...

  3. Industrial Art: Mission to Meaning

    Wilhelm, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This is a story about industrial art. It is certainly not a story about smart studios and fashionable galleries, subtle techniques and aesthetic beauty. This is a story of sheet rock, nails, and low-grade lumber in the hands of unskilled teenage laborers. While this story boasts of no future museum pieces, it tells a heartwarming story of rare…

  4. Spilt Ink: Aesthetic Globalization and Contemporary Chinese Art

    Gaskell, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In response to globalization, is there to be a single, homogeneous set of aesthetic values governing the production and consumption of art? The article focuses on a newcomer to globalized contemporary art, China. It suggests that artworld art (encompassed by the artworld institutions of commerce, museums, and the academy) is far from the only art currently produced. Art beyond the artworld, whether commercial or religious, is important to many people worldwide. It describes four kinds of art ...

  5. The Art of Copying

    Christensen, Hans Dam

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses copies within the field of art museums by way of mapping strategies for copy practices. This mapping leans heavily towards parts of the writings of Jacques Derrida (1930–2004). Against the backdrop of this theoretical premise, the article distinguishes five main strategies....... An informational copy is just as unique as an original object of art, and at the same time, it defines the original and is itself defined by this opposition. Lastly, the strategy for the imagined relation between original and copy follows. This strategy is dependent upon several of the previous approaches, and...

  6. Private Florida Research University | Nova Southeastern University NSU

    some of the best you will ever have. Go Sharks! Admissions Discover exactly what you need and when to , faculty and staff members. NSU Art Museum Provides arts curriculum and the best in visual arts exhibits Core Values Learn more about NSU's plan for the future. NSU History Learn more about NSU's 50 year

  7. Presidential Libraries Museum Collection Management Database

    National Archives and Records Administration — MCMD serves as a descriptive catalog for the Presidential Libraries museum collections, and also supports a full range of museum collections management processes...

  8. Constructing an Evaluation Framework for Eco-Museum Operations-Management Performance, Based on the Case of Jhushan, Taiwan

    Kuo-Wei Hsu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The bamboo-art industry in Taiwan’s Jhushan Township is inseparable from local life. In the face of local industrial-development difficulties in smaller towns, the Taiwan government aimed to achieve a range of (redevelopment goals using eco-museums as collaboration platforms and required such museums to combine their operations management with cultural preservation, local industrial development, and local residents’ goals. As such, the likely future performance of such operations management has emerged as a crucially important factor in decision-making about whether such museums should be constructed. This study, therefore, reviews the relevant literature on the operations-management performance of museums, with special attention to eco-museums, and proposes an operations-management performance measurement framework for eco-museums based on that review and a two-stage questionnaire administered to experts. The first stage utilized the Fuzzy Delphi Method, which focuses on impact factors, and the second, the Analytica Network Process Method, deals with performance factors. The results indicate that the key impacts on the performance of eco-museums and their operations management were, in order of importance, (1 community symbiosis, (2 cultural inheritance, and (3 regional revitalization. The preservation of cultural heritage, local identity, and community participation are the most important criteria in the operations management of eco-museums, and Jhushan Town can promote such museums through these guidelines.

  9. 77 FR 54647 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Sicily: Art and Invention...

    2012-09-05

    ... exhibition ``Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome,'' imported from abroad for temporary... exhibit objects at The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, California from on or about April 3, 2013, until on or about August 19, 2013; and then at the Cleveland Museum of Art in Cleveland, Ohio from...

  10. MUSEUMS, MARKETING, TOURISM AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT. THE BRITISH MUSEUM – A SUCCESSFUL MODEL FOR ROMANIAN MUSEUMS

    Răzvan-Andrei CORBOS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of cultural influence upon the modern societycombined with the increasing role of tourism in the economic life of cities, ledto the development of the “emblem museums”. The “emblem museum”usually becomes a touristic attraction objective that must be visited bytourists from a city, and by taking the decision of prolonging their staying inthat city, the tourists will increase the amount of money they spend in thatlocation. The “emblem museums” represent a way to develop urban tourism,gain competitive advantage and attract new sources of income for the city`seconomy. A recent study showed that 3 out of 10 tourists visited London forits museums. One of them is the British Museum, which, in 2010 was on the2nd place in the top10 world`s most visited museums. This study aims topresent the British Museum from the mix marketing perspective, from thevisitor’s point of view, and to present some of the good practices this giant isusing to attract more visitors and to maintain its competitive advantage,practices which may be used by Romanian museums in order to increase thevisitors number and to obtain a better position in the economy life ofRomanian cities.

  11. Towards a more sonically inclusive museum practice: a new definition of the ‘sound object’

    John Kannenberg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As museums continue to search for new ways to attract visitors, recent trends within museum practice have focused on providing audiences with multisensory experiences. Books such as 2014’s The Multisensory Museum present preliminary strategies by which museums might help visitors engage with collections using senses beyond the visual. In this article, an overview of the multisensory roots of museum display and an exploration of the shifting definition of ‘object’ leads to a discussion of Pierre Schaeffer’s musical term objet sonore – the ‘sound object’, which has traditionally stood for recorded sounds on magnetic tape used as source material for electroacoustic musical composition. A problematic term within sound studies, this article proposes a revised definition of ‘sound object’, shifting it from experimental music into the realm of the author’s own experimental curatorial practice of establishing The Museum of Portable Sound, an institution dedicated to the collection and display of sounds as cultural objects. Utilising Brian Kane’s critique of Schaeffer, Christoph Cox and Casey O’Callaghan’s thoughts on sonic materialism, Dan Novak and Matt Sakakeeny’s anthropological approach to sound theory, and art historian Alexander Nagel’s thoughts on the origins of art forgery, this article presents a new working definition of the sound object as a museological (rather than a musical concept.

  12. Mobile Technology as a Virtual Assistant at the Museum of the Isidro Ayora Fiscal School

    Fausto Alberto Viscaino Naranjo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Isidro Ayora School located in the Latacunga Canton, between Quijano / Ordóñez and Tarqui streets, has a museum that is open to the citizens without any age difference, projecting during the tour in a traditional, monotonous and unconventional way all their art, By this factor the influx of public is very sporadic, which does not allow the development and recognition of the Museum. For the development of the research was applied the hypothetical-deductive method and the analytical, on the other hand was applied the methodology of application development for Smartphones Mobile-D; Through the collection of information that involves eld research, it was veri ed that the Museum does not have technological alternatives that allow the dissemination of the historical-cultural heritage, thus demonstrating that the creation of the virtual guide through mobile technology is the technological solution to improve The user’s experience in visiting and disseminating museums; So is the search for the use of new technologies helping to turn a forgotten environment into an interactive and friendly environment. With the implementation of Mobile Technology in the Museum of the Isidro Ayora School, visitors will be able to interact with the art articles displayed and visualize their information on any Android device through a multimedia library by simply scanning the QR code that each contains and In consequence it will allow the innovation, difusion and recognition of the Museum.

  13. Institutional comunication and cultural marketing: Peculiarities in museum communication within the framework of public relations

    Camelia BURGHELE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural management theoreticians believe that the main target of museum communication is gaining knowledge on specific messages by as large a number of people as possible. Museum public relation practice – intensified and upgraded at the same time with the revolution of the new communication technologies – is both science and art which analyse certain tendences (in attitude, taste and informal of anticipating their consequences for implementing certain museum offer programs to appeal to the public.As an institution with a decisive role in guarding cultural heritage and in outlining cultural identity – as it keeps the necessary instruments for this, the specialists and also the motivation through its own purposes – the museum in its dynamic, modern, enhanced shape must provide an attractive cultural product to the public, based on a anthropological approach to cultural fact.Modern museum-ology is built upon the concept that museum is a story and modern museums stimulate to a high degree participative learning, generated by a productive dialogue.

  14. Painting Shades of Gray: How to Communicate the History of Communism in Museums

    Alexandra Zbuchea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Communication of sciences / arts lies at the core of a museum public activity. It is a special type of communication, meant to make the collections and the domain of the expertise of the museum accessible to a wide public in order to fulfill the special cultural and social role that museums have in the contemporary society. This cannot be achieved without the cooperation of visitors, as well as the museum stakeholders. For fruitful relationships, museums have to design their activity and public offer taking into account the characteristics as well as the interests of various segments of its audience. The present paper discusses the prerequisites for a successful museum exhibition. Special attention is given to designing an effective exhibition on the history of communism. By investigating the profile of the potential visitors for such an exhibition, the paper draws a framework to be considered when designing it. The discussion is timely, since in the last few years there are discussions and initiatives related with the establishment of a museum of communism.

  15. The Study of Scientific Outputs Status of Faculty Members of Humanities, Art and Social Sciences Faculties of State Universities of Iran during 2000-2008

    Fatemeh Jafari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated scientific outputs status of faculty members of Humanities, Art and Social Sciences faculties of state universities of Iran that indexed in A&HCI and SSCI during 2000 to 2008. Descriptive and analytical method was used to conduct this research. Findings showed that Tehran University with 38/73% and then Shiraz University with 15.65% had the greatest value of scientific outputs, while in other universities the status of scientific outputs was not satisfying. Article with 76.42% was the most published format and then meeting abstract, book review, proceeding paper are next in rank . 65.65% of scientific outputs were collective and 34.34% individual. Scientific outputs development process in universities during the investigated period was ascending. Scientific outputs of Humanities, Art and Social Sciences faculties of state universities were published in167 titles and through these 135 titles (80.83% were indexed in Journal Citation Reports and among these the impact factor of 74 journals (54.81% range from 0 to 1 and the other 61 (45.18% journals’ impact factors value more than one.

  16. A Museum for Palle Nielsen

    Thorborg, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The present project attempts to articulate architecturally the psychic content in the danish graphic artist and draftsman Palle Nielsen's oeuvre. The museum inscribes itself within the city of Copenhagen as a part of it, but simultaneously establishes a taut vacuum between the city's buildings......, thereby setting these existing, surrounding monumental buildings in relief. The interior of the museum manifests itself as a dramatic, labyrinthine course of empty spaces, within which the visitor is deprived of contact with the city, and potentially loses his or her sense of place....

  17. Arts Impact: Lessons from ArtsBridge

    Shimshon-Santo, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    Arts Impact summarizes lessons learned at the ArtsBridge Program. It is informed by in-depth participant observation, logic modeling, and quantitative evaluation of program impact on K-12 students in inner city schools and arts students at the University of California Los Angeles over a two year period. The case study frames its analysis through a…

  18. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection on...

  19. Adult Education in Museums and Public Libraries.

    Miller, Harry G.

    Both museums and public libraries are available sources of education for adults. Besides their traditional functions of collecting and preserving items from human artistic or scientific history, museums have taken on a more active role in educating the public, particularly adults. Some educational services provided by museums are dioramas, period…

  20. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…