WorldWideScience

Sample records for universities language schools

  1. Language Schools of MGIMO-University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Gladkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1943, when the Department of International Relations at MSU was established to develop one year later into the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO, the first task of the faculty was to teach future diplomats of foreign languages, which they for the most part simply did not know. Of course, in the midst of World War II, the most important foreign language seemed to be German. But the question was in providing for language support for the system of world diplomacy of the Soviet state. And pretty soon it became clear that proficiency in two foreign languages was the main advantage of MGIMO graduates over graduates of all other national universities. The language study at MGIMO is of applied nature: while studying languages students at the same time receive other professions - a diplomat, an economist, a lawyer, a journalist. Studying a language of profession became an academic niche of MGIMO. That is why today MGIMO entered the Guinness Book of Records for the number of foreign languages studied: 53 in 2014.

  2. Research in the School of Languages and Linguistics at Griffith University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton-Smith, Ben; Walkinshaw, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Griffith University is set across five campuses in south-east Queensland, Australia, and has a student population of 43,000. The School of Languages and Linguistics (LAL) offers programs in linguistics, international English, Chinese, Italian, Japanese and Spanish, as well as English language enhancement courses. Research strands reflect the…

  3. Students' Attitudes and Motivation for Learning English at Dokuz Eylul University School of Foreign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Kadim

    2014-01-01

    Attitudes and motivation are two of the key factors in second language learning since positive attitudes and high levels of motivation are considered as the predictors of a successful learning process. This study aims to reveal the relation between university preparatory students' attitudes towards learning English and their language learning…

  4. Implementation of multiple intelligences theory in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakić-Mirić, Natasa

    2010-01-01

    Theory of multiple intelligences (MI) is considered an innovation in learning the English language because it helps students develop all eight intelligences that, on the other hand, represent ways people understand the world around them, solve problems and learn. They are: verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial, bodily/kinaesthetic, musical/rhythmic, interpersonal, intrapersonal and naturalist. Also, by focusing on the problem-solving activities, teachers, by implementing theory of multiple intelligences, encourage students not only to build their existing language knowledge but also learn new content and skills. The objective of this study has been to determine the importance of implementation of the theory of multiple intelligences in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School. Ways in which the theory of multiple intelligences has been implemented in the English language course syllabus particularly in one lecture for junior year students of pharmacy in the University of Nis Medical School. The English language final exam results from February 2009 when compared with the final exam results from June 2007 prior to the implementation of MI theory showed the following: out of 80 junior year students of pharmacy, 40 obtained grade 10 (outstanding), 16 obtained grade 9 (excellent), 11 obtained grade 8 (very good), 4 obtained grade 7 (good) and 9 obtained grade 6 (pass). No student failed. The implementation of the theory of multiple intelligences in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School has had a positive impact on learning the English language and has increased students' interest in language learning. Genarally speaking, this theory offers better understanding of students' intelligence and greater appreciation of their strengths. It provides numerous opportunities for students to use and develop all eight intelligences not just the few they excel in prior to enrolling in a

  5. School of German Language

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    Sergei V. Evteev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of German is one of the oldest language departments at MGIMO. Since its foundation in 1944 the military experienced teachers of the department, most of whom were native speakers, have begun to develop a unique method of teaching the German language, thereby revolutionize learning this foreign language. The first steps made under the supervision of the Department of Antonina V. Celica. The department refused to conventional time and is still used in universities such as the Moscow Linguistic University, separate teaching phonetics, grammar and vocabulary, which was due to the specific objectives set for the teaching staff: prepare for short term specialists in international relations, active Germanspeaking. The department can be proud of its graduates, many of whom continue his career in the walls of native high school. Many graduates have dedicated their lives to serving the State in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  6. MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES THEORY – A MILESTONE INNOVATION IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NIŠ MEDICAL SCHOOL

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    Nataša Bakić-Mirić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Theory of multiple intelligences is considered an innovation in both teaching and learning English language because it helps students develop all the eight intelligences that are grouped as verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial, bodily/kinesthetic, musical/rhythmic, interpersonal, intrapersonal and naturalist. The aforementioned intelligences are thought to represent ways in which individuals understand and perceive the world, solve problems and learn. Correspondingly, by focusing on the problem solving activities, teachers, by implementing theory of multiple intelligences encourage students not only to build-up their existing language knowledge but also learn new content and skills. The implementation of the theory of multiple intelligences in teaching the English language at the University of Niš Medical School has had a positive impact on learning English language and increased students' interest in language learning. Genarally speaking, this theory offers a better understanding of students’ intelligence and a greater appreciation of their strengths. It provides numerous opportunities for students to use and develop all the eight intelligences not just the few they excel in prior to enrolling a university or college.

  7. Text-Message Abbreviations and Language Skills in High School and University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonge, Sarah; Kemp, Nenagh

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the use of text-message abbreviations (textisms) in Australian adolescents and young adults, and relations between textism use and literacy abilities. Fifty-two high school students aged 13-15 years, and 53 undergraduates aged 18-24 years, all users of predictive texting, translated conventional English sentences into…

  8. Language variety, language hierarchy, and language choice in the international university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut; Mortensen, Janus

    2012-01-01

    Introduction to thematic issue on Language variety, language hierarchy, and language choice in the international university......Introduction to thematic issue on Language variety, language hierarchy, and language choice in the international university...

  9. Guest Comment: Universal Language Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne

    1979-01-01

    Explains that reading English among Scientists is almost universal, however, there are enormous problems with spoken English. Advocates the use of Esperanto as a viable alternative, and as a language requirement for graduate work. (GA)

  10. Teachers' attitudes and understandings about process writing in the School of Foreign Languages at Muğla University

    OpenAIRE

    Gümüş, Özlem

    2002-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, the Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent University, 2002. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2002. Includes bibliographical references leaves 96-99. In the last 25 years, process writing has grown to dominate the traditional approaches in writing instruction. Many studies have looked at process writing in terms of implementation or the composing processes of students using process writ...

  11. Language Alternation in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the alternate use of Arabic and English in the context of a university classroom, where a policy to use the former language in place of the latter was being implemented. Analysis of a sample of recorded university lectures of English and Arabic medium classes in sciences and humanities reveals that teachers use code switching,…

  12. Interaction university and school

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    Gionara Tauchen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the interaction between universities and middle schools is fundamental for organization and the qualification of the education system, we conducted a qualitative study on twenty public municipal schools of Rio Grande, RS, designed to investigate and understand the effectiveness of university activities (teaching, research and extension in regard to the promotion and strengthening of the interactions between these institutions. We highlight the activities related to Pibid, the Education Observatory, extension, supervised internships, and to undergraduate and postgraduate research. From comprehensions about these activities, we discuss the interaction between school and university.

  13. Schools and Languages in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Brian

    1968-01-01

    A brief review of Indian education focuses on special problems caused by overcrowded schools, insufficient funding, and the status of education itself in the Indian social structure. Language instruction in India, a complex issue due largely to the numerous official languages currently spoken, is commented on with special reference to the problem…

  14. El Espanol como Idioma Universal (Spanish as a Universal Language)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijares, Jose

    1977-01-01

    A proposal to transform Spanish into a universal language because it possesses the prerequisites: it is a living language, spoken in several countries; it is a natural language; and it uses the ordinary alphabet. Details on simplification and standardization are given. (Text is in Spanish.) (AMH)

  15. Language-universal constraints on speech segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, D.; McQueen, J.M.; Cutler, A.; Butterfield, S.; Kearns, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    Two word-spotting experiments are reported that examine whether the Possible-Word Constraint (PWC; Norris, McQueen, Cutler & Butterfield, 1997) is a language-specific or language-universal strategy for the segmentation of continuous speech. The PWC disfavors parses which leave an impossible residue

  16. Where "Sign Language Studies" Has Led Us in Forty Years: Opening High School and University Education for Deaf People in Viet Nam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching, and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, James; Hoa, Nguyen Thi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses how the Nippon Foundation-funded project "Opening University Education to Deaf People in Viet Nam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching, and Interpretation," also known as the Dong Nai Deaf Education Project, has been implemented through sign language studies from 2000 through 2012. This project has provided deaf…

  17. Languages+ Internationalisation and the multilingual university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    . With different language backgrounds come different ethnic, cultural and educational backgrounds that have wide implications for what happens in the learning space or classroom. Based on the outcomes of the IntlUni Erasmus Academic Network (Lauridsen & Lillemose 2015) and other sources, this keynote will address......Languages+ Internationalisation and the multilingual university The growth in English Medium Instruction (EMI) outside the English speaking countries (Wächter & Maiworm 2014) as well as the increase in non-L1 speakers in English-dominant settings is one of the very conspicuous outcomes of higher...... education internationalisation efforts today. Lecturers and students teach and learn through a language other than their own first language, which has led university leaders and other key actors to believe that issues arising from this situation are a question of language capabilities only. It is not...

  18. Language Games: University Responses to Ranking Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Troy A.; Heffernan, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    League tables of universities that measure performance in various ways are now commonplace, with numerous bodies providing their own rankings of how institutions throughout the world are seen to be performing on a range of metrics. This paper uses Lyotard's notion of language games to theorise that universities are regaining some power over being…

  19. Developing a universal reading comprehension intervention for mainstream primary schools within areas of social deprivation for children with and without language-learning impairment: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elspeth; Boyle, James; Ellis, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Some children in areas of social deprivation in Scotland have lower reading attainment than neighbouring children in less deprived areas, and some of these also have lower spoken language comprehension skills than expected by assessment norms. There is a need to develop effective reading comprehension interventions that fit easily into the school curriculum and can benefit all pupils. A feasibility study of reading comprehension strategies with existing evidence of efficacy was undertaken in three mainstream primary schools within an area of social deprivation in west central Scotland, to decide whether further investigation of this intervention was warranted. Aims were to measure comprehension of spoken language and reading via standardised assessments towards the beginning of the school year (T1) in mainstream primary school classrooms within an area of social deprivation; to have teachers introduce previously-validated text comprehension strategies, and to measure change in reading comprehension outcome measures towards the end of the year (T2). A pre- and post-intervention cohort design was used. Reading comprehension strategies were introduced to staff in participating schools and used throughout the school year as part of on-going reading instruction. Spoken language comprehension was measured by TROG-2 at T1, and reading progress by score changes from T1 to T2 on the WIAT-II(UK) -T reading comprehension scale. Forty-seven pupils in five classes in three primary schools took part: 38% had TROG-2 scores below the 10(th) centile. As a group, children made good reading comprehension progress, with a medium effect size of 0.46. Children with TROG-2 scores below the 10(th) centile had lower mean reading scores than others at T1 and T2, although with considerable overlap. However, TROG-2 did not make a unique contribution to reading progress: children below the 10(th) centile made as much progress as other children. The intervention was welcomed by schools, and the

  20. [Union-Endicott Schools: Foreign Language Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Raymond S.

    This brochure describing language programs to both parents and prospective high school language students in Endicott, New York focuses on developing student motivation and interest. Topics discussed include: (1) reasons for studying foreign language, (2) stages of foreign language learning, (3) course offerings, (4) homework, and (5) examinations.…

  1. Water Recycling in Schools & Universities

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    Meeten, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Consider the waste streams generated in schools and universities. So what is in the typical used water generated in schools and universities? It is typically about 99 percent water, with the remaining 1 percent mainly made up of organic compounds. Used water contains nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. When one judges it on its quality, it…

  2. LANGUAGE SCHOOLS AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDYING PROGRAMS IN PORTUGAL

    OpenAIRE

    Hritchenko, Iryna

    2017-01-01

    The article is devoted to the description and characterizing of language schools and foreign language studying programs in Portugal. The relevance of language learning for professional, mobility, self-developing means is shown. The main courses and programs are observed and the advantages and disadvantages of each of them are given. It is stated that Portuguese courses mostly follow the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. A small synopsis of the abilities for each level is p...

  3. Human language reveals a universal positivity bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Clark, Eric M; Desu, Suma; Frank, Morgan R; Reagan, Andrew J; Williams, Jake Ryland; Mitchell, Lewis; Harris, Kameron Decker; Kloumann, Isabel M; Bagrow, James P; Megerdoomian, Karine; McMahon, Matthew T; Tivnan, Brian F; Danforth, Christopher M

    2015-02-24

    Using human evaluation of 100,000 words spread across 24 corpora in 10 languages diverse in origin and culture, we present evidence of a deep imprint of human sociality in language, observing that (i) the words of natural human language possess a universal positivity bias, (ii) the estimated emotional content of words is consistent between languages under translation, and (iii) this positivity bias is strongly independent of frequency of word use. Alongside these general regularities, we describe interlanguage variations in the emotional spectrum of languages that allow us to rank corpora. We also show how our word evaluations can be used to construct physical-like instruments for both real-time and offline measurement of the emotional content of large-scale texts.

  4. Predictors of Language Gains among School-Age Children with Language Impairment in the Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M.; Jiang, Hui; Logan, Jessica A.; Schmitt, Mary Beth

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to identify child-level characteristics that predict gains in language skills for children with language impairment who were receiving therapy within the public schools. The therapy provided represented business-as-usual speech/language treatment provided by speech-language pathologists in the public schools. Method: The…

  5. Language Ideology or Language Practice? An Analysis of Language Policy Documents at Swedish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Beyza

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an analysis and interpretation of language policy documents from eight Swedish universities with regard to intertextuality, authorship and content analysis of the notions of language practices and English as a lingua franca (ELF). The analysis is then linked to Spolsky's framework of language policy, namely language…

  6. Foreign language education: Principles of teaching English to adults at commercial language schools and centers

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    Oleg Tarnopolsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing spread of English as the language of global communication leads to ever-increasing demand for learning it among adult populations of non-English-speaking countries. If such people did not have a chance of acquiring English during their school or university years but urgently need it for professional or personal purposes, they have no other choice but to go and learn it at courses offered by numerous commercial language schools and centers. In post-Communist countries, such as Ukraine, commercial language schools and centers are responsible for English language training of the majority of adults learning that language after their secondary or tertiary school studies. They also serve the needs of many high and higher schools’ students who, due to various reasons, are not satisfied with learning English at their educational institutions. However, despite the importance and spread of this specific type of language education, its pedagogical and methodological foundations have hardly been developed at all. The present article is an attempt of partly filling this gap in pedagogy and methodology of English language education in non-English-speaking countries. The paper develops some theoretical underpinnings of that kind of education in the form of six principles underlying the organization of commercial English language courses, formulating their goals, selecting the learning contents, and choosing the methods of teaching and learning. The practical consequences of adopting the six suggested principles are outlined.

  7. The language of the protein universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaiewicz, Andrea; Levitt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Proteins, the main cell machinery which play a major role in nearly every cellular process, have always been a central focus in biology. We live in the post-genomic era, and inferring information from massive data sets is a steadily growing universal challenge. The increasing availability of fully sequenced genomes can be regarded as the 'Rosetta Stone' of the protein universe, allowing the understanding of genomes and their evolution, just as the original Rosetta Stone allowed Champollion to decipher the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics. In this review, we consider aspects of the protein domain architectures repertoire that are closely related to those of human languages and aim to provide some insights about the language of proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Foreign Language Education: Principles of Teaching English to Adults at Commercial Language Schools and Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    The ever-increasing spread of English as the language of global communication leads to ever-increasing demand for learning it among adult populations of non-English-speaking countries. If such people did not have a chance of acquiring English during their school or university years but urgently need it for professional or personal purposes, they…

  9. "Speaking English Naturally": The Language Ideologies of English as an Official Language at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinsook

    2016-01-01

    This study explores language ideologies of English at a Korean university where English has been adopted as an official language. This study draws on ethnographic data in order to understand how speakers respond to and experience the institutional language policy. The findings show that language ideologies in this university represent the…

  10. Research on Foreign Language Teaching in North America : The University of Toronto and Michigan State University

    OpenAIRE

    Lauer, Joe; Yamada, Jun

    1998-01-01

    Both the Modern Language Centre at the University of Toronto's Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE/UT), and the English Language Center at Michigan State University, are acknowledged as being among the best centers for applied linguistics research and education in the world. The Modern Language Centre has published important findings in the areas of second language acquisition, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and language curricula. Meanwhile, the English Language Center has ...

  11. Language Universalization for Improved Information Management: The Necessity for Esperanto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. Kent

    1978-01-01

    Discusses problems for information management in dealing with multilingual documentation. The planned language, Esperanto, is suggested as a universal working language because of its neutrality, rational structure, clarity, and expressive power. (Author/CWM)

  12. A Model for Community-based Language Teaching to Young Learners: The Impact of University Outreach

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    Martha Nyikos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A primary challenge given to university foreign language departments and Title VI National Resource Centers is to increase interest and participation in foreign language learning, with particular emphasis on less commonly taught languages (LCTLs. Given that many LCTLs in high demand by the US government, including Arabic, Chinese, Persian and Turkish, rarely find their way into the school curricula, this article offers a successful ongoing community-based model of how one university-town partnership addresses advocacy with programming for pre-K-grade 9. Non-native and heritage undergraduate language students who volunteered as community language teachers found the experience invaluable to their pedagogical development. Teacher education programs or language departments can employ this approach to community-based teaching, by providing free, sustained language teaching in existing community centers. This article offers guidance for how to start and expand such a program.

  13. Repositioning Ghana Schools as English Language Learner Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Although English has traditionally been the only language of instruction in Ghana, most young children do not speak English at home. This paper argues that students' academic performance might be improved if their native languages were also used in school. Such an approach offers benefits in areas such as classroom participation, engagement in…

  14. Predictors of Language Gains Among School-Age Children With Language Impairment in the Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M; Jiang, Hui; Logan, Jessica A; Schmitt, Mary Beth

    2017-06-10

    This study aimed to identify child-level characteristics that predict gains in language skills for children with language impairment who were receiving therapy within the public schools. The therapy provided represented business-as-usual speech/language treatment provided by speech-language pathologists in the public schools. The sample included 272 kindergartners and first-graders with language impairment who participated in a larger study titled "Speech-Therapy Experiences in the Public Schools." Multilevel regression analyses were applied to examine the extent to which select child-level characteristics, including age, nonverbal cognition, memory, phonological awareness, vocabulary, behavior problems, and self-regulation, predicted children's language gains over an academic year. Pratt indices were computed to establish the relative importance of the predictors of interest. Phonological awareness and vocabulary skill related to greater gains in language skills, and together they accounted for nearly 70% of the explained variance, or 10% of total variance at child level. Externalizing behavior, nonverbal cognition, and age were also potentially important predictors of language gains. This study significantly advances our understanding of the characteristics of children that may contribute to their language gains while receiving therapy in the public schools. Researchers can explore how these characteristics may serve to moderate treatment outcomes, whereas clinicians can assess how these characteristics may factor into understanding treatment responses.

  15. WAYS OF DEVELOPING PEDAGOGICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ ENGLISH LANGUAGE COMPETENCE

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    Lyudmyla Gavrilova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of future specialists into advanced studying of English as the main language of international communication is a relevant problem of modern higher education in Ukraine. This issue relevance is proved by the country's integration into the European educational environment, changes in strategic directions of higher education development in Ukraine, regulations by Ukrainian Government and the Ministry of Education, in particular, the Decree of the President of Ukraine “On Declaring 2016 the Year of English Language in Ukraine”, “Common European Framework on Language Education”. Essential changes which are now taking place in studying foreign languages, especially English, are also associated with the competency paradigm of education that focuses on achieving certain educational results and orienting scientific research of professional pedagogical education in recent years. An important condition for reformatting process of learning a foreign (English language is monitoring future specialists’ academic achievements in this field, particularly future teachers’ ones. The concept “pedagogical monitoring” is interpreted as a system of measures for collecting and analyzing data to study and evaluate the quality of professional training and to make decisions on further improvement of the educational process. The purpose of the article is to highlight and analyze the results of monitoring the level of English of State higher educational establishment “Donbas State Pedagogical University” students and reveal the ways of improving future teachers` English communicative competence. The monitoring stages are assessing the starting level of foreign (English language of students who are not trained in the field of language-related professions using the tests for A2 level standards of Cambridge Educational Syndicate; reformatting the content of learning English at the university: developing and implementing the course

  16. FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAMS OFFERED IN TURKISH UNIVERSITIES

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    Bengül CETINTAS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available n this study, the departments of philology and teaching, which take place in higher education programs in Turkey and give education in foreign language, have been examined. 23 different languages are offered to philology students who wants to attend to faculty of literature. Students can prefer classical languages besides modern languages. However, English, German, French, Arabic and Japanese are offered to the students of teaching department. To teach another foreign language, pedagogical formation is also required.This study focuses on the departments of German Language Teaching and German Language and Literature. From this point, the place and the importance of other philology and foreign language teaching departments in Turkish higher education have been examined.

  17. Language Barrier And The Performance of Secondary School Students in EnglishLanguage in Katsina Metropolis

    OpenAIRE

    Nwabudike Christopher Eziafa; Ojoko E. A.; George Anaso Nwaorah

    2014-01-01

    This research work centres on Language Barrier and the Performance of Secondary School Students in English Language in Katsina Metropolis. The study identifies the causes of failure in English Language in secondary schools, the factors responsible for the inability of students to learn English language as a second language and the effect of mother tongue interference on the performance of students in English language in the study area. Data for this study  were collected through the use of st...

  18. Navigating the Challenges Arising from University-School Collaborative Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rui; Mak, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence showing the benefits language teachers can reap from university-school collaborative action research (CAR), scant attention has been given to how university researchers collaborate with language teachers, what challenges they might encounter, and how they navigate such challenges in CAR. To fill the gap, this study…

  19. FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING IN SUDANESE UNIVERSITIES: GOALS, ATTITUDES, AND REALITY

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    Abdel Rahim Hamid Mugaddam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The goals and means of language study continue in the very center of debates among specialists in language teaching/learning. Different views relating to language and its functions are reflected in two main approaches to language teaching/learning. On the one hand, language is considered to be principally instrumental, a means of communicating thought and information. One the other hand, language is viewed as an important element of human being’s thought processes, perceptions, and self-expressions; and as such, it is placed at the core of translingual and transcultural competence. This paper investigates the current situation of teaching/learning foreign languages in the Sudanese universities with special focus on the goals of teaching these languages and their role in students’ future. Goals of language teaching and students’ attitudes towards the process will be related to the job opportunities available for the students on graduation. Data for the paper have been collected using questionnaires and interviews administered to students and teachers from five language departments at Khartoum University: English, French, German, Russian, and Chinese. Questionnaires and interviews on language attitude will be administered among Four-year language majors representing the four departments. The central question the paper tries to answer is whether there is a realistic match between the goals of language teaching/learning set by policy makers and students’ interests and expectations. Results are expected to contribute to the efforts made to restructure language-in-education curriculum at university level in a way that addresses the expectations of both policy makers and students. Keywords: Foreign language teaching and learning, goals, attitude.

  20. Which Second Language Learning Theories Underlie Language Courses Offered by Slovene Private Language Schools

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    Marša Meznarič

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with language courses offered by private language schools in Slovenia. It examines who the people in charge of the language schools are, what criteria new teachers have to meet to become an employee of a school, whether the methodology applied (if any has been carefully chosen, what the teaching techniques are and who chooses them. Second language method discoveries have been subjected to perennial criticism and scepticism over the last half of century. Teachers around the globe have been confused by the constant shifts in the popularity of different methods. The article examines the con sequences of the abovementioned circumstances. The 15 interviews conducted with private language schools’ managers have generated valuable information on the level of professionalism in this area of business. The results have shown that most of the randomly chosen schools are managed by language professionals or by economists who employ a linguist for controlling the teaching and learning processes and that the majority of schools does adopt a particular approach or method of teaching. Teacher trainees receive a lot of support and guidance prior to teaching in a school. In most cases, teachers are free to choose techniques of teaching according to their preferences, providing the techniques are not in conflict with the general schools’ principles. The criteria for employment vary considerably. Nearly all managers would employ a professional language teacher with experience only, but others demand that the teacher be a native speaker regardless of his/her education. Several stress the importance of personal characteristics and would consider employing only lighthearted and energetic teachers. Teachers’ work and students’ progress are often evaluated.

  1. Realities of and perspectives for languages in the globalised world: Can language teaching survive the inadequacies of policies implemented today at Leeds Beckett University?

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    Saadia Gamir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various newspaper articles report that British ministers, university representatives, exam chiefs and business bodies agree that foreign languages skills in primary, secondary and tertiary UK education are in crisis. Lower funding and policy changes have caused language skills deficiencies felt gravely in the business sectors. Funding and support initiatives pledged by policy makers appear to be election-driven, barely outliving newly elected governments. Others blame secondary school language curriculum for failing to inspire students to take up a language when they reach 13 or 14. Others still argue that severe A-level examinations marking deters students from taking up a foreign language at 6th form level, producing fewer prospective language learners for university departments. Community languages are also undervalued as small-entry languages could soon be axed from GCSE and A-level examinations. In a world increasingly interconnected, it is essential the importance of language learning be reinstated in all our educational institutions. This paper reviews two decades of the conditions of language provision in the UK in general, with an emphasis on Leeds Beckett University. It also attempts to answer two questions emerging form the author’s personal teaching experience and reflections: What are the realities and challenges language teaching faces at Leeds Beckett University? And, how may we support language learners in fulfilling their ambition to acquire the required skills to communicate effectively in this globalised world?

  2. Innovations in the higher school language education

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    Наталія Вікторівна Гагіна

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with innovations in the higher school language education. Authors note that innovations result in intensification of the educational process, guarantee its flexibility, diversify the program of studying languages in HEI, favor the growth of motivation, the involvement of students in the research activity, the development of creativity, elaboration of intellectual products, the creation of the favorable atmosphere for the students’ independent work.In the offered article was studied the essence of the notion “innovation” and the importance of innovative technologies in education and also grounded the expedience of using informational graphics (infographics as the one of the most effective innovative methods of studying languages in HEI, analyzed the main tasks, advantages of the use and principles of creation of infopraphics, determined the levels of complication of informational graphics elaboration, cited the examples of on-line services that allow create the static and dynamic infographics

  3. Language and the politics of institutional identity: can the University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the recent decline of bilingualism at three formerly statutorily designated bilingual South African universities, one has to ask: Will an institution such as the University of Pretoria really be able to remain a bilingual university in a meaningful way? What forces are operative in tertiary language policy development in ...

  4. STORYLINE APPROACH AS ENHANCEMENT OF LEARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND CHARACTER BUILDING AT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frimadhona Syafri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Using stories in teaching foreign language, it forces the teacher to be crative and innovative to encourage the young learners to enjoy reading stories. The teacher has to be smart to select which one approaches or methods which can enhance learning foreign language and character building in the teaching foreign language process.The storyline approach was specifically designed for the use at primary schools. The storyline method (Storyline for teaching children at primary schools was mainly developed in 1967 by a team of teachers from Jordanhill College of Education (now known as University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland. The primary schools in Scotland use a curriculum that involves integration of new topics, such as environmental studies and expressive arts, in their teaching foreign language process. This method could be one of alternative method that be applied in teaching foreign language to Elementary School or English Courses for Children in Indonesia.

  5. Language Policy and Planning: Challenges for Latin American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Rainer Enrique; Álvarez López, Elisa; Carvalhal, Tatiana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    This article starts with an overview of the sociolinguistic situation in Latin America as a context for language policy and planning (LPP) decisions in the academic field. Then it gives a brief overview of the language policy challenges faced by universities to cope with neoliberal internationalisation. A conceptualisation of the domain as a…

  6. Exploiting the Theory of Universals in Adult Second Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, Thiru

    1994-01-01

    This article presents a bilingual teaching strategy based on Noam Chomsky's universalist hypothesis, which emphasizes the "universal" aspects of human language. The strategy focuses on the matching process that all learners carry out between the first (L1) and second (L2) language, as well as the differences between L1 and L2. (58…

  7. Language in the Workplace Project and Workplace Communication for Skilled Migrants Course at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bres, Julia; Holmes, Janet; Joe, Angela; Marra, Meredith; Newton, Jonathan; Riddiford Nicky; Vine, Bernadette

    2009-01-01

    The School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies (LALS) at Victoria University of Wellington conducts research and teaching in Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Writing and Deaf Studies. It incorporates a Deaf Studies Research Unit, which undertakes research on topics relating to deaf people and their language in New Zealand, and the New…

  8. Refining English Language Tests for University Admission: A Malaysian Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Abd Samad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available English has now become the lingua franca of much of technological, business and academic endeavours. Consequently, learning the English language is now seen as vital, especially at the university level where proficiency in the language has become a selection criterion. At present, the Malaysian University English Test (MUET has been adopted by Malaysian public universities as an indicator of English language proficiency. A student’s overall result depends on all the four language components of the MUET and often determines the number and nature of the English language courses he or she has to attend at university. This study seeks to examine whether MUET is an accurate predictor of performance and success at university and how the MUET can be finetuned as an entry level English language test. It was carried out among 52 third year undergraduates of the Faculty of Educational Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia, admitted into the Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL programme. The findings of the study do not offer conclusive evidence about the validity of MUET as a predictor of academic success. However, six models of various combinations of scores on language components on the MUET scores are examined in terms of their effectiveness in increasing the accuracy in selecting students for the TESL programme. The correlations obtained using these models indicate that the combination of various components of the MUET can be used to more accurately predict student achievement at tertiary level than the cumulative MUET score itself. The results of these correlations and their implications in using language tests as admission requirements in general are also discussed

  9. Teaching English Language Skills for School Teachers: CTE Programme of IGNOU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Khare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available India is a multilingual country. English is the second most important language in the country after the national language Hindi since it is taught as a compulsory subject in all the Indian schools. In the educational system of a multilingual country, it becomes imperative to improve the English Language teaching skills of the school teachers who come from various linguistic backgrounds. The school teacher plays a vital role in the development of linguistic skills of the students. What children learn can affect their later success or failure in school, work, and their personal lives. As such, the school teachers need to improve their own English language skills if they are teaching without any previous English language training. This paper throws light on the communicative approach of English language teaching. It introduces the Certificate in Teaching of English (CTE programme of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU and outlines the syllabus and the methods used by the university to impart English Language Teaching skills to the elementary/secondary school teachers through this programme with the objective to enhance teacher’s understanding of  the learners and their learning process.

  10. Language as capital in international university education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Margrethe; Shaw, Philip

    be a trade-off between the fluency in a second language provided by its use as sole or parallel medium in education and educational depth in the discipline studied. This fluency may in some circumstances constitute greater capital than the disciplinary insights partially sacrificed. But this varies......As Bourdieu and Passeron noted, academic discourse is never anyone’s ‘mother tongue’. Acquisition of this discourse in one’s first language is a prime aim of undergraduate education, but there is evidence that a substantial minority of students fail to acquire it. There is strong evidence...

  11. Family Language Policy and School Language Choice: Pathways to Bilingualism and Multilingualism in a Canadian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavkov, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a survey with 170 school-age children growing up with two or more languages in the Canadian province of Ontario where English is the majority language, French is a minority language, and numerous other minority languages may be spoken by immigrant or Indigenous residents. Within this context the study focuses on minority…

  12. The Language Environments of Exchange Students at some Scandinavian Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caudery, Tim; Petersen, Margrethe; Shaw, Philip

    Language Environments of Exchange Students at Scandinavian Universities One aspect of, and one reason for, the internationalisation of Scandinavian universities is the increasing number of exchange students and postgraduates from outside Scandinavia attending courses here. Few of these students...... are primarily motivated by a desire to learn the local language. In fact it is widely believed that many of them live in a lingua-franca English-speaking environment, so that Erasmus contributes to linguistic homogenisation rather than plurilingualism. This paper reports results of an ongoing study...... of the language environment and language learning experiences of some hundred (so far) Erasmus exchange students in two institutions in Sweden and two in Denmark. Subjects had French, German and Spanish as mother tongues. This design is intended to enable the identification of language/culturespecific factors...

  13. Stability of Language and Literacy Profiles of Children with Language Impairment in the Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambyraja, Sherine R.; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Farquharson, Kelly; Justice, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study focused on the identification and stability of language and literacy profiles of primary school children receiving school-based language therapy over the course of one academic year. Method: Participants included 272 early elementary school-age children (144 boys, 128 girls) who had been clinically identified as having a…

  14. Multimedia Instruction & Language Learning Attitudes: A Study with University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Izquierdo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of two types of Multimedia Instruction (MI and learners’ second language (L2 proficiency on language learning attitudes. During four weeks, university learners of French received MI on the distinctive use of the perfective and the imperfective past in one of the four following conditions: learners with low L2 proficiency level exposed to MI with (n=17 or without language awareness tasks (n=17, and learners with intermediate L2 proficiency level exposed to MI with (n=14 or without language awareness tasks (n=28. Before and after the experiment, participants completed the Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (AMTB. Non-parametric analyses revealed a positive enhancement of classroom-related attitudes only among intermediate learners exposed to MI without Language Awareness Tasks. Nevertheless, the results showed similar as well as stable attitudes towards language learning in all the experimental conditions.

  15. Self-Access Language Learning for Malaysian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew Yau Hau

    2012-01-01

    Just a few Malaysian universities offer self-access language learning activities to students. The objective of this study is to investigate if self-access learning can promote self-directed or autonomous learning in a public Malaysian technical university. Data collection is by means of interviewing the Director, lecturers, and students in a…

  16. Language Learning Motivation among Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftah, Muneera; Rafik-Galea, Shameem

    2013-01-01

    The study describes and examines Malaysian pre-university students' integrative and instrumental motivation toward learning English language. In this study, 182 non-English major students in one of the Malaysian public universities are selected to fill out a questionnaire reflecting their attitudes and motivation towards learning English. The…

  17. Syracuse University English Language Institute: Business Communication for Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Berly, Geraldine; McGraw, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The Syracuse University English Language Institute (ELI), housed within University College, has been offering noncredit executive English courses on a contract basis for the past 12 years. Despite its small size and limited resources, the ELI, whose main mission is to prepare international students for academic study, also manages a successful…

  18. Assessing the current implementation of communicative language for English language teachers in Ethiopian Universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anto, A.G.; Coenders, Ferdinand G.M.; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    This study has attempted to assess the current implementation of communicative language teaching (CLT) approach in two Ethiopian universities to identify professional development (PD) needs of English language teachers. A cross-sectional study using teachers, students and management as sources of

  19. MODERN MEANS OF TEACHING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Iaburova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the problems of teaching tools and resources used in the process of teaching foreign languages in primary school. The author gives the definition of the meanings “teaching resources”, “additional materials for teaching foreign languages», and their classification. The author pays attention to the fact that in the academic and upbringing process primary school teachers use different teaching resources in addition to the text-books as the basic means of teaching. That is why there is an evident reason for deep study of these kind materials, their classification. According to the way of presenting, teaching flash-cards and hand-outs as additional materials are pointed out. That is why the necessity of optimal and effective choice of these means of teaching depends on professional preparation of a teacher and teaching tools implementing in the academic process alongside with the text-books as the basic means of teaching foreign languages. The author notes that all these learning tools are not universal. They cannot completely replace a teacher or other learning tools. The author supports the idea of the need for optimum, deeply conscious and scientific approach to using additional educational resources in academic and upbringing process along with the textbook as the primary means of learning.

  20. Transfer and access to universal grammar in adult second language acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauter, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Summary This dissertation focuses on the roles of first language transfer and Universal Grammar in adult second (or foreign) language acquisition. It contributes to the ongoing debate whether second language acquisition is constrained by Universal Grammar. According to generative linguists,

  1. English Teaching and Learning in Brazilian Regular Schools and Language Schools: A Study on Teachers' Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragozo, Carina Silva; Monawar, Mônica Deitos Stedile

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to diagnose, through a qualitative comparative study, the main differences concerning the teaching of English in Brazilian regular schools when compared to language schools. There has been a growing tendency of students to attend language schools while still having English classes at their regular schools, and this has led to a lot…

  2. Can Peru's Rural Schools Be Agents for Quechua Language Maintenance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    1989-01-01

    Draws on sociolinguistic literature and on an ethnographic study of language use and bilingual education in Quechua-speaking rural communities of Puno. Consider the roles of both language planning and the schools in achieving language maintenance for Quechua. (35 references) (Author/CB)

  3. Developing Oral Language Skills in Middle School English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2018-01-01

    Oral language development can help English learners develop academic proficiency with the English language. In this investigation, at one middle school, teachers focused on improving oral language skills. Using a formative experiment process, the teachers developed an intervention to accomplish their pedagogical goal and then tracked data to see…

  4. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  5. The Language Demands of Science Reading in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhihui

    2006-04-01

    The language used to construct knowledge, beliefs, and worldviews in school science is distinct from the social language that students use in their everyday ordinary life. This difference is a major source of reading difficulty for many students, especially struggling readers and English-language learners. This article identifies some of the linguistic challenges involved in reading middle-school science texts and suggests several teaching strategies to help students cope with these challenges. It is argued that explicit attention to the unique language of school science should be an integral part of science literacy pedagogy.

  6. The role of foreign and indigenous languages in primary schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article investigates the use of English and other African languages in Kenyan primary schools. English is a .... For a long time, the issue of the medium of instruction, in especially primary schools, has persisted in spite of .... mother tongue, they use this language for spoken classroom interaction in order to bring about.

  7. Multiple Schools, Languages, Experiences and Affiliations: Ideological Becomings and Positionings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Mary H.; Curdt-Christiansen, Xiao Lan

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the identity accounts of a group of Chinese children who attend a heritage language school. Bakhtin's concepts of ideological becoming, and authoritative and internally persuasive discourse, frame our exploration. Taking a dialogic view of language and learning raises questions about schools as socializing spaces and…

  8. The Importance of Language Games in School Public Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarelli, Lance; Sanders, Marla

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the language games played by superintendents as they work with school boards and community activists to craft school policy. We begin by examining the role of language in problem definition and the agenda-setting process. We then examine how political culture and the media affect problem definition. We argue that school…

  9. The Language of Schooling: A Challenge to Subject Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Moe

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the importance of language as a means to acquire knowledge in traditional content subjects at school. The article's aim is threefold: to introduce the term language of schooling; to point to some recent research findings in the field; to discuss what a focus on language in subject classes could mean in a school context. This article builds on findings from the project Language descriptors for migrant and minority students’ success in compulsory education hosted by the European Centre for Modern Languages (ECML in Graz in 2012 and 2013 ( Moe et al. 2015 and materials collected in connection with an ECML think tank on the language of schooling in September 2016 (ECML 2016.

  10. The Effects of Selected Language Stimulation Upon the Language Skills of Hard of Hearing School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Cynthia Pont

    Results of a study involving 20 hard of hearing school aged students indicated that Ss in two experimental conditions (language stimulation by Big Brothers or Big Sisters and special training in oral and written language skills with a hearing specialist) increased in the complexity of their oral language more than control Ss did. (CL)

  11. Language and Social Identity Construction: A Study of a Russian Heritage Language Orthodox Christian School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ekaterina Leonidovna

    2012-01-01

    Grounded in discourse analytic and language socialization paradigms, this dissertation examines issues of language and social identity construction in children attending a Russian Heritage Language Orthodox Christian Saturday School in California. By conducting micro-analysis of naturally-occurring talk-in-interaction combined with longitudinal…

  12. High School Teacher Perspectives and Practices: Second Language Writing and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' understandings of second language learning influence their practices in the classroom. This paper analyzes interview and classroom data collected during a year-long ethnographic study of two high school English language development classes to identify (1) what the teachers understood about second language (L2) development and L2 academic…

  13. Monoglossic Echoes in Multilingual Spaces: Language Narratives from a Vietnamese Community Language School in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reath Warren, Anne

    2018-01-01

    This article reports on language narratives in the ecology of a Vietnamese community language school (VCLS) in Australia. The study takes a dialogical perspective, where the stories about language that informants in the research setting tell are understood to shape and be shaped by the contexts in which they are told. Systematic analysis of…

  14. Oral English Language Proficiency and Reading Mastery: The Role of Home Language and School Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Natalia; Kibler, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of 21,409 participants of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten cohort focused on home and school factors sought to understand the level of reading mastery that children experienced throughout elementary school and Grade 8 by relating home language use, timing of oral English language proficiency, and the provision of…

  15. Hypermedia for language learning: the FREE model at Coventry University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Orsini-Jones

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The tradition of incorporating CALL into the language-learning curriculum goes back to the early 1980s at Coventry University, and since then has evolved in keeping with changes in the technology available (Corness 1984; Benwell 1986; Orsini-Jones 1987; Corness et al 1992; Orsini-Jones 1993. Coventry University is at present pioneering the integration of hypermedia into the curriculum for the teaching of Italian language and society. The syllabus for a complete module of the BA Modern Languages and BA European Studies Degrees, which will count as l/8th of the students' programme for year 2, has been designed upon in-house produced hypermedia courseware.

  16. Innovative Language Teaching and Learning at University: Enhancing Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Mayo, Carmen, Ed.; Gallagher-Brett, Angela, Ed.; Michel, Franck, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    This second volume in this series of papers dedicated to innovative language teaching and learning at university focuses on enhancing employability. Throughout the book, which includes a selection of 14 peer-reviewed and edited short papers, authors share good practices drawing on research; reflect on their experience to promote student…

  17. PROSPECTIVE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS’ FOREIGN LANGUAGE SOCIOCULTURAL COMPETENCE: MONITORING PRINCIPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Ishutina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates the necessity and importance of the organization of prospective primary school teachers’ foreign language sociocultural competence monitoring in the educational process of high school. The author notes that prospective primary school teachers’ foreign language sociocultural competence is inseparably linked with linguomethodological competence. It is proved that the measurement of foreign language sociocultural competence of primary school foreign language teachers should be performed in the process of lingvomethodological training of the students as lingvomethodological competence occupies a dominant place and is a unifying and a backbone for other competencies of the future teacher’s professiogram. In this regard, the concept of “foreign language sociocultural competence of prospective primary school teacher” is clarified, the essence of lingvomethodological monitoring of foreign language sociocultural competence is revealed. It is emphasized that linguistic disciplines (“The practice of oral and written language”, “Practical grammar of a foreign language”, “Practical phonetics of a foreign language”, etc. and linguomethodological courses (“Methods of teaching English at primary school”, “ICT in learning foreign languages”, “Innovative technologies of learning foreign languages”, etc. play very important role in forming “foreign language sociocultural competence of prospective primary school teacher”. Specific principles of lingvomethodological monitoring of foreign language sociocultural competence are identified and characterized. They are complexity, lingvomethodological orientation, validity, multi-vector monitoring procedures.

  18. Effects of Elementary School Home Language, Immigrant Generation, Language Classification, and School's English Learner Concentration on Latinos' High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Maria Estela; Pineda, Claudia G.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Relying largely on high school measures of home language use, the literature examining immigrant incorporation in schools provides contradictory evidence of home language effects on educational outcomes. More recent research has demonstrated that home language use is dynamic and thus it is important to examine the implications…

  19. Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 2001. Linguistics, Language, and the Real World: Discourse and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Deborah, Ed.; Alatis, James E., Ed.

    This book contains papers from the 2001 Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics, "Linguistics, Language, and the Real World: Discourse and Beyond." Papers include: "Introduction" (Deborah Tannen); "A Brief History of the Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics" (James E.…

  20. Flipped Instruction with English Language Learners at a Newcomer High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Kevin J.; Hall, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Research on flipped instruction with English Language Learners (ELLs) is sparse. Data-driven flipped research conducted with ELLs primarily involves adult learners attending a college or university. This study examined the academic performance of secondary ELLs who received flipped instruction in an algebra course at a newcomer school compared to…

  1. Languages, Cultural Capital and School Choice: Distinction and Second-Language Immersion Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smala, Simone; Paz, Jesus Bergas; Lingard, Bob

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that languages, increasingly marginalised in schools in English-speaking countries, are gaining "elitist" ground as part of the "value-added" marketisation of schools and parents' desire for their children to gain "positional goods" through schooling. In arguing our case, the paper draws on survey…

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL APPROACH TO TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES IN TECHNICAL UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Kuts

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern learning foreign languages is based on a humanistic paradigm. The realization of the possibility of such activity researches consider in implementation of technological approach in educational process. The scientists connect the optimal and qualitative realization of this activity with the implementation of education technology into learning process. Modern studies are focused on questions of implementation of technological approach into teaching foreign languages. It is thought to allow to achieve guaranteed minimal level of learning results. At the same time there are some incompletely studied aspects such as content of pedagogical technologies, their conceptual and procedural characteristics, approaches to classification. In the article the essence of technological approach is revealed, the communicatively focused technologies of teaching foreign languages in non-linguistic universities are concretized. The interpretation of technological approach is given; characteristics and attributes in teaching foreign languages are selected. It is noticed that technological approach is social and engineering ideology in the sphere of didactics according to which teaching process is considered to be a completely designed process with strictly planned and fixed results (M. Klarin. In the article it is emphasized on feasibility and efficiency of technological approach while teaching foreign languages, the degree of its integration in educational process is defined. The communication-oriented technologies, based on a communicative method of E. Passov, are allocated as the most optimum. It is shown the communication-oriented technologies go beyond the conceptual idea of modelling in teaching process of real foreign-language communication, and their procedural component and contents are founded on certain principles. The most commonly used technologies of teaching foreign languages are classified as technologies of modernization and technologies of

  3. University strategy for doctoral training: the Ghent University Doctoral Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, N; Moens, L

    2010-01-01

    The Doctoral Schools at Ghent University have a three-fold mission: (1) to provide support to doctoral students during their doctoral research, (2) to foster a quality culture in (doctoral) research, (3) to promote the international and social stature and prestige of the doctorate vis-a-vis potential researchers and the potential labour market. The Doctoral Schools offer top-level specialized courses and transferable skills training to doctoral students as part of their doctoral training programme. They establish mechanisms of quality assurance in doctoral research. The Doctoral Schools initialize and support initiatives of internationalization. They also organize information sessions, promotional events and interaction with the labour market, and as such keep a finger on the pulse of external stakeholders.

  4. 2017 Joint Universities Accelerator School (JUAS) - Registrations

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The registrations for the 2017 session of the Joint Universities Accelerator School (JUAS) are now open.   Applications are welcome from staff, fellows and post-graduate students wishing to further their knowledge in the field. The deadline for submission of the full application form is 16 October 2016.

  5. American School & University. Volume 77, Number 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agron, Joe, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Each month, "American School & University" provides a mix of thought-provoking features, how-to-articles, industry reports, exclusive surveys, new sections, insightful columns, new product introductions and case histories to assist education officials in better performing their jobs. This July 2005 issue includes the following: "Sweat Shop"…

  6. University Infrastructure for Effective Work with Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, Lee

    1994-01-01

    A "10% solution" to systematic coordination of university collaborations with local schools involves a decentralized approach with incentives and a focus for coordination. The overall effect is that the institution lays out no additional cash, redirects funds to support coordination, and intensifies and focuses scattered efforts for…

  7. 2016 Joint Universities Accelerator School (JUAS) - Registrations

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The registrations for the 2016 session of the Joint Universities Accelerator School (JUAS) are now open.   Applications are welcome from second-year Master and PhD and for physicists wishing to further their knowledge in this particular field. The deadline for submission of the full application form is 30 October 2015.

  8. Translating language policy into practice: Language and culture policy at a Dutch university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haines, Kevin; Dijk, Anje

    2016-01-01

    The CEFR will only achieve its potential in higher education if it is embedded in a meaningful way in the wider processes of the university. One means of embedding the CEFR is through policy, and in this article we report the development of a language policy in the broader context of

  9. Sprogpolitik for Roskilde Universitet/Language Policy for Roskilde University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karsten; Klitgård, Ida; Hvidtfeldt, Susanne

    Med vedtagelsen af den Internationale Uddannelsesstrategi i 2012 blev det også vedtaget at Roskilde Universitet skulle udarbejde en ny sprogpolitik. Sprogpolitikken skal være med til at sikre at Roskilde Universitet bliver en arbejdsplads med plads til mennesker fra forskellige kulturer og steder....... Politikken fastslår at dansk er hovedsproget på RUC (svensk og norsk er ligestillet med dansk), at engelsk er det fælles andetsprog som universitetet bruger til sin egen interne kommunikation og til at kommunikere med sin ikke dansktalende omverden med, og at andre sprog kan og bør benyttes i de relevante...... sammenhænge. Roskilde University’s International Education Strategy was passed in 2012. Part of the strategy said the Roskilde University must implement a new language policy. The language policy will contribute to Roskilde University as a workplace with room for people from various cultures and places...

  10. Knowledge of the Guarani language in medical students at a university hospital in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Hassel Jimmy; Delgadillo, Lorena; Campuzano de Rolon, Ana; Jiménez, Diana; de Samudio, Angélica; Agüero, Adriana; Radice, César; Jiménez-Britez, Gustavo

    2018-04-10

    Paraguay is a bilingual country and knowledge of the guarani language is an important communication tool for the doctor- patient relationship. To determine the degree of and the factors that influence the knowledge of the Guaraní language in medical students at a University Hospital in Paraguay. Observational, cross-sectional, analytical study in which an anonymous questionnaire was applied to the final year medical students of a University Hospital of Paraguay. The baseline characteristics of the medical students and their degree of knowledge of the Guarani language were described. The association between the characteristics of the students and the degree of knowledge of the Guarani language was evaluated with the Chi square association test and the logistic regression model. We included 264 students in the survey. Eighty two percent come from the capital, 72% made their pre-university studies in the capital; 92% studied Guaraní in primary and secondary education; 67.9% do not interpret Guarani correctly; 8.5% understand and express themselves totally in Guaraní. Of these, 86% refer to have the greater learning of the language in their home; 75.2% of respondents believe that primary and secondary education did not help in learning the language. The degree of knowledge of the language (speaks and understands the Guarani language correctly) varies according to: the origin of the student, the inland regions or the capital (31.25% vs. 2.5%, adjusted OR = 0.24, 95% confidence interval: 0.06 to 0.92, p = 0.003); the location of primary and secondary school: inland versus capital (25.6% vs. 1%, adjusted OR: 0.08, 95% confidence interval: 0.01 to 0.53, p = 0.009). The degree of knowledge of the Guaraní language of the students is lower compared to the general population; those who best understand and express themselves were born or studied in the interior of the country. The majority considers that primary and secondary education contribute little in the learning of

  11. Universal Style Sheet Language Environment Modification for the Business Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Brázdil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the description of USSL – Universal Style Sheet Language environment. USSL style sheet language is platform-independent and its primary focus is the declarative notation of the appearance of GUI libraries used by imperative programming languages. The implementation of the software support for wxWidgets library is made, because this library has no support for the separate declarative notation of the appearance via style sheet language. The separation of the appearance enables us to reuse and standardize the appearance notation and the independent development of the appearance. In this way it is possible to achieve consistent appearance of applications of specific set or even all of company software products. However, the first proposal of the USSL has several disadvantages which restrict the possibilities for practical use in business or other environment. These disadvantages are: the lack of @import rule for importing other style sheets, USSL only supports basic set of selectors compared with selectors of other style sheet languages for desktop environment such as Qt QSS and GTK+ GtkCssProvider, the lack of styling of the cursors, it is impossible to put down URL. The placement of widgets and its borders are not solved either. This paper contains suggestions for solving these issues.

  12. Examining the Oral Language Competency of Children from Korean Immigrant Families in English-Only and Dual Language Immersion Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Younga; Lee, Jin Sook; Oh, Janet S.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we examined the bilingual language development among Korean American first-graders in two southern California cities and explored the opportunities for language use available to them in various spaces: at school (one dual language immersion school and one traditional English-only public school), at home, and in the community. Data…

  13. Impact of Prematurity on Language Skills at School Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jamie Mahurin; DeThorne, Laura Segebart; Logan, Jessica A. R.; Channell, Ron W.; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The existing literature on language outcomes in children born prematurely focuses almost exclusively on standardized test scores rather than discourse-level abilities. The authors of this study looked longitudinally at school-age language outcomes and potential moderating variables for a group of twins born prematurely versus a control…

  14. School Leadership for Dual Language Education: A Social Justice Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David; Izquierdo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how a dual language program can be developed within the framework of social justice leadership. The authors analyzed principal, teacher, and parent interview transcripts as well as field notes and key documents to understand the role of school leadership in creating inclusive dual language programs to close the Latina/o-White…

  15. Instant Messaging Language in Jordanian Female School Students' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabab'ah, Ghaleb A.; Rabab'ah, Bayan B.; Suleiman, Nour A.

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the existence of Instant Messaging language phenomenon among female teenagers in some Jordanian private schools and its influence on their learning experience, mainly literacy. It also raises questions about the characteristics of textese as well as teachers' attitude towards their students' use of SMS language in their…

  16. Babel's language or semiotics not taught in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tito Pérez Martínez

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to make a journey through the world of language, communication, semiotics and the school to do a scan of the territory to enable us to imagine and to try moving up a map of the territory we inhabit; it also presents the different changes which have been made in the languages and how they have not been fully assumed by the school.

  17. German Language Proficiency among Students of Business and Management in the Czech Republic and its Perception: The Importance of German Language Skills on the Labour Market and the Role of Universities in Foreign Language Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinecker Marek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an empirical study designed to map German language proficiency among students at Czech universities of business and management. The results of this empirical survey can be summarised as follows. First, the ability of students at Czech universities of business and management to communicate in German is poor, and exceeds the general German language proficiency of the Czech population only to an insignificant extent. Second, the school environment (the opportunity to learn the language, compulsory subject, language study motivation has a decisive influence on the respondents’ ability to communicate in German. Third, nearly three-quarters of the respondents perceive German as a language that is very or rather important for their profession and career growth. Fourth, almost two-thirds of the respondents consider the role played by a university of business and management in the improvement of German language proficiency rather or very important. In conclusion, the study proposes directions for the potential development of the national educational system in the area of German language proficiency of university graduates in business and management in the Czech Republic, with an emphasis on the concept of content and language integrated learning (CLIL. We believe that the survey results are also very important from the point of view of enterprises operating in the Czech Republic because of the very close economic relations between the Czech Republic and German-speaking countries.

  18. Learning English as a Second Language at the University Level in Jordan: Motivation, Self-Regulation and Learning Environment Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, Eman; Aldridge, Jill M.; Khine, Myint Swe

    2016-01-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to investigate students' perceptions of the learning environment and whether these influenced their motivation and self-regulation in learning English as a second language at the university level in Jordan. Our sample involved 994 students, drawn from 13 schools, within three faculties (humanities, health…

  19. Is it Purposeful for Students of Lithuanian Higher Schools to Continue Learning the English Language? Motivation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramunė Ilgūnaitienė

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After Lithuania had regained its independence the policy of foreign languages teaching/learning at secondary schools changed cardinally. The majority or former school leavers do not perceive it to be purposeful and meaningful to prolong the English language learning on the university or college level. According to them, having covered the secondary school programme they possess a full baggage of the English language knowledge allowing them to communicate fluently in the above mentioned language while travelling, studying and working in foreign countries. Does this belief correspond to the reality of today? The article is based on four factors which are supposed to motivate freshmen and senior students to go on learning the English language as the main tool to enhance their position in contemporary world irreversibly affected by massive globalization and Eurointegration processes. VDU UKI in spring semester of 2014 carried out a research. The questionnaire was compiled the goal of which was to determine whether the English language level of the students matches all the international requirements for the language awareness and present the motives for students to continue the English language studies on a higher level. 172 first year students of various programmes participated in the research. The principle points of the questionnaire sought to provide answers to the following questions: whether the level of the English language acquirement is sufficient after having covered the secondary school programme, if VDU UKI English language teaching/learning policy enables students to acquire the language on a higher level, whether a language is a living, thus a constantly changing organism which requires progressive studies and refreshment of knowledge, if the level of language acquisition remains on the same level if it is not exploited on daily basis. Having systematized the questionnaire results the authoresses of the article draw the conclusion for

  20. Disciplinary Disjunctures in the Transition from Secondary School to Higher Education Study of Modern Foreign Languages: A Case Study from the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Brett, Angela; Canning, John

    2011-01-01

    Discussions of student transition from the study of languages in UK high schools to the study of languages at university usually focus on the vertical transition, comparing the differences in curricula and approach to languages taken in each sector. Whilst acknowledging that this aspect of the student transition is important, this article explores…

  1. Overcoming Language and Cultural Barriers in School: Helping Hispanic Students Acquire Success in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Pauline S.

    2011-01-01

    Research shows that Hispanic second language students are not as successful as their English-speaking peers in school. The problem is in part due to several factors: curriculum deliverance in a foreign language, cultural differences, and family/school disconnect. Current census reports reveal that Hispanic populations in the United States, and…

  2. Language Genre Transitions in a Secondary School Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, M. W.; Ellerton, N. F.

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this paper addressed the nature of transitions between language genres in school physics. In this qualitative study, quasi-ethnographic methods were employed to understand the culture of one secondary school physics classroom in the USA. One teacher and his physics students were the participants. The teacher was…

  3. Waldorf Schools: Seventy-Six Years of Early Language Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navascues, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes the history, curriculum, and methodology of elementary school foreign-language (FL) learning within Waldorf schools, using information from Waldorf FL teachers, class observations, and research readings. Waldorf students study two FLs. An oral/choral method is used in the early years. Reading, writing, and formal grammar are introduced…

  4. Foreign Languages at the Pre-School Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Raymond; Ford, James F.

    French was added to the early childhood curriculum at the New School in Fayetteville, Arkansas, after a review of the literature on the subject indicated potential beneficial effects of teaching foreign languages to young children. Some of the advantages to be gained by the children were greater readiness for school work in general, greater…

  5. Fast Capitalism, School Reform, and Second Language Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, Meg

    2004-01-01

    This 2-year qualitative study explores the ironies of educational reform in the United States as experienced by three second language learners attending a school attempting to transform itself into a high-performance elementary school in California's Silicon Valley. Drawing on the concept of fast capitalism in a globalized economic work order…

  6. Discursive Mechanisms and Human Agency in Language Policy Formation: Negotiating Bilingualism and Parallel Language Use at a Swedish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källkvist, Marie; Hult, Francis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the enactment of Sweden's Language Act in 2009 and in the face of the growing presence of English, Swedish universities have been called upon by the Swedish Higher Education Authority to craft their own language policy documents. This study focuses on the discursive negotiation of institutional bilingualism by a language policy…

  7. Implementing Task-Based Language Teaching to Integrate Language Skills in an EFL Program at a Colombian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba Zúñiga, Eulices

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a qualitative research study conducted with six first semester students of an English as a foreign language program in a public university in Colombia. The aim of the study was to implement task-based language teaching as a way to integrate language skills and help learners to improve their communicative…

  8. Foreign Language Reading Anxiety among Yemeni Secondary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia Ahmed Y. Al-Sohbani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine Foreign Language (FL reading anxiety level of Arabicspeaking Yemeni students learning English as a foreign language (n = 106. It utilized (a a background information questionnaire, (b the Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale (FLRAS, and (c students' English school marks. Results of the study showed that learners of English experienced an above moderate level of FL reading anxiety. There was no significant difference between students' FL reading anxiety and their gender. However, a statistically reliable difference between the means of public and private schools regarding their FL reading anxiety in favor of the private school. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between students' FL reading anxiety and their type of school. Difficulties of uncertainty, pronunciation of English words, unfamiliar topic, unknown vocabulary, reading aloud, using word by word translation, unfamiliar English culture and history, unfamiliar grammar, English letters and symbols were identified as the major sources of FL reading anxiety.

  9. Teaching Monologue Type of Language in a Technical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandras Velička

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a very urgent issue of the methods of teaching foreign languages – teaching monologue type of language in a technical university. The author analyses psychological and linguistic aspects of monologue as a subject of teaching and what could influence scientifically motivated selection of teaching methods. There are three stages of teaching monologue. They comprise the ability to speak monologue as well as the process of gaining the skills – from elementary to intermediate and advanced. The article presents a number of recommendations for practice. The main principles of the article are based on the author‘s practical experience in the teaching process as well as on the analysis of scientific data in the field. The findings could be useful for practice and theory in the field.

  10. The Accelerator Markup Language and the Universal Accelerator Parser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagan, D.; Forster, M.; Cornell U., LNS; Bates, D.A.; LBL, Berkeley; Wolski, A.; Liverpool U.; Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Schmidt, F.; CERN; Walker, N.J.; DESY; Larrieu, T.; Roblin, Y.; Jefferson Lab; Pelaia, T.; Oak Ridge; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; SLAC; Reiche, S.; UCLA

    2006-01-01

    A major obstacle to collaboration on accelerator projects has been the sharing of lattice description files between modeling codes. To address this problem, a lattice description format called Accelerator Markup Language (AML) has been created. AML is based upon the standard eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format; this provides the flexibility for AML to be easily extended to satisfy changing requirements. In conjunction with AML, a software library, called the Universal Accelerator Parser (UAP), is being developed to speed the integration of AML into any program. The UAP is structured to make it relatively straightforward (by giving appropriate specifications) to read and write lattice files in any format. This will allow programs that use the UAP code to read a variety of different file formats. Additionally, this will greatly simplify conversion of files from one format to another. Currently, besides AML, the UAP supports the MAD lattice format

  11. CONSTRUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT SCHOOL-UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Petrovna Shatalova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study the key components of the development of constructive thinking of students on the basis of model building constructive educational environment school-University. It was conducted from a position of constructive approach in education, as a process of systemic-structural methodology of cognitive and creative activity of the student, promotes development and formation of various constructive qualities of the individual. The functions of constructive educational environment school-University aimed at developing constructive thinking of students, defined by its structural components and connections, shows the consistency of self-development of constructive thinking and job satisfaction the development of constructive skills. The findings reveal innovative possibilities of cooperation of schools and universities in the design and functioning model of constructive educatio-nal space that contributes to the development of constructive thinking of all its stakeholders.Purpose: measuring the effectiveness of the model constructive educational environment school-University aimed at the development of students.Methodology: the Programme of research included: (1 diagnosis of the development level of constructive thinking on the questionnaire developed in the context of the constructive theory of education, (2 augmented and revised by the author the diagnosis of satisfaction and importance model of constructive educational environment school-University by the method of G.A. Gagarin, as well as theoretical modeling, method of involved observation, formal teaching method.Results. The article introduces the concept of «constructive learning environments», which are considered in relation to the organization and conduct of joint activities of teachers, teachers and students. The authors give a theoretical comparative analysis of scientific works of colleagues in the context of the problem. Offer a brief

  12. Modeling the language learning strategies and English language proficiency of pre-university students in UMS: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiram, J. J.; Sulaiman, J.; Swanto, S.; Din, W. A.

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to construct a mathematical model of the relationship between a student's Language Learning Strategy usage and English Language proficiency. Fifty-six pre-university students of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. A self-report questionnaire called the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning was administered to them to measure their language learning strategy preferences before they sat for the Malaysian University English Test (MUET), the results of which were utilised to measure their English language proficiency. We attempted the model assessment specific to Multiple Linear Regression Analysis subject to variable selection using Stepwise regression. We conducted various assessments to the model obtained, including the Global F-test, Root Mean Square Error and R-squared. The model obtained suggests that not all language learning strategies should be included in the model in an attempt to predict Language Proficiency.

  13. Supporting Language in Schools: Evaluating an Intervention for Children with Delayed Language in the Early School Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wendy; Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence exists that many children who experience early socio-economic disadvantage have delayed language development. These delays have been shown to exist when children start school and appear to persist through their education. Interventions that can help these children are desirable to ease the difficulties they have in school and to…

  14. The use of first language scaffolding to teach English as a foreign language to pre-school children during dramatic play in West Sumatera, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulia Dewi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indonesian community generally perceives that English language teaching should require phonology, vocabulary, grammar, discourse, and pragmatics. As a result, this often demands that pre-school teachers use English all the time. Code switching between English, Indonesian, and Minang – the local language of the region – is perceived negatively, and teachers are often criticized for using a multilingual approach that is “part snake and part eel” [sakarek ula sakarek baluik]. This refers to a negative perception of mixing languages in educational settings. In fact, code switching between Minang (first language, Indonesian (second language, and English (foreign language is the norm of language use in this part of Indonesia. However, in this community, there is a lack of respect for pre-school teachers' professionalism as well as scepticism towards the effectiveness of a multilingual teaching approach, which is used widely at the pre-school level. Vygotsky [14], the Russian psychologist, presents a different perspective on this phenomenon, noting that children learn languages by playing. Their first language can be the main tool to help them understand new words and utterances in context. By using code switching, teachers help pre-school children to link their prior knowledge and experience to the new forms of expression that enable them to derive the meaning of new words from the social context of language use. For this reason, scaffolding techniques should be used by pre-school teachers, particularly in ways which support children's cognitive development in constructing new meanings based on their first language experience. This paper, based on a research study-in-progress at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia, explores patterns of interaction between pre-school teachers and their students as teachers scaffold the development of EFL through dramatic play in West Sumatera, Indonesia. This interaction is systemic in nature and

  15. Language Teacher Burnout and School Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Zare, Pezhman; Zarifi, Abdolvahed; Manaf, Umi Kalthom Abdul; Sahamid, Husniah

    2015-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to explore the level of burnout among primary school teachers in Malaysia. In addition, the study tried to determine if the school type has any significant influence on teachers' burnout level. To this end, 714 primary school teachers participated in the study. They were teaching at Malay (SK), Tamil (SJKT), and…

  16. Assessment for English Language Education on the Programs at the Agricultural Engineering School of Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Sinobas, Leonor; San José Martínez, Fernando; Hontoria, Kira; Adán, Angeles; Blanco, María; Calderón, Fernando; Carbonell, Victoria; Chaya, Carolina; Fondevila, Guillermo; González, Trinidad; Marín, Carmen; Mira, Sara; Molina, Antonio; Pereira, David; Quemada, Miguel; Ricote, Luis; Sánchez Monje, Rosa; Sanz, Alberto; Albir, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The convergence process among European academic degrees pursues the exchange of graduate students and the adaptation of university programs to social demand. Within the framework of the European Higher Education, European universities will need to be more competitive not only by increasing or maintaining the student enrolment, but also in their academic performance. Thus, the reinforcing of English language education within the University Programs might play an important role to reach these objectives. In this sense, a complete survey was accomplished at the Agricultural Egineering School of Madrid (ETSIA ) addressing issues such as: identification the needs for bilingual instruction at ETSIA, identification resources needed and interest and background in English language of students and professors (San José et al., 2013). The conclusions and recommendations to promote the bilingual instruction in the ETSIA, taking into account the approaches followed by other Spanish universities, are presented in this work.

  17. Multilingualism at Danish universities equal to English? The Implications for other foreign languages and linguistic poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancino, Rita

    and revenue (Phillipson, 2010). This issue forms the background of the presentation, in which it will be discussed how the extended use of English at Danish Universities contributes to linguistic poverty and lack of other foreign languages. The presentation will be centered around the study of language......Language policy and the economics of the workplace, Language policy and globalization Keywords: Key words: Danish Universities, multilingualism, language policy, foreign languages, globalization, Multilingualism at Danish universities equal to English? The Implications for other foreign languages...... and linguistic poverty. Since 2003, with the new Danish University Act and the strengthening of internationalisation, Danish Universities have changed rapidly with a massive transition to English as language of instruction in many study programmes. Studies taught in English attract a large amount of both Danish...

  18. Investigation of Chinese University Students’ Attributions of English Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjin Lu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of developing students’ learning autonomy in Chinese schools similar to Western cultured schools, many concerns are raised regarding the influence and effectiveness that learner autonomy has on students’ academic achievements. The aim of this study was to identify the attribution patterns of Chinese university students for success and failure toward students who learnt through autonomy learning (student-centered approaches compared with students who learnt through teacher-centered approaches. Within this study, mixed research methods were adopted, and students used a reflective method to distinguish whether they were taught English through a traditional or student-centered method. The findings of the study reveal that there are no significant differences in attributional patterns between students who had learnt in high school through autonomous learning and those who learnt through teacher-centered approaches. The findings have implications for policy and practice in the Chinese Ministry of Education system and recommendations for future research.

  19. Stability of Language and Literacy Profiles of Children With Language Impairment in the Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambyraja, Sherine R; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Farquharson, Kelly; Justice, Laura M

    2015-08-01

    The present study focused on the identification and stability of language and literacy profiles of primary school children receiving school-based language therapy over the course of one academic year. Participants included 272 early elementary school-age children (144 boys, 128 girls) who had been clinically identified as having a language impairment. A latent profile analysis was used to identify distinct profiles on the basis of a battery of language and literacy assessments in the fall and spring of the academic year. Four profiles were identified in both fall and spring that could be best described as representing high, average, and low overall abilities. Two average groups were identified that differentiated according to phonological awareness abilities. Children's profile membership was variable from fall to spring with nearly 60% of children shifting into a higher profile. The results of t tests comparing children who shifted into higher profiles from those who remained stable in profile membership revealed group differences regarding language severity, socio-economic status, and proportion of therapy sessions received in the classroom. These results provide further evidence regarding the heterogeneity of children with language impairment served in the public schools, indicating that differences may be best conceptualized along a continuum of severity.

  20. Learning through English Language in Early Childhood Education: A Case of English Medium Schools in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwalongo, Leopard Jacob

    2016-01-01

    In China the English medium schools are now mushrooming and many parents send their children at very early age. These schools enroll children of pre-school to school age to learn through English as foreign language regardless of their proficiency in the first language. Therefore the study aims at examining the learning English language as a…

  1. Foreign Language Teaching in Rudolf Steiner Schools. Guidelines for Class-Teachers and Language Teachers. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Michael

    This book is intended for foreign language teachers interested in the approaches used in Rudolf Steiner schools, and also classroom teachers who teach foreign languages. Chapters address these issues: what the language lesson is to achieve; how the language lesson differs from other lessons; lesson design; examples of actual lessons; avoiding the…

  2. Impact of specific language impairment and type of school on different language subsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Marina Leite; Befi-Lopes, Debora Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore quantitative and qualitative effects of type of school and specific language impairment (SLI) on different language abilities. 204 Brazilian children aged from 4 to 6 years old participated in the study. Children were selected to form three groups: 1) 63 typically developing children studying in private schools (TDPri); 2) 102 typically developing children studying in state schools (TDSta); and 39 children with SLI studying in state schools (SLISta). All individuals were assessed regarding expressive vocabulary, number morphology and morphosyntactic comprehension. All language subsystems were vulnerable to both environmental (type of school) and biological (SLI) effects. The relationship between the three language measures was exactly the same to all groups: vocabulary growth correlated with age and with the development of morphological abilities and morphosyntactic comprehension. Children with SLI showed atypical errors in the comprehension test at the age of 4, but presented a pattern of errors that gradually resembled typical development. The effect of type of school was marked by quantitative differences, while the effect of SLI was characterised by both quantitative and qualitative differences.

  3. Japanese Language as an Organizational Barrier for International Students to Access to University Services: A Case of Aoyama Gakuin University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, Aoyama Gakuin University (AGU) started a government-funded degree program (taught in English) to accept international students with limited or no Japanese language proficiency. However, the students faced obstacles in accessing all of the university resources provided. In this article, I investigated Japanese language as an organizational…

  4. Bilingual Language Assessment: Contemporary Versus Recommended Practice in American Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Graciela; Friberg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify current practices of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in the United States for bilingual language assessment and compare them to American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) best practice guidelines and mandates of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004). The study was modeled to replicate portions of Caesar and Kohler's (2007) study and expanded to include a nationally representative sample. A total of 166 respondents completed an electronic survey. Results indicated that the majority of respondents have performed bilingual language assessments. Furthermore, the most frequently used informal and standardized assessments were identified. SLPs identified supports, and barriers to assessment, as well as their perceptions of graduate preparation. The findings of this study demonstrated that although SLPs have become more compliant to ASHA and IDEA guidelines, there is room for improvement in terms of adequate training in bilingual language assessment.

  5. Facebook Marketing Plan : Company: Language Alive! English School

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Phuong

    2017-01-01

    Language Alive! is a start-up in language education with good methodology, which can create a new way of learning English in Vietnam. However, the fees to run marketing ac-tivities are high, the cost per lead is very expensive according to the statistic numbers given by the school. Besides, the current marketing strategy does not seem to be effec-tive; not many people know anything about the school or realize the benefit from the new methodology; therefore, they do not have any intention to p...

  6. School Science and the Language Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2014-01-01

    An integrated science curriculum assists pupils to retain learnings better than to separate academic disciplines. Too frequently, science teachers teach each academic discipline as separate entities. However, there is much correlating of science with language, for example which might well be implemented in teaching and learning situations. Thus,…

  7. Factors Related to Professional Development of English Language University Teachers in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichadee, Saovapa

    2012-01-01

    Professional development is deemed necessary for university teachers at all levels, as it helps to enhance teaching quality. However, the extent of English language university teachers' professional development might depend on a number of factors. This paper reports on a study investigating English language university teachers' professional…

  8. The effects of multisensory structured language instruction on native language and foreign language aptitude skills of at-risk high school foreign language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, R; Ganschow, L; Pohlman, J; Skinner, S; Artzer, M

    1992-12-01

    Research findings suggest that most students who have foreign language learning problems have language-based difficulties and, in particular, phonological processing problems. Authors of the present study examined pre- and posttest scores on native language and foreign language aptitude tests of three groups of at-risk high school students enrolled in special, self-contained sections of first-year Spanish. Two groups were instructed using a multisensory structured language (MSL) approach. One of the groups was taught in both English and Spanish (MSL/ES), the other only in Spanish (MSL/S). The third group (NO-MSL) was instructed using more traditional second language teaching methodologies. Significant gains were made by the MSL-ES group on measures of native language phonology, vocabulary, and verbal memory and on a test of foreign language aptitude; the MSL/S group made significant gains on the test of foreign language aptitude. No significant gains on the native language or foreign language aptitude measures were made by the NO-MSL group. Implications for foreign language classroom instruction of at-risk students are discussed.

  9. Teaching and Learning the Language of Science: A Case Study of Academic Language Acquisition in a Dual Language Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Robin Margaretha

    English language learners (EL) are the fastest growing sub-group of the student population in California, yet ELs also score the lowest on the science section of the California Standardized Tests. In the area of bilingual education, California has dramatically changed its approach to English learners since the passage of Proposition 227 in 1998, which called for most EL instruction to be conducted in English (Cummins, 2000; Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2008). In reality, this means that EL students are often placed in programs that focus on basic language skills rather than rigorous content, meaning that they are not getting access to grade level science content (Lee & Fradd, 1998). As a result, many EL students exit eighth grade without a strong foundation in science, and they continue to score below their English-speaking peers on standardized achievements. While the usefulness of the academic language construct remains controversial (Bailey, 2012), the language used in science instruction is nevertheless often unfamiliar to both EL and English proficient students. The discourse is frequently specialized for discipline-specific interactions and activities (Bailey, 2007; Lemke, 1990). This qualitative case study examined academic language instruction in three middle school science classrooms at a dual language charter school. The goal was to understand how teachers integrate academic language and content for linguistically diverse students. The findings fom this study indicate that targeting language instruction in isolation from science content instruction prohibits students from engaging in the "doing of science" and scientific discourse, or the ability to think, reason, and communicate about science. The recommendations of this study support authentically embedding language development into rigorous science instruction in order to maximize opportunities for learning in both domains.

  10. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview Information; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program...

  11. University Students’ Perceptions of Their Failures in Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen YILMAZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate university students' perceived failure attributions in learning English as a foreign language at a preparatory school. The participants were 118 undergraduate students who failed at the end of a preparatory year and had to attend the repeat program. Each participant was asked to write about their perceived causes of failure in learning English. Students' responses were analyzed based on Weiner's (1983, 1985 Attribution Theory, and the emerging themes were linked to the locus of control, stability and controllability dimensions. The qualitative nature of the study provided in-depth information about the content of each dimension. The results suggest that students mostly attributed their academic failure in learning English to external and uncontrollable factors, which are in line with the findings of similar studies conducted in other university settings.

  12. Indirect language therapy for children with persistent language impairment in mainstream primary schools: outcomes from a cohort intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elspeth; Boyle, James; Ellis, Sue; Bannatyne, Susan; Turnbull, Mary

    2011-01-01

    A manualized language therapy developed via a randomized controlled trial had proved efficacious in the short-term in developing expressive language for mainstream primary school children with persistent language impairment. This therapy had been delivered to a predetermined schedule by speech and language therapists or speech and language therapy assistants to children individually or in groups. However, this model of service delivery is no longer the most common model in UK schools, where indirect consultancy approaches with intervention delivered by school staff are often used. A cohort study was undertaken to investigate whether the therapy was equally efficacious when delivered to comparable children by school staff, rather than speech and language therapists or speech and language therapy assistants. Children in the cohort study were selected using the same criteria as in the randomized controlled trial, and the same manualized therapy was used, but delivered by mainstream school staff using a consultancy model common in the UK. Outcomes were compared with those of randomized controlled trial participants. The gains in expressive language measured in the randomized controlled trial were not replicated in the cohort study. Less language-learning activity was recorded than had been planned, and less than was delivered in the randomized controlled trial. Implications for 'consultancy' speech and language therapist service delivery models in mainstream schools are outlined. At present, the more efficacious therapy is that delivered by speech and language therapists or speech and language therapy assistants to children individually or in groups. This may be related to more faithful adherence to the interventions schedule, and to a probably greater amount of language-learning activity undertaken. Intervention delivered via school-based 'consultancy' approaches in schools will require to be carefully monitored by schools and SLT services. © 2010 Royal College of

  13. Language as a universal form of culture’s existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Shishko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Today it is increasingly becoming the subject of attention of philosophers, philologists, linguists, since the existence of many problems and their solutions are in the language. To any information became available to the human mind, you need to make much effort to establish links between the mind and the outside world. The author of the article analyzes the active and constructive properties of language and its ability to influence the popular culture, psychology and creative writing I. Herder, W. von Humboldt, J., L. Vaysgerbera and others. Since, it is a social phenomenon and it reflected the requirements of collectivism, the author of the article reveals its role in the development of culture through their close interrelation in modern society. It is a necessary condition and a means of socialization of the individual and no common life with other people without learning social norms, rules, culture, without development achievements created by the labor of many generations, people are not aware of themselves as part of society. The article author is considered as a unique way of educating people and a universal condition for the existence of any culture.

  14. English Language Education in Primary Schooling in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Melina

    2016-01-01

    This article describes public primary English language education in Argentina. I begin with background information about the country and a brief historical overview of education in general, accompanied by a portrait of primary schooling in particular. This overview involves local, political and economic considerations but also international…

  15. Keyboarding, Language Arts, and the Elementary School Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    1988-01-01

    Discusses benefits of keyboarding instruction for elementary school students, emphasizing the integration of keyboarding with language arts instruction. Traditional typing and computer-assisted instruction are discussed, six software packages for adapting keyboarding instruction to the classroom are reviewed, and suggestions for software selection…

  16. Writing Learning Outcomes for English Language Lessons in Multilingual Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a pedagogic innovation in teacher education by articulating a method for writing learning outcomes for English language lessons in multilingual school contexts. The argument for this approach is founded on curriculum studies; however, the practice also draws specifically on applied psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic…

  17. Interactions of Identity: Indochinese Refugee Youths, Language Use, and Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Yuri

    A study examined the roles of language and school in the lives of a group of five Indochinese friends, aged 10-12, in the same sixth-grade class. Two were born in the United States; three were born in Thai refugee camps. The ways in which the subjects defined themselves in relation to other students, particularly other Asian students, and to each…

  18. Speech, Language, and Audiology Services in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of communication disorders (speech, language, and hearing) among school-age children continues to increase, making it imperative that the classroom teacher be able to identify children in need of services. This article provides information that will enable all teachers to recognize when a child is exhibiting signs of a communication…

  19. Developing Children's Language Learner Strategies at Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the strategy repertoires and strategy development of six English children who learned foreign languages at primary school. My study differs from mainstream research, in that it focuses on young children and on the development of their strategies, draws on sociocultural theory and uses ethnographic methods. My findings show…

  20. Conjunctions in Malaysian Secondary School English Language Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Philip

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to investigate the distribution pattern of conjunctions and their ranking in two different corpora, namely the Malaysian school English language Textbook Corpus (Textbook Corpus and the British National Corpus (BNC. An additional objective of the study was to find out how conjunctions had been presented in the Malaysian school English language textbooks (Forms 1-5. The method applied was qualitative content analysis. The findings indicated that coordinating conjunctions were the most frequent conjunctions that occurred in the five textbooks followed by subordinating and correlative conjunctions. The ranking of the different types of conjunctions in the Textbook Corpus was similar to that of the reference corpus, BNC. The results also indicated that the textbooks failed to present conjunctions effectively. The findings are expected to help textbook developers or language teachers in developing or adapting learning materials. Keywords: Conjunctions, Textbook evaluation, Distribution patterns

  1. Baylor University and Midway Independent School District: An Exemplary Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Madelon; Howell, Leanne; Rogers, Rachelle; Osborne, Lisa; Goree, Krystal; Merritt, Brent; Cox, Herb; Fischer, Jay; Gardner, Paula; Gasaway, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The National Association of Professional Development Schools recognized the partnership between Baylor University and Midway Independent School District as one of three partnerships to receive the 2017 Award for Exemplary Professional Development School Achievement. This Professional Development School partnership began in 2009 and places the…

  2. New York University's Stern School of Business: A Centennial Retrospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlow, Abraham L.

    This volume traces the history of the first hundred years of the Stern School of Business at New York University. Chapter 1 describes the school's original mission and founding. Chapter 2 describes how the school changed and developed as it responded to trends from 1900 to 1950. Chapter 3 explores the school's dramatic decline between 1955 and…

  3. Teachers' Perceptions of Principals' Motivating Language and Public School Climates in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Abdulmuhsen Ayedh

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that the overall climate in a school can encourage or deter learning. One significant factor promoting a positive climate is the use of motivational language by school leaders. This article presents empirical evidence of teachers' perceptions of motivational language used by school principals and the effects of this language on…

  4. Transition to University Life: Insights from High School and University Female Students in Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuo, Mary; Edda, Medhanit

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to get an insight about how high school female students perceive the transition to university life, and to understand the transition experience of university female students in the first semester. An exploratory study design was used where 166 high school female students and 88 first year university female students…

  5. English Language Proficiency and Early School Attainment Among Children Learning English as an Additional Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Katie E; Gooch, Debbie; Norbury, Courtenay F

    2017-05-01

    Children learning English as an additional language (EAL) often experience lower academic attainment than monolingual peers. In this study, teachers provided ratings of English language proficiency and social, emotional, and behavioral functioning for 782 children with EAL and 6,485 monolingual children in reception year (ages 4-5). Academic attainment was assessed in reception and Year 2 (ages 6-7). Relative to monolingual peers with comparable English language proficiency, children with EAL displayed fewer social, emotional, and behavioral difficulties in reception, were equally likely to meet curriculum targets in reception, and were more likely to meet targets in Year 2. Academic attainment and social, emotional, and behavioral functioning in children with EAL are associated with English language proficiency at school entry. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Research in Child Development.

  6. The Graduate School of Climate Sciences, University of Bern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L.

    2012-04-01

    students in an ongoing research project and gives them the opportunity to collaborate with experienced scientists in a team. Alternatively, a short thesis (30 ECTS) may be combined with an internship (30 ECTS) at another university, in the private sector or in the administration. A bachelor degree in any field of science at university level (B.A. for specialisation in economics or history) or an equivalent degree is required for admission to the M.Sc. programme. The teaching language is English. The Ph.D. in Climate Sciences is research oriented and consists mainly of 3 to 4 years full time work in a project within one of the institutes involved in the Graduate School of Climate Sciences. The Ph.D. programme is research oriented and has a compulsory module of 12 ECTS credits containing workshops (professional skills), a summer school, an international conference, colloquia, seminars and optionally lectures. The compulsory module gives the Ph.D. students the opportunity to build up their own network in the local and international research community. The Ph.D. thesis is usually written in the form of research articles in international peer reviewed journals. A M.Sc. or an equivalent academic degree is conditional for admission to the Ph.D. programme.

  7. Language and social status differences in two urban schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørreby, Thomas Rørbeck

    This dissertation is about distinctions, social status differences and contemporary pupil diversity. It addresses how Copenhagen school children in two different schools use language to handle their social everyday lives and how this organizing involves constructions and ascriptions of identities...... and social stereotypes. My research is driven by an interest in learning more about the experience of being part of today´s diverse school environments. Therefore, I approach my data with an emphasis on the participant perspective and focus analytically on the ways in which the participants in my study enact...... of a connection between the prevalent focus on ethnicity in public debates on schooling and social class relations and then the interplay between these relations of power and prestige and the practices that I analyze. Key words: School children, youth, social interaction, linguistic and social difference, social...

  8. English Language Learners in Canadian Schools: Emerging Directions for School-Based Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Jim; Mirza, Rania; Stille, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to provide ESL teachers, school administrators, and policymakers with a concise overview of what matters in promoting academic success among learners of English in Canadian schools. We review research focused on bilingual and biliteracy development, the nature of academic language, and the roles of societal power relations…

  9. Emergent Communities of Practice: Secondary Schools' Interaction with Primary School Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael; Fisher, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an account of the response of secondary schools to the primary school foreign language teaching initiative recently introduced by the UK government. The paper also explores defining features of the process of cross-phase interaction and the role that knowledge and collaborative practice plays in generating change…

  10. Communicative Textbooks: English Language Textbooks in Iranian Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahmardeh, Mahdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available English language teaching materials (textbooks play an important role in many language classrooms, but recently there have been a lot of debates within the English language teaching profession based on the actual role that materials play in teaching English as a foreign language. Arguments have encompassed both the potential and the limitations of materials used for 'guiding' students through the learning processes and curriculum as well as the needs and preferences of teachers who are using the textbooks that are available. Other issues that have arisen in recent years include textbook design and practicality, methodological validity, the role of textbooks in innovation, the authenticity of materials in terms of their representation of language, communicative textbooks, and balance in presenting the language skills as well as cultural components.The purpose of this article is to report the findings of a study carried out in 2006 into how Iranian textbooks could be made more communicative. The textbooks referred to are three English language textbooks, which are currently used in Iranian Secondary Schools. Although the work has been done within Iranian context, many suggestions could be applied to other foreign/second language situations.I will start my discussion by presenting an overview about the English language teaching in Iran, before and after the revolution. This will be followed by presenting the findings of this research that would include the Iranian ELT curriculum, the questionnaire survey (author's and teachers' perspectives as well as their discomfort will be addressed as well as introducing the English language coursebooks for secondary schools in Iran (topic, progression, structure of the lessons, types of exercises etc.. I will then present a discussion on findings of this research which would be a detailed exemplary criticism and suggestions for changes to make the materials communicative.The findings of this explanatory case

  11. Internationalization of Higher Education and Language Policy: The Case of a Bilingual University in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ken; Lin, Chia-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Universities worldwide, in placing a greater emphasis on global mobility, have recently seen a growing number of in- and outbound students. Parallel to this development has been the need to internationalize individual campuses, an important aspect of which is to have a common language (or languages) used for communication. The language policies in…

  12. From Opposition to Transcendence: The Language Practices and Ideologies of Students in a Multilingual University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mingyue

    2014-01-01

    This article explores language ideologies and language uses in a multilingual university in Hong Kong by exploring the voices and experiences of both mainland Chinese and Hong Kong students. Drawing on the notions of language ideologies, separate multilingualism, and translanguaging, the research illustrates how students' linguistic ideologies are…

  13. The Ecology of Language in Classrooms at a University in Eastern Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Oleg B.; Goodman, Bridget A.

    2014-01-01

    Using an ecology of language framework, the purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which English as a medium of instruction (EMI) at a private university in eastern Ukraine allows for the use of Ukrainian, the state language, or Russian, the predominantly spoken language, in large cities in eastern Ukraine. Uses of English and Russian…

  14. The Work of Ideology: Examining Class, Language Use, and Attitudes among Moroccan University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrani, Brahim; Huang, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates overt language attitudes and linguistic practices among French-taught university students in Morocco, showing the relationship between language behavior and attitudes. The results reveal a class-based divide in respondents' patterns of language use, in their support of the French monolingual sanitized classroom, and in…

  15. Whose Parallellingualism? Overt and Covert Ideologies in Danish University Language Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Anna Kristina

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the study of multilingualism in the workplace by analysing top-down language policies advocating parallellingualism at Denmark's eight universities. Parallellingualism, a key concept in Nordic language policy, has been suggested as a way to ensure an equitable balance between English and the Nordic language(s)…

  16. Healthcare system information at language schools for newly arrived immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tynell, Lena Lyngholt; Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2017-01-01

    a language school in Copenhagen in 2012 received either a course or written information on the Danish healthcare system and subsequently evaluated this quantitatively. Results: The evaluation revealed a positive appraisal of the course/information provided. Conclusion: In times of austerity, incorporating......Objective: In most European countries, immigrants do not systematically learn about the host countries’ healthcare system when arriving. This study investigated how newly arrived immigrants perceived the information they received about the Danish healthcare system. Method: Immigrants attending...... healthcare information into an already existing language programme may be pertinent for providing immigrants with knowledge on the healthcare system....

  17. Designing a second language bridging course for university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A. Puhl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of students, especially black students, enrolling at university and needing to study in a medium of instruction which is not their mother tongue has underlined the need for additional language preparation as one way to reduce the failure and dropout rate. A possible solution is a bridging course aimed at developing academic language competencies to enable students to cope with communicative demands of their chosen course. An effective bridging course must take into account the requirements of the chosen institution and course, the level of student competency already achieved, and the actual student needs. These needs are divided into three areas: cognitive, which includes communicative macro-language skills and problem-solving skills; affective which includes self-confidence, acceptance of responsibility, and motivation; and behavioural, which includes cross-cultural competencies. Issues include duration of the course, the extent to which the course catersfor special purposes, and the didactic strategies employed. Three further considerations are the influence on the course of sponsors from business and industry, the academic level of the course, and effective evaluation methods. Die toenemende aantal studente, vera/ swart studente, wat aan 'n universiteit registreer waar die onderrigmedium nie hul moedertaal is nie, noodsaak bykomende taalvoorbereiding in 'n poging om die druip- en uitsaksyfer te verminder. Een moontlike oplossing is 'n oorbruggingskursus wat gemik is op die ontwikkeling van akademiese taalvermoens om studente in staat te stel om die kommunikatiewe eise van hul gekose kursus die hoof te bied. 'n Effektiewe oorbruggingskursus moet die volgende faktore in ag nee m: die vereistes van die gekose inrigting en kursus, die vaardigheidsvlak wat die student a/reeds bereik het sowel as die werklike studentebehoeftes. Hierdie behoeftes word in drie kategoriee verdeel: kognitief - wat kommunikatiewe makro

  18. Language Trends 2013/14: The State of Language Learning in Primary and Secondary Schools in England. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Kathryn; Tinsley, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The Language Trends survey 2013/4 is the 12th in a series of annual research exercises charting the health of language teaching and learning in English schools. The findings are based on an online survey completed by teachers in a large sample of secondary schools across the country from both the state and independent sectors. In 2012, and again…

  19. Learner Beliefs about Sociolinguistic Competence: A Qualitative Case Study of Four University Second Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinsuk; Rehner, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the beliefs about second language (L2) sociolinguistic competence of four university-level advanced L2 learners. It places particular emphasis on 1) how these university learners conceptualized L2 sociolinguistic competence; 2) how they thought about two different language learning contexts (viz., the L2 classroom versus…

  20. Field of Study, Learning Styles, and Language Learning Strategies of University Students: Are There Any Relations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahragard, Rahman; Khajavi, Yaser; Abbasian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the possible relationships between field of study, learning style preferences, and language learning strategies among university students majoring in the fields of arts and humanities, science, engineering, social sciences, and English as a foreign language. To this end, 376 university students completed the…

  1. A universal model for languages and cities, and their lifetimes

    OpenAIRE

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2007-01-01

    Present human languages display slightly asymmetric log-normal (Gauss) distribution for size [1-3], whereas present cities follow power law (Pareto-Zipf law)[4]. Our model considers the competition between languages and that between cities in terms of growing (multiplicative noise process)[5] and fragmentation [6]; where, relevant parameters are (naturally) different for languages and cities. We consider lifetime distribution for old and living languages and that for old and living cities. We...

  2. Grammar Is the Heart of Language: Grammar and Its Role in Language Learning among Finnish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaristo, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    This article presents and discusses views on grammar and its role in formal language learning amongst Finnish university students. The results are based on a questionnaire which was distributed to students at the University of Jyväskylä as part of institutional action research. The background to the project was a feeling amongst some teachers of…

  3. Algerian EFL University Teachers’ Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloud Bouchefra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of training and absence of facilities are clearly apparent, stakeholders’ attitudes are a decisive aspect that needs to be mapped out if we are to alter the current situation. Thus, the present work aims at investigating EFL university teachers’ attitudes towards CALL at Djilali Liabes University (western Algeria. The current work is a cross-sectional descriptive study that explores teachers’ attitudes across the three domains (affective, cognitive, and behavioural and investigates other related aspects that may help indicate teachers’ likelihood to adopt CALL in the future. The results are promising as the investigated population not only demonstrated a clearly positive attitude towards CALL but also manifested a number of signs that indicate their likelihood to adopt CALL in the future if circumstances are favourable.

  4. Motivation, Psychology and Language Effect on Mobile Learning in Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issham Ismail

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the motivation, psychology and language effect on Mobile learning in the School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang. Mobile learning or m-learning is a new learning phenomenon in the open and distance learning environments. Moving from stationary to mobile learning allows informal collaboration and interaction between learners. Therefore, there is a necessity to revise people’s psychological factors, process and mechanisms that underlie M-learning so that the practice can move from technology-centred implementation to human-centred effective learning processes. The Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS Version 12.0 and Rasch Model Analysis was used to measure these items. The 5-point Likert scale questionnaires (12 items being sent to 105 distance education students from four courses including Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Social Science and Bachelor of Management which was distributed in tutorial sessions during the annual residential intensive course in the main campus of the Universiti Sains Malaysia by their respective course managers. The finding shows that a positive response from the learners as they feel happy to use this additional learning tools (mobile learning. Learner’s feel supported and motivated to use the mobile application with the usability of simple language.

  5. Consistent Quantum Histories: Towards a Universal Language of Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygiel, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    The consistent histories interpretation of quantum mechanics is a reformulation of the standard Copenhagen interpretation that aims at incorporating quantum probabilities as part of the axiomatic foundations of the theory. It is not only supposed to equip quantum mechanics with clear criteria of its own experimental verification but, first and foremost, to alleviate one of the stumbling blocks of the theory - the measurement problem. Since the consistent histories interpretation operates with a series of quantum events integrated into one quantum history, the measurement problem is naturally absorbed as one of the events that build up a history. The interpretation rests upon the two following assumptions, proposed already by J. von Neumann: (1) both the microscopic and macroscopic regimes are subject to the same set of quantum laws and (2) a projector operator that is assigned to each event within a history permits to transcribe the history into a set of propositions that relate the entire course of quantum events. Based on this, a universal language of physics is expected to emerge that will bring the quantum apparatus back to common sense propositional logic. The basic philosophical issue raised this study is whether one should justify quantum mechanics by means of what emerges from it, that is, the properties of the macroscopic world, or use the axioms of quantum mechanics to demonstrate the mechanisms how the macroscopic world comes about from the quantum regime. (author)

  6. Sleep disorders in high school and pre-university students

    OpenAIRE

    Célia R.S. Rocha; Sueli Rossini; Rubens Reimão

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence is a period in which youngsters have to make choices such as applying for university. The selection process is competitive, and it brings distress and anxiety, risk factors for the appearance of sleep disorders. Objective: To verify the occurrence of sleep disorders in third-year high school and pre-university students. Method: This cross-sectional descriptive study comprised a sample of 529 students (M=241, F=288) from three public schools, four private schools and two pre-univer...

  7. A VIEW ON BLEY-VROMAN’S FUNDAMENTAL CHARACTERS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING IN INDONESIAN HIGH SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa’wanatul Abidah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available English as a subject has been a part of curriculum in Indonesian schools from primary to university study for several decades now. The decision of education authorities to include it as a compulsory subject in high school is based on the fact that English has played an important role as academic language that is universally used, as well as the belief that having good English proficiency will enable Indonesian young people to face the fierce competition in global world. However, this policy does not run without challenge. Problems in mastering the language are encountered by both teachers and students, and results of the learning are not always as expected. This is a signature of foreign language learning as elaborated by Vroman in his book (The Logical Problem of Foreign Language Learning. This paper reviews on how the characters of language learning proposed by Vroman are seen in Indonesian classrooms at high school level where English is learned as a foreign language.

  8. How the Goethe-Institut Finland Promotes Its Services to Finnish University Students of German Language

    OpenAIRE

    Venho, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes how the Goethe-Institut Finnland, a nonprofit cultural German institution, promotes its services to Finnish university students of German language, by focusing on the perspectives of students in HAAGA-HELIA University of Applied Sciences. The objective of the study is to identify the degree of familiarity of the Goethe-Institut Finnland among students of German language in HAAGA-HELIA University of Applied Sciences, to recognize the demand for its services for learners...

  9. The Meanings of Hebrew: Defining Bilingual Education in a Dual-Language Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Using a discourse analytic framework that draws on theories of language ideologies, this paper analyzes the semiotics of a heritage language as it moves from the context of parochial education to the realm of public schooling. Specifically, it examines how Hebrew undergoes resemioticization when a Hebrew language charter school in the District of…

  10. Content-Based Language Teaching with Functional Grammar in the Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleppegrell, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    Today many second language (L2) teachers work with school-aged learners who need to be supported in their language development at the same time they learn school subjects. Applied linguists and researchers in second language acquisition (SLA) have much to contribute to those teachers, but to do so in more powerful ways calls for an orientation…

  11. The Language Environments of Exchange Students at Scandinavian Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caudery, Tim; Petersen, Margrethe; Shaw, Philip

    2007-01-01

    -student subculture. A few do break out of the bubble, learn the local language, and experience the local culture. Here we report on preliminary findings from a project intended to identify the factors leading to successful learning of both English and the local languages. Around 20-40 students at each of four...... institutions, two in Sweden, two in Denmark, were interviewed three times over a semester and asked to complete simple language tests. English proficiency improved in most cases, though not all features of language improved; Swedish/Danish was only learnt by those with good initial English and appropriate...

  12. Crossing borders: High school science teachers learning to teach the specialized language of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Jennifer Drake

    The highly specialized language of science is both challenging and alienating to adolescent readers. This study investigated how secondary science teachers learn to teach the specialized language of science in their classrooms. Three research questions guided this study: (a) what do science teachers know about teaching reading in science? (b) what understanding about the unique language demands of science reading do they construct through professional development? and (c) how do they integrate what they have learned about these specialized features of science language into their teaching practices? This study investigated the experience of seven secondary science teachers as they participated in a professional development program designed to teach them about the specialized language of science. Data sources included participant interviews, audio-taped professional development sessions, field notes from classroom observations, and a prior knowledge survey. Results from this study suggest that science teachers (a) were excited to learn about disciplinary reading practices, (b) developed an emergent awareness of the specialized features of science language and the various genres of science writing, and (c) recognized that the challenges of science reading goes beyond vocabulary. These teachers' efforts to understand and address the language of science in their teaching practices were undermined by their lack of basic knowledge of grammar, availability of time and resources, their prior knowledge and experiences, existing curriculum, and school structure. This study contributes to our understanding of how secondary science teachers learn about disciplinary literacy and apply that knowledge in their classroom instruction. It has important implications for literacy educators and science educators who are interested in using language and literacy practices in the service of science teaching and learning. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University

  13. Multimedia Scenario Based Learning Programme for Enhancing the English Language Efficiency among Primary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navnath Tupe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research was undertaken with a view to assess the deficiencies in English language among Primary School Children and to develop Multimedia Scenario Based Learning Programme (MSBLP for mastery of English language which required special attention and effective treatment. The experimental study with pretest, post-test control group design was employed to carry out the experiment of MSBLP in a sample school and to determine its efficacy for enhancing English Language skills among Primary School Students. In India, the Central and State Government has made great efforts to Education for All (EFA and initiated several programs to provide universal access to education, to reduce the drop-out rates and ensure achievement of minimum levels of learning. To our surprise the scenario had not much changed inside the classroom even implementing several programmes. However, it was still unclear how effective was the delivery of the course content in the classroom. An intensive training for teachers on a regular basis on a state-wide scale may not be feasible again and again. Hence, multimedia offers pragmatic solutions So that this research paper devoted to explore the issues of learning English and describes the creation of MSBLP as a solution in scientific manner.

  14. Event representations constrain the structure of language: Sign language as a window into universally accessible linguistic biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Brent; Geraci, Carlo; Chemla, Emmanuel; Schlenker, Philippe; Kelepir, Meltem; Pfau, Roland

    2015-05-12

    According to a theoretical tradition dating back to Aristotle, verbs can be classified into two broad categories. Telic verbs (e.g., "decide," "sell," "die") encode a logical endpoint, whereas atelic verbs (e.g., "think," "negotiate," "run") do not, and the denoted event could therefore logically continue indefinitely. Here we show that sign languages encode telicity in a seemingly universal way and moreover that even nonsigners lacking any prior experience with sign language understand these encodings. In experiments 1-5, nonsigning English speakers accurately distinguished between telic (e.g., "decide") and atelic (e.g., "think") signs from (the historically unrelated) Italian Sign Language, Sign Language of the Netherlands, and Turkish Sign Language. These results were not due to participants' inferring that the sign merely imitated the action in question. In experiment 6, we used pseudosigns to show that the presence of a salient visual boundary at the end of a gesture was sufficient to elicit telic interpretations, whereas repeated movement without salient boundaries elicited atelic interpretations. Experiments 7-10 confirmed that these visual cues were used by all of the sign languages studied here. Together, these results suggest that signers and nonsigners share universally accessible notions of telicity as well as universally accessible "mapping biases" between telicity and visual form.

  15. Use of Language Sample Analysis by School-Based SLPs: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelko, Stacey L.; Owens, Robert E., Jr.; Ireland, Marie; Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines use of language sample analysis (LSA) by school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs), including characteristics of language samples, methods of transcription and analysis, barriers to LSA use, and factors affecting LSA use, such as American Speech-Language-Hearing Association certification, number of years'…

  16. Ethnic Identification and School Language of Russian-Speaking Students in Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Raija P.; Hilton, Sterling C.; Rannut, Ülle

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic identification is closely tied to language. Society's appreciation of one's first language and the opportunity to use it may help strengthen ethnic identification. This research examined the relationship between ethnic identifications and school language and investigated other factors that potentially impact language-minority students'…

  17. The Employment of Pop Culture in Middle School English Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨才英

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays,culture teaching is more emphasized in language teaching. But less attention is paid to the influence of pop culture in language teaching. The important role of pop culture in middle school English language teaching will be discussed in this thesis through its correlation with some factors in English language teaching.

  18. Universality versus language-specificity in listening to running speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Demuth, K.; McQueen, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Recognizing spoken language involves automatic activation of multiple candidate words. The process of selection between candidates is made more efficient by inhibition of embedded words (like egg in beg) which leave a portion of the input stranded (here, b). Results from European languages suggest

  19. When can a language have adjectives? An implicational universal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    1999-01-01

    Data from a representative sample of the world's languages indicate that adjectives only occur in languages in which the numeral is in a direct construction with a noun (i.e. the numeral does not occur with a sortal classifier). In my sample Hmong Njua is the only counterexample, but I will show ...

  20. When can a language have adjectives? An implicational universal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Data from a representative sample of the world's languages indicate that adjectives only occur in languages in which the numeral is in a direct construction with a noun (i.e. the numeral does not occur with a sortal classifier). In my sample Hmong Njua is the only counterexample, but I will show ...

  1. Literature in the Modern Languages Curriculum of British Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Susan N.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the changes in the literature department of modern language curriculum and assesses their significance in terms of the past and future of literature as a component of the modern languages degree. The teaching of literature is trying to serve two masters: liberal humanism and utilitarianism. (32 references) (CK)

  2. Use of internet technologies for students' communicative competence development in the process of professional foreign language study in technical universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanova, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    Problems of mature thinking formation and development of foreign-language professional communicative competence of competitive graduates of technical universities are considered in the article. The most important factors influencing the achievement of high standard of knowledge, students' abilities and skills and increase of their abilities to establish deep meta-subject connections due to Internet technologies in the course of professional foreign language training are analyzed. The article is written on the basis of project material "Network School of National Research Nuclear University MEPhI" aimed at optimization of technological aspect of training. The given academic on-line program assigns to the teacher a part of an organizer who only coordinates creative, academic students' activity.

  3. School of Optometry at Inter American University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Henry W.

    1981-01-01

    The optometry program at the Inter American University in Puerto Rico is profiled, with highlights of admission criteria, temporary and permanent facilities, faculty, governance structure, curriculum, research opportunities, and relationship with the university as a whole. (MSE)

  4. Language Choice and Use of Malaysian Public University Lecturers in the Education Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Lee Mei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is a norm for people from a multilingual and multicultural country such as Malaysia to speak at least two or more languages. Thus, the Malaysian multilingual situation resulted in speakers having to make decisions about which languages are to be used for different purposes in different domains. In order to explain the phenomenon of language choice, Fishman domain analysis (1964 was adapted into this research. According to Fishman’s domain analysis, language choice and use may depend on the speaker’s experiences situated in different settings, different language repertoires that are available to the speaker, different interlocutors and different topics. Such situations inevitably cause barriers and difficulties to those professionals who work in the education domain. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to explore the language choice and use of Malaysian public university lecturers in the education domain and to investigate whether any significant differences exist between ethnicity and field of study with the English language choice and use of the lecturers. 200 survey questionnaires were distributed to examine the details of the lecturers’ language choice and use. The findings of this research reveal that all of the respondents generally preferred to choose and use English language in both formal and informal education domain. Besides, all of the respondents claimed that they chose and used more than one language. It is also found that ethnicity and field of study of the respondents influence the language choice and use in the education domain. In addition, this research suggested that the language and educational policy makers have been largely successful in raising the role and status of the English language as the medium of instruction in tertiary education while maintaining the Malay language as having an important role in the communicative acts, thus characterizing the lecturers’ language choice and use. Keywords: Language

  5. The Effect of Indigenous Politics on English Language Provision in New Zealand's Maori Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Elizabeth; Tamati, Tauwehe

    2013-01-01

    An ambivalence characterising the provision of English language instruction in New Zealand's Maori schools is traced to the establishment of the schools in the recent period of biculturalism and retribalisation, and to the role of the schools in indigenous ideology. The article discusses the effects of the ambivalence on English language provision…

  6. New Lands, New Languages: Navigating Intersectionality in School Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Fuller

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the global context of deepening social and political divisions and at a time of growing forced displacement of people due to conflict, there is an ever increasing need for educators and school leaders to understand issues relating to equality and diversity with respect to themselves and the students with whom they work. In particular, the intersecting characteristics that make up individual and collective identities simultaneously afford opportunities and inflict oppressions depending on circumstances and context. This paper focuses on a theorization of intersectionality as simultaneity through an analysis of linguistic exchanges as they reveal fluctuations of empowerment and disempowerment in the context of culturally and linguistically responsive school leadership. It draws on research findings from the English case as part of an international comparative project focused on Black women principals' experiences of leading schools in England, South Africa and the United States of America. It reports an account of a British Pakistani Muslim woman's experience of school leadership as she negotiated a discussion of institutional racism in a school serving a multi-ethnic population of students. Using Bourdieu's linguistic concepts, I argue that a fine grained analysis of a series of reported linguistic exchanges with multiple stakeholders reveals how various members of the school community accepted or resisted her authority to use official language. There is no guarantee that linguistic habitus will convert into linguistic capital. Moreover, I argue that educators and school leaders need to understand intersectionality as simultaneity so they can navigate identity, institutional and social practices in relation to school leadership and the education of minoritized students.

  7. Motivations and attitudes affecting high school students' choice of foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Strobelt, Jody; Chen, Huabin

    2003-01-01

    There are some foreign languages that enjoy great status in the United States, while other foreign languages are rarely represented at the high school level. The present study explored the following questions: Why do students choose to take a particular foreign language? Do students gravitate toward it because it is widely thought to be the easiest language to learn or because they perceive greater career opportunities with proficiency in this particular language, or is it simply because there are more classes offered? As long as foreign language study is elective in high schools and as long as a variety of languages are offered, the answers to these questions will remain important for foreign language educators, especially in schools where the various language programs compete with one another for student enrollments and the programs' ultimate survival.

  8. DEVELOPING COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TESTS FOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harsono

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Communicative Approach of teaching English in senior high school in Indonesia has been adopted since the implementation of The 1984 Curriculum, but the tests–the communicative language tests–(CL Tests have not been developed and used properly. The objective of the study is to develop CL Tests for senior high school. The procedure of conducting the study consists of three major steps, that is, identifying the objectives, developing the test specification, and developing the CL Tests. The development of the CL Tests in detail consists of fifteen sub-steps from determining what language skills tested, selecting the suitable source materials, up to rewriting the CL Tests to be used as CL Tests alternative for senior high school. The results of the test development reveal that there are fifteen CL Tests consisting of three tests of listening, three reading, three speaking, and three writing tests. The whole tests have construct and content validity, no complete evidence of concurrent validity with report marks and semester test scores, high to very high inter-rater reliability, and no complete practicality.

  9. Profile: The School of Optometry, University of Waterloo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    The school of optometry at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, is described including location, facilities, administration, programs, faculty, research, graduate study, residency programs, and interprofessional relationships. (JMF)

  10. The Language Environments of Exchange Students at Scandinavian Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caudery, Tim; Petersen, Margrethe; Shaw, Philip

    2006-01-01

    it is widely believed that many of them live in a lingua-franca English-speaking environment, so that Erasmus contributes to linguistic homogenisation rather than new This paper reports results of a study of the language environment and language learning experiences of some hundred Erasmus exchange students...... three times over the course of a term on which languages they used with whom, and how they perceived their English and Swedish as developing, and their language was also tested informally. A striking result was that a number of well-motivated students in certain subjects were able to attend lectures...... in Swedish after only a few weeks of courses. Nevertheless, most subjects spoke English most of the time, and mother-tongue use decreased as social groups came to be more integrated across national boundaries. Contact with Swedes was limited , but strongly associated with sport participation, which once...

  11. The Spanish Language in Californian Colleges and Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Buzatu, Anamaría

    2013-01-01

    Spanish is considered the second familiar language in California due to its Californian history, our state’s proximity to Mexico and other Latin American countries, continuous Hispanic immigration, and the size of its Hispanic population, which surpasses that of all other states. This article analyzes the number of enrollment in Spanish courses during 2010–2011 academic year and then compared to the ones from other Romance languages (Portuguese, Italian, French, Romanian & Catalan) taught at ...

  12. TEACHING ENTREPENEURSHIP AT ADMINISTRCTIONS SCHOOL IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ZULIA

    OpenAIRE

    René Hernandez; Karin Silvestri; Anjuli Alvarez; Joel Cobis

    2009-01-01

    The investigation is framed within the research management training developed in the Management Development Research Group at the University of Zulia. The goal was to determine the teaching undertaken in the management training of school administration from the University of Zulia. The methodology was descriptive, by field study the population was comprised of students from the course of administrative systems at the school of administration at East Coast Lake Maracaibo in 2007. The results w...

  13. Harmonic biases in child learners: in support of language universals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Newport, Elissa L

    2015-06-01

    A fundamental question for cognitive science concerns the ways in which languages are shaped by the biases of language learners. Recent research using laboratory language learning paradigms, primarily with adults, has shown that structures or rules that are common in the languages of the world are learned or processed more easily than patterns that are rare or unattested. Here we target child learners, investigating a set of biases for word order learning in the noun phrase studied by Culbertson, Smolensky, and Legendre (2012) in college-age adults. We provide the first evidence that child learners exhibit a preference for typologically common harmonic word order patterns-those which preserve the order of the head with respect to its complements-validating the psychological reality of a principle formalized in many different linguistic theories. We also discuss important differences between child and adult learners in terms of both the strength and content of the biases at play during language learning. In particular, the bias favoring harmonic patterns is markedly stronger in children than adults, and children (unlike adults) acquire adjective ordering more readily than numeral ordering. The results point to the importance of investigating learning biases across development in order to understand how these biases may shape the history and structure of natural languages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Harmonic biases in child learners: In support of language universals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Newport, Elissa L.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question for cognitive science concerns the ways in which languages are shaped by the biases of language learners. Recent research using laboratory language learning paradigms, primarily with adults, has shown that structures or rules that are common in the languages of the world are learned or processed more easily than patterns that are rare or unattested. Here we target child learners, investigating a set of biases for word order learning in the noun phrase studied by Culbertson, Smolensky & Legendre (2012) in college-age adults. We provide the first evidence that child learners exhibit a preference for typologically common harmonic word order patterns—those which preserve the order of the head with respect to its complements—validating the psychological reality of a principle formalized in many different linguistic theories. We also discuss important differences between child and adult learners in terms of both the strength and content of the biases at play during language learning. In particular, the bias favoring harmonic patterns is markedly stronger in children than adults, and children (unlike adults) acquire adjective ordering more readily than numeral ordering. The results point to the importance of investigating learning biases across development in order to understand how these biases may shape the history and structure of natural languages. PMID:25800352

  15. Relationships between narrative language samples and norm-referenced test scores in language assessments of school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danahy Ebert, Kerry; Scott, Cheryl M

    2014-10-01

    Both narrative language samples and norm-referenced language tests can be important components of language assessment for school-age children. The present study explored the relationship between these 2 tools within a group of children referred for language assessment. The study is a retrospective analysis of clinical records from 73 school-age children. Participants had completed an oral narrative language sample and at least one norm-referenced language test. Correlations between microstructural language sample measures and norm-referenced test scores were compared for younger (6- to 8-year-old) and older (9- to 12-year-old) children. Contingency tables were constructed to compare the 2 types of tools, at 2 different cutpoints, in terms of which children were identified as having a language disorder. Correlations between narrative language sample measures and norm-referenced tests were stronger for the younger group than the older group. Within the younger group, the level of language assessed by each measure contributed to associations among measures. Contingency analyses revealed moderate overlap in the children identified by each tool, with agreement affected by the cutpoint used. Narrative language samples may complement norm-referenced tests well, but age combined with narrative task can be expected to influence the nature of the relationship.

  16. Teaching English Language Skills for School Teachers: CTE Programme of IGNOU

    OpenAIRE

    Asha Khare

    2011-01-01

    India is a multilingual country. English is the second most important language in the country after the national language Hindi since it is taught as a compulsory subject in all the Indian schools. In the educational system of a multilingual country, it becomes imperative to improve the English Language teaching skills of the school teachers who come from various linguistic backgrounds. The school teacher plays a vital role in the development of linguistic skills of the students. What childre...

  17. University students' context-dependent conscious attitudes towards the official South African languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilton, Nanna Haug

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the results of an empirical investigation of overt language attitudes held by students attending North-West University, South Africa. Attitudes elicited from 325 students with mainly Setswana, Sesotho, Afrikaans and English as home languages are analysed comparatively. The study

  18. Learning Indicators of a Foreign Language in Spanish Public University. Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Lorenzo, M-Teresa; Salas-Pascual, Marcos; Afonzo-de-Tovar, Isabel-Cristina; Vera-Cazorla, M-Jesús; Santana-Alvarado, Yaiza; Santana-Quintana, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates 292 postgraduate students of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain), through a Likert-scale questionnaire. This inquiry was about private, educational actions and learning valuation of a foreign language and its relation with the learning of one or several foreign languages. The analysis of…

  19. Attitudes and Attained English Language Proficiency of University Students in Thailand: A Sociolinguistic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykin, Arsene; Trungamphai, Arunthadee

    English proficiency of Thai university students studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) was studied in relation to attitudinal scores on social, economic, travel, or prestige scales. Secondarily, the subjects' attitudes toward their native group and toward the target language group, and their motives for learning English were studied in…

  20. The Empirical Dimension of Communicative Language Tests: The Case of Selected Philippine Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Alejandro S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the "communicativeness" of 22 English language tests designed and administered by 22 English instructors from 22 different colleges and universities in the Philippines. Its key objective was to answer the question "How communicative are the language tests used in assessing students' competence (knowledge of the…

  1. Analytical Review of Universal Grammar (UG) Approach on Second Language Acquisition (SLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwandy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the analysis of Universal Grammar (UG) approach on Second Language Acquisition (SLA). This paper is significant as the sources for teacher or researcher of the second language since this elaboration is deeply focusing on the use of UG on SLA. The method used in this academic writing is inductive method of…

  2. Research in the Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Costa, Peter I.; Bernales, Carolina; Merrill, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Faculty and graduate students in the Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison engage in a broad spectrum of research. From Professor Sally Magnan's research on study abroad and Professor Monika Chavez's work in foreign language policy through Professor Richard Young's examination of…

  3. Multilingual Dyslexia in University Students: Reading and Writing Patterns in Three Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Signe-Anita; Laine, Matti

    2011-01-01

    We investigated reading and writing in two domestic languages (Swedish and Finnish) and one foreign language (English) among multilingual university students with (n = 20) versus without dyslexia (n = 20). Our analyses encompassed overall speed and accuracy measures and an in-depth analysis of grapheme-phoneme-grapheme errors and inflectional…

  4. Internet-Assisted Technologies for English Language Teaching in Turkish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    Although the enormous potential of the Internet has gained attention in Internet-assisted language teaching (IALT), a solid background of research is still lacking about/investigating English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' use of Internet assistive technologies. This study set out to determine Turkish university level EFL instructors'…

  5. Emerging Literacy in Spanish among Hispanic Heritage Language University Students in the USA: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Marta; Belpoliti, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study identifies some lexical aspects of the emerging writing skills in Spanish among receptive English/Spanish bilingual students with little or no exposure to formal study of the home language upon entering a Spanish Heritage Language Program at a large public university in the Southwestern United States. The 200+ essays analyzed in…

  6. Investigating Foreign Language Learning Anxiety among Students Learning English in a Public Sector University, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopang, Illahi Bux; Bughio, Faraz Ali; Pathan, Habibullah

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated foreign language anxiety among students of Lasbela University, Baluchistan, Pakistan. The study adopted the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz et al., 1986). The respondents were (N = 240) including 26 female and 214 male. The data was run through the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS)…

  7. Education, Language, and Identity amongst Students at a South African University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jean; Crouch, Alison

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study of language and cultural identity of mother-tongue Zulu students at an English-medium South African university. The data consist of focus group interviews, questionnaires, and student opinions in essays. Findings include a strong identification of the participants with the Zulu language and Zulu culture, and a view…

  8. Foreign language classroom anxiety : A study of Chinese university students of Japanese and English over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Yinxing

    2016-01-01

    This PhD project mainly aimed at exploring the relationship between foreign language (FL) anxiety and FL proficiency development, the sources of FL anxiety, and the stability of FL anxiety over time and across target languages. To this end, 146 L1 Chinese university students, who had been learning

  9. Language Attitudes, Language Learning Experiences and Individual Strategies What Does School Offer and What Does It Lack?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tódor Erika-Mária

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Language learners’ attitudes towards the language and its speakers greatly influence the language learning process and the learning outcomes. Previous research and studies on attitudes and motivation in language learning (Csizér 2007, Dörnyei 2009 show that attitudes and motivation are strongly intertwined. Positive attitude towards the language and its speakers can lead to increased motivation, which then results in better learning achievement and a positive attitude towards learning the language. The aim of the present study was to get a better insight into what regards the language attitudes of students attending Hungarian minority schools in Romania. The interest of the study lies in students’ attitudes towards the different languages, the factors/criteria along which they express their language attitudes, students’ learning experiences and strategies that they consider efficient and useful in order to acquire a language. Results suggest that students’ attitudes are determined by their own experiences of language use, and in this sense we can differentiate between a language for identification – built upon specific emotional, affective, and cognitive factors – and language for communication.

  10. 25 CFR 39.132 - Can a school integrate Language Development programs into its regular instructional program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a school integrate Language Development programs into... Language Development Programs § 39.132 Can a school integrate Language Development programs into its regular instructional program? A school may offer Language Development programs to students as part of its...

  11. 25 CFR 39.137 - May schools operate a language development program without a specific appropriation from Congress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May schools operate a language development program... Formula Language Development Programs § 39.137 May schools operate a language development program without a specific appropriation from Congress? Yes, a school may operate a language development program...

  12. Academic Performance, School Desertion and Emotional Paradigm in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Emma Rosa Cruz; Barrientos, Laura Gática; Castro, Patricia Eugenia García; García, Jesús Hernández

    2010-01-01

    The present work aims to describe academic performance, school desertion and the emotional paradigm of the university students of the accounting school of the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (FCPBUAP). We have found that low academic performance is related to students' economic deficiency, which affects their concentration on their…

  13. Tanzanian High School students' attitude towards five University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the attitude of high school students majoring in Physics, Chemistry and Biology (PCB) towards Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine and Nursing as professions at university. Design: A cross sectional study of a representative sample of high school students using a pretested attitudinal ...

  14. What Has Been Learned from School-University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Melissa; Templin, Thomas; Setiawan, Caly

    2012-01-01

    Sustained school-university partnerships are recognized as a means by which school physical education can move forward and sustain itself. Yet, these partnerships have been more the exception than the rule. There is little public knowledge about the benefits of sustained partnerships or of the process to achieve them. This article summarizes the…

  15. Exploring Language Choice and Identity Construction in "In-Between" Sites: Ethnic Media and Community Languages Schools in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Antonia; Cruickshank, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Australian research on immigrant languages has paid little attention to interactional approaches to language alternation as identity construction, and sites other than the family and the mainstream school. We argue for the need of studies that take into account a wider range of sites, in particular "community" sites, and adopt…

  16. MANAGEMENT TEAM CHARACTERISTICS: EVIDENCE FROM UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE AND SCHOOL PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-Tsai Chiang; Mei-Chih Lin

    2013-01-01

    The paper examines cognition from the viewpoint of internal management teams of private universities against satisfaction with school performance, applying the SEM model. Empirical results show that the board’s operational effectiveness and attendance rate for internal important meetings held on campus have a significantly positive relationship with implementing effectiveness and satisfaction with school administrative performance. The satisfaction with school administrative performance and...

  17. MEDIA EDUCATION IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE LESSONS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna O. Taraba

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with possible ways of the use of media education in the process of teaching foreign languages in elementary school, which corresponds to innovative educational trends. The task of the teacher is to build a learning process so that the children were interested. The author analyzes the concept of media education and suggests possible ways of formation of skills of using media education for primary school pupils. This will allow teachers to use self-made educational material based on the personal characteristics of the students, their level of preparation, the individual way of perception of information and work with it in order to develop their autonomy, the ability to analyze, synthesize and generalize information, to form a culture of communication with the media, creative, communicative abilities, critical thinking.

  18. A call for (trans)languaging: The language profiles at Roskilde University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daryai-Hansen, Petra; Barfod, Sonja; Schwarz, Lena

    2016-01-01

    in the humanities and social sciences. The students in the programme are explicitly asked to use translanguaging in order to enhance their languaging, i.e. they are invited to use translanguaging strategies in order to achieve interactional and social aims. The chapter introduces the design and the learning...... objectives of RUC’s language profiles. Furthermore we discuss, based on the language profiles as an example, how translanguaging practices and policies can be described on a supra, macro, meso, micro and nano level. The analysis focuses on teachers’ and students’ translanguaging practices and their attitudes...... towards translanguaging in language teaching/learning....

  19. Elite Bilingualism? Language Use among Multilingual Teenagers of Swedish Background in European Schools and International Schools in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenvald, Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the language use and language attitudes as reported by a number of multilingual teenagers with a Swedish background in European Schools and international schools in Europe. Special attention is given to the concepts of Third Culture Kids and elite bilingualism in relation to teenagers' multilingualism. This study is based on…

  20. The Laboratory for School Science at the University of Oslo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoberg, Svein

    1976-01-01

    Describes the purposes of the Center for Science Education at the University of Oslo as follows: to give help and advice to acting teachers; to make the staff at the university more aware of the needs and problems of the schools. Outlines the activities involved in fulfilling these purposes. (GS)

  1. Empowering Innovations: Adding Value to University-School Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Peg; Faucette, Nell

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses results from a study on beginning teachers who developed university interns as a focus of their induction program at their schools. For 13-weeks, four novice physical educators (who were considered highly skilled pedagogically) received support from prior university faculty as interns worked with them twice weekly. Results…

  2. The Language Environments of Exchange Students at Scandinavian Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caudery, Tim; Petersen, Margrethe; Shaw, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Exchange students who come to Scandinavia are often motivated by an intention to improve their proficiency in English rather than the local language. They take academic classes conducted in English and may find themselves living in a linguafranca English bubble, acculturated to an international......-student subculture. A few do break out of the bubble, learn the local language, and experience the local culture. Here we report on preliminary findings from a project intended to identify the factors leading to successful learning of both English and the local languages. Around 20-40 students at each of four...... motivation. As expected, contact with local students was limited. Institutional policies could probably influence these outcomes....

  3. Co-Constructing Community, School, University Partnerships for Urban School Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillenwaters, Jamila Najah

    2009-01-01

    University-school-community partnerships represent a collaborative model of urban educational reformation inclusive of all the organizations that impact urban education. Co-constructed relationships among communities, schools, and universities have the potential for redistributing hierarchical power, thereby enabling all partners to contribute to…

  4. The Transition from School to University in Mathematics: Which Influence Do School-Related Variables Have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rach, Stefanie; Heinze, Aiso

    2017-01-01

    Particularly in mathematics, the transition from school to university often appears to be a substantial hurdle in the individual learning biography. Differences between the characters of school mathematics and scientific university mathematics as well as different demands related to the learning cultures in both institutions are discussed as…

  5. Compelling Comprehensible Input, Academic Language and School Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Krashen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant research confirming that we pass through three stages on the path to full development of literacy, which includes the acquisition of academic language. The stages are: hearing stories, doing a great deal of self-selected reading, followed by reading for our own interest in our chosen specialization. At stages two and three, the reading is highly interesting or compelling to the reader. It is also specialized; there is no attempt to cover a wide variety. The research confirms that the library, in particular school library, makes a powerful contribution at all three stages: for many living in poverty it is the only place to find books for recreational reading or specialized interest reading, with the librarian serving as the guide on how to locate information as well as supplier of compelling reading. The expertise of certified librarians is pivotal for compelling reading in a foreign language, such as EFL worldwide and ELLs in the US, as well as compelling reading in children’s heritage languages.

  6. University Language Policies, Internationalism, Multilingualism, and Language Development in South Africa and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines legislation concerning language policy and language choice in the UK and South Africa. In particular an account of the pressures and imperatives to which such policy development must respond is provided. The paper suggests that the comparison between South Africa and the UK is relevant and compelling, not least because both…

  7. Effect of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety on Turkish University Students' Academic Achievement in Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Murat; Dogan, Yunus

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to identify to what extent the Turkish students' English classroom anxiety affects their academic achievement in English language. In this quantitative descriptive study, a correlational survey model was employed, and the convenience sampling was done. In order to collect data, the Foreign Language Classroom…

  8. Linking University Students’ Willingness to Learn to Their Recollections of Motivation at Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gorges

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of recollected school-based motivation on university students’ willingness to use new learning opportunities. Following Eccles’ expectancy-value theory, willingness to learn was conceptualized as task value, which has been found to predict task choice in previous empirical studies. Based on three motivational theories, we suggest two broad motivational dimensions for an economic description of motivational orientations, inward and outward, that should differentially predict the formation of task value. German university students (N = 1580 were asked about their task value for receiving their instructions in English as a foreign language at university and, retrospectively, their motivation in English language class at secondary school. Principal components analysis and confirmatory factor analyses of motivational variables yielded a two-factor solution supporting the differentiation between inward and outward motivational orientation. Inward motivational orientation at school was positively linked to students’ task value in adulthood, even if the individual’s self-concept of ability was controlled. The effects of outward motivation were rather small and tended to be counterproductive. Our findings suggest a complex interplay between past and present motivation and self-concept of ability underlying one’s willingness to learn and to participate in education.

  9. A Whole-School Approach to Promoting Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Languages teachers are all aware of the significant advantages and benefits learning a language provides, and believe in the importance of second language acquisition. However, why is it that languages teachers need to justify learning a second language and work hard to encourage more students to see the importance of learning a language and to…

  10. The Effects of Speech and Language Therapy Intervention on Children with Pragmatic Language Impairments in Mainstream School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine; Lloyd, Julian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, Catherine Adams, clinical senior lecturer in speech and language therapy at the University of Manchester, and Julian Lloyd, senior lecturer in psychology at Newman College, Birmingham, describe the implementation and effects of an intensive programme of speech and language therapy for children who have pragmatic language…

  11. Universal School Readiness Screening at Kindergarten Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Matthew; Dowdy, Erin; Dever, Bridget; Carnazzo, Katherine; Bolton, Courtney

    2018-01-01

    Researchers examined the concurrent and predictive validity of a brief (12-item) teacher-rated school readiness screener, the Kindergarten Student Entrance Profile (KSEP), using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to examine associations between (N = 78) children's social-emotional (SE) and cognitive (COG) readiness with…

  12. Linking Foreign Language to Occupational Education in a Rural High School: Foreign Language with Criminal Justice and Travel & Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, William R.

    Ticonderoga High School (New York) has succeeded in increasing enrollments in foreign language courses beyond the college bound, Regents-level students who usually choose such courses. The school is located in the Adirondack Mountains, a region that, in the past decade, has seen increases both in prison construction and in tourism by…

  13. Are They All Language Learners?: Educational Labeling and Raciolinguistic Identifying in a California Middle School Dual Language Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Sera J.

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript draws from a 2-year multiple-case ethnography on the educational experiences of Mexican immigrant families with California middle schools. The article explores the influence of the political landscape and raciolinguistic ideologies surrounding the nature and implementation of a middle school dual language bilingual program, and it…

  14. Investigating Attitude and Motivation of Iranian University Learners toward English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayadian, Sima; Lashkarian, Anita

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the attitudes and motivation Iranian learners have toward learning EFL at their university level. Although research of a similar nature has been done in other countries, the present study complements others by following 500 university learners and it provides another avenue for examining the language situation in Iran. To…

  15. The Effect of Peer Support on University Level Students' English Language Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Irfan; Çeliköz, Nadir; Ünal, Süleyman

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of peer support on university level students' English language achievements. An experimental model with pretest-posttest experimental and control group was used with 800 students who were studying at a university in Istanbul vicinity. As experiment group, 400 students (200 of whom…

  16. An Analysis of the Language of Attribution in University Students' Academic Essays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabulani, Sibanda

    2014-01-01

    The study reports on challenges related to the use of the language of attribution in academic essay writing by Post-Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) students at Rhodes University, as a microcosm of similar challenges faced by university students elsewhere. The study content-analysed 150 essays written by 50 PGCE students taking the course…

  17. An analysis of the language of attribution in university students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Certificate in Education (PGCE) students at Rhodes University, as a microcosm of ... academic writing and publishing which derives from English's unrivalled status as a global lingua franca. ... (2003:32) note that at university level, “…disciplinary knowledge and ...... Chinese International Graduate Students' Views of English.

  18. How Juries Assess Universal Design in Norwegian Architectural School Competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Leif D

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how architectural school competition juries assess Universal Design. The method used is a case study of 18 recent architectural school competitions in Norway. The results show that most competition briefs ask for Universal Designed buildings. In 8 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is mentioned as an assessment criterion. In 11 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is commented on by the juries in the jury reports, but only in 3 of the cases, do the juries assess this aspect consistently on every competition project. The overall impression is that some amount of uncertainty looms concerning how Universal Design should be assessed in the competition stage. Based on the findings, future juries should concentrate on orientation and overview prior to technicalities and details.

  19. Exploring Quality Programs for English Language Learners in Charter Schools: A Framework to Guide Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Peggie; Morales, P. Zitlali

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been a great deal of debate about the effectiveness of charter schools in the research literature, there has been surprisingly little attention paid to English language learners (ELLs) in charter schools. Moreover, the charter school research has predominantly focused on whether or not charter schools are effective rather than…

  20. School Meaning Systems: The Symbiotic Nature of Culture and "Language-In-Use"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abawi, Lindy

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has produced evidence to suggest a strong reciprocal link between school context-specific language constructions that reflect a school's vision and schoolwide pedagogy, and the way that meaning making occurs, and a school's culture is characterized. This research was conducted within three diverse settings: one school in the Sydney…

  1. Education for university students, high school teachers and the general public using the Kinki University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University is equipped with a nuclear reactor which is called UTR-KINKI. UTR is the abbreviation for University Teaching and Research Reactor. The reactor is the first one installed in Japanese universities. Though the reactor is owned and operated by Kinki University, its use is widely open to scientists and students from other universities and research institutions. The reactor is made the best of teaching instrument for the training of high school teachers. In addition, the reactor is utilized for general public education concerning atomic energy. (author)

  2. English as an Additional Language and Attainment in Primary Schools in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demie, Feyisa

    2018-01-01

    English as an additional language (EAL) and language diversity attract much interest amongst policymakers and educationists; yet little is known about the performance in English schools of EAL pupils who are not fluent in English and speak different languages at home. The findings of the aggregated data confirm that EAL pupils achieved less well…

  3. Serbian heritage language schools in the Netherlands through the eyes of the parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, Andrej

    It is difficult to find the exact number of other languages spoken besides Dutch in the Netherlands. A study showed that a total of 96 other languages are spoken by students attending Dutch primary and secondary schools. The variety of languages spoken shows the growth of linguistic diversity in the

  4. Responding to the Diversity of Chinese Language Learners in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Until recently Chinese language learning in Australian primary and junior secondary schools has been characterised by programs primarily designed for second language learners who have had no prior knowledge of or exposure to Chinese language. Participation in such programs by Australian-born children who speak Putonghua (Mandarin) or another…

  5. Conceptual Formulation of Neologisms in Various Dictionaries and Primary School Macedonian Language Course Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januševa, Violeta; Jurukovska, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses the conceptual formulation of neologisms in various dictionaries of Macedonian language, other Slavic and non-Slavic languages, as well as in primary school Macedonian language textbooks, by putting special emphasis on the role of, both, time criterion, i.e. the period of time in which a lexical unit is present in the active…

  6. Teaching the Romanian Neighbors Hungarian: Language Ideologies and the Debrecen Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Attila Gyula

    2016-01-01

    This article is a contribution to the hitherto scant literature on learning a historical minority language and on language ideologies in the context of a study abroad program in Hungary, Debrecen. I analyse the language ideologies of the decision makers in Hungary and in the Debrecen Summer School in relation to the teaching of Hungarian to the…

  7. Heritage Language Learners in Mixed Spanish Classes: Subtractive Practices and Perceptions of High School Spanish Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Linwood J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the language ideologies and instructional practices of an entire Spanish language faculty at a high school in a new gateway state for immigration. The study examined additive and subtractive practices of teachers as they strived to teach Spanish to heritage language learners (HLLs) enrolled in mixed…

  8. Iranian English Language Teachers' Job Satisfaction and Organisational Climate in Public and Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavipour, Kioumars; Yousefi, Moslem

    2017-01-01

    Organisation issues rarely feature in the English language education literature, since language education is seemingly mostly concerned with the individual learner or teacher. As such, the impact that school climate might have on Iranian English language teachers remains an uncharted territory. This mixed-method study explores the relationship…

  9. From Home to School: Bridging the Language Gap in Mauritian Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auleear Owodally, Ambarin Mooznah

    2010-01-01

    Most Mauritian children face a language challenge as they leave their homes and start school. While most Mauritian children speak a French-lexified Creole as home language, the Mauritian primary education programme promotes English as the main language of literacy and the only written medium of instruction. In such a context, the preschool has the…

  10. FOREIGN LANGUAGE OFFERINGS AND ENROLLMENTS IN PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS, FALL 1965.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUTIMANN, HANS; TEAGUE, CAROLINE

    THIS REPORT ON FOREIGN LANGUAGE ENROLLMENTS, THE EIGHTH IN A SERIES PUBLISHED ANNUALLY, SHOWS THE LANGUAGE ENROLLMENT DISTRIBUTION IN PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS (GRADES 7 TO 12) WHICH, IN 1965, WAS 85.8 PERCENT ENROLLED IN SPANISH, FRENCH, GERMAN, RUSSIAN, AND ITALIAN, 13.9 PERCENT ENROLLED IN LATIN, AND 0.3 PERCENT IN "OTHER" LANGUAGES. THREE BASIC…

  11. An Investigation of School Counselor Self-Efficacy with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Leonissa V.; Ziomek-Daigle, Jolie; Haskins, Natoya Hill; Paisley, Pamela O.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory quantitative study described school counselors' self-efficacy with English language learners. Findings suggest that school counselors with exposure to and experiences with English language learners have higher levels of self-efficacy. Statistically significant and practical differences in self-efficacy were apparent by race, U.S.…

  12. An Insight into Secondary School Students' Beliefs Regarding Learning English Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fakhra; Quraishi, Uzma

    2017-01-01

    The present descriptive study aimed to get an insight into secondary school students' beliefs regarding English language learning. The survey method was employed for obtaining data from the secondary school students (N = 664). A modified version of "beliefs about language learning inventory" was used to collect data. Five out of nine…

  13. Standing Strong: Maloney Interdistrict Magnet School Japanese Language and Culture Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhi, Jessica; Yamashita-Iverson, Kazumi

    2009-01-01

    Maloney Interdistrict Magnet School (MIMS) is the only elementary school in Waterbury that has a world language program and is one of only two elementary Japanese programs in Connecticut. In the past 15 years, more than 1500 students have participated in its Japanese Language and Culture (JLC) Program in grades Prekindergarten through 5th. The JLC…

  14. Signs of Resistance: Peer Learning of Sign Languages within "Oral" Schools for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin-Jaffe, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the role of the Deaf child as peer educator. In schools where sign languages were banned, Deaf children became the educators of their Deaf peers in a number of contexts worldwide. This paper analyses how this peer education of sign language worked in context by drawing on two examples from boarding schools for the deaf in…

  15. Early-Adolescents' Reading Comprehension and the Stability of the Middle School Classroom-Language Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Perla B.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined teachers' language use across the school year in 6th grade urban middle-school classrooms (n = 24) and investigated the influence of this classroom-based linguistic input on the reading comprehension skills of the students (n = 851; 599 language minority learners and 252 English-only) in the participating classrooms. Analysis…

  16. Effect of Distributive Leadership Behaviours of Foreign Language Schools' Principals on the Job Satisfaction of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriögen, A.; Iscan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of distributive leadership behavior of foreign language schools' principals on the job satisfaction of instructors. Sample size of 416 instructors working in foreign language school for the academic year 2013 to 2014 was used in the study. The data was gathered using questionnaires tag…

  17. Universal free school breakfast: a qualitative model for breakfast behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eHarvey-Golding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the provision of school breakfast has increased significantly in the UK. However, research examining the effectiveness of school breakfast is still within relative stages of infancy, and findings to date have been rather mixed. Moreover, previous evaluations of school breakfast schemes have been predominantly quantitative in their methodologies. Presently there are few qualitative studies examining the subjective perceptions and experiences of stakeholders, and thereby an absence of knowledge regarding the sociocultural impacts of school breakfast. The purpose of this study was to investigate the beliefs, views and attitudes, and breakfast consumption behaviors, among key stakeholders, served by a council-wide universal free school breakfast initiative, within the North West of England, UK. A sample of children, parents and school staff were recruited from three primary schools, participating in the universal free school breakfast scheme, to partake in semi-structured interviews and small focus groups. A Grounded Theory analysis of the data collected identified a theoretical model of breakfast behaviors, underpinned by the subjective perceptions and experiences of these key stakeholders. The model comprises of three domains relating to breakfast behaviors, and the internal and external factors that are perceived to influence breakfast behaviors, among children, parents and school staff. Findings were validated using triangulation methods, member checks and inter-rater reliability measures. In presenting this theoretically grounded model for breakfast behaviors, this paper provides a unique qualitative insight into the breakfast consumption behaviors and barriers to breakfast consumption, within a socioeconomically deprived community, participating in a universal free school breakfast intervention program.

  18. First Language Proficiency and Successful Foreign Language Learning: The Case of High School Students Learning French as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnintedem, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether there was a correlation between first language proficiency as measured by the Mississippi Curriculum Test (MCT II) Reading and Language Arts and foreign language proficiency as measured by the French Language Proficiency Test. Data for the independent variable, first language proficiency, was collected from the…

  19. First additional language teaching in the foundation phase of schools in disadvantaged areas

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen Lenyai

    2011-01-01

    Second language learning in South African schools is of supreme importance given the multilingual nature of the country. However, there is no certainty that teachers in the foundation phase of schools in poor environments have the skills to teach literacy in the first additional language and produce competent learners. This investigation revealed that the methods that teachers used to teach English, as the first additional language did not develop children’s comprehension and communication sk...

  20. Professional Language Training of International Students in the Multicultural Environment of University for International Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Glebova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses the specific features of professional language training of international students in the multicultural environment of a Russian university teaching students of international relations. After a brief historical survey of teaching foreign students in the universities of Russia, the writer considers the factors that influence the choice of universities graduating specialists in international relations by foreign students. The author goes on to analyze the specifics of linguisticand socio-cultural environment in Russian universities and its impact on international students stressing the fact that the educational environment at MGIMO-University is multilingual and multicultural. That explains the relevance of studying the quality of professional language training of foreign students in the sphere of international relations. The language of teaching in most universities of the Russian Federation is Russian, besides, all MGIMO students are obliged to learn English either as their first or second foreign language, that is why international students have to study in a tri-lingual environment and the interfering influence of several cultures. The writer points out that under such circumstances it is necessary for future IR specialists to build a number of professionally relevant competences: linguistic, socio-cultural, communicative, and suggests educational technologies that have proved to be effective in building them: case-study, role-plays, etc. The article gives special attention to the place and role of translation in teaching English as translation is a system of encoding within the system of two language systems. Translating phrases from Russian into English the student does 'inner', mental translation using the mother tongue. That makes the author suggest using the students'mother tongues in the teaching process. While learning foreign languages, international students should, along with language material, study the system

  1. High school achievement as a predictor for university performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshkani Z

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high-school grade point average ( GPA-H and university entrance examination can predict the university achievement and Purpose. To examine the predictive value of GPA-H for GPA-U Methods: In this cross sectional study, the subjects were 240 medical students at basic science phase of their medical education. Data were collected by a questionnaire, consisting of questions measuring factual background variable and 10 Llikert-type questions measuring attitude. The multiple regression analysis was used. Results: The analysis showed that student GPA were a better predictor for educational achievement of medical students than rank on university entrance exam and students with high GPA have not been on probation at all. Also parent's education and occupation influence the students' attitudes toward their medical study. Conclusion: High-school GPA is a predictor for university GPA .This may warrant further investigation into criteria of medical university entrance exam. Keywords: UNIVERSITY ACHIEVEMENT, HIGH-SCHOOL GPA, UNIVERSITY SUCCESS, PREDICTOR

  2. Challenges of the introduction of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages at foreign-language universities in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet anh Nguyen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In today’s globalized world, it seems necessary, or even indispensable for the teaching/learning of foreign languages to be based on international standards proposed by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL. The present article deals with issues of integration of the CEFRL in the Vietnamese context by analyzing the results of a study of training programs at six universities specializing in foreign languages, which are based in three regions of the country (Northern, Central and Southern Vietnam. Despite some positive changes and the dynamism characteristic of the approach, a mechanical and rigid introduction of CEFRL in foreign-language universities in Vietnam has actually caused several problems. These include (1 the inconsistency between the levels established by the CEFRL and the organization of teaching/learning; (2 the risk of teaching/learning becoming too “utilitarian” and too function-oriented and (3 excessive attention given to the evaluation and assessment of linguistic knowledge and of performance level  rather than on the ability to use various resources as well as to long-term process of competence development. The study results show some possible ways for the development of a referential frame for learning/teaching French in Vietnam.

  3. Algerian EFL University Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchefra, Miloud; Baghoussi, Meriem

    2017-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs) are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of…

  4. Computer simulation as an important approach to explore language universal. Comment on "Dependency distance: a new perspective on syntactic patterns in natural languages" by Haitao Liu et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian

    2017-07-01

    Exploring language universal is one of the major goals of linguistic researches, which are largely devoted to answering the ;Platonic questions; in linguistics, that is, what is the language knowledge, how to get and use this knowledge. However, if solely guided by linguistic intuition, it is very difficult for syntactic studies to answer these questions, or to achieve abstractions in the scientific sense. This suggests that linguistic analyses based on the probability theory may provide effective ways to investigate into language universals in terms of biological motivations or cognitive psychological mechanisms. With the view that ;Language is a human-driven system;, Liu, Xu & Liang's review [1] pointed out that dependency distance minimization (DDM), which has been corroborated by big data analysis of corpus, may be a language universal shaped in language evolution, a universal that has profound effect on syntactic patterns.

  5. Fish Philosophy and School Culture: A School and University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardieck, Sherrie; Bussan, Beth; Bond, Ann; Greer, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    In the fall of 2004, an early childhood education center in the Midwest experienced a period of transition resulting from a significant turnover in administration and staff. Seeking strategies to improve and sustain a positive school culture, a newly formed Leadership Team looked to the business community for improvement strategies. The Team…

  6. Survey on a sleep habits for university and high school students.

    OpenAIRE

    林, 光緒; 堀, 忠雄

    1988-01-01

    A survey was performed on 466 high school students and 403 university students. 86% of high school students and 89% of university students estimated their customary sleep time to be 6-8 hours. Although there was no significant difference between high school students and university students with awake time, bed time was later for university students than high school students. So that sleep time was shorter for university students. Also there was more regular sleepers for high school students a...

  7. Language intervention at schools: changing orientations within the South African context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alant, E

    1989-01-01

    The role of the speech therapist in the school has changed drastically over the last decade. The reasons for these changes originate from a growing realisation of the importance of contextualising intervention within a particular community. This article aims at providing an analysis of the present school population in South Africa with specific reference to the Black schools as a basis for discussion on the role of the speech and language therapist within this context. The problems of second language learning and teaching are highlighted and the role of the language therapist as a consultant within the Black school system is emphasized.

  8. [Publications in the Croatian medical journals by doctoral candidates at University of Zagreb School of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sember, Marijan; Petrak, Jelka

    2014-01-01

    By searching Medline/PubMed bibliographic database we collected data on publications of two groups of PhD candidates who earned their PhD degrees at University of Zagreb Medical School in 2000 and 2010. We identifed their publications in the Croatian medical journals and separately in the Croatian language. First group of PhD candidates (y 2000) published in the Croatian journals 34% of all published papers, with a share of 29% in the Croatian language. Another group (y 2010) published in the Croatian journals 44% of all published papers in which the number of papers published in the Croatian journals in English language grow significantly (5% vs. 31%). The number of papers published in the Croatian language decreased to 13%. Our results agreed with the global decreasing trend of the number of medical papers in non-English languages. The importance of mother-tongue in the medical education and health care may have influence on preserving scientific communication in non-English medical journals.

  9. How Immigrant Students' Self-Views at School Relate to Different Patterns of First and Second Language Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Ute; Lilla, Nanine; Zander, Lysann; Hannover, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates how students from immigrant families whose first language differs from the language of instruction at school view themselves while at school, depending on the way in which they use their first and second language. While some immigrant students are inclined to predominantly use their first language in the home environment…

  10. Now What? Think Fast: Using Healthcare Clinics as Universal Language to Maximize Learning for International Students in a Graduate Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Katila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available International students in Masters programs come to the US optimistic and willing to learn. Upon arrival and entrance into programs, they often encounter unexpected environments. Culture shock and language barriers may seem like obvious hurdles, but work ethic and scope of visual knowledge also pose unique challenges for both students and design educators. Although all students share new challenges in graduate school, international students face tougher impediments in studio environments where they express themselves both visually and verbally. Additionally, much of design uses humor, idioms, and visual clues only understood in English. So how do educators help international students build on what they already know? How do educators break barriers between domestic and international students so they may teach one another through a shared language? In fall 2015, my Conceptual Development and Implementation class was struggling to exchange ideas in the classroom. We moved through that struggle by developing a shared language around each student's experiences with healthcare clinics in their country of origin. Students explained what makes healthcare clinics reputable; how people access information in India, China, small towns and larger urban areas; and where people look for trustworthy information. This paper discusses how one educator used student experience of healthcare clinics to find a universal language to maximize learning for international students in design education.

  11. Investigating Students' Beliefs about Arabic Language Programs at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaye, Shaye S.

    2009-01-01

    The current study attempted to identify students' of Arabic programs beliefs about their chosen programs. To achieve this purpose, a survey was developed to collect the data from randomly selected students in liberal-arts and education-based programs at Kuwait University. The results showed that students were statistically differentiated as a…

  12. Teaching Popular Culture in a Second Language University Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson-Smith, Anne; Chik, Alice; Miller, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an established course on Popular Culture which is framed within the general educational model in an English-medium university. The article is organized into three parts: the underlining educational rationale for general educational courses, the course description, and the students' perspectives of their learning experience.…

  13. Against the Corrosive Language of Corpspeak in the Contemporary University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Many universities today are businesses, embracing the priorities and values of any other consumerist enterprise. There is an argument that, insofar as the phenomenon of marketisation is a function of what (Michaels, F. [2011]. "Monoculture: How one story is changing everything". Red Clover Press) terms a global economic…

  14. Erasmus Language Students in a British University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogain, Ariane

    2012-01-01

    Students' assessment of their academic experience is actively sought by higher education institutions, as evidenced in the UK's National Student Survey, introduced in 2005. Erasmus students, despite their growing numbers, tend to be excluded from these satisfaction surveys, even though they, too, are primary customers of a university. This study…

  15. The Exploration of the Associations between Locus of Control and High School Students’ Language Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Eslami-Rasekh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to determine the relationships between locus of control (LOC orientation and high school students’ language achievement. The popular categorization of internals and externals was taken into account. The participants of this study were 121 high school students in the second, third and pre-university grades in two public high schools of Isfahan, Iran. One of the instruments used in the study was an adopted version of Julian Rotters’ locus of control (1966 which identified internal and external orientations. The participants’ English scores were regarded as the measure of their achievement. Besides, a questionnaire consisting of 29 items was administered to all 121 students. Responses were put into one way and two-way ANOVA, the regression analysis, the independent t-test, chi-square and linear regression analysis to compare the means of two sets of scores. The findings of this study show a significant relationship between locus control and achievement of high school students. The findings can be used by EFL teachers and syllabus designers.

  16. Investigating the Information Needs of University Students in Foundational Foreign Language Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenna Westwood

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This investigation seeks to address two issues: first, to discover if there is evidence that university students in foundational language courses need information resources to support their language learning and second, if such evidence exists, what the specific information resource needs might be and how important those resources are to students’ language learning. After engaging in a year of foreign language study, the author used the evidence gathered to develop and conduct a survey of the user needs of language students at the Self Access Centre (CAADI of the University of Guanajuato, Mexico. Results of the survey supported the personal learning experiences of the author. Over 80% of students surveyed reported using the information resources in the CAADI at least once a week with general grammar books, course text books and films being reported as the most important resources. This investigation provides a starting point for research in to the collection development practices of academic libraries supporting the learning of foreign languages. By examining the information needs of one population, evidence has been provided that these students do indeed need information resources to support their language learning. The study suggests specific resource types that could be important for these users.

  17. · Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jalali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted language learning (CALL is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instructional classroom management approaches implemented by English institute teachers. In so doing, a total of 105 male (n = 27 and female (n = 78 EFL teachers participated in this study. A computer attitude questionnaire adapted from Albirini (2006 and a Behavior and Instructional Management Scale (BIMS adopted from Martin and Sass (2010 were benefitted from for the purpose of collecting the data. The results of the Pearson Correlation Coefficient revealed that there were no significant relationships between attitude and behavior and instructional management across gender. However, it was found that the more male teachers experience tendency toward using computers in their classes, the more teacher-centered their classes become. In addition, the more female teachers are prone to use computers in their classes, the more student-centered and lenient their classes become.

  18. METHODICAL ASPECTS OF CREATING AND USING THE LANGUAGE E-BOOKS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Khyzhnyak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article the important role of electronic linguomethodical tools use in primary school and one of the largest groups of this means – Ukrainian language e-books are substantiated. This group contains, in author opinion, the different types of tools: visual (multimedia presentations, infographics, interactive posters, etc., practical (learning language games, training language aids, interactive crosswords, etc.; studying (learning language aids, etc. Each type has its creating and using methodical features in primary school. In addition, the use of various kinds of e-books must be systematic and take linguomethodical patterns of language teaching in primary school.The author gives a brief description each type of language e-books for primary school, describes the methods of their application and gives general guidance on their implementation in the learning process. A teacher is able to design and make all these types of electronic training manuals in Ukrainian language on his own using free software that allows to take into account the typical class features, its gender specificity, primary schoolchildren’s interests, to process local country studying information. In the conclusion author gives the main requirements to Ukrainian language e-books for a primary school: available and interesting for each pupil, despite the level of language development, use multimedia and hyperlinks, interactivity, predictable methodology of working with electronic trainers should be maximum simple, and its design should have national-patriotic character etc.

  19. The Effect of Language Learning Strategies on Proficiency, Attitudes and School Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Habók

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines language learning strategy (LLS use in connexion with foreign language attitude, proficiency and general school achievement among lower secondary students in Years 5 and 8 (n = 868 in Hungary. An adapted version of the Strategies Inventory for Language Learning questionnaire was used for data collection. The results showed that Hungarian students mainly engage in metacognitive strategies in both years. Differences between more and less proficient language learners’ strategy use have also been found. With regard to the effect of LLS on foreign language attitude, the foreign language mark and school achievement, path analysis indicated a good fit in both years. The metacognitive, social and memory strategies primarily influenced foreign language attitudes and marks in Year 5. The metacognitive strategies had a slight impact on school achievement as well as on foreign language marks. We demonstrated the dominant effect of metacognitive strategies and the low effect of memory strategies in Year 8. In addition, metacognitive strategies also influenced foreign language marks. The effect of foreign language marks on school achievement was also remarkable. There was a strong impact on the children’s attitudes through these variables.

  20. The Effect of Language Learning Strategies on Proficiency, Attitudes and School Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habók, Anita; Magyar, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This study examines language learning strategy (LLS) use in connexion with foreign language attitude, proficiency and general school achievement among lower secondary students in Years 5 and 8 ( n = 868) in Hungary. An adapted version of the Strategies Inventory for Language Learning questionnaire was used for data collection. The results showed that Hungarian students mainly engage in metacognitive strategies in both years. Differences between more and less proficient language learners' strategy use have also been found. With regard to the effect of LLS on foreign language attitude, the foreign language mark and school achievement, path analysis indicated a good fit in both years. The metacognitive, social and memory strategies primarily influenced foreign language attitudes and marks in Year 5. The metacognitive strategies had a slight impact on school achievement as well as on foreign language marks. We demonstrated the dominant effect of metacognitive strategies and the low effect of memory strategies in Year 8. In addition, metacognitive strategies also influenced foreign language marks. The effect of foreign language marks on school achievement was also remarkable. There was a strong impact on the children's attitudes through these variables.

  1. MOTIVATION AND LEARNING STRATEGIES IN UNIVERSITY COURSES IN ITALIAN LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosi-Randić, Neala; Ružić, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The present work explores relationships among motivation, the use of learning strategies and anxiety. In this research 93 university students took part; 84 females and 9 males, 19 to 26 years old. Obtained results indicate existence of positive and significant correlations between motivation and the use of learning strategies. More motivated students organise their personal activities better, they are more active during lectures and they elaborate materials better compared to the less motivat...

  2. Language, the Learner and the School. Penguin Papers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Douglas

    This book is concerned with language as it is used by the teacher, as it affects the learner, and as it can function to integrate the curriculum. Douglas Barnes, in "Language in the Secondary Classroom," discusses the student-teacher language interaction in 12 sample lessons, and analyzes the importance upon student learning of the languages used…

  3. Nigerian language policy and its implication in the school curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper observes that the Nigerian language policy, failed to take into consideration the socio-linguistic habits of Nigerians. Since English language is a focal point for communication it then implies that policy makers to formulate language policies based on realities of language need. This is the only way that the ...

  4. Language practices in school-based Grade R classrooms | Lenyai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The investigation on language practices aimed at establishing how the language of learning policy formulated by the Department of Education in South Africa was interpreted at classroom level. The study focused on language activities in schoolbased Grade R classes to observe how learners' home language was used as ...

  5. Universal Design for Learning and School Libraries: A Logical Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David E.

    2017-01-01

    This article will explore the basic tenets of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in relation to collaborative curriculum development and implementation; provide a case study examination of UDL principles in action; and suggest school library curricular activities that provide opportunities for multiple means of representation, action, and…

  6. Equality and Education: The Role of Universities and Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensham, Peter J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses equal education issues in Victoria, Australia, summarizing the expansion of secondary and higher education since the 1940s. Explores transition problems between school and university furthering social inequalities. Views educational structures from abundancy and scarcity perspectives, cautioning that limited resources will maintain the…

  7. Enhancing Thinking Skills with School-University Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, William D.; Kolter, Gerald E.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a collaborative Purdue University and Twin Lakes School Corporation (Indiana) project to specify and demonstrate research-based instructional models facilitating the development of students' higher thinking skills. The project has developed a special site where student teachers can observe and practice teaching these skills. Includes 10…

  8. The Bowie State University Professional Development Schools Network Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Eva; Taylor, Traki; Madden, Maggie; Beiter, Judy; Davis, Julius; Farmer, Cynthia; Nowlin, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    The Bowie State University PDS Network Partnership is one of the 2015 Exemplary PDS Partnerships recognized by the National Association for Professional Development Schools. This partnership is built on a series of signature programs that define and support our partnership work. This article describes each of those signature programs that make our…

  9. Moral education and citizenship education at pre-university schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, H.; Veugelers, W.; de Kat, E.; Oser, F.; Veugelers, W.

    2008-01-01

    This survey investigates the objectives, practical application and learning outcomes of moral education at three pre-university (VWO) schools with differing views on citizenship. We explore teachers’ and students’ pedagogical, socialpolitical and moral development objectives, and how they deal with

  10. Impact of University Lecturers' Intervention in School MathTeaching

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some schools in the neighbourhood of Sefako MakgathoHealth Sciences University (SMU) in South Africa persistentlyyielded poor mathematics results in the past years. Thiswas of concern since maths is the main subject for manyopportunities, including admissiontoSMUstudy programmes.Some SMU maths lecturers ...

  11. "Rural" schools and universities: The use of partnerships as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    "Rural" schools and universities: The use of partnerships as a teaching strategy in enhancing a positive response to rurality. ... These approaches have been initiated within a broad understanding of what is meant by rurality, acknowledging that there is no agreement on what constitutes urban and rural contexts.

  12. Connecting university science experiences to middle school science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gordon; Laughran, Laura; Tamppari, Ray; Thomas, Perry

    1991-06-01

    Science teachers naturally rely on their university science experiences as a foundation for teaching middle school science. This foundation consists of knowledge far too complex for the middle level students to comprehend. In order for middle school science teachers to utilize their university science training they must search for ways to adapt their college experiences into appropriate middle school learning experience. The criteria set forth above provide broad-based guidelines for translating university science laboratory experiences into middle school activities. These guidelines are used by preservice teachers in our project as they identify, test, and organize a resource file of hands-on inquiry activities for use in their first year classrooms. It is anticipated that this file will provide a basis for future curriculum development as the teacher becomes more comfortable and more experienced in teaching hands-on science. The presentation of these guidelines is not meant to preclude any other criteria or considerations which a teacher or science department deems important. This is merely one example of how teachers may proceed to utilize their advanced science training as a basis for teaching middle school science.

  13. Developing and Improving:A Study of the Middle School Students’ Writing Ability in the Second Language Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing WANG

    2016-01-01

    With the development and advancement of social and cultural communication between China and other countries in the world, the second language education is very popular with Chinese people. And usually, it will take the young for nearly 16 years to learn a second language, especially English. Most of them learn English from primary school until university. Besides having routine English classes at school, they also pay extra time and money to learn English in their spare time in many training companies. And now, English education has already become an industry in China and some training companies such as New Oriental English, are familiar to common people. And a crucial problem is that, after so many years of hard work, most of them are even having basic writing difficulties. The systemic and effective teaching method of writing in a second language education in China is being researched. This thesis attempts to cultivate the students’ subjective initiative in second language education activities, raise the students’ learning consciousness, and enhance their lasting interests in learning so as to reach the goal to improve the students’ writing ability in second language education.

  14. Expanding School-District/University Partnerships to Advance Health Promoting Schools Implementation and Efficacy in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chieh-Hsing; Chang, Fong-Ching; Liao, Li-Ling; Niu, Yu-Zhen; Cheng, Chi-Chia; Shih, Shu-Fang; Chang, Tzu-Chau; Chou, Hsin-Pei

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Taiwan government expanded its support of school-district/university partnership programs that promote the implementation of the evidenced-based Health Promoting Schools (HPS) program. This study examined whether expanding the support for this initiative was effective in advancing HPS implementation, perceived HPS impact and perceived…

  15. School Grades, School Context and University Degree Performance: Evidence from an Elite Scottish Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasselle, Laurence; McDougall-Bagnall, Jonathan; Smith, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates degree classification outcomes for students with SQA Higher qualifications at an elite Scottish university. Students are characterised according to a new indicator based on their secondary school's academic performance relative to the national (Scottish) average. The results show that our school context indicator provides…

  16. The Inclusion of Slovak Roma Pupils in Secondary School: Contexts of Language Policy and Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The arrival of large numbers of Slovak Roma to Sheffield over a relatively short period has inserted two new languages (Slovak and Romani) into an already diverse, multilingual school environment. Schools face challenges in welcoming the new migrant children, inducting and integrating them and facilitating access to the English school curriculum.…

  17. Language and Culture Restrictions and Discrimination in K-12 Private Schools: An Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Joy; Mawdsley, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    In a companion article, we considered legal issues in language and culture in private schooling in two U.S. contexts: "Silva v. St. Anne Catholic School" and "Doe v. Kamehameha Schools". In this article, we consider the facts and findings of these two cases under the human rights and antidiscrimination legal frameworks of…

  18. English Language Learners' Strategies for Reading Computer-Based Texts at Home and in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ho-Ryong; Kim, Deoksoon

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated four elementary-level English language learners' (ELLs') use of strategies for reading computer-based texts at home and in school. The ELLs in this study were in the fourth and fifth grades in a public elementary school. We identify the ELLs' strategies for reading computer-based texts in home and school environments. We…

  19. Learner Performance in Mandarin Immersion and High School World Language Programs: A Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoqiu; Padilla, Amado M.; Silva, Duarte M.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the Mandarin performance of elementary immersion program students and high school world language program students in the same school district. A cross-sectional design was employed to gather information on Mandarin proficiency of fourth and fifth graders and Level 4 and Level 5 (AP Chinese) high school students who took the…

  20. High School Teachers' Perspectives on the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2016-01-01

    This was an exploratory study that examined high school teachers' perspectives about their early experiences with the English language arts Common Core State Standards. The sources of data for the study included a survey and structured interviews. Twenty-three high school ELA teachers from one unified school district in Southern California…

  1. What Does "International University" Mean at a European Bilingual University? the Role of Languages and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiz, Aintzane; Lasagabaster, David; Sierra, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Internationalisation has brought about remarkable changes at universities all over the world. In the case of the University of the Basque Country (Spain) this is reflected in the increasing presence of English-medium instruction. This paper examines two issues: the university community's perception of (1) the term "international…

  2. Enhancing the interfaces among schools, colleges, universities, and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' The 2005 Rae Report on higher education in Ontario recommended that the Provincial government 'reaffirm the mandate of colleges to focus on occupational education and labour market needs, while continuing to allow applied degrees and institutional evolution. Mandate colleges to reach out to the fifty percent of high school students not going on to further studies...' Another recommendation was 'encourage the distinct evolution of each institution (i.e. colleges and universities) and promote differentiation through the tuition framework, accountability arrangements and the design of the Province's funding formula. At the same time, require that colleges and universities recognize each others' related programming to create clear and efficient pathways for students.' Implementing these recommendations requires major changes in the interfaces among schools, colleges, universities and industry, and also in the attitudes of parents, the teaching profession, and employers. Will it happen? (author)

  3. Screening 5 and 6 year-old children starting primary school for development and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Deniz; Bayar-Muluk, Nuray; Bayoğlu, Birgül; İdil, Aysun; Anlar, Banu

    2016-01-01

    Beginning school is an important milestone for children. Children's readiness for school involves cognitive, physical, and emotional development. Certain school programs allow children to start first grade after 66 months of age, together with 72 month-old children. In order to estimate school readiness, we screened children before starting first grade and compared their school performance according to their age and socio-demographic characteristics. Marmara School Readiness, Denver II developmental screening, and language assessment tests were applied. Language delays were more frequent and school readiness test scores were lower in the younger group compared to older children. However, school achievement did not differ between the two age groups. Preschool education, parental income and education affected performance in most tests. Preschool screening seems effective in detecting children with lower than average developmental skills, and the school system may provide a practical opportunity for providing support to those children.

  4. Managing Expectations: A Case Study of Sessional Staff in Languages and Cultures Education in Australian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Brown

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In light of the increasing casualisation of the academic workforce in recent years, expectations of sessional staff in Australian universities from their academic employment are becoming more poignant. Following on from a previous report by Ferrari & Hajek (2012, this paper further highlights how these workers are affected by short-term, often only semester-long, contracts. We focus on how the brevity of employment affects sessional teachers’ perceptions of their role and perceived obligations to the university, and consequently the health of languages education. We present the results of an online survey conducted at the vast majority of Australian universities, which investigated sessional staff’s expectations. This study reveals that language sessional staff have expectations of their employment which are often at odds with their role as academics in the university environment.

  5. DIFFICULTIES OF SPEAKING THAT ARE ENCOUNTERED BY ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDENTS AT AL MARGEB UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Dalem

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explore the speaking difficulties encountered by English language students at Al Margeb University, and to discover the causes of such difficulties. Speaking English has been a vital importance in international communication. Speaking fluent English is a common problem among the nonnative speakers. The second language learners have gone through a variety of cases to learn how to speak not only correct grammar and using the right vocabulary but with correct accent and pronunciation. Many obstacles, therefore, have been known as the predictors of such a problem among the language learners.  According to the review of literature, appropriate speaking instruction was found to be the learners' priority and a field in which they need more attention. In this paper the writer highlight the speaking difficulties encountered by English language students at Al Margeb University, which are considered to be the most urgent for every teacher, such as fear of mistakes, shyness, anxiety, lack of confidence and lack of motivation. This paper can be useful to teachers to consider their language learners' speaking needs in English language teaching and learning context.

  6. The Impact of Authentic Materials and Tasks on Students’ Communicative Competence at a Colombian Language School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Castillo Losada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a study carried out in a foreign language school at a Colombian public university. Its main purpose was to analyze the extent to which the use of authentic materials and tasks contributes to the enhancement of the communicative competence on an A2 level English course. A mixed study composed of a quasi-experimental and a descriptive-qualitative research design was implemented by means of a pre-test, a post-test, observations, semi-structured interviews, surveys, and diaries. The findings showed that the use of authentic materials and tasks, within the framework of a pedagogical project, had an impact on students’ communicative competence progress and on the teaching practices of the experimental group teacher.

  7. The Recruitment Organization of the Business Schools in Italian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnitskiy Maksim V.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at studying the practice of Italian universities in the sphere of organizing recruitment at business schools. The article considers specifics of Italian business schools, which consist of their wide division by specialization and of flexible approaches to attracting students. The basic criteria for admission and training in Italian business schools have been generalized. Recommendations for Ukraine have been elaborated in view of the following needs: involving in the teaching process the practitioners, known in the world for their efficiency in the business sphere; balancing the price for providing educational services, developing flexible payment schedules, and setting up a discount system as well as scholarship programs for students with high learning results; revising curricula in line with the requirements of modern business environment; providing employment and career statistics for business school graduates; systematically improving the quality of education and concentrating on the efficiency indicators of a program for students, etc.

  8. SCHOOL OBSERVATION AS ONE OF THE ASSESSMENTS FOR ENGLISH EDUCATION DEPARTMENT STUDENTS OF MURIA KUDUS UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atik Rokhayani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, learning requires students to develop their knowledge through critical thinking. Knowledge is not just receiving the information but also interpreting the information. It requires new learning goals change the relationship between assessment and instruction. So, the lecturers need to assess the students’ ability to comprehend the materials. In addition, the lecturers have to take an active role about the purpose of the assessment and the content that is being assessed. There are many kinds of assessments used by the lecturers given to their students. For example: asking the students to do the discussion, test, questioning, observation etc. School observation tends to be familiar for the students of English Education Department of Muria Kudus University since by doing the observation they can face the real school condition. The students can observe the English teaching and learning process in the classroom. This paper focuses in AMEL (Approaches and Methods in English Language class. It discusses the application of school observation as one of the authentic assessment for English Education Department students of Muria Kudus University through exploring the approaches and methods used by Junior High School teachers in Kudus. In the end of the observation, the students have to report the discussion in form of poster presentation.

  9. Struggling Authorial Identity of Second Language University Academic Writers in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Crawford

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the different factors that appear to affect the on-going construction of second language authorial identity in a professional academic environment in Mexico. Through narrative research methodology from a qualitative paradigm, the everyday struggles of two university professors to maintain their professional status in second language writing are explored. The areas of study for these two are chemistry and penal law. With data the learning processes of entering into a community of second language writers are studied as well as the problems they faced and how they resolved them. Finally, the process of negotiating an authorial identity in a second language seems to be a constant underlying struggle composed of a variety of psychological factors.

  10. Change in Language Policy in Malaysia: The Reality of Implementation in Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saran Kaur

    2006-01-01

    In Malaysia, a sudden change in language policy, from Bahasa Melayu to English, has been instituted for the disciplines of science and technology at varying levels of the educational system. For this paper, it will be the domain of higher education that will be focused on. In 2005, the students who had their pre-university courses in English would…

  11. Toward Implementing Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Assessment in the Official Spanish University Entrance Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ana Gimeno; Pavón, Ana Sevilla

    2015-01-01

    In 2008 the Spanish Government announced the inclusion of an oral section in the foreign language exam of the National University Entrance Examination during the year 2012 (Royal Decree 1892/2008, of 14 November 2008, Ministerio de Educación, Gobierno de España, 2008). Still awaiting the implementation of these changes, and in an attempt to offer…

  12. Effective Utilization of ICT in English Language Learning--The Case of University of Botswana Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umunnakwe, Ngozi; Sello, Queen

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the effective utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by first year undergraduates of the University of Botswana (UB) in their reading and writing skills. The first year students are not first language (L1) learners of English. They have not utilized computers for learning reading and writing in their…

  13. Language Policy as a Sociocultural Tool: Insights from the University of Cape Town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Magda

    2016-01-01

    This theoretically oriented article draws on the author's previous research, which examined language policy and planning (LPP) of the University of Cape Town within the context of post-apartheid transformation driven by need to redress inequalities of the past, and demands of globalization. Drawing on critical linguistics, but indicating…

  14. Teaching Language and Content: Instructor Strategies in a Bilingual Science Class at a Chinese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Smith, Sara W.

    2012-01-01

    The present research analyzes instructional strategies used to integrate the learning of content and English as a foreign language in a bilingual physics class at a university in Shanghai, China. It examines how the instructor handles meaning and form of new English science vocabulary in concept-focused physics lectures and the strategies he used…

  15. Language Choice and Identity Construction in Peer Interactions: Insights from a Multilingual University in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mingyue

    2011-01-01

    Informed by linguistic ecological theory and the notion of identity, this study investigates language uses and identity construction in interactions among students with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds in a multilingual university. Individual and focus-group interviews were conducted with two groups of students: Hong Kong (HK) and…

  16. The Curriculum for English Language Teacher Education in Australian and Vietnamese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Hue

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the curricula for English language teacher education in two universities, one in Australia and the other in Vietnam. Specifically, it analyses the structures of the two curricula, compares and contrasts them, and examines how the development of the curricula was shaped by distinctive contextual factors. Sources of data include…

  17. The Language of Request: Annual Giftgiving to the University. ASHE 1983 Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Katherine

    The organization of culture and the language of gift-giving used by a university development office were studied using an ethnographic approach. Attention was directed to the way that an academic institution selects, designs, and expresses its written and oral fund-raising messages, as well as the variety of factors that precede, structure, and…

  18. Factors associated with foreign language anxiety : A study of Chinese university learners of Japanese and English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Yinxing; de Bot, Kees; Keijzer, Merel

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a study that investigates and compares the effects of foreign language proficiency, social status of a learner’s family, self-esteem, and competitiveness on FL anxiety. Chinese university students (N = 146), who were learning Japanese and English, participated in this study.

  19. Challenges Facing Chinese Academic Staff in a UK University in Terms of Language, Relationships and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-hua

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment of international academic staff is viewed as one of the strategies to internationalise the universities. International academic staff, however, usually encounter many challenges when in a foreign context. This study aims to investigate the challenges of Chinese academic staff teaching in the UK in terms of language, relationships…

  20. Universal and Language-Specific Patterns in the Acquisition of Verb Argument Structures in German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischner, Franziska N.; Weissenborn, Jürgen; Naigles, Letitia R.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the influence of universal and language-specific morpho-syntactic properties (i.e., flexible word order, case) on the acquisition of verb argument structures in German compared with English. To this end, 65 three- to nine-year-old German learning children and adults were asked to act out grammatical ("The sheep…

  1. Gellish : A generic extensible ontological language - design and application of a universal data structure -

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Renssen, A.S.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Since long data storage and data communication lack a common standard universal data model as well as a common data language for the application domains of database users. This hampers data communication between systems and causes costly data conversion processes. Various solutions have been

  2. French language: A basic G.S course for Nnamdi Azikiwe University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Descriptive method was adopted for the study and data were collected from articles, internet sources and interview. The finding indicated that some universities have adopted French as one of the GS courses. It suggested that French language be taught in UNIZIK as a GS course. The work was based on NUC benchmark ...

  3. The difficulties in teaching the foreign languages in technical universities and the ways of their overcoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishina G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available the article considers the main problems in teaching the foreign language for non-linguistic students at University. To achieve good results and to increase the quality of higher education, effective ways and methods of teaching are covered.

  4. An Exploration of Language Anxiety in L2 Academic Context for Chinese International Students in U.S. Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing

    2013-01-01

    This mix-methods study examined the language anxiety levels that the Chinese international students perceived in second language (L2) academic context at four universities in the northeastern region of the United States of America; it explored the impact of language anxiety that these students perceived on their academic learning; it also…

  5. Foreign Language Learning in a "Monoglot Culture": Motivational Variables amongst Students of French and Spanish at an English University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    The study on which this article is based investigated reasons for learning a foreign language at university in a predominantly English-speaking environment (the UK). It examined the relative importance of motivational variables as theorised in the field of second language (L2) motivation, and the effect of first language (L1) and linguistic…

  6. [Issues related to national university medical schools: focusing on the low wages of university hospital physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamuku, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    University hospitals, bringing together the three divisions of education, research, and clinical medicine, could be said to represent the pinnacle of medicine. However, when compared with physicians working at public and private hospitals, physicians working at university hospitals and medical schools face extremely poor conditions. This is because physicians at national university hospitals are considered to be "educators." Meanwhile, even after the privatization of national hospitals, physicians working for these institutions continue to be perceived as "medical practitioners." A situation may arise in which physicians working at university hospitals-performing top-level medical work while also being involved with university and postgraduate education, as well as research-might leave their posts because they are unable to live on their current salaries, especially in comparison with physicians working at national hospitals, who focus solely on medical care. This situation would be a great loss for Japan. This potential loss can be prevented by amending the classification of physicians at national university hospitals from "educators" to "medical practitioners." In order to accomplish this, the Japan Medical Association, upon increasing its membership and achieving growth, should act as a mediator in negotiations between national university hospitals, medical schools, and the government.

  7. Language Learners and Diverse Legacies: Question of Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Margaret

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 43 Scottish open university students, aged 28-87, who were studying another language, examined extent of bilingualism; schooling in and exposure to other languages in youth; school, family, media, and travel influences on language attitudes; and motivations for language study. Social and educational legacies affecting student…

  8. Is Weak Oral Language Associated with Poor Spelling in School-Age Children with Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, or Both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Jillian H.; Hogan, Tiffany P.; Catts, Hugh W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that word reading accuracy, not oral language, is associated with spelling performance in school-age children. We compared fourth grade spelling accuracy in children with specific language impairment (SLI), dyslexia, or both (SLI/dyslexia) to their typically developing grade-matched peers. Results of the study revealed that children with SLI performed similarly to their typically developing peers on a single word spelling task. Alternatively, those with dyslexia and SLI/dyslexia evidenced poor spelling accuracy. Errors made by both those with dyslexia and SLI/dyslexia were characterized by numerous phonologic, orthographic, and semantic errors. Cumulative results support the hypothesis that word reading accuracy, not oral language, is associated with spelling performance in typically developing school-age children and their peers with SLI and dyslexia. Findings are provided as further support for the notion that SLI and dyslexia are distinct, yet co-morbid, developmental disorders. PMID:22876769

  9. Early and Late Language Start at Private Schools in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepik, Saban; Sarandi, Hedayat

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the interaction effect of age in L2 attainment. It explores whether success in foreign language learning at early childhood grades varies depending on age. It also addresses the beliefs of foreign language teachers regarding the variables under review. Eighty-three 11 year-old language learners who started learning English at…

  10. First additional language teaching in the foundation phase of schools in disadvantaged areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Lenyai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Second language learning in South African schools is of supreme importance given the multilingual nature of the country. However, there is no certainty that teachers in the foundation phase of schools in poor environments have the skills to teach literacy in the first additional language and produce competent learners. This investigation revealed that the methods that teachers used to teach English, as the first additional language did not develop children’s comprehension and communication skills. It argues that if teachers do not use methods that encourage children to communicate in English the children might not acquire the competence needed to use English as the language for learning in Grade 4. Policy makers are advised to monitor the implementation of the first additional language policy and to oversee the development of an English literacy-training programme in the foundation phase that could provide teachers with the necessary skills and appropriate approaches for teaching the target language.

  11. Effects of Language Learning Interventions in Pre-School Children: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger-Klicpera, B.; Knapp, W.; Kucharz, D.; Schabmann, A.; Schmidt, B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present contribution is to evaluate and discuss the impacts of language learning interventions in pre-school children with German as a first or a second language. The sample consisted of 864 children in intervention groups and 294 children as a comparison group within two successive cohorts. The instruments used were the SSV (Grimm…

  12. Readability of Igbo Language Textbook in Use in Nigerian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Nneka Justina

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the readability of Igbo language textbook in use in Nigerian secondary schools. Five Igbo Language textbook were evaluated. The study employed an evaluation research design. The study was conducted in South Eastern Geopolitical zone of Nigeria which is predominantly the Igbo tribe of Nigeria. Four hundred secondary school…

  13. School Language Profiles: Valorizing Linguistic Resources in Heteroglossic Situations in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Brigitta

    2010-01-01

    Although South Africa is committed to a policy of linguistic diversity, the language-in-education policy is still plagued by the racialization of language issues under apartheid and, more recently, by new challenges posed by internal African migration. Drawing on the experience of a school in the Western Cape Province, this paper explores the role…

  14. Internationally Adopted Children in the Early School Years: Relative Strengths and Weaknesses in Language Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennen, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to determine the relative strengths and weaknesses in language and verbal short-term memory abilities of school-age children who were adopted from Eastern Europe. Method: Children adopted between 1;0 and 4;11 (years;months) of age were assessed with the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool, Second…

  15. Designing between Pedagogies and Cultures: Audio-Visual Chinese Language Resources for Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yifeng; Shen, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    This design-based study examines the creation and development of audio-visual Chinese language teaching and learning materials for Australian schools by incorporating users' feedback and content writers' input that emerged in the designing process. Data were collected from workshop feedback of two groups of Chinese-language teachers from primary…

  16. School-External Factors in Finnish Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, Sophie; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the English language competence of Finnish bilingual pupils and school-external factors such as parental expectations, home involvement, and exposure to English outside the classroom. Data on the pupils' language competence was collected from n?=?122 6th graders in bilingual education, and compared…

  17. Enablers and Inhibitors to English Language Learners' Research Process in a High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Un

    2015-01-01

    This researcher sought to examine enablers and inhibitors to English language learner (ELL) students' research process within the framework of Carol C. Kuhlthau's Information Search Process (ISP). At a high school forty-eight ELL students in three classes, an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher, and a biology teacher participated in the…

  18. The Meta-Pragmatic Discourses of Australian High School Students on Language, Migration and Belonging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Donna; Willoughby, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a backlash against multiculturalism in many Western countries and increasing calls to restrict migration and citizenship rights to those who can pass language tests. This paper explores the sentiment of high school students who were born and raised in Australia towards issues of language and migration, including the need for…

  19. Rigor or Restriction: Examining Close Reading with High School English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Betty; Brown, Clara Lee; Ward, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    English language learners (ELLs) are the fastest growing student subgroup in the United States, and public schools have the challenging task of teaching ELLs both English language and academic content. In spite of the attention given to improving outcomes for ELLs, the achievement gap between ELLs and native English speakers persists, especially…

  20. Translation as a Site of Language Policy Negotiation in Jewish Day School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how students and teachers at a non-Orthodox Jewish day school in New York City negotiate the use of translation within the context of an institutionalized language policy that stresses the use of a sacred language over that of the vernacular. Specifically, this paper analyzes the negotiation of a Hebrew-only policy through…

  1. Developmental Trajectories of Structural and Pragmatic Language Skills in School-Aged Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Heuvel, E.; Manders, E.; Swillen, A.; Zink, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to compare developmental courses of structural and pragmatic language skills in school-aged children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID). Comparison of these language trajectories could highlight syndrome-specific developmental features. Method: Twelve monolingual…

  2. Challenging Minority Language Isolation: Translanguaging in a Trilingual School in the Basque Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonet, Oihana; Cenoz, Jasone; Gorter, Durk

    2017-01-01

    Learning two or more languages at school is quite common all over Europe, but languages are often isolated from each other. This pedagogical practice is in contrast to the way multilingual speakers use their whole linguistic repertoire when communicating in social contexts. These multilingual solitudes are challenged when translanguaging…

  3. Conditions Restraining the Teaching of Major Nigerian Languages in Secondary School in Ebonyi State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidi-Ehiem, Ugochi Ijeoma

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive survey was carried out in order to determine the conditions handicapping the teaching of major Nigerian languages in secondary schools in Ebonyi State, Nigeria. A random sample of 953 students and 602 language teachers completed a corresponding copies of questionnaire designed for the study. Out of 1555 copies of questionnaire…

  4. L. V. Shcherba: A "New Slant" on Modern Foreign Languages in the School Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Thomson, Olga

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, I offer a critical reflection on the thesis of the general educational value of foreign languages developed by Russian linguist Lev Vladimirovich Shcherba. I do so against the background of current debates on the positioning of foreign languages in the school curriculum in the United Kingdom (UK). I argue that Shcherba's thesis,…

  5. Out-of-school factors in english language proficiency: comparison between Slovenia and the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Gorenc, Ana

    2017-01-01

    In my master's thesis, I focus on the connection between social environment and learning a foreign language, namely English. I write about out-of-school exposure, which is an important part of informal learning of English as a foreign language. In the theoretical part I discuss to what extent English is present in every-day life in Slovenia, the Netherlands and globally. This part contains facts about important out-of-school effects that affect learning English: social environment, family ba...

  6. The growth of language: Universal Grammar, experience, and principles of computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Charles; Crain, Stephen; Berwick, Robert C; Chomsky, Noam; Bolhuis, Johan J

    2017-10-01

    Human infants develop language remarkably rapidly and without overt instruction. We argue that the distinctive ontogenesis of child language arises from the interplay of three factors: domain-specific principles of language (Universal Grammar), external experience, and properties of non-linguistic domains of cognition including general learning mechanisms and principles of efficient computation. We review developmental evidence that children make use of hierarchically composed structures ('Merge') from the earliest stages and at all levels of linguistic organization. At the same time, longitudinal trajectories of development show sensitivity to the quantity of specific patterns in the input, which suggests the use of probabilistic processes as well as inductive learning mechanisms that are suitable for the psychological constraints on language acquisition. By considering the place of language in human biology and evolution, we propose an approach that integrates principles from Universal Grammar and constraints from other domains of cognition. We outline some initial results of this approach as well as challenges for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. One hundred years ago: Start of the Optometry School at Columbia University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, David A

    2010-10-01

    An optometry school at Columbia University entered its first students in 1910. This was the first optometry school at a university. This article examines what was said in optometry periodicals of 1910 and 1911 about this significant development.

  8. University-Level Research Projects for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to provide an opportunity for high school students to participate in university-level research projects. In this case, students from Pinkerton Academy (Derry, New Hampshire) were invited to participate in efforts to catalog data from the COMPTEL experiment on NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). These activities were part of a senior level honors course at Pinkerton. Although the success of this particular program was rather limited, we feel that the general concept is a sound one. In principle, the concept of partnerships between local schools and university researchers is one that could be especially attractive to soft money researchers. Programs can be carefully designed to benefit both the students and the research program.

  9. TEACHING ENTREPENEURSHIP AT ADMINISTRCTIONS SCHOOL IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ZULIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hernandez

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation is framed within the research management training developed in the Management Development Research Group at the University of Zulia. The goal was to determine the teaching undertaken in the management training of school administration from the University of Zulia. The methodology was descriptive, by field study the population was comprised of students from the course of administrative systems at the school of administration at East Coast Lake Maracaibo in 2007. The results was obtained that knowledge management systems in the department regarding the organization, is a cornerstone to enhance their learning. We conclude that the learning strategies employed to manage the management tools such as organizational charts, administrative manuals, flowcharts etc.; let you be aware of the importance of procedures and processes in any organization and encouraged the teaching of undertaken as part of management training.

  10. The 2011 Estonian High School Language Reform in the Context of Critical Language Policy and Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Delaney Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper seeks to situate Estonian language use and policy within the emerging field of critical language policy and planning (CLPP) by investigating the discourses that frame linguistic behaviour. This done by way of an analysis of a series of interviews carried out with key actors in language policy in Estonia. The discourses framing language…

  11. Language Models and the Teaching of English Language to Secondary School Students in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntongieh, Njwe Amah Eyovi

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates Language models with an emphasis on an appraisal of the Competence Based Language Teaching Model (CBLT) employed in the teaching and learning of English language in Cameroon. Research endeavours at various levels combined with cumulative deficiencies experienced over the years have propelled educational policy makers to…

  12. Classroom Promotion of Oral Language (CPOL): protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial of a school-based intervention to improve children’s literacy outcomes at grade 3, oral language and mental health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Sharon; Snow, Pamela; Eadie, Patricia; Munro, John; Gold, Lisa; Le, Ha N D; Orsini, Francesca; Shingles, Beth; Lee, Katherine; Connell, Judy; Watts, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Oral language and literacy competence are major influences on children’s developmental pathways and life success. Children who do not develop the necessary language and literacy skills in the early years of school then go on to face long-term difficulties. Improving teacher effectiveness may be a critical step in lifting oral language and literacy outcomes. The Classroom Promotion of Oral Language trial aims to determine whether a specifically designed teacher professional learning programme focusing on promoting oral language can lead to improved teacher knowledge and practice, and advance outcomes in oral language and literacy for early years school children, compared with usual practice. Methods and analysis This is a two-arm cluster multisite randomised controlled trial conducted within Catholic and Government primary schools across Victoria, Australia. The intervention comprises 4 days of face-to-face professional learning for teachers and ongoing implementation support via a specific worker. The primary outcome is reading ability of the students at grade 3, and the secondary outcomes are teacher knowledge and practice, student mental health, reading comprehension and language ability at grade 1; and literacy, writing and numeracy at grade 3. Economic evaluation will compare the incremental costs of the intervention to the measured primary and secondary outcomes. Ethics and dissemination This trial was approved by the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee #CF13/2634-2013001403 and later transferred to the University of Melbourne #1545540. The investigators (including Government and Catholic partners) will communicate trial results to stakeholders, collaborators and participating schools and teachers via appropriate presentations and publications. Trial registration number ISRCTN77681972; Pre-results. PMID:29162571

  13. Classroom Promotion of Oral Language (CPOL): protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial of a school-based intervention to improve children's literacy outcomes at grade 3, oral language and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Sharon; Snow, Pamela; Eadie, Patricia; Munro, John; Gold, Lisa; Le, Ha N D; Orsini, Francesca; Shingles, Beth; Lee, Katherine; Connell, Judy; Watts, Amy

    2017-11-20

    Oral language and literacy competence are major influences on children's developmental pathways and life success. Children who do not develop the necessary language and literacy skills in the early years of school then go on to face long-term difficulties. Improving teacher effectiveness may be a critical step in lifting oral language and literacy outcomes. The Classroom Promotion of Oral Language trial aims to determine whether a specifically designed teacher professional learning programme focusing on promoting oral language can lead to improved teacher knowledge and practice, and advance outcomes in oral language and literacy for early years school children, compared with usual practice. This is a two-arm cluster multisite randomised controlled trial conducted within Catholic and Government primary schools across Victoria, Australia. The intervention comprises 4 days of face-to-face professional learning for teachers and ongoing implementation support via a specific worker. The primary outcome is reading ability of the students at grade 3, and the secondary outcomes are teacher knowledge and practice, student mental health, reading comprehension and language ability at grade 1; and literacy, writing and numeracy at grade 3. Economic evaluation will compare the incremental costs of the intervention to the measured primary and secondary outcomes. This trial was approved by the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee #CF13/2634-2013001403 and later transferred to the University of Melbourne #1545540. The investigators (including Government and Catholic partners) will communicate trial results to stakeholders, collaborators and participating schools and teachers via appropriate presentations and publications. ISRCTN77681972; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Google apps for virtual learning communities development: strengthening english language skills in an university environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Intriago

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This action research project aims to strengthen English language reading comprehension and speaking skills in college students through the use of Google Apps and Literature Circles (LCs in virtual communities for learning. Method: The study involved 70 students at a public university in Ecuador. The educational intervention lasted a semester, included the implementation of LCs virtually and in person with a phase of independent reading and another for the discussion. 14 learning communities were organized and students assumed specific roles in order to warranty equality participation. The “Google Apps” were chosen for their ease of access. To monitor the progress of learning English, a pretest and a posttest were applied using the Preliminary English Test (PET by Cambridge University, whose validity and reliability are amply recognized internationally. Results: It showed an improvement of the reading comprehension and speaking skills in English Language in the participants group, who went from A1 to B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL at the end of the process. Conclusion: it is confirmed that the use of “Google Apps” aided in the building of virtual learning communities to support the second language acquisition process (L2 in the university context.

  15. The University of Zambia School Teaching Experience: Is It Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Chomba Manchishi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching practice exercises serve the purpose of orienting the teacher into real classroom situations where the novice puts his or her skills into practice. Education students at the University of Zambia (UNZA go through the school teaching experience after their third year of study. This comes after they have arguably completed enough content and methodology courses to teach. The purpose of this study was to establish the effectiveness of the UNZA school teaching experience. The research instruments used were interview guides, observation checklists, and focus group discussions. The respondents included 80 serving teachers, 80 student teachers, and 10 head teachers drawn from 10 high schools in the Lusaka District. In addition, 10 lecturers from UNZA were also sampled. The findings revealed that the design and delivery of the UNZA student teaching experience was not effective.

  16. An examination of university-school partnerships in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Mutemeri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine university-school partnerships in the process of teacher education. The research question that guided the study was how teacher educators partner with schools in teacher training. A qualitative study was preferred because the aim was to gather information and opinions on how teacher educators trained student teachers as well as to provide a forum for pre-service student teachers to air their views about how they were trained. Twenty- six lecturers and nine student focus groups, purposively sampled, participated in the study. An interview was used for data collection and Holliday's thematic approach was used to analyse the data. The research revealed that there was a weak partnership between teacher education and schools. The study recommends the creation of third spaces in teacher education which involve an "equal and more dialectical relationship between academic and practitioner knowledge" in support of student teachers' learning.

  17. Sleep disorders in high school and pre-university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia R.S. Rocha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a period in which youngsters have to make choices such as applying for university. The selection process is competitive, and it brings distress and anxiety, risk factors for the appearance of sleep disorders. OBJECTIVE: To verify the occurrence of sleep disorders in third-year high school and pre-university students. METHOD: This cross-sectional descriptive study comprised a sample of 529 students (M=241, F=288 from three public schools, four private schools and two pre-university courses - a middle-class neighborhood in the city of São Paulo - aged between 16 and 19 years old. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI - a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS: The participants (52.9% took about 30 minutes to fall asleep, with an average of 306.4 minutes asleep, moderate daytime sleepiness (n=243, 45.9% and indisposition (n=402, 75.9% to develop the activities. The scores (M and F were similar regarding problems that affect sleep. CONCLUSION: The investigated population showed sleep disorders and poor sleep quality.

  18. Sleep disorders in high school and pre-university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Célia R S; Rossini, Sueli; Reimão, Rubens

    2010-12-01

    Adolescence is a period in which youngsters have to make choices such as applying for university. The selection process is competitive, and it brings distress and anxiety, risk factors for the appearance of sleep disorders. To verify the occurrence of sleep disorders in third-year high school and pre-university students. This cross-sectional descriptive study comprised a sample of 529 students (M=241, F=288) from three public schools, four private schools and two pre-university courses - a middle-class neighborhood in the city of São Paulo - aged between 16 and 19 years old. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) - a standardized questionnaire. The participants (52.9%) took about 30 minutes to fall asleep, with an average of 306.4 minutes asleep, moderate daytime sleepiness (n=243, 45.9%) and indisposition (n=402, 75.9%) to develop the activities. The scores (M and F) were similar regarding problems that affect sleep. The investigated population showed sleep disorders and poor sleep quality.

  19. Dyslexia and the learning of a foreign language in school: where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, M A

    2000-01-01

    The difficulties which many dyslexic students encounter in the learning of the English language often extend to the learning of a foreign language in school. Although this problem has been acknowledged for some time, and although the learning of a modern foreign language is a core element in the Scottish curriculum, there has been little research into how modern languages can be presented to offer the best learning opportunities to dyslexic students. Dyslexic students are likely to benefit from a multisensory approach to the learning of a modern foreign language, and it seems likely that they will need to utilize similar strategies to those used for learning their first language. Strategies are discussed with a view to making modern language learning more appropriate for students with difficulties in learning.

  20. English Second Language, General, Special Education, and Speech/Language Personal Teacher Efficacy, English Language Arts Scientifically-Validated Intervention Practice, and Working Memory Development of English Language Learners in High and Low Performing Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    The researcher investigated teacher factors contributing to English language arts (ELA) achievement of English language learners (ELLs) over 2 consecutive years, in high and low performing elementary schools with a Hispanic/Latino student population greater than or equal to 30 percent. These factors included personal teacher efficacy, teacher…

  1. Applying Language Learning Strategies in the Foreign Language Listening Comprehension: A Study of Islamic Senior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIAN PERTIWI

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present study was to empirically investigate the possible correlation and the influence between students’ language learning strategies and listening comprehension. The population of this study was 138 eleventh grade students of Islamic Senior High School number 2 Palembang. The sample was all of eleventh grade students in social class. The total number of the student was 138. Since 16 students were absent, so the sample consisted of 122 students. To collect the data in order to measure the students’ language learning strategies and listening comprehension, SILL (strategy inventory in learning language and listening comprehension test from TOEFL Junior test were used in this study. The Pearson correlation was used in analyzing the data using SPSS 16. The result from questionnaire showed that most of the students used metacognitive strategies were in medium level and sometimes used language learning strategies. The result from listening comprehension test showed that most of the students were in very poor level. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between the two variables that can be seen from the correlation coefficient or r-obtained (-.011 was lower than r-table (0.1779 then the level of probability or sig. value (.902 was higher than .05. From the result, it can be concluded that there was no significant correlation between language learning strategies and listening comprehension of eleventh grade students of Islamic Senior High School number 2 Palembang.

  2. Prior knowledge of deaf students fluent in brazilian sign languages regarding the algebraic language in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Teresinha Frizzarini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There are few researches with deeper reflections on the study of algebra with deaf students. In order to validate and disseminate educational activities in that context, this article aims at highlighting the deaf students’ prior knowledge, fluent in Brazilian Sign Language, referring to the algebraic language used in high school. The theoretical framework used was Duval’s theory, with analysis of the changes, by treatment and conversion, of different registers of semiotic representation, in particular inequalities. The methodology used was the application of a diagnostic evaluation performed with deaf students, all fluent in Brazilian Sign Language, in a special school located in the north of Paraná State. We emphasize the need to work in both directions of conversion, in different languages, especially when the starting record is the graphic. Therefore, the conclusion reached was that one should not separate the algebraic representation from other records, due to the need of sign language perform not only the communication function, but also the functions of objectification and treatment, fundamental in cognitive development.

  3. FORMATION OF COGNITIVE INTEREST AT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LESSONS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL: TECHNOLOGIES, METHODS, TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova, E.G.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There are a lot of didactic and technological methods and techniques that shape and develop cognitive interest of primary school students in modern methodology of teaching foreign languages. The use of various forms of gaming interaction, problem assignments, information and communication technologies in the teaching of primary school students allows diversifying the teaching of a foreign language, contributes to the development of their creative and cognitive activity. The use of health-saving technologies ensures the creation of a psychologically and emotionally supportive atmosphere at the lesson, which is an essential condition for acquiring new knowledge and maintaining stable cognitive interest among students while learning a foreign language.

  4. “Our job is to deliver a good secondary school student, not a good university student.” Secondary school teachers’ beliefs and practices regarding university preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Els; Jansen, Ellen

    This study investigated secondary school teachers’ beliefs and practices regarding university preparation by interviewing 50 teachers. Teachers most often mentioned study skills as important aspect of university readiness. Although most teachers believed their role involved contributing to

  5. Teaching Computer Languages and Elementary Theory for Mixed Audiences at University Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical issues of computer science are traditionally taught in a way that presupposes a solid mathematical background and are usually considered more or less unaccessible for students without this. An effective methodology is described which has been developed for a target group of university...... into a learning-by-doing approach having the students to develop such descriptions themselves from an informal introduction....... students with different backgrounds such as natural science or humanities. It has been developed for a course that integrates theoretical material on computer languages and abstract machines with practical programming techniques. Prolog used as meta-language for describing language issues is the central...... instrument in the approach: Formal descriptions become running prototypes that are easy and appealing to test and modify, and can be extended into analyzers, interpreters, and tools such as tracers and debuggers. Experience shows a high learning curve, especially when the principles are extended...

  6. Universal brain signature of proficient reading: Evidence from four contrasting languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueckl, Jay G; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M; Molfese, Peter J; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Bick, Atira; Frost, Stephen J; Hancock, Roeland; Wu, Denise H; Mencl, William Einar; Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Lee, Jun-Ren; Oliver, Myriam; Zevin, Jason D; Hoeft, Fumiko; Carreiras, Manuel; Tzeng, Ovid J L; Pugh, Kenneth R; Frost, Ram

    2015-12-15

    We propose and test a theoretical perspective in which a universal hallmark of successful literacy acquisition is the convergence of the speech and orthographic processing systems onto a common network of neural structures, regardless of how spoken words are represented orthographically in a writing system. During functional MRI, skilled adult readers of four distinct and highly contrasting languages, Spanish, English, Hebrew, and Chinese, performed an identical semantic categorization task to spoken and written words. Results from three complementary analytic approaches demonstrate limited language variation, with speech-print convergence emerging as a common brain signature of reading proficiency across the wide spectrum of selected languages, whether their writing system is alphabetic or logographic, whether it is opaque or transparent, and regardless of the phonological and morphological structure it represents.

  7. [Assessing research productivity in Department of Internal Medicine, University of Zagreb, School of Medicine and University Hospital Centre Zagreb].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Jelka; Sember, Marijan; Granić, Davorka

    2012-01-01

    Bibliometric analysis may give an objective information about publishing activity, citation rate and collaboration patterns of individuals, groups and institutions. The publication productivity of the present medical staff (79 with specialist degree and 22 residents) in Department of Internal Medicine, University of Zagreb School of Medicine in University Hospital Centre Zagreb was measured by the number of papers indexed by Medline, their impact was measured by the number of times these papers had subsequently been cited in the medical literature, while the collaboration pattern was estimated by the authors' addresses listed in the papers. PubMed database was a source for verifying the bibliographic data, and the citation data were searched via Thomson Web of Scence (WoS) platform. There were a total of 1182 papers, published from 1974 to date. The number of papers per author ranged from 0 to 252. Sixty of papers were published in English, and 39% in Croatian language. The roughly equal share was published in local and foreign journals. The RCT studies and practice guidelines were among the most cited papers and were at the same time published by the highly ranked journals. The collaboration analysis confirmed the extensive involment in the international multicentric clinical trials as well as in the development of international/local practice guidelines.

  8. The relationship between English language learning strategies and gender among pre-university students: An overview of UMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to analyze the effects psychological gender differences on the relationship between language learning strategies and their proficiency in English language for pre-university students. Previous researchers found that the more employment of language learning strategies, the more successful the learners are and those with higher level of strategy use are female rather than male. In this study, fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  9. Exploration and analysis of rural primary school teacher’s language violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Honglian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the problem of rural education becomes more and more obvious while the supervision on stay-at-home children’s education becomes more and more difficult, rural primary school teacher’s language violence has become a new big problem today. This paper collected and investigated the improper language used by rural primary school teachers so as to analyze the features, harm, causes and solutions of language violence, trying to explore and analyze rural primary school teacher’s language violence from perspective of sociology and remind primary school teachers of rethinking. In subjective aspect, this paper hopes to improve rural primary school teacher’s comprehensive quality, establish specification for teacher’s language, lower rural teacher’s vocational burnout and alleviate the psychological pressure that exam-oriented education and rural stay-at-home children impose on teachers. In objective aspect, this paper hopes to enhance the supervision from society and administrative departments for education. All the above measures can be taken to effectively eliminate teacher’s language violence and resolve the crisis.

  10. Serbian schools and teaching of Serbian language in Greece in the 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Gordana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this work is Serbian schools and the teaching of Serbian language in Greece in the 20th century. During the first half of the 20th century the existence of Serbian people in Turkey (later in Greece was acknowledged through school and church. Thanks to the Serbian schools, Serbs as an invisible minority became a visible one. In the second half of the 20th century there is primarily a teaching of Serbian language as a foreign language. During this period, Serbian was accepted primarily by Greeks at courses and private classes. At the beginning of the nineties in the 20th century because of the war in the territory of Yugoslavia, a large number of refugees went to Greece. Teaching of Serbian as a native language was organized only ten years later (at the beginning of 21st century. In some places, the schools are located in consular sections and have the assistance of the country of origin (Thessalonica, Katerini while in Hani (Crete immigrants organized them-selves without the assistance from the country of origin. By studying Serbian schools and the teaching of Serbian language, this work considers relation towards language as a symbol of ethnic identity - at the individual level, at the level of receiving country and at the level of country of origin.

  11. Teaching Foreign Languages in Slovenian School System: Is There any Room for Japanese?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronka STRAUS

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article opens with a brief insight into the language policies of some international multilateral organisations of importance to Slovenia, and then continues to describe the place and roles of foreign languages in Slovene elementary and upper secondary schools. Chinese was the last foreign language to be integrated into the Slovene school system. The article introduces the process of its integration from the professional and organisational point of view as well as the one from the Slovenian school system. The whole integration process of Chinese into the Slovene curriculum was very complex and time consuming, but can as such serve as the bases for reflection on the way to integrate the Japanese language as well.

  12. Classroom Interaction in Teaching English as Foreign Language at Lower Secondary Schools in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Sundari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a deep understanding of interaction in language classroom in foreign language context. Interviews, as major instrument, to twenty experienced English language teachers from eight lower secondary schools (SMP were conducted in Jakarta, completed by focus group discussions and class observation/recordings. The gathered data was analyzed according to systematic design of grounded theory analysis method through 3-phase coding. A model of classroom interaction was formulated defining several dimensions in interaction. Classroom interaction can be more comprehended under the background of interrelated factors: interaction practices, teacher and student factors, learning objectives, materials, classroom contexts, and outer contexts surrounding the interaction practices. The developed model of interaction for language classroom is notably to give deep descriptions on how interaction substantially occurs and what factors affect it in foreign language classrooms at lower secondary schools from teachers’ perspectives.

  13. The effects of multisensory structured language instruction on native language and foreign language aptitude skills of at-risk high school foreign language learners: A replication and follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, R L; Ganschow, L

    1993-12-01

    According to research findings, most students who experience foreign language learning problems are thought to have overt or subtle native language learning difficulties, primarily with phonological processing. A recent study by the authors showed that when a multisensory structured language approach to teaching Spanish was used with a group of at-risk high school students, the group's pre- and posttest scores on native language phonological processing, verbal memory and vocabulary, and foreign language aptitude measures significantly improved. In this replication and follow-up study, the authors compared pre- and posttest scores of a second group of students (Cohort 2) who received MSL instruction in Spanish on native language and foreign language aptitude measures. They also followed students from the first study (Cohort 1) over a second year of foreign language instruction. Findings showed that the second cohort made significant gains on three native language phonological measures and a test of foreign language aptitude. Follow-up testing on the first cohort showed that the group maintained its initial gains on all native language and foreign language aptitude measures. Implications for the authors' Linguistic Coding Deficit Hypothesis are discussed and linked with current reading research, in particular the concepts of the assumption of specificity and modularity.

  14. Communication Strategies Used by High School English Language Learners in Multilingual Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spromberg, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    In this study, twenty-five high school English language learners were observed in their classrooms in a New York City public school while they worked in small groups. All observations were video recorded or done by the researcher while in the classrooms. The videos were then transcribed. Communication strategies that the participants used were…

  15. The Role of the School Psychologist in the Examination of Complex Language Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werder, Hans

    1988-01-01

    School psychologists must utilize an interdisciplinary approach to understand and analyze language disturbances, by examining the student's motor coordination, sensorium, perception, cognition, emotionality, and sociability. Implications for the practice of school psychology are offered in the areas of dyslalia, dysgrammatia, retardation of…

  16. Managing Internal Marketing in a New Zealand Language School: Some Important Lessons for All Educational Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski, Christopher Allen

    2008-01-01

    In New Zealand, private language schools, although controversial, are popular for international travellers who want to study and travel simultaneously. These alternative schools are run in a business-like fashion and their educational administrators have embraced the use of marketing as part of their everyday educational management practice. Even…

  17. Health-related quality of life in school-age children with speech-language-impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flapper, B.C.; Van Den Heuvel, M.

    Speech-language-impairment (SLI) as well as behavioral-dysfunction and school-type might influence health-related-quality-of-life. Patients and methods: Cross-sectional study in 124 children aged 5-8 years with SLI, in 4 special education (SE) and 7 mainstream ambulatory care (AC) schools, and 35

  18. Youth Citizenship at the End of Primary School: The Role of Language Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidhof, Bram B. F.; ten Dam, Geert T. M.; Dijkstra, A. B.; van de Werfhorst, H. G.

    2017-01-01

    Schools are expected to fulfil different types of goals, including citizenship development. An important question is to what extent schools can simultaneously promote different learning outcomes. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between language ability and youth citizenship. Using a representative sample of 2429 grade 6 pupils (age…

  19. Equity Traps Redux: Inequitable Access to Foreign Language Courses for African American High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoener, Herbert Joseph, III; McKenzie, Kathryn Bell

    2016-01-01

    Although much of the current educational research literature on achievement gaps has focused on core curricular areas in public schools, few have focused on racially identifiable gaps in non-core areas such as high school foreign languages. These achievement, and thus advancement, gaps often result in the under-representation of students of color…

  20. Educating English Language Learners: Instructional Approaches and Teacher Collaboration in Philadelphia Public Schools. PERC Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann-Moore, Rebecca; Rowland, Jeannette; Hughes, Rosemary; Lin, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Districts, charter management organizations, and individual schools can learn a great deal from each other about strategies for creating robust and supportive learning environments for English Language Learners (ELLS). This brief highlights key findings about how Philadelphia public schools were crafting instructional approaches to serve their…

  1. Encountering Problems at Home and at School: Language and Cognition in Two Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Mary

    This paper discusses cognitive communicative training in preschool and reports on a study of 11 Hawaiian preschoolers that examined how these children interacted with others, used language, manipulated objects, and solved problems at home and at school. The study observed the children at school and at home over a 5-month period, collecting…

  2. Stimulating students’ academic language : Opportunities in instructional methods in elementary school mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, Nanke; Aarts, Rian; Kurvers, J.J.H.; Ros, Anje; Kroon, Sjaak

    2017-01-01

    Mastering academic language (AL) by elementary school students is important for achieving school success. The extent to which teachers play a role in stimulating students’ AL development may differ. Two types of AL stimulating behavior are distinguished: aimed at students’ understanding and at

  3. Stimulating students’ academic language : opportunities in instructional methods in elementary school mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rian Aarts; Jeanne Kurvers; Sjaak Kroon; Anje Ros; Nanke Dokter

    2017-01-01

    Mastering academic language (AL) by elementary school students is important for achieving school success. The extent to which teachers play a role in stimulating students’ AL development may differ. Two types of AL stimulating behavior are distinguished: aimed at students’ understanding and at

  4. Making the Difference for Minority Children: The Development of an Holistic Language Policy at Richmond Road School, Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Stephan A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the development of a holistic language policy, which recognized and included minority languages within the curriculum, at the Richmond Road school in New Zealand. The policy illustrates how the formulation and implementation of school-based curriculum development can be effectively achieved by the school. (25 references) (JL)

  5. A Multilevel, Longitudinal Analysis of Middle School Math and Language Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Zvoch

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of schools in a large urban school district was examined using achievement data from a longitudinally matched cohort of middle school students. Schools were evaluated in terms of the mean achievement and mean growth of students in mathematics and language arts. Application of multilevel, longitudinal models to student achievement data revealed that 1 school performance varied across both outcome measures in both subject areas, 2 significant proportions of variation were associated with school-to-school differences in performance, 3 evaluations of school performance differed depending on whether school mean achievement or school mean growth in achievement was examined, and 4 school mean achievement was a weak predictor of school mean growth. These results suggest that assessments of school performance depend on choices of how data are modeled and analyzed. In particular, the present study indicates that schools with low mean scores are not always “poor performing” schools. Use of student growth rates to evaluate school performance enables schools that would otherwise be deemed low performing to demonstrate positive effects on student achievement. Implications for state accountability systems are discussed.

  6. Middle School Foreign Language Instruction: A Missed Opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissau, Scott; Adams, Mary Jo; Algozzine, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies conducted over the past decade have suggested the motivational and proficiency-related benefits of commencing language instruction at an early age. Limitations in many of these studies, however, have prevented their results from being applied to the teaching of foreign languages in the United States. In response to calls for…

  7. QUESTIONING FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING IN ISLAMIC PRE-SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohmani Nur Indah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper questions the urgency of foreign language learning at early age by covering some arguments on the acquisition and bilingualism. Nowadays in Indonesia, under the interest of education, bilingual learning is undertaken by adopting the theory of bilingual acquisition referring to Chomsky’s ideas. In fact, the foreign language learning is not always in line with the principle of language acquisition especially for the early age children. The globalization era requires foreign language mastery so that for many institutions of children education have got the bilingual learning. As the example, some of Islamic educational institutions at the level of playgroup have applied the instruction in English and teaching Arabic words, by considering that the earlier foreign language learning is the better, and the fact that the golden age of brain development occurs at the first five years. This needs to be analyzed further, because there is also important task to have mother tongue language acquisition. For the community of multilingual such as in Indonesia, the acquisition of many languages is unavoidable. Therefore, parents are faced with two choices: To prior the mother tongue and bahasa Indonesia as second language or encourage the bilingual learning of Arabic and English.

  8. Punjabi Heritage Language Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwana, Ravneet Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Punjabi heritage language maintenance and development are rooted in community, identity, and, for many, faith. Various opportunities are available for maintaining linguistic ties to Punjabi (also spelled Panjabi) and for developing proficiency in the Punjabi language. They range from community-based to federally funded programs, available in…

  9. Using multi-criteria decision methods for selecting a language school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mileine Henriques Elias Velasco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the interest of organizations by professionals who have deep knowledge concerning more than one language has been increasing. In this scenario, the choice of a language school has been one of the most common decision problems, which has been often made on the basis of word-of-mouth, marketing activities of schools and trials without criteria. In order to contribute to this problem, this paper presents a study in which two multi-criteria decision aid methods (AHP and Weighted Average were used to select a language school. Thus, the degree of importance of criteria relating to the problem and the degree of satisfaction of undergraduate and postgraduate students in relation to language schools they study were taken into account. The best ranked language school was the same for both MCDA methods, although some schools have obtained different positions. It was found that the analysis with AHP is richer and more elaborate than with the Weighted Average method. However, the large number of pairwise comparisons which were required to the study demanded significant attention and cognitive effort from the decision maker, and more time to perform the analysis - aspects that may contribute to the preference for the Weighted Average method in similar studies.

  10. IS ENGLISH THERE?: INVESTIGATING LANGUAGE USE AMONG THE YOUNG ALGERIAN USERS OF INTERNET AT TLEMCEN UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    KRIM, Sihem

    2015-01-01

    This present work tries to investigate how language is used electronically among the young Algerian users of Internet, and if they use English or not. For doing this study, a case study was conducted at Tlemcen University: English Department relying on two main research instruments: students’ questionnaire and teachers’ interview. After collecting data from the respondents( 20 Master 1 students and 8 teachers), the results reveal that the majority of participants use English vi...

  11. Gellish: A generic extensible ontological language - design and application of a universal data structure -

    OpenAIRE

    Van Renssen, A.S.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Since long data storage and data communication lack a common standard universal data model as well as a common data language for the application domains of database users. This hampers data communication between systems and causes costly data conversion processes. Various solutions have been proposed. However, those solutions either have a limited scope and are mutually incompatible or are difficult to implement. This thesis presents an integral solution to this problem in the form of the sem...

  12. Integrating ICT in English Language Learning: Students’ Perceptions of a State University in Jambi Province

    OpenAIRE

    Oktalia, Dwi; Ngadiso, Ngadiso; Supriyadi, Slamet

    2018-01-01

    This research was done in order to know students‘ perception toward integrating ICT in English Language Learning and also to find out problem that may faced by students during the ICT integration. This research used quantitative method in order to describe students‘ perception toward the use of ICT in ELL. This research involved English students from a state university in Jambi province as the respondents. The data were collected by using questionnaires adapted from Chutopama (2004). The ques...

  13. PROFICIENCY LEVEL AND LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES AMONG JORDANIAN STUDENTS AT UNIVERSITI UTARA MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jaradat, Eshraq Mahmoud Mustafa; Bakrin, Haryati

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between proficiency level and language learning strategies (LLSs) among Jordanian students enrolled at Universiti Utara Malaysia. The frequency level of the LLSs employed by the students was also investigated. The theoretical foundation for the study was provided by three comprehensive theories which are the Behaviorism, the Cognitive Psychology, and the Schema Theory. The data for the LLSs was obtained from using Oxford’s (1990) Strategy Inventory for Lan...

  14. Language-universal sensory deficits in developmental dyslexia: English, Spanish, and Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Usha; Wang, H-L Sharon; Cruz, Alicia; Fosker, Tim; Mead, Natasha; Huss, Martina

    2011-02-01

    Studies in sensory neuroscience reveal the critical importance of accurate sensory perception for cognitive development. There is considerable debate concerning the possible sensory correlates of phonological processing, the primary cognitive risk factor for developmental dyslexia. Across languages, children with dyslexia have a specific difficulty with the neural representation of the phonological structure of speech. The identification of a robust sensory marker of phonological difficulties would enable early identification of risk for developmental dyslexia and early targeted intervention. Here, we explore whether phonological processing difficulties are associated with difficulties in processing acoustic cues to speech rhythm. Speech rhythm is used across languages by infants to segment the speech stream into words and syllables. Early difficulties in perceiving auditory sensory cues to speech rhythm and prosody could lead developmentally to impairments in phonology. We compared matched samples of children with and without dyslexia, learning three very different spoken and written languages, English, Spanish, and Chinese. The key sensory cue measured was rate of onset of the amplitude envelope (rise time), known to be critical for the rhythmic timing of speech. Despite phonological and orthographic differences, for each language, rise time sensitivity was a significant predictor of phonological awareness, and rise time was the only consistent predictor of reading acquisition. The data support a language-universal theory of the neural basis of developmental dyslexia on the basis of rhythmic perception and syllable segmentation. They also suggest that novel remediation strategies on the basis of rhythm and music may offer benefits for phonological and linguistic development.

  15. Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathologists on the Use of Telepractice in Schools: Quantitative Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice K. Tucker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This research surveyed 170 school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs in one northeastern state, with only 1.8% reporting telepractice use in school-settings. These results were consistent with two ASHA surveys (2002; 2011 that reported limited use of telepractice for school-based speech-language pathology. In the present study, willingness to use telepractice was inversely related to age, perhaps because younger members of the profession are more accustomed to using technology.  Overall, respondents were concerned about the validity of assessments administered via telepractice; whether clinicians can adequately establish rapport with clients via telepractice; and if therapy conducted via telepractice can be as effective as in-person speech-language therapy. Most respondents indicated the need to establish procedures and guidelines for school-based telepractice programs.

  16. Papers in Language Learning and Language Acquisition. AFinLA Yearbook 1980. No. 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajavaara, Kari, Ed.; And Others

    Papers include: (1) "Language Acquisitional Universals: L1, L2, Pidgins, and FLT" (Henning Wode); (2) "Language Acquisition, Language Learning and the School Curriculum" (Norman F. Davies); (3) "Language Teaching and Acquisition of Communication" (Kari Sajavaara, Jaakko Lehtonen); (4) "On the Distinction between…

  17. On the Relationship among Critical Thinking, Language Learning Strategy Use and University Achievement of Iranian English as a Foreign Language Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Hassan Soodmand; Movassagh, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship among critical thinking, strategy use and university achievement. To this end, 76 English major students sat the California Critical Thinking Skills Test and filled out Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning. Participants' Grade Point Averages were regarded as their university achievement. The…

  18. The relationship between English language learning strategies and proficiency of pre-university students: A study case of UMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-07-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the relationship between language learning strategies and proficiency in English. Fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were judged based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) Results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  19. The language scripts of pre-school children and of the language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It reflects on the lessons learnt from a language stimulation programme implemented by a dedicated volunteer in a childcare centre in an isolated farming valley in the Stellenbosch area. Some children attending this centre received deliberate language stimulation in a small-group setting on a weekly basis for 18 weeks ...

  20. Eliminating Social Inequality by Reinforcing Standard Language Ideology? Language Policy for Dutch in Flemish Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Steven; De Caluwe, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Flanders, the northern, Dutch-speaking part of Belgium, is experiencing growing intra- and interlingual diversity. On the intralingual level, Tussentaal ("in-between-language") has emerged as a cluster of intermediate varieties between the Flemish dialects and Standard Dutch, gradually becoming "the" colloquial language. At the…

  1. Oral language supports early literacy: a pilot cluster randomized trial in disadvantaged schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Pamela C; Eadie, Patricia A; Connell, Judy; Dalheim, Brenda; McCusker, Hugh J; Munro, John K

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the impact of teacher professional development aimed at improving the capacity of primary teachers in disadvantaged schools to strengthen children's expressive and receptive oral language skills and early literacy success in the first 2 years of school. Fourteen low-SES schools in Victoria, Australia were randomly allocated to a research (n = 8) or control arm (n = 6), resulting in an initial sample of 1254 students, (n = 602 in research arm and n = 652 in control arm). The intervention comprised 6 days of teacher and principal professional development (delivered by language and literacy experts), school-based continuing contact with the research team and completion by one staff member of each research school of a postgraduate unit on early language and literacy. Schools in the control arm received standard teaching according to state auspiced curriculum guidelines. Full data were available on 979 students at follow-up (time 2). Students in the research arm performed significantly better on Test of Language Development: Primary (Fourth Edition) sub-tests (p ≤ .002) and the Reading Progress Test (F = 10.4(1); p = .001) than students in the control arm at time 2. Narrative scores were not significantly different at time 2, although students in research schools showed greater gains. Findings provide "proof of concept" for this approach, and are discussed with respect to implications for teacher professional development and pre-service education concerning the psycholinguistic competencies that underpin the transition to literacy.

  2. Effect on School Language in Assessment of Achievement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eric Wilmot

    changes, including physical, social, cognitive and emotional development. .... week in the 6 years of elementary school in early1970s were compared with a control group .... The School Media Resource Centre in Nigeria: A Panacea for Youth.

  3. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the school and home language environments of preschool-aged children with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Sloane; Audet, Lisa; Harjusola-Webb, Sanna

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to begin to characterize and compare the school and home language environments of 10 preschool-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Naturalistic language samples were collected from each child, utilizing Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) digital voice recorder technology, at 3-month intervals over the course of one year. LENA software was used to identify 15-min segments of each sample that represented the highest number of adult words used during interactions with each child for all school and home language samples. Selected segments were transcribed and analyzed using Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT). LENA data was utilized to evaluate quantitative characteristics of the school and home language environments and SALT data was utilized to evaluate quantitative and qualitative characteristics of language environment. Results revealed many similarities in home and school language environments including the degree of semantic richness, and complexity of adult language, types of utterances, and pragmatic functions of utterances used by adults during interactions with child participants. Study implications and recommendations for future research are discussed. The reader will be able to, (1) describe how two language sampling technologies can be utilized together to collect and analyze language samples, (2) describe characteristics of the school and home language environments of young children with ASD, and (3) identify environmental factors that may lead to more positive expressive language outcomes of young children with ASD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Determining the Correlation Between Language Scores Obtained by Medical Students in their University Entrance and Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ahmadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Some professors and educators in the field of English language believe that the high grades attained by medical students in their Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exam (CMBSE are mainly a result of the students prior fluency in the language before entering medical colleges; they are of the opinion that these grades are not necessarily a result of the combined effort of the English teachers and students in language courses at the university. This research aimsat determining the correlation between the level of fluency in English of medical students prior to university entrance and the grades obtained by them in their CMBSE after 3 terms of language courses at the university.Methods: Seven of the major and smaller universities of medical sciences were selected. The language scores of 2426 students admitted to these universities during the three academic years of 1999 to 2002 in both the National University Entrance Examination (NUEE and the Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exam (CMBSE were obtained from their related universities and from the secretariat of the Council of Medical Basic Sciences Education respectively. The language scores of each studentobtained in both NUEE and CMBSE were then matched. The related SPSS software was used to assess the level of correlation between these two groups of language scores for the students of each university, for each academic year and semester and also the overall score for the three years.Results: Overall a positive and moderately significant correlation was found between the NUEE language scores and those of the CMBSE of the students of the universities studied (P<0/001; R=443%. The level of correlation for the various universities studied differed (Max. 69%, min.27%.A comparison of the means of these two groups of scores also confirmed this correlation.Conclusion: students’ grades The NUEE language score was not the only factor affecting the student’s CMBSE score

  5. Providing written language services in the schools: the time is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Karen A; Katz, Lauren A

    2011-01-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the provision of written language services by school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Specifically, the study examined SLPs' knowledge, attitudes, and collaborative practices in the area of written language services as well as the variables that impact provision of these services. Public school-based SLPs from across the country were solicited for participation in an online, Web-based survey. Data from 645 full-time SLPs from 49 states were evaluated using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Many school-based SLPs reported not providing any services in the area of written language to students with written language weaknesses. Knowledge, attitudes, and collaborative practices were mixed. A logistic regression revealed three variables likely to predict high levels of service provision in the area of written language. Data from the current study revealed that many struggling readers and writers on school-based SLPs' caseloads are not receiving services from their SLPs. Implications for SLPs' preservice preparation, continuing education, and doctoral preparation are discussed.

  6. Early language mediates the relations between preschool inattention and school-age reading achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sarah; Thornton, Veronica; Marks, David J; Rajendran, Khushmand; Halperin, Jeffrey M

    2016-05-01

    Early inattention is associated with later reading problems in children, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. We investigated whether the negative relation between preschoolers' ADHD symptoms and 8-year-old reading achievement is directly related to the severity of inattention or is mediated by early language skills. Children (n = 150; 76% boys) were evaluated at 3 time points: preschool (T1), mean (SD) age = 4.24 (.49) years; 1 year later (T2), mean (SD) age = 5.28 (.50) years; and during school age (T3), mean (SD) age = 8.61 (.31) years. At T1, parents' Kiddie-SADS responses were dimensionalized to reflect ADHD severity. Children completed the Language domain of the NEPSY (i.e., A Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment) at T1 and again at T2. At T3, children completed the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, Second Edition Word Reading, Pseudoword Decoding, Reading Comprehension, and Spelling subtests, and their teachers completed ratings of Reading and Written Expression performance in school. The mediating effect of T2 Language on the relation between preschool Inattention and age 8 Reading was examined using the nonparametric bootstrapping procedure, while controlling for T1 Language. Language ability at T2 mediated the path from preschool inattention (but not hyperactivity/impulsivity) to 8-year-old reading achievement (both test scores and ratings) after controlling for preschoolers' language ability. Early attentional deficits may negatively impact school-age reading outcomes by compromising the development of language skills, which in turn imperils later reading achievement. Screening children with attentional problems for language impairment, as well as implementing early intervention for both attentional and language problems may be critical to promote reading achievement during school years. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. The English proficiency and academic language skills of Australian bilingual children during the primary school years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennaoui, Kamelia; Nicholls, Ruth Jane; O'Connor, Meredith; Tarasuik, Joanne; Kvalsvig, Amanda; Goldfeld, Sharon

    2016-04-01

    Evidence suggests that early proficiency in the language of school instruction is an important predictor of academic success for bilingual children. This study investigated whether English-proficiency at 4-5 years of age predicts academic language and literacy skills among Australian bilingual children at 10-11 years of age, as part of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children ( LSAC, 2012 ). The LSAC comprises a nationally representative clustered cross-sequential sample of Australian children. Data were analysed from a sub-sample of 129 bilingual children from the LSAC Kindergarten cohort (n = 4983), for whom teachers completed the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) checklist (a population measure of early childhood development) and the Academic Rating Scale (ARS) language and literacy subscale. Linear regression analyses revealed that bilingual children who commenced school with stronger English proficiency had higher academic language and literacy scores at the end of primary school (β = 0.45). English proficiency remained a significant predictor, even when accounting for gender and socio-economic disadvantage (β = 0.38). The findings indicate that bilingual children who begin school without English proficiency are at risk of difficulties with academic language and literacy, even after 6 years of schooling. Risk factors need to be identified so early support can be targeted towards the most vulnerable children.

  8. Perceived teacher support and language anxiety in Polish secondary school EFL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Piechurska-Kuciel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The teacher’s role is vital, both in respect to achieving academic goals, and with regard to the regulation of emotional and social processes. Positive perceptions of teacher support can endorse psychological wellness, and help maintain students’ academic interests, higher academic achievement and more positive peer relationships. The teacher who shows understanding, empathy and consistency in their behavior helps students start forming an identity, which will assist them in coping with stress and anxiety directly connected with the foreign language learning process (language anxiety. The main aim of this research is to investigate the relationship between teacher support and language anxiety levels. It is speculated that teacher support functions as a buffer from the effects of negative emotions, such as language anxiety experienced in the foreign language learning process. The participants of the study were 621 secondary grammar school students whose responses to a questionnaire were the main data source. The results of the study demonstrate that students with higher levels of teacher support experience lower language anxiety levels in comparison to their peers with lower levels of teacher support. Students who have a feeling that they can count on the instructor’s help, advice, assistance, or backing manage the learning process more successfully. They evaluate their language abilities highly and receive better final grades. Nevertheless, gender and residential location do not moderate teacher support and language anxiety due to the specificity of the sample consisting of novice secondary grammar school students.

  9. An investigation of Chinese university EFL learner’s foreign language reading anxiety, reading strategy use and reading comprehension performance

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongshe Lu; Meihua Liu

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the interrelations between foreign language (FL) reading anxiety, FL reading strategy use and their interactive effect on FL reading comprehension performance at the tertiary level in China. Analyses of the survey data collected from 1702 university students yielded the following results: (a) Both Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale (FLRAS) and Foreign Language Reading Strategy Use Scale (FLRSUS) had important subcomponents, (b) more than half of the stu...

  10. Language, Identity, and Citizenship in a U.S. University: Immigrant English Learners' Identity (Re)positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In response to growing linguistic diversity, many U.S. universities have implemented language policies that include procedures for English learner (EL) identification. Institutional labels such as "English learner" and "limited English proficiency" are regularly used to identify students who may need English language support;…

  11. Universals of Word Order in Esperanto. Lektos: Interdisciplinary Working Papers in Language Sciences, Vol. 3, No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Robert N.

    The contention that Esperanto is a natural linguistic system is discussed. Research is cited concerning universals of word order, dominant word order, polar type languages, Esperanto as a verb-subject-object language, and gapping in Esperanto. It is concluded that contrary to grammatical tradition, word order is not and cannot be completely free.…

  12. An Empirical Examination of the Association between Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Self-Efficacy among TEFL University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moafian, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the association between multiple intelligences and language learning efficacy expectations among TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) university students. To fulfill the aim of the study, 108 junior and senior TEFL students were asked to complete the "Multiple Intelligence Developmental Assessment…

  13. Internet Technology-Based Projects in Learning and Teaching English as a Foreign Language at Yakutsk State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorshchikova, Lena; Egorova, Olga; Popova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses recent uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in fostering Internet-based projects for learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at the Faculty of Foreign Languages in Yakutsk State University, Russia. It covers the authors' experiences integrating distance education and creating educational resources…

  14. The Role of Second Language in Higher Education: A Case Study of German Students at a Dutch University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Lidy; Neijt, Anneke; van Hout, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of the challenges and benefits of university students taking a degree course in a language other than their mother tongue. Our study was conducted from the point of view of the non-native students themselves, and our primary concern was the role of language. We investigated the academic achievement of…

  15. French Second Language Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development in Canada: The Roles of Smaller Universities and Related Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses teacher shortages in French language instruction areas in Canada, both core and immersion; the rationalization of programs; staffing and financial support among Alberta's tertiary education; language teacher preparation; and continuing professional development. Suggestions are made as to how a smaller university can better fulfill its…

  16. Mobile Technologies as Boundary Objects in the Hands of Student Teachers of Languages inside and outside the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the use of mobile devices by students of linguistics, future foreign language teachers, outside the university and in-campus, and their vision of the potential usefulness of such devices for language learning at tertiary level. As various characteristics of mobile devices influence their usability, users select a device to fit…

  17. Meeting the Needs of High School Science Teachers in English Language Learner Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seonhee; McDonnough, Jacqueline T.

    2009-08-01

    This survey study explored high school science teachers’ challenges and needs specific to their growing English language learning (ELL) student population. Thirty-three science teachers from 6 English as a Second language (ESL)-center high schools in central Virginia participated in the survey. Issues surveyed were (a) strategies used by science teachers to accommodate ELL students’ special needs, (b) challenges they experienced, and (c) support and training necessary for effective ELL instruction. Results suggest that language barriers as well as ELL students’ lack of science foundational knowledge challenged teachers most. Teachers perceived that appropriate instructional materials and pedagogical training was most needed. The findings have implications for science teacher preservice and inservice education in regard to working with language minority students.

  18. The development of executive function and language skills in the early school years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Debbie; Thompson, Paul; Nash, Hannah M; Snowling, Margaret J; Hulme, Charles

    2016-02-01

    The developmental relationships between executive functions (EF) and early language skills are unclear. This study explores the longitudinal relationships between children's early EF and language skills in a sample of children with a wide range of language abilities including children at risk of dyslexia. In addition, we investigated whether these skills independently predict children's attention/behaviour skills. Data are presented from 243 children at four time points. Children were selected for being at risk of reading difficulties either because of a family history of dyslexia (FR; N = 90) or because of concerns regarding their language development (LI; N = 79) or as typically developing controls (TD; N = 74). The children completed tasks to assess their executive function and language skills at ages 4, 5 and 6 years. At 6 (T4) and 7 years (T5) parents and teachers rated the children's attention/behaviour skills. There was a strong concurrent relationship between language and EF at each assessment. Longitudinal analyses indicated a considerable degree of stability in children's language and EF skills: the influence of language on later EF skills (and vice versa) was weak and not significant in the current sample. Children's EF, but not language, skills at T3 predicted attention/behaviour ratings at T4/T5. There is a strong concurrent association between language and EF skills during the preschool and early school years, when children with language impairment show persistent EF deficits. Latent variables measuring language and EF show high longitudinal stability with little evidence of significant or strong reciprocal influences between these constructs. EF, but not language, skills predict later ratings of children's attention and behaviour. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  19. Home and Community Language Proficiency in Spanish-English Early Bilingual University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Jens

    2017-10-17

    This study assessed home and community language proficiency in Spanish-English bilingual university students to investigate whether the vocabulary gap reported in studies of bilingual children persists into adulthood. Sixty-five early bilinguals (mean age = 21 years) were assessed in English and Spanish vocabulary and verbal reasoning ability using subtests of the Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey-Revised (Schrank & Woodcock, 2009). Their English scores were compared to 74 monolinguals matched in age and level of education. Participants also completed a background questionnaire. Bilinguals scored below the monolingual control group on both subtests, and the difference was larger for vocabulary compared to verbal reasoning. However, bilinguals were close to the population mean for verbal reasoning. Spanish scores were on average lower than English scores, but participants differed widely in their degree of balance. Participants with an earlier age of acquisition of English and more current exposure to English tended to be more dominant in English. Vocabulary tests in the home or community language may underestimate bilingual university students' true verbal ability and should be interpreted with caution in high-stakes situations. Verbal reasoning ability may be more indicative of a bilingual's verbal ability.

  20. THE VIEW OF INTERNS IN THE UNIVERSITY AND SCHOOL RELATIONSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia do Carmo Rosa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a clipping of the master dissertation entitled “Internships in the formation process of geography teachers: university and school relationship”. When considering the formation process of geography teachers, the internship is a curricular component that enhances the university and school relationship, even knowing of the existing gaps for an effective inter-institutional approach. For this reason, first, the text has a brief summary of the research conducted presenting its study matter, objectives, research subjects and methodology. Following, the vision of the interns of the Supervised Internship in Geography of UEG in the context of the university-school relationship will be presented. For this, five illustrative indicators are used to show the view of the research subjects in relations to the internship. Namely, the motivations for carrying out the internship; the difficulties encountered; overcoming such difficulties; and the importance of the internship in the university and school relationship. However, it was possible to establish the view of interns about the internship when approaching each indicator, as they brought many elements/factors for discussion, with the aim to reflect about how the internships have been made effective in this institution, pointing limits and possibilities in the university and school relationship. O presente trabalho trata-se de um recorte da dissertação de mestrado intitulada “O Estágio na Formação do Professor de Geografia: relação universidade e escola”. Ao considerar o processo de formação do professor de Geografia, o estágio é um componente curricular potencializador da relação universidade e escola, mesmo sabendo das lacunas existentes para uma efetiva aproximação interinstitucional. Por esse motivo, primeiramente, o texto faz-se uma breve síntese da pesquisa realizada apresentando seu objeto de estudo, objetivos, sujeitos da pesquisa e metodologia. Na sequ

  1. ENGAGING ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS IN ROBOTICS THROUGH HUMMINGBIRD KIT WITH SNAP! VISUAL PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Newley; Hasan Deniz; Erdogan Kaya; Ezgi Yesilyurt

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how Hummingbird robotics kit with Snap! programing language was used to introduce basics of robotics to elementary and middle school students. Each student in the robotics program built a robot. The robot building process was open ended. Any specific robotics challenge was not provided to the students. Students’ knowledge about robots and programming language were measured through pre, post, and delayed posttests. Results indicated that students improv...

  2. Perspectives of speech-language pathologists on the use of telepractice in schools: the qualitative view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Janice K

    2012-01-01

    Telepractice in speech-language pathology shows the potential to mitigate the current shortage of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) available to serve a growing number of persons with communication disorders. Since a majority of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) certified SLPs work in schools and the population of communicatively impaired clients in schools continues to grow, research into the use of telepractice in the educational setting is warranted. This article reports upon the perspectives of SLPs regarding the use of telepractice in school settings. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with five SLPs experienced in the delivery of telepractice. Four major themes emerged: barriers, benefits, reasons for acceptance and use of telepractice, and suggestions to resolve telepractice professional issues.

  3. UNIVERSITY AND/OR VOCATIONAL SCHOOL – WHEN AND WHY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Leino

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 2013, the university degree is free for everyone in Estonia. Vocational education has always been for free. University degrees have been valued as more academical, and vocational education because of the practical skills gained. There is a new trend in Estonia to enter into a vocational school after the university degree; and/or after one vocational education in to another vocational school. Study eagerness is always nice, but the question here is about the reason(s – is this kind of behaviour rather the sign of lifelong learning, or of wrong choices? In this question the research problem is included also – in case of wrong choices the waste of resources can be considered (from the point of view of society. In 2016, the National Audit Office of Estonia studied the progress of adults aged 25 and over, who had started acquiring vocational education (from 2010/2011 to 2014/2015 academic years before and during their studies, and in working life after the completion of their studies. The focus was on adults, because the decreasing number of young people in the state means that adults are and will remain an important target group for vocational education. The aim of this research is to analyze the background of the fact that many adults in Estonia with vocational education (36% or higher education (20% have started acquiring vocational education alongside adults without any professional education (44%. The subjects/respondents of this research were people who decided to influence the quality of their life through education. The object of the research were shcolars’ opinions about the type of education. In this research I focus on the opinion of students about university and/or vocational education. As an illustration, I discuss one case study of a highly educated person with two master degrees, who is going to start studying in a vocational school. The research question: which background impulses influence the choice of educational

  4. Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: – The purpose of this paper is to analyse the consequences of globalisation in the area of corporate communication, and investigate how language may be managed as a strategic resource. Design/methodology/approach: – A review of previous studies on the effects of globalisation on corporate...... communication and the implications of language management initiatives in international business. Findings: – Efficient language management can turn language into a strategic resource. Language needs analyses, i.e. linguistic auditing/language check-ups, can be used to determine the language situation...... of a company. Language policies and/or strategies can be used to regulate a company’s internal modes of communication. Language management tools can be deployed to address existing and expected language needs. Continuous feedback from the front line ensures strategic learning and reduces the risk of suboptimal...

  5. University Involvement with Charter Schools: Unique Opportunities for Service and Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Julie Hentges

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Charter schools are a controversial, but vibrant, component of the current educational landscape, now serving over 3.1 million students in approximately 6900 schools across the United States.  A unique aspect of this movement has been the establishment of alternative authorizers, and specifically universities, to approve and provide oversight to these public schools.  Campus leaders and policy makers must consider numerous variables regarding a university’s involvement with charter schools.  What are the implications of school choice on university policies and practices? Should universities be “authorizers”, granting charters to schools in direct competition with the traditional public school system? Can universities provide the required “oversight” mandated by the charter school laws, as well as providing “support” for the schools? What opportunities for partnerships and practicum experiences exist?  The article provides an overview of issues that arise with public charter schools authorized by universities.  With 18 years of experiences as a public university on the forefront of enabling charter legislation and the “sponsorship” of inner-city public charter schools, the authors provide a historical perspective of the role of universities within the school choice movement, including oversight roles and supportive programs within the unique and growing phenomenon of school choice.

  6. The impact of language and high-stakes testing policies on elementary school English language learners in Arizona.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne E. Wright

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the results of a survey of third-grade teachers of English Language Learners (ELLs in Arizona regarding school language and accountability policies—Proposition 203, which restricts bilingual education and mandates sheltered English Immersion; the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB; and Arizona LEARNS, the state’s high-stakes testing and accountability program. The instrument, consisting of 126 survey questions plus open-ended interview question, was designed to obtain teacher’s views, to ascertain the impact of these polices, and to explore their effectiveness in improving the education of ELL students. The survey was administered via telephone to 40 teacher participants from different urban, rural and reservation schools across the state. Each participant represents the elementary school in their respective school district which has the largest population of ELL students. Analyses of both quantitative and qualitative data reveal that these policies have mostly resulted in confusion in schools throughout the state over what is and is not allowed, and what constitutes quality instruction for ELLs, that there is little evidence that such policies have led to improvements in the education of ELL students, and that these policies may be causing more harm than good. Specifically, teachers report they have been given little to no guidance over what constitutes sheltered English immersion, and provide evidence that most ELL students in their schools are receiving mainstream sink-or-swim instruction. In terms of accountability, while the overwhelming majority of teachers support the general principle, they believe that high-stakes tests are inappropriate for ELLs and participants provided evidence that the focus on testing is leading to instruction practices for ELLs which fail to meet their unique linguistic and academic needs. The article concludes with suggestions for needed changes to improve the quality of

  7. Challenges facing primary school educators of English Second (or Other Language learners in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie O'Connor

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We were prompted by the prevalence of English Second or Other Language (ESOL learners identified by educators as having language disorders and being referred for Speech-Language Therapy. We describe challenges faced by Grade 1, 2 and 3 educators at government schools in the Cape Metropolitan area who were working with such learners. Applying a mixed-methods descriptive design, a self-administered questionnaire and three focus groups were used for data collection. Educator perceptions and experiences regarding ESOL learners were described. Some participant educators at schools that were not former Model C schools had large classes, including large proportions of ESOL learners. Fur­thermore, there was a shortage of educators who were able to speak isiXhosa, the most frequently occurring first (or home language of the region's ESOL learners. Challenges faced by educators when teaching ESOL learners included learners' academic and socio-emotional difficulties and a lack of parent in­volvement in their children's education. Participant educators indicated a need for departmental, professional and parental support, and additional training and resources. Implications and recommendations for speech-language thera­pist and educator collaborations and speech-language therapists' participation in educator training were identified.

  8. Developing Practitioner-Scholars through University-School District Research Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Nicole C.; Tarasawa, Beth; Waggoner, Jacqueline M.; Smith, Rebecca; Naegele, Zulema

    2016-01-01

    University-community partnerships have gained popularity in the United States as a means of extending university research resources and collaborative opportunities. However, research-driven partnerships between universities and K-12 school districts that prioritize the research needs of K-12 schools are unique. Recently, education scholars have…

  9. EFL Students’ Attitudes and Perception towards English Language Learning and Their English Language Proficiency: A Study from Assa’adah Islamic Boarding School, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falita G. Jaliyya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The English language has been given the status of Foreign Language (FL in Indonesia, unlike the language being a second language in its neighbouring countries. However, the language has becoming quite popular and dominant in certain parts of Indonesian schools, especially private schools and colleges. Thus, this investigation sought to examine the attitudes and perceptions of selected Indonesian English language learners. It also aspired to find out how these attitudes and perceptions towards the English language affect their proficiency. A qualitative research design employing the in-depth semi-structured interview was carried out with 12 students at the As’saadah Islamic Boarding School in Banten, West Java.  Thematic analyses were also performed to analyse the data. The findings point to the direction of students’ motivation in learning English as a foreign language. Students were found to have positive attitudes  and were motivated  to learn the language although learning the language might not stem from their own willingness to learn.

  10. In-service English language training for Italian Primary School Teachers An experience in syllabus design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dawes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report on an in-service English Language Teacher Training Programme devised for the Government project to equip Italian primary school teachers  with the skills to teach English. The paper focuses on the first phase of the project which envisaged research into the best training models and the preparation of appropriate  English Language syllabuses. In  the first three sections of the paper we report on the experience of designing the language syllabus. In the last section we suggest ways of using the syllabus as a tool for self reflective professional development.

  11. World Nuclear University School of Uranium Production: Eight years' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojacek, J.

    2014-01-01

    The World Nuclear University School of Uranium Production was established by DIAMO, state enterprise in 2006 year under the auspices of the World Nuclear University in London in partnership with international nuclear organizations – OECD/NEA and IAEA. Using the expertise and infrastructure of DIAMO State Enterprise, in conjuction with national and international universities, scientific institutions, regulatory authorities and other individual experts, the “school” covers its mission with the aim to provide world-class training on all aspects of uranium production cycle to equip operators, regulators and executives with the knowledge and expertise needed to provide expanded, environmentally-sound uranium mining throughout the world: • to educate students on all aspects of uranium production cycle including exploration, planning, development, operation, remediation and closure of uranium production facilities; • to improve the state of the art of uranium exploration, mining and mine remediation through research and development; • to provide a forum for the exchange of information on the latest uranium mining technologies and experiences – best practices.

  12. Dual language profiles of Latino children of immigrants: Stability and change over the early school years

    Science.gov (United States)

    COLLINS, BRIAN A.; O'CONNOR, ERIN E.; SUÁREZ-OROZCO, CAROLA; NIETO-CASTAÑON, ALFONSO; TOPPELBERG, CLAUDIO O.

    2013-01-01

    Dual language children enter school with varying levels of proficiencies in their first and second language. This study of Latino children of immigrants (N = 163) analyzes their dual language profiles at kindergarten and second grade, derived from the direct assessment of Spanish and English proficiencies (Woodcock Language Proficiency Batteries–Revised). Children were grouped based on the similarity of language profiles (competent profiles, such as dual proficient, Spanish proficient, and English proficient; and low-performing profiles, including borderline proficient and limited proficient). At kindergarten, the majority of children (63%) demonstrated a low-performing profile; by second grade, however, the majority of children (64%) had competent profiles. Change and stability of language profiles over time of individual children were then analyzed. Of concern, are children who continued to demonstrate a low-performing, high-risk profile. Factors in the linguistic environments at school and home, as well as other family and child factors associated with dual language profiles and change/stability over time were examined, with a particular focus on the persistently low-performing profile groups. PMID:24825925

  13. The relationship between language anxiety and students' participation in foreign language classes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanibek, Ardak

    2001-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, the Institute of Economics and Social Sciences, Bilkent University, 2001. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2001. Includes bibliographical references leaves 51-56. This study was designed to explore the relationship between teachers’ and students’ perceptions about students’ participation and students’ anxiety in foreign language classes. This study was conducted at Gazi University Preparatory School. ...

  14. Speech-language pathologists as determiners of the human right to diversity in communication for school children in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia-Bernard, Audrey M

    2018-02-01

    Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression - the right to communication. Communication is at the core of the speech-language pathology (SLP) profession. Yet, while we celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights some of our most vulnerable youth are being placed in special education at disproportional rates. School-based SLPs in the United States may be unwittingly contributing to this phenomenon, obstructing the human right to communication because of biased assessment procedures. However, increasing cultural competence, diversifying the profession, and utilising additional assessment measures are actions that can be taken to promote equity in assessment for all children.

  15. English language writing centres in Japanese universities: What do students really need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim McKinley

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The installation of English language writing centres in Japanese universities is a relatively recent event—the first ones established with funding from the Ministry of Education in 2004. Because of the EFL writing context, setting up a writing centre requires consideration of students’ needs and cultural expectations of writing and writing centres. In general, writing centres that have been established in Japanese universities follow a structure similar to those in the US. This raises the question as to whether or not this is appropriate for the particular needs of EFL students and the obstacles they face. For this study, in order to explore students’ attitudes toward writing centres and the role they play in writing education, interview data was collected from students of English composition in two different departments at a university in Japan well known for its English language education: the English department, which does not have a writing centre, and the liberal arts department, which has one of the first writing centres established in Japan.

  16. EFL Teachers’ Perceptions, Evaluations and Expectations about English Language Courses as EFL in Saudi Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Ahmed Liton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study is to explore EFL teachers’ perceptions, evaluations and expectations about English language courses as EFL in Saudi tertiary level. In other words, this article aims at creating a new avenue for effective EFL teaching-learning curriculum techniques and syllabus in the Saudi tertiary context. Saudi universities offer credit and non-credit Foundation English courses as a part of their program, which are not being very effective. These courses do not promote the students in dealing with their disciplines or programs oriented courses. Even after completion of the Foundation English courses in consecutive two or three semesters, students fail to grasp comprehensive control over the reading materials of their discipline-oriented courses. This is a common scenario in almost all the universities in KSA. The author of this paper ventured to study the predicament of EFL courses in some universities through survey questionnaires, observation as well as primary and secondary sources. The data were collected through questionnaires from a total of 25 EFL teachers at renowned Saudi universities. The research results revealed that the existing Foundation English Course syllabus is not tailored appropriately to the needs of the students so far as the higher studies concerned, and EFL classroom is not conducive to task-based language teaching (TBLT practice due to large class size (100-140. It, therefore, suggests that university Foundation English Courses should be redesigned in assimilating the learners’ standard and previous learning, and course contents should cover the socio-cultural factors of the learners. The study also concludes with some effective implications and recommendations based on the findings of the present research.

  17. Deaf children attending different school environments: sign language abilities and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasuolo, Elena; Valeri, Giovanni; Di Renzo, Alessio; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Volterra, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether full access to sign language as a medium for instruction could influence performance in Theory of Mind (ToM) tasks. Three groups of Italian participants (age range: 6-14 years) participated in the study: Two groups of deaf signing children and one group of hearing-speaking children. The two groups of deaf children differed only in their school environment: One group attended a school with a teaching assistant (TA; Sign Language is offered only by the TA to a single deaf child), and the other group attended a bilingual program (Italian Sign Language and Italian). Linguistic abilities and understanding of false belief were assessed using similar materials and procedures in spoken Italian with hearing children and in Italian Sign Language with deaf children. Deaf children attending the bilingual school performed significantly better than deaf children attending school with the TA in tasks assessing lexical comprehension and ToM, whereas the performance of hearing children was in between that of the two deaf groups. As for lexical production, deaf children attending the bilingual school performed significantly better than the two other groups. No significant differences were found between early and late signers or between children with deaf and hearing parents.

  18. Examination of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety and Achievement in Foreign Language in Turkish University Students in Terms of Various Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Yunus; Tuncer, Murat

    2016-01-01

    This correlational survey study aimed to investigate whether the Turkish prep-class students' foreign language classroom anxiety levels and foreign language achievement significantly differ in terms of such variables as their gender, their experience abroad, perceived level of income and any third language (other than Turkish and English) they…

  19. Effect on School Language in Assessment of Achievement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eric Wilmot

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences Vol. 7, 2009. 35. Looking at ... science students which are considered important to effective learning of science. Forty science ... Negative perception and low performance of females in science .... Nigeria is usually a second language-English. An important ...

  20. Das Sprachlabor in der Schule (The Language Laboratory in Schools).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabus, Hans-Joachim; Freudenstein, Reinhold

    This technical manual for the use of language laboratories includes information on the following topics: (1) types of laboratories, (2) the tape, (3) the tape recorder, (4) other basic technical equipment, (5) the audio-active laboratory, the audio-active-compare laboratory, and an evaluation of the two, (6) possibilities for expanded use, (7)…

  1. Teaching and Learning the Language of Science: A Case Study of Academic Language Acquisition in a Dual Language Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Robin Margaretha

    2013-01-01

    English language learners (EL) are the fastest growing sub-group of the student population in California, yet ELs also score the lowest on the science section of the California Standardized Tests. In the area of bilingual education, California has dramatically changed its approach to English learners since the passage of Proposition 227 in 1998,…

  2. Linking Curriculum and Learning to Facilities: Arizona State University's GK-12 Sustainable Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Monica M.; Pollari, Lynette; Frisk, Erin; Wood, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Arizona State University's "Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools program" brings together graduate students, sustainability researchers, high school teachers and students, and school or district administrators in a project designed to address the challenge of becoming a "sustainable school." Funded by the National…

  3. Universal Prevention Program Outcomes: Safe Schools Healthy Students in a Rural, Multicultural Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Elizabeth; McFarland, Joyce; Siebold, Wendi; Aguilar, Rafael; Sarmiento, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The Idaho Consortium for Safe Schools Healthy Students consists of three school districts in rural North Central Idaho and the Nez Perce Tribe's Students for Success Program. Universal prevention programs implemented in the elementary schools include Second Step and the middle schools implemented the Life Skills program. Each of the three…

  4. Rice Creek Elementary School and the University of South Carolina: A Shared Vision for Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kathy; Holley, Jessica; Richburg-Sellers, Felicia; Robey, Susan; Suber, Shawn; Burton, Megan; Field, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Professional Development Schools National Conference recognized Rice Creek Elementary School for its outstanding collaborative accomplishments with the University of South Carolina, naming it as a recipient of the National Association for Professional Development School's Award for Exemplary Professional Development School Achievement.…

  5. Strategy Use for Listening in English as a Foreign Language: A Comparison of Academic and Vocational High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mu-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Researchers of learner and language use strategies have long suggested that appropriate application of strategies can facilitate second or foreign language learning. Listening is the most fundamental skill in language learning, but for decades this skill was not emphasized in secondary schools in Taiwan. However, in 2012 a new national English…

  6. Interests and Conflicts: Exploring the Context for Early Implementation of a Dual Language Policy in One Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Dual language immersion program models represent a potentially effective way to serve growing numbers of English language learners (ELLs) in schools and districts. However, local challenges, such as interpersonal conflict, can impact the process of implementing dual language policies and programs, limiting the extent to which they are able to meet…

  7. The Effects of Early Language on Age at Diagnosis and Functioning at School Age in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Anthony; Matthews, Nicole L.; Smith, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that toddlers with no language delay (NLD) should have better outcomes than those with language delay (LD). However, the predictive utility of language milestones relative to co-varying factors such as age at diagnosis, IQ, and ASD symptomatology is unclear. This study compared school-aged children with ASD and NLD (n = 59) to a…

  8. Cinderella's Coach or Just Another Pumpkin? Information Communication Technologies and the Continuing Marginalisation of Languages in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Lindy; Coutas, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    The rhetoric around global connectedness and advances in information communication technologies (ICTs) suggests that: Professional life for the marginalised and isolated language teacher should be easier; the experience of language learners in Australian schools should be more meaningful and bring them closer to the languages and communities that…

  9. Story Discourse and Use of Mental State Language between Mothers and School-Aged Children with and without Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Valerija; Pring, Linda; Dale, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lack of sight compromises insight into other people's mental states. Little is known about the role of maternal language in assisting the development of mental state language in children with visual impairment (VI). Aims: To investigate mental state language strategies of mothers of school-aged children with VI and to compare…

  10. A Diagnosis of English Language Teaching in Public Elementary Schools in Pasto, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Alirio Bastidas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available English teaching in Colombian primary schools became a requirement because of the promulgation of the Law of Education in 1994. Taking into account that this decision produced some difficulties in the schools, a study was conducted to diagnose the state of English language teaching in primary schools in Pasto, Colombia. Data were gathered through classroom observation, a questionnaire, and interviews. The results showed that teachers are not well versed either in methodology or in the command of the English language; there was no English syllabus; didactic materials were nonexistent; and the children’s lack of motivation was the most critical problem. Teachers, institutions and the government have to take into account these findings in order to improve English learning in primary schools.

  11. Forms of Cooperative Learning in Language Teaching in Slovenian Language Classes at the Primary School Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Rot Vrhovec

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Slovenian language syllabus, teachers are recommended to provide a greater share of group work during class. During types of learning such as cooperative learning in smaller groups or pairs, students actively develop communicative competence. The present article presents a survey that attempted to determine whether teachers from the first to the fifth grade execute cooperative learning in language classes. The purpose of the article is to raise teachers’ awareness and encourage them to design and execute cooperative learning more frequently.

  12. Educating Bilingual/ESL Teachers in a Language/Culture Exchange Field School: A Collaborative Model in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama, Irma N.

    This paper describes a program that brings bilingual and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teachers from the United States to a Mexican ESL school to teach in the Tetiz (Yucatan, Mexico) field school and in exchange, learn Mayan language and culture. The theoretical base for the project is drawn from the work of major theorists in second language…

  13. Language as a Status Symbol of Power in Social Interactions at a Multicultural School in the City of Medan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fernanda Desky

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available One’s habit in language use is influenced by daily social life structures thereby creating different interaction patterns both individually or as a group. Sociology of language critically analyzes the use of language as a symbol of power which dominates the arena in a multicultural school. This research utilizes mixed methods as it is considered capable of finding and answering the issues and problems under examination. The location of research was Sultan Iskandar Muda High School which is the only multicultural education curriculum based pilot school in the city of Medan. The informants in this study were the principal, teachers, and students while the respondents were samples of high school students totaling 86 individuals. Research results show that one’s power in language use is determined by one’s interest in using language. School power and individual power has different portions when positioning one’s self during interactions. Although power is coercive in nature, the community must submit to rules of the school. The power of the school in determining language emphasizes values of nationalism, which is different to individual or group power which adjusts the language to the situation at hand so that relations of language use has its own portion of interaction in the multicultural school.

  14. Rural Navajo Students in Kayenta Unified School District's Special Education Programs: The Effects of Home Location and Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbecker, Connie; Bradley-Wilkinson, Evangeline; Nelson, Bernita; Smith, Jody; Whitehair, Marsha; Begay, Mary H.; Bradley, Brian; Gamble, Armanda; McCarty, Nellie; Medina, Catherine; Nelson, Jacob; Pettigrew, Bobbie; Sealander, Karen; Snyder, Maria; White, Sherri; Redsteer, Denise; Prater, Greg

    In Kayenta Unified School District (KUSD) on the Navajo Reservation, 92 percent of students come from homes where Navajo is the primary language, but many students entering school are not fluent in either English or Navajo. A survey of 23 educators examined the effects of language and culture on the likelihood that a student would be placed in…

  15. Oral Language Competence and the Transition to School: Socio-Economic and Behavioural Factors That Influence Academic and Social Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Oral language competence (skill in everyday talking and listening) is critical in the early years of school in two key respects: it underpins the transition to literacy in the early years, and is the means by which children form and maintain interpersonal relationships in the school setting. In this paper, the role of oral language competence with…

  16. The "Robustness" of Vocabulary Intervention in the Public Schools: Targets and Techniques Employed in Speech-Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M.; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Murphy, Kimberly A.; Pratt, Amy; Biancone, Tricia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined vocabulary intervention--in terms of targets and techniques--for children with language impairment receiving speech-language therapy in public schools (i.e., non-fee-paying schools) in the United States. Vocabulary treatments and targets were examined with respect to their alignment with the empirically validated practice of…

  17. Morphing into Adolescents: Active Word Learning for English-Language Learners and Their Classmates in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2010-01-01

    Many students arrive at middle school without the academic language skills they need to read sophisticated texts with comprehension. In particular, English language learners and students from low-income backgrounds attending underresourced, urban middle schools lack opportunities to learn the thousands of academic words they need to succeed. To…

  18. Heritage Language Education without Inheriting Hegemonic Ideologies: Shifting Perspectives on "Korea" in a Weekend Japanese-Language School in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Neriko Musha; Lee, Kiri

    2016-01-01

    Learning a heritage language can be celebrated to enhance marginalized groups' self-esteem, but a heritage can also encompass ideologies prevalent in the groups' original homeland. Based on ethnographic fieldwork (2007-2011) at a weekend Japanese-language school in the United States, this article investigates how ideologies on race politics…

  19. Teens, Power Tools, and Green Schools: Education for Sustainability through a University Environmental Design Program and Middle School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the role of green schools in promoting education for sustainability by reflecting on a university-middle school partnership focused on sustainable design. Undergraduates and middle school students met weekly for a semester to learn about sustainability through simple design projects and activities that focused on…

  20. The Dewey School as Triumph, Tragedy, and Misunderstood: Exploring the Myths and Historiography of the University of Chicago Laboratory School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallace, Thomas; Fantozzi, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Background/Context: Over the last century, perhaps no school in American history has been studied more than John Dewey's Laboratory School at the University of Chicago (1896-1904). Scholars have published dozens of articles, books, essays, and assessments of a school that existed for only seven and a half years. Purpose/Objective/Research…

  1. Effect on School Language in Assessment of Achievement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eric Wilmot

    hundred randomly selected Senior Secondary School II (SSS II) Agricultural Science ... interaction effect of treatment and gender on students' achievement in an ...... Self-concept and science achievement in co-educational and single-sex.

  2. First Year Experiences in School of Mechanical Engineering Kanazawa University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinari, Toshiyasu; Kanjin, Yuichi; Furuhata, Toru; Tada, Yukio

    This paper reports two lectures of the first year experience, ‧Lecture on Life in Campus and Society‧ and ‧Freshman Seminar‧ and discusses their effects. Both lectures have been given freshmen of the school of mechanical engineering, Kanazawa University in H20 spring term. The former lecture is aimed at freshmen to keep on a proper way in both social and college life. It consists of normal class and e-learning system lectures. E-learning system examination requires students to review the whole text book and that seems to have brought better results in the survey. The latter seminar is aimed at freshmen to get active and self-disciplined learning way through their investigation, discussion, presentation, writing work, and so on.

  3. LANGUAGE POLICIES AND MULTILINGUAL EDUCATION IN MINORITY SCHOOLS IN OTTOMAN EMPIRE: OUTCOMES AND FUTURE INSIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah DOLGUNSOZ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Language is the spirit of nations; the cement of the culture mosaic. Its education has a critical role especially for multi-national societies and states. According to Human Rights, every individual has the right to develop, teach and learn his native language in any setting. But this democratic right is required to be regularized with a healthy, efficient and long term multilingual education policy. As one of the most powerful multi-ethnic empires of history, Ottoman Empire embraced numerous cultures and several unique languages. As a policy, the Empire followed a relatively flexible and irregular language policy which fostered national homogeneity and unity in time. On the other hand, the Empire always kept the gap between Anatolian Turkish language by employing Ottoman language as official language. The imbalanced policies of multilingual education and Porte’s distance to Anatolian Turkish contributed a lot to the disintegration of the Empire. This study focuses on why Ottoman language policies adversely affected the unity of the multilingual Empire, scrutinizes the insufficient multilingual education models among Muslim society with its outcomes and discusses how multilingual education in minority schools contributed the disintegration process.

  4. Language, reading, and math learning profiles in an epidemiological sample of school age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Lisa M D; Oram Cardy, Janis; Joanisse, Marc F; Ansari, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Dyscalculia, dyslexia, and specific language impairment (SLI) are relatively specific developmental learning disabilities in math, reading, and oral language, respectively, that occur in the context of average intellectual capacity and adequate environmental opportunities. Past research has been dominated by studies focused on single impairments despite the widespread recognition that overlapping and comorbid deficits are common. The present study took an epidemiological approach to study the learning profiles of a large school age sample in language, reading, and math. Both general learning profiles reflecting good or poor performance across measures and specific learning profiles involving either weak language, weak reading, weak math, or weak math and reading were observed. These latter four profiles characterized 70% of children with some evidence of a learning disability. Low scores in phonological short-term memory characterized clusters with a language-based weakness whereas low or variable phonological awareness was associated with the reading (but not language-based) weaknesses. The low math only group did not show these phonological deficits. These findings may suggest different etiologies for language-based deficits in language, reading, and math, reading-related impairments in reading and math, and isolated math disabilities.

  5. Theory of mind and specific language impairment in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudis, George

    2016-01-01

    Research on the relationship between aspects of language development and Theory of Mind (ToM) in children with language impairments suggests that children with language impairment show a delay in ToM development. This study aimed to examine the relationships of the syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic skills with ToM in school-age children. Twenty children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) aged 9-12 years and two control groups, one matched for chronological age (CA) and one for language ability (LA) (aged 8-10 years) were compared on a set of language tasks tapping syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic skills and on an advanced test of ToM. Results showed that children with SLI performed poorly on the ToM task compared to the CA matches. Also, analysis showed that language skills and ToM are related and that syntactic and pragmatic abilities contributed significantly to the prediction of ToM performance in the SLI group. It is concluded that the syntax/pragmatic aspects of the language impact on ToM understanding in children with SLI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Language, reading, and math learning profiles in an epidemiological sample of school age children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M D Archibald

    Full Text Available Dyscalculia, dyslexia, and specific language impairment (SLI are relatively specific developmental learning disabilities in math, reading, and oral language, respectively, that occur in the context of average intellectual capacity and adequate environmental opportunities. Past research has been dominated by studies focused on single impairments despite the widespread recognition that overlapping and comorbid deficits are common. The present study took an epidemiological approach to study the learning profiles of a large school age sample in language, reading, and math. Both general learning profiles reflecting good or poor performance across measures and specific learning profiles involving either weak language, weak reading, weak math, or weak math and reading were observed. These latter four profiles characterized 70% of children with some evidence of a learning disability. Low scores in phonological short-term memory characterized clusters with a language-based weakness whereas low or variable phonological awareness was associated with the reading (but not language-based weaknesses. The low math only group did not show these phonological deficits. These findings may suggest different etiologies for language-based deficits in language, reading, and math, reading-related impairments in reading and math, and isolated math disabilities.

  7. Forms of Cooperative Learning in Language Teaching in Slovenian Language Classes at the Primary School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrhovec, Alenka Rot

    2015-01-01

    In the Slovenian language syllabus, teachers are recommended to provide a greater share of group work during class. During types of learning such as cooperative learning in smaller groups or pairs, students actively develop communicative competence. The present article presents a survey that attempted to determine whether teachers from the first…

  8. Task-based Language Learning in Bilingual Montessori Elementary Schools: Customizing Foreign Language Learning and Promoting L2 Speaking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Winnefeld

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign language learning has been a part of German elementary schools for several years now. Montessori schools focusing on individual learning, i.e. mostly independent from the teacher and based on auto-education, interest, and free choice, are also asked to teach an L2. The original lack of a concept of L2 learning for this environment has brought forth different approaches. Bilingual education seems to be feasible and applicable in Montessori education. The downside to this is that even in a bilingual classroom the Montessori way of learning may not allow for very much oral production of the foreign language. The role of L2 production (cf. Swain 1985, 1995, 2005 for language acquisition has been theoretically claimed and empirically investigated. Output can have a positive influence on L2 learning (cf. e.g. Izumi 2002, Keck et al. 2006. This also applies to interaction (cf. Long 1996, where negotiation of meaning and modified output are factors supporting L2 development (cf. e.g. de la Fuente 2002, McDonough 2005. Task-based Language Learning (TBLL presents itself as one way to promote oral language production and to provide opportunities for meaning-negotiation. Especially tasks with required information exchange and a closed outcome have been shown to be beneficial for the elicitation of negotiation of meaning and modified output. This paper argues that TBLL is a promising approach for the facilitation of L2 production and thus the development of speaking skills in a Montessori context. It also hypothesizes that TBLL can be implemented in a bilingual Montessori environment while still making the Montessori way of learning possible. Different tasks on various topics, examples of which are presented in this article, can lay the foundation for this. Offering such tasks in a bilingual Montessori elementary classroom promises to foster language production and the use of communication strategies like negotiation of meaning, both being

  9. PATTERNS OF DOMINANCE OF LANGUAGE VITALITIES AMONG MALAYSIAN STUDENTS IN PRIMARY NATIONAL-TYPE AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Ying How

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilingualism is embedded in the Malaysian Education Blueprint (2015-2025 as a stated goal towards nation building. The education system provides opportunity to learn Malay which is the national language, the mother tongue (Mandarin or Tamil and the English language as part of formal schooling. In fact, Malaysian primary schools are classified into two major divisions. Students can opt to study in national schools in which the medium of instruction is Malay with the provision for the learning of English and a mother tongue. The other option allows students to enrol in national-type schools of which the medium of instruction is either Mandarin or Tamil, with English and Malay taught as academic subjects. At secondary level, the medium of instruction in national schools is Malay and students are provided the opportunity to learn their mother tongue and English. Other than in school, other social milieus also allow the use and practice of these languages. Given this linguistic environment, there exists a myriad of language experiences within and outside formal learning which together would influence the totality of language vitality. This paper investigates language vitality featured in this multilingual environment. It focuses on the vitality of the English language among students that appears to co-exist with the learning and use of other languages as they progress through the primary and secondary levels. The vitality is measured by the following indicators: language preference, choice, dominance, use, attitude and motivation and proficiency which were used to develop a questionnaire to obtain data on strength evaluation of these languages. The methodology encompasses random and convenient sampling to obtain representative responses from students with different levels of education and language experiences. The study reveals relative vitalities of languages used and highlights values attached to languages at different points of language

  10. Differentiation, Distinction and Equality--or Diversity? The Language of the Marketised University: An England, New Zealand Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowl, Marion

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines how universities reconcile the need to project themselves as successful global competitors with the need to respond to national policy expectations, particularly around equality. It does so through a comparative analysis of the language used in the publicly available documents of universities in England and New Zealand. While a…

  11. Parental Attachment and Love Language as Determinants of Resilience Among Graduating University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally I. Maximo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of parental attachment and love language on the resilience of graduating university students was studied in a Philippine setting. Using the survey method (N = 843, it was found that a secure attachment and receiving love from parents result in higher resilience. The parental love languages quality time, words of affirmation, and acts of service significantly contributed to resilience. These are love languages that provide emotional, motivational, and practical resources that build resilience. While quality time contributed the most to resilience, a secure attachment is most especially required of fathers whereas words of affirmation and physical touch are needed from mothers. Sons need quality time from their fathers and the physical touch of their mothers. Daughters benefit from quality time with mothers alongside a secure attachment and words of affirmation from their fathers. This study emphasizes the parental factors of attachment and love as external resources of resilience. The research highlights the quality of parent–child relationship experience that would support the resilience of young adults. Results also point to the advantage of having loving parents and a secure parental attachment.

  12. The Role of Social Factors in Iranian University Students' Predispositions towards Autonomous Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Kashefian Naeeini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the demands of the changing world, students should become endowed with the ability to learn perpetually and regard learning as a life-long enterprise. This study investigated those learners belief which showed learners’ predispositions toward autonomy  and some social factors such as gender, academic achievement, marital status and age were taken into consideration. All BA and MA students majoring in English Literature at the department of Foreign Languages of Shiraz University of Iran were involved. The data were collected through a questionnaire the items of which were obtained from two questionnaires by Cotterall (1995 and Cotterall (1999 which were incorporated into a five-point Likert-type rating scale. Factor analysis of responses of students revealed the existence of five underlying factors for learner autonomy which were learner independence, dependence on the teacher, learner confidence, attitudes towards language learning and self-assessment. Based on t-test for independent samples and Analysis of Variance it came to light that age and gender did not have impact on students’ readiness for autonomy while martial statues influenced students’  self-assessment. Moreover, good academic achievement positively influenced their predispositions towards autonomous language learning.

  13. The development of English grammar and reading comprehension by majority and minority language children in a bilingual primary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja K. Steinlen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Both for the first language (L1 and for all additional languages (L2 or L3, grammatical knowledge plays a vital role in understanding texts (e.g., Grabe, 2005. However, little is known about the development and interaction of grammar and reading comprehension in beginning foreign language learning, especially with respect to children with a minority language background. This longitudinal study, therefore, examined minority and majority language children’s English grammar and reading comprehension skills. The children attended a German-English partial immersion primary school and were tested at the end of Grades 3 and 4. As expected, we found grammar to affect reading comprehension but also reverse effects. Most importantly, the results did not reveal any differences between the two language groups, irrespective of the test. Therefore, immersion primary school programs seem to be suitable for minority language children, and these children do not automatically represent an at-risk group for foreign language learning.

  14. University Students from Single-Sex and Coeducational High Schools: Differences in Majors and Attitudes at a Catholic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiak, Christie P.; Buchanan, James P.; Hosey, Megan; Smith, Allison

    2007-01-01

    We conducted an archival study at a coeducational Catholic university to test the proposition that single-sex secondary education predicts lasting differences in college majors. Men from single-sex schools were more likely to both declare and graduate in gender-neutral majors than those from coeducational schools. Women from single-sex schools…

  15. Making sense of syntax – Innate or acquired? Contrasting universal grammar with other approaches to language acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kliesch

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of a Universal Grammar argue that humans are born with a dedicated language system that shapes and restricts the number of grammars found in human languages (Chomsky, 2005. It is essentially innate and has a genetic manifestation. Such an innate system is necessary because human grammars are too complex to be passed on through social interactions and probabilistic learning alone. However, this view is contested by a combination of emergentist approaches and a number of studies suggest that many of the core assumptions of Universal Grammar are either unnecessary or do not hold. Furthermore, this review will explore theoretical criticism of the Universal Grammar research programme.

  16. Historical trajectory of nursing school at Technical University of Babahoyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecibel Vera Marquez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bachelors of the province of the Rivers, to study the careers of health had to travel to other sectors of the country, and before this necessity the Technical University of Babahoyo opened academic spaces in formation in areas of the health creating the School of Nursing with the The mission of training nurses that meet the needs of the population is in the hospital or community, and thus contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of the population of Rio de Janeiro, acting under the ethical and moral principles that society demands. This remembrance describes its historical trajectory, and its spaces of institutional growth, as well as the population coverage, being one of the races with greater demand in the university, the statistical data delivered by the Center of Leveling and Admission of the UTB, shows a Historical evolution of the UTB academic offer of the ENES processes of September 2013 and March 2015, the nursing career is among the first five races most offered among the four periods (Equipo de Apoyo y Seguimiento Acad´emico, 2015. In this way the Nursing career of the Faculty of Health Sciences, has become a space of knowledge and lucubraci´on inspired by the desire to overcome and the permanent work of a practice that strengthens the knowledge, skills and skills that Consolidate the competencies of the nurse profile.

  17. Language Practices in Multilingual Communities: Insights from a Suburban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Louisa

    2013-01-01

    As a result of globalisation and mass migration, suburbs and schools around the world are becoming increasingly multiethnic, multilingual places. Yet there is still relatively little linguistic research on how language is used in everyday interaction in these multilingual communities. In this paper, I explore the strengths and limitations of…

  18. Language learning experience in school context and metacognitive awareness of multilingual children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pichon Vorstman, E.; de Swart, H.; Ceginskas, V.; van den Bergh, H.

    2009-01-01

    What is the influence of a language learning experience (LLE) in a school context on the metacognitive development of children? To answer that question, we presented 54 multilingual preschoolers with two movie clips and examined their reactions to an exolingual situation of communication. These

  19. Methods of Work with Pupils-Immigrants at Russian Language Lessons in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Kamalova, Lera A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin by outlining the basic principles of teaching children-migrants at the elementary school level. These principles include: (1) Learning Russian is focused on the development of children's ability to communicate; (2) Language is learned by migrant children as a mean of communication; (3) Students can see the…

  20. Arabic Language Teachers' Engagement with Published Educational Research in Kuwait's Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhumidi, Hamed A.; Uba, Sani Yantandu

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates Arabic language teachers' engagement with published educational research in Kuwait's secondary schools. The study employs 170 participants across six educational regions in the country by using a quota sampling strategy. It used a questionnaire in eliciting their engagement with published educational research. The data were…

  1. Dysphagia Management: A Survey of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Tiffany L.; Gerety, Katherine W.; Mulligan, Moira

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study (a) gathered information about the kinds of dysphagia management services school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) provide, (b) examined the attitudes of SLPs related to dysphagia management, (c) compared the responses of SLPs on the basis of their experience working in a medical setting, and (d) investigated the…

  2. Designing Bilingual Scenarios to Promote English Language Learning at a Public School in Monteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Yanilis; Manjarres, Milton Pájaro

    2016-01-01

    This research study examines the assumptions of creating bilingual scenarios to promote English language learning for 384 students of ninth, tenth and eleventh grade of a public school in Monteria Colombia. An action research methodology was carried out in this study. The findings of this research suggested that the creation of bilingual scenarios…

  3. Sign Language as Medium of Instruction in Botswana Primary Schools: Voices from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpuang, Kerileng D.; Mukhopadhyay, Sourav; Malatsi, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive phenomenological study investigates teachers' experiences of using sign language for learners who are deaf in the primary schools in Botswana. Eight in-service teachers who have had more than ten years of teaching deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) learners were purposively selected for this study. Data were collected using multiple…

  4. Reading Strategies to Support Home-to-School Connections Used by Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Socorro

    2016-01-01

    This particularistic qualitative case study design examined reading strategies, approaches, and resources teachers of ELL (English Language Learner) students in kindergarten through third grade use to support reading development and promote the home to school connection regarding literacy proficiency. The purpose of this study was to examine…

  5. MARGINALIZATION OF DEPARTMENTS OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND LANGUAGES IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN DENPASAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Winaja

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Learning should be focused on the social and cultural development of intellectual ability, and encourage the learner’s comprehension and knowledge in order to produce intelligent and educated society. From the data collected from Public Senior High School 1 Denpasar and Dwijendra Senior High School Denpasar, it was found that the departments of social sciences and languages were seriously marginalized, indicated by the time allocated for social sciences and languages. The time allocated for Natural Sciences such as chemistry, physics, and biology averaged three hours a week. The additional ‘extra’ time allocated for Natural Sciences made the overall time allocated for them double the overall time allocated for Social Sciences such as economics, history sociology, and geography. Furthermore, the time allocated for one of them was one hour a week. The knowledge presented by the books of Natural Sciences was highly “instrumentalist-positivistic”; unlike the books of social sciences which only provided academic normative information. The modernity contained in “instrumentative positivism” was the philosophy which gave more priority to practical things and hard work with financial success as the main criterion. It was concluded that the marginalization of the departments of social sciences and languages in Public Senior High School 1 Denpasar and Dwijendra Senior High School Denpasar resulted from modernism, the culture of image, and the image that natural sciences were more advantageous than social sciences and languages.

  6. The Swedish "People's School" in Finland and the Language Question: Homogenization and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sven-Erik

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an historical overview of issues around the language of instruction and the curriculum of mother-tongue education for the Swedish-speaking minority in Finland during the half-century after the establishment of the public school in 1866. In a linguistic- and culturally-diverse society like that of Finland it has not been…

  7. Intercultural Manifestations of Racial, Language, and Class Privilege in Schooling: An Autoethnographic Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Sherry

    2017-01-01

    In this autoethnographic tale, I tell the story of my own family's experience with race, class, and language privilege. In particular, I focus on my children's experience with elementary schooling in the United States and Hungary. Their intercultural education experience vividly illuminates the socially and culturally constructed nature of race,…

  8. Urban School Leadership for Elementary Science Education: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, Maricela H.

    2012-01-01

    Science education reform and state testing accountability call upon principals to become instructional leaders in science. Specifically, elementary school principals must take an active role in science instruction to effectively improve science education for all students including English Language Learners. As such, the research questioned posed…

  9. Perceptions of Arabic Language Teachers toward Their Use of Technology at the Omani Basic Education Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Musawi, Ali; Al Hashmi, Abdullah; Kazem, Ali Mahdi; Al Busaidi, Fatima; Al Khaifi, Salim

    2016-01-01

    This study is part of a 3-year strategic research project to measure the effectiveness of the design and use of new software for learning Arabic. However, this paper's particular objective is to evaluate the use of technology in the Omani basic education schools as it is perceived by the Arabic language teachers. The study follows the descriptive…

  10. Access to English Language Acquisition in Ghana Schools for the Deaf: Are the Deaf Students Handicapped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obosu, Gideon Kwesi; Opoku-Asare, Nana Afia; Deku, Prosper

    2016-01-01

    This paper primarily discusses the challenges deaf students in Ghana are likely to grapple with as they access education provided for them in English language. The arguments discussed in this paper are supported by findings from a multiple site case study of five Schools for the Deaf purposively sampled from four regions of Ghana. Observations…

  11. Contradictions around Differentiation for Pupils with Dyslexia Learning English as a Foreign Language at Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with differentiation of teaching methods and extra time in class for pupils with dyslexia by English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers in two Greek state secondary schools. Activity theory is applied to analyse the contradictions that emerge around the issue of differentiation for pupils with dyslexia from data compiled from…

  12. Power Relations in the Enactment of English Language Education Policy for Chinese Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minglin

    2017-01-01

    The scale of English language education in China is astounding, but recent research has shown that the latest national English education policy for Chinese schools has not been implemented successfully due to various reasons. One reason given for the lack of success is the impracticability of the top-down policy itself excluding teachers'…

  13. Perceived Attachment Security to Father, Academic Self-Concept and School Performance in Language Mastery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacro, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations between 8-12-year-olds' perceived attachment security to father, academic self-concept and school performance in language mastery. One hundred and twenty two French students' perceptions of attachment to mother and to father were explored with the Security Scale and their academic self-concept was assessed with…

  14. Out-of-School English Language Use by Newcomer English Learners from Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine E.

    2017-01-01

    This study reports the major findings of an in-depth survey and interview with a group of students and parents who recently immigrated to the U.S. from Korea. The study was conducted to identify how they engage in out-of-school English language use and to what extent parents and teachers are involved and supportive in the process. All the…

  15. Same Program, Distinctive Development: Exploring the Biliteracy Trajectories of Two Dual Language Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babino, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Using a mixed methods comparative case study, the researcher explored the dual language contexts at each school before examining the second- through fifth-grade Spanish and English reading biliteracy trajectories. While both campuses' students experienced positive trajectories toward biliteracy by the end of fifth grade, each campus was…

  16. Varieties of teacher expertise in teaching Danish language and literature in lower secondary schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorf, Hans; Kelly, Peter; Pratt, Nick

    2012-01-01

    In this study we seek to explore how expert teachers mediate the many influences on their practice. The research we report here is set in the context of lower secondary school teaching of Danish language and literature. Our findings suggest that teacher expertise can be conceptualized by a set...

  17. High School Spanish Teachers' Attitudes and Practices toward Spanish Heritage Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Brittany D.; Kuriscak, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    This case study uses survey data to examine the attitudes and pedagogical practices of preservice and current high school Spanish teachers toward Spanish heritage language learners (HLLs). The research questions addressed were (1) the extent to which participants were aware of the challenges facing Spanish HLLs who are enrolled in traditional…

  18. A Phonologically Based Intervention for School-Age Children with Language Impairment: Implications for Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Michaela J.; Park, Jungjun; Saxon, Terrill F.; Colson, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted utilizing a quasi-experimental pre- and postgroup design to examine the effects of a phonologically based intervention aimed to improve phonological awareness (PA) and reading abilities in school-age children with language impairment (LI) in Grades 1 through 3. The intervention included instruction in PA and sound-symbol…

  19. An Investigation into the Characteristics of Iranian EFL Teachers of Senior Secondary Schools and Language Institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Hassan Soodmand; Hamzavi, Raouf

    2017-01-01

    The present study explored the characteristics of 147 Iranian EFL teachers teaching at senior secondary schools (N = 62) and those teaching in private language institutes (N = 85). Data were collected through a Likert-scale teacher characteristics questionnaire mainly adapted from Borg (2006). Also, for data triangulation purposes, 20 teachers…

  20. Evidence-Based Speech-Language Pathology Practices in Schools: Findings from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, LaVae M.; Ireland, Marie; Hall-Mills, Shannon; Flynn, Perry

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study documented evidence-based practice (EBP) patterns as reported by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) employed in public schools during 2010-2011. Method: Using an online survey, practioners reported their EBP training experiences, resources available in their workplaces, and the frequency with which they engage in specific EBP…