WorldWideScience

Sample records for units cross-curricular activities

  1. Sports Business Unit Meets Cross-Curricular Learning Goals: Grades 9-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    A new online learning tool called the eCommSports Kit links a seven-step sports marketing curriculum with a school team to give students real-life experience in developing and executing a plan to boost game attendance. The kit, available through http://www.ecommsports.com, takes teens on a cross-curricular journey through conducting business…

  2. Updating Classroom Libraries and Cross-Curricular Activities: Celebrating Gender Identity and Diversity through LGBTQ Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Susan Trostle; Maasch, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    By using carefully selected children's literature and related curricular activities, and including parents and community members in information sessions and newsletters, teachers can make a positive difference in the lives of individuals who are transgender and/or those who live in diverse families. As children see positive depictions of children…

  3. A orientação profissional como atividade transversal ao currículo escolar Occupational guidance as a cross-curricular school activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altemir José Gonçalves Barbosa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A teorização e a prática em orientação profissional (OP desenvolveram-se significativamente nas últimas décadas. Porém, parcela significativa das aplicações desse conhecimento na escola não tem acompanhado os desenvolvimentos atuais. Para analisar um projeto de OP transversal ao currículo escolar, avaliou-se a participação dos docentes e as implicações da OP no comportamento vocacional de alunos do segundo ano do ensino médio. Todos os professores foram convidados a participar. A avaliação do projeto foi feita por 69 alunos que responderam a um questionário e a uma escala de atitudes pré e pós-OP. Nem todos os docentes transversalizaram os temas propostos, mas a quantidade dos que fizeram isso aumentou significativamente. Quanto ao comportamento vocacional, constatou-se redução do número de dúvidas sobre profissões a seguir pós-OP. Houve manutenção das demais variáveis analisadas. A OP transversal ao currículo é uma atividade viável, capaz de promover o desenvolvimento dos adolescentes. Estudos adicionais são recomendados.The theory and practice on occupational guidance (OG have developed significantly in recent decades. However, a significant portion of the applications of this knowledge in school has not followed the current developments. In order to analyze the cross-curricular school OG project, the participation of teachers and the implications of the OG in the vocational behavior of the second year High School students were evaluated. All teachers were invited to participate. The project assessment was made by 69 students who answered a questionnaire and an attitude scale pre and post OG. Not all teachers transversalized the proposed themes, but the amount of who did this has increased significantly. As for the vocational behavior, a reduction in the number of uncertainties about what profession to follow was noted post-test. Other variables were maintained. The cross-curricular school OG is a viable

  4. Multiple Intelligences within the Cross-Curricular Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthoula Vaiou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was realized in a Greek 6th grade State Primary School class and was based on Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences, which was first introduced in 1983. More particularly, it was explored to what extent the young learners possess multiple intelligences through the use of a specially-designed questionnaire and a series of interviews. The findings of the above have served as a tool to the construction of a project work based on students’ learning preferences within a cross-curricular framework, easily applicable to the Greek State School curriculum. All learners were activated to participate within a school environment that traditionally promotes linguistic and mathematical skills matching dominant multiple intelligences or a combination of some of them to thematic units already taught by Greek teachers. The suggested project was assessed through observation and student portfolio, showing that the young learners’ multiple intelligences were exploited to a great extent, promoting the learning process satisfactorily. The results of this study can provide a contribution to the literature of multiple intelligences in the Greek reality and suggest a need for further consideration and exploration in the field. Finally, the researcher of this study hopes the present work could function as a springboard for more elaborated studies in the future.

  5. Critical literacy: a cross-curricular tool-and-result in the teaching-learning activity Letramento Crítico: uma ferramenta-e-resultado transcurricular na atividade de ensino-aprendizagem

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    Angela B. Cavenaghi T. Lessa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of critical literacy as cross curricular tool-and-result in the teaching learning activity. Based on the Socio-Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (Vygotsky, 1934; Leontiev, 1977, it discusses a teacher continuous education intervention program aimed at the teaching-learning of different subject areas mediated by different genres (Bakhtin, 1953. Teachers' tasks, which really simultaneously develop critical understanding and an engagement with area contents in a non-segmented format, are analyzed and seem to indicate a view of literacy as tool-and-result in students' transformational actions.Este artigo discute a importância do letramento crítico como uma ferramenta-e-resultado transcurricular no ensino da atividade de leitura. Baseado na Teoria da Atividade Sócio-Histórico-Cultural (Vygotsky, 1934; Leontiev, 1977, apresenta um programa intervencionista de formação contínua de professores cujo foco é o ensino-aprendizagem de diferentes disciplinas mediadas por gêneros diferentes (Bakhtin, 1953. As tarefas criadas pelos professores, realmente pautadas simultaneamente por compreensão critica e por compromisso com conteúdos das áreas considerados de forma não segmentada, são analisadas e parecem apontar para uma visão de letramento como instrumento-e-resultado para a possível ação transformadora dos alunos.

  6. History, Music and Law: Commemorative Cross-Curricularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, James

    2013-01-01

    James Woodcock continues his theme from "Teaching History 138" about the difference between superficial, thematic cross-curricularity and much more rigorous interdisciplinarity. His concern is to retain rather than compromise the integrity of the subject disciplines. Woodcock argues that interdisciplinary working adds value to learning…

  7. METHODOLOGY FOR CROSS-CURRICULAR THEME OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL AXIS

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    José Luis Aparicio López

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a methodology to identify the presence of the environmental axis in educational programs in Bachelors in the Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Mexico. It is sustained on competency-based education and constructionism, due to they appeal to humanism to deal current problems. It is composed of four phases: committee conformation, theoretical and conceptual concerning analysis, construction and application of instruments on a PE, and identification of the cross-curricular theme level. Even though the proposed methodology is applied to the environment, it is feasible to adapt to other axes, such as human rights, multiculturalism, and poverty, relevant to the educational context of the state of Guerrero.

  8. Cross-curricular goals and raising the relevance of science education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belova, Nadja; Dittmar, Johanna; Hansson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    education go beyond single contents and concepts; many challenges are tied to cross-curricular goals. Specifically, when it comes to the societal and vocational relevance of science education, many demands can only be met when we develop corresponding skills across disciplines and grade levels. This chapter...... focuses on a set of such cross-curricular goals from a chemistry education perspective, namely education for sustainability, critical media literacy, innovation competence, vocational orientation, and employability. It relates them to the idea of relevant chemistry and science education. Directions...... for research and curriculum development will be suggested that emerge from taking into account cross-curricular goals on the science curriculum more thoroughly....

  9. A Cross-Curricular, Problem-Based Project to Promote Understanding of Poverty in Urban Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Daniel S.; Tuchman, Ellen; Hawkins, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the use of problem-based learning to teach students about the scope and consequences of urban poverty through an innovative cross-curricular project. We illustrate the process, goals, and tasks of the Community Assessment Project, which incorporates community-level assessment, collection and analysis of public data, and…

  10. "Teachosaurus" and "Learnoceratops": Dinosaurs as a Motivating Cross-Curricular Theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The author takes a look into the benefits that dinosaurs may bring to the classroom. He discusses how he used dinosaurs as a cross-curricular theme to improve children's understanding and knowledge of science concepts. To investigate what a child might learn from dinosaurs, he started by comparing the many non-fiction dinosaur books using the…

  11. Contemporary Art and Citizenship Education: The Possibilities of Cross-Curricular Links on the Level of Content

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    Metoda Kemperl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the previous phenomenon of modern art, contemporary art strives to return to society and everyday life, while thematising the current issues that the individual faces here and now. One of its more frequent topics is that of sustainable development, and the accompanying issues of environment, values, relations to others, etc. All such topics are part of the concept of active citizenship, which is why understanding contemporary art calls for active citizenship. This particularly holds true for relational art, which demands active participation on the part of the viewer. This paper inquires into the possibilities of the connection of contemporary art and citizenship education in elementary schools. Contemporary pedagogic doctrine highly encourages cross-curricular teaching; therefore, I have focused my analysis on the curricula of the subjects of Art Education, and Citizenship and Patriotic Education and Ethics, determining that (from this perspective their link is quite troublesome. The absence of contemporary art from the curriculum of Art Education has been criticised on many occasions, but the problem of its curriculum seems to be of a conceptual nature. Only by a more intense inter-institutional link between schools and contemporary art galleries and museums can the common goals of art education and citizenship education be realised. This paper will, therefore, strive to show potential cross curricular links in content on three examples of participatory practices (Proletarians of All Countries, Beggar Robot and EU/Others, while warning (from the pedagogic perspective against the often neglected fact that contemporary art is experienced here and now.

  12. Cross-curricular goals and raising the relevance of science education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belova, Nadja; Dittmar, Johanna; Hansson, Lena

    2017-01-01

    ‘Relevance’ is one of the most commonly used terms when it comes to reforms in science education. The term is used in manifold ways. It can be understood – among other things – as meeting an interest, fulfilling needs or contributing to intellectual development. Many components of relevant science...... education go beyond single contents and concepts; many challenges are tied to cross-curricular goals. Specifically, when it comes to the societal and vocational relevance of science education, many demands can only be met when we develop corresponding skills across disciplines and grade levels. This chapter...... focuses on a set of such cross-curricular goals from a chemistry education perspective, namely, education for sustainability, critical media literacy, innovation competence, vocational orientation and employability. It relates them to the idea of relevant chemistry and science education. Directions...

  13. A Mountain Child: An Active Learning Pack for 9-13 Year Olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Sue; Jenkins, Alyson

    This resource packet includes a teacher's guide, reproducible student activity sheets, a simulation game: "Life with the Incas", and a poster. The resource presents a cross-curricular thematic approach to the United Kingdom's National Curriculum. The materials look at the Andes and the Andean people, the Quechuan, who live in the…

  14. Cross-Curricular Teaching: The Case of Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melita Kukovec

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge learners acquire at school has to be applicable in practice to ensure their motivation for learning. Both cross-curricular and interdisciplinary teaching provide a meaningful way in which students can use the knowledge acquired in one context as the basis for learning in other contexts in and out of school. By using interdisciplinary teaching, the instructor can present the topics in a holistic manner: this approach therefore allows us to activate more of the learners’ senses and intelligences. Since Mathematics is one of the least liked subjects by our students, and English one of the favorite ones, the article will demonstrate how we can integrate activities addressing all types of intelligences in a language learning class to achieve the whole range of Bloom’s levels of educational objectives on the basis of a novel which includes a wealth of references to mathematics: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon, which has recently been compulsory reading in all Slovene grammar school programs.

  15. How to use The National Gallery as a cross curricular approach to weather and climate studies at primary level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P. J. K.

    2009-09-01

    How to use The National Gallery as a cross curricular approach to weather and climate studies at primary level. Pål J. Kirkeby Hansen Faculty of Education and International Studies, Oslo University College (PalKirkeby.Hansen@lui.hio.no) Weather and climate are topics in natural science and geography in primary and secondary education in most countries. The pupils are often doing own weather observations and measurements and are presenting the results oral, by posters or with digital aids. They also use the Internet with all its relevant resources in their studies to develop vocabulary, practical and conceptual knowledge. Knowledge about weather and climate is parts of liberal education and could be projected to other topics in science and to topics in other subjects, for instance: history, social geography, literature and arts. This article reports from a case study in grade 3 classes (age 9 year) during their Weather Week. Their science teacher was, quite untypical, also educated in art history. She arranged a visited to The National Gallery with the double agenda: 1. To introduce the pupils to Norwegian canon paintings from the national romantic period, our so-called "golden age”. 2. To look for and discuss weather elements in this paintings. For one hour the museum curator guided the pupils around the water cycle by using the paintings. While the pupils' own observations of weather, clouds and wind and measurements of temperature and precipitation during the Weather Week only are point checks, the guided tour in The National Gallery gave literally "the whole picture” of the Norwegian weather and climate and of the water cycle. During the tour, the curator constantly invited the pupils to tell about and discuss what weather and water elements they were looking at when standing in front of a painting. The pupils were responsive and interested all the time. Back at school, they demonstrated that they had learned much about both weather elements, the water

  16. Science and mathematics teachers’ core teaching conceptions and their implications for engaging in cross-curricular innovations

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    Hanne Møller Andersen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found core teaching conceptions (CTCs to influence teachers’ actions, i.e. how they engage with new teaching practices (e.g. Lotter, Harwood, & Bonner, 2007. This study explores typical CTCs and their subject specific nature in a sample of teachers from physics, biology, and mathematics in Danish upper secondary school. Teachers’ CTCs were investigated through their essay responses to a set of open core questions, administered through a web-platform. Results demonstrate that teachers’ CTCs come in subject specific flavours, encompassing their purpose for teaching the subject, their conceptions of teaching and learning, and their conceptions of interdisciplinary teaching. It is argued that such differences shape teachers’ engagement with new cross-curricular innovations in the Danish context. Assessing and addressing typical and personal CTCs are found to be crucial to a successful implementation of current reform-initiatives, for teacher training, and for self-regulated professional development among teachers.

  17. Comparison of Effects of Teaching English to Thai Undergraduate Teacher-Students through Cross-Curricular Thematic Instruction Program Based on Multiple Intelligence Theory and Conventional Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at comparing the effects of teaching English to Thai undergraduate teacher-students through cross-curricular thematic instruction program based on multiple intelligence theory and through conventional instruction. Two experimental groups, which utilized Randomized True Control Group-Pretest-posttest Time Series Design and…

  18. From the History of Maths to the History of Greatness: Towards Worthwhile Cross-Curricular Study through the Refinement of a Scheme of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Wood, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Readers of "Teaching History" will be familiar with the benefits and difficulties of cross-curricular planning, and the pages of this journal have often carried analysis of successful collaborations with the English department, or music, or geography. Harry Fletcher-Wood describes in this article a collaboration involving maths,…

  19. "Living with Volcanoes": Cross-Curricular Teaching in the High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Alison; Ayala, Gianna

    2015-01-01

    A new, interdisciplinary high school geoarchaeology curriculum unit, titled "Living with Volcanoes," was created and tested in two pilot lessons with 30 high school students total studying geography and classical civilization in northern England. Students were highly engaged during the curriculum unit and showed positive learning gains…

  20. Identifying Cross Curricular Linkages of a Class-Based Walking Challenge: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapere, David Allen; Mummery, W. Kerry; Yates, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Adult workplace intervention programs to improve physical activity through wearing personal pedometers and completing team orientated "virtual journeys" have been shown to be useful in enhancing activity levels (Mummery, Schofield, Hinchliffe, Joyner, & Brown, 2006). Similar approaches applied to the school setting have also been…

  1. Ecological consequences of United Enterprises 'Majak' activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanov, G.N.; Drozko, Y.G.

    1996-01-01

    The United Enterprises ''Majak'' held in 1948 in Soviet Union has mainly dealt of plutonium production for military use. The consequence for environment of their activities has been extensively investigated. The soil, water and air contamination in the Czelabinsk region where the Majak Enterprises was localized have been recognized. The program of environment recultivation and radiation safety assurance in Majak Enterprises have been worked out and already accepted for realization. 6 figs, 10 tabs

  2. Burnup credit activities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.H.; Thomas, D.A.; Doering, T.W.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers progress in burnup credit activities that have occurred in the United States of America (USA) since the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Burnup Credit was convened in October 1997. The Proceeding of the AGM were issued in April 1998 (IAEA-TECDOC-1013, April 1998). The three applications of the use of burnup credit that are discussed in this report are spent fuel storage, spent fuel transportation, and spent fuel disposal. (author)

  3. Experimental Activities in Primary School to Learn about Microbes in an Oral Health Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafra, Paulo; Lima, Nelson; Carvalho, Graça S.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental science activities in primary school enable important cross-curricular learning. In this study, experimental activities on microbiology were carried out by 16 pupils in a Portuguese grade-4 classroom (9-10?years old) and were focused on two problem-questions related to microbiology and health: (1) do your teeth carry microbes? (2) why…

  4. Wind Lidar Activities in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Newman, Jennifer; St. Pe, Alexandra; Iungo, G. Valerio; Wharton, Sonia; Herges, Tommy; Filippelli, Matthew; Pontbriand, Philippe; Osler, Evan

    2017-06-28

    IEA Wind Task 32 seeks to identify and mitigate the barriers to the adoption of lidar for wind energy applications. This work is partly achieved by sharing experience across researchers and practitioners in the United States and worldwide. This presentation is a short summary of some wind lidar-related activities taking place in the country, and was presented by Andrew Clifton at the Task 32 meeting in December 2016 in his role as the U.S. Department of Energy-nominated country representative to the task.

  5. IAEA A+M Unit Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Sheikh, K.

    2011-01-01

    Research on fusion energy devices requires a large amount of data for atomic, molecular and plasma-surface interactions. As current machines are updated and future machines are designed, data for a variety of different materials for a wide range of plasma parameters arise. The Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency works to coordinate efforts to establish databases for this fusion research effort. Current activities for database development include a number of Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Meetings, Consultant Meetings and a number of collaborations. These activities generate significant new data in support of fusion research. These data are published in journals as well as IAEA publications and are included in numerical databases ALADDIN accessible by all fusion researchers. Historically a number of institutions have contributed to development of such databases and continue to participate in a Data Centre Network, supported by the A+M Unit. Members of this network maintain individual databases, many of which can be searched using the GENIE search engine. The A+M Unit host the OPEN-ADAS system that allows access to most of the numerical data stored within the ADAS system. An effort on development of an XML schema for data exchange among the databases is underway. Many numerical data for specific processes in fusion relevant materials are not available. In many cases computer codes exist with the capability of generating such data as needed. An informal network of institutions with such capabilities is in the process of formation to provide a means quickly generating such data. The A+M Unit maintains on-line code capabilities to generate atomic and molecular data and serves as an access point to LANL atomic physics codes and FLYCHK, Non-LTE kinetics codes at NIST. Currently, a wiki-style knowledge base is under the development. It will host a wealth of information on atomic, molecular, plasma-surface data for

  6. THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCES VIA CROSS-CURRICULAR ECTS SEMINARS EL DESARROLLO DE COMPETENCIAS COMUNICATIVAS A TRAVÉS DE SEMINARIOS TRANSVERSALES ECTS: UNA EXPERIENCIA EN LA UNIVERSIDAD DE JAÉN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Pérez Cañado

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an innovative experience in the development of cross-curricular generic and subject-specific competencies carried out via a system of ECTS seminars which has been developed within the degree in English Philology at the University of Jaén during the academic year 2008-2009. The aim of these seminars has been to reinforce coordination amongst professors, to overcome the oftentimes worrying individualism which characterizes teaching practices at tertiary level, and to make the transition from the transmission of information model based on ex-cathedra lecturing to a more critical and significant learning based on competencies and not merely on contents. After justifying the need for an experience of this type and describing its development, contents, and evaluation, the article goes on to present the results of the descriptive study which has accompanied it. The outcomes of the investigation have revealed that the ECTS seminar system has been highly beneficial for the participating students. The latter have been aware of the existence, development, and usefulness of a set of generic and specific competencies which are essential for the English philologist. We consider that, in our immediate context, these ECTS seminars have constituted an important first step in the integration, teaching, and assessment of competencies in the curriculum.El presente artículo describe una experiencia novedosa en el desarrollo de competencias genéricas y específicas y en el fomento de la interdisciplinariedad y la transversalidad. Se trata de un sistema de seminarios ECTS – que también entroncan con el Plan de Acción Tutorial – que se han desarrollado en la Licenciatura en Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Jaén durante este curso académico (2008-2009. Con ellos, hemos pretendido fomentar la coordinación entre el profesorado de dicha titulación, superar el individualismo que suele caracterizar a las actuaciones docentes en

  7. Decommissioning project management unit started its activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeliene, D.

    2002-01-01

    The Decommissioning Project Management Unit team comprises western experts as well as experts from INPP Decommissioning Service who all work as a single team. The DPMU will develop the Final Decommissioning Plan and a more detailed Decommissioning Project, which will describe how the plant will be removed from service and safely decommissioned

  8. Survey of United States uranium marketing activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Uranium marketing activity was much lower in 1977 than during 1976, which was the largest procurement year to date. Results from the survey suggest that there is an adequate supply of uranium--at least through 1985--in light of apparent buyer concepts of demand. Unfilled requirements were reduced by additional procurement and slippages in requirements. U.S. buyers continue to concentrate almost exclusively on U.S. sources for procurement. Buyer and producer inventories changed only slightly during the year. The average price reported for 1977 deliveries was $19.75 per pound of U 3 O 8 , compared to the $17.20 estimate reported as of July 1, 1977. An average of $17.40 was reported for 1978. Settlements of market prices in 1977 averaged $41.50 and for 1978 averaged $43.95. Most market price contracts have a base price. These prices are much higher than average contract prics and are closer to market price settlements. Producers estimate they will be able to offer for sale substantial additional quantities of uranium, indicating that they expect to expand production considerably

  9. Implementation of Active Learning Method in Unit Operations II Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Ma'mun, Sholeh

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Active Learning Method which requires students to take an active role in the process of learning in the classroom has been applied in Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Islamic University of Indonesia for Unit Operations II subject in the Even Semester of Academic Year 2015/2016. The purpose of implementation of the learning method is to assist students in achieving competencies associated with the Unit Operations II subject and to help in creating...

  10. Activities of the Entomology Unit. Report No.1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This semiannual report describes the activities carried out by the staff of the Entomology Unit at the Agency's Laboratories, Seibersdorf, between 1 January and 31 July 1988. The colonization of Glossina spp. was continued to provide insects for ongoing and anticipated control programmes and supporting research activities. Hybridization of the two subspecies palpalis palpalis (GPP) and palpalis gambiensis (GPG) was studied. Rearing of medfly was studied. Figs and tabs

  11. Activities of the Entomology Unit. Report No. 1, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This semi-annual report describes the activities carried out by the staff of the Entomology Unit at the Agency's Laboratories, Seibersdorf, between 1 January and 30 June 1987. This report includes preliminary results of research not sufficiently complete to justify general release. Such findings, when adequately confirmed will be released through established channels. Figs and tabs

  12. Activities of the Entomology Unit. Report No. 2, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    This semi-annual report describes the activities carried out by the staff of the Entomology Unit at the Agency's Laboratories, Seibersdorf, between 1 July and 31 December 1986. This report includes preliminary results of research not sufficiently complete to justify general release. Such findings, when adequately confirmed, will be released through established channels. Figs and tabs

  13. Temelin 1000 MW Units active testing stage - commissioning experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubra, O.; Riha, V.

    2003-01-01

    There were three basic stages of the NPP Temelin Units active testing stage- The zero and low power testing, The power ascension testing and Plant Performance Test. The main objective of the start- up process stages and the testing procedures including some operational experience are described in the paper. (author)

  14. Active Transportation Surveillance - United States, 1999-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Geoffrey P; Paul, Prabasaj; Wendel, Arthur M

    2015-08-28

    Physical activity is a health-enhancing behavior, and most U.S. adults do not meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Active transportation, such as by walking or bicycling, is one way that persons can be physically active. No comprehensive, multiyear assessments of active transportation surveillance in the United States have been conducted. 1999-2012. Five surveillance systems assess one or more components of active transportation. The American Community Survey and the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) both assess the mode of transportation to work in the past week. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who reported walking or bicycling to work can be calculated. NHTS and the American Time Use Survey include 1-day assessments of trips or activities. With that information, the proportion of respondents who report any walking or bicycling for transportation can be calculated. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey both assess recent (i.e., in the past week or past month) habitual physical activity behaviors, including those performed during active travel. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who report any recent habitual active transportation can be calculated. The prevalence of active transportation as the primary commute mode to work in the past week ranged from 2.6% to 3.4%. The 1-day assessment indicated that the prevalence of any active transportation ranged from 10.5% to 18.5%. The prevalence of any habitual active transportation ranged from 23.9% to 31.4%. No consistent trends in active transportation across time periods and surveillance systems were identified. Among systems, active transportation was usually more common among men, younger respondents, and minority racial/ethnic groups. Among education groups, the highest prevalence of active transportation was usually among the least or most educated groups, and active transportation tended to be more

  15. Activities of the Entomology Unit. Report No.2, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This semiannual report describes the activities carried out by the RIAL Staff of the Entomology Unit at the Agency's Laboratories, Seibersdorf, between 1 July and 31 December 1989. The Tsetse fly research has been concentrated to: Colonization and colony status; Blood collection, processing and quality control; Feeding; Effects of low temperature; Reproductive biology and Shipping effects. The Medfly research has been concentrated to: Rearing; Genetic sexing; Age determination; Microbial control; Molecular biology and Screening of genes. Figs and tabs

  16. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  17. Geothermal exploitation activity by the United Nations in Ethiopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H. (Geological Survey of Japan)

    1971-01-01

    The Rift Valley in Ethiopia was investigated for geothermal exploitation by the United Nations because it has Quaternary volcanoes which often indicate possible geothermal power generation. Preparations for the project are still being made, and the chemical analysis of hot springs is being conducted. The Rift Valley has high temperature springs and potential mineral deposits. The Danakil basin in Ethiopia which is included in the Northern Afar, has several active volcanoes made up of basalt deposits and has active hot springs. The East Africa Rift Valley, the Red Sea Rift Valley, and the Afar area are also areas suitable for investigation. Seven maps are included.

  18. Assembling optically active and nonactive metamaterials with chiral units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xiong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials constructed with chiral units can be either optically active or nonactive depending on the spatial configuration of the building blocks. For a class of chiral units, their effective induced electric and magnetic dipoles, which originate from the induced surface electric current upon illumination of incident light, can be collinear at the resonant frequency. This feature provides significant advantage in designing metamaterials. In this paper we concentrate on several examples. In one scenario, chiral units with opposite chiralities are used to construct the optically nonactive metamaterial structure. It turns out that with linearly polarized incident light, the pure electric or magnetic resonance (and accordingly negative permittivity or negative permeability can be selectively realized by tuning the polarization of incident light for 90°. Alternatively, units with the same chirality can be assembled as a chiral metamaterial by taking the advantage of the collinear induced electric and magnetic dipoles. It follows that for the circularly polarized incident light, negative refractive index can be realized. These examples demonstrate the unique approach to achieve certain optical properties by assembling chiral building blocks, which could be enlightening in designing metamaterials.

  19. A simple approach to calculate active power of electrosurgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Regis Monteiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Despite of more than a hundred years of electrosurgery, only a few electrosurgical equipment manufacturers have developed methods to regulate the active power delivered to the patient, usually around an arbitrary setpoint. In fact, no manufacturer has a method to measure the active power actually delivered to the load. Measuring the delivered power and computing it fast enough so as to avoid injury to the organic tissue is challenging. If voltage and current signals can be sampled in time and discretized in the frequency domain, a simple and very fast multiplication process can be used to determine the active power. Methods This paper presents an approach for measuring active power at the output power stage of electrosurgical units with mathematical shortcuts based on a simple multiplication procedure of discretized variables – frequency domain vectors – obtained through Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT applied on time-sampled voltage and current vectors. Results Comparative results between simulations and a practical experiment are presented – all being in accordance with the requirements of the applicable industry standards. Conclusion An analysis is presented comparing the active power analytically obtained through well-known voltage and current signals against a computational methodology based on vector manipulation using DFT only for time-to-frequency domain transformation. The greatest advantage of this method is to determine the active power of noisy and phased out signals with neither complex DFT or ordinary transform methodologies nor sophisticated computing techniques such as convolution. All results presented errors substantially lower than the thresholds defined by the applicable standards.

  20. Activities of the Entomology Unit. Report No.2, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This semi-annual report describes the activities of the Entomology Unit at the Agency's Laboratories, Seibersdorf, between 1 July and 31 December 1987. Tsetse nutrition research have been carried out. Emphasis was put on attempts to improve the nutritional quality of whole blood diets by simple physical treatments. Other studies included chemical analyses of tsetse tissue and diets, investigations of the effect of fly nutrition on endosymbionts, and attempts to determine the importance of haem in haemoglobin digestion. Different yeasts for use in medfly mass rearing were compared. The results of the radiosensitivity of eggs and larva of Ceratitis capitata indicated that mature eggs were more tolerant than immature eggs and that mature larva were more tolerant than immature larva to irradiation. Figs and tabs

  1. Firing patterns of spontaneously active motor units in spinal cord-injured subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Thomas, Christine K.

    Involuntary motor unit activity at low rates is common in hand muscles paralysed by spinal cord injury. Our aim was to describe these patterns of motor unit behaviour in relation to motoneurone and motor unit properties. Intramuscular electromyographic activity (EMG), surface EMG and force were

  2. WASH activities at two Ebola treatment units in Sierra Leone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Mallow

    Full Text Available The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD in West Africa was the largest in history. Starting in September 2014, International Medical Corps (IMC operated five Ebola treatment units (ETUs in Sierra Leone and Liberia. This paper explores how future infectious disease outbreak facilities in resource-limited settings can be planned, organized, and managed by analyzing data collected on water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH and infection prevention control (IPC protocols.We conducted a retrospective cohort study by analyzing WASH/IPC activity data routinely recorded on paper forms or white boards at ETUs during the outbreak and later merged into a database from two IMC-run ETUs in Sierra Leone between December 2014 and December 2015.The IMC WASH/IPC database contains data from over 369 days. Our results highlight parameters key to designing and maintaining an ETU. High concentration chlorine solution usage was highly correlated with both daily patient occupancy and high-risk zone staff entries; low concentration chlorine usage was less well explained by these measures. There is high demand for laundering and disinfecting of personal protective equipment (PPE on a daily basis and approximately 1 (0-4 piece of PPE is damaged each day.Lack of standardization in the type and format of data collected at ETUs made constructing the WASH/IPC database difficult. However, the data presented here may help inform humanitarian response operations in future epidemics.

  3. Aeroelastic code development activities in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Designing wind turbines to be fatigue resistant and to have long lifetimes at minimal cost is a major goal of the federal wind program and the wind industry in the United States. To achieve this goal, we must be able to predict critical loads for a wide variety of different wind turbines operating under extreme conditions. The codes used for wind turbine dynamic analysis must be able to analyze a wide range of different wind turbine configurations as well as rapidly predict the loads due to turbulent wind inflow with a minimal set of degrees of freedom. Code development activities in the US have taken a two-pronged approach in order to satisfy both of these criteria: (1) development of a multi-purpose code which can be used to analyze a wide variety of wind turbine configurations without having to develop new equations of motion with each configuration change, and (2) development of specialized codes with minimal sets of specific degrees of freedom for analysis of two- and three-bladed horizontal axis wind turbines and calculation of machine loads due to turbulent inflow. In the first method we have adapted a commercial multi-body dynamics simulation package for wind turbine analysis. In the second approach we are developing specialized codes with limited degrees of freedom, usually specified in the modal domain. This paper will summarize progress to date in the development, validation, and application of these codes. (au) 13 refs.

  4. Lung segmentation from HRCT using united geometric active contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwei; Li, Chuanfu; Xiong, Jin; Feng, Huanqing

    2007-12-01

    Accurate lung segmentation from high resolution CT images is a challenging task due to various detail tracheal structures, missing boundary segments and complex lung anatomy. One popular method is based on gray-level threshold, however its results are usually rough. A united geometric active contours model based on level set is proposed for lung segmentation in this paper. Particularly, this method combines local boundary information and region statistical-based model synchronously: 1) Boundary term ensures the integrality of lung tissue.2) Region term makes the level set function evolve with global characteristic and independent on initial settings. A penalizing energy term is introduced into the model, which forces the level set function evolving without re-initialization. The method is found to be much more efficient in lung segmentation than other methods that are only based on boundary or region. Results are shown by 3D lung surface reconstruction, which indicates that the method will play an important role in the design of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system.

  5. [Media Studies: a diachronic and cross-curricular approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, G; Di Giorgio, V; Tomei, F; Sancini, A

    2011-01-01

    Studies on Media have generated analysis and remarks involving many different disciplines. We have just entered the age of Mass Communication. Each media (papers, radio, movie, TV and web too) wants to interpret reality and offer it to its audience. Each message coming from media is sifted and proposed according to the structural and technical characteristics of the media itself (as M.McLuhan said "the medium is the message"). In time there have been interpretations in favour or against as well, as experts detractors or defenders of media; U Eco called them "apocalyptic" and "integrated". In Medicine there are many different pathologies referable to excessive or incorrect utilization of mass-media: obesity due to high-calorie intake caused by sedentary use of TV, anorexia caused by forced imitation of models created by media, anxiety and sleeping disorders in teen-agers caused by watching TV news. Research are being carried out on mental effort due to incorrect use of screen, similar to the research on VDU operators. Categories gathered from Cognitive Ergonomics are suggested to hypothesize models of correct use of media and maybe the capacity of getting free from the influence of media so that aware audience can have a conscious perspective and not the perception of reality based entirely on the use of any media.

  6. Building a Better Mousetrap Offers Cross-Curricular Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    "If you build a better mousetrap, the world will beat a path to your door," Ralph Waldo Emerson is often credited with saying. In today's world, that might more likely be "if you build a better cell phone..." or maybe "a better vehicle..." But as an 8th-grade design project, the author challenges his students to build that better mousetrap. In…

  7. Using Cross-Curricular Ideas to Infuse Paralympic Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfer, Amanda T. S.; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2012-01-01

    The Paralympic Games are the second largest sport event in the world. They occur two weeks after the Olympic Games in the same geographic location and sport venues. Despite the Paralympic Games' longevity, many Americans do not even know they exist. One way to meaningfully share information about this event with people of all ages is to infuse a…

  8. Boxing It Up-a Cross-curricular Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Wesley

    1996-01-01

    Reports on a class project that examined the manufacture of boxes and packaging to teach about design and technology. The class discovered basic manufacturing techniques by examining and disassembling cereal boxes. Field trips to stores provided more examples. Appraises the children's final projects and discusses acquiring materials. (MJP)

  9. Water-temperature data acquisition activities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauszek, F.H.

    1972-01-01

    Water Data Coordination, U.S. Geological Survey, and published in the "Catalog of Information on Water Data, Index to Water Quality Section, Edition 1970." This is one of four indexes, each of which is a separate section of the Catalog. Three of the indexes, "Index to Water-Quality Section," "Index to Surface-Water Section," and "Index to Ground-.Water Stations," contain information on data acquired on a recurrent basis at specific locations for a period of 3 years or more. The fourth section, "Index to Areal Investigations and Miscellaneous Activities," is concerned with specific projects or shorter-term data activities that involve field or laboratory measurements or observations not included in any other section of the Catalog. The Catalog is a record of activities throughout the country (and in some places along the international border between the United States and Canada) conducted by Federal and non-Federal agencies engaged in the acquisition of water data and who furnish such information for presentation in the Catalog. The Catalog itself is an outgrowth of an assignment to the Department of the Interior and in turn to the Geological Survey, by the Office of Management and Budget, through the medium of OMB Circular A-67. This Circular states in part that one of the assigned responsibilities will be maintenance of a "central catalog of information on...water data and on Federal activities being planned or conducted to acquire such data." As an extension of this activity, non-Federal agencies are solicited to participate in the program. In this report, information is presented by means of tables and illustrations preceded by brief explanations. It includes the agencies collecting the data, the number of stations located on surface and ground waters where temperature measurements are made, the distribution of stations by States and by the 21 regions of the Water Resources Council (WRC) (a Federal agency created in accordance with the Water Resources Planning Act of

  10. 77 FR 69650 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States Duty Free AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... information collection requirement concerning the Holders or Containers which Enter the United States Duty... concerning the following information collection: Title: Holders or Containers which Enter the United States...

  11. Infusing Active Learning into the Research Methods Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    The research methods unit of survey psychology classes introduces important concepts of scientific reasoning and fluency, making it an ideal course in which to deliver enhanced curricula. To increase interest and engagement, the author developed an expanded research methods and statistics module to give students the opportunity to explore…

  12. Active Gaming Among High School Students--United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, MinKyoung; Carroll, Dianna D; Lee, Sarah M; Fulton, Janet E

    2015-08-01

    Our study is the first to describe the prevalence and correlates (demographics, body mass index [BMI], sedentary behaviors, and physical activity) of high school youth who report active videogame playing (active gaming) in a U.S. representative sample. The National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Study of 2010 provided data for this study. Active gaming was assessed as the number of days in the 7 days prior to the survey that students in grades 9-12 (14-18 years of age) reported participating in active videogames (e.g., "Wii™ Fit" [Nintendo, Kyoto, Japan], "Dance Dance Revolution" [Konami, Osaka, Japan]). Students reporting ≥1 days were classified as active gamers. Logistic regression was used to examine the association among active gaming and demographic characteristics, BMI, sedentary behaviors, and physical activity. Among 9125 U.S. high school students in grades 9-12 surveyed, 39.9 percent (95 percent confidence interval=37.9 percent, 42.0 percent) reported active gaming. Adjusting for covariates, the following characteristics were positively associated (Pblack, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity; being overweight or obese; watching DVDs >0 hours/day; watching TV >0 hours/day; and meeting guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity. Four out of 10 U.S. high school students report participating in active gaming. Active gamers tend to spend more time watching DVDs or TV, meet guidelines for physical activity, and/or be overweight or obese compared with nonactive gamers. These findings may serve to provide a baseline to track active gaming in U.S. youth and inform interventions that target sedentary behaviors and/or physical activity.

  13. 78 FR 49553 - Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-320; NRC-2013-0183] Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of receipt... Shutdown Decommissioning Activity Report (PSDAR) for Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2). The PSDAR provides...

  14. Cognitive model of the power unit operator activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chachko, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Basic notions making it possible to study and simulate the peculiarities of man-operator activity, in particular his way of thiking, are considered. Special attention is paid to cognitive models based on concept of decisive role of knowledge (its acquisition, storage and application) in the man mental processes and activity. The models are based on three basic notions, which are the professional world image, activity strategy and spontaneous decisions

  15. Non-Relative Value Unit-Generating Activities Represent One-Fifth of Academic Neuroradiologist Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, M; Zeineh, M; Zaharchuk, G; Srivastava, A; Fischbein, N

    2016-07-01

    A neuroradiologist's activity includes many tasks beyond interpreting relative value unit-generating imaging studies. Our aim was to test a simple method to record and quantify the non-relative value unit-generating clinical activity represented by consults and clinical conferences, including tumor boards. Four full-time neuroradiologists, working an average of 50% clinical and 50% academic activity, systematically recorded all the non-relative value unit-generating consults and conferences in which they were involved during 3 months by using a simple, Web-based, computer-based application accessible from smartphones, tablets, or computers. The number and type of imaging studies they interpreted during the same period and the associated relative value units were extracted from our billing system. During 3 months, the 4 neuroradiologists working an average of 50% clinical activity interpreted 4241 relative value unit-generating imaging studies, representing 8152 work relative value units. During the same period, they recorded 792 non-relative value unit-generating study reviews as part of consults and conferences (not including reading room consults), representing 19% of the interpreted relative value unit-generating imaging studies. We propose a simple Web-based smartphone app to record and quantify non-relative value unit-generating activities including consults, clinical conferences, and tumor boards. The quantification of non-relative value unit-generating activities is paramount in this time of a paradigm shift from volume to value. It also represents an important tool for determining staffing levels, which cannot be performed on the basis of relative value unit only, considering the importance of time spent by radiologists on non-relative value unit-generating activities. It may also influence payment models from medical centers to radiology departments or practices. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Firing patterns of spontaneously active motor units in spinal cord-injured subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Thomas, Christine K

    2012-04-01

    Involuntary motor unit activity at low rates is common in hand muscles paralysed by spinal cord injury. Our aim was to describe these patterns of motor unit behaviour in relation to motoneurone and motor unit properties. Intramuscular electromyographic activity (EMG), surface EMG and force were recorded for 30 min from thenar muscles of nine men with chronic cervical SCI. Motor units fired for sustained periods (>10 min) at regular (coefficient of variation ≤ 0.15, CV, n =19 units) or irregular intervals (CV>0.15, n =14). Regularly firing units started and stopped firing independently suggesting that intrinsic motoneurone properties were important for recruitment and derecruitment. Recruitment (3.6 Hz, SD 1.2), maximal (10.2 Hz, SD 2.3, range: 7.5-15.4 Hz) and derecruitment frequencies were low (3.3 Hz, SD 1.6), as were firing rate increases after recruitment (~20 intervals in 3 s). Once active, firing often covaried, promoting the idea that units received common inputs.Half of the regularly firing units showed a very slow decline (>40 s) in discharge before derecruitment and had interspike intervals longer than their estimated after hyperpolarisation potential (AHP) duration (estimated by death rate and breakpoint analyses). The other units were derecruited more abruptly and had shorter estimated AHP durations. Overall, regularly firing units had longer estimated AHP durations and were weaker than irregularly firing units, suggesting they were lower threshold units. Sustained firing of units at regular rates may reflect activation of persistent inward currents, visible here in the absence of voluntary drive, whereas irregularly firing units may only respond to synaptic noise.

  17. Motor unit activity after eccentric exercise and muscle damage in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, J G

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that unaccustomed eccentric exercise leads to muscle damage and soreness, which can produce long-lasting effects on muscle function. How this muscle damage influences muscle activation is poorly understood. The purpose of this brief review is to highlight the effect of eccentric exercise on the activation of muscle by the nervous system, by examining the change in motor unit activity obtained from surface electromyography (EMG) and intramuscular recordings. Previous research shows that eccentric exercise produces unusual changes in the EMG–force relation that influences motor performance during isometric, shortening and lengthening muscle contractions and during fatiguing tasks. When examining the effect of eccentric exercise at the single motor unit level, there are substantial changes in recruitment thresholds, discharge rates, motor unit conduction velocities and synchronization, which can last for up to 1 week after eccentric exercise. Examining the time course of these changes suggests that the increased submaximal EMG after eccentric exercise most likely occurs through a decrease in motor unit conduction velocity and an increase in motor unit activity related to antagonist muscle coactivation and low-frequency fatigue. Furthermore, there is a commonly held view that eccentric exercise produces preferential damage to high-threshold motor units, but the evidence for this in humans is limited. Further research is needed to establish whether there is preferential damage to high-threshold motor units after eccentric exercise in humans, preferably by linking changes in motor unit activity with estimates of motor unit size using selective intramuscular recording techniques.

  18. Sector activities and lessons learned around initial implementation of the United States national physical activity plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Kelly R; Satinsky, Sara B

    2014-08-01

    National plans are increasingly common but infrequently evaluated. The 2010 United States National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP) provided strategies to increase population levels of physical activity. This paper describes (i) the initial accomplishments of the NPAP sector teams, and (ii) results from a process evaluation to determine how the sectors operated, their cross-sector collaboration, challenges encountered, and positive experiences. During 2011, a quarterly reporting system was developed to capture sector-level activities. A year-end interview derived more detailed information. Interviews with 12 sector leads were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for common themes. The 6 sectors worked on goals from the implementation plan that focused broadly on education, promotion, intervention, policy, collaboration, and evaluation. Through year-end interviews, themes were generated around operations, goal setting, and cross-sector collaboration. Challenges to the NPAP work included lack of funding and time, the need for marketing and promotion, and organizational support. Positive experiences included collaboration, efficiency of work, enhanced community dynamic, and accomplishments toward NPAP goals. These initial results on the NPAP sector teams can be used as a baseline assessment for future monitoring. The lessons learned may be useful to other practitioners developing evaluations around state- or national-level plans.

  19. Population, 54 Activities: An Experimental Unit, First Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denver Univ., CO. Center for Teaching International Relations.

    Supplementary teaching activities at the junior- and senior-high school level on issues and topics involving population factors are provided. Topics include population growth, demography, graphing, population distribution, and population control. Community and national census factors as well as world population are studied. Students are helped to…

  20. Marine Activity Dynamics (M.A.D.). Unit S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Education Information Center.

    This curriculum guide describes an activity-oriented marine study program, designed for use with middle school children (grade 5). The content focuses primarily upon the life sciences, with some emphasis on chemistry and geology. Following the development of a rationale for the inclusion of marine sciences in the school curriculum, a middle…

  1. Accounting for Activity Units which Perform Agricultural Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vârteiu Daniel Petru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is a domain of nationally and internationally interest, because it has to ensure through the obtained production, the necessary of safe provisions, which are to satisfy the population’s needs. Agricultural products are obtained within the agricultural holdings, which may be constituted by individual persons, agricultural associations, self – employed persons, individual enterprises, family partnership, agricultural associations, or companies which activate in the vegetal, livestock or mixed section. In order to obtain high quality agricultural products, the owners of agricultural holdings have to make investments from own financing sources, or as a result of accessing European funds, which are dedicated to developing the agricultural sector. The sum of all economical operations made for performing agricultural activities have to be registered in accounting, having the purpose of establishing the value of owned patrimonial elements and of the results obtained by the entity at a certain point.

  2. United States-Russia: Environmental management activities. Summer 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A Joint Coordinating Committee for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (JCCEM) was formed between the US and Russia. This report describes the areas of research being studied under JCCEM, namely: Efficient separations; Contaminant transport and site characterization; Mixed wastes; High level waste tank remediation; Transuranic stabilization; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Emergency response. Other sections describe: Administrative framework for cooperation; Scientist exchange; Future actions; Non-JCCEM DOE-Russian activities; and JCCEM publications

  3. United States-Russia: Environmental management activities, Summer 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A Joint Coordinating Committee for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (JCCEM) was formed between the US and Russia. This report describes the areas of research being studied under JCCEM, namely: Efficient separations; Contaminant transport and site characterization; Mixed wastes; High level waste tank remediation; Transuranic stabilization; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Emergency response. Other sections describe: Administrative framework for cooperation; Scientist exchange; Future actions; Non-JCCEM DOE-Russian activities; and JCCEM publications.

  4. 78 FR 9720 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States Duty Free AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... or Containers which enter the United States Duty Free. This is a proposed extension of an information..., or other technological techniques or other forms of information. Title: Holders or Containers which...

  5. Pivoting output unit control systems activated by jacks. [for controlling aircraft flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliere, P.

    1978-01-01

    An invention to be used for controlling aircraft flaps is described. It is applicable to control systems with two coaxial output units which pivot simultaneously with respect to two fixed units and which are activated by two opposed, straight coaxial jacks.

  6. Analisis Unit Cost Sectio Caesaria dengan Metode Activity Based Costing di Rumah Sakit Bhayangkara Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsalisah Damayanti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the unit cost of sectio Caesaria by ABC method, second to analyze the differences between the unit cost calculation of Sectio Caesaria by ABC method with applied cost. Unit cost analysis was conducted at Sectio Caesaria procedure without comorbidities or complications. Data that used in the form of primary data interviews with specialists Obgyn and secondary data financial data and hospitals profiles. The result of the calculation of unit cost of Sectio Caesaria service through Activity Based Costing approach is still lower than INA CBG’s tariff.

  7. Burnup credit activities being conducted in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes burnup credit activities being conducted in the U.S. where burnup credit is either being used or being planned to be used for storage, transport, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Currently approved uses of burnup credit are for wet storage of PWR fuel. For dry storage of spent PWR fuel, burnup credit is used to supplement a principle of moderator exclusion. These storage applications have been pursued by the private sector. The Department of Energy (DOE) which is an organization of the U.S. Federal government is seeking approval for burnup credit for transport and disposal applications. For transport of spent fuel, regulatory review of an actinide-only PWR burnup credit method is now being conducted. A request by DOE for regulatory review of actinide and fission product burnup credit for disposal of spent BWR and PWR fuel is scheduled to occur in 1998. (author)

  8. Recruitment of rat diaphragm motor units across motor behaviors with different levels of diaphragm activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Yasin B; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2014-12-01

    Phrenic motor neurons are recruited across a range of motor behaviors to generate varying levels of diaphragm muscle (DIAm) force. We hypothesized that DIAm motor units are recruited in a fixed order across a range of motor behaviors of varying force levels, consistent with the Henneman Size Principle. Single motor unit action potentials and compound DIAm EMG activities were recorded in anesthetized, neurally intact rats across different motor behaviors, i.e., eupnea, hypoxia-hypercapnia (10% O2 and 5% CO2), deep breaths, sustained airway occlusion, and sneezing. Central drive [estimated by root-mean-squared (RMS) EMG value 75 ms after the onset of EMG activity (RMS75)], recruitment delay, and onset discharge frequencies were similar during eupnea and hypoxia-hypercapnia. Compared with eupnea, central drive increased (∼25%) during deep breaths, and motor units were recruited ∼12 ms earlier (P motor units were recruited ∼30 ms earlier (P motor unit onset discharge frequencies were significantly higher (P Recruitment order of motor unit pairs observed during eupnea was maintained for 98%, 87%, and 84% of the same pairs recorded during hypoxia-hypercapnia, deep breaths, and airway occlusion, respectively. Reversals in motor unit recruitment order were observed primarily if motor unit pairs were recruited motor unit recruitment order being determined primarily by the intrinsic size-dependent electrophysiological properties of phrenic motor neurons. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Motor unit recruitment and bursts of activity in the surface electromyogram during a sustained contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Zachary A; Terry, Mary E; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Litsey, Jane C; Enoka, Roger M

    2008-06-01

    Bursts of activity in the surface electromyogram (EMG) during a sustained contraction have been interpreted as corresponding to the transient recruitment of motor units, but this association has never been confirmed. The current study compared the timing of trains of action potentials discharged by single motor units during a sustained contraction with the bursts of activity detected in the surface EMG signal. The 20 motor units from 6 subjects [recruitment threshold, 35.3 +/- 11.3% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force] that were detected with fine wire electrodes discharged 2-9 trains of action potentials (7.2 +/- 5.6 s in duration) when recruited during a contraction that was sustained at a force below its recruitment threshold (target force, 25.4 +/- 10.6% MVC force). High-pass filtering the bipolar surface EMG signal improved its correlation with the single motor unit signal. An algorithm applied to the surface EMG was able to detect 75% of the trains of motor unit action potentials. The results indicate that bursts of activity in the surface EMG during a constant-force contraction correspond to the transient recruitment of higher-threshold motor units in healthy individuals, and these results could assist in the diagnosis and design of treatment in individuals who demonstrate deficits in motor unit activation.

  10. Activities of the United States Geological Survey in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles R.

    1997-01-01

    Since the late 1800's, when the U.S. Geological Survey first established a presence in Pennsylvania, the focus of our work has changed from general hydrologic and geologic appraisals to issue-oriented investigations; from predominantly data collection to a balanced program of data collection, interpretation, and research; and from traditional, hand-drawn mapping to digitally produced coverages with specialized themes. Yet our basic mission has not changed. It is as relevant to the resource issues of today as it was when our geologists first arrived in western Pennsylvania in 1884. Continuing in this proud heritage and tradition, the U.S. Geological Survey is moving confidently toward the next century, evolving organizationally and technologically to better meet the needs of our many constituencies. One major organizational change is the recent accession of employees from the former National Biological Service, who now form the Survey's fourth program division, the Biological Resources Division. These employees join forces with colleagues in our other three divisions: Water Resources, Geologic, and National Mapping. More than any other change in decades, the addition of this biological expertise creates new and exciting opportunities for scientific research and public service. This report provides an overview of recent activities in Pennsylvania conducted by the four program divisions and is intended to inform those interested in U.S. Geological Survey products and services. Additional information is available on our home page (at http://wwwpah2o.er.usgs.gov/). Together with numerous Federal, State, and local agencies and organizations who are our customers and partners, we at the U.S. Geological Survey look forward to providing continued scientific contributions and public service to Pennsylvania and the Nation.

  11. The practice of active rest by workplace units improves personal relationships, mental health, and physical activity among workers

    OpenAIRE

    Michishita, Ryoma; Jiang, Ying; Ariyoshi, Daisuke; Yoshida, Marie; Moriyama, Hideko; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to clarify the effects of active rest, with a focus on the practice of short-time group exercise by workplace units, on personal relationships, mental health, physical activity, and work ability among workers. Methods: Fifty-nine white-collar workers (40 males and 19 females) performed our active rest (short-time exercise) program, which consists of warm-up, cognitive functional training, aerobic exercise, resistance training and cool-down for 10 minutes per day, ...

  12. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit I--Grinding Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the first unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  13. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit II--Surface Grinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the second unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  14. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit III--Cylindrical Grinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the third unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  15. Vibration-accelerated activation of flow units in a Pd-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ning, E-mail: hslining@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Ze [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang, Xinyun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Meng [Institute of Advanced Wear & Corrosion Resistant and Functional Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2017-04-24

    Controlled activation of flow units and in-situ characterization of mechanical properties in metallic glasses are facing challenges thus far. Here, vibrational loading is introduced through nanoscale dynamic mechanical analysis technique to probe vibration-accelerated atomic level flow that plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses. The intriguing finding is that high vibrational frequency induces deep indentation depth, prominent pop-in events on load–depth curves and low storage modulus, exhibiting a vibration-facilitated activation of flow units in Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} metallic glass. Theoretical analysis revealed that vibration-moderated activation time-scale accelerate the activation of flow units and responsible for the above scenario.

  16. The practice of active rest by workplace units improves personal relationships, mental health, and physical activity among workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Jiang, Ying; Ariyoshi, Daisuke; Yoshida, Marie; Moriyama, Hideko; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2017-03-28

    This study was designed to clarify the effects of active rest, with a focus on the practice of short-time group exercise by workplace units, on personal relationships, mental health, physical activity, and work ability among workers. Fifty-nine white-collar workers (40 males and 19 females) performed our active rest (short-time exercise) program, which consists of warm-up, cognitive functional training, aerobic exercise, resistance training and cool-down for 10 minutes per day, 3 times per week during their lunch breaks for 10 weeks. Participants from a workplace unit were randomly allocated to the intervention (five workplaces, n=29) or control groups (six workplaces, n=30). The participants' anthropometric measurements, and their Profile of Mood States (POMS) 2, Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ), physical activity levels and Work Ability Index were examined at the baseline and after the 10-week intervention. After 10 weeks, physical activity levels, especially the time spent in moderate and vigorous intensity, increased in the intervention group (pworkplace units is important for improving personal relationships, mental health, and physical activity among workers.

  17. Time use and physical activity in a specialised brain injury rehabilitation unit: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Leanne; Wong, Siobhan; Sheaves, Emma; Daher, Maysaa; Grady, Andrew; Egan, Cara; Seeto, Carol; Hosking, Talia; Moseley, Anne

    2018-04-18

    To determine what is the use of time and physical activity in people undertaking inpatient rehabilitation in a specialised brain injury unit. To determine participants' level of independence related to the use of time and physical activity. Design: Cross-sectional observation study. Fourteen people [mean (SD) age 40 (15) years] with brain injuries undertaking inpatient rehabilitation. Participants were observed every 12 minutes over 5 days (Monday to Friday from 7:30 am until 7:30 pm) using a behaviour mapping tool. Observation of location, people present, body position and activity engaged in (both therapeutic and nontherapeutic). Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores were determined for each participant. Participants spent a large part of their time alone (34%) in sedentary positions (83%) and in their bedrooms (48%) doing non-therapeutic activities (78%). There was a positive relationship between a higher level of independence (higher FIM score) and being observed in active body positions (r=0.60; p=0.03) and participating in physically active therapeutic activities (r=0.53; p=0.05). Similar to stroke units, inpatients in a specialised brain injury unit spend large parts of the day sedentary, alone and doing non-therapeutic activities. Strategies need to be evaluated to address this problem, particularly for people with greater physical dependence.

  18. COMPARATIVE LEGISLATIVE ANALYSIS OF ACTIVE BRIBERY IN THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijo Galiot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Confronting socially unacceptable activities, especially corruptive criminal acts, including bribing, makes an important issue of every regulated legal system. The crucial part of such policies are the criminal polices. In this paper, the author deals with the criminal legislation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, related to the matters of active bribing as one of the basic forms of corruptive behaviour. While comparing the way the penal system is regulated in the said country, the author comments basic similarities and differences of the passive bribing legal regulation in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Croatia.

  19. Patient care and administrative activities of nurses in clinical/surgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Moura Luvisotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the administrative and nursing care activities most performed by nurses in clinical/surgical units and to determine which are most and least pleasant to them. Methods: A descriptive-exploratory field study, with a quantitative approach and with a sample made up of 40 nurses working in clinical/surgical units who answered a three-part questionnaire composed of identification data and characterization of the professional; a list of nursing and administrative activities for the nurse to grade according to the numbers: “0 = I do not perform it”, “1 = I perform it occasionally”, “2 = I perform it often”, “3 = I perform it daily”; two open-ended questions, in which the nurse listed the activities he/she enjoyed the most and the least. Results: The administrative activities most performed by the nurses were: changing work shifts, preparing employee daily task charts and managing tests; the most performed nursing care activities were related to the stages of the Nursing Care Systematization and the interaction with the multi-professional team; the most enjoyable activities were direct patient care, patient evaluation and implementation of the systematization; the least enjoyable activities were administrative and bureaucratic routines, justification of complaints/problem-solving and preparation of employee task charts. Conclusion: Compared to administrative activities, nursing activities were performed most during the daily routine of the nurse, and the most enjoyable activities were those related to patient care, according to the opinions of the professionals.

  20. Nurse Activism in the newborn intensive care unit: actions in response to an ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Peggy Doyle

    2014-03-01

    Nurses working in a newborn intensive care unit report that treatment decision disagreements for infants in their care may lead to ethical dilemmas involving all health-care providers. Applying Rest's Four-Component Model of Moral Action as the theoretical framework, this study examined the responses of 224 newborn intensive care unit nurses to the Nurses Ethical Involvement Survey. The three most frequent actions selected were as follows: talking with other nurses, talking with doctors, and requesting a team meeting. The multiple regression analysis indicates that newborn intensive care unit nurses with greater concern for the ethical aspects of clinical practice (p = .001) and an increased perception of their ability to influence ethical decision making (p = .018) were more likely to display Nurse Activism. Future research is necessary to identify other factors leading to and inhibiting Nurse Activism as these findings explained just 8.5% of the variance.

  1. THE HUMAN ACTIVITY AS AFFECTIVE-COGNITIVE UNIT: A HISTORIC-CULTURAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Márcia Martins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article puts in question the affectional-cognitive unit which sustains the human activity, with the purpose to light incorrectness of approaches which dichotomize reason and emotion. It asserts that such dissociations are founded in theorical-methodological principles which set bounds for explanations about the human psychism, so that the overcoming of referred dualisms puts on as a method matter. For making explicit that assertion, it resorted to Historic-Cultural Psychology, based on that it explains about the psychism as subjective image of objective reality, of Vygotskyan criticisms to Cartesian dualism and the need of a historic-cultural approach on emotion studies, intend to analyzing the human activity as a affective-cognitive unit and the imbricated relations that are waged, within it, among affections, emotions, feelings and thoughts. Once presented the interrelations between emotions and cognitions this exhibition argues that the concepts are necessary as a minimum unit of analysis both of thought and feelings.

  2. United States and European students’ social-networking site activities and academic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpinski, Aryn; Kirschner, Paul A.; Shreffler, Anthony; Albert, Patricia; Tomko, Carrie

    2018-01-01

    Different cultures communicate differently. Research is beginning to examine the differences in culture related to social-networking site (SNS) use. Differences in specific SNS activities related to academic performance among United States (US; n = 446) and European (n = 394) university students

  3. Motor unit activation order during electrically evoked contractions of paralyzed or partially paralyzed muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, CK; Nelson, G; Than, L; Zijdewind, Inge

    The activation order of motor units during electrically evoked contractions of paralyzed or partially paralyzed thenar muscles was determined in seven subjects with chronic cervical spinal cord injury. The median nerve was stimulated percutaneously with pulses of graded intensity to produce

  4. The content of nurse unit managers' work: a descriptive study using daily activity diaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsdóttir, Herdís; Blöndal, Katrín; Jónsdóttir, Heiður Hrund; Bragadóttir, Helga

    2017-09-07

    NUMs' job description in Icelandic hospitals has been revised and now also includes managerial and financial responsibilities. To describe the actual work activities of nurse unit managers (NUMs) in surgical and internal medicine services as self-documented and reflected in their job description. Prospective exploratory study. The study's setting was the largest hospital in Iceland. Data were collected over 7 days from NUMs working on surgical and medical units with an activity diary listing five domains and 41 activities: 'management and planning' (seven activities), 'staff responsibility (seven activities), 'direct clinical work' (five activities), 'service' (12 activities) and 'other' (nine activities). The managers' spent most of their time within the 'other' domain (32% of their time), then the next significant amount of time on 'management and planning' and 'clinical nursing' (19%), and the least amount of time on 'service' (14%). All reported working on two or more activities simultaneously. NUMs made erroneous estimations approximately half of the time about the domain they spent most of their time in and their satisfaction with their work each day varied greatly. The work of NUMs is highly diverse, including undefined miscellaneous tasks and clinical work beyond their job description. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  5. Years of Life Gained Due to Leisure-Time Physical Activity in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ian; Carson, Valerie; Lee, I-Min; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Blair, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is an important modifiable risk factor for non-communicable disease. The degree to which physical activity affects the life expectancy of Americans is unknown. This study estimated the potential years of life gained due to leisure-time physical activity across the adult lifespan in the United States. Methods Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2010), National Health Interview Study mortality linkage (1990–2006), and US Life Tables (2006) were used to estimate and compare life expectancy at each age of adult life for inactive (no moderate-to-vigorous physical activity), somewhat active (some moderate-to-vigorous activity but active (≥500 metabolic equivalent min/week of moderate-to-vigorous activity) adults. Analyses were conducted in 2012. Results Somewhat active and active non-Hispanic white men had a life expectancy at age 20 that was around 2.4 years longer than the inactive men; this life expectancy advantage was 1.2 years at age 80. Similar observations were made in non-Hispanic white women, with a higher life expectancy within the active category of 3.0 years at age 20 and 1.6 years at age 80. In non-Hispanic black women, as many as 5.5 potential years of life were gained due to physical activity. Significant increases in longevity were also observed within somewhat active and active non-Hispanic black men; however, among Hispanics the years of life gained estimates were more variable and not significantly different from 0 years gained. Conclusions Leisure-time physical activity is associated with increases in longevity in the United States. PMID:23253646

  6. Using Student-Generated Comic Books in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Timothy G.; Bryan, Gregory; Chilcoat, George W.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests having students create comic books, particularly as a culminating activity to present their learning at the conclusion of a unit. Describes how comic-book design can be used to help students develop their writing, comprehension, and research skills in a cross-curricular activity. Concludes that by creating and sharing their own comic…

  7. Recent Data Generation Activities at the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.; Humbert, D.

    2005-01-01

    The main data generation mechanism of the Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data Unit of the IAEA is the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). The International Fusion Research Council Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion recommends topics for new CRPs to be initiated by the A+M Unit. A typical CRP has a lifetime of three to five years. At the start of the CRP a Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) is held with the purpose of formulating a detailed work plan. At later RCMs progress on these work plans is reported and the studies debated and expanded. At the conclusion of the CRP the results are compiled in a volume of the journal Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion. Numerical results are also added to the electronic database as appropriate. Normally the Unit has three to four active CRPs, and also holds Technical Meetings and invites individual Consultants to IAEA Headquarters, Vienna for specific tasks. Such activities can result in providing advice on a particular topic, on data for a particular process, or a new capability to be made widely available. Recently, consultants to the Unit have provided extensive additions to the Unit databases, as well as interfaces to run several calculational tools through the Internet. Specific examples will be presented

  8. The regulation of visitors conduction activity in the State System os Brazilian Conservation Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Alves Nascimento

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Beyond to conserving biodiversity, conservation units must promote public use in contact with nature, assisting in increasing the economic resource of the area, approximating the society to nature and promoting their sustainable use. In Brazil, there are rules of the Ministry of Environment and Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation that regulate the conduction of visitors in federal conservation units. Remains to know how the activity is regulated in other spheres of the National Conservation Units System. Therefore, this article purpose to identify the legal basis for the conduction of visitors in the state conservation units and their adherence to guidelines of the Ministry of Environment. The methodology consisted in documentary research and data survey of the legal basis, done through visits to websites and sending e-mails to state management agencies. Adherence to the guidelines of the regulations was done through the evaluation to fulfillment or not from them. Legal basis were found in 18.5% of federal units of Brazil, being that only Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro meet almost all of the guideline. The conclusion was that there is a long way to go forward as the creation of rules and procedures that simultaneously encourage visitation accompanied to qualified conductors and biodiversity conservation. It is recommended greater efforts of state management agencies for the development of these legal basis, promoting improvements in desenvolviment of the activity and awareness of society.

  9. [Evaluation of the activity of a urological emergency unit in university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Pillot, P; Bardonnaud, N; Lillaz, J; Chabannes, E; Bernardini, S; Guichard, G; Bittard, H; Kleinclauss, F

    2014-01-01

    To determine the epidemiology of urological emergencies in a university hospital and the interest of a dedicated urological emergency unit. In 2008, a dedicated urological emergency unit was individualized in our department of urology. We conducted a retrospective study including all patients consulting in this unit in 2009 with epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic data. During 2009, 1257 patients consulted in this unit. Main diagnoses were acute urinary retention (303, 24.11%), renal colic (219, 17.42%), urinary infections (278, 22.11%), postoperative complications (141, 11.22%), symptomatic benign prostate hyperplasia (65, 5.17%), genitourinary cancers (61, 4.85%), trauma of urinary apparel (41, 3.26%), and spermatic cords torsion (10, 0.8%). In 99 cases (7.88%) diagnosis did not involved the urinary system. The treatment was surgical in 213 (17.7%) cases, technical procedure under local anesthesia in 368 (29.3%) and a medical treatment in 675 (53.7%) cases. Six hundred and sixty (52.5%) patients were managed ambulatory whereas 596 (47.5%) needed hospitalization. The opening of a dedicated urological emergency unit lead to 1257 emergency consultations. Frequent etiologies were acute urinary retention, renal colic and urinary infection. The creation of this unit allowed to register and to valorize this emergency activity through the ATU emergency amount. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Design and simulation of an activated sludge unit associated to a continuous reactor to remove heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Avila, J.S.; Nascimento, R.R. [Ambientec Consultoria Ltda., Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    A software was developed to design and simulate an activated sludge unit associated to a new technology to remove heavy metals from wastewater. In this process, a continuous high efficiency biphasic reactor operates by using particles of activated peat in conjugation with the sludge unit. The results obtained may be useful to increase the efficiency or to reduce the design and operational costs involved in a activated sludge unit. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Design and simulation of an activated sludge unit associated to a continuous reactor to remove heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D` Avila, J S; Nascimento, R R [Ambientec Consultoria Ltda., Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    A software was developed to design and simulate an activated sludge unit associated to a new technology to remove heavy metals from wastewater. In this process, a continuous high efficiency biphasic reactor operates by using particles of activated peat in conjugation with the sludge unit. The results obtained may be useful to increase the efficiency or to reduce the design and operational costs involved in a activated sludge unit. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. EMG analysis tuned for determining the timing and level of activation in different motor units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sabrina S M; Miara, Maria de Boef; Arnold, Allison S; Biewener, Andrew A; Wakeling, James M

    2011-08-01

    Recruitment patterns and activation dynamics of different motor units greatly influence the temporal pattern and magnitude of muscle force development, yet these features are not often considered in muscle models. The purpose of this study was to characterize the recruitment and activation dynamics of slow and fast motor units from electromyographic (EMG) recordings and twitch force profiles recorded directly from animal muscles. EMG and force data from the gastrocnemius muscles of seven goats were recorded during in vivo tendon-tap reflex and in situ nerve stimulation experiments. These experiments elicited EMG signals with significant differences in frequency content (p<0.001). The frequency content was characterized using wavelet and principal components analysis, and optimized wavelets with centre frequencies, 149.94 Hz and 323.13 Hz, were obtained. The optimized wavelets were used to calculate the EMG intensities and, with the reconstructed twitch force profiles, to derive transfer functions for slow and fast motor units that estimate the activation state of the muscle from the EMG signal. The resulting activation-deactivation time constants gave r values of 0.98-0.99 between the activation state and the force profiles. This work establishes a framework for developing improved muscle models that consider the intrinsic properties of slow and fast fibres within a mixed muscle, and that can more accurately predict muscle force output from EMG. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Geography, Race/Ethnicity, and Physical Activity Among Men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Elizabeth Kelley; Porch, Tichelle; Hill, Sarah; Thorpe, Roland J

    2017-07-01

    Engaging in regular physical activity reduces one's risk of chronic disease, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and some forms of cancer. These preventive benefits associated with physical activity are of particular importance for men, who have shorter life expectancy and experience higher rates of chronic diseases as compared to women. Studies at the community and national levels have found that social and environmental factors are important determinants of men's physical activity, but little is known about how regional influences affect physical activity behaviors among men. The objective of this study is to examine the association between geographic region and physical activity among men in the United States, and to determine if there are racial/ethnic differences in physical activity within these geographic regions. Cross-sectional data from men who participated the 2000 to 2010 National Health Interview Survey ( N = 327,556) was used. The primary outcome in this study was whether or not men had engaged in sufficient physical activity to receive health benefits, defined as meeting the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Race/ethnicity and geographic region were the primary independent variables. Within every region, Hispanic and Asian men had lower odds of engaging in sufficient physical activity compared to white men. Within the Northeast, South, and West, black men had lower odds of engaging in sufficient physical activity compared to white men. The key findings indicate that the odds of engaging in sufficient physical activity among men differ significantly between geographic regions and within regions by race/ethnicity.

  14. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion unit at your plant. Include supporting calculations. (b) Records of low carbon feed... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units for Which Construction is...

  15. Restoration of trust and activities for public consensus toward installation of newly added units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junko; Murabe, Yoshikazu

    2001-01-01

    Japan Atomic Power Company, as a pioneer of nuclear power generation in Japan, owns 4 units in total in Tokai Mura, Ibaraki Prefecture and Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture. The Tokai Power Plant installed at Tokai Mura has ceased its commercial operation, now in preparation for decommissioning. It is necessary for Japan to promote nuclear power generation with such factors taken into consideration as self-reliance and stable supply of energy, reduction of CO 2 emissions for prevention of global warming, etc., despite fallen confidence in nuclear energy due to various troubles like the JCO accident. Under such circumstances, our Company has the plan to add 2 Units of Advanced Pressurised Water Reactor (APWR ) as Units No. 3 and 4 of the Tsuruga Power Generating Station, each rated to be 1,530 MWe, the world largest capacity , totalling 3,070 MWe. at this nuclear site. This paper presents the basic Corporate principles for promotion of understanding of nuclear energy itself, and the Corporate activities for promotion of understanding by the community people on adding the Tsuruga Units 3 and 4, in pursuant to the basic principles, discussing how the public trust in nuclear energy should be restored in the toughest situation against nuclear energy, and how the added installation of the nuclear units should be promoted

  16. Activities Contributing to Total Energy Expenditure in the United States: Results from the NHAPS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Block Gladys

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is increasingly recognized as an important factor influencing health and disease status. Total energy expenditure, both low-intensity and high-intensity, contributes to maintenance of healthy body weight. This paper presents the results of a quantitative approach to determining the activities that contribute to total energy expenditure in the United States. Methods Data from the National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS were used. In 1992–1994 the NHAPS sampled 4,185 females and 3,330 males, aged 18 years and over, weighted to be representative of the 48 contiguous United States. A detailed report of each activity performed in the previous 24 hours was obtained. A score was created for each activity, by multiplying duration and intensity for each individual and summing across individuals. This score was then used to rank each activity according to its contribution to total population energy expenditure, for the total sample and separately for each gender, race, age, region, and season. Results This analysis reveals our society to be primarily sedentary; leisure time physical activity contributed only approximately 5% of the population's total energy expenditure. Not counting sleeping, the largest contributor to energy expenditure was "Driving a car", followed by "Office work" and "Watching TV". Household activities accounted for 20.1% and 33.3% of energy expenditure for males and females respectively. Conclusion The information presented in this paper may be useful in identifying common activities that could be appropriate targets for behavioral interventions to increase physical activity.

  17. Prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Eboneé N; Evenson, Kelly R

    2014-01-01

    The risk of stroke is greatest among adults who have experienced a previous stroke, transient ischemic attack, or myocardial infarction. Physical activity may reduce the secondary risk of stroke through mediating effects on blood pressure, vasoconstriction, and circulating lipid concentrations; however, little is known about the prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we describe self-reported and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior among adults with a self-reported history of stroke. We also contrast physical activity among stroke survivors with that of adults without stroke (unexposed) to illustrate expected behavior in the absence of disease. Fewer participants with stroke met weekly physical activity guidelines as outlined in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans when compared with unexposed participants (17.9% vs 25.0%) according to self-reported data. In addition, participants with stroke reported less moderate (46.1% vs 54.7%) and vigorous (9.1% vs 19.6%) leisure activity compared with unexposed participants. As measured by accelerometer, time since diagnosis was inversely associated with physical activity engagement, and participants with stroke recorded more daily hours of sedentary behavior compared with unexposed participants (10.1 hours vs 8.9 hours). Findings from this study provide a basis for future work seeking to measure the impact of physical activity on the secondary prevention of stroke by characterizing the prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States.

  18. Exercise and limitations in physical activity levels among new dialysis patients in the United States: an epidemiologic study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2008-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies of physical activity among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are lacking. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of physical activity among new dialysis patients in the United States.

  19. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. Objective: This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS. Results: The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. Conclusion: By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department. PMID:26234974

  20. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2015-05-17

    Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran.‎ This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS.‎ The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department.

  1. Using photovoice to explore nigerian immigrants' eating and physical activity in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Melanie T; Fapohunda, Abimbola; Zoucha, Rick

    2015-01-01

    African immigrants are one of the fastest growing immigrant groups to the United States; there is a crucial need to learn about African immigrants' beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that may impact health. The purposes of this study were to (a) explore the perceptions and practices of Nigerian immigrants regarding healthy eating and physical activity in the United States; (b) assess the influence of cultural beliefs of Nigerian immigrants on eating and physical activity; (c) describe the role that healthcare providers can play in helping to promote healthy eating and physical activity; and (d) evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of using Photovoice to collect data on the perceptions and practices of Nigerian immigrants regarding healthy eating and physical activity. Qualitative visual ethnography using Photovoice. Thirteen Nigerian immigrants were recruited. Data were collected using photography and focus group discussions at a church. Photovoice methodology and Leininger's four phases of qualitative analysis were used to analyze photographs, field notes, and focus group transcripts. Four overarching themes emerged from the data: moderation is healthy, Nigerian ways of living are healthy, acquiring American ways is unhealthy, and cultural context is important to promote healthy behaviors. Photovoice was a feasible, effective methodology for collecting data on the perceptions and practices of Nigerian immigrants. Nigerian participants believed that adherence to traditional dietary and activity practices are healthy. Nurses and other healthcare providers must make concerted efforts to communicate with and educate Nigerian immigrants about healthful eating and activity behaviors within their cultural context. The number of African immigrants to the United States has increased dramatically. Photovoice is a creative method to learn about the health beliefs and behaviors of the Nigerian immigrant population. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Electronic word of mouth on twitter about physical activity in the United States: exploratory infodemiology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Campo, Shelly; Janz, Kathleen F; Eckler, Petya; Yang, Jingzhen; Snetselaar, Linda G; Signorini, Alessio

    2013-11-20

    Twitter is a widely used social medium. However, its application in promoting health behaviors is understudied. In order to provide insights into designing health marketing interventions to promote physical activity on Twitter, this exploratory infodemiology study applied both social cognitive theory and the path model of online word of mouth to examine the distribution of different electronic word of mouth (eWOM) characteristics among personal tweets about physical activity in the United States. This study used 113 keywords to retrieve 1 million public tweets about physical activity in the United States posted between January 1 and March 31, 2011. A total of 30,000 tweets were randomly selected and sorted based on numbers generated by a random number generator. Two coders scanned the first 16,100 tweets and yielded 4672 (29.02%) tweets that they both agreed to be about physical activity and were from personal accounts. Finally, 1500 tweets were randomly selected from the 4672 tweets (32.11%) for further coding. After intercoder reliability scores reached satisfactory levels in the pilot coding (100 tweets separate from the final 1500 tweets), 2 coders coded 750 tweets each. Descriptive analyses, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Fisher exact tests were performed. Tweets about physical activity were dominated by neutral sentiments (1270/1500, 84.67%). Providing opinions or information regarding physical activity (1464/1500, 97.60%) and chatting about physical activity (1354/1500, 90.27%) were found to be popular on Twitter. Approximately 60% (905/1500, 60.33%) of the tweets demonstrated users' past or current participation in physical activity or intentions to participate in physical activity. However, social support about physical activity was provided in less than 10% of the tweets (135/1500, 9.00%). Users with fewer people following their tweets (followers) (P=.02) and with fewer accounts that they followed (followings) (P=.04) were more likely to talk positively about

  3. [Activity-based costing methodology to manage resources in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvear V, Sandra; Canteros G, Jorge; Jara M, Juan; Rodríguez C, Patricia

    2013-11-01

    An accurate estimation of resources use by individual patients is crucial in hospital management. To measure financial costs of health care actions in intensive care units of two public regional hospitals in Chile. Prospective follow up of 716 patients admitted to two intensive care units during 2011. The financial costs of health care activities was calculated using the Activity-Based Costing methodology. The main activities recorded were procedures and treatments, monitoring, response to patient needs, patient maintenance and coordination. Activity-Based Costs, including human resources and assorted indirect costs correspond to 81 to 88% of costs per disease in one hospital and 69 to 80% in the other. The costs associated to procedures and treatments are the most significant and are approximately $100,000 (Chilean pesos) per day of hospitalization. The second most significant cost corresponds to coordination activities, which fluctuates between $86,000 and 122,000 (Chilean pesos). There are significant differences in resources use between the two hospitals studied. Therefore cost estimation methodologies should be incorporated in the management of these clinical services.

  4. Evaluation of a technology unit in a girls' primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Marion; Gardner, Paul L.

    1991-12-01

    Rapid advances in technology are changing the structure of the workforce. There are elite highly-paid hi-tech occupations and low status poorly-paid jobs. Women are unfortunately more likely to be found in the latter category. To allow them to qualify and compete for the higher-status positions, girls need to participate in the physical sciences and in technology studies. However, they are rarely attracted to them in secondary school, possibly because they are already alienated from them by the time they leave primary school. This paper reports some of the outcomes of a curriculum unit taught in two primary school classes in an independent school for girls. The unit was cross-curricular, involving technology, science and other fields of knowledge; it made extensive use of LEGO Technic materials. The evaluation of the unit, based on observations, a teacher journal and pupil questionnaires, focussed upon the issue of whether it assisted the girls to feel happier about working with unfamiliar technology and feel more capable of doing so. Implications for teaching technology are also discussed.

  5. Motor unit activation patterns during concentric wrist flexion in humans with different muscle fibre composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, K; Christensen, H; Fallentin, N; Mizuno, M; Quistorff, B; Sjøgaard, G

    1998-10-01

    Muscle activity was recorded from the flexor carpi radialis muscle during static and dynamic-concentric wrist flexion in six subjects, who had exhibited large differences in histochemically identified muscle fibre composition. Motor unit recruitment patterns were identified by sampling 310 motor units and counting firing rates in pulses per second (pps). During concentric wrist flexion at 30% of maximal exercise intensity the mean firing rate was 27 (SD 13) pps. This was around twice the value of 12 (SD 5) pps recorded during sustained static contraction at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, despite a larger absolute force level during the static contraction. A similar pattern of higher firing rates during dynamic exercise was seen when concentric wrist flexion at 60% of maximal exercise intensity [30 (SD 14) pps] was compared with sustained static contraction at 60% of maximal voluntary contraction [19 (SD 8) pps]. The increase in dynamic exercise intensity was accomplished by recruitment of additional motor units rather than by increasing the firing rate as during static contractions. No difference in mean firing rates was found among subjects with different muscle fibre composition, who had previously exhibited marked differences in metabolic response during corresponding dynamic contractions. It was concluded that during submaximal dynamic contractions motor unit firing rate cannot be deduced from observations during static contractions and that muscle fibre composition may play a minor role.

  6. Calculation of radioactive inventory of activated parts for nuclear power unit and analysis of influence factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Cai Qi; Lin Xiaoling

    2011-01-01

    Based on the operation characteristics of the nuclear power unit, the radioactive inventory of activated parts was calculated by ORIGEN2, and the effects of bum-up, operation mode and power change on the radioactive inventory for activated parts were analyzed. The results indicated that the radioactive inventory grew with the increasing of burn-up, and when the actual operation time was longer than the effective operation time, the increasing rate of nuclide activity approximated the burn-up increasing; Radioactive inventory of activated parts was influenced directly by the operation modes of the nuclear power unit, and under same reactor load, operation power and bum-up, the radioactive inventory for non-continuous operation mode is less than that for the continuous operation mode. Effects of operation modes on radioactive inventory reversed with half life of nuclides. Under same bum-up and longer operation time, the effect of operation power change on the radioactive inventory is not obvious, (authors)

  7. Detections of Yersinia pestis East of the Known Distribution of Active Plague in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mize, Erica L; Britten, Hugh B

    2016-02-01

    We examined fleas collected from black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) burrows from 2009 through 2011 in five national park units east of the known distribution of active plague across the northern Great Plains for the presence of Yersinia pestis. Across all national park units, Oropsylla tuberculata and Oropsylla hirsuta were the most common fleas collected from prairie dog burrows, 42.4% and 56.9%, respectively, of the 3964 fleas collected from burrow swabbing. Using a nested PCR assay, we detected 200 Y. pestis-positive fleas from 3117 assays. In total, 6.4% of assayed fleas were Y. pestis positive and 13.9% of prairie dog burrows swabbed contained Y. pestis-positive fleas. Evidence of the presence of Y. pestis was observed at all national park units except Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming. We detected the presence of Y. pestis without large die-offs, i.e., enzootic sylvatic plague, east of the known distribution of active plague and near the eastern edge of the present distribution of black-tailed prairie dogs. This study, in combination with previous work suggests that sylvatic plague likely occurs across the range of black-tailed prairie dogs and should now be treated as endemic across this range.

  8. [Analysis of cost and efficiency of a medical nursing unit using time-driven activity-based costing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Young; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2011-08-01

    Time-driven activity-based costing was applied to analyze the nursing activity cost and efficiency of a medical unit. Data were collected at a medical unit of a general hospital. Nursing activities were measured using a nursing activities inventory and classified as 6 domains using Easley-Storfjell Instrument. Descriptive statistics were used to identify general characteristics of the unit, nursing activities and activity time, and stochastic frontier model was adopted to estimate true activity time. The average efficiency of the medical unit using theoretical resource capacity was 77%, however the efficiency using practical resource capacity was 96%. According to these results, the portion of non-added value time was estimated 23% and 4% each. The sums of total nursing activity costs were estimated 109,860,977 won in traditional activity-based costing and 84,427,126 won in time-driven activity-based costing. The difference in the two cost calculating methods was 25,433,851 won. These results indicate that the time-driven activity-based costing provides useful and more realistic information about the efficiency of unit operation compared to traditional activity-based costing. So time-driven activity-based costing is recommended as a performance evaluation framework for nursing departments based on cost management.

  9. Status of activities: Low-level radioactive waste management in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, C.B.; Shilkett, R.C.; Kirkpatrick, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    A primary objective of low-level radioactive waste management in the United States is to protect the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. In support of this objective is the development of waste treatment and disposal technologies designed to provide stabilization and long-term institutional control of low-level radioactive wastes. Presented herein is a technical review of specific low-level radioactive waste management activities in the United States. Waste treatment and disposal technologies are discussed along with the performance objectives of the technologies aimed at protecting the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. 13 refs., 4 figs

  10. Update: Influenza Activity - United States and Worldwide, May 21-September 23, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Lenee; Wentworth, David E; Alabi, Noreen; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Barnes, John; Brammer, Lynnette; Burns, Erin; Davis, C Todd; Dugan, Vivien G; Fry, Alicia M; Garten, Rebecca; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Gubareva, Larisa; Kniss, Krista; Lindstrom, Stephen; Mustaquim, Desiree; Olsen, Sonja J; Roguski, Katherine; Taylor, Calli; Trock, Susan; Xu, Xiyan; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel

    2017-10-06

    During May 21-September 23, 2017,* the United States experienced low-level seasonal influenza virus activity; however, beginning in early September, CDC received reports of a small number of localized influenza outbreaks caused by influenza A(H3N2) viruses. In addition to influenza A(H3N2) viruses, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza B viruses were detected during May-September worldwide and in the United States. Influenza B viruses predominated in the United States from late May through late June, and influenza A viruses predominated beginning in early July. The majority of the influenza viruses collected and received from the United States and other countries during that time have been characterized genetically or antigenically as being similar to the 2017 Southern Hemisphere and 2017-18 Northern Hemisphere cell-grown vaccine reference viruses; however, a smaller proportion of the circulating A(H3N2) viruses showed similarity to the egg-grown A(H3N2) vaccine reference virus which represents the A(H3N2) viruses used for the majority of vaccine production in the United States. Also, during May 21-September 23, 2017, CDC confirmed a total of 33 influenza variant virus † infections; two were influenza A(H1N2) variant (H1N2v) viruses (Ohio) and 31 were influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) viruses (Delaware [1], Maryland [13], North Dakota [1], Pennsylvania [1], and Ohio [15]). An additional 18 specimens from Maryland have tested presumptive positive for H3v and further analysis is being conducted at CDC.

  11. Mortality of induced abortion, other outpatient surgical procedures and common activities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Elizabeth G; Grossman, Daniel; Weaver, Mark A; Toti, Stephanie; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-11-01

    The recent surge of new legislation regulating induced abortion in the United States is ostensibly motivated by the desire to protect women's health. To provide context for interpreting the risk of abortion, we compared abortion-related mortality to mortality associated with other outpatient surgical procedures and selected nonmedical activities. We calculated the abortion-related mortality rate during 2000-2009 using national data. We searched PubMed and other sources for contemporaneous data on mortality associated with other outpatient procedures commonly performed on healthy young women, marathon running, bicycling and driving. The abortion-related mortality rate in 2000-2009 in the United States was 0.7 per 100,000 abortions. Studies in approximately the same years found mortality rates of 0.8-1.7 deaths per 100,000 plastic surgery procedures, 0-1.7deaths per 100,000 dental procedures, 0.6-1.2 deaths per 100,000 marathons run and at least 4 deaths among 100,000 cyclists in a large annual bicycling event. The traffic fatality rate per 758 vehicle miles traveled by passenger cars in the United States in 2007-2011 was about equal to the abortion-related mortality rate. The safety of induced abortion as practiced in the United States for the past decade met or exceeded expectations for outpatient surgical procedures and compared favorably to that of two common nonmedical voluntary activities. The new legislation restricting abortion is unnecessary; indeed, by reducing the geographic distribution of abortion providers and requiring women to travel farther for the procedure, these laws are potentially detrimental to women's health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The physical environment and patients' activities and care: A comparative case study at three newly built stroke units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anåker, Anna; von Koch, Lena; Sjöstrand, Christina; Heylighen, Ann; Elf, Marie

    2018-04-20

    To explore and compare the impact of the physical environment on patients' activities and care at three newly built stroke units. Receiving care in a stroke unit instead of in a general ward reduces the odds of death, dependency and institutionalized care. In stroke units, the design of the physical environment should support evidence-based care. Studies on patients' activities in relation to the design of the physical environment of stroke units are scarce. This work is a comparative descriptive case study. Patients (N = 55) who had a confirmed diagnosis of stroke were recruited from three newly built stroke units in Sweden. The units were examined by non-participant observation using two types of data collection: behavioural mapping analysed with descriptive statistics and field note taking analysed with deductive content analysis. Data were collected from April 2013 - December 2015. The units differed in the patients' levels of physical activity, the proportion of the day that patients spent with health professionals and family presence. Patients were more physically active in a unit with a combination of single and multi-bed room designs than in a unit with an entirely single-room design. Stroke units that were easy to navigate and offered variations in the physical environment had an impact on patients' activities and care. Patients' activity levels and interactions appeared to vary with the design of the physical environments of stroke units. Stroke guidelines focused on health status assessments, avoidance of bed-rest and early rehabilitation require a supportive physical environment. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Research and development activities on Three Mile Island Unit Two. Annual report for 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The year 1985 was significant in the cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). Major milestones in the project included lifting the plenum assembly from the reactor vessel and the start of operations to remove the damaged fuel from the reactor. This report summarizes these milestones and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include the following: waste immobilization and management; fuel shipping cask delivery and testing; sample acquisition and evaluation; and decontamination and dose reduction. 26 figs.

  14. FINAL INTERIM REPORT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FINAL STATUS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 and 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadick, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) facilities were constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium. SPRU operated between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction/oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes that were subsequently used by the Hanford and the Savannah River sites.

  15. Annual and seasonal tornado activity in the United States and the global wind oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Todd W.

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have searched for relationships between tornado activity and atmospheric teleconnections to provide insight on the relationship between tornadoes, their environments, and larger scale patterns in the climate system. Knowledge of these relationships is practical because it can improve seasonal and sub-seasonal predictions of tornado probability and, therefore, help mitigate tornado-related losses. This study explores the relationships between the annual and seasonal tornado activity in the United States and the Global Wind Oscillation. Time series herein show that phases of the Global Wind Oscillation, and atmospheric angular momentum anomalies, vary over a period of roughly 20-25 years. Rank correlations indicate that tornado activity is weakly correlated with phases 2, 3, and 4 (positive) and 6, 7, and 8 (negative) of the Global Wind Oscillation in winter, spring, and fall. The correlation is not as clear in summer or at the annual scale. Non-parametric Mann-Whitney U tests indicate that winters and springs with more phase 2, 3, and 4 and fewer phase 6, 7, and 8 days tend to have more tornadoes. Lastly, logistic regression models indicate that winters and springs with more phase 2, 3, and 4 days have greater likelihoods of having more than normal tornado activity. Combined, these analyses suggest that seasons with more low atmospheric angular momentum days, or phase 2, 3, and 4 days, tend to have greater tornado activity than those with fewer days, and that this relationship is most evident in winter and spring.

  16. Annual and seasonal tornado activity in the United States and the global wind oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Todd W.

    2018-06-01

    Previous studies have searched for relationships between tornado activity and atmospheric teleconnections to provide insight on the relationship between tornadoes, their environments, and larger scale patterns in the climate system. Knowledge of these relationships is practical because it can improve seasonal and sub-seasonal predictions of tornado probability and, therefore, help mitigate tornado-related losses. This study explores the relationships between the annual and seasonal tornado activity in the United States and the Global Wind Oscillation. Time series herein show that phases of the Global Wind Oscillation, and atmospheric angular momentum anomalies, vary over a period of roughly 20-25 years. Rank correlations indicate that tornado activity is weakly correlated with phases 2, 3, and 4 (positive) and 6, 7, and 8 (negative) of the Global Wind Oscillation in winter, spring, and fall. The correlation is not as clear in summer or at the annual scale. Non-parametric Mann-Whitney U tests indicate that winters and springs with more phase 2, 3, and 4 and fewer phase 6, 7, and 8 days tend to have more tornadoes. Lastly, logistic regression models indicate that winters and springs with more phase 2, 3, and 4 days have greater likelihoods of having more than normal tornado activity. Combined, these analyses suggest that seasons with more low atmospheric angular momentum days, or phase 2, 3, and 4 days, tend to have greater tornado activity than those with fewer days, and that this relationship is most evident in winter and spring.

  17. Human presence diminishes the importance of climate in driving fire activity across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Keeley, Jon E.; Pfaff, Anne Hopkins; Ferschweiler, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Growing human and ecological costs due to increasing wildfire are an urgent concern in policy and management, particularly given projections of worsening fire conditions under climate change. Thus, understanding the relationship between climatic variation and fire activity is a critically important scientific question. Different factors limit fire behavior in different places and times, but most fire-climate analyses are conducted across broad spatial extents that mask geographical variation. This could result in overly broad or inappropriate management and policy decisions that neglect to account for regionally specific or other important factors driving fire activity. We developed statistical models relating seasonal temperature and precipitation variables to historical annual fire activity for 37 different regions across the continental United States and asked whether and how fire-climate relationships vary geographically, and why climate is more important in some regions than in others. Climatic variation played a significant role in explaining annual fire activity in some regions, but the relative importance of seasonal temperature or precipitation, in addition to the overall importance of climate, varied substantially depending on geographical context. Human presence was the primary reason that climate explained less fire activity in some regions than in others. That is, where human presence was more prominent, climate was less important. This means that humans may not only influence fire regimes but their presence can actually override, or swamp out, the effect of climate. Thus, geographical context as well as human influence should be considered alongside climate in national wildfire policy and management.

  18. 2-Deoxyglucose autoradiography of single motor units: labelling of individual acutely active muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toop, J.; Burke, R.E.; Dum, R.P.; O'Donovan, M.J.; Smith, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    2-Deoxy-D-[1- 14 C]glucose (2DG) was given intravenously during repetitive stimulation of single motor units in adult cats and autoradiographs were made of frozen sections of the target muscles in order to evaluate methods designed to improve the spatial resolution of [ 14 C]2DG autoradiography. With the modifications used, acutely active muscle fibers, independently identified by depletion of intrafiber glycogen, were associated with highly localized accumulations of silver grains over the depleted fibers. The results indicate that [ 14 C]2DG autoradiography can successfully identify individual active muscle fibers and might in principle be used to obtain quantitative data about rates of glucose metabolism in single muscle fibers of defined histochemical type. The modifications may be applicable also to other tissues to give improved spatial resolution with [ 14 C]-labeled metabolic markers. (Auth.)

  19. Reconstructing the population activity of olfactory output neurons that innervate identifiable processing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Namiki

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the functional organization of the moth antennal lobe (AL, the primary olfactory network, using in vivo electrophysiological recordings and anatomical identification. The moth AL contains about 60 processing units called glomeruli that are identifiable from one animal to another. We were able to monitor the output information of the AL by recording the activity of a population of output neurons, each of which innervated a single glomerulus. Using compiled intracellular recordings and staining data from different animals, we mapped the odor-evoked dynamics on a digital atlas of the AL and geometrically reconstructed the population activity. We examined the quantitative relationship between the similarity of olfactory responses and the anatomical distance between glomeruli. Globally, the olfactory response profile was independent of the anatomical distance, although some local features were present.

  20. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2' NUREG-0683

  1. Walking associated with public transit: moving toward increased physical activity in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Amy L; Banerjee, Shailendra N; Dannenberg, Andrew L; Wendel, Arthur M

    2013-03-01

    We assessed changes in transit-associated walking in the United States from 2001 to 2009 and documented their importance to public health. We examined transit walk times using the National Household Travel Survey, a telephone survey administered by the US Department of Transportation to examine travel behavior in the United States. People are more likely to transit walk if they are from lower income households, are non-White, and live in large urban areas with access to rail systems. Transit walkers in large urban areas with a rail system were 72% more likely to transit walk 30 minutes or more per day than were those without a rail system. From 2001 to 2009, the estimated number of transit walkers rose from 7.5 million to 9.6 million (a 28% increase); those whose transit-associated walking time was 30 minutes or more increased from approximately 2.6 million to 3.4 million (a 31% increase). Transit walking contributes to meeting physical activity recommendations. Study results may contribute to transportation-related health impact assessment studies evaluating the impact of proposed transit systems on physical activity, potentially influencing transportation planning decisions.

  2. Motor Unit Action Potential Clustering—Theoretical Consideration for Muscle Activation during a Motor Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Asmussen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During dynamic or sustained isometric contractions, bursts of muscle activity appear in the electromyography (EMG signal. Theoretically, these bursts of activity likely occur because motor units are constrained to fire temporally close to one another and thus the impulses are “clustered” with short delays to elicit bursts of muscle activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a sequence comprised of “clustered” motor unit action potentials (MUAP can explain spectral and amplitude changes of the EMG during a simulated motor task. This question would be difficult to answer experimentally and thus, required a model to study this type of muscle activation pattern. To this end, we modeled two EMG signals, whereby a single MUAP was either convolved with a randomly distributed impulse train (EMG-rand or a “clustered” sequence of impulses (EMG-clust. The clustering occurred in windows lasting 5–100 ms. A final mixed signal of EMG-clust and EMG-rand, with ratios (1:1–1:10, was also modeled. A ratio of 1:1 would indicate that 50% of MUAP were randomly distributed, while 50% of “clustered” MUAP occurred in a given time window (5–100 ms. The results of the model showed that clustering MUAP caused a downshift in the mean power frequency (i.e., ~30 Hz with the largest shift occurring with a cluster window of 10 ms. The mean frequency shift was largest when the ratio of EMG-clust to EMG-rand was high. Further, the clustering of MUAP also caused a substantial increase in the amplitude of the EMG signal. This model potentially explains an activation pattern that changes the EMG spectra during a motor task and thus, a potential activation pattern of muscles observed experimentally. Changes in EMG measurements during fatiguing conditions are typically attributed to slowing of conduction velocity but could, per this model, also result from changes of the clustering of MUAP. From a clinical standpoint, this type of muscle

  3. [Community vegetable gardens as a health promotion activity: an experience in Primary Healthcare Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christiane Gasparini Araújo; Garcia, Mariana Tarricone; Ribeiro, Silvana Maria; Salandini, Marcia Fernanda de Sousa; Bógus, Cláudia Maria

    2015-10-01

    Urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) is being practiced in different settings, contributing to the improvement of health in communities and healthier environments. In order to identify the meanings and implications of the practice of UPA in Primary Healthcare Units (PHU) as an activity of health promotion (HP), and to what extent its therapeutic dimension characterizes it as an activity aligned with complementary and integrative practices (CIP), a qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in Embu das Artes, State of São Paulo. From the analysis, the following main themes arose: health concept, health outcomes, the return to traditional practices and habits and the reorientation of health services. It was possible to identify the close link between the cultivation of vegetable gardens and HP guidelines and fields of action, such as creating healthier environments, boosting community actions, developing personal skills, stimulating autonomy and empowerment and demands for the reorientation of services. The garden activities, set up in PHU areas, proved to be an implementation strategy of CIP. The conclusion reached is that vegetable gardening activities in community gardens are seen to be health promotion practices that integrate key elements of CIP.

  4. Demonstrating the unit hydrograph and flow routing processes involving active student participation - a university lecture experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Karsten; Burgholzer, Reinhard; Klotz, Daniel; Wesemann, Johannes; Herrnegger, Mathew

    2018-05-01

    The unit hydrograph (UH) has been one of the most widely employed hydrological modelling techniques to predict rainfall-runoff behaviour of hydrological catchments, and is still used to this day. Its concept is based on the idea that a unit of effective precipitation per time unit (e.g. mm h-1) will always lead to a specific catchment response in runoff. Given its relevance, the UH is an important topic that is addressed in most (engineering) hydrology courses at all academic levels. While the principles of the UH seem to be simple and easy to understand, teaching experiences in the past suggest strong difficulties in students' perception of the UH theory and application. In order to facilitate a deeper understanding of the theory and application of the UH for students, we developed a simple and cheap lecture theatre experiment which involved active student participation. The seating of the students in the lecture theatre represented the hydrological catchment in its size and form. A set of plastic balls, prepared with a piece of magnetic strip to be tacked to any white/black board, each represented a unit amount of effective precipitation. The balls are evenly distributed over the lecture theatre and routed by some given rules down the catchment to the catchment outlet, where the resulting hydrograph is monitored and illustrated at the black/white board. The experiment allowed an illustration of the underlying principles of the UH, including stationarity, linearity, and superposition of the generated runoff and subsequent routing. In addition, some variations of the experimental setup extended the UH concept to demonstrate the impact of elevation, different runoff regimes, and non-uniform precipitation events on the resulting hydrograph. In summary, our own experience in the classroom, a first set of student exams, as well as student feedback and formal evaluation suggest that the integration of such an experiment deepened the learning experience by active

  5. A Prediction on the Unit Cost Estimation for Decommissioning Activities Using the Experienced Data from DECOMMIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Kook; Park, Hee Seong; Choi, Yoon Dong; Song, Chan Ho; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has developed the DECOMMIS (Decommissioning Information Management System) and have been applied for the decommissioning project of the KRR (Korea Research Reactor)-1 and 2 and UCP (Uranium Conversion Plant), as the meaning of the first decommissioning project in Korea. All information and data which are from the decommissioning activities are input, saved, output and managed in the DECOMMIS. This system was consists of the web server and the database server. The users could be access through a web page, depending on the input, processing and output, and be modified the permissions to do such activities can after the decommissioning activities have created the initial system-wide data is stored. When it could be used the experienced data from DECOMMIS, the cost estimation on the new facilities for the decommissioning planning will be established with the basic frame of the WBS structures and its codes. In this paper, the prediction on the cost estimation through using the experienced data which were store in DECOMMIS was studied. For the new decommissioning project on the nuclear facilities in the future, through this paper, the cost estimation for the decommissioning using the experienced data which were WBS codes, unit-work productivity factors and annual governmental unit labor cost is proposed. These data were from the KRR and UCP decommissioning project. The differences on the WBS code sectors and facility characterization between new objected components and experienced dismantled components was reduces as scaling factors. The study on the establishment the scaling factors and cost prediction for the cost estimation is developing with the algorithms from the productivity data, now.

  6. Active travel to work and cardiovascular risk factors in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Anthony A; Mindell, Jennifer S; Webb, Elizabeth A; Millett, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Increasing active travel (walking, cycling, public transport) is increasingly seen as integral to strategies to raise physical activity levels. This study examined (1) sociodemographic correlates of active travel to work and (2) associations between active travel and cardiovascular risk factors in the United Kingdom (UK). Data come from Understanding Society, a nationally representative survey of UK residents in 2009/2011, analyzed in 2012. Multinomial logistic regression assessed associations between sociodemographic factors and mode of transport to work. Linear and logistic regression was used to examine associations between mode of travel and overweight/obesity, and having hypertension or diabetes. A total of 69% of participants traveled to work using private transport, with public transport, walking, and cycling used by 16%, 12%, and 3%, respectively. Use of any active travel was more likely in participants living in London. Black participants were more likely to walk (AOR=1.41, 95% CI=1.08, 1.84) or take public transport (AOR=2.34, 95% CI=1.88, 2.90) to work than whites. Using public transport, walking, or cycling to work was associated with a lower likelihood of being overweight (AOR=0.80, 95% CI=0.54, 0.88 for walking). Walking or cycling was associated with a lower likelihood of having diabetes, and walking was associated with a lower likelihood of having hypertension than private transport (AOR=0.83, 95% CI=0.71, 0.97). There are wide variations in the mode of travel to work across regions and sociodemographic groups in the UK. The protective association between active travel and cardiovascular risk demonstrated in this nationally representative study adds to growing evidence that concerted policy focus in this area may benefit population health. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A description of the roles, activities, and skills of clinical nurse specialists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R A

    1999-07-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) frequently adapt to meet the challenging and changing needs of patients, families, nurses, physicians, and institutions, thus creating an advance practice role that is problematic in definition and description. The two dilemmas associated with CNSs have been role confusion and ambiguity, and the inability to explicate CNSs' value in economic terms. The purpose of this study was to describe the roles, activities, skills, and the cost-saving and revenue-generating activities of Master's-prepared nurses who function in traditional CNS roles in the United States. A descriptive research design was employed, using Role Theory as a framework to guide the study. The tool used to measure CNS practice included a 68-item instrument. It was pretested and used in two pilot studies. Content validity was supported by three experienced CNSs who were, at the time, in a doctoral nursing program. Instrument reliability was 0.89. Surveys were mailed to all individuals who subscribed (n = 2379) to the Clinical Nurse Specialist Journal. From the convenience sample, 724 CNSs participated, providing a margin of error of +/- 4 percentage points with a 99% confidence level. Regarding the five role components, CNSs reported (listed from most frequently to least frequently) spending time in the role of expert practitioner, educator, consultant, administrator, and researcher. Most of the activities listed in each of the roles were typical of CNS practice. Of the advanced practice roles, the two with the most surprising results were the expert practitioner and administrator roles. The results indicated a trend toward performing advanced skills that have been in the past considered solely medical practice and toward increasing administrative responsibilities. A small number of CNSs were able to identify cost-saving and revenue-generating activities, including the monetary value of the activity.

  8. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding

  9. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Department of Trade and Industry - DTI; Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Secretary of State for Health; Secretary of State for Transport; Secretary of State for Education); 2. Advisory Bodies (Medical Research Council - MRC; Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee; Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA; Health and Safety Commission and Executive - HSC/HSE; National Radiological Protection Board - NRPB; Environment Agencies; British Nuclear Fuels plc. - BNFL; Amersham International plc.; The National Nuclear Corporation Ltd. - NNC; United Kingdom Nirex Ltd.; Magnox Electric plc.; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Scottish Electricity Generator Companies; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Regional Electricity Companies in England and Wales)

  10. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Armstrong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective: This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods: During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36. Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion: The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision

  11. Usage, biological activity, and safety of selected botanical dietary supplements consumed in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Annécie Benatrehina

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In view of the continuous growth of the botanical dietary supplement industry and the increased popularity of lesser known or exotic botanicals, recent findings are described on the phytochemical composition and biological activities of five selected fruits consumed in the United States, namely, açaí, noni, mangosteen, black chokeberry, and maqui berry. A review of the ethnomedicinal uses of these plants has revealed some similarities ranging from wound-healing to the treatment of fever and infectious diseases. Laboratory studies on açaí have shown both its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro, and more importantly, its neuroprotective properties in animals. Anthraquinones and iridoid glucosides isolated from noni fruit induce the phase II enzyme quinone reductase (QR, and noni fruit juice exhibited antitumor and antidiabetic activities in certain animal models. Antitumorigenic effects of mangosteen in animal xenograft models of human cancers have been attributed to its xanthone content, and pure α-mangostin was shown to display antineoplastic activity in mice despite a reported low oral bioavailability. Work on the less extensively investigated black chokeberry and maqui berry has focused on recent isolation studies and has resulted in the identification of bioactive secondary metabolites with QR-inducing and hydroxyl-radical scavenging properties. On the basis of the safety studies and toxicity case reports described herein, these fruits may be generally considered as safe. However, cases of adulteration found in a commercialized açaí product and some conflicting results from mangosteen safety studies warrant further investigation on the safety of these marketed botanical dietary supplements. Keywords: Açaí, Noni, Mangosteen, Black chokeberry, Maqui berry

  12. Kozloduy nuclear power plant. Units 1-4. Status of safety assessment activities. Rev. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the status of safety assessment activities carried out by the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) in order to evaluate the current status of the safety of its reactor units 1-4. The steam supply system of this units is based of the reactor WWER-440/ B-230, which is a PWR of Russian design developed according to the safety standards in force in USSR in late 60-s. Now a days 10 reactor units of this type are in operation in four NPPs. Despite of efforts of the different plants to implement safety improvements measures during first 10-15 years of operation of this type of reactor its major safety problems were not eliminated and were a subject of international concern. The systematic evaluation of the deficiencies of the original design of this type of reactors have been initiated by IAEA in the beginning of 1990 and brought to developing a comprehensive list of safety problems which required urgent implementation of safety measures in all plants. To solve this problems in 1991 KNPP initiated implementation of so called 'short term' safety improvement program, developed with the help of WANO under agreement with Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority (BNSA) and consortium RISKAUDIT. The program was based on a stage approach and was foreseen to be implemented by tree stages in very tight time schedule in order to achieve significant and rapid improvements of the level of safety in operation of the units. The Short Tenn Program was implemented between the years 1991 and 1997 thanks of the strong safety commitment of NEK and KNPP staff and the broad international cooperation and financial support. Important part of resources were supplied under PHARE program of CEC, EBRD grant agreement and EDF support. The plant current safety level analysis has been performed using IAEA analytical methodology according to 50-SG-O12 standard 'Periodic safety review of operational nuclear power plants'. The approach and criteria for acceptable safety level

  13. PATIENT AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT IN EARLY AWARENESS AND ALERT ACTIVITIES: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Sue; Cook, Alison; Miles, Kathryn

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report on the experiences, benefits, and challenges of patient and public involvement and engagement (PPIE) from a publicly funded early awareness and alert (EAA) system in the United Kingdom. Using email, telephone, a Web site portal, Twitter and focus groups, patients and the public were involved and engaged in the recognized stages of an EAA system: identification, filtration, prioritization, early assessment, and dissemination. Approaches for PPIE were successfully integrated into all aspects of the National Institute for Health Research Horizon Scanning Research and Intelligence Centre's EAA system. Input into identification activities was not as beneficial as involvement in prioritization and early assessment. Patients gave useful insight into the Centre's Web site and engaging patients using Twitter has enabled the Centre to disseminate outputs to a wider audience. EAA systems should consider involving and engaging with patients and the public in identification, prioritization, and assessment of emerging health technologies where practicable. Further research is required to examine the value and impact of PPIE in EAA activities and in the early development of health technologies.

  14. Reduction of noise in the neonatal intensive care unit using sound-activated noise meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Aubertin, C; Barrowman, N; Moreau, K; Dunn, S; Harrold, J

    2014-11-01

    To determine if sound-activated noise meters providing direct audit and visual feedback can reduce sound levels in a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Sound levels (in dB) were compared between a 2-month period with noise meters present but without visual signal fluctuation and a subsequent 2 months with the noise meters providing direct audit and visual feedback. There was a significant increase in the percentage of time the sound level in the NICU was below 50 dB across all patient care areas (9.9%, 8.9% and 7.3%). This improvement was not observed in the desk area where there are no admitted patients. There was no change in the percentage of time the NICU was below 45 or 55 dB. Sound-activated noise meters seem effective in reducing sound levels in patient care areas. Conversations may have moved to non-patient care areas preventing a similar change there. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Objectively Measured School Day Physical Activity Among Elementary Students in the United States and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Piipari, Sami; Kulmala, Janne Santeri; Jaakkola, Timo; Hakonen, Harto; Fish, Joseph Cole; Tammelin, Tuija

    2016-04-01

    Schools are in a unique position to ensure that all students meet the current physical activity (PA) recommendations. This study aimed to examine 1st to 3rd grade elementary students' accelerometer measured school day PA in the United States (U.S.) and Finland. The sample consisted of 200 students (107 girls, 93 boys; ages 6 to 8) and their school day PA was monitored with hip-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers across a 5-day school week and the thresholds 100 and 2296 count per minute were used to separate sedentary time, light PA, and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). On an average school day, students were engaged in MVPA for 20.0 min in the U.S. and 24.1 min in Finland. Students' school-day MVPA was 9 to 16 minutes higher during physical education (PE) days compared with non-PE days (U.S: 25.8 vs. 16.6 min/day; Finland: 36.3 vs. 20.1 min/day). Girls had less MVPA and more sedentary time compared with boys in both samples. This study highlights both the role of PE and other school day physical activities in meeting PA guidelines. Policy measures are needed to change the structure of the school day and enhance PA to ensure that students meet the PA recommendations.

  16. Structure–Activity Relationship of Oligomeric Flavan-3-ols: Importance of the Upper-Unit B-ring Hydroxyl Groups in the Dimeric Structure for Strong Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitomo Hamada

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins, which are composed of oligomeric flavan-3-ol units, are contained in various foodstuffs (e.g., fruits, vegetables, and drinks and are strongly biologically active compounds. We investigated which element of the proanthocyanidin structure is primarily responsible for this functionality. In this study, we elucidate the importance of the upper-unit of 4–8 condensed dimeric flavan-3-ols for antimicrobial activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae and cervical epithelioid carcinoma cell line HeLa S3 proliferation inhibitory activity. To clarify the important constituent unit of proanthocyanidin, we synthesized four dimeric compounds, (−-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(+-catechin, (−-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(−-epigallocatechin, (−-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(−-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, and (+-catechin-[4,8]-(−-epigallocatechin and performed structure–activity relationship (SAR studies. In addition to antimicrobial activity against S. cerevisiae and proliferation inhibitory activity on HeLa S3 cells, the correlation of 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity with the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups was low. On the basis of the results of our SAR studies, we concluded that B-ring hydroxyl groups of the upper-unit of the dimer are crucially important for strong and effective activity.

  17. Recruitment and Decruitment of Motor Units Activities of M. Biceps Brachii During Isovelocity Movements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okuno, Ryuhei

    2001-01-01

    ... (from 0 DEG to 120 DEG) of elbow joint angle with a surface electrode array. We identified action potensials of each moitor unit and detected recruitment and decruitment of the identified motor units...

  18. Built environment interventions aimed at improving physical activity levels in rural Ontario health units: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghill, Cara-Lee; Valaitis, Ruta K; Eyles, John D

    2015-05-03

    Few studies to date have explored the relationship between the built environment and physical activity specifically in rural settings. The Ontario Public Health Standards policies mandate that health units in Ontario address the built environment; however, it is unclear how public health practitioners are integrating the built environment into public health interventions aimed at improving physical activity in chronic disease prevention programs. This descriptive qualitative study explored interventions that have or are being implemented which address the built environment specifically related to physical activity in rural Ontario health units, and the impact of these interventions. Data were collected through twelve in-depth semi-structured interviews with rural public health practitioners and managers representing 12 of 13 health units serving rural communities. Key themes were identified using qualitative content analysis. Themes that emerged regarding the types of interventions that health units are employing included: Engagement with policy work at a municipal level; building and working with community partners, committees and coalitions; gathering and providing evidence; developing and implementing programs; and social marketing and awareness raising. Evaluation of interventions to date has been limited. Public health interventions, and their evaluations, are complex. Health units who serve large rural populations in Ontario are engaging in numerous activities to address physical activity levels. There is a need to further evaluate the impact of these interventions on population health.

  19. Reliability of Wearable Inertial Measurement Units to Measure Physical Activity in Team Handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luteberget, Live S; Holme, Benjamin R; Spencer, Matt

    2018-04-01

    To assess the reliability and sensitivity of commercially available inertial measurement units to measure physical activity in team handball. Twenty-two handball players were instrumented with 2 inertial measurement units (OptimEye S5; Catapult Sports, Melbourne, Australia) taped together. They participated in either a laboratory assessment (n = 10) consisting of 7 team handball-specific tasks or field assessment (n = 12) conducted in 12 training sessions. Variables, including PlayerLoad™ and inertial movement analysis (IMA) magnitude and counts, were extracted from the manufacturers' software. IMA counts were divided into intensity bands of low (1.5-2.5 m·s -1 ), medium (2.5-3.5 m·s -1 ), high (>3.5 m·s -1 ), medium/high (>2.5 m·s -1 ), and total (>1.5 m·s -1 ). Reliability between devices and sensitivity was established using coefficient of variation (CV) and smallest worthwhile difference (SWD). Laboratory assessment: IMA magnitude showed a good reliability (CV = 3.1%) in well-controlled tasks. CV increased (4.4-6.7%) in more-complex tasks. Field assessment: Total IMA counts (CV = 1.8% and SWD = 2.5%), PlayerLoad (CV = 0.9% and SWD = 2.1%), and their associated variables (CV = 0.4-1.7%) showed a good reliability, well below the SWD. However, the CV of IMA increased when categorized into intensity bands (2.9-5.6%). The reliability of IMA counts was good when data were displayed as total, high, or medium/high counts. A good reliability for PlayerLoad and associated variables was evident. The CV of the previously mentioned variables was well below the SWD, suggesting that OptimEye's inertial measurement unit and its software are sensitive for use in team handball.

  20. Comparative costs and activity from a sample of UK clinical trials units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Daniel; Reeves, Barnaby C; Bathers, Sarah; Bray, Christopher; Corkhill, Andrea; Hayward, Christopher; Harper, Lynda; Napp, Vicky; Norrie, John; Speed, Chris; Tremain, Liz; Keat, Nicola; Bradburn, Mike

    2017-05-02

    The costs of medical research are a concern. Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) need to better understand variations in the costs of their activities. Representatives of ten CTUs and two grant-awarding bodies pooled their experiences in discussions over 1.5 years. Five of the CTUs provided estimates of, and written justification for, costs associated with CTU activities required to implement an identical protocol. The protocol described a 5.5-year, nonpharmacological randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted at 20 centres. Direct and indirect costs, the number of full time equivalents (FTEs) and the FTEs attracting overheads were compared and qualitative methods (unstructured interviews and thematic analysis) were used to interpret the results. Four members of the group (funding-body representatives or award panel members) reviewed the justification statements for transparency and information content. Separately, 163 activities common to trials were assigned to roles used by nine CTUs; the consistency of role delineation was assessed by Cohen's κ. Median full economic cost of CTU activities was £769,637 (range: £661,112 to £1,383,323). Indirect costs varied considerably, accounting for between 15% and 59% (median 35%) of the full economic cost of the grant. Excluding one CTU, which used external statisticians, the total number of FTEs ranged from 2.0 to 3.0; total FTEs attracting overheads ranged from 0.3 to 2.0. Variation in directly incurred staff costs depended on whether CTUs: supported particular roles from core funding rather than grants; opted not to cost certain activities into the grant; assigned clerical or data management tasks to research or administrative staff; employed extensive on-site monitoring strategies (also the main source of variation in non-staff costs). Funders preferred written justifications of costs that described both FTEs and indicative tasks for funded roles, with itemised non-staff costs. Consistency in role delineation was fair (κ

  1. High gamma power in ECoG reflects cortical electrical stimulation effects on unit activity in layers V/VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdan-Shahmorad, Azadeh; Kipke, Daryl R.; Lehmkuhle, Mark J.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Cortical electrical stimulation (CES) has been used extensively in experimental neuroscience to modulate neuronal or behavioral activity, which has led this technique to be considered in neurorehabilitation. Because the cortex and the surrounding anatomy have irregular geometries as well as inhomogeneous and anisotropic electrical properties, the mechanism by which CES has therapeutic effects is poorly understood. Therapeutic effects of CES can be improved by optimizing the stimulation parameters based on the effects of various stimulation parameters on target brain regions. Approach. In this study we have compared the effects of CES pulse polarity, frequency, and amplitude on unit activity recorded from rat primary motor cortex with the effects on the corresponding local field potentials (LFP), and electrocorticograms (ECoG). CES was applied at the surface of the cortex and the unit activity and LFPs were recorded using a penetrating electrode array, which was implanted below the stimulation site. ECoGs were recorded from the vicinity of the stimulation site. Main results. Time-frequency analysis of LFPs following CES showed correlation of gamma frequencies with unit activity response in all layers. More importantly, high gamma power of ECoG signals only correlated with the unit activity in lower layers (V-VI) following CES. Time-frequency correlations, which were found between LFPs, ECoGs and unit activity, were frequency- and amplitude-dependent. Significance. The signature of the neural activity observed in LFP and ECoG signals provides a better understanding of the effects of stimulation on network activity, representative of large numbers of neurons responding to stimulation. These results demonstrate that the neurorehabilitation and neuroprosthetic applications of CES targeting layered cortex can be further improved by using field potential recordings as surrogates to unit activity aimed at optimizing stimulation efficacy. Likewise, the signatures

  2. Flowsheet development studies for the decontamination of high-activity-level water at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.D.; Bigelow, J.E.; Campbell, D.O.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Several chemical processing flowsheets were considered for the decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2. A zeolite ion exchange process was evaluated and recommended for absorption of the bulk of the highly radioactive cesium and strontium. Standard organic ion-exchange resins were selected to remove the remaining traces of radioactive nuclides (except tritium which cannot be removed by any practical process). Process conditions were evaluated using both synthetic, tracer-level solutions and samples of actual, high-activity level water from TMI Unit 2

  3. Enhanced static ground power unit based on flying capacitor based h-bridge hybrid active-neutral-point-clamped converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abarzadeh, Mostafa; Madadi Kojabadi, Hossein; Deng, Fujin

    2016-01-01

    Static power converters have various applications, such as static ground power units (GPUs) for airplanes. This study proposes a new configuration of a static GPU based on a novel nine-level flying capacitor h-bridge active-neutral-point-clamped (FCHB_ANPC) converter. The main advantages of the p......Static power converters have various applications, such as static ground power units (GPUs) for airplanes. This study proposes a new configuration of a static GPU based on a novel nine-level flying capacitor h-bridge active-neutral-point-clamped (FCHB_ANPC) converter. The main advantages...

  4. Corrective Action Management Unit Report of Post-Closure Care Activities Calendar Year 2017.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Little, Bonnie Colleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) consists of a containment cell and ancillary systems that underwent regulatory closure in 2003 in accordance with the Closure Plan in Appendix D of the Class 3 Permit Modification (SNL/NM September 1997). The containment cell was closed with wastes in place. On January 27, 2015, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued the Hazardous Waste Facility Operating Permit (Permit) for Sandia National Laboratories (NMED January 2015). The Permit became effective February 26, 2015. The CAMU is undergoing post-closure care in accordance with the Permit, as revised and updated. This CAMU Report of Post-Closure Care Activities documents all activities and results for Calendar Year (CY) 2017 as required by the Permit. The CAMU containment cell consists of engineered barriers including a cover system, a bottom liner with a leachate collection and removal system (LCRS), and a vadose zone monitoring system (VZMS). The VZMS provides information on soil conditions under the cell for early leak detection. The VZMS consists of three monitoring subsystems, which include the primary subliner (PSL), a vertical sensor array (VSA), and the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) sanitary sewer (CSS) line. The PSL, VSA, and CSS monitoring subsystems are monitored quarterly for soil moisture concentration, the VSA is monitored quarterly for soil temperature, and the VSA and CSS monitoring subsystems are monitored annually for volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the soil vapor at various depths. Baseline data for the soil moisture, soil temperature, and soil vapor were established between October 2003 and September 2004.

  5. [The activity of local health units in agriculture: promotion, prevention, control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotzi, G; Ariano, E; Quercia, A

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture shows an high proportion of injuries, mostly by machineries and instruments, and the highest proportion between fatal and total injuries. The Conference of Regions has adopted the National Agriculture and Forestry Prevention Plan, in application of the "Pact for health and safety in workplaces". The plan gives priority to actions improving the safety of agricultural machines, specially if more frequently involved in serious and fatal injuries. Goal is to achieve an homogenous intervention standard all over in the country, composed by a mix of information, support and control, addressed to farms and agricultural machines traders. Public prevention organizations of Local Health Units moreover will record homogenously the happen modality of fatal and serious accidents, will collaborate in joining prevention objectives with Rural Develop Plans and in drawing up good practices. At another level in some regions have been developed prevention activities for other risk factors: definition of exposition profiles of pesticides, development of professionally exposed workers formation, control of buildings and cattle breeding, medical and epidemiological periodic survey of employees.

  6. Effects of silvicultural activity on ecological processes in floodplain forests of the southern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockaby, B.G.; Stanturf, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Activities associated with timber harvesting have occurred within floodplain forests in the southern United States for nearly two hundred years. However, it is only in the last ten years that any information has become available about the effects of harvesting on the ecological functions of this valuable resource. Hydrology is the driving influence behind all ecological processes in floodplains and, in most cases, timber harvesting alone has little long-term effect on hydroperiod. However, there may be some instances where logging roads, built in association with harvest sites , can alter hydroperiod to the extent that vegetation productivity is altered positively or negatively. There is no documentation that harvesting followed by natural regeneration represents a threat to ground or surface water quality on floodplain sites, as long as Best Management Practices are followed. Harvested floodplains may increase or have little effect on decomposition rates of surface organic matter. The nature of the effect seems to be controlled by site wetness. Data from recently harvested sites (i.e. within the last ten years) suggest that vegetation productivity is maintained at levels similar to that observed prior to harvests. During the early stages of stand development vegetation species composition is heavily influenced by harvest method. Similarly, amphibian populations (monitored as bioindicators of ecosystem recovery) seem to rebound rapidly following harvests, although species composition may be different. 40 refs, 3 figs

  7. Electromagnetic radiation from VDT units: study of the effectiveness of an active shielding device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, R; Casciardi, S; Giliberti, C; Moleti, A

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields and low frequency magnetic fields emitted by a set of video display terminal (VDT) units are reported. The field values measured at the position normally occupied by the user are below the safety limits. This is because the field amplitudes decrease rapidly (following a 1/R3 law) with the distance from the source, as has been verified in this work. Measurements with a commercial shielding device consisting of small plastic balls filled with a water solution of rare earth elements were also performed. The only physical mechanism that could be hypothesized to produce an active suppression of the VDT field is that rare earth atoms, which probably were chosen due to their large magnetic moment, behave as oscillating magnetic dipoles capable of emitting a secondary magnetic field that, along some particular directions, has a phase that is opposite to that of the exciting field. Unfortunately, if one analyzes this mechanism quantitatively, it is easy to show that the secondary magnetic field is absolutely negligible, as was confirmed by experimental measurements performed in this study.

  8. Heat stress control in the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] defueling and decontamination activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, J.S.; Parfitt, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the initial stages of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling and decontamination activities for the reactor building, it was realized that the high levels of loose radioactive contamination would require the use of extensive protective clothing by entry personnel. While there was no doubt that layered protective clothing protects workers from becoming contaminated, it was recognized that these same layers of clothing would impose a very significant heat stress burden. To prevent the potentially serious consequences of a severe reaction to heat stress by workers in the hostile environment of the TMI-2 reactor building and yet maintain the reasonable work productivity necessary to perform the recovery adequately, an effective program of controlling worker exposure to heat stress had to be developed. Body-cooling devices produce a flow of cool air, which is introduced close to the skin to remove body heat through convection and increased sweat evaporation. The cooling effect produced by the Vortex tube successfully protected the workers from heat stress, however, there were several logistical and operational problems that hindered extensive use of these devices. The last type of cooling garment examined was the frozen water garment (FWG) developed by Elizier Kamon at the Pennsylvania State University as part of an Electric Power Research Institute research grant. Personal protection, i.e., body cooling, engineering controls, and administrative controls, have been implemented successfully

  9. Chronic neural probe for simultaneous recording of single-unit, multi-unit, and local field potential activity from multiple brain sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothof, F.; Bonini, L.; Lanzilotto, M.; Livi, A.; Fogassi, L.; Orban, G. A.; Paul, O.; Ruther, P.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Drug resistant focal epilepsy can be treated by resecting the epileptic focus requiring a precise focus localisation using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) probes. As commercial SEEG probes offer only a limited spatial resolution, probes of higher channel count and design freedom enabling the incorporation of macro and microelectrodes would help increasing spatial resolution and thus open new perspectives for investigating mechanisms underlying focal epilepsy and its treatment. This work describes a new fabrication process for SEEG probes with materials and dimensions similar to clinical probes enabling recording single neuron activity at high spatial resolution. Approach. Polyimide is used as a biocompatible flexible substrate into which platinum electrodes and leads are integrated with a minimal feature size of 5 μm. The polyimide foils are rolled into the cylindrical probe shape at a diameter of 0.8 mm. The resulting probe features match those of clinically approved devices. Tests in saline solution confirmed the probe stability and functionality. Probes were implanted into the brain of one monkey (Macaca mulatta), trained to perform different motor tasks. Suitable configurations including up to 128 electrode sites allow the recording of task-related neuronal signals. Main results. Probes with 32 and 64 electrode sites were implanted in the posterior parietal cortex. Local field potentials and multi-unit activity were recorded as early as one hour after implantation. Stable single-unit activity was achieved for up to 26 days after implantation of a 64-channel probe. All recorded signals showed modulation during task execution. Significance. With the novel probes it is possible to record stable biologically relevant data over a time span exceeding the usual time needed for epileptic focus localisation in human patients. This is the first time that single units are recorded along cylindrical polyimide probes chronically implanted 22 mm deep into the

  10. Characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with active tuberculosis followed in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulasli, Sevinc Sarinc; Ulubay, Gaye; Arslan, Nevra Gullu; Akcay, Sule; Eyuboglu, Fusun Oner; Sezer, Siren; Haberal, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure. In intensive care units, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of TB is common. Therefore, a description of characteristics of active TB in patients with renal failure followed in intensive care units is important to reduce mortality and transmission of the disease. This study was performed to describe the characteristics of patients with renal failure admitted to the intensive care units and having active TB and evaluate predictive factors for in hospital mortality. The hospital records of 24 patients (11 women, 13 men) having ESRD and TB between 2001-2006 were reviewed. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory data on admission were recorded. Possible parameters contributing to in-hospital mortality were obtained from the medical records. In-hospital mortality rate was 66.6%. Factors associated with mortality were decreased partial pressure of oxygen and malnutrition. Fever was reported in 8 patients and hemoptysis was reported in 3 patients. Eight patients had consolidation on chest radiograph, while 4 had normal findings Seventeen patients had pulmonary involvement, and 11 had extra pulmonary involvement. The mortality rate in TB patients followed in intensive care units is high, with 3 factors contributing to in-hospital mortality. Clinicians should consider active TB in renal failure patients being followed in the intensive care unit, even when results of a chest radiograph are normal especially in patients with unexplained poor general health or respiratory failure. (author)

  11. Motor unit firing intervals and other parameters of electrical activity in normal and pathological muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Smith, T; Høgenhaven, H

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of the firing intervals of motor units has been suggested as a diagnostic tool in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Part of the increase in number of turns seen in patients with myopathy could be secondary to the decrease in motor unit firing intervals at threshold force...

  12. China: Past and Present. A Supplemental Activity Unit on Chinese Culture for Grades 7-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Lynn

    Designed as a supplement to the classroom text, this unit contains 14 lessons on Chinese culture and society. Students are encouraged to compare the cultures of traditional and modern China as well as those of China and the United States. Materials are divided into two sections. The first section contains lesson outlines, including teaching plans,…

  13. Interruptions of activities experienced by nursing professionals in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Daniele de Oliveira; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo

    2016-09-09

    to analyze the interruptions experienced by nursing professionals while undertaking care activities. an observational study undertaken in two intensive care units. Two nurses observed 33 nursing professionals for three hours. The data were recorded in real time, using a semistructured instrument. after 99 hours of observation of 739 activities, it was identified that 46.82% were interrupted, resulting in 7.85 interruptions per hour. On average, the interruptions compromised 9.42% of the nursing professionals' worktime. The activities geared towards indirect care of the patient suffered the highest number of interruptions (56.65%), with the nursing records being the activity interrupted most. The principal source of the interruptions was external, coming from the health professionals (51%), and the main causes were those related to the patients (34.70%) and to interpersonal communication (26.47%). the activity of nursing suffers a high number of interruptions, mainly caused by the health professionals themselves, indicating that the work environment needs to undergo interventions aiming to reduce the risk of compromising of the professional's performance and to increase the patients' safety. analisar as interrupções experienciadas por profissionais de enfermagem durante realização de atividades assistenciais. estudo observacional realizado em duas unidades de tratamento intensivo. Dois enfermeiros observaram 33 profissionais de enfermagem, por três horas. Os dados foram registrados em tempo real, usando um instrumento semiestruturado. após 99 horas de observação de 739 atividades, foi identificado que 46,82% sofreram interrupções, perfazendo 7,85 interrupções por hora. As interrupções comprometeram, em média, 9,42% do tempo de trabalho dos profissionais de enfermagem. As atividades direcionadas ao cuidado indireto do paciente foram as que sofreram maior número de interrupções (56,65%), sendo o registro de enfermagem a atividade mais interrompida. A

  14. Sustainability in a global context: How does local factor affect the outcomes of CSR activities in international business units?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christa; Lauring, Jakob

    In recent years CSR has become increasingly important for the activities and branding of MNCs. While some studies have investigated CSR management and branding in domestic situations, fewer studies exist in the case of international business units (subsidiaries, joint ventures, and franchises...

  15. Associations Between Sex Education and Contraceptive Use Among Heterosexually Active, Adolescent Males in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Nicole; Buhi, Eric R; Elder, John P; Corliss, Heather L

    2017-05-01

    This study examined associations between reports of receiving education on topics commonly included in sex education (e.g., abstinence only, comprehensive) prior to age 18 years and contraceptive use at the last sex among heterosexually active, 15- to 20-year-old males in the United States. Cross-sectional data from 539 males participating in the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth were analyzed. Bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses adjusting for confounding estimated associations between receipt of seven sex education topics (e.g., information on HIV/AIDS, how to say no to sex) and contraceptive use at the last sex (i.e., dual barrier and female-controlled effective methods, female-controlled effective method only, barrier method only, and no method). Nearly, all participants (99%) reported receiving sex education on at least one topic. Education on sexually transmitted diseases (94.7%) and HIV/AIDS (92.0%) were the most commonly reported topics received; education on where to get birth control was the least common (41.6%). Instruction about birth control methods (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32-6.87) and how to say no to sex (AOR = 3.39; CI = 1.33-8.64) were positively associated with dual contraception compared to no use. For each additional sex education topic respondents were exposed to, their odds of using dual methods compared to no method was 47% greater (AOR = 1.47; CI = 1.16-1.86). Exposure to a larger number of sex education topics is associated with young men's report of dual contraception use at the last sex. Comprehensive sex education, focusing on a range of topics, may be most effective at promoting safer sex among adolescent males. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Summary of First Year Activities of the United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment: UAE(2)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reid, Jeffrey S; Piketh, Stuart J; Kahn, Ralph; Bruintjes, Roelof T; Holben, Brent N

    2005-01-01

    In August and September of 2004, scientists from two dozen international research organizations converged in the Arabian Gulf region to participate in the United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE...

  17. Current staffing personnel and areas of activity of the units of SSPA radio physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angulo Pain, E.; Roldan Arjona, J. M.; Carrasco Rodriguez, J. L.; Guerrero Alcaide, R.; Almansa Lopez, J.; Rodriguez Castillo, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    The work arises from the Andalucia society of hospital Radiophysics as a study of the situation in the year 2012 in Andalusia, in terms of human resources and equipment in charge of services or units clinics of management of Radiophysics of the health public system of Andalusia (SSPA). Clinical management units are organizational structures established by the service Andalucia health (SAS) which are governed by agreements in the area of health care management providing that coverage. (Author)

  18. Synchronization of lower limb motor unit activity during walking in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Naja L; Hansen, S; Christensen, L. O. D.

    2001-01-01

    lateralis and medialis of quadriceps), but not or rarely for paired recordings from ankle and knee muscles. The data demonstrate that human motor units within a muscle as well as synergistic muscles acting on the same joint receive a common synaptic drive during human gait. It is speculated that the common...... drive responsible for the motor unit synchronization during gait may be similar to that responsible for short-term synchronization during tonic voluntary contraction....

  19. The Music of the Spheres: Cross-Curricular Perspectives on Music and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, George L.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of music and science is embodied in the music of the spheres, the ancient concept that the universe is ordered in a manner consistent with principles of musical harmony. This idea boasts a long history, from the teachings of Pythagoras (ca. 600 BC) through Isaac Newton in the eighteenth century, and makes a fascinating…

  20. Cross-Curricular Literacy: Writing for Learning in a Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shelley Stagg; Rochwerger, Leonora

    2006-01-01

    Teacher educator and researcher Peterson works with eighth-grade science teacher, Rochwerger, who believes that writing is a learning tool that will enable her students to become scientifically literate. Here, we see this belief played out through an action research project that found students using a genre of their choice to write about what they…

  1. Cross-Curricular Teaching Going Forward: A View from "Strange Fruit"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Faubel, José-María; Martin, Tania Josephine; Junda, Mary Ellen

    2018-01-01

    "Strange Fruit," a song popularized by Billie Holiday in 1939, paints a gruesome picture of racial violence suffered by former African-American slaves following Reconstruction, 1863-1877 (Foner, 2011). While many scholars have analyzed the lyrics of "Strange Fruit", research that focuses on young people's reaction to the song…

  2. IRE/F as a Cross-Curricular Collaborative Genre of Implicit Argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ann M.; Crespo, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    We contend that the classroom-discourse routine of IRE/F (teacher initiation, student response, teacher evaluation/follow-up) is a genre of argumentation that is both collaborative and implicit because teachers and students cooperate during IRE/F exchanges not only to make and mirror knowledge claims but also to suppress justification for those…

  3. The Impact of Sustainability on Global Trade: A Cross-Curricular Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Curt M.; Roy, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges in higher education is leading students in the application of information from one course to learning material in subsequent coursework. The authors have devised a joint project for courses in Logistics and Administrative Law to assist students in correlation of material in courses of two business majors, with emphasis on…

  4. The Content of Educational Technology Curricula: A Cross-Curricular State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aesaert, Koen; Vanderlinde, Ruben; Tondeur, Jo; van Braak, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the content features of educational technology curricula for primary education developed by national governments. A qualitative cross-case document analysis of the national educational technology curriculum of Norway, Flanders and England was conducted. The analysis focuses on the underlying visions,…

  5. Establishing cross-curricular links between Science and English in ninth grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chala Bejarano Pedro Antonio

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available For many years, English has been studied apart from the other subjects in nonbilingual centres, isolating it from other knowledge areas, underestimating its nature as a vehicle for communication. English has thus been considered just as a set of rules to be memorized with no communicative purpose. As English teachers our objective to design this proposal, was to show this language as a useful tool, not only to be practiced in the classroom, but also in the context of other areas, in this case, science. Throughout the piloting of this project at Gustavo Restrepo school, in the south of Bogotá, English was used to learn science and science was used to practice English during the performance of some tasks with a communicative purpose so that the students of ninth grade had the opportunity to learn by doing. Key Words: English-High School-Teaching, Sciences-High School-Teaching, English-Teaching-Methods Por muchos años, el inglés ha sido estudiado aparte de las otras materias en instituciones no bilingües, aislándolo de otras áreas del conocimiento y menospreciando su naturaleza como vehículo de comunicación. El inglés ha sido entonces considerado simplemente un conjunto de reglas que se memorizan sin un propósito comunicativo. Como profesores de inglés nuestro objetivo al diseñar esta propuesta fue mostrar este idioma como una herramienta útil, no sólo para ser usada en el aula, sino también en el contexto de otras áreas; en este caso ciencias naturales. A través del pilotaje de este proyecto en el colegio Gustavo Restrepo en el sur de Bogotá, el inglés fue usado para aprender ciencias naturales y las ciencias naturales fueron usadas para practicar inglés durante el desarrollo de algunas actividades, con un propósito comunicativo de manera que los estudiantes de noveno grado tuvieran la oportunidad de aprender haciendo. Palabras claves: Inglés-Enseñanza Secundaria, Ciencias Naturales-Enseñanza Secundaria, Inglés-Enseñanza-Métodos

  6. Sustainability as a Cross-Curricular Priority in the Australian Curriculum: A Tasmanian Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Janet E.; Hill, Allen; Emery, Sherridan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on an investigation into sustainability education in schools in the Australian state of Tasmania following the implementation of the Australian Curriculum. Sustainability is one of three cross-curriculum priorities in the new national curriculum and is the focus of this research (sustainability cross-curriculum priority…

  7. North Anna Power Station - Unit 1: Overview of steam generator replacement project activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gettler, M.W.; Bayer, R.K.; Lippard, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The original steam generators at Virginia Electric and Power Company's (Virginia Power) North Anna Power Station (NAPS) Unit 1 have experienced corrosion-related degradation that require periodic inspection and plugging of steam generator tubes to ensure their continued safe and reliable operation. Despite improvements in secondary water chemistry, continued tube degradation in the steam generators necessitated the removal from service of approximately 20.3 percent of the tubes by plugging, (18.6, 17.3, and 25.1 for steam generators A, B, and C, respectively). Additionally, the unit power was limited to 95 % during, its last cycle of operation. Projections of industry and Virginia Power experience indicated the possibility of mid-cycle inspections and reductions in unit power. Therefore, economic considerations led to the decision to repair the steam generators (i.e., replace the steam generator lower assemblies). Three new Model 51F Steam Generator lower assembly units were ordered from Westinghouse. Virginia Power contracted Bechtel Power Corporation to provide the engineering and construction support to repair the Unit 1 steam generators. On January 4, 1993, after an extended coastdown period, North Anna Unit 1 was brought off-line and the 110 day (breaker-to-breaker) Steam Generator Replacement Project (SGRP) outage began. As of this paper, the outage is still in progress

  8. Determination of low α activity levels applying a pulse discrimination system to a conventional liquid scintillation unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.A.; Bonino, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    The described system allows the measurement of α activity in the presence of β/γ activities in various types of samples. Pulse shape discrimination of the signal from a conventional liquid scintillation unit is used for assessing the α activity in samples obtained from several radiochemical processes as well as in samples from area and surface monitoring, without separating for the γ and β emitters present. Additionally, the considerable background reduction attained by this method makes possible the utilization of automatic liquid scintillation systems for measuring enviromental and occupational monitoring samples. (Author) [es

  9. The effect of fast and slow motor unit activation on whole-muscle mechanical performance: the size principle may not pose a mechanical paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, N C; Wakeling, J M; Biewener, A A

    2014-05-22

    The output of skeletal muscle can be varied by selectively recruiting different motor units. However, our knowledge of muscle function is largely derived from muscle in which all motor units are activated. This discrepancy may limit our understanding of in vivo muscle function. Hence, this study aimed to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle with different motor unit activation. We determined the isometric properties and isotonic force-velocity relationship of rat plantaris muscles in situ with all of the muscle active, 30% of the muscle containing predominately slower motor units active or 20% of the muscle containing predominately faster motor units active. There was a significant effect of active motor unit type on isometric force rise time (p motor units were active than when either fast or slow motor units were selectively activated. We propose this is due to the greater relative effects of factors such as series compliance and muscle resistance to shortening during sub-maximal contractions. The findings presented here suggest that recruitment according to the size principle, where slow motor units are activated first and faster ones recruited as demand increases, may not pose a mechanical paradox, as has been previously suggested.

  10. Ionic liquid-impregnated activated carbon for biohydrogen purification in an adsorption unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, N. Y.; Masdar, M. S.; Isahak, W. N. R. W.; Nordin, D.; Husaini, T.; Majlan, E. H.; Rejab, S. A. M.; Chew, C. L.

    2017-06-01

    Biological methods for hydrogen production (biohydrogen) are known as energy intensive and can be operated at ambient temperature and pressure; however, consecutive productions such as purification and separation processes still remain challenging in the industry. Various techniques are used to purify and separate hydrogen. These techniques include the use of sorbents/solvents, membranes and cryogenic distillation. In this study, carbon dioxide (CO2) was purified and separated from biohydrogen to produce high purity hydrogen gas. CO2 capture was studied using the activated carbon (AC) modified with the ionic liquid (IL) choline chloride as adsorbent. The physical and chemical properties of the adsorbents were characterized through XRD, FTIR, SEM-EDX, TGA, and BET analyses. The effects of IL loading, flow rate, temperature, and gas mixture were also investigated based on the absorption and desorption of CO2. The CO2 level in the biohydrogen composition was analyzed using a CO2 gas analyzer. The SEM image indicated that the IL homogeneously covered the AC surface. High IL dispersion inlet enhanced the capability of the adsorbent to capture CO2 gas. The thermal stability and presence of the functionalized group of ILs on AC were analyzed by TGA and FTIR techniques, respectively. CO2 adsorption experiments were conducted using a 1 L adsorber unit. Hence, adsorption technologies exhibit potential for biohydrogen purification and mainly affected by adsorbent ability and operating parameters. This research presents an improved biohydrogen technique based on adsorption technology with novel adsorbents. Two different types of commercial CO2 adsorbents were used in the experiment. Results show that the IL/AC exhibited properties suitable for CO2 adsorption. The IL/AC sample presented a high CO2 uptake of 30 wt. % IL when treated at 30 °C for 6 h under a flow rate of 1 L/min. The presence of IL increased the selectivity of CO2 removal during the adsorption process. This IL

  11. National legislative and regulatory activities: Armenia, Brazil, Canada, France, Georgia, Greece, India, Ireland, Japan, Lithuania, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    Armenia: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (Initiation of process relating to the life extension of nuclear power plant unit 2). Brazil: General legislation (Authorisation for the construction of nuclear submarines). Canada: Environmental protection (Changes to the federal environmental assessment law). France: Radioactive waste management (Changes to the National Plan for Management of Radioactive Materials and Waste). Georgia: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (New law on nuclear and radiation safety). Greece: Nuclear safety (Presidential decree on nuclear safety transposing European Council directive into national legislation); Emergency preparedness and response (Establishment of national plan for nuclear, radiological, biological and chemical threats). India: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure (Pending invitation for the IAEA's Integrated Regulatory Review Services to conduct a peer review); Liability and compensation (Committee on Subordinate Legislation Report on the Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Rules, 2011). Ireland: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (Adoption of revised regulations regarding radiological protection). Japan: Nuclear Regulation Authority Act (Structure, Functions, New Nuclear Emergency Preparedness System). Lithuania: General legislation (New laws affecting Visaginas nuclear power plant project implementation); Licensing and regulatory infrastructure (Revised rules for issuing licenses and permits); Nuclear security (Revised physical protection requirements, New rules for the preparation of security plans); Radioactive waste management (Revised Rules of Procedure of Submission of Data on Activities Involving Radioactive Waste Disposal to the European Commission). Switzerland: General legislation (Draft energy strategy open for public comment until January 2013). Ukraine: Radioactive waste management (New law on development of a central repository); General legislation (Law providing for the location

  12. Use of active noise cancellation devices in caregivers in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S; Weigle, C G; Cheng, E Y; Toohill, R; Berens, R J

    2000-04-01

    Recent development of noise cancellation devices may offer relief from noise in the intensive care unit environment. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of noise cancellation devices on subjective hearing assessment by caregivers in the intensive care units. Randomized, double-blind. Adult medical intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Caregivers of patients, including nurses, parents, respiratory therapists, and nursing assistants from a medical intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care, were enrolled in the study. Each participant was asked to wear the headphones, functional or nonfunctional noise cancellation devices, for a minimum of 30 mins. Subjective ambient noise level was assessed on a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) before and during headphone use by each participant. Headphone comfort and the preference of the caregiver to wear the headphone were also evaluated on a 10-point VAS. Simultaneously, objective measurement of noise was done with a sound level meter using the decibel-A scale and at each of nine octave bands at each bedspace. The functional headphones significantly reduced the subjective assessment of noise by 2 (out of 10) VAS points (p noise profiles, based on decibel-A and octave band assessments. Noise cancellation devices improve subjective assessment of noise in caretakers. The benefit of these devices on hearing loss needs further evaluation in caregivers and critically ill patients.

  13. Detecting bladder fullness through the ensemble activity patterns of the spinal cord unit population in a somatovisceral convergence environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Chang-Eop; Shin, Jaewoo; Im, Changkyun; Koh, Chin Su; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Sang Jeong; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Chronic monitoring of the state of the bladder can be used to notify patients with urinary dysfunction when the bladder should be voided. Given that many spinal neurons respond both to somatic and visceral inputs, it is necessary to extract bladder information selectively from the spinal cord. Here, we hypothesize that sensory information with distinct modalities should be represented by the distinct ensemble activity patterns within the neuronal population and, therefore, analyzing the activity patterns of the neuronal population could distinguish bladder fullness from somatic stimuli. Approach. We simultaneously recorded 26-27 single unit activities in response to bladder distension or tactile stimuli in the dorsal spinal cord of each Sprague-Dawley rat. In order to discriminate between bladder fullness and tactile stimulus inputs, we analyzed the ensemble activity patterns of the entire neuronal population. A support vector machine (SVM) was employed as a classifier, and discrimination performance was measured by k-fold cross-validation tests. Main results. Most of the units responding to bladder fullness also responded to the tactile stimuli (88.9-100%). The SVM classifier precisely distinguished the bladder fullness from the somatic input (100%), indicating that the ensemble activity patterns of the unit population in the spinal cord are distinct enough to identify the current input modality. Moreover, our ensemble activity pattern-based classifier showed high robustness against random losses of signals. Significance. This study is the first to demonstrate that the two main issues of electroneurographic monitoring of bladder fullness, low signals and selectiveness, can be solved by an ensemble activity pattern-based approach, improving the feasibility of chronic monitoring of bladder fullness by neural recording.

  14. Apparent discrepancy between single-unit activity and [14C]deoxyglucose labeling in optic tectum of the rattlesnake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auker, C.R.; Meszler, R.M.; Carpenter, D.O.

    1983-01-01

    Autoradiographic analysis of [1- 14 C]2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate ([ 14 C]2-DG-P) accumulation in the rattlesnake brain stem and optic tectum was used in an effort to map infrared and visual neuronal pathways. Visual stimulation with a standard stimulus (a heat lamp) resulted in dense labeling of the superficial layers of the optic tectum. Infrared stimulation resulted in labeling at the first synaptic relay, the lateral descending nucleus of the trigeminal tract, but not at higher levels. Responses of infrared units in one hemitectum and visual units in the other were analyzed. There were no clear differences in the number, maximal density, spread, or rates of accommodation of visual units and infrared units, although the locus of maximal density was more superficial for visual units. In general, infrared units generated a greater number of action potentials. All infrared units responded to onset but they varied greatly in their ability to maintain discharge for the duration of the stimulus. Infrared stimuli generated single, large, triphasic on-responses, whereas visual stimulation generated complex multiphasic and long-lasting on- and off-responses. The major infrared-on peak reached maximal amplitude at greater depths and was larger than the major visual-on peak. Amplitude of the infrared peak fell off more rapidly with distance than did amplitude of the visual peak. These observations are consistent with the view that infrared stimulation is effective in discharging neurons but is not associated with intense synaptic excitation. Our observations suggest that 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake is not necessarily correlated with the degree of action potential activation of specific neuronal pathways. The amount of [ 14 C]2-DG-P labeling may reflect the metabolic requirements for support of synaptic depolarization as well as that supporting action potentials

  15. An overview of the activities of the ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, Andre

    1993-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) shares with other International Organizations several common features: easy and privileged access and exchange of information between the different countries and concentration of scientific and medical expertise. Although the ICRU has no legal or regulatory power, it tries to reach a worldwide consensus on quantities and units, on dosimetric procedures, on terminology and concepts etc. This international consensus, together with the improved exchange of information, certainly facilitates the acceptance and the application of the recommendations and thus at the end, will be beneficial for the patient in radiological diagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy, as well as in radiation protection. (author). 1 appendix

  16. Enhancing Information Usefulness by Line Managers’ Involvement in Cross-Unit Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Rodgers, Waymond

    2011-01-01

    Organization and management scholars have long advocated that efficient use of information is critical for firms to compete successfully in the modern marketplace. This study examines whether the use of managerial cross-unit involvement in an organization enhances managers’ propensity to use useful...... information provided by a functionally related unit in the organization. Senior line managers in a major global bank participated in our study in which they provided information related to their information processing and assessments of the usefulness of corporate audit information. We analyse the effect...

  17. Results From the United States of America's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Denstel, Kara D; Beals, Kim; Bolling, Christopher; Wright, Carly; Crouter, Scott E; McKenzie, Thomas L; Pate, Russell R; Saelens, Brian E; Staiano, Amanda E; Stanish, Heidi I; Sisson, Susan B

    2016-11-01

    The 2016 United States (U.S.) Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth provides a comprehensive evaluation of physical activity levels and factors influencing physical activity among children and youth. The report card includes 10 indicators: Overall Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, Active Transportation, Organized Sport Participation, Active Play, Health-related Fitness, Family and Peers, School, Community and the Built Environment, and Government Strategies and Investments. Nationally representative data were used to evaluate the indicators using a standard grading rubric. Sufficient data were available to assign grades to 7 of the indicators, and these ranged from B- for Community and the Built Environment to F for Active Transportation. Overall Physical Activity received a grade of D- due to the low prevalence of meeting physical activity guidelines. A grade of D was assigned to Health-related Fitness, reflecting the low prevalence of meeting cardiorespiratory fitness standards. Disparities across age, gender, racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups were observed for several indicators. Continued poor grades suggest that additional work is required to provide opportunities for U.S. children to be physically active. The observed disparities indicate that special attention should be given to girls, minorities, and those from lower socioeconomic groups when implementing intervention strategies.

  18. Improvement in neonatal intensive care unit care: a cluster randomised controlled trial of active dissemination of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acolet, Dominique; Allen, Elizabeth; Houston, Rosie; Wilkinson, Andrew R; Costeloe, Kate; Elbourne, Diana

    2011-11-01

    Research findings are not rapidly or fully implemented into policies and practice in care. To assess whether an 'active' strategy was more likely to lead to changes in policy and practice in preterm baby care than traditional information dissemination. Cluster randomised trial. 180 neonatal units (87 active, 93 control) in England; clinicians from active arm units; babies born Dissemination of research report; slides; information about newborn care position statement. ACTIVE ARM: As above plus offer to become 'regional 'champion' (attend two workshops, support clinicians to implement research evidence regionally), or attend one workshop, promote implementation of research evidence locally. timing of surfactant administration; admission temperature; staffing of resuscitation team present at birth. 48/87 Lead clinicians in the active arm attended one or both workshops. There was no evidence of difference in post-intervention policies between trial arms. Practice outcomes based on babies in the active (169) and control arms (186), in 45 and 49 neonatal units respectively, showed active arm babies were more likely to have been given surfactant on labour ward (RR=1.30; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.70); p=0.06); to have a higher temperature on admission to neonatal intensive care unit (mean difference=0.29(o)C; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.55; p=0.03); and to have had the baby's trunk delivered into a plastic bag (RR=1.27; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.60; p=0.04) than the control group. The effect on having an 'ideal' resuscitation team at birth was in the same direction of benefit for the active arm (RR=1.18; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.43; p=0.09). The costs of the intervention were modest. This is the first trial to evaluate methods for transferring information from neonatal research into local policies and practice in England. An active approach to research dissemination is both feasible and cost-effective. Current controlled trials ISRCTN89683698.

  19. Forest Inventory and Analysis in the United States: Remote sensing and geospatial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Nelson; Gretchen Moisen; Mark Finco

    2007-01-01

    Our Nation's forests provide a wealth of ecological, social, and economic resources. These forest lands cover over 300 million hectares of the United States, or about one third of the total land area. Accurate and timely information about them is essential to their wise management and use. The mission of the Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA...

  20. Corrective Action Management Unit Report of Post-Closure Care Activities Calendar Year 2016.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Little, Bonnie Colleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) consisted of a containment cell, two treatment systems, four associated waste staging and storage areas, and support areas; all were used for management of remediation wastes between 1997 and 2003.

  1. 75 FR 28034 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... enforcement agencies; and the Federal intelligence community to assist in the decisions they make related to... the collection of fingerprints from two prints to 10. The new collection time of 35 seconds, an... overseas posts; other DHS officers; and appropriate officers of the United States intelligence and law...

  2. Motor unit activity when young and old adults perform steady contractions while supporting an inertial load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Jeffrey R.; Enoka, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the discharge characteristics of biceps brachii motor units of young and old adults when they performed steady, submaximal contractions while the arm supported different inertial loads. Young (28 ± 4 yr; n = 16) and old (75 ± 4 yr; n = 14) adults performed steady contractions with the elbow flexors at target forces set at either small (11.7 ± 4.4% maximum) or large (17.8 ± 6.5% maximum) differences below the recruitment threshold force of the motor unit (n = 40). The task was to maintain an elbow angle at 1.57 rad until the motor unit was recruited and discharged action potentials for ∼120 s. Time to recruitment was longer for the larger target force difference (187 ± 227 s vs. 23 ± 46 s, P recruited, motor units discharged action potentials either repetitively or intermittently, with a greater proportion of motor units exhibiting the repetitive pattern for old adults. Discharge rate at recruitment and during the steady contraction was similar for the two target force differences for old adults but was greater for the small target force difference for young adults. Discharge variability was similar at recruitment for the two age groups but less for the old adults during the steady contraction. The greatest difference between the present results and those reported previously when the arm pulled against a rigid restraint was that old adults modulated discharge rate less than young adults across the two contraction intensities for both load types. PMID:23221403

  3. Significance of specific activity and a possible universal unit for its definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, K.

    1985-01-01

    The growing importance of specific activity is reviewed. It concerns especially surface phenomena, toxicity, labelling of radiopharmaceuticals, isotope exchange, enzymatic and pharmacological ligand-receptor reactions. The present state of evaluating the specific activity is analyzed. Introduction of the coefficient Dsub(CF) (deviation from true carrier free state) is proposed as a possibility for universal declaration of the specific activity. (author)

  4. Design of a one-chip board microcontrol unit for active vibration control of a naval ship mounting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok; Han, Young-Min; Nguyen, Vien-Quoc; Moon, Seok-Jun

    2012-01-01

    This work presents an experimental implementation of a user-tunable one-chip board microcontrol unit which is specifically designed for vibration control of the active mounting system for naval ships. The proposed mounting system consists of four active mounts supporting vibration-sensitive equipment. Each active mount constitutes a rubber element, an inertial mass and the piezostack actuator. It is designed for particular applications that require effective isolation performance against wide frequency ranges, such as naval ship equipment. After describing the configuration of the active mount, dynamic characteristics of the rubber element and the piezostack actuator are experimentally identified. Accordingly, the proposed mounting system is constructed and the governing equations of motion are formulated. In order to attenuate the unwanted vibrations transferred from the upper mass, a feedforward controller with fast Fourier algorithm is designed and experimentally realized using the one-chip microcontrol board which is specially made for this practical application. In order to evaluate the performance of the one-chip microcontrol unit, vibration control results of the proposed active mounting system are presented in the frequency domain. (technical note)

  5. Vital signs: disability and physical activity--United States, 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dianna D; Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A; Stevens, Alissa C; Sloan, Michelle L; Lullo, Carolyn; Visser, Susanna N; Fox, Michael H; Armour, Brian S; Campbell, Vincent A; Brown, David R; Dorn, Joan M

    2014-05-09

    Adults with disabilities are less active and have higher rates of chronic disease than the general population. Given the health benefits of physical activity, understanding physical activity, its relationship with chronic disease, and health professional recommendations for physical activity among young to middle-age adults with disabilities could help increase the effectiveness of health promotion efforts. Data from the 2009-2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to estimate the prevalence of, and association between, aerobic physical activity (inactive, insufficiently active, or active) and chronic diseases (heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer) among adults aged 18-64 years by disability status and type (hearing, vision, cognitive, and mobility). The prevalence of, and association between, receiving a health professional recommendation for physical activity and level of aerobic physical activity was assessed using 2010 data. Overall, 11.6% of U.S. adults aged 18-64 years reported a disability, with estimates for disability type ranging from 1.7% (vision) to 5.8% (mobility). Compared with adults without disabilities, inactivity was more prevalent among adults with any disability (47.1% versus 26.1%) and for adults with each type of disability. Inactive adults with disabilities were 50% more likely to report one or more chronic diseases than those who were physically active. Approximately 44% of adults with disabilities received a recommendation from a health professional for physical activity in the past 12 months. Almost half of adults with disabilities are physically inactive and are more likely to have a chronic disease. Among adults with disabilities who visited a health professional in the past 12 months, the majority (56%) did not receive a recommendation for physical activity. These data highlight the need for increased physical activity among persons with disabilities, which might require support across societal sectors, including

  6. Vital Signs: Disability and Physical ActivityUnited States, 2009–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dianna D.; Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A.; Stevens, Alissa C.; Sloan, Michelle L.; Lullo, Carolyn; Visser, Susanna N.; Fox, Michael H.; Armour, Brian S.; Campbell, Vincent A.; Brown, David R.; Dorn, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adults with disabilities are less active and have higher rates of chronic disease than the general population. Given the health benefits of physical activity, understanding physical activity, its relationship with chronic disease, and health professional recommendations for physical activity among young to middle-age adults with disabilities could help increase the effectiveness of health promotion efforts. Methods Data from the 2009–2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to estimate the prevalence of, and association between, aerobic physical activity (inactive, insufficiently active, or active) and chronic diseases (heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer) among adults aged 18–64 years by disability status and type (hearing, vision, cognitive, and mobility). The prevalence of, and association between, receiving a health professional recommendation for physical activity and level of aerobic physical activity was assessed using 2010 data. Results Overall, 11.6% of U.S. adults aged 18–64 years reported a disability, with estimates for disability type ranging from 1.7% (vision) to 5.8% (mobility). Compared with adults without disabilities, inactivity was more prevalent among adults with any disability (47.1% versus 26.1%) and for adults with each type of disability. Inactive adults with disabilities were 50% more likely to report one or more chronic diseases than those who were physically active. Approximately 44% of adults with disabilities received a recommendation from a health professional for physical activity in the past 12 months. Conclusions Almost half of adults with disabilities are physically inactive and are more likely to have a chronic disease. Among adults with disabilities who visited a health professional in the past 12 months, the majority (56%) did not receive a recommendation for physical activity. Implications for Public Health These data highlight the need for increased physical activity among persons with

  7. Revealing flow behaviors of metallic glass based on activation of flow units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, T. P.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y., E-mail: hybai@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-05-28

    Atomic level flow plays a critical role in the mechanical behavior of metallic glass (MG) while the connection between the flow and the heterogeneous microstructure of the glass remains unclear. We describe the heterogeneity of MGs as the elastic matrix with “inclusions” of nano-scale liquid-like flow units, and the plastic flow behavior of MGs is considered to be accommodated by the flow units. We show that the model can explain the various deformation behaviors, the transformation from inhomogeneous deformation to homogeneous flow upon strain rate or temperature, and the deformation map in MGs, which might provide insights into the flow mechanisms in glasses and inspiration for improving the plasticity of MGs.

  8. Some activities in the United States concerning the physics aspects of actinide waste recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.

    1976-01-01

    This review paper briefly discusses the reactor types being considered in the United States for the purpose of actinide waste recycling. The reactor types include thermal reactors operating on the 3.3% 235 U- 238 U and the 233 U- 232 Th fuel cycles, liquid metal fast breeder reactors, reactors fueled entirely by actinide wastes, gaseous fuel reactors and fusion reactors. This paper also discusses cross section measurements in progress or planned toward providing basic data for testing the recycle concept. (author)

  9. Some activities in the United States concerning the physics aspects of actinide waste recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.

    1975-01-01

    Reactor types being considered in the United States for the purpose of actinide waste recycling are discussed briefly. The reactor types include thermal reactors operating on the 3.3 percent 235 U-- 238 U and the 233 U-- 232 Th fuel cycles, liquid metal fast breeder reactors, reactors fueled entirely by actinide wastes, gaseous fuel reactors, and fusion reactors. Cross section measurements in progress or planned toward providing basic data for testing the recycle concept are also discussed

  10. The Role of the Family in Immigrants' Labor-Market Activity: Evidence from the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Francine D. Blau; Lawrence M. Kahn; Joan Y. Moriarty; Andre Portela Souza

    2002-01-01

    We use Census of Population microdata for 1980 and 1990 to examine the labor supply and wages of immigrant husbands and wives in the United States in a family context. Earlier research by Baker and Benjamin (1997) posits a family investment model in which, upon arrival, immigrant husbands invest in their human capital while immigrant wives work to provide the family with liquidity during this period. Consistent with this model, they find for Canada that immigrant wives work longer hours upon ...

  11. Periodic modulation of motor-unit activity in extrinsic hand muscles during multidigit grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamie A; Winges, Sara A; Santello, Marco

    2005-07-01

    We recently examined the extent to which motor units of digit flexor muscles receive common input during multidigit grasping. This task elicited moderate to strong motor-unit synchrony (common input strength, CIS) across muscles (flexor digitorum profundus, FDP, and flexor pollicis longus, FPL) and across FDP muscle compartments, although the strength of this common input was not uniform across digit pairs. To further characterize the neural mechanisms underlying the control of multidigit grasping, we analyzed the relationship between firing of single motor units from these hand muscles in the frequency domain by computing coherence. We report three primary findings. First, in contrast to what has been reported in intrinsic hand muscles, motor units belonging to different muscles and muscle compartments of extrinsic digit flexors exhibited significant coherence in the 0- to 5- and 5- to 10-Hz frequency ranges and much weaker coherence in the higher 10-20 Hz range (maximum 0.0025 and 0.0008, respectively, pooled across all FDP compartment pairs). Second, the strength and incidence of coherence differed considerably across digit pairs. Third, contrary to what has been reported in the literature, across-muscle coherence can be stronger and more prevalent than within-muscle coherence, as FPL-FDP2 (thumb-index digit pair) exhibited the strongest and most prevalent coherence in our data (0.010 and 43% at 3 Hz, respectively). The heterogeneous organization of common input to these muscles and muscle compartments is discussed in relation to the functional role of individual digit pairs in the coordination of multiple digit forces in grasping.

  12. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU): activities and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; DeLuca, P.M.; Caswell, R.S.; Menzel, H.G.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the ICRU is to develop a universally accepted set of quantities and units for the different applications of radiations in medicine, protection, research and industry. Absorbed dose was introduced by the ICRU in 1953 as the fundamental quantity correlated to the biological effect. This quantity (with its special unit gray, initially rad) is found to be most useful for the majority of applications and is university accepted. However some limitations in the concept of absorbed dose have been recently identified, in particular when the conditions for the 'averaging procedure' implied in the concept are no longer met. This issue is now studied very carefully by the ICRU. In 1962, the ICRU introduced the quantity dose equivalent for radiation protection purposes (with its special unit sievert, initially rem). In 1985, it developed operational quantities for the specification of dose equivalent for area monitoring in the case of external radiation sources. Besides its efforts in the development of concepts and quantities, the ICRU has always played an important role in providing guidance for measurements in the field of radiation protection. Increased focus on guidance for specific measurement procedures and techniques will further harmonize the approaches and improve the reliability of results. Contribution of the ICRU in radiation protection was achieved in collaboration with the ICRP. As an example, Report on 'Conversion coefficients for use in radiological protection against external radiation' is the result of such collaboration and has been published in the report series of both Commissions (1997, 1998). (author)

  13. Geography of community health information organization activity in the United States: Implications for the effectiveness of health information exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Joshua R

    The United States has invested nearly a billion dollars in creating community health information organizations (HIOs) to foster health information exchange. Community HIOs provide exchange services to health care organizations within a distinct geographic area. While geography is a key organizing principle for community HIOs, it is unclear if geography is an effective method for organization or what challenges are created by a geography-based approach to health information exchange. This study describes the extent of reported community HIO coverage in the United States and explores the practical and policy implications of overlaps and gaps in HIO service areas. Furthermore, because self-reported service areas may not accurately reflect the true extent of HIOs activities, this study maps the actual markets for health services included in each HIO. An inventory of operational community HIOs that included self-reported geographic markets and participating organizations was face-validated using a crowd-sourcing approach. Aggregation of the participating hospitals' individual health care markets provided the total geographic market served by each community HIO. Mapping and overlay analyses using geographic information system methods described the extent of community HIO activity in the United States. Evidence suggests that community HIOs may be inefficiently distributed. Parts of the United States have multiple, overlapping HIOs, while others do not have any providing health information exchange services. In markets served by multiple community HIOs, 45% of hospitals were participants of only one HIO. The current geography of community HIO activity does not provide comprehensive patient information to providers, nor community-wide information for public health agencies. The discord between the self-reported and market geography of community HIOs raises concerns about the potential effectiveness of health information exchange, illustrates the limitations of geography as

  14. Comparison of Physical Activity Among New United States Army Recruits and High School Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Sarah B; Knapik, Joseph J; Darakjy, Salima; Morrison, Stephanie; Piskator, Gene; Jones, Bruce H

    2006-01-01

    ... 1.9 days/wk of activity, respectively, while high school men and women reported 3.8 plus or minus 2.2 and 2.9 plus or minus 2.2 days/wk of activity, respectively (p=0.02 for men, p<0.01 for women). The data suggests that new recruits tend to report more frequent physical activity than high school students.

  15. The role of the negative selection activities in securing the competence of an organization belonging to SEN units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boruga, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    The transformation and the accommodation of National Power System (SEN) units to a new management system, own to a decentralized economy and having financial support from both native capital and foreign capital, in uncertain proportion at the moment and being in a continuous adjustment determined by the reasons and the motivations first of all political, generated conceptual changes in the so-called modern management theory. The accommodation of this theory to the concrete situation from SEN units imposed the concept of negative selection. It is a concept which represents author's desire to be created as an original contribution to the contemporary management theory. Unlike the selection at the hiring (or positive selection), the negative selection is achieved on personal already employed, in the conditions of activities of a decreased number of personnel and also of a redistribution of personnel on the other side. The negative selection, much more than the positive selection activity in this period in the SEN units (recording a drastic decrease from 90.000 employees counted by the energetic system at the end of 9th decade of the past century, to a little over 30.000 who at the moment work in the societies became independent), determines the specialist in human resources to ensure a judicious training and high competence. It concerns the knowledge of the standard systems and is also related to the method of knowledge and valuation of behavior of the organizational employees. This subject was developed on basis of the documentation and the analyses of documents but also on the basis of a set of studies and researches that were made during 1996-2006 in the SEN units. The work methods and models of negative selection used in the SEN units were analysed. This work concerns four companies which constitute currently the SEN nucleus at present at which the nuclear units with a particular status were added. One finds out that these methods and models of negative selection

  16. Learning Activity Packets for Milling Machines. Unit I--Introduction to Milling Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) outlines the study activities and performance tasks covered in a related curriculum guide on milling machines. The course of study in this LAP is intended to help students learn to identify parts and attachments of vertical and horizontal milling machines, identify work-holding devices, state safety rules, and…

  17. Organized and Unstructured Activity Participation among Adolescents Involved with Child Protective Services in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yoonyoung; Lu, Ting; Christ, Sharon L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many adolescents are referred to Child Protective Services for possible maltreatment every year, but not much is known about their organized and unstructured activity participation. Objective: The purposes of this study are to provide a description of organized and unstructured activity participation for adolescents who were possible…

  18. Development of sinkholes resulting from man's activities in the Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, John G.

    1987-01-01

    Development of induced sinkholes in carbonate terranes in the Eastern United States has resulted in costly damage and water pollution. Previously, detailed investigations of sinkholes were limited to Alabama and Missouri, with the most comprehensive being in Alabama. An investigation of the remainder of the area was made in 1981 to regionalize previous findings. More than 850 sites of sinkhole development have been identified in 19 States. It is estimated that more than 6,500 sinkholes or related features have formed at these sites. Most have occurred since 1950. Based on information available, States most impacted are Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

  19. Nuclear safety improvement activities related to WWER-440 units in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantchev, T.

    1998-01-01

    The systematic evaluation of the deficiencies of the original design of the WWER reactors brought to the development of a Short Term Programme for Safety Upgrading and Modernisation of Kozloduy WWER-440 units. The implementation of this Programme was completed in 1997. The strive for continuos improvement of Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety level, the new requirements of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority and the public concern initiated the development of new Complex Programme for Safety Improvement (PRG'97), now in a process of implementation. (author)

  20. Status of remedial investigation activities in the Hanford Site 300 Area groundwater operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulstrom, L.C.; Innis, B.E.; Frank, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    The Phase 1 remedial investigation (RI) and Phase 1 and 2 feasibility studies (FS) for the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit underlying the 300 Area on the Hanford Site have been completed. Analysis and evaluation of soil, sediment, and surface water, and biotic sampling data, groundwater chemistry, and radiological data gathered over the past 3 years has been completed. Risk assessment calculations have been performed. Use of the data gathered, coupled with information from an automated water level data collection system, has enabled engineers to track three plumes that represent the most significant contamination of the groundwater

  1. Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation activities in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodings, A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes the status of the NPP control and instrumentation in the United Kingdom. The general technology underlying most aspects of power reactor C and I in the UK has not altered since the last progress report although there have been many improvements in detail. In one field, however, that of computer applications, the change has almost been one of kind rather than degree. The following fields are briefly described: The status of nuclear power in the UK, the development of sensors, the development of electronic equipment, signal processing - information technology, quality assurance and the validation and verification of software, expert systems, training simulators. (author). 1 ref

  2. Activation measurements for thermal neutrons. Part D. 36Cl measurements in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, Tore; Men, Ping; Marchetti, Alfredo A.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Roberts, James A.; Fujita, Shoichiro; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2005-01-01

    A large number of measurements were performed in the United States of 36 Cl in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of 36 Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results of these measurements are presented in this section and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. (J.P.N.)

  3. The impact of OAB on physical activity in the United States: results from OAB-POLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Karin S; Sexton, Chris C; Clemens, J Quentin; Thompson, Christine L; Chen, Chieh-I; Bavendam, Tamara; Dmochowski, Roger

    2013-10-01

    To provide data on physical activity among those with and without overactive bladder (OAB) in a large, ethnically diverse U.S. sample. A cross-sectional survey was conducted via the Internet among 10,000 men and women aged 18-70 (2000 African Americans, 2000 Hispanics, and 6000 whites) using the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) tool and questions from the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). OAB cases and those with no/minimal symptoms (NMS) were compared on federal guidelines of indices of physical activity: 2008 guidelines and 2010 Healthy People. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate differences between OAB and NMS. Logistic regressions examined the impact of OAB on physical activity. Response rate, 57%; 818 men and 1505 women with OAB, and 1857 men and 1615 women with NMS. Respondents with other LUTS were excluded from this analysis (2302 men and 1904 women). Those with OAB were significantly less likely to report moderate and vigorous physical activities in their leisure time and to satisfy recommended physical activity levels compared to those with NMS. Symptoms of OAB (men and women: urgency and urinary frequency; women: urinary urge incontinence) were associated with limitations in physical activity in the logistic regressions. This study benchmarks physical activity levels among people with OAB. Men and women with OAB were significantly less likely to achieve recommended physical activity levels than people with NMS. More research is needed to further evaluate how OAB affects physical activity and health status and to determine causal relationships. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regular physical activity has differential association with reduced obesity among diverse youth in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradkin, Chris; Wallander, Jan L; Elliott, Marc N; Cuccaro, Paula; Schuster, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    This study examined whether daily or almost daily lower-intensity physical activity was associated with reduced obesity, among 4824 African American, Hispanic, and White youth assessed in fifth and seventh grades. Regular lower-intensity physical activity was associated with reduced obesity only among Hispanic and White males and only in seventh grade, and not among youth in fifth grade, females, or African American males or females. Findings from this study suggest that the reduced obesity risk generally attributed to physical activity may not be consistent across racial/ethnic and gender groups of early adolescents. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Grafting synthetic transmembrane units to the engineered low-toxicity α-hemolysin to restore its hemolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Mihoko; Harima, Kousuke; Takei, Toshiaki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Endo, Sumire; Akiyama, Kimio; Muraoka, Takahiro; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-12-01

    The chemical modification of proteins to provide desirable functions and/or structures broadens their possibilities for use in various applications. Usually, proteins can acquire new functions and characteristics, in addition to their original ones, via the introduction of synthetic functional moieties. Here, we adopted a more radical approach to protein modification, i.e., the replacement of a functional domain of proteins with alternative chemical compounds to build "cyborg proteins." As a proof of concept model, we chose staphylococcal α-hemolysin (Hla), which is a well-studied, pore-forming toxin. The hemolytic activity of Hla mutants was dramatically decreased by truncation of the stem domain, which forms a β-barrel pore in the membrane. However, the impaired hemolytic activity was significantly restored by attaching a pyrenyl-maleimide unit to the cysteine residue that was introduced in the remaining stem domain. In contrast, negatively charged fluorescein-maleimide completely abolished the remaining activity of the mutants.

  6. Analysis of electrical systems from Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1 based on commissioning activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goia, M.L.; Manolescu, I.

    1996-01-01

    Several design solutions regarding the electrical part of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 station auxiliaries are discussed in this paper. The solutions mentioned may have different variants which should be taken into consideration in the design of Units U2 - U5. This work offers an ample debate on such matters as the supply source connection of the station auxiliaries, the use of two different voltages for the mean voltage (MV) supply, the consequence of the lack of breakers on the 24 kV part of station auxiliary transformers T03 - T04, the protection devices non correlated with the breakers to which they react, as well as the consequences of low subtransient reactance of the new stand-by Diesel generators. Besides these design solutions that can influence the station auxiliaries reliability, matters as malfunctioning of the dry type MV/LV transformers and unreliable behaviour of some MV composite insulators are also discussed. For some of the above mentioned problems the authors proposed several solutions. (authors). 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Comparison of Physical Activity Among New United States Army Recruits and High School Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Sarah B; Knapik, Joseph J; Darakjy, Salima; Morrison, Stephanie; Piskator, Gene; Jones, Bruce H

    2006-01-01

    .... Both groups were asked "On how many of the past 7 days did you exercise or participate in physical activity for at least 20 minutes that made you sweat and breathe hard, such as basketball, soccer...

  8. Thermal characteristics of spent activated carbon generated from air cleaning units in korean nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yang So

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify the feasibility of disposing of spent activated carbon as a clearance level waste, we performed characterization of radioactive pollution for spent activated carbon through radioisotope analysis; results showed that the C-14 concentrations of about half of the spent activated carbon samples taken from Korean NPPs exceeded the clearance level limit. In this situation, we selected thermal treatment technology to remove C-14 and analyzed the moisture content and thermal characteristics. The results of the moisture content analysis showed that the moisture content of the spent activated carbon is in the range of 1.2–23.9 wt% depending on the operation and storage conditions. The results of TGA indicated that most of the spent activated carbon lost weight in 3 temperature ranges. Through py-GC/MS analysis based on the result of TGA, we found that activated carbon loses weight rapidly with moisture desorption reaching to 100°C and desorbs various organic and inorganic carbon compounds reaching to 200°C. The result of pyrolysis analysis showed that the experiment of C-14 desorption using thermal treatment technology requires at least 3 steps of heat treatment, including a heat treatment at high temperature over 850°C, in order to reduce the C-14 concentration below the clearance level.

  9. Thermal characteristics of spent activated carbon generated from air cleaning units in Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hang Rae; So, Ji Yang [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To identify the feasibility of disposing of spent activated carbon as a clearance level waste, we performed characterization of radioactive pollution for spent activated carbon through radioisotope analysis; results showed that the C-14 concentrations of about half of the spent activated carbon samples taken from Korean NPPs exceeded the clearance level limit. In this situation, we selected thermal treatment technology to remove C-14 and analyzed the moisture content and thermal characteristics. The results of the moisture content analysis showed that the moisture content of the spent activated carbon is in the range of 1.2–23.9 wt% depending on the operation and storage conditions. The results of TGA indicated that most of the spent activated carbon lost weight in 3 temperature ranges. Through py-GC/MS analysis based on the result of TGA, we found that activated carbon loses weight rapidly with moisture desorption reaching to 100°C and desorbs various organic and inorganic carbon compounds reaching to 200°C. The result of pyrolysis analysis showed that the experiment of C-14 desorption using thermal treatment technology requires at least 3 steps of heat treatment, including a heat treatment at high temperature over 850°C, in order to reduce the C-14 concentration below the clearance level.

  10. Cernavoda Unit 2: - BOP 3D model proposal for a possible organization of site activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiesura, G.; Scarsin, Sioli; Orlandi, S.

    1999-01-01

    The scope of this activity is to define characteristics and advantages of the 3D model of Cernavoda BOP to this set up at site for engineering and construction activities. This model will provide a modern and proven tool able to strongly support the site activities with particular regard to the following: 1. engineering activities, - plant arrangement 'double check' for resolution of clashing; - easy management of future design changes; - real time plant configuration updating as soon as any design modification is approved and integrated in the model; - preparation of high quality documentation for procurement, construction and commissioning; - prompt availability of the as built configuration of the plant as soon as the last modification is frozen; 2. material procurement activities, - definition of the priorities in the construction material procurement according to the construction planning by area; - inventory list of equipment, pipes, fittings, valves, cable trays and ventilation ducts to be installed in each construction area; 3. construction activities, - definition of construction sequences, with particular reference in the congested areas, for piping cable trays (electrical and C-and-I) and ventilations ducts; - definition of piping spools by construction contractors; - follow-up of the activities in each area (i.e. construction, painting, insulation, flushing, pressure testing, etc); 4. turn-over and commissioning, - check of the progress. The success of this approach is based on the following: i) proper management of the remote workstations providing easy and reliable access to the model; ii) subdivision of the Integrated Building in construction areas, whose detail design may be allotted to Romanian organizations with multidisciplinary tasks; iii) integration in the model of the remote developed engineering in order to validate the details of the design. (authors)

  11. 1990 update of the United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Paola, G.M.; Stefansson, V.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Technical Co-operation for Development (UN/DTCD), is the United Nations executing agency for technical co-operation projects in developing countries. This paper reports that the UN/DTCD, inter alia, has played an important role for 30 years to promote geothermal resources exploration and development in many developing countries worldwide. During the period 1985-1990 some major geothermal projects have been executed and very successfully completed by the UN/DTCD, thanks to the availability of sufficient funds provided by the international community. New geothermal project proposals in 20 developing countries totaling an estimated financial requirement of $60 million have also been formulated by the UN/DTCD during the last 5 years

  12. Engineering analysis activities in support of susquehanna unit 1 startup testing and cycle 1 operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.D.; Kukielka, C.A.; Olson, L.M.; Refling, J.G.; Roscioli, A.J.; Somma, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The engineering analysis group is responsible for all nuclear plant systems analysis and reactor analysis activities, excluding fuel management analysis, at Pennsylvania Power and Light Company. These activities include making pretest and posttest predictions of startup tests; analyzing unplanned or unexpected transient events; providing technical training to plant personnel; assisting in the development of emergency drill scenarios; providing engineering evaluations to support design and technical specification changes, and evaluating, assessing, and resolving a number of license conditions. Many of these activities have required the direct use of RETRAN models. Two RETRAN analyses that were completed to support plant operations - a pretest analysis of the turbine trip startup test, and a posttest analysis of the loss of startup transformer event - are investigated. For each case, RETRAN results are compared with available plant data and comparisons are drawn on the acceptability of the performance of the plant systems

  13. Review of nuclear regulatory activities associated with safety culture and the management of safety in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhouse, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes some of the key regulatory activities which have taken place in the United Kingdom in recent years in the areas of safety culture and management of safety. It explains how the UK's nuclear licensing regime, regulated and enforced by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, (NII), provides the framework for a viable safety management system and identifies a management of safety model which a NII Task Force has developed. It finally identifies further work which is being undertaken by the NII. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  14. Calculations of the radiological impact of disposal of unit activity of selected radionuclides for use in waste management system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.M.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of the work described is to provide estimates of the radiological impact following disposal of unit activity via each of several options, including shallow burial, engineered trench disposal, disposal in a geologic repository and disposal on the deep ocean bed. Results are presented for a range of important representative radionuclides. No single option is clearly the best from the radiological point of view. However, in conjunction with waste inventory data the results may be used to provide a preliminary view of the relative radiological merits of the various disposal options. (author)

  15. Ride On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Public Transportation for Grades 9 through 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the public transportation topic for grades 9-12. It contains forty-nine learning activities grouped…

  16. Ride On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Public Transportation for Grades 6 through 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the public transportation topic for grades 6-9. It contains forty-two learning activities grouped…

  17. Analyzing Science Activities in Force and Motion Concepts: A Design of an Immersion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Mehmet C.; Aydeniz, Mehmet; Yalvac, Bugrahan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the science activities offered at 7th grade in the Turkish science and technology curriculum along with addressing the curriculum's original intent. We refer to several science education researchers' ideas, including Chinn & Malhotra's (Science Education, 86:175--218, 2002) theoretical framework and Edelson's (1998)…

  18. Effects of acoustic ceiling units on the cooling performance of thermally activated building systems (TABS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacarte, Luis Marcos Domínguez; Rage, Niels; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2017-01-01

    Europe, with a building stock responsible for about 40% of the total energy use, needs to reduce the primary energy use in buildings in order to meet the 2020 energy targets of the European Union. High temperature cooling and low temperature heating systems, and as an example, Thermally Activated...

  19. Dental Charting. Learning Activities, Unit Tests, Progress Chart, and Work Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Univ., Austin. Center for Occupational Curriculum Development.

    These materials are part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. These student materials, designed to be used with the Dental Charting Student Manual, consist of learning activities, unit…

  20. Sports Management Faculty External Grant-Writing Activities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVinney, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to fill a void in information, provide relevant, current data for faculty members related to external grant-writing activities related to the academic field of sport management and serve as a tool that may aid in the advancement of external grant-writing efforts within the field of sport management. All data is specific to…

  1. ASSESSMENT OF ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY IN EFFLUENTS FROM SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS IN THE UNITED STATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newly developed molecular biology methods have been used for the measurement of estrogenic activity in source-biased studies of sewage treatment plants. Studies in Texas and New Mexico have shown the utility of the measurement of changes in vitellogenin gene expression in fathea...

  2. Cost of reactive nitrogen release from human activities to the environment in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leakage of reactive nitrogen (N) from human activities to the environment can cause human health and ecological problems. Often these harmful effects are not reflected in the costs of food, fuel, and fiber that derive from N use. Spatial analyses of economic costs and benef...

  3. Pre-commissioning activities of exchange units of Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru (Paper No. 1.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, H.S.; Sikaria, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru (HWPM) comprises of two exchange units where enrichment of deuterium from natural concentration to 15% concentration is achieved using dual temperature H 2 S-H 2 O exchange process in a three stage cascade. In each exchange unit an inventory of around 200 MT of H 2 S gas is required under normal operating pressure and a feed water flow rate of 450 MT/Hr is required to be maintained. In view of the large flow rates of H 2 S circulating gas, water, cooling water, steam etc., the lines sizes in exchange unit are quite large. Further, H 2 S gas being highly toxic and corrosive, extreme care is required in order to ensure integrity and leak tightness. While due care is taken in material selection, design, quality surveillance etc., during fabrication, certain additional measures are required to be taken during precommissioning of the systems handling H 2 S under pressure. This paper deals with the activities from completion of plant erection including hydrotesting of piping by the piping contractor to the stage of trial production run. (author)

  4. Exercise and limitations in physical activity levels among new dialysis patients in the United States: an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Austin G; Murthy, Bhamidipati

    2008-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies of physical activity among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are lacking. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of physical activity among new dialysis patients in the United States. Multivariate logistic regression analyses examined associations of self-reported limitations in physical activity and exercise frequency with sociodemographic and clinical variables in 2,264 patients from Wave 2 of the Dialysis Morbidity and Mortality Study. Overall, 56% of patients exercised less than once a week, 75% reported severe limitations in vigorous activities, whereas 42% had severe limitations in moderate physical activities. Fewer limitations in moderate or vigorous activities correlated positively with male gender (odds-ratio [OR] = 1.61), black race OR =1.49), Hispanic ethnicity (OR = 2.39), serum albumin (OR = 1.69 per 1 g/L higher), positive affect (OR = 2.33), peritoneal dialysis (OR = 1.90), and negatively with age (OR = 0.67), heart failure (OR = 0.75), peripheral vascular disease (OR = 0.69), malnutrition (OR = 0.67), and depression (OR = 0.39). Patients reporting fewer limitations in moderate or vigorous activities (OR = 1.35 and 1.28, respectively), or frequent visits with a dietitian (2 to 3 times per week vs. less) (OR = 1.21) in the pre-ESRD period exercised more frequently. Limitations in physical activity are common among new ESRD patients and these, in part, are related to pre-existing cardiovascular disease, malnutrition, and mental health.

  5. The mean active bone marrow dose to the adult population of the United States from diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shleien, B.; Tucker, T.T.; Johnson, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates, based on an empirical model and computer program, have been calculated and are presented on the mean active bone marrow dose to adults from diagnostic radiography, fluoroscopy, and dental radiography as practiced in the United States in 1970. The annual per capita mean active bone marrow dose in 1970 to adults from the above practices is estimated to be 103 mrad; 77 percent, 20 percent, and 3 percent from radiographic, fluoroscopic and dental examinations respectively. Examinations of the upper and lower abdomen contribute approximately 39 percent each to the total mean active bone marrow dose for adults; those of the pelvis 4 percent; the thorax 12 percent; and head and neck examinations (including dental) contribute about 6 percent. The per capita mean active bone marrow dose for various age groups is discussed. Contributions to the dose within a given age group from different examinations indicate that in the 15-34 year old age group Lumbar and Lumbosacral Spine examinations contribute most to the mean active bone marrow dose. Thereafter Upper G I Series and Barium Enemas are the highest contributors. Comparisons are made with results of the 1964 U.S. X-ray survey and similar surveys from other nations

  6. Integrating psychological research on girls with feminist activism: a model for building a liberation psychology in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kathryn E; Finkelstein, Jo-Ann S; Lyons, Aoife L

    2003-03-01

    A liberation psychology is needed to bridge the gap between psychology's focus on individual distress and broad social forces that foster such distress. We offer a model for bridging this gap by focusing on a specific area of psychology (psychological research on girls) and a specific social movement (feminist activism). Psychological research on girls and feminist activism share the common goal of improving the lives of girls and women. However, both have fallen short of this goal. This is due, in part, to the weaknesses associated with each endeavor and to the fact that the complementary strengths of each have remained isolated from the other. In this paper, we propose a common language and shared framework to integrate psychological research with feminist activism. First, we review the basic strengths and weaknesses associated with psychological research and feminist activism, with a particular focus on how they are distinct from one another. Second, we provide a taxonomic framework for integrating these two areas on the basis of the stress paradigm, with specific examples provided from our recent reviews of the literature and our own empirical work with adolescent girls. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for future work needed to integrate psychological research on girls with feminist activism toward the goal of building a liberation psychology in the United States.

  7. Gene conversion of ribosomal DNA in Nicotiana tabacum is associated with undermethylated, decondensed and probably active gene units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K Y; Kovarik, A; Matýăsek, R; Bezdĕk, M; Lichtenstein, C P; Leitch, A R

    2000-06-01

    We examined the structure, intranuclear distribution and activity of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in Nicotiana sylvestris (2n = 2x = 24) and N. tomentosiformis (2n = 2x = 24) and compared these with patterns in N. tabacum (tobacco, 2n = 4x = 48). We also examined a long-established N. tabacum culture, TBY-2. Nicotiana tabacum is an allotetraploid thought to be derived from ancestors of N. sylvestris (S-genome donor) and N. tomentosiformis (T-genome donor). Nicotiana sylvestris has three rDNA loci, one locus each on chromosomes 10, 11, and 12. In root-tip meristematic interphase cells, the site on chromosome 12 remains condensed and inactive, while the sites on chromosomes 10 and 11 show activity at the proximal end of the locus only. Nicotiana tomentosiformis has one major locus on chromosome 3 showing activity and a minor, inactive locus on chromosome 11. In N. tabacum cv. 095-55, there are four rDNA loci on T3, S10, S11/t and S12 (S11/t carries a small T-genome translocation). The locus on S12 remains condensed and inactive in root-tip meristematic cells while the others show activity, including decondensation at interphase and secondary constrictions at metaphase. Nicotiana tabacum DNA digested with methylcytosine-sensitive enzymes revealed a hybridisation pattern for rDNA that resembled that of N. tomentosiformis and not N. sylvestris. The data indicate that active, undermethylated genes are of the N. tomentosiformis type. Since S-genome chromosomes of N. tabacum show rDNA expression, the result indicates rDNA gene conversion of the active rDNA units on these chromosomes. Gene conversion in N. tabacum is consistent with the results of previous work. However, using primers specific for the S-genome rDNA intergenic sequences (IGS) in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) show that rDNA gene conversion has not gone to completion in N. tabacum. Furthermore, using methylation-insensitive restriction enzymes we demonstrate that about 8% of the rDNA units remain of the N

  8. Administration of recombinant activated factor VII in the intensive care unit after complex cardiovascular surgery: clinical and economic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uber, Walter E; Toole, John M; Stroud, Martha R; Haney, Jason S; Lazarchick, John; Crawford, Fred A; Ikonomidis, John S

    2011-06-01

    Refractory bleeding after complex cardiovascular surgery often leads to increased length of stay, cost, morbidity, and mortality. Recombinant activated factor VII administered in the intensive care unit can reduce bleeding, transfusion, and surgical re-exploration. We retrospectively compared factor VII administration in the intensive care unit with reoperation for refractory bleeding after complex cardiovascular surgery. From 1501 patients who underwent cardiovascular procedures between December 2003 and September 2007, 415 high-risk patients were identified. From this cohort, 24 patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether they either received factor VII in the intensive care unit (n = 12) or underwent reoperation (n = 12) for refractory bleeding. Preoperative and postoperative data were collected to compare efficacy, safety, and economic outcomes. In-hospital survival for both groups was 100%. Factor VII was comparable with reoperation in achieving hemostasis, with both groups demonstrating decreases in chest tube output and need for blood products. Freedom from reoperation was achieved in 75% of patients receiving factor VII, whereas reoperation was effective in achieving hemostasis alone in 83.3% of patients. Prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, and median operating room time were significantly less (P factor VII. Both groups had no statistically significant differences in other efficacy, safety, or economic outcomes. Factor VII administration in the intensive care unit appears comparable with reoperation for refractory bleeding after complex cardiovascular surgical procedures and might represent an alternative to reoperation in selected patients. Future prospective, randomized controlled trials might further define its role. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. United States-Chile binational exchange for volcanic risk reduction, 2015—Activities and benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Thomas C.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Lara Pulgar, Luis E.; Ramos Amigo, Álvaro

    2017-07-25

    In 2015, representatives from the United States and Chile exchanged visits to discuss and share their expertise and experiences dealing with volcano hazards. Communities in both countries are at risk from various volcano hazards. Risks to lives and property posed by these hazards are a function not only of the type and size of future eruptions but also of distances from volcanoes, structural integrity of volcanic edifices, landscape changes imposed by recent past eruptions, exposure of people and resources to harm, and any mitigative measures taken (or not taken) to reduce risk. Thus, effective risk-reduction efforts require the knowledge and consideration of many factors, and firsthand experience with past volcano crises provides a tremendous advantage for this work. However, most scientists monitoring volcanoes and most officials delegated with the responsibility for emergency response and management in volcanic areas have little or no firsthand experience with eruptions or volcano hazards. The reality is that eruptions are infrequent in most regions, and individual volcanoes may have dormant periods lasting hundreds to thousands of years. Knowledge may be lacking about how to best plan for and manage future volcanic crises, and much can be learned from the sharing of insights and experiences among counterpart specialists who have had direct, recent, or different experiences in dealing with restless volcanoes and threatened populations. The sharing of information and best practices can help all volcano scientists and officials to better prepare for future eruptions or noneruptive volcano hazards, such as large volcanic mudflows (lahars), which could affect their communities.

  10. Content of redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants) in foods consumed in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Bente L; Carlsen, Monica H; Phillips, Katherine M; Bøhn, Siv K; Holte, Kari; Jacobs, David R; Blomhoff, Rune

    2006-07-01

    Supplements containing ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, or beta-carotene do not protect against oxidative stress-related diseases in most randomized intervention trials. We suggest that other redox-active phytochemicals may be more effective and that a combination of different redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants or reductants) may be needed for proper protection against oxidative damage. We aimed to generate a ranked food table with values for total content of redox-active compounds to test this alternative antioxidant hypothesis. An assay that measures the total concentration of redox-active compounds above a certain cutoff reduction potential was used to analyze 1113 food samples obtained from the US Department of Agriculture National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program. Large variations in the content of antioxidants were observed in different foods and food categories. The food groups spices and herbs, nuts and seeds, berries, and fruit and vegetables all contained foods with very high antioxidant contents. Most food categories also contained products almost devoid of antioxidants. Of the 50 food products highest in antioxidant concentrations, 13 were spices, 8 were in the fruit and vegetables category, 5 were berries, 5 were chocolate-based, 5 were breakfast cereals, and 4 were nuts or seeds. On the basis of typical serving sizes, blackberries, walnuts, strawberries, artichokes, cranberries, brewed coffee, raspberries, pecans, blueberries, ground cloves, grape juice, and unsweetened baking chocolate were at the top of the ranked list. This ranked antioxidant food table provides a useful tool for investigations into the possible health benefit of dietary antioxidants.

  11. Modeling The Economic And Health Impact Of Increasing Children's Physical Activity In The United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bruce Y; Adam, Atif; Zenkov, Eli; Hertenstein, Daniel; Ferguson, Marie C; Wang, Peggy I; Wong, Michelle S; Wedlock, Patrick; Nyathi, Sindiso; Gittelsohn, Joel; Falah-Fini, Saeideh; Bartsch, Sarah M; Cheskin, Lawrence J; Brown, Shawn T

    2017-05-01

    Increasing physical activity among children is a potentially important public health intervention. Quantifying the economic and health effects of the intervention would help decision makers understand its impact and priority. Using a computational simulation model that we developed to represent all US children ages 8-11 years, we estimated that maintaining the current physical activity levels (only 31.9 percent of children get twenty-five minutes of high-calorie-burning physical activity three times a week) would result each year in a net present value of $1.1 trillion in direct medical costs and $1.7 trillion in lost productivity over the course of their lifetimes. If 50 percent of children would exercise, the number of obese and overweight youth would decrease by 4.18 percent, averting $8.1 billion in direct medical costs and $13.8 billion in lost productivity. Increasing the proportion of children who exercised to 75 percent would avert $16.6 billion and $23.6 billion, respectively. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  12. Interest of Monitoring Diaphragmatic Electrical Activity in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Ducharme-Crevier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of electrical activity of the diaphragm (EAdi is a new minimally invasive bedside technology that was developed for the neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA mode of ventilation. In addition to its role in NAVA ventilation, this technology provides the clinician with previously unavailable and essential information on diaphragm activity. In this paper, we review the clinical interests of EAdi in the pediatric intensive care setting. Firstly, the monitoring of EAdi allows the clinician to tailor the ventilatory settings on an individual basis, avoiding frequent overassistance leading potentially to diaphragmatic atrophy. Increased inspiratory EAdi levels can also suggest insufficient support, while a strong tonic activity may reflect the patient efforts to increase its lung volume. EAdi monitoring also allows detection of patient-ventilator asynchrony. It can play a role in evaluation of extubation readiness. Finally, EAdi monitoring provides the clinician with better understanding of the ventilatory capacity of patients with acute neuromuscular disease. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical impact of these potential benefits.

  13. Challenges in safety regulation of R and D activities for advanced technologies in DAE units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    DAE is engaged in intensive research and developmental activities, especially for advanced technologies such as accelerators, lasers, supercomputers, advanced materials and instrumentation. The starting point of an R and D project might be a hypothesis to be tested, problem to be solved, or the performance of an item to be improved, and there may be many possible solutions and technologies that could be used. R and D is quite different from designing, constructing, operating a plant. In these, precisely described result can be defined from the beginning and can be described in design specifications, process descriptions and procedures. However, while established procedures may be available to begin an R and D project, deviation from these procedures may occur often as a legitimate component of the conduct of R and D. Nevertheless, the R and D activities have to be performed in a manner which provides assurance that safety requirements are adequately addressed. Hence, the regulatory approach for enforcing the safety regulation in such facilities is also not as rigid as those for an operating industry. This paper is aimed to discuss some of the key challenges in regulating such R and D activities and also attempts to suggest a way forward. (author)

  14. Scientific activity of the spanish liberal exiles in the United Kingdom, 1823-1833

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera Candel, Manuel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1823, after the squashing of Riego and the restoration of the absolutism of Fernando VII, most of the Spanish liberals went to England, where they carried out different scientific and technical activities. Among the émigrés there was reputed scientists, like Bauzá, Lagasca o Seoane, that in London were able to continue with their scientific activities. Other émigrés carried out an important activity of diffusion of scientific and technical advances through papers and notes that appeared in different magazines of general character published in the Spanish language; of special interest was El Museo Universal de Ciencias y Artes, directed and edited by J. J. Mora, and dedicated entirely to the scientific and technical divulgation. There was, likewise, another activity related to the scientific education, the «scientific catechisms», brief textbooks on mathematics, geography, chemistry, natural sciences, etc., directed towards elementary teaching and aimed to Latino American people, published by Ackermann. In the present work, we offer a comprehensive description of thes  activities.

    En 1823, tras el aplastamiento de Riego y la reinstauración del absolutismo fernandino, se produjo un exilio masivo de liberales hacia el Reino Unido, donde realizaron diversas actividades relacionadas con la ciencia y la técnica. Entre los liberales exiliados había reputados científicos, como Mariano Lagasca, Felipe Bauzá o Mateo Seoane, que en Londres pudieron proseguir con sus actividades científicas. Otros emigrados realizaron una importante labor de difusión de los adelantos científicos y técnicos a través de las diferentes revistas editadas en lengua española; entre ellas
    destacó El Museo Universal de Ciencias y Artes, dirigida y redactada por J. J. de Mora, dedicada íntegramente a la divulgación científico-técnica. Hubo, finalmente, otra actividad relacionada con la educación científica, la elaboración de los

  15. Iron turbidity removal from the active process water system of the Kaiga Generating Station Unit 1 using an electrochemical filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswaran, G.; Gokhale, B.K.

    2007-01-01

    Iron turbidity is observed in the intermediate cooling circuit of the active process water system (APWS) of Kaiga Generating Station (KGS). Deposition of hydrous/hydrated oxides of iron on the plate type heat exchanger, which is employed to transfer heat from the APWS to the active process cooling water system (APCWS), can in turn result in higher moderator D 2 O temperatures due to reduced heat transfer. Characterization of turbidity showed that the major component is γ-FeOOH. An in-house designed and fabricated electrochemical filter (ECF) containing an alternate array of 33 pairs of cathode and anode graphite felts was successfully tested for the removal of iron turbidity from the APWS of Kaiga Generating Station Unit No. 1 (KGS No. 1). A total volume of 52.5 m 3 water was processed using the filter. At an average inlet turbidity of 5.6 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU), the outlet turbidity observed from the ECF was 1.6 NTU. A maximum flow rate (10 L . min -1 ) and applied potential of 18.0-20.0 V was found to yield an average turbidity-removal efficiency of ∝ 75 %. When the experiment was terminated, a throughput of > 2.08 . 10 5 NTU-liters was realized without any reduction in the removal efficiency. Removal of the internals of the filter showed that only the bottom 11 pairs of felts had brownish deposits, while the remaining felts looked clean and unused. (orig.)

  16. Radiation hazards control activities in BARC and other DAE units in Bombay and Indore: annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagwat, A M; Pimputkar, D P; Mogal, M P; Mehta, S K [comps.; Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiation Safety Systems Division

    1996-12-31

    The radiation hazards control activities of units of Radiation Safety Systems Division stationed at different plants and facilities of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and other units of Department of Atomic Energy in Bombay are briefly summarised. The activities are reported plantwise and include the following: (i) nature of radioactive operations, (ii) radiological status of the plant, (iii) personnel exposure data including collective and average exposures, (iv) effluent discharges, (v) waste disposal data, and (vi) safety related unusual occurrences and special problems, if any. Important operations for which extensive radiation safety surveillance was provided during the year 1994 are included. During the year 4319 persons were provided with radiation safety coverage at 25 different facilities. The collective dose and the average individual dose for the year 1994 are 6.08 man-Sv and 1.41 mSv respectively. Trends in personnel radiation exposure for a longer period i.e. from 1981 onwards are shown graphically. The figure also shows a steady trend in collective as well as average doses. The major contribution to dose comes from the following facilities: Plutonium Plant, Thorium Plant, Cirus, Radiological Laboratories and Dhruva in the decreasing order. (author). refs., tabs., 1 fig.

  17. Radiation hazards control activities in BARC and other DAE units in Bombay and Indore: annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagwat, A.M.; Pimputkar, D.P.; Mogal, M.P.; Mehta, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    The radiation hazards control activities of units of Radiation Safety Systems Division stationed at different plants and facilities of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and other units of Department of Atomic Energy in Bombay are briefly summarised. The activities are reported plantwise and include the following: (i) nature of radioactive operations, (ii) radiological status of the plant, (iii) personnel exposure data including collective and average exposures, (iv) effluent discharges, (v) waste disposal data, and (vi) safety related unusual occurrences and special problems, if any. Important operations for which extensive radiation safety surveillance was provided during the year 1994 are included. During the year 4319 persons were provided with radiation safety coverage at 25 different facilities. The collective dose and the average individual dose for the year 1994 are 6.08 man-Sv and 1.41 mSv respectively. Trends in personnel radiation exposure for a longer period i.e. from 1981 onwards are shown graphically. The figure also shows a steady trend in collective as well as average doses. The major contribution to dose comes from the following facilities: Plutonium Plant, Thorium Plant, Cirus, Radiological Laboratories and Dhruva in the decreasing order. (author). refs., tabs., 1 fig

  18. Moving the Barricades to Physical Activity: A Qualitative Analysis of Open Streets Initiatives Across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Amy A; Hipp, J Aaron; Lokuta, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Ciclovía, or Open Streets initiatives, are events where streets are opened for physical activity and closed to motorized traffic. Although the initiatives are gaining popularity in the United States, little is known about planning and implementing them. The goals of this paper are to explore the development and implementation of Open Streets initiatives and make recommendations for increasing the capacity of organizers to enhance initiative success. Phenomenology with qualitative analysis of structured interviews was used. Study setting was urban and suburban communities in the United States. Study participants were organizers of Open Streets initiatives in U.S. cities. Using a list of 47 events held in 2011, 27 lead organizers were interviewed by telephone about planning, implementation, and lessons learned. The interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. A phenomenologic approach was used, an initial coding tool was developed after reviewing a sample of transcripts, and constant comparative coding methodology was applied. Themes and subthemes were generated from codes. The most common reasons for initiation were to highlight or improve health and transportation. Most initiatives aimed to reach the general population, but some targeted families, children, or specific neighborhoods. Getting people to understand the concept of Open Streets was an important challenge. Other challenges included lack of funding and personnel, and complex logistics. These initiatives democratize public space for citizens while promoting physical activity, social connectedness, and other broad agendas. There are opportunities for the research community to contribute to the expanse and sustainability of Open Streets, particularly in evaluation and dissemination.

  19. Worksite Food and Physical Activity Environments and Wellness Supports Reported by Employed Adults in the United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onufrak, Stephen J; Watson, Kathleen B; Kimmons, Joel; Pan, Liping; Khan, Laura Kettel; Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee; Park, Sohyun

    2018-01-01

    To examine the workplace food and physical activity (PA) environments and wellness culture reported by employed United States adults, overall and by employer size. Cross-sectional study using web-based survey on wellness policies and environmental supports for healthy eating and PA. Worksites in the United States. A total of 2101 adults employed outside the home. Survey items were based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Worksite Health ScoreCard and Checklist of Health Promotion Environments and included the availability and promotion of healthy food items, nutrition education, promotion of breast-feeding, availability of PA amenities and programs, facility discounts, time for PA, stairwell signage, health promotion programs, and health risk assessments. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the prevalence of worksite environmental and facility supports by employer size (<100 or ≥100 employees). Chi-square tests were used to examine the differences by employer size. Among employed respondents with workplace food or drink vending machines, approximately 35% indicated the availability of healthy items. Regarding PA, 30.9% of respondents reported that their employer provided opportunities to be physically active and 17.6% reported worksite exercise facilities. Wellness programs were reported by 53.2% working for large employers, compared to 18.1% for smaller employers. Employee reports suggested that workplace supports for healthy eating, PA, and wellness were limited and were less common among smaller employers.

  20. Active learning units interrelated using TIC’s tools in architectural construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Martí Audí

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 141 779 USAL 6 1 919 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} The presence of new technologies in the university world is a matter of fact. Nevertheless, it has not always blended correctly as in many cases TIC incorporation has not taken alumni opinion understood as final users. A correct implementation might evaluate some variables as satisfaction, need, interest and finally that versatility to adapt it to proficient professional training on a regular basis. This paper analyses a new approach to learning in the field of Architectural Construction based on a series of strategically designed and interactive units. The centre of these is the collaborative project; this is based on complex problem-solving situations akin to the professional world; where theory and practice are combined in a discovery-learning process. The tools of Information and Communication Technology are applied, simultaneously facilitating the student’s autonomy in acquiring skills and knowledge.

  1. Inversion of Multi-Station Schumann Resonance Background Records for Global Lightning Activity in Absolute Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. R.; Mushtak, V. C.; Guha, A.; Boldi, R. A.; Bor, J.; Nagy, T.; Satori, G.; Sinha, A. K.; Rawat, R.; Hobara, Y.; Sato, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Price, C. G.; Neska, M.; Alexander, K.; Yampolski, Y.; Moore, R. C.; Mitchell, M. F.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Every lightning flash contributes energy to the TEM mode of the natural global waveguide that contains the Earth's Schumann resonances. The modest attenuation at ELF (0.1 dB/Mm) allows for the continuous monitoring of the global lightning with a small number of receiving stations worldwide. In this study, nine ELF receiving sites (in Antarctica (3 sites), Hungary, India, Japan, Poland, Spitsbergen and USA) are used to provide power spectra at 12-minute intervals in two absolutely calibrated magnetic fields and occasionally, one electric field, with up to five resonance modes each. The observables are the extracted modal parameters (peak intensity, peak frequency and Q-factor) for each spectrum. The unknown quantities are the geographical locations of three continental lightning 'chimneys' and their lightning source strengths in absolute units (C2 km2/sec). The unknowns are calculated from the observables by the iterative inversion of an evolving 'sensitivity matrix' whose elements are the partial derivatives of each observable for all receiving sites with respect to each unknown quantity. The propagation model includes the important day-night asymmetry of the natural waveguide. To overcome the problem of multiple minima (common in inversion problems of this kind), location information from the World Wide Lightning Location Network has been used to make initial guess solutions based on centroids of stroke locations in each chimney. Results for five consecutive days in 2009 (Jan 7-11) show UT variations with the African chimney dominating on four of five days, and America dominating on the fifth day. The amplitude variations in absolute source strength exceed that of the 'Carnegie curve' of the DC global circuit by roughly twofold. Day-to-day variations in chimney source strength are of the order of tens of percent. Examination of forward calculations performed with the global inversion solution often show good agreement with the observed diurnal variations at

  2. Index to the United States Atomic Energy Commission's Annual Report to Congress for 1960. Major activities in the atomic energy programs, January 1960 - December 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCone, John A.

    1961-01-31

    This volume contains a name and subject index for the 1960 report of the United States Atomic Energy Commission to Congress. The full semiannual report covers the major unclassified activities of the Commission from January through December 1960.

  3. Index to the United States Atomic Energy Commission's Annual Report to Congress for 1962. Major activities in the atomic energy programs, January 1962 - December 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, Glenn T.

    1963-01-31

    This volume contains a name and subject index for the 1962 report of the United States Atomic Energy Commission to Congress. The full semiannual report covers the major unclassified activities of the Commission from January through December 1962.

  4. Index to the United States Atomic Energy Commission's Annual Report to Congress for 1959. Major activities in the atomic energy programs, January 1959 - December 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCone, John A.

    1960-01-31

    This volume contains a name and subject index for the 1959 report of the United States Atomic Energy Commission to Congress. The full semiannual report covers the major unclassified activities of the Commission from January through December 1959.

  5. Calibration and performance testing of the IAEA Aquila Active Well Coincidence Counter (Unit 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O..; Siebelist, R.; Wenz, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a portable shift register (PSR-B) produced by Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., have been tested and cross-calibrated with existing AWCCs used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the results of these tests and the cross-calibration of the detector. In addition, updated tables summarizing the cross-calibration of existing AWCCs and AmLi sources are also included. Using the Aquila PSR-B with existing IAEA software requires secondary software also supplied by Aquila to set up the PSR-B with the appropriate measurement parameters

  6. Regulatory inspection activities on nuclear power plant sites during construction in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    The work of regulatory inspection of the construction of the plant on the site is performed not only by the inspector who has been allocated to inspection duties for that site but also by the specialist staff who are involved with the safety assessment of the plant. The co-ordination of this work is described in the paper and examples are given of inspection activities associated with the enforcement requirements of licence conditions as well as those related to the inspection of the plant itself. (author)

  7. Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior with Atopic Disease in United States Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Mark A; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    To determine if eczema, asthma, and hay fever are associated with vigorous physical activity, television/video game usage, and sports participation and if sleep disturbance modifies such associations. Data were analyzed from 2 cross-sectional studies including 133 107 children age 6-17 years enrolled in the 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health. Bivariate and multivariate survey logistic regression models were created to calculate the odds of atopic disease and atopic disease severity on vigorous physical activity, television/video game use, and sports participation. In multivariate logistic regression models controlling for sociodemographic factors, lifetime history of asthma was associated with decreased odds of ≥1 days of vigorous physical activity (aOR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.77-0.99) and decreased odds of sports participation (0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.99). Atopic disease accompanied by sleep disturbance had significantly higher odds of screen time and lower odds of sports participation compared with children with either atopic disease or sleep disturbance alone. Severe eczema (aOR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.19-0.78), asthma (aOR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.14-0.61), and hay fever (aOR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24-0.97) were all associated with decreased odds of ≥1 days of vigorous physical activity. Moderate (aOR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.57-0.99) and severe eczema (aOR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28-0.73), severe asthma (aOR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.25-0.89), and hay fever (aOR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.36-0.61) were associated with decreased odds of sports participation in the past year. Children with severe atopic disease, accompanied by sleep disturbance, have higher risk of sedentary behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Active acoustic leak detection in steam generator units of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriol, L.; Journeau, Ch.

    1996-01-01

    Steam generators (SG) of Fast Reactors can be subject to water leakage into the sodium secondary circuit, causing an exothermic chemical reaction with potential serious damage to plant. Within the framework of the European Fast Reactor project, the CEA has developed an active acoustic detection technique which, when used in parallel with passive acoustic detection, will lead to effective leak detection results in terms of reliability and false alarm rates. Whilst the passive method is based on the increase in acoustic noise generated by the reaction, the active method takes advantage of the acoustic attenuation by the hydrogen bubbles produced. The method has been validated: in water, during laboratory testing at the Centre d'Etudes de Cadarache; in sodium, at the ASB loop at Bensberg (Germany) and at AEA Dounreay (Scotland). Full analysis of the tests carried out on the SG of the Prototype Fast Reactor in 1994 during end-of-life testing should lead to reactor validation on the method. (authors)

  9. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-08-17

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA's influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence-influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being.

  10. Associations between active shooter incidents and gun ownership and storage among families with young children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Taryn W

    2017-07-01

    The presence of firearms and their unsafe storage in the home can increase risk of firearm-related death and injury, but public opinion suggests that firearm ownership is a protective factor against gun violence. This study examined the effects of a recent nearby active shooter incident on gun ownership and storage practices among families with young children. A series of regression models, with data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort merged with the FBI's Active Shooter Incidents data collected in 2003-2006, were used to examine whether household gun ownership and storage practices differed in the months prior to and following an active shooter incident that occurred anywhere in the United States or within the same state. Approximately one-fifth of young children lived in households with one or more guns; of these children, only two-thirds lived in homes that stored all guns in locked cabinets. Results suggest that the experience of a recent active shooter incident was associated with an increased likelihood of storing all guns locked, with the magnitude dependent on the temporal and geographic proximity of the incident. The severity of the incident, defined as the number of fatalities, predicted an increase in storing guns locked. Findings suggest that public shootings change behaviors related to firearm storage among families with young children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Increase of arginase activity in old apolipoprotein-E deficient mice under Western diet associated with changes in neurovascular unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badaut Jérôme

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aging and atherosclerosis are well-recognized risk factors for cardiac and neurovascular diseases. The Apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE−/− mouse on a high-fat diet is a classical model of atherosclerosis, characterized by the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in extracranial vessels but not in cerebral arteries. Increase in arginase activity was shown to participate in vascular dysfunction in the peripheral arteries of atherosclerotic mice by changing the level of nitric oxide (NO. NO plays a key role in the physiological functions of the neurovascular unit (NVU. However, the regulation of arginase expression and activity in the brain was never investigated in association with changes in the NVU, ApoE deficiency and high fat diet. Fourteen-month-old ApoE−/− mice on high-fat diet exhibited deposition of lipids in the NVU, impairment of blood–brain barrier properties, astrogliosis and an increase of aquaporin 4 staining. In association with these changes, brain arginase activity was significantly increased in the old ApoE−/− mice as compared to old wild type mice, with an increase in the level of arginase type I in the blood vessels. In conclusion, aging in this classical mouse model of atherosclerosis induces an increase in the level and activity of arginase I that may impair NO synthesis and contribute to changes in the NVU leading to blood–brain barrier leakage and inflammation.

  12. Motor Unit Activity during Fatiguing Isometric Muscle Contraction in Hemispheric Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara McManus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced muscle weakness is commonly experienced following stroke and may be accompanied by increased susceptibility to fatigue. To examine the contributions of central and peripheral factors to isometric muscle fatigue in stroke survivors, this study investigates changes in motor unit (MU mean firing rate, and action potential duration during, and directly following, a sustained submaximal fatiguing contraction at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. A series of short contractions of the first dorsal interosseous muscle were performed pre- and post-fatigue at 20% MVC, and again following a 10-min recovery period, by 12 chronic stroke survivors. Individual MU firing times were extracted using surface EMG decomposition and used to obtain the spike-triggered average MU action potential waveforms. During the sustained fatiguing contraction, the mean rate of change in firing rate across all detected MUs was greater on the affected side (-0.02 ± 0.03 Hz/s than on the less-affected side (-0.004 ± 0.003 Hz/s, p = 0.045. The change in firing rate immediately post-fatigue was also greater on the affected side than less-affected side (-13.5 ± 20 and 0.1 ± 19%, p = 0.04. Mean MU firing rates increased following the recovery period on the less-affected side when compared to the affected side (19.3 ± 17 and 0.5 ± 20%, respectively, p = 0.03. MU action potential duration increased post-fatigue on both sides (10.3 ± 1.2 to 11.2 ± 1.3 ms on the affected side and 9.9 ± 1.7 to 11.2 ± 1.9 ms on the less-affected side, p = 0.001 and p = 0.02, respectively, and changes in action potential duration tended to be smaller in subjects with greater impairment (p = 0.04. This study presents evidence of both central and peripheral fatigue at the MU level during isometric fatiguing contraction for the first time in stroke survivors. Together, these preliminary observations indicate that the response to an isometric fatiguing contraction differs between the

  13. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  14. Marital status, labour force activity and mortality: A study of the United States and 6 European countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hedel, Karen; van Lenthe, Frank J; Avendano, Mauricio; Bopp, Matthias; Esnaola, Santiago; Kovács, Katalin; Martikainen, Pekka; Regidor, Enrique; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2015-01-01

    Aims Labour force activity and marriage share some of the pathways through which they potentially influence health. In this paper, we examine whether marriage and labour force participation interact in the way they influence mortality in the United States and six European countries. Methods We used data from the US National Health Interview Survey linked to the National Death Index, and national mortality registry data for Austria, England/Wales, Finland, Hungary, Norway and Spain (Basque country) during 1999-2007 for men and women aged 30-59 at baseline. Poisson regression was used to estimate both additive (the relative excess risk due to interaction) and multiplicative interactions between marriage and labour force activity on mortality. Results Labour force inactivity was associated with higher mortality, but this association was stronger for unmarried than married individuals. Likewise, being unmarried was associated with higher mortality, but this association was stronger for inactive than for active individuals. To illustrate, among US women out of the labour force, being unmarried was associated with a 3.98 (95%CI:3.28-4.82) times higher risk of dying than being married, whereas the relative risk was 2.49 (95%CI:2.10-2.94) for women active in the labour market. Although this interaction between marriage and labour force activity was only significant for women on a multiplicative scale, there was a significant additive interaction for both men and women. The pattern was similar across all countries. Conclusions Marriage attenuates the increased mortality risk associated with labour force inactivity, while labour force activity attenuates the mortality risk associated with being unmarried. Our study emphasizes the importance of public health and social policies that improve the health and well-being of men and women who are both unmarried and inactive. PMID:25868643

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Special nuclear material; Source material; By-product material; Agreement state programmes); 4. Nuclear installations (Initial licensing; Operation and inspection, including nuclear safety; Operating licence renewal; Decommissioning; Emergency response); 5. Radiological protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public); 6. Radioactive waste management (High-level waste; Low-level waste; Disposal at sea; Uranium mill tailings; Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - FUSRAP); 7. Non-proliferation and exports (Exports of source material, special nuclear material, production or utilisation facilities and sensitive nuclear technology; Exports of components; Exports of by-product material; Exports and imports of radiation sources; Conduct resulting in the termination of exports or economic assistance; Subsequent arrangements; Technology exports; Information and restricted data); 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC; Department of Energy - DOE; Department of Labor - DOL; Department of Transportation - DOT; Environmental Protection Agency - EPA); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: A. Cabinet-level departments (Department of

  16. Estimating active transportation behaviors to support health impact assessment in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore J Mansfield

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Health impact assessment (HIA has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as active transportation, which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9–23.2 minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5–6.4 minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5–38.1 minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 minutes of daily walking time for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15–59 premature deaths potentially could be

  17. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Theodore J; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as "active transportation"), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9-23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5-6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5-38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15-59) premature deaths potentially could be avoided if the entire

  18. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Theodore J.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as “active transportation”), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9–23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5–6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5–38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15–59) premature deaths potentially could

  19. Survey on astrobiology research and teaching activities within the United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Burchell, Mark J

    2009-10-01

    While astrobiology is apparently growing steadily around the world, in terms of the number of researchers drawn into this interdisciplinary area and teaching courses provided for new students, there have been very few studies conducted to chart this expansion quantitatively. To address this deficiency, the Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB) conducted a questionnaire survey of universities and research institutions nationwide to ascertain the current extent of astrobiology research and teaching in the UK. The aim was to provide compiled statistics and an information resource for those who seek research groups or courses of study, and to facilitate new interdisciplinary collaborations. The report here summarizes details gathered on 33 UK research groups, which involved 286 researchers (from undergraduate project students to faculty members). The survey indicates that around 880 students are taking university-level courses, with significant elements of astrobiology included, every year in the UK. Data are also presented on the composition of astrobiology students by their original academic field, which show a significant dominance of physics and astronomy students. This survey represents the first published systematic national assessment of astrobiological academic activity and indicates that this emerging field has already achieved a strong degree of penetration into the UK academic community.

  20. Deviant Citizenship: DREAMer Activism in the United States and Transnational Belonging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquina Weber-Shirk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available My analysis places the assertions of political presence by non-citizen immigrant youth in the U.S. (often referred to as DREAMers within a rapidly globalizing world; this placement re-frames the DREAMers’ movement from a fight for U.S. citizenship to a broader critique of the limits and impossibility of liberal democratic citizenship, which claims to be all-inclusive. Increased transnational migration has brought into stark relief the inequality that current frameworks of nation-state citizenship, as a caste-system of rights, have codified. I am interested in the activism of immigrant youth as a place to explore where immigrants themselves are reasserting the right to politics. This reassertion privileges the social embeddedness of family ties and community above the notion of individual choice or individual rationality. In doing so, this articulation of politics is a critique of the liberal order by forcing the consideration of the contexts and structures that create migration, exploitation, and transnational communities of belonging.

  1. Monitoring obesity prevalence in the United States through bookmarking activities in online food portals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Trattner

    Full Text Available Studying the impact of food consumption on people's health is a serious matter for its implications on public policy, but it has traditionally been a slow process since it requires information gathered through expensive collection processes such as surveys, census and systematic reviews of research articles. We argue that this process could be supported and hastened using data collected via online social networks. In this work we investigate the relationships between the online traces left behind by users of a large US online food community and the prevalence of obesity in 47 states and 311 counties in the US. Using data associated with the recipes bookmarked over an 9-year period by 144,839 users of the Allrecipes.com food website residing throughout the US, several hierarchical regression models are created to (i shed light on these relations and (ii establish their magnitude. The results of our analysis provide strong evidence that bookmarking activities on recipes in online food communities can provide a signal allowing food and health related issues, such as obesity to be better understood and monitored. We discover that higher fat and sugar content in bookmarked recipes is associated with higher rates of obesity. The dataset is complicated, but strong temporal and geographical trends are identifiable. We show the importance of accounting for these trends in the modeling process.

  2. Monitoring obesity prevalence in the United States through bookmarking activities in online food portals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Christoph; Parra, Denis; Elsweiler, David

    2017-01-01

    Studying the impact of food consumption on people's health is a serious matter for its implications on public policy, but it has traditionally been a slow process since it requires information gathered through expensive collection processes such as surveys, census and systematic reviews of research articles. We argue that this process could be supported and hastened using data collected via online social networks. In this work we investigate the relationships between the online traces left behind by users of a large US online food community and the prevalence of obesity in 47 states and 311 counties in the US. Using data associated with the recipes bookmarked over an 9-year period by 144,839 users of the Allrecipes.com food website residing throughout the US, several hierarchical regression models are created to (i) shed light on these relations and (ii) establish their magnitude. The results of our analysis provide strong evidence that bookmarking activities on recipes in online food communities can provide a signal allowing food and health related issues, such as obesity to be better understood and monitored. We discover that higher fat and sugar content in bookmarked recipes is associated with higher rates of obesity. The dataset is complicated, but strong temporal and geographical trends are identifiable. We show the importance of accounting for these trends in the modeling process.

  3. Low-impact sampling under an active solid low-level radioactive waste disposal unit using horizontal drilling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, C.V.; Vold, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the performance of the solid low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal units located on a mesa top at TA-54, Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, and to provide in-situ (vadose zone) site characterization information to Area G's Performance Assessment. The vadose zone beneath an active disposal unit (DU 37), was accessed by utilizing low-impact, air-rotary horizontal drilling technology. Core samples were pulled, via wire-line core method, in 3 horizontal holes fanning out below DU 37 at approximately 5 foot intervals depending on recovery percentage. Samples were surveyed and prepared in-field following Environmental Restoration (ER) guidelines. Samples were transferred from the field to the CST-9 Radvan for initial radiological screening. Following screening, samples were delivered to CST-3 analytical lab for analyses including moisture content, 23 inorganics, 60 volatile organic compounds (VOC's), 68 semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC's), tritium, lead 210, radium 226 ampersand 228, cesium 137, isotopic plutonium, americium 241, strontium 90, isotopic uranium, and isotopic thorium. Other analyses included matric potential, alpha spectroscopy, gamma spectroscopy, and gross alpha/beta. The overall results of the analysis identified only tritium as having migrated from the DU. Am-241, Eu-152, and Pu-238 were possibly identified above background but the results are not definitive. Of all organics analysed for, only ethyl acetate was tentatively identified slightly above background. All inorganics were found to be well below regulatory limits. Based on the results of the above mentioned analyses, it was determined that Area G's disposal units are performing well and no significant liquid phase migration of contaminants has occurred

  4. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission in a Ghanaian Burn Unit: The Importance of Active Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Ama Amissah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Staphylococcus aureus infections in burn patients can lead to serious complications and death. The frequency of S. aureus infection is high in low- and middle-income countries presumably due to limited resources, misuse of antibiotics and poor infection control. The objective of the present study was to apply population genomics to precisely define, for the first time, the transmission of antibiotic resistant S. aureus in a resource-limited setting in sub-Saharan Africa.Methods:Staphylococcus aureus surveillance was performed amongst burn patients and healthcare workers during a 7-months survey within the burn unit of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana.Results: Sixty-six S. aureus isolates (59 colonizing and 7 clinical were obtained from 31 patients and 10 healthcare workers. Twenty-one of these isolates were ST250-IV methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Notably, 25 (81% of the 31 patients carried or were infected with S. aureus within 24 h of admission. Genome comparisons revealed six distinct S. aureus clones circulating in the burn unit, and demonstrated multiple transmission events between patients and healthcare workers. Further, the collected S. aureus isolates exhibited a wide range of genotypic resistances to antibiotics, including trimethoprim (21%, aminoglycosides (33%, oxacillin (33%, chloramphenicol (50%, tetracycline (59% and fluoroquinolones (100%.Conclusion: Population genomics uncovered multiple transmission events of S. aureus, especially MRSA, within the investigated burn unit. Our findings highlight lapses in infection control and prevention, and underscore the great importance of active surveillance to protect burn victims against multi-drug resistant pathogens in resource-limited settings.

  5. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission in a Ghanaian Burn Unit: The Importance of Active Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Buultjens, Andrew H; Ablordey, Anthony; van Dam, Lieke; Opoku-Ware, Ampomah; Baines, Sarah L; Bulach, Dieter; Tetteh, Caitlin S; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S; Friedrich, Alexander W; Seemann, Torsten; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje; Stinear, Timothy P; Rossen, John W

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus infections in burn patients can lead to serious complications and death. The frequency of S. aureus infection is high in low- and middle-income countries presumably due to limited resources, misuse of antibiotics and poor infection control. The objective of the present study was to apply population genomics to precisely define, for the first time, the transmission of antibiotic resistant S. aureus in a resource-limited setting in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: Staphylococcus aureus surveillance was performed amongst burn patients and healthcare workers during a 7-months survey within the burn unit of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana. Results: Sixty-six S. aureus isolates (59 colonizing and 7 clinical) were obtained from 31 patients and 10 healthcare workers. Twenty-one of these isolates were ST250-IV methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Notably, 25 (81%) of the 31 patients carried or were infected with S. aureus within 24 h of admission. Genome comparisons revealed six distinct S. aureus clones circulating in the burn unit, and demonstrated multiple transmission events between patients and healthcare workers. Further, the collected S. aureus isolates exhibited a wide range of genotypic resistances to antibiotics, including trimethoprim (21%), aminoglycosides (33%), oxacillin (33%), chloramphenicol (50%), tetracycline (59%) and fluoroquinolones (100%). Conclusion: Population genomics uncovered multiple transmission events of S. aureus , especially MRSA, within the investigated burn unit. Our findings highlight lapses in infection control and prevention, and underscore the great importance of active surveillance to protect burn victims against multi-drug resistant pathogens in resource-limited settings.

  6. Tuberculosis unit: study of 10 years of activity (1999–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lopes

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Setting: The Pulmonology Service of a Central Hospital in Lisbon created a Unit dedicated to the treatment of tuberculosis (TB. Objectives: Casuistic analysis and assessment of the predictive factors for in-hospital mortality, over a 10-year period. Design: Retrospective study, from April 1999 to September 2009, through the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences application for binary logistic regression. Results: In a total of 1917 patients, most were male (n = 1450; 76%, Caucasian (76.6%, with an average age of 43 ± 15.2 years, and 19.8% were immigrants. The retreatments were responsible for 26% of the hospitalizations. The presence of comorbidities was detected in 85.7%, particularly HIV infection (34.7%. The multidrug-resistant (MDR and the extensively drug resistant (XDR TB occurred in 6.6% and 6.8%, respectively. The average delay was 28.5 ± 54.8 days, with the mortality rate at 8.6%. The mortality risk was more significant amongst men (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.16–2.90; p < 0.01, in patients with HIV infection (OR 3.7; 95% CI 2.47–5.49; p < 0.001, and amongst those who presented MDR TB (OR 2.5; 95% CI 1.24–5.15; p < 0.01 and XDR TB (OR 5.5; 95% CI 3.14–9.58; p < 0.001. Conclusion: A high percentage of patients presented comorbidities, namely HIV infection. The main factors associated with mortality were HIV infection, XDR TB and MDR TB. Resumo: Introdução: O Serviço de Pneumologia de um Hospital Central de Lisboa criou uma Unidade dedicada exclusivamente ao internamento de casos de tuberculose (TB. Objectivos: Análise casuística e avaliação dos factores preditivos de mortalidade intra-hospitalar, num período de 10 anos. Material/Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo, entre Abril de 1999 e Setembro de 2009, através da aplicação SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences para a regressão logística binária. Resultados: : Do total de

  7. Late Cambrian magmatic arc activity in peri-Gondwana: geochemical evidence from the Basal Allochthonous Units of NW Iberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andonaegui, P.; Abati, J.; Díez-Fernández, R.

    2017-07-01

    The North African section of the Gondwana margin was the site of voluminous, arc-related magmatism during the Late Neoproterozoic (Avalonian–Cadomian orogen). The lower (and older) metasedimentary sequence that constitutes the Basal Units of the Allochthonous Complexes of NW Iberia was deposited in that setting. In these units, sedimentation was followed by the intrusion of tonalites and granodiorites in the late Cambrian (ca. 493–489Ma). In the Late Paleozoic, the collision of Gondwana and Laurussia (Variscan orogeny) deformed and metamorphosed the whole ensemble. New whole rock geochemical analysis performed in seven samples of metatonalites and fourteen samples of metagranodiorites are characterized by: i) slight enrichment in incompatible elements (Rb, Ba, Th, U), ii) negative anomalies in Nb, Ta, P, and Ti, and iii) negative anomalies in Eu. These chemical features are in agreement with a subduction-related setting for the genesis of both types of magma, which is also supported by chemical discrimination using tectonic setting diagrams. Positive anomalies of Pb suggest a crustal component. The new geochemical data reveal that the convergent orogen that ruled the paleogeography of the Gondwana periphery during the Neoproterozoic (Cadomian orogen) remained active bey.

  8. Salicylate-induced changes in spontaneous activity of single units in the inferior colliculus of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, P J; Sasaki, C T

    1986-11-01

    Changes in spontaneous neuronal activity of the inferior colliculus in albino guinea pigs before and after administration of sodium salicylate were analyzed. Animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital, and two microelectrodes separated by a few hundred microns were driven through the inferior colliculus. After collecting a sufficiently large sample of cells, sodium salicylate (450 mg/kg) was injected i.p. and recordings again made 2 h after the injection. Comparison of spontaneous activity recorded before and after salicylate administration revealed highly statistically significant differences (p less than 0.001). After salicylate, the mean rate of the cell population increased from 29 to 83 Hz and the median from 26 to 74 Hz. Control experiments in which sodium salicylate was replaced by saline injection revealed no statistically significant differences in cell discharges. Recordings made during the same experiments from lobulus V of the cerebellar vermis revealed no changes in response to salicylate. The observed changes in single-unit activity due to salicylate administration may represent the first systematic evidence of a tinnituslike phenomenon in animals.

  9. Park availability and physical activity, TV time, and overweight and obesity among women: Findings from Australia and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Jenny; Abbott, Gavin; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja A; Besenyi, Gina M; Lamb, Karen E

    2016-03-01

    This study examined relationships between three measures of park availability and self-reported physical activity (PA), television viewing (TV) time, and overweight/obesity among women from Australia and the United States. Having more parks near home was the only measure of park availability associated with an outcome. Australian women (n=1848) with more parks near home had higher odds of meeting PA recommendations and lower odds of being overweight/obese. In the US sample (n=489), women with more parks near home had lower odds of watching >4h TV per day. A greater number of parks near home was associated with lower BMI among both Australian and US women. Evidence across diverse contexts provides support to improve park availability to promote PA and other health behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lifetime and current sexual assault and harassment victimization rates of active-duty United States Air Force women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, Deborah J; Daley, James G

    2007-09-01

    From a stratified random sample, 2,018 active-duty United States Air Force women completed a telephone survey dealing with sexual assault and harassment. The lifetime prevalence of rape among Air Force women (28%) was more than twice as high as the prevalence in a national sample (13%). Nearly half of the military sample had been the victims of rape, molestation, or attempted sexual assault. The majority of both initial rapes (75%) and most recent rapes (56%) involved assault by civilians when the victims were civilians. Family members perpetrated 29% of initial rapes and 33% of most recent rapes. Regarding military status of the perpetrator, 14% of first-time victims were raped by a military member, 26% of multiple-time victims were raped by a military member, 31.8% of military women were sexually harassed by a military supervisor or boss, and 26.7% of military women were sexually harassed by a military coworker.

  11. Reciprocal activation of gastrocnemius and soleus motor units is associated with fascicle length change during knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Benedikt; Lichtwark, Glen A; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2014-06-01

    While medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (SOL) are considered synergists, they are anatomically exclusive in that SOL crosses only the ankle, while MG crosses both the knee and ankle. Due to the force-length properties of both active and passive structures, activation of SOL and MG must be constantly regulated to provide the required joint torques for any planned movement. As such, the aim of this study was to investigate the neural regulation of MG and SOL when independently changing their length by changing only the knee joint angle, thus exclusively altering the length of MG fibers. MG and SOL motor units (MU) were recorded intramuscularly along with ultrasound imaging of MG and SOL fascicle lengths, while moving the knee through 60° of rotation and maintaining a low level of voluntary plantar flexor torque. The results showed a reciprocal activation of MG and SOL as the knee was moved into flexion and extension. A clear reduction in MG MU firing rates occurred as the knee was flexed (MG fascicles shortening), with de-recruitment of most MG MU occurring at close to full knee flexion. A concomitant increase in SOL MU activity was observed while no change in the length of its fascicles was found. The opposite effects were found when the knee was moved into extension. A strong correlation (ICC = 0.78) was found between the fascicle length at which MG MUs were de-recruited and subsequently re-recruited. This was stronger than the relationship of de-recruitment and re-recruitment with knee angle (ICC = 0.52), indicating that in this instance, muscle fascicle length rather than joint angle is more influential in regulating MG recruitment. Such a reciprocal arrangement like the one presented here for SOL and MG is essential for human voluntary movements such as walking or cycling. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  12. AGM: 16. A+M data Centres and ALADDIN network. Atomic and Molecular Data Unit, Nuclear Data Section. Report of activities: September 1999 - September 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Stephens presented a report of activities of the IAEA A+M Data Unit. The activities consisted of data evaluation and recommendation, WWW database developments, AMDIS services, coordinated research programmes, and A+M Data Center Network coordination. Dr. Stephens also presented and demonstrated a new ALADDIN database server

  13. Influence of light curing unit and ceramic thickness on temperature rise during resin cement photo-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Mastrofrancisco, Sarina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different ceramic thickness on heat generation during resin cement photo-activation by QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen), LED (light emitting diode), and PAC (plasma arc-curing) LCUs (light curing units). The resin cement used was Rely X ARC (3M-ESPE), and the ceramic was IPS Empress Esthetic (Ivoclar-Vivadent), of which 0.7-, 1.4- and 2.0-mm thick disks, 0.8 mm in diameter were made. Temperature increase was recorded with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). An acrylic resin base was built to guide the thermocouple and support the 1.0-mm thick dentin disk. A 0.1-mm thick black adhesive paper matrix with a perforation 6 mm in diameter was placed on the dentin to contain the resin cement and support the ceramic disks of different thicknesses. Three LCUs were used: QTH, LED and PAC. Nine groups were formed (n=10) according to the interaction: 3 ceramic thicknesses, 1 resin cement and 3 photo-activation methods. Temperature increase data were submitted to Tukey's test (5%). For all ceramic thicknesses, a statistically significant difference in temperature increase was observed among the LCUs, with the highest mean value for the QTH LCU (p0.05). The interaction of higher energy density with smaller ceramic thickness showed higher temperature increase values.

  14. SDSS-IV MaNGA: identification of active galactic nuclei in optical integral field unit surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Drory, Niv; Andrews, Brett H.; Merloni, Andrea; Thomas, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate 2727 galaxies observed by MaNGA as of 2016 June to develop spatially resolved techniques for identifying signatures of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We identify 303 AGN candidates. The additional spatial dimension imposes challenges in identifying AGNs due to contamination from diffuse ionized gas, extraplanar gas and photoionization by hot stars. We show that the combination of spatially resolved line diagnostic diagrams and additional cuts on H α surface brightness and H α equivalent width can distinguish between AGN-like signatures and high-metallicity galaxies with low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions-like spectra. Low-mass galaxies with high specific star formation rates are particularly difficult to diagnose and routinely show diagnostic line ratios outside of the standard star formation locus. We develop a new diagnostic - the distance from the standard diagnostic line in the line-ratio space - to evaluate the significance of the deviation from the star formation locus. We find 173 galaxies that would not have been selected as AGN candidates based on single-fibre spectral measurements but exhibit photoionization signatures suggestive of AGN activity in the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO resolved observations, underscoring the power of large integral field unit surveys. A complete census of these new AGN candidates is necessary to understand their nature and probe the complex co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their hosts.

  15. CORPORATE E-MAIL SERVICE GOOGLE APPS AS AN INSTRUMENT OF ACTIVITY OF ORGANIZATIONAL-EDUCATIONAL UNITS OF THE HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Кarpenko А.

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of usage of cloud technologies, particularly, of Gmail service Google Apps in work of organizational-educational units of higher educational institutions are analyzed in this work. The main accents are put concerning usage of corporate e-mail Gmail service Google Apps, with the help of which informational-analytical support of activity of organizational-educational units of the University is provided. The author of the publication underlines key advantages of Gmail and analyses...

  16. [Endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit: dependence of respiration of secretory cells on activity of ryanodine- and IP3 - sensitive Ca(2+)-channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velykopols'ka, O Iu; Man'ko, B O; Man'ko, V V

    2012-01-01

    Using Clark oxygen electrode, dependence of mitochondrial functions on Ca(2+)-release channels activity of Chironomus plumosus L. larvae salivary glands suspension was investigated. Cells were ATP-permeabilized in order to enable penetration of exogenous oxidative substrates. Activation of plasmalemmal P2X-receptors (as well as P2Y-receptors) per se does not modify the endogenous respiration of salivary gland suspension. That is, Ca(2+)-influx from extracellular medium does not influence functional activity of mitochondria, although they are located along the basal part of the plasma membrane. Activation of RyRs intensifies endogenous respiration and pyruvate-malate-stimulated respiration, but not succinate-stimulated respiration. Neither activation of IP3Rs (via P2Y-receptors activation), nor their inhibition alters endogenous respiration. Nevertheless, IP3Rs inhibition by 2-APB intensifies succinate-stimulated respiration. All abovementioned facts testify that Ca2+, released from stores via channels, alters functional activity of mitochondria, and undoubtedly confirm the existence of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit in Ch. plumosus larvae salivary glands secretory cells. In steady state of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit the spontaneous activity of IP3Rs is observed; released through IP3Rs, Ca2+ is accumulated in mitochondria via uniporter and modulates oxidative processes. Activation of RyRs induces the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to the active state, which is required to intensify cell respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. As expected, the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to inactivated state (i. e. inhibition of Ca(2+)-release channels at excessive [Ca2+]i) limits the duration of signal transduction, has protective nature and prevents apoptosis.

  17. Non-stationarity and power spectral shifts in EMG activity reflect motor unit recruitment in rat diaphragm muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Yasin B; Mantilla, Carlos B; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C

    2013-01-15

    We hypothesized that a shift in diaphragm muscle (DIAm) EMG power spectral density (PSD) to higher frequencies reflects recruitment of more fatigable fast-twitch motor units and motor unit recruitment is reflected by EMG non-stationarity. DIAm EMG was recorded in anesthetized rats during eupnea, hypoxia-hypercapnia (10% O(2)-5% CO(2)), airway occlusion, and sneezing (maximal DIAm force). Although power in all frequency bands increased progressively across motor behaviors, PSD centroid frequency increased only during sneezing (pmotor units were recruited during different motor behaviors. Motor units augmented their discharge frequencies progressively beyond the non-stationary period; yet, EMG signal became stationary. In conclusion, non-stationarity of DIAm EMG reflects the period of motor unit recruitment, while a shift in the PSD towards higher frequencies reflects recruitment of more fatigable fast-twitch motor units. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CORPORATE E-MAIL SERVICE GOOGLE APPS AS AN INSTRUMENT OF ACTIVITY OF ORGANIZATIONAL-EDUCATIONAL UNITS OF THE HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Кarpenko А.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of usage of cloud technologies, particularly, of Gmail service Google Apps in work of organizational-educational units of higher educational institutions are analyzed in this work. The main accents are put concerning usage of corporate e-mail Gmail service Google Apps, with the help of which informational-analytical support of activity of organizational-educational units of the University is provided. The author of the publication underlines key advantages of Gmail and analyses its opportunities. Main characteristics of corporate e-mail Gmail service Google Apps are described. It is identified that implementation of corporate e-mail Gmail service Google Apps is a part of creation of certain information system, that will ensure united information space of a modern higher educational institution. Effective organization of educational process, that was used by methodist of organizational-educational units (Scientific-methodological centre of research, scientific projects and programs of Borys Grinchenko Kyiv University in the work of corporate mail Gmail service Google Aps is analyzed and presented. It is identified, that creation and improvement of mechanisms of building corporate content with the help of Gmail service Google Apps will allow the collaborators of organizational-educational units of the higher educational institution to plan and organize educational process. Such organization of educational process optimizes the activity of organizational-educational units of higher educational institutions.

  19. Sunflower/Girasol: Spanish/English Elementary School Science Activity Curriculum. Evaluation of the Educational Efficacy of the Plant and Water Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercultural Center for Research in Education, Arlington, MA.

    The Sunflower/Girasol program is a Spanish/English bilingual science discovery program for Hispanic children in grades 2-6, designed to improve science instruction and educational opportunity for this group. The report describes the program's proposed activities and products, progress to date, and results of an evaluation of the first two units of…

  20. A Year of Hands-on Science: Exciting Theme Units with More Than 100 Activities, Projects, and Experiments To Make Science Come Alive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Lynne; Novelli, Joan, Ed.

    This book contains 18 themed teaching units with 2 themes per chapter, organized seasonally around the traditional school year. Each theme includes natural connections and hands-on science activities that correspond to what children are already observing in their world. Each chapter begins with highlights of the month and a reproducible "Science…

  1. Structural Analysis and Anticoagulant Activities of the Novel Sulfated Fucan Possessing a Regular Well-Defined Repeating Unit from Sea Cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC–MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2 and (1→3-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from L. grisea (100% for H. edulis fucan contain sides of oligosaccharides formed by nonsulfated fucose units linked to the O-4 position of the central core. Anticoagulant activity assays indicate that the sea cucumber fucans strongly inhibit human blood clotting through the intrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade. Moreover, the mechanism of anticoagulant action of the fucans is selective inhibition of thrombin activity by heparin cofactor II. The distinctive tetrasaccharide repeating units contribute to the anticoagulant action. Additionally, unlike the fucans from marine alga, although the sea cucumber fucans have great molecular weights and affluent sulfates, they do not induce platelet aggregation. Overall, our results may be helpful in understanding the structure-function relationships of the well-defined polysaccharides from invertebrate as new types of safer anticoagulants.

  2. Justification for parameters of a dynamic stabilizer of the experimental stand mobile unit in studying of active rotational working tools of tiller machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir F. Kupryashkin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article deals with design options and technological modes of the dynamic stabilizer of the experimental stand mobile unit for studying tillage machine active rotating work tools. Based on theoretical and experimental studies, the possibility the movable module instability was discovered. This negatively affects on implementing the experiment program trough the especific method. The need in engineering solutions for the defect correction is shown. In addition, the authors consider the structural features and characteristics of the used devices for providing the stabilization of the movable module in the study of active rotating work tools of tillage machines. An electromagnetic brake dynamic stabilizer in the structure of the existing rolling module was proposed as an engineering device. Materials and Methods: A theoretical study of rolling module stability, based on synthesis of basic regulations and laws of mechanics related to active rotating work tools was conducted. As a result of the theoretical research, a design scheme of movable module loading was created. This scheme includes the design features and structural power factors. Results: A database representing the settings of power specification in the motion stability determining the mobile unit was created. Further use of the database values allow supporting the most optimal location of the electromagnetic brake with its design options. Discussion and Conclusions: The research of the electromagnetic brake in a mobile unit promoted stabilizing the unit movement, increased the frequency of its use and provided data that are more precise during experiments.

  3. The use of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and whole genome sequencing to inform tuberculosis prevention and control activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2013-07-01

    Molecular strain typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been possible for only about 20 years; it has significantly improved our understanding of the evolution and epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and tuberculosis disease. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing, based on 24 variable number tandem repeat unit loci, is highly discriminatory, relatively easy to perform and interpret and is currently the most widely used molecular typing system for tuberculosis surveillance. Nevertheless, clusters identified by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing sometimes cannot be confirmed or adequately defined by contact tracing and additional methods are needed. Recently, whole genome sequencing has been used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and other mutations, between genotypically indistinguishable isolates from the same cluster, to more accurately trace transmission pathways. Rapidly increasing speed and quality and reduced costs will soon make large scale whole genome sequencing feasible, combined with the use of sophisticated bioinformatics tools, for epidemiological surveillance of tuberculosis.

  4. Pre-Service Teachers' Shifting Perceptions of Cross-Curricular Practice: The Impact of School Experience in Mediating Professional Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, David; Parker, Joan; Jolley, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary educational debate in curriculum organisation and pedagogy has focused on the merits or otherwise of integrating disciplines for more effective learning. A wide range of terms is used to describe the various traditions associated with the presentation and structure of the curriculum and there are various perspectives on the purposes…

  5. Discursive Positioning in Norwegian Teacher Education: Shifting from Cross-Curricularity to Skills-Based Subject Specialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathe, Hans Jorgen

    2012-01-01

    Late and limited organisational differentiation is a characteristic which has, until now, distinguished the structure of education -- including teacher education - in the Nordic countries from that of the rest of Europe. However, this tradition is now challenged by utilitarian ideologies, supported by international comparison tests such as PISA…

  6. How to link geography, cross-curricular approach and inquiry in science education at the primary schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvánková, Petra; Popjaková, Dagmar

    2018-05-01

    Pupil research in school lessons in the sense of Inquiry-Based Education (IBE) is one of the constructivist approaches to education. Inquiry strengthens the positive approach of pupils to natural science subjects, encouraging them to study phenomena and processes taking place in the natural environment around them and use the acquired knowledge in their practical life. Geography as a school subject, due to the multidisciplinary nature of geography as a science, is close to natural sciences as well. This is because of the broadness of the subject of geographical studies, the complex (natural and cultural) landscape. The close links of geography to all cross-sectional themes make it a good support for teaching classical science subjects at schools such as mathematics, physics, chemistry or biology, environmental education. Moreover, the field teaching is one of the strong assets of the implementation of IBE in the school geography. Presented case study on the 'effect of noise on the surroundings' explores the facts mentioned above, in geography teaching. It verifies the pupils' knowledge and skills to adopt the basic principles of IBE in the practice. At the same time, it presents the concrete experiences how the children master the individual stages of IBE during the process of education.

  7. Using Learning Modules for Instructor Neutrality in Ethical Quagmires: A Cross-Curricular Study in Academic Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Robert Lester

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this disquisition is to add to the body of educational research through practitioner, quantitative, and qualitative inquiry on the topic of academic debate. In a three-tiered study, the author conducted research for this dissertation with the intent to examine argumentation and debate in higher education. The settings for this…

  8. Problem-based scenarios with laptops: an effective combination for cross-curricular learning in mathematics, science and language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Freiman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many educational systems consider using one-to-one access to the laptop as a way to improve teaching and learning. A two-year action research project on the use of laptop computers by New Brunswick (Canada grade 7 and 8 Francophone students aimed to better understand the impact of laptops on learning. Two problem-based learning (PBL interdisciplinary scenarios (math, science, language arts were implemented in eight experimental classes to measure and document students’ actual learning process, particularly in terms of their ability to scientifically investigate authentic problems, to reason mathematically, and to communicate. On-site observations, video-recording, journals, samples of students’ work, and interviews were used to collect qualitative data. Based on our findings, we argue that laptops in and of themselves may not automatically lead to better results on standardized tests, but rather create opportunities to enrich learning with more open-ended, constructive, collaborative, reflective, and cognitively complex learning tasks.

  9. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  10. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  11. The dead, hardened floral bracts of dispersal units of wild wheat function as storage for active hydrolases and in enhancing seedling vigor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buzi Raviv

    Full Text Available It is commonly assumed that the dead, hardened floral bracts of the dispersal unit of grasses have been evolved to protect seeds from predation and / or assist in fruit/caryopsis dispersal. While these structures have important agronomical and economical implications, their adaptive value has not been fully explored. We investigated the hypothesis that the maternally derived hardened floral bracts have been evolved not just as a means for caryopsis protection and dispersal, but also as storage for substances that might affect seed germination and seedling vigor. Dead glumes as well as lemmas and paleas of wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum var dicoccoides were found to store and release upon hydration active hydrolases including nucleases and chitinases. High nuclease activity was released upon hydration from glumes derived from wild strains of wheat including Triticum urartu and wild emmer wheat, while very low nuclease activity was detected in glumes derived from domesticated, free-threshing wheat cultivars (e.g., durum wheat. Germination from the intact dispersal unit of wild emmer wheat was delayed, but post germination growth was better than those of separated caryopses. Most notable was a significant increase in lateral root production on seedlings germinated from the intact dispersal unit. Proteome analysis of wild emmer wheat glumes revealed many proteins stored and released upon hydration including S1-type nucleases, peptidases, antifungal hydrolases such as chitinases and β-1,3-glucanase as well as pectin acetylesterase, a protein involved in cell wall degradation and remodeling. Also, reactive oxygen species (ROS-detoxifying enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase were overrepresented in dead glumes of wild emmer wheat. Thus our study highlighted previously unknown features of the dispersal unit in wild wheat in which the dead, hardened floral bracts enclosing the caryopsis store active hydrolases and

  12. The Masticatory Contractile Load Induced Expression and Activation of Akt1/PKBα in Muscle Fibers at the Myotendinous Junction within Muscle-Tendon-Bone Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Korkmaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell specific detection of enzyme activation in response to the physiological contractile load within muscle-tendon-bone unit is essential for understanding of the mechanical forces transmission from muscle cells via tendon to the bone. The hypothesis that the physiological mechanical loading regulates activation of Akt1/PKBα at Thr308 and at Ser473 in muscle fibers within muscle-tendon-bone unit was tested using quantitative immunohistochemistry, confocal double fluorescence analysis, and immunoblot analysis. In comparison to the staining intensities in peripheral regions of the muscle fibers, Akt1/PKBα was detected with a higher staining intensity in muscle fibers at the myotendinous junction (MTJ areas. In muscle fibers at the MTJ areas, Akt1/PKBα is dually phosphorylated at Thr308 and Ser473. The immunohistochemical results were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that contractile load generated by masticatory muscles induces local domain-dependent expression of Akt1/PKBα as well as activation by dually phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473 in muscle fibers at the MTJ areas within muscle-tendon-bone unit.

  13. Passive dosing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures to terrestrial springtails: Linking mixture toxicity to chemical activities, equilibrium lipid concentrations, and toxic units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Holmstrup, Martin; Smith, Kilian E. C.

    2013-01-01

    treatments, containing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Springtail lethality was then linked to sum chemical activities (∑a), sum equilibrium lipid concentrations (∑Clipid eq.), and sum toxic units (∑TU). In each case, the effects of all 12 mixture treatments...... could be fitted to one sigmoidal exposure-response relationship. The effective lethal chemical activity (La50) of 0.027 was well within the expected range for baseline toxicity of 0.01-0.1. Linking the effects to the lipid-based exposure parameter yielded an effective lethal concentration (LClipid eq...

  14. Accelerometer Measured Level of Physical Activity Indoors and Outdoors During Preschool Time in Sweden and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raustorp, A.; Pagels, P.; Boldemann, C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is important to understand the correlates of physical activity in order to influence policy and create environments that promote physical activity among preschool children. We compared preschoolers' physical activity in Swedish and in US settings and objectively examined differences...... boys and girls indoor and outdoor physical activity regarding different intensity levels and sedentary behaviour. METHODS: Accelerometer determined physical activity in 50 children with mean age 52 months, (range 40-67) was recorded during preschool time for 5 consecutive weekdays at four sites...

  15. What advice are oncologists and surgeons in the United Kingdom giving to breast cancer patients about physical activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daley Amanda J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evidence has shown that physical activity may attenuate the negative physical, psychological and functional effects of treatment in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Physical activity levels also decline substantially during and after completion of treatment for cancer, highlighting the importance of strategies to promote participation in regular physical activity in this population. Oncologists and surgeons may serve as an influential source of motivation to be physically activity in cancer patients, by conveying the importance of a healthy lifestyle. The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate whether oncologists and surgeons routinely discuss physical activity with their breast cancer patients and to investigate the nature of any information/advice provided during consultations. A secondary aim was to examine whether physically active oncologists and surgeons were more likely to provide advice about physical activity to patients, than inactive oncologists and surgeons. A brief postal questionnaire was sent to 710 consultant breast cancer oncologists and surgeons throughout the UK and 102 responded (response rate = 14.4%. Of responders, most (55.9% did not routinely discuss physical activity with their patients. Amongst oncologists/surgeons (clinicians who did offer advice, most focussed on discussing the benefits of physical activity for physical and functional health gains and for facilitating weight control and maintenance. A number of clinicians indicated they advised patients that physical activity may decrease risk of recurrence and improve survival, despite the lack of evidence from RCTs to support this suggestion. There was no significant association between the physical activity status of oncologists/surgeons and the likelihood that they discussed physical activity with patients. Educational strategies aimed at encouraging clinicians to promote physical activity in consultations need to be targeted widely

  16. Insects: An Interdisciplinary Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The author talks about an interdisciplinary unit on insects, and presents activities that can help students practice communication skills (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and learn about insects with hands-on activities.

  17. Making Meaning of Everyday Practices: Parents' Attitudes toward Children's Extracurricular Activities in the United States and in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer-Sadlik, Tamar; Izquierdo, Carolina; Fatigante, Marilena

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on children's engagement in extracurricular activities from the perspective of middle-class parents in Rome, Italy, and Los Angeles, California. Analysis of parents' accounts captured in interviews and ethnographic fieldwork reveals that both sets of parents perceive activities as important for children's success. Yet Roman…

  18. The Dynamic Interplay between Spatialization of Written Units in Writing Activity and Functions of Tools on the Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Joo Hee

    2012-01-01

    I criticize the typewriting model and linear writing structure of Microsoft Word software for writing in the computer. I problematize bodily movement in writing that the error of the software disregards. In this research, writing activity is viewed as bodily, spatial and mediated activity under the premise of the unity of consciousness and…

  19. Participating in Politics Resembles Physical Activity: General Action Patterns in International Archives, United States Archives, and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenji; Handley, Ian M.; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies examined whether political participation can emerge from general patterns of indiscriminate activity. In the first two studies, general action tendencies were measured by combining national and state-level indicators of high activity (e.g., impulsiveness, pace of life, and physical activity) from international and U.S. data. This action-tendency index positively correlated with a measure of political participation that consisted of voting behaviors and participation in political demonstrations. The following two experimental studies indicated that participants exposed to action words (e.g., go, move) had stronger intentions to vote in an upcoming election and volunteered more time to make phone calls on behalf of a university policy than participants exposed to inaction words did (e.g., relax, stop). These studies suggest that political participation can be predicted from general tendencies toward activity present at the national and state levels, as well as from verbal prompts suggestive of activity. PMID:21177515

  20. Antioxidant activity and polyphenol and procyanidin contents of selected commercially available cocoa-containing and chocolate products in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth B; Stuart, David A; Smith, Nancy L; Lee, Chang Y; McHale, Nancy L; Flanagan, Judith A; Ou, Boxin; Hurst, W Jeffrey

    2006-05-31

    In the United States, commercially available foods, including cocoa and chocolate, are being marketed with statements referring to the level of antioxidant activity and polyphenols. For cocoa-containing foods, there has been no comprehensive survey of the content of these and other chemistries. A survey of cocoa and chocolate-containing products marketed in the United States was conducted to determine antioxidant activity and polyphenol and procyanidin contents. Commercially available samples consisted of the top market share products in each of the following six categories: natural cocoa, unsweetened baking chocolate, dark chocolate, semisweet baking chips, milk chocolate, and chocolate syrup. Composite samples were characterized using four different methods: oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), vitamin C equivalence antioxidant capacity (VCEAC), total polyphenols, and procyanidins. All composite lots were further characterized for percent nonfat cocoa solids (NFCS) and percent fat. Natural cocoas had the highest levels of antioxidant activities, total polyphenols, and procyanidins followed by baking chocolates, dark chocolates and baking chips, and finally milk chocolate and syrups. The results showed a strong linear correlation between NFCS and ORAC (R (2) = 0.9849), total polyphenols (R (2) = 0.9793), and procyanidins (R (2) = 0.946), respectively. On the basis of principal component analysis, 81.4% of the sample set was associated with NFCS, antioxidant activity, total polyphenols, and procyanidins. The results indicated that, regardless of the product category, NFCS were the primary factor contributing to the level of cocoa antioxidants in the products tested. Results further suggested that differences in cocoa bean blends and processing, with the possible exception of Dutching, are minor factors in determining the level of antioxidants in commercially available cocoa-containing products in the United States.

  1. Prevalence of Low High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Among Adults, by Physical Activity: United States, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwald, Marissa L; Akinbami, Lara J; Fakhouri, Tala H I; Fryar, Chryl D

    2017-03-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey •The prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was significantly higher among adults who did not meet recommended physical activity guidelines (21.0%) than adults who met the guidelines (17.7%). •Low HDL cholesterol prevalence differed significantly for both men and women by adherence to physical activity guidelines. •Prevalence of low HDL cholesterol declined as age increased for both those who did and did not meet the physical activity guidelines. •Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black adults who did not meet the physical activity guidelines had a higher prevalence than those who met the guidelines. •Low HDL cholesterol prevalence declined with increasing education level regardless of adherence to physical activity guidelines. Regular physical activity can improve cholesterol levels among adults, including increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (1). HDL cholesterol is known as "good" cholesterol because high levels can reduce cardiovascular disease risk (2). The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults engage in 150 minutes or more of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or an equivalent combination (3). Adherence to these guidelines is expected to decrease the prevalence of low HDL cholesterol levels (4-8). This report presents national data for 2011-2014 on low HDL cholesterol prevalence among U.S. adults aged 20 and over, by whether they met these guidelines. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  2. Examination of the readiness of Two Units of the Helenic Navy to Implement Activity Based Cost Management (ABCM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsiakiris, George

    2000-01-01

    A growing concern in the Hellenic Navy (HN) about doing the best with the resources provided has initiated an interest of adopting "best practice" methods such as Activity Based Cost Management (ABCM...

  3. The importance of culturally meaningful activity for health benefits among older Korean immigrant living in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyoung Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that participation in culturally meaningful activity is beneficial for immigrants’ health and well-being, yet older Korean immigrants struggle with accepting new cultural perspectives, which can negatively affect their health and well-being. Using in-depth interviews, this study was designed to capture the value of culturally meaningful activities for health among older Korean immigrants. Three themes were identified: (a improved psychological well-being, (b enhanced positive emotions and feelings, and (c social connections developed with others. The findings suggest that by engaging in various culturally meaningful activities, older Korean immigrants gain a sense of social, cultural, and psychological significance in life. This study also provided evidence that older Korean immigrants maintain and develop their cultural identity through culturally meaningful activities.

  4. The importance of culturally meaningful activity for health benefits among older Korean immigrant living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, May; Han, Areum; Chin, Seungtae

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that participation in culturally meaningful activity is beneficial for immigrants' health and well-being, yet older Korean immigrants struggle with accepting new cultural perspectives, which can negatively affect their health and well-being. Using in-depth interviews, this study was designed to capture the value of culturally meaningful activities for health among older Korean immigrants. Three themes were identified: (a) improved psychological well-being, (b) enhanced positive emotions and feelings, and (c) social connections developed with others. The findings suggest that by engaging in various culturally meaningful activities, older Korean immigrants gain a sense of social, cultural, and psychological significance in life. This study also provided evidence that older Korean immigrants maintain and develop their cultural identity through culturally meaningful activities.

  5. Performing mathematics activities with non-standard units of measurement using robots controlled via speech-generating devices: three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kim D; Cook, Albert M

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To examine how using a Lego robot controlled via a speech-generating device (SGD) can contribute to how students with physical and communication impairments perform hands-on and communicative mathematics measurement activities. This study was a follow-up to a previous study. Method Three students with cerebral palsy used the robot to measure objects using non-standard units, such as straws, and then compared and ordered the objects using the resulting measurement. Their performance was assessed, and the manipulation and communication events were observed. Teachers and education assistants were interviewed regarding robot use. Results Similar benefits to the previous study were found in this study. Gaps in student procedural knowledge were identified such as knowing to place measurement units tip-to-tip, and students' reporting revealed gaps in conceptual understanding. However, performance improved with repeated practice. Stakeholders identified that some robot tasks took too long or were too difficult to perform. Conclusions Having access to both their SGD and a robot gave the students multiple ways to show their understanding of the measurement concepts. Though they could participate actively in the new mathematics activities, robot use is most appropriate in short tasks requiring reasonable operational skill. Implications for Rehabilitation Lego robots controlled via speech-generating devices (SGDs) can help students to engage in the mathematics pedagogy of performing hands-on activities while communicating about concepts. Students can "show what they know" using the Lego robots, and report and reflect on concepts using the SGD. Level 1 and Level 2 mathematics measurement activities have been adapted to be accomplished by the Lego robot. Other activities can likely be accomplished with similar robot adaptations (e.g., gripper, pen). It is not recommended to use the robot to measure items that are long, or perform measurements that require high

  6. Environmental Influences on Physical Activity among Rural Adults in Montana, United States: Views from Built Environment Audits, Resident Focus Groups, and Key Informant Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Lo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rural populations in the United States have lower physical activity levels and are at a higher risk of being overweight and suffering from obesity than their urban counterparts. This paper aimed to understand the environmental factors that influence physical activity among rural adults in Montana. Eight built environment audits, 15 resident focus groups, and 24 key informant interviews were conducted between August and December 2014. Themes were triangulated and summarized into five categories of environmental factors: built, social, organizational, policy, and natural environments. Although the existence of active living features was documented by environmental audits, residents and key informants agreed that additional indoor recreation facilities and more well-maintained and conveniently located options were needed. Residents and key informants also agreed on the importance of age-specific, well-promoted, and structured physical activity programs, offered in socially supportive environments, as facilitators to physical activity. Key informants, however, noted that funding constraints and limited political will were barriers to developing these opportunities. Since building new recreational facilities and structures to support active transportation pose resource challenges, especially for rural communities, our results suggest that enhancing existing features, making small improvements, and involving stakeholders in the city planning process would be more fruitful to build momentum towards larger changes.

  7. Environmental Influences on Physical Activity among Rural Adults in Montana, United States: Views from Built Environment Audits, Resident Focus Groups, and Key Informant Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Brian K; Morgan, Emily H; Folta, Sara C; Graham, Meredith L; Paul, Lynn C; Nelson, Miriam E; Jew, Nicolette V; Moffat, Laurel F; Seguin, Rebecca A

    2017-10-04

    Rural populations in the United States have lower physical activity levels and are at a higher risk of being overweight and suffering from obesity than their urban counterparts. This paper aimed to understand the environmental factors that influence physical activity among rural adults in Montana. Eight built environment audits, 15 resident focus groups, and 24 key informant interviews were conducted between August and December 2014. Themes were triangulated and summarized into five categories of environmental factors: built, social, organizational, policy, and natural environments. Although the existence of active living features was documented by environmental audits, residents and key informants agreed that additional indoor recreation facilities and more well-maintained and conveniently located options were needed. Residents and key informants also agreed on the importance of age-specific, well-promoted, and structured physical activity programs, offered in socially supportive environments, as facilitators to physical activity. Key informants, however, noted that funding constraints and limited political will were barriers to developing these opportunities. Since building new recreational facilities and structures to support active transportation pose resource challenges, especially for rural communities, our results suggest that enhancing existing features, making small improvements, and involving stakeholders in the city planning process would be more fruitful to build momentum towards larger changes.

  8. A comparison of individual doses for continuous annual unit releases of tritium and activation products into brackish water and lake-river ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, O.; Aquilonius, K.

    1995-12-31

    The annual effective doses to critical group from potential unit releases of tritium and activation products (32 nuclides) from a hypothetical fusion reactor into two aquatic environments, one with brackish water and the other with fresh water, are assessed. Unit continuous releases (1 Bq/year during 50 years) for each relevant activation product are analyzed, and the effective dose rate is calculated for each nuclide. The transfer of released activity is simulated by compartment models using first-order linear differential equations for the transport. The rate constants for the brackish-water ecosystem are based on measurements. Four exposure pathways are considered in the brackish water system, the Tvaeren Bay, (a) consumption of fish, (b) consumption of milk, (c) consumption of meat, and (d) exposure from swimming. For the freshwater system, five additional pathways are considered, namely consumption of (e) water, (f) vegetables, (g) cereals, and (h) root vegetables and (i) external exposure from contaminated ground. The paper presents the compartment models used and a description of how the exposure pathways are treated, especially the pathways via food consumption. The dominating exposure pathways are for most of the nuclides consumption of fish and water. For Ag-isotopes other exposure pathways, such as ground-shine, cereals and meat, are of importance. The results of this study show that individual annual effective doses attributed to unit releases of most of the nuclides to the lake-river system become 1.3-60 times lower than those released to the brackish-water system. The niobium isotopes, however, give a factor 2.5-4.8 higher dose. The reason to that is that the values of the bioaccumulation factor for these isotopes are higher in fresh water than in marine water. An uncertainty analysis is performed on each ecosystem and the results are obtained in the form of distributions. 38 refs, 29 tabs.

  9. A comparison of individual doses for continuous annual unit releases of tritium and activation products into brackish water and lake-river ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlund, O.; Aquilonius, K.

    1995-01-01

    The annual effective doses to critical group from potential unit releases of tritium and activation products (32 nuclides) from a hypothetical fusion reactor into two aquatic environments, one with brackish water and the other with fresh water, are assessed. Unit continuous releases (1 Bq/year during 50 years) for each relevant activation product are analyzed, and the effective dose rate is calculated for each nuclide. The transfer of released activity is simulated by compartment models using first-order linear differential equations for the transport. The rate constants for the brackish-water ecosystem are based on measurements. Four exposure pathways are considered in the brackish water system, the Tvaeren Bay, (a) consumption of fish, (b) consumption of milk, (c) consumption of meat, and (d) exposure from swimming. For the freshwater system, five additional pathways are considered, namely consumption of e) water, f) vegetables, g) cereals, and h) root vegetables and i) external exposure from contaminated ground. The paper presents the compartment models used and a description of how the exposure pathways are treated, especially the pathways via food consumption. The dominating exposure pathways are for most of the nuclides consumption of fish and water. For Ag-isotopes other exposure pathways, such as ground-shine, cereals and meat, are of importance. The results of this study show that individual annual effective doses attributed to unit releases of most of the nuclides to the lake-river system become 1.3-60 times lower than those released to the brackish-water system. The niobium isotopes, however, give a factor 2.5-4.8 higher dose. The reason to that is that the values of the bioaccumulation factor for these isotopes are higher in fresh water than in marine water. An uncertainty analysis is performed on each ecosystem and the results are obtained in the form of distributions. 38 refs, 29 tabs

  10. A comparison of individual doses for continuous annual unit releases of tritium and activation products into brackish water and lake-river ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, O; Aquilonius, K

    1996-12-31

    The annual effective doses to critical group from potential unit releases of tritium and activation products (32 nuclides) from a hypothetical fusion reactor into two aquatic environments, one with brackish water and the other with fresh water, are assessed. Unit continuous releases (1 Bq/year during 50 years) for each relevant activation product are analyzed, and the effective dose rate is calculated for each nuclide. The transfer of released activity is simulated by compartment models using first-order linear differential equations for the transport. The rate constants for the brackish-water ecosystem are based on measurements. Four exposure pathways are considered in the brackish water system, the Tvaeren Bay, (a) consumption of fish, (b) consumption of milk, (c) consumption of meat, and (d) exposure from swimming. For the freshwater system, five additional pathways are considered, namely consumption of (e) water, (f) vegetables, (g) cereals, and (h) root vegetables and (i) external exposure from contaminated ground. The paper presents the compartment models used and a description of how the exposure pathways are treated, especially the pathways via food consumption. The dominating exposure pathways are for most of the nuclides consumption of fish and water. For Ag-isotopes other exposure pathways, such as ground-shine, cereals and meat, are of importance. The results of this study show that individual annual effective doses attributed to unit releases of most of the nuclides to the lake-river system become 1.3-60 times lower than those released to the brackish-water system. The niobium isotopes, however, give a factor 2.5-4.8 higher dose. The reason to that is that the values of the bioaccumulation factor for these isotopes are higher in fresh water than in marine water. An uncertainty analysis is performed on each ecosystem and the results are obtained in the form of distributions. 38 refs, 29 tabs.

  11. Active and reactive power sharing and frequency restoration in a distributed power system consisting of two UPS units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlak, Koray Sener; Oezdemir, Mehmet [Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Firat University, Elazig, 23119 (Turkey); Aydemir, M. Timur [Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Gazi University, Maltepe-Ankara 06570 (Turkey)

    2009-06-15

    A distributed power system consisting of two uninterrupted power supplies (UPS) is investigated in this paper. Parallel operation of the two sources increases the established power rating of the system. One of the sources can supply the system even when the other system is disconnected due to some faults, and this is an important feature. The control algorithm makes sure that the total load is shared between the supplies in accordance with their rated power levels, and the frequency of the supplies are restored to the rated values after the transitions. As the UPSs operate at an optimum power level, losses and faults due to overloading are prevented. The units safely operate without any means of communication between each other. The focus of the work is on the inverter stages of the UPSs. Simulations performed in Matlab Simulink environment have been verified with experimental work via DS1103 controller card. (author)

  12. Integration of quality assurance activities into a computerized patient data management system in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, C; Mossel, P; Haimet, S; King, T C

    1990-11-01

    A prototype computer-based patient data management system (PDMS) was developed for a surgery-anesthesiology intensive care unit (ICU) to reduce the time and staff needed to implement quality assurance (QA) functions. Goals of the system were to make QA functions routine and minimally intrusive to the daily operation of the ICU. PDMS collects general data (eg, admissions and discharges, lengths of stay, and bed utilization rates) and specialized data (eg, specific indicators) unique to the ICU and performs prospective monitoring for the occurrence of specific events (occurrence screening) and retrospective examinations of patient records (targeted reviews). Preliminary results suggest that PDMS facilitates the acquisition and analysis of QA data and reduces the time needed to acquire these data. Research to validate these claims and efforts to improve and expand the prototype system with a permanent production system are in progress.

  13. A feasibility study on active ultrasonic techniques for water into sodium leak detection on FBR steam generator units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, J.P.; Garnaud, P.; Journeau, C.; Demarais, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the framework of the European Fast Breeder Project one of the aims is to provide the ferritic straight tube steam generator with a fast and reliable leak detection system. The first studies of water sodium leaks, based on the passive listening of noise source, are described. Considerable experience has been acquired of this technique and one of the conclusions is that a high level of reliability may require a sophisticated surveillance algorithm. Further works on the subject should lead to demonstration phase in 1993-1995 on a real and representative steam generator unit in order to have the benefit of a long term run of the surveillance method prior to industrial use in a compulsory safety system. 1 ref., 10 figs

  14. Methods used to characterize the chemical composition and biological activity of environmental waters throughout the United States, 2012-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanok, Kristin M.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Barber, Larry B.; Boone, J. Scott; Buxton, Herbert T.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Hladik, Michelle; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Journey, Celeste A.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Loftin, Keith A.; Mills, Marc A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Orlando, James L.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2017-03-22

    A vast array of chemical compounds are in wide commercial use in the United States, and the potential ecological and human-health effect of exposure to chemical mixtures has been identified as a high priority in environment health science. Awareness of the potential effects of low-level chemical exposures is rising. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a study in which samples were collected from 38 streams in 25 States to provide an overview of contaminants found in stream water across the Nation. Additionally, biological screening assays were used to help determine any potential ecological and human-health effects of these chemical mixtures and to prioritize target chemicals for future toxicological studies. This report describes the site locations and the sampling and analytical methods and quality-assurance procedures used in the study.

  15. FACILITIES PLANNING WORKSHOP FOR BLASTING SUPPORT THE ACTIVITY OF DEVELOPMENT AND REPAIR SHIP IN PT. JASA MARINA INDAH UNIT II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Samuel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Blasting in the process of planning the workshop production of new building and ship repair to play a role in providing blasting and paint on the block that will be of erection. As a result of blasting workshop facilities that do not have resulted in low production capacity that can be achieved by this workshop, namely three block ships per month. Capacity blasting and paint shop in this low resulted in low productivity process stage (stage the previous workshops which of course result in a decrease in vessel productivity in general.                 In penelitiaan aims to plan for blasting and paint shop facility which has been adjusted to the planned production capacity of PT. JASA MARINA INDAH II units.                 In this study it - thing to note is to understand the data - the data field for research conducted in terms of both technical and economic terms, with the blasting and paint shop facilities on the construction or repair of ships that have been planned, then the effectiveness of the work and production flow at. Jasa Marina Indah II units can be known.                 Based on the analysis and calculation of both technical and economical it can be identified by the workshop on the process of blasting Blasting efficiency is obtained for 2.55 hours, at 10.16 hours during the painting process, while economical in terms of labor costs can be reduced blasting cost is Rp.930000    for          paint       and         Rp.1.23million

  16. Examining differences in physical activity levels by employment status and/or job activity level: Gender-specific comparisons between the United States and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Lydia; Berrigan, David; Van Domelen, Dane; Sjöström, Michael; Hagströmer, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between employment status and job activity level with physical activity (PA) and sedentary time, stratified by gender and country. Cross-sectional study design. Data from working age adults (18-65 years) from two cross-sectional studies, the Swedish 2001-2002 and 2007-2008 Attitude Behavior and Change Study (ABC; n=1165) and the 2003-2006 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n=4201), were stratified by employment status (employed and not employed) and job activity level (active, sedentary and mixed). PA in counts×min(-1) and time spent in sedentary, low and moderate or higher intensity were measured with accelerometers. Analyses were conducted in 2012-2013. In NHANES, the employed had significantly higher counts×min(-1) and spent more time in moderate or higher intensity PA than those not employed. In ABC, no significant differences were observed between employed and unemployed. Adults with active versus sedentary occupations had higher counts×min(-1) and less sedentary time in both the USA and Sweden and in both men and women. For example, counts×min(-1) were 20-40% greater in active versus sedentary jobs. Employment status is related to PA and sedentary time among men and women in the USA but not in Sweden. Among the employed, occupational PA is associated with total PA and sedentary time for both genders and in both countries. Comparisons of PA levels based on objective measurements can refine understanding of country differences in activity. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  17. Embedding an enriched environment in an acute stroke unit increases activity in people with stroke: a controlled before-after pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosbergen, Ingrid Cm; Grimley, Rohan S; Hayward, Kathryn S; Walker, Katrina C; Rowley, Donna; Campbell, Alana M; McGufficke, Suzanne; Robertson, Samantha T; Trinder, Janelle; Janssen, Heidi; Brauer, Sandra G

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether an enriched environment embedded in an acute stroke unit could increase activity levels in acute stroke patients and reduce adverse events. Controlled before-after pilot study. An acute stroke unit in a regional Australian hospital. Acute stroke patients admitted during (a) initial usual care control period, (b) an enriched environment period and (c) a sustainability period. Usual care participants received usual one-on-one allied health intervention and nursing care. The enriched environment participants were provided stimulating resources, communal areas for eating and socializing and daily group activities. Change management strategies were used to implement an enriched environment within existing staffing levels. Behavioural mapping was used to estimate patient activity levels across groups. Participants were observed every 10 minutes between 7.30 am and 7.30 pm within the first 10 days after stroke. Adverse and serious adverse events were recorded using a clinical registry. The enriched environment group ( n = 30, mean age 76.7 ± 12.1) spent a significantly higher proportion of their day engaged in 'any' activity (71% vs. 58%, P = 0.005) compared to the usual care group ( n = 30, mean age 76.0 ± 12.8). They were more active in physical (33% vs. 22%, P social (40% vs. 29%, P = 0.007) and cognitive domains (59% vs. 45%, P = 0.002) and changes were sustained six months post implementation. The enriched group experienced significantly fewer adverse events (0.4 ± 0.7 vs.1.3 ± 1.6, P = 0.001), with no differences found in serious adverse events (0.5 ± 1.6 vs.1.0 ± 2.0, P = 0.309). Embedding an enriched environment in an acute stroke unit increased activity in stroke patients.

  18. Enhanced hydrological extremes in the western United States under global warming through the lens of water vapor wave activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jian; Xue, Daokai; Gao, Yang; Chen, Gang; Leung, Lai-Yung; Staten, Paul W.

    2018-04-23

    Understanding how regional hydrological extremes would respond to warming is a grand challenge to the community of climate change research. To address this challenge, we construct an analysis framework based on column integrated water vapor (CWV) wave activity to diagnose the wave component of the hydrological cycle that contributes to hydrological extremes. By applying the analysis to the historical and future climate projections from the CMIP5 models, we found that the wet-versus-dry disparity of daily net precipitation along a zonal band can increase at a super Clausius-Clapeyron rate due to the enhanced stirring length of wave activity at the poleward flank of the mean storm track. The local variant of CWV wave activity reveals the unique characteristics of atmospheric rivers (ARs) in terms of their transport function, enhanced mixing and hydrological cycling rate (HC). Under RCP8.5, the local moist wave activity increases by ~40% over the northeastern Pacific by the end of the 21st century, indicating more ARs hitting the west coast, giving rise to a ~20% increase in the related hydrological extremes − $ despite a weakening of the local HC.

  19. Modifying the Clinical Research Infrastructure at a Dedicated Clinical Trials Unit: Assessment of Trial Development, Activation, and Participant Accrual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chad; Hess, Kenneth R; Sanders, Dwana; Davis, Suzanne E; Buzdar, Aman U; Kurzrock, Razelle; Lee, J Jack; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hong, David S

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Information on processes for trials assessing investigational therapeutics is sparse. We assessed the trial development processes within the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (ICT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) and analyzed their effects on the trial activation timeline and enrolment. Experimental Design: Data were from a prospectively maintained registry that tracks all clinical studies at MD Anderson. From this database, we identified 2,261 activated phase I-III trials; 221 were done at the ICT. ICT trials were matched to trials from other MD Anderson departments by phase, sponsorship, and submission year. Trial performance metrics were compared with paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results: We identified three facets of the ICT research infrastructure: parallel processing of trial approval steps; a physician-led research team; and regular weekly meetings to foster research accountability. Separate analyses were conducted stratified by sponsorship [industry (133 ICT and 133 non-ICT trials) or institutional (68 ICT and 68 non-ICT trials)]. ICT trial development was faster from IRB approval to activation (median difference of 1.1 months for industry-sponsored trials vs. 2.3 months for institutional) and from activation to first enrolment (median difference of 0.3 months for industry vs. 1.2 months for institutional; all matched P infrastructure within a large academic cancer center was associated with efficient trial development and participant accrual. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1407-13. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Proceedings of the Fourth MDEP Conference on New Reactor Design Activities, 12-13 September 2017, London, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacoste, Andre-Claude; Rigail, Anne-Cecile; Collet, Julien; Holahan, Gary; Garcia, Ismael; Rising, Agneta; Kaser, Greg; Wei, Xuejun; Turner, Shane; Wardle, Stephen; Allen, Stuart; Yates, Simon; Obushev, Andrey; Prinja, Nawal; Malouines, Philippe; Zhang, Hongwei; Bouard, Jean-Paul; Pickelmann, Johannes; Cofer, Darren; Shihong, Ma; Wang, Dejun; Hua, Liu; Emond, David; Nicaise, Norbert; Ivey, Randy C.; Woo, Sweng Woong; Easterling, Richard J.; Kim, Yun Ho; Lee, Sang Won; Svetlov, Sergey; Watson, Dave; Viktorsson, Christer; Zhang, Lin; Lambert, Didier; Zhang, Ke; Bezzubtsev, Valery S.; Nieh, Ho; ); Tiippana, Petteri; Bhardwaj, S.A.; Ferapontov, Alexey; Finnerty, Michael; Sato, Kenichi; Spitzer, Cornelia; )

    2017-09-01

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) is a unique multinational initiative leveraging the resources and knowledge of national regulators to review new reactor designs. The programme celebrated its 10. anniversary in 2006 and is recognised as an effective framework for regulatory co-operation and harmonisation. Over the first 10 years of its existence, MDEP has published 24 common positions and 13 technical reports. In 2015, the MDEP members extended the cooperation period from the end of 2017 to the end of 2022, focusing on its core mission of collaborating on new reactor design-specific activities. The scope of MDEP has been extended in 2016 to incorporate commissioning and early phase operation as MDEP areas of co-operation. At this important milestone, MDEP was willing to gather feedback on its current activities and discuss its future. To this end, MDEP organised its fourth MDEP conference. The event provided a forum for MDEP stakeholders (including industry representatives, standard development organisations and other international organisations) to share the results of their engagement with the programme and to deliver presentations on ongoing activities related to new reactor licensing. The two-day conference included sessions on codes and standards harmonisation, digital instrumentation and controls, supply chain regulatory issues and vendor inspection co-operation, influence of MDEP interactions on reactor designs safety, commissioning activities and perspectives for MDEP. This document gathers the presentations (slides) given at the 4. MDEP conference

  1. The Effects of Exhaustive Military Activities in Man. The Performance of Small Isolated Military Units in Extreme Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    parties (military, sportive or scientific) has endured unreasonable hardships if not complete failure due to foreseeable but not met requirements. Food is...been many new clothing materials. This development has been spurrd by the affluent market within the civilian (sporting activities) sector. Much of this

  2. Single unit activity in the medial prefrontal cortex during Pavlovian heart rate conditioning: Effects of peripheral autonomic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D A; Ginsberg, Jay P

    2005-11-01

    Electrical activity was recorded from single neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of rabbits during differential Pavlovian heart rate (HR) conditioning. A heterogeneous population of cells were found, some of which showed CS-evoked increases and others CS-evoked decreases in discharge, while some cells were biphasic. A subset of cells also showed trial-related changes in discharge that were related to acquisition of the HR discrimination between the reinforced CS+ and non-reinforced CS-. Administration of the peripheral cholinergic antagonist, methylscopolamine, and the andrenergic antagonist, atenolol, either increased or decreased maintained baseline activity of many cells, but had little or no effect on the CS-evoked activity of these cells. Waveform changes also did not result from administration of these drugs. This finding suggests that CS-evoked mPFC activity is not being driven by cardiac afferent input to CNS cardiac control centers. Previous studies have shown that ibotenic acid lesions of this area greatly decreases the magnitude of decelerative heart rate conditioned responses; the latter finding, plus the results of the present study, suggest that processing of CS/US contingencies by the prefrontal cortex contributes to the acquisition of autonomic changes during Pavlovian conditioning.

  3. Activities of colistin- and minocycline-based combinations against extensive drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii is a serious problem in the clinical setting. It is therefore important to find active antibiotic combinations that could be effective in the treatment of infections caused by this problematic 'superbug'. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro activities of three colistin-based combinations and a minocycline-based combination against clinically isolated extensive drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDR-AB strains. Methods Fourteen XDR-AB clinical isolates were collected. The clonotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-based fingerprinting. Susceptibility testing was carried out according to the standards of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Activities of drug combinations were investigated against four selected strains and analyzed by mean survival time over 12 hours (MST12 h in a time-kill study. Results The time-kill studies indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of colistin (0.5 or 0.25 μg/mL completely killed all strains at 2 to 4 hours, but 0.5×MIC colistin showed no bactericidal activity. Meropenem (8 μg/mL, minocycline (1 μg/mL or rifampicin (0.06 μg/mL did not show bactericidal activity. However, combinations of colistin at 0.5×MIC (0.25 or 0.125 μg/mL with each of the above were synergistic and shown bactericidal activities against all test isolates. A combination of meropenem (16 μg/mL with minocycline (0.5×MIC, 4 or 2 μg/mL was synergitic to all test isolates, but neither showed bactericidal activity alone. The MST12 h values of drug combinations (either colistin- or minocycline-based combinations were significantly shorter than those of the single drugs (p Conclusions This study indicates that combinations of colistin/meropenem, colistin/rifampicin, colistin/minocycline and minocycline/meropenem are synergistic in vitro against XDR-AB strains.

  4. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Medical Encounters among Active Duty United States Military Personnel and Their Dependents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Rha

    Full Text Available Norovirus is a leading cause of gastroenteritis episodes and outbreaks in US military deployments, but estimates of endemic disease burden among military personnel in garrison are lacking.Diagnostic codes from gastroenteritis-associated medical encounters of active duty military personnel and their beneficiaries from July 1998-June 2011 were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. Using time-series regression models, cause-unspecified encounters were modeled as a function of encounters for specific enteropathogens. Model residuals (representing unexplained encounters were used to estimate norovirus-attributable medical encounters. Incidence rates were calculated using population data for both active duty and beneficiary populations.The estimated annual mean rate of norovirus-associated medically-attended visits among active duty personnel and their beneficiaries was 292 (95% CI: 258 to 326 and 93 (95% CI: 80 to 105 encounters per 10,000 persons, respectively. Rates were highest among beneficiaries <5 years of age with a median annual rate of 435 (range: 318 to 646 encounters per 10,000 children. Norovirus was estimated to cause 31% and 27% of all-cause gastroenteritis encounters in the active duty and beneficiary populations, respectively, with over 60% occurring between November and April. There was no evidence of any lag effect where norovirus disease occurred in one population before the other, or in one beneficiary age group before the others.Norovirus is a major cause of medically-attended gastroenteritis among non-deployed US military active duty members as well as in their beneficiaries.

  5. Recent Temporal Trends in Parent-Reported Physical Activity in Children in the United States, 2009 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Davis, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to provide recent temporal trends in parent-reported physical activity in children (6-11 years) between 2009 and 2014. Data from the 2009 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. The analytic sample included 3946 children. Parent proxy of child physical activity at each of the 3 2-year cycles was assessed. For the entire sample, there was a quadratic trend, with the number of days children engaged in at least 60 min/d of physical activity increasing in the period 2011 to 2012 (6.12 days) when compared with the period 2009 to 2010 (5.96 days) and then decreasing in the period 2013 to 2014 (5.83 days). A similar quadratic trend was evident for boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites (particularly boys), and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age percentile based on sex. A negative linear trend was observed for those above the poverty level and non-Hispanic whites (particularly girls). In conclusion, these findings provide suggestive evidence that over the past 6 years (1999-2014), parents report that children's physical activity has slightly decreased in the latest years, with this observation being most pronounced in boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites, and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age and sex percentile. Encouragingly, however, across all evaluated subpopulations, most children (55%-82%), as determined by their parents, engaged in 60 min/d of physical activity (consistent with government recommendations). Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. National and State Estimates of the Numbers of Adults and Children with Active Epilepsy - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zack, Matthew M; Kobau, Rosemarie

    2017-08-11

    Epilepsy, a brain disorder leading to recurring seizures, has garnered increased public health focus because persons with epilepsy experience pronounced and persistent health and socioeconomic disparities despite treatment advances, public awareness programs, and expanded rights for persons with disabilities (1,2). For almost all states, epilepsy prevalence estimates do not exist. CDC used national data sources including the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for adults (aged ≥18 years), the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH), and the 2015 Current Population Survey data, describing 2014 income levels, to estimate prevalent cases of active epilepsy, overall and by state, to provide information for state public health planning. In 2015, 1.2% of the U.S. population (3.4 million persons: 3 million adults and 470,000 children) reported active epilepsy (self-reported doctor-diagnosed epilepsy and under treatment or with recent seizures within 12 months of interview) or current epilepsy (parent-reported doctor-diagnosed epilepsy and current epilepsy). Estimated numbers of persons with active epilepsy, after accounting for income and age differences by state, ranged from 5,900 in Wyoming to 427,700 in California. NHIS data from 2010-2015 indicate increases in the number of persons with active epilepsy, probably because of population growth. This study provides updated national and modeled state-specific numbers of active epilepsy cases. Public health practitioners, health care providers, policy makers, epilepsy researchers, and other epilepsy stakeholders, including family members and people with epilepsy, can use these findings to ensure that evidence-based programs meet the complex needs of adults and children with epilepsy and reduce the disparities resulting from it.

  7. Environmental Assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies across the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), for the proposed granting of DOE permission of offloading activities to support the movement Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies (SGSAs) across the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. On the basis of the floodplain/wetlands assessment in the EA, DOE has determined that there is no practicable alternative to the proposed activities and that the proposed action has been designed to minimize potential harm to or within the floodplain of the SRS boat ramp. No wetlands on SRS would be affected by the proposed action

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance activity in the United Kingdom: a survey on behalf of the british society of cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dargie Henry J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The indications, complexity and capabilities of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR have rapidly expanded. Whether actual service provision and training have developed in parallel is unknown. Methods We undertook a systematic telephone and postal survey of all public hospitals on behalf of the British Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance to identify all CMR providers within the United Kingdom. Results Of the 60 CMR centres identified, 88% responded to a detailed questionnaire. Services are led by cardiologists and radiologists in equal proportion, though the majority of current trainees are cardiologists. The mean number of CMR scans performed annually per centre increased by 44% over two years. This trend was consistent across centres of different scanning volumes. The commonest indication for CMR was assessment of heart failure and cardiomyopathy (39%, followed by coronary artery disease and congenital heart disease. There was striking geographical variation in CMR availability, numbers of scans performed, and distribution of trainees. Centres without on site scanning capability refer very few patients for CMR. Just over half of centres had a formal training programme, and few performed regular audit. Conclusion The number of CMR scans performed in the UK has increased dramatically in just two years. Trainees are mainly located in large volume centres and enrolled in cardiology as opposed to radiology training programmes.

  9. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects.

  10. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects

  11. Optimization of the procedure for verification of the response on activity of activimeters in PET production units using 13N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verde Velasco, J. M.; Lopez Lorenzo, B.; Ruiz Guijarro, J. A.; Montes Fuentes, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Spanish Protocol for quality control in medicine nuclear1 establishes the need to control regular activity of the calibrators of dose response. This Protocol establishes the use of 99mTc for performing this test. In the case of a PET facility this methodology is feasible not to dispose of the radionuclide in the installation. We propose an alternative methodology for carrying out this test of fast, cheap and efficient form in a facility that has cyclotron. (Author)

  12. Use of indium and rare-earths activable tracers for the evaluation of the hydraulic performance of wastewater treatment units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga, Gilmara Lucia Souza; Barreto, Alberto Avelar; Pinto, Amenonia Maria Ferreira; Moreira, Rubens Martins, E-mail: gil_lsa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: aab@cdtn.br, E-mail: amfp@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Lauris Lucia da, E-mail: laurislsilva@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DQ/UFMG), Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2013-07-01

    Efforts aimed at going deeper into the understanding of the purification processes of contaminated waters and at the optimization of both the technological and economic performance of such processes have been developed following the introduction of innovative wastewater treatment processes. Among the several wastewater depuration processes, this study focuses physical aspects of systems known as artificial wetlands and a special version of the anaerobic biological reactor. This biological reactor is of the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) type, which is increasingly being utilized for the processing of urban wastewater. However, its effluent eventually needs some polishing to be performed at an artificial wetland stage. The hydrodynamic performances of both a special version of the UASB and a vegetated wetland have been studied using the tracer methodology, based on the impulse response of these systems. Both radioactive and activable tracers have been employed and had their information analyzed by appropriate software. Comments are presented on the advantages of the activable tracers. The results thus obtained have demonstrated the potential of the application of activable tracers in the experimental research of either natural or artificial hydraulic systems. (author)

  13. Use of indium and rare-earths activable tracers for the evaluation of the hydraulic performance of wastewater treatment units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, Gilmara Lucia Souza; Barreto, Alberto Avelar; Pinto, Amenonia Maria Ferreira; Moreira, Rubens Martins; Silva, Lauris Lucia da

    2013-01-01

    Efforts aimed at going deeper into the understanding of the purification processes of contaminated waters and at the optimization of both the technological and economic performance of such processes have been developed following the introduction of innovative wastewater treatment processes. Among the several wastewater depuration processes, this study focuses physical aspects of systems known as artificial wetlands and a special version of the anaerobic biological reactor. This biological reactor is of the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) type, which is increasingly being utilized for the processing of urban wastewater. However, its effluent eventually needs some polishing to be performed at an artificial wetland stage. The hydrodynamic performances of both a special version of the UASB and a vegetated wetland have been studied using the tracer methodology, based on the impulse response of these systems. Both radioactive and activable tracers have been employed and had their information analyzed by appropriate software. Comments are presented on the advantages of the activable tracers. The results thus obtained have demonstrated the potential of the application of activable tracers in the experimental research of either natural or artificial hydraulic systems. (author)

  14. Parent-child leisure activities and cultural capital in the United Kingdom: The gendered effects of education and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    This article uses data on couples from the 2000 UK Time Use Survey (N=610) to analyze how social position influences parents' leisure activities with children. The study is the first using representative data to investigate this fundamental question to understand social inequalities in family life and children's life chances. Results reveal that social position intersects with gender in influencing parent-child leisure activities with implications on children's cultural capital. Three are the main findings: (1) social position has significant positive effects on cultural activities with children and negative on parent-child television watching among mothers, but moderate differences are observed for fathers; (2) father-child leisure is strongly influenced by the spouse's social position, but not mother-child leisure; (3) education and social class show complex differences in affecting parent-child leisure, suggesting that future studies should include these two variables when analyzing parent-child time and family life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A wedge-based approach to estimating health co-benefits of climate change mitigation activities in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbus, John M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Greenblatt, Jeffery B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chari, Ramya [Rand Corporation, Santa Monica, CA (United States); Millstein, Dev [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ebi, Kristie L. [ClimAdapt, Inc., Los Altos, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    While it has been recognized that actions reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can have significant positive and negative impacts on human health through reductions in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations, these impacts are rarely taken into account when analyzing specific policies. This study presents a new framework for estimating the change in health outcomes resulting from implementation of specific carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction activities, allowing comparison of different sectors and options for climate mitigation activities. Our estimates suggest that in the year 2020, the reductions in adverse health outcomes from lessened exposure to PM2.5 would yield economic benefits in the range of $6 to $14 billion (in 2008 USD), depending on the specific activity. This equates to between $40 and $93 per metric ton of CO2 in health benefits. Specific climate interventions will vary in the health co-benefits they provide as well as in potential harms that may result from their implementation. Rigorous assessment of these health impacts is essential for guiding policy decisions as efforts to reduce GHG emissions increase in scope and intensity.

  16. Impact of etanercept on work and activity impairment in employed moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, Devon; Cheng, Annie; Watson, Crystal; Huang, Baisong; Bitman, Bojena; Huang, Xing-Yue; Gandra, Shravanthi R

    2013-10-01

    To quantify the impact of etanercept on work and activity impairment in employed US patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This prospective, observational, longitudinal study recruited RA patients initiating etanercept (50 mg/week) between January 2009 and March 2010. The Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI) and domestic productivity questionnaire were administered by telephone interviews at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months after etanercept initiation. The human capital approach was used to estimate the costs of work impairment. Changes in WPAI measures were analyzed using Wilcoxon's signed rank test. RA patients (n = 204) initiating etanercept were a mean ± SD age of 46.6 ± 10.9 years and 72% were women. After 6 months, 153 patients continued treatment (continuers) and showed significant decreases in overall work impairment (41.9% at baseline versus 25.2% at 6 months; P work hours lost weekly due to RA (3.2 versus 0.8; P = 0.0001). The projected 12-month gain in work productivity for continuers was 284.5 hours per patient, equating to $3,233-22,533 depending on annual income level, which partially or completely offset the annual cost of etanercept ($20,190). Domestic productivity improved from 41.5% at baseline to 69.6% at 6 months (P work and activity impairment; the value of increased work productivity partially or completely offset the cost of treatment. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Passive dosing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures to terrestrial springtails: linking mixture toxicity to chemical activities, equilibrium lipid concentrations, and toxic units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stine N; Holmstrup, Martin; Smith, Kilian E C; Mayer, Philipp

    2013-07-02

    A 7-day mixture toxicity experiment with the terrestrial springtail Folsomia candida was conducted, and the effects were linked to three different mixture exposure parameters. Passive dosing from silicone was applied to tightly control exposure levels and compositions of 12 mixture treatments, containing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Springtail lethality was then linked to sum chemical activities (∑a), sum equilibrium lipid concentrations (∑C(lipid eq.)), and sum toxic units (∑TU). In each case, the effects of all 12 mixture treatments could be fitted to one sigmoidal exposure-response relationship. The effective lethal chemical activity (La50) of 0.027 was well within the expected range for baseline toxicity of 0.01-0.1. Linking the effects to the lipid-based exposure parameter yielded an effective lethal concentration (LC(lipid eq 50)) of 133 mmol kg(-1) lipid in good correspondence with the lethal membrane burden for baseline toxicity (40-160 mmol kg(-1) lipid). Finally, the effective lethal toxic unit (LTU50) of 1.20 was rather close to the expected value of 1. Altogether, passive dosing provided tightly controlled mixture exposure in terms of both level and composition, while ∑a, ∑C(lipid eq.), and ∑TU allowed baseline toxicity to be linked to mixture exposure.

  18. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  19. United States Adolescents' Television, Computer, Videogame, Smartphone, and Tablet Use: Associations with Sugary Drinks, Sleep, Physical Activity, and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2017-03-01

    To quantify the relationships between youth use of television (TV) and other screen devices, including smartphones and tablets, and obesity risk factors. TV and other screen device use, including smartphones, tablets, computers, and/or videogames, was self-reported by a nationally representative, cross-sectional sample of 24 800 US high school students (2013-2015 Youth Risk Behavior Surveys). Students also reported on health behaviors including sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake, physical activity, sleep, and weight and height. Sex-stratified logistic regression models, adjusting for the sampling design, estimated associations between TV and other screen device use and SSB intake, physical activity, sleep, and obesity. Approximately 20% of participants used other screen devices for ≥5 hours daily. Watching TV ≥5 hours daily was associated with daily SSB consumption (aOR = 2.72, 95% CI: 2.23, 3.32) and obesity (aOR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.40, 2.27). Using other screen devices ≥5 hours daily was associated with daily SSB consumption (aOR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.69, 2.32), inadequate physical activity (aOR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.69, 2.25), and inadequate sleep (aOR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.54, 2.08). Using smartphones, tablets, computers, and videogames is associated with several obesity risk factors. Although further study is needed, families should be encouraged to limit both TV viewing and newer screen devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Change of mechanisms of control bars, an activity of high performance in the twelve recharge of the Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano R, H.

    2007-01-01

    One of the activities that are carried out during the fuel loading stage in the reactors of the Laguna Verde Power station (CNLV), it is the change of the control bar mechanisms (CRDs); the importance of giving maintenance to these mechanisms of control bars is that they should be reliable during the reactor operation. The insert of the control bars at one time of less than 7 seconds, it is the time required to carry out a sure reactor shutdown either of automatic way or manual by the operator action this insert of the control bars is through the CRDs that work them completely to insert negative reactivity to the reactor core. In this insert of the bars the neutrons are absorbed that maintain the reaction of self-sustained fission. The neutron absorber material in the control bars is a mixture of boron-gadolinium. It is also through the extraction of control bars like the fission reaction is controlled by means of the neutron density in the core. Extracting the control bars in form controlled by the operator is known as positive reactivity. This activity, that of the change of CRDs can only be carried out in the reload stage, that is to say, when the reactor is out one. The complexity of carrying out the change of those CRDs by its complexity as for radiological support that it demands, has taken to that the involved personnel acquires an experience and ability that it has allowed it to have a high performance. The importance of having this experience and ability, in the following generations, is fundamental for the CNLV, since that it requires to account with personal properly prepared, taking into account that the Safety is our maximum priority. The use of ALARA tools like devices with extension to maintain the distance of the source are key to optimize the personnel's dose; it is also key the support tools of the last technologies like the tele dosimetry, the television closed circuit (CCTV), the bubble suits for the extraction of the CRDs by the inferior part

  1. Fluoxetine and its active metabolite norfluoxetine disrupt estrogen synthesis in a co-culture model of the feto-placental unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon Thibeault, Andrée-Anne; Laurent, Laetitia; Vo Duy, Sung; Sauvé, Sébastien; Caron, Patrick; Guillemette, Chantal; Sanderson, J Thomas; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2017-02-15

    The effects of fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy, and its active metabolite norfluoxetine were studied on placental aromatase (CYP19) and feto-placental steroidogenesis. Fluoxetine did not alter estrogen secretion in co-culture of fetal-like adrenocortical (H295R) and trophoblast-like (BeWo) cells used as a model of the feto-placental unit, although it induced CYP19 activity, apparently mediated by the serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor/PKC signaling pathway. Norfluoxetine decreased estrogen secretion in the feto-placental co-culture and competitively inhibited catalytic CYP19 activity in BeWo cells. Decreased serotonin transporter (SERT) activity in the co-culture was comparable to 17β-estradiol treatment of BeWo cells. This work shows that the complex interaction of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine with placental estrogen production, involves 5-HT-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Considering the crucial role of estrogens during pregnancy, our results raise concern about the impact of SSRI treatment on placental function and fetal health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A geographical information system-based analysis of cancer mortality and population exposure to coal mining activities in West Virginia, United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hendryx

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer incidence and mortality rates are high in West Virginia compared to the rest of the United States of America. Previous research has suggested that exposure to activities of the coal mining industry may contribute to elevated cancer mortality, although exposure measures have been limited. This study tests alternative specifications of exposure to mining activity to determine whether a measure based on location of mines, processing plants, coal slurry impoundments and underground slurry injection sites relative to population levels is superior to a previously-reported measure of exposure based on tons mined at the county level, in the prediction of age-adjusted cancer mortality rates. To this end, we utilize two geographical information system (GIS techniques – exploratory spatial data analysis and inverse distance mapping – to construct new statistical analyses. Total, respiratory and “other” age-adjusted cancer mortality rates in West Virginia were found to be more highly associated with the GIS-exposure measure than the tonnage measure, before and after statistical control for smoking rates. The superior performance of the GIS measure, based on where people in the state live relative to mining activity, suggests that activities of the industry contribute to cancer mortality. Further confirmation of observed phenomena is necessary with person-level studies, but the results add to the body of evidence that coal mining poses environmental risks to population health in West Virginia.

  3. Monitoring influenza activity in the United States: a comparison of traditional surveillance systems with Google Flu Trends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Ortiz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Google Flu Trends was developed to estimate US influenza-like illness (ILI rates from internet searches; however ILI does not necessarily correlate with actual influenza virus infections.Influenza activity data from 2003-04 through 2007-08 were obtained from three US surveillance systems: Google Flu Trends, CDC Outpatient ILI Surveillance Network (CDC ILI Surveillance, and US Influenza Virologic Surveillance System (CDC Virus Surveillance. Pearson's correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated to compare surveillance data. An analysis was performed to investigate outlier observations and determine the extent to which they affected the correlations between surveillance data. Pearson's correlation coefficient describing Google Flu Trends and CDC Virus Surveillance over the study period was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.79. The correlation between CDC ILI Surveillance and CDC Virus Surveillance over the same period was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.89. Most of the outlier observations in both comparisons were from the 2003-04 influenza season. Exclusion of the outlier observations did not substantially improve the correlation between Google Flu Trends and CDC Virus Surveillance (0.82; 95% CI: 0.76, 0.87 or CDC ILI Surveillance and CDC Virus Surveillance (0.86; 95%CI: 0.82, 0.90.This analysis demonstrates that while Google Flu Trends is highly correlated with rates of ILI, it has a lower correlation with surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza. Most of the outlier observations occurred during the 2003-04 influenza season that was characterized by early and intense influenza activity, which potentially altered health care seeking behavior, physician testing practices, and internet search behavior.

  4. Monitoring Influenza Activity in the United States: A Comparison of Traditional Surveillance Systems with Google Flu Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Justin R.; Zhou, Hong; Shay, David K.; Neuzil, Kathleen M.; Fowlkes, Ashley L.; Goss, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Google Flu Trends was developed to estimate US influenza-like illness (ILI) rates from internet searches; however ILI does not necessarily correlate with actual influenza virus infections. Methods and Findings Influenza activity data from 2003–04 through 2007–08 were obtained from three US surveillance systems: Google Flu Trends, CDC Outpatient ILI Surveillance Network (CDC ILI Surveillance), and US Influenza Virologic Surveillance System (CDC Virus Surveillance). Pearson's correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to compare surveillance data. An analysis was performed to investigate outlier observations and determine the extent to which they affected the correlations between surveillance data. Pearson's correlation coefficient describing Google Flu Trends and CDC Virus Surveillance over the study period was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.79). The correlation between CDC ILI Surveillance and CDC Virus Surveillance over the same period was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.89). Most of the outlier observations in both comparisons were from the 2003–04 influenza season. Exclusion of the outlier observations did not substantially improve the correlation between Google Flu Trends and CDC Virus Surveillance (0.82; 95% CI: 0.76, 0.87) or CDC ILI Surveillance and CDC Virus Surveillance (0.86; 95%CI: 0.82, 0.90). Conclusions This analysis demonstrates that while Google Flu Trends is highly correlated with rates of ILI, it has a lower correlation with surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza. Most of the outlier observations occurred during the 2003–04 influenza season that was characterized by early and intense influenza activity, which potentially altered health care seeking behavior, physician testing practices, and internet search behavior. PMID:21556151

  5. The Association between active and passive smoking and latent tuberculosis infection in adults and children in the united states: results from NHANES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Lindsay

    Full Text Available Few studies assessing the relationship between active and passive smoking and tuberculosis have used biomarkers to measure smoke exposure. We sought to determine the association between active and passive smoking and LTBI in a representative sample of US adults and children.We used the 1999-2000 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES dataset with tuberculin skin test (TST data to assess the association between cotinine-confirmed smoke exposure and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI among adults ages ≥20 years (n = 3598 and children 3-19 years (n = 2943 and estimate the prevalence of smoke exposure among those with LTBI. Weighted multivariate logistic regression was used to measure the associations between active and passive smoking and LTBI.LTBI prevalence in 1999-2000 among cotinine-confirmed active, passive, and non-smoking adults and children was 6.0%, 5.2%, 3.3% and 0.3%, 1.0%, 1.5%, respectively. This corresponds to approximately 3,556,000 active and 3,379,000 passive smoking adults with LTBI in the US civilian non-institutionalized population in 1999-2000. Controlling for age, gender, socioeconomic status, race, birthplace (US vs. foreign-born, household size, and having ever lived with someone with TB, adult active smokers were significantly more likely to have LTBI than non-smoking adults (AOR = 2.31 95% CI 1.17-4.55. Adult passive smokers also had a greater odds of LTBI compared with non-smokers, but this association did not achieve statistical significance (AOR = 2.00 95% CI 0.87-4.60. Neither active or passive smoking was associated with LTBI among children. Among only the foreign-born adults, both active (AOR = 2.56 (95% CI 1.20-5.45 and passive smoking (AOR = 2.27 95% CI 1.09-4.72 were significantly associated with LTBI.Active adult smokers and both foreign-born active and passive smokers in the United States are at elevated risk for LTBI. Targeted smoking prevention and cessation

  6. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa S. Gibson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK. Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ, a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD, in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006 and BMI centiles (p = 0.002 than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001. Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15. Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005, who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01. In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management.

  7. R and D activities on manufacturing plasma-facing unit for prototype of ITER divertor outer target in JADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Seki, Yohji; Nishi, Hiroshi; Mohri, Kensuke; Enoeda, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    Japan Domestic Agency (JADA) carried out R and Ds activities to improve joining CFC monoblocks onto a CuCrZr cooling tube in PFUs to boost the success rate of joint and to confirm load carrying capability of the monoblock attachments to Steel Support Structure (SSS) against tensile force simulating electromagnetic load to pull PFUs from SSS. In joining the CFC monoblocks to the cooling tube, JADA has adopted brazing by using noble-metal-free filler with the following improvements; (1) metalizing joint surface of CFC using Ti-coating with accurate thickness controlling, (2) Changing buffer layer material from soft pure copper to Cu–W alloy. By using the present improved joint, JADA has manufactured three mock-ups with 5 CFC monoblocks and tested against repetitive high heat loads more than 20 MW/m 2 . All of CFC monoblocks of each mockup can survive the high heat loads throughout 1000 cycles with no degradation of heat removal capability. Regarding the load carrying capability of monoblock attachments to SSS, tensile experiments were carried out using the same geometries of CFC and tungsten monoblocks in PFUs and the results show that both geometries and joints meet the ITER requirements, that is, 3 kN and 8 kN, respectively.

  8. Radioactive and other environmental threats to the United States and the Arctic resulting from past Soviet activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Earlier this year the Senate Intelligence Committee began to receive reports from environmental and nuclear scientists in Russia detailing the reckless nuclear waste disposal practices, nuclear accidents and the use of nuclear detonations. We found that information disturbing to say the least. Also troubling is the fact that 15 Chernobyl style RBMK nuclear power reactors continue to operate in the former Soviet Union today. These reactors lack a containment structure and they're designed in such a way that nuclear reaction can actually increase when the reactor overheats. As scientists here at the University of Alaska have documented, polar air masses and prevailing weather patterns provide a pathway for radioactive contaminants from Eastern Europe and Western Russia, where many of these reactors are located. The threats presented by those potential radioactive risks are just a part of a larger Arctic pollution problem. Every day, industrial activities of the former Soviet Union continue to create pollutants. I think we should face up to the reality that in a country struggling for economic survival, environment protection isn't necessarily the high priority. And that could be very troubling news for the Arctic in the future

  9. R and D activities on manufacturing plasma-facing unit for prototype of ITER divertor outer target in JADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezato, Koichiro, E-mail: ezatok.koichiro@jaea.go.jp [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, JAEA, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, Satoshi; Seki, Yohji; Nishi, Hiroshi; Mohri, Kensuke; Enoeda, Mikio [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, JAEA, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Japan Domestic Agency (JADA) carried out R and Ds activities to improve joining CFC monoblocks onto a CuCrZr cooling tube in PFUs to boost the success rate of joint and to confirm load carrying capability of the monoblock attachments to Steel Support Structure (SSS) against tensile force simulating electromagnetic load to pull PFUs from SSS. In joining the CFC monoblocks to the cooling tube, JADA has adopted brazing by using noble-metal-free filler with the following improvements; (1) metalizing joint surface of CFC using Ti-coating with accurate thickness controlling, (2) Changing buffer layer material from soft pure copper to Cu-W alloy. By using the present improved joint, JADA has manufactured three mock-ups with 5 CFC monoblocks and tested against repetitive high heat loads more than 20 MW/m{sup 2}. All of CFC monoblocks of each mockup can survive the high heat loads throughout 1000 cycles with no degradation of heat removal capability. Regarding the load carrying capability of monoblock attachments to SSS, tensile experiments were carried out using the same geometries of CFC and tungsten monoblocks in PFUs and the results show that both geometries and joints meet the ITER requirements, that is, 3 kN and 8 kN, respectively.

  10. Radioactive and other environmental threats to the United States and the Arctic resulting from past Soviet activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Earlier this year the Senate Intelligence Committee began to receive reports from environmental and nuclear scientists in Russia detailing the reckless nuclear waste disposal practices, nuclear accidents and the use of nuclear detonations. We found that information disturbing to say the least. Also troubling is the fact that 15 Chernobyl style RBMK nuclear power reactors continue to operate in the former Soviet Union today. These reactors lack a containment structure and they`re designed in such a way that nuclear reaction can actually increase when the reactor overheats. As scientists here at the University of Alaska have documented, polar air masses and prevailing weather patterns provide a pathway for radioactive contaminants from Eastern Europe and Western Russia, where many of these reactors are located. The threats presented by those potential radioactive risks are just a part of a larger Arctic pollution problem. Every day, industrial activities of the former Soviet Union continue to create pollutants. I think we should face up to the reality that in a country struggling for economic survival, environment protection isn`t necessarily the high priority. And that could be very troubling news for the Arctic in the future.

  11. Socioeconomic and Demographic Factors for Spousal Resemblance in Obesity Status and Habitual Physical Activity in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Jen Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggested that the married population has an increased risk of obesity and assimilation between spouses’ body weight. We examined what factors may affect married spouses’ resemblance in weight status and habitual physical activity (HPA and the association of obesity/HPA with spouses’ sociodemoeconomic characteristics and lifestyles. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data of 11,403 adult married couples in the US during years 2006–2008 were used. Absolute-scale difference and relative-scale resemblance indices (correlation and kappa coefficients in body mass index (BMI and HPA were estimated by couples’ socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. We found that spousal difference in BMI was smaller for couples with a lower household income, for who were both unemployed, and for older spouses. Correlation coefficient between spouses’ BMI was 0.24, differing by race/ethnicity and family size. Kappa coefficient for weight status (obesity: BMI ≥ 30, overweight: 30 > BMI ≥ 25 was 0.11 and 0.35 for HPA. Never-working women’s husbands had lower odds of obesity than employed women’s husbands (OR = 0.69 (95% CI = 0.53–0.89. Men’s unemployment status was associated with wives’ greater odds of obesity (OR = 1.31 (95% CI = 1.01–1.71. HPA was associated with men’s employment status and income level, but not with women’s. The population representative survey showed that spousal resemblance in weight status and HPA varied with socioeconomic and demographic factors.

  12. Cool-weather activity of the forensically important hairy maggot blow fly Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) on carrion in Upstate South Carolina, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammack, Jonathan A; Nelder, Mark P

    2010-02-25

    The hairy maggot blow fly Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) has expanded its range in the United States since its introduction into Texas (ca. 1980) and has been collected in 15 states. We investigated the bionomics of immature and adult C. rufifacies collected from carcasses of a raccoon Procyon lotor (Linnaeus) and white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus Zimmerman in Upstate South Carolina during November 2007, and used these insects to estimate the minimum period of insect activity. Puparia of C. rufifacies were collected from deer carrion; 28% were parasitized by Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). The mean daily ambient temperature during this study was 11.4+/-1.02 degrees C, representing the lowest recorded mean temperature for adult activity of C. rufifacies; adults of C. rufifacies were observed flying among the carcasses at 9.0 degrees C. Although C. rufifacies is considered a warm-weather blow fly, researchers should be aware of its activity at suboptimal conditions, behavior that might aid its expansion into more northern areas. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of zeolite mixtures for decontaminating high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.D.; Campbell, D.O.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.; Wallace, R.M.

    1984-05-01

    Mixtures of Linde Ionsiv IE-96 and Ionsiv A-51 were evaluated for use in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) that was installed at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station to decontaminate approx. 2780 m 3 of high-activity-level water. The original SDS flowsheet was conservatively designed for removal of cesium and strontium and would have required the use of approx. 60 SDS columns. Mixed zeolite tests were made on a 10 -5 scale and indicated that the appropriate ratio of IE-96/A-51 was 3/2. A mathematical model was used to predict the performance of the mixed zeolite columns in the SDS configuration and with the intended method of operation. Actual loading results were similar to those predicted for strontium and better than those predicted for cesium. The number of SDS columns needed to process the HALW was reduced to approx. 10. 6 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  14. On the results of nuclear fuel temperature dynamics restoration at the Chornobyl NPP unit 4 during active phase of the accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mikhailov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fuel temperature dynamics was reconstructed for active phase of the accident at the Chernobyl NPP Unit 4. Method of effective temperature calculation for uranium oxide is based on implementation of the CORSOR type mathematical codes and the model of lava-like fuel containing materials (LFCM formation from fragments of the former core (FFC in the room 305/2. Calculations were carried out according to release rate of 131I and 137Cs radionuclides during the period from April 26 until May 6, 1986. The rate of temperature drop during the FCM stage cooling bath silicate melt was estimated. It is shown that the main streams of LFCM could be formed at more moderate values of temperatures than it was performed previously. The results of the work are used to verify the “blast furnace” version of LFCM formation and formation of FCM with high uranium concentration.

  15. A decade of changes in nitrogen oxides over regions of oil and natural gas activity in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Majid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO are a highly regulated species that play a major role in the formation of photochemical smog. While NOx emissions are generally decreasing over the U.S. as a result of more stringent environmental policies and improved emissions control technologies, the shale oil and natural gas industry is reversing this rate of changes in certain regions. We present here a quantitative analysis of NOx levels over the seven main U.S. shale plays (Bakken, Eagle Ford, Permian, Niobrara-Codell, Marcellus-Utica, Haynesville, and Barnett between 2005 and 2015 using measurements of tropospheric NO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aboard the NASA EOS-Aura aircraft. We develop and apply a methodology that seeks to maximise pollutant signals from oil and gas activities. For reference, we also examine the national trend averaged over the lower 48 states. Consistent with previous studies, we find NOx across the U.S. is generally declining. During the low-production phase of oil and natural gas production (2005–2009, we find declining trends in tropospheric NOx that are similar to the national trend (–4.6% yr–1 in 6 of the 7 study regions (–8 to –2% yr–1. In the high-production phase (2010–15, we find an increasing NOx trend in 5 of the 7 study basins (0.4 to 4.5% yr–1 while the national trend continued to decline (–0.3% yr–1. Over the most intensive oil-producing shale plays (Bakken, Eagle Ford, Permian and Niobrara-Codell, we observe a rapid growth (1–4.5% yr–1, which correlates well (r2 = 0.6–0.9 with their annual oil production rates and/or drilling rigs. In contrast, trends across the mainly gas-producing regions (Haynesville, Barnett, and Marcellus-Utica show decreases (–0.4 to –1.7% yr–1 similar to the national trend, with the exception of the Marcellus-Utica where a slight increase (0.4 ± 0.2% yr–1 may be an indication of a small regional increase. Our study shows the important decadal

  16. Erect penile length and circumference dimensions of 1,661 sexually active men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbenick, Debby; Reece, Michael; Schick, Vanessa; Sanders, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    Penile size continues to receive popular and empirical attention. Little is known about the process of self-measurement and whether the behaviors a man engages in to become erect for self-measurement are associated with his erect penile dimensions. The article aims to assess men's erect penile dimensions in a study in which the men would presumably be motivated to report accurate information about their penis size; and to explore associations between men's erect penile dimensions, their method of measurement, and their demographics. Data are from an Internet-based baseline phase of a large prospective daily diary study that compared men's use of a standard-sized condom to men's use of a condom sized to fit their erect penis. The main outcomes are participant characteristics, activities engaged in during self-measurement process, and self-reported erect penile length and circumference. For this sample of 1,661 men, the mean erect penile length was 14.15 cm (SD = 2.66; range = 4 to 26 cm), and the mean erect penile circumference was 12.23 cm (SD = 2.23; range = 3 to 19). Participant characteristics were not associated with measured length or circumference. Most men measured their penis while alone, using hand stimulation to become erect. In this sample of men who measured their erect penile length and circumference for the purposes of receiving a condom sized to fit their erect penis, we found a mean erect penile length of 14.15 cm and a mean erect penile circumference of 12.23 cm. The self-reported erect penile dimensions in this study are consistent with other penile dimension research. Also, findings suggest that mode of getting an erection may influence erect penile dimensions. Additionally, how a man becomes erect for self-measurement may be associated with his erect penile length and/or circumference. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  17. In vitro studies of the antibacterial activity of Copaifera spp. oleoresins, sodium hypochlorite, and peracetic acid against clinical and environmental isolates recovered from a hemodialysis unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimara Gonçalves Leite Vieira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients submitted to hemodialysis therapy are more susceptible to infection, especially to infection by Gram-positive bacteria. Various research works have attempted to discover new antimicrobial agents from plant extracts and other natural products. Methods The present study aimed to assess the antibacterial activities of Copaifera duckei, C. reticulata, and C. oblongifolia oleoresins; sodium hypochlorite; and peracetic acid against clinical and environmental isolates recovered from a Hemodialysis Unit. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and the Fractionated Inhibitory Concentration Index were determined; the ability of the tested compounds/extracts to inhibit biofilm formation was evaluated by calculating the MICB50 and IC50. Results C. duckei was the most efficient among the assayed Copaifera species, and its oleoresin was more effective than peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite. Copaifera oleoresins and disinfectants did not act synergistically at any of the tested combinations. Certain of C. duckei oleoresin, peracetic acid, and sodium hypochlorite concentrations inhibited biofilm formation and eradicated 50% of the biofilm population. Conclusion C. duckei oleoresin is a potential candidate for disinfectant formulations. Based on these results and given the high incidence of multi-resistant bacteria in hemodialysis patients, it is imperative that new potential antibacterial agents like C. duckei oleoresin, which is active against Staphylococcus, be included in disinfectant formulations.

  18. In vitro studies of the antibacterial activity of Copaifera spp. oleoresins, sodium hypochlorite, and peracetic acid against clinical and environmental isolates recovered from a hemodialysis unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Rosimara Gonçalves Leite; Moraes, Thaís da Silva; Silva, Larissa de Oliveira; Bianchi, Thamires Chiquini; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Pires, Regina Helena; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes

    2018-01-01

    Patients submitted to hemodialysis therapy are more susceptible to infection, especially to infection by Gram-positive bacteria. Various research works have attempted to discover new antimicrobial agents from plant extracts and other natural products. The present study aimed to assess the antibacterial activities of Copaifera duckei , C. reticulata , and C. oblongifolia oleoresins; sodium hypochlorite; and peracetic acid against clinical and environmental isolates recovered from a Hemodialysis Unit. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and the Fractionated Inhibitory Concentration Index were determined; the ability of the tested compounds/extracts to inhibit biofilm formation was evaluated by calculating the MICB 50 and IC 50 . C. duckei was the most efficient among the assayed Copaifera species, and its oleoresin was more effective than peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite. Copaifera oleoresins and disinfectants did not act synergistically at any of the tested combinations. Certain of C. duckei oleoresin, peracetic acid, and sodium hypochlorite concentrations inhibited biofilm formation and eradicated 50% of the biofilm population. C. duckei oleoresin is a potential candidate for disinfectant formulations. Based on these results and given the high incidence of multi-resistant bacteria in hemodialysis patients, it is imperative that new potential antibacterial agents like C. duckei oleoresin, which is active against Staphylococcus , be included in disinfectant formulations.

  19. Standardization process for pipeline right-of-way activities: the case of TRANSPETRO's Oil Pipeline and Terminals Business Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Kassandra Senra de Morais M.; Goncalves, Bruno Martins [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Terminais e Oleodutos; Almeida, Maria Fatima Ludovico de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio/ITUC), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Tecnologico

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the experience of PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. concerning the standardization process for its pipeline right-of-way (ROW) activities. This standardization initiative has been carried out within the Oil Pipelines and Terminals Standardization Program (PRONOT), focusing on planning, standardization and implementation of all norms and corporate procedures referring to TRANSPETRO's right-of-way activities. The process promoted the integration of isolated regional initiatives, a sense of unity and the creation of a learning network consisting of 60 employees. This paper presents the last phase's results concerning implementation of corporate standards, based upon achievements of previous phases. It covers the following topics: a general view of the whole process by way of introduction; the potential of integration of recent standardization results with TRANSPETRO's corporate management tools and information systems; definition of four performance indicators and their metrics related to pipeline right-of-way management, as well as a corporate standard for the requirements for contracting services related to rights-of-way inspection, maintenance and communication; challenges, barriers and benefits perceived by the team responsible for formulating and implementing standards and procedures in TRANSPETRO's Oil Pipelines and Terminals Unit. (author)

  20. EURISOL-DS multi-MW target unit: Neutronics performance and shielding assessment, dose rate and material activation calculations for the MAFF configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanets, Y; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Goncalves, I F; Tecchio, L; Kharoua, C; Vaz, P; Ene, D; David, J C; Rocca, R; Negoita, F

    2010-01-01

    One of the objectives of the EURISOL (EURopean Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam) Design Study consisted of providing a safe and reliable facility layout and design for the following operational parameters and characteristics: (a) a 4 MW proton beam of 1 GeV energy impinging on a mercury target (the converter); (b) high neutron fluxes (similar to 3 x 10(16) neutrons/s) generated by spallation reactions of the protons impinging in the converter and (c) fission rate on fissile U-235 targets in excess of 10(15) fissions/s. In this work, the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX (Pelowitz, 2005) and FLUKA (Vlachoudis, 2009; Ferrari et al., 2008) were used to characterize the neutronics performance and to perform the shielding assessment (Herrera-Martinez and Kadi, 2006; Cornell, 2003) of the EURISOLTarget Unit and to provide estimations of dose rate and activation of different components, in view of the radiation safety assessment of the facility. Dosimetry and activation calculations were perfor...

  1. Mechanical and morphological properties of different muscle-tendon units in the lower extremity and running mechanics: effect of aging and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanidis, Kiros; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2005-10-01

    The objectives of this work were (i) to investigate whether chronic endurance running is a sufficient stimulus to counteract the age-related changes in the mechanical and morphological properties of human triceps surae (TS) and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle-tendon units (MTUs) by comparing runners and non-active subjects at different ages (young and old), (ii) to identify adaptational phenomena in running mechanics due to age-related changes in the mechanical and morphological properties of the TS and QF MTUs, and finally (iii) to examine whether chronic endurance-running exercise is associated with adaptational effects on running characteristics in old and young adults. The investigation was conducted on 30 old and 19 young adult males divided into two subgroups according to their running activity: endurance-runners vs non-active. To analyse the properties of the MTUs, all subjects performed isometric maximal voluntary (MVC) ankle plantarflexion and knee extension contractions at 11 different MTU lengths on a dynamometer. The activation of the TS and QF during MVC was estimated by surface electromyography. The gastrocnemius medialis and the vastus lateralis and their distal aponeuroses were visualized by ultrasonography at rest and during MVC, respectively. Ground reaction forces and kinematic data were recorded during running trials at 2.7 m s(-1). The TS and QF MTU capacities were reduced with aging (lower muscle strength and lower tendon stiffness). Runners and non-active subjects had similar MTU properties, suggesting that chronic endurance-running exercise does not counteract the age-related degeneration of the MTUs. Runners showed a higher mechanical advantage for the QF MTU while running (lower gear ratio) compared to non-active subjects, indicating a task-specific adaptation even at old age. Older adults reacted to the reduced capacities of their MTUs by increasing running safety (higher duty factor, lower flight time) and benefitting from a mechanical

  2. Communities on the move: Pedestrian-oriented zoning as a facilitator of adult active travel to work in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Friedman Chriqui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Communities across the United States have been reforming their zoning codes to create pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods with increased street connectivity, mixed-use and higher density, open space, transportation infrastructure, and a traditional neighborhood structure. Zoning code reforms include new urbanist zoning such as the SmartCode, form-based codes, transects, transportation and pedestrian-oriented developments, and traditional neighborhood developments.Purpose: To examine the relationship of zoning code reforms and more active living-oriented zoning provisions with adult active travel to work via walking, biking, or by using public transit.Methods: Zoning codes effective as of 2010 were compiled for 3,914 municipal-level jurisdictions located in 471 counties and 2 consolidated cities in 48 states and the District of Columbia, and that collectively covered 72.9% of the U.S. population. Zoning codes were evaluated for the presence of code reform zoning and nine pedestrian-oriented zoning provisions (1=yes: sidewalks, crosswalks, bike-pedestrian connectivity, street connectivity, bike lanes, bike parking, bike-pedestrian trails/paths, mixed use development, and other walkability/pedestrian-orientation. A zoning scale reflected the number of provisions addressed (out of 10. Five continuous outcome measures were constructed using 2010-2014 American Community Survey municipal-level 5-year estimates to assess the percentage of workers: walking, biking, walking or biking, or taking public transit to work OR engaged in any active travel to work. Regression models controlled for municipal-level socioeconomic characteristics and a GIS-constructed walkability scale and were clustered on county with robust standard errors. Results: Adjusted models indicated that several pedestrian-oriented zoning provisions were statistically associated (p<.05 or lower with increased rates of walking, biking, or engaging in any active travel (walking

  3. Communities on the Move: Pedestrian-Oriented Zoning as a Facilitator of Adult Active Travel to Work in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F; Leider, Julien; Thrun, Emily; Nicholson, Lisa M; Slater, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Communities across the United States have been reforming their zoning codes to create pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods with increased street connectivity, mixed use and higher density, open space, transportation infrastructure, and a traditional neighborhood structure. Zoning code reforms include new urbanist zoning such as the SmartCode, form-based codes, transects, transportation and pedestrian-oriented developments, and traditional neighborhood developments. To examine the relationship of zoning code reforms and more active living--oriented zoning provisions with adult active travel to work via walking, biking, or by using public transit. Zoning codes effective as of 2010 were compiled for 3,914 municipal-level jurisdictions located in 471 counties and 2 consolidated cities in 48 states and the District of Columbia, and that collectively covered 72.9% of the U.S. population. Zoning codes were evaluated for the presence of code reform zoning and nine pedestrian-oriented zoning provisions (1 = yes): sidewalks, crosswalks, bike-pedestrian connectivity, street connectivity, bike lanes, bike parking, bike-pedestrian trails/paths, mixed-use development, and other walkability/pedestrian orientation. A zoning scale reflected the number of provisions addressed (out of 10). Five continuous outcome measures were constructed using 2010-2014 American Community Survey municipal-level 5-year estimates to assess the percentage of workers: walking, biking, walking or biking, or taking public transit to work OR engaged in any active travel to work. Regression models controlled for municipal-level socioeconomic characteristics and a GIS-constructed walkability scale and were clustered on county with robust standard errors. Adjusted models indicated that several pedestrian-oriented zoning provisions were statistically associated (p biking, or engaging in any active travel (walking, biking, or any active travel) to work: code reform zoning, bike parking (street furniture

  4. Diversity and antifungal activity of the endophytic fungi associated with the native medicinal cactus Opuntia humifusa (Cactaceae) from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Hughes, Alice F; Wedge, David E; Cantrell, Charles L; Carvalho, Camila R; Pan, Zhiqiang; Moraes, Rita M; Madoxx, Victor L; Rosa, Luiz H

    2015-06-01

    The endophytic fungal community associated with the native cactus Opuntia humifusa in the United States was investigated and its potential for providing antifungal compounds. A hundred-eight endophytic fungal isolates were obtained and identified by molecular methods into 17 different taxa of the genera Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Biscogniauxia, Cladosporium, Cryptococcus, Curvularia, Diaporthe, Epicoccum, Paraconiothyrium, Pestalotiopsis and Phoma. The most frequent species associated with O. humifusa were Alternaria sp. 3, Aureobasidium pullulans and Diaporthe sp. The fungal community of O. humifusa had a high richness and diversity; additionally, the species richness obtained indicates that the sample effort was enough to recover the diversity pattern obtained. Six extracts of endophytes showed antifungal properties and (1)H NMR analyses of the extracts of Alternaria sp. 5 Ohu 8B2, Alternaria sp. 3 Ohu 30A, Cladosporium funiculosum Ohu 17C1 and Paraconiothyrium sp. Ohu 17A indicated the presence of functional groups associated with unsaturated fatty-acid olefinic protons and fatty acid methylene and methyl protons. GC-FID analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of a mixture of different fatty acids. The (1)H NMR analyses of Biscogniauxia mediterranea Ohu 19B extracts showed the presence of aromatic compounds. From the extract of B. mediterranea we isolated the compound 5-methylmellein that displayed moderate antifungal activity against the phytopathogenic fungi Phomopsis obscurans. Our results suggest that native medicinal cacti of the United States can live symbiotically with rich and diverse endophytic communities and may be a source of bioactive molecules, including those able to inhibit or control plant disease pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  6. Responding To Changes in the Decommissioning Plans for Demolition of a Former Active Handling Building at The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Establishment Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2006-01-01

    The full decommissioning of the former Active Handling Building A59 at Winfrith in Dorset is being carried out by RWE NUKEM Limited under contract from the site owners and nuclear site licence holder, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA). Following recent government changes, the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has now set up contracts with UKAEA for delivery of the site clean-up programme. The building contains two heavily shielded suites of caves originally used to carry out remote examination of irradiated nuclear fuel elements together with other supporting facilities. The original intention was to demolish the caves ahead of the building but after detailed consideration it was concluded that demolition of the building in advance of the caves was more operationally effective. As a result, the original decommissioning plan had to be reworked to reflect these changes. The paper briefly explains how this situation arose and the means by which the problems experienced were overcome by a complete revision to the decommissioning programme. The updated plan has been adopted by UKAEA and work is now proceeding apace to clear the building of redundant items, to complete decontamination of all remaining areas and facilities and to carry out detailed radiological surveys to confirm that the building structure is clean and ready for demolition. Both cave lines have been completely decontaminated to low residual levels of activity and are essentially ready for controlled demolition. This paper describes some of the significant tasks undertaken during the past year with particular reference to the decommissioning techniques that gave the greatest success and the limitations of others originally considered. Some of these processes were aimed at minimising the volume of low level waste (LLW) generated by using standard off-the-shelf equipment to remove contamination from ∼5 Ton concrete blocks recovered from both cave line structures. A

  7. Decrease in Staphylococcus aureus colonization and hospital-acquired infection in a medical intensive care unit after institution of an active surveillance and decolonization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Thomas G; Fatica, Cynthia; Scarpelli, Michele; Arroliga, Alejandro C; Guzman, Jorge; Shrestha, Nabin K; Hixson, Eric; Rosenblatt, Miriam; Gordon, Steven M; Procop, Gary W

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of an active surveillance program for Staphylococcus aureus linked to a decolonization protocol on the incidence of healthcare-associated infection and new nasal colonization due to S. aureus. Retrospective quasi-experimental study. An 18-bed medical intensive care unit at a tertiary care center in Cleveland, Ohio. From January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2007, all patients in the medical intensive care unit were screened for S. aureus nasal carriage at admission and weekly thereafter. During the preintervention period, January 1 through September 30, 2006, only surveillance occurred. During the intervention period, January 1 through December 31, 2007, S. aureus carriers received mupirocin intranasally. Beginning in February 2007, carriers also received chlorhexidine gluconate baths. During the preintervention period, 604 (73.7%) of 819 patients were screened for S. aureus nasal carriage, yielding 248 prevalent carriers (30.3%). During the intervention period, 752 (78.3%) of 960 patients were screened, yielding 276 carriers (28.8%). The incidence of S. aureus carriage decreased from 25 cases in 3,982 patient-days (6.28 cases per 1,000 patient-days) before intervention to 18 cases in 5,415 patient-days (3.32 cases per 1,000 patient-days) (P=.04; relative risk [RR], 0.53 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.28-0.97]) and from 9.57 to 4.77 cases per 1,000 at-risk patient-days (P=.02; RR, 0.50 [95% CI, 0.27-0.91]). The incidence of S. aureus hospital-acquired bloodstream infection during the 2 periods was 2.01 and 1.11 cases per 1,000 patient-days, respectively (P=.28). The incidence of S. aureus ventilator-associated pneumonia decreased from 1.51 to 0.18 cases per 1,000 patient-days (P=.03; RR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.01-0.83]). The total incidence of S. aureus hospital-acquired infection decreased from 3.52 to 1.29 cases per 1,000 patient-days (P=.03; RR, 0.37 [95% CI, 0.14-0.90]). Active surveillance for S. aureus nasal carriage combined with

  8. Tungsten covered graphite and copper elements and ITER-like actively cooled tungsten divertor plasma facing units for the WEST project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhem, D; Bucalossi, J; Burles, S; Corre, Y; Ferlay, F; Firdaouss, M; Languille, P; Lipa, M; Martinez, A; Missirlian, M; Proust, M; Richou, M; Samaille, F; Tsitrone, E

    2016-01-01

    After a brief introduction giving some insight of the WEST project, we present the three types of plasma facing units (PFUs) developed for the WEST project taking into account the envisaged main scenarios: (1) high power short pulse scenario (a few seconds) where the objective is to maximize the power handling of the PFUs, up to 20 MW m −2 , (2) high fluence scenario (a few 100 s) on actively cooled ITER-like tungsten (W) PFUs, up to 10 MW m −2 during 1000 s. For the graphite PFUs, the high heat flux tests have been done at GLADIS (ion beam test facility), and for the CuCrZr PFUs on the JUDITH (electron beam test facility). The tests were successful, as no damage occurred for the different load cases. This confirms that the modelling done during the design phase is appropriate to describe these PFUs. Series productions are expected to be achieved by the end of 2015 for the graphite and CuCrZr PFUs, and few ITER-like W PFUs are expected at the beginning of 2016. The lower divertor will be complemented with ITER-like W PFUs as soon as available from our partners so that different fabrication procedures could be evaluated in a real industrial process and a real tokamak environment. (paper)

  9. The influence of the cigarette smoke pollution and ventilation rate on alpha-activities per unit volume due to radon and its progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdaq, M.A.; Flata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Alpha and beta activities per unit volume air due to radon, thoron and their decay products were evaluated in the air of various cafe rooms polluted by cigarette smoke. Both CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were used. Equilibrium factors between radon and its progeny and thoron and its daughters have been evaluated in the air of the studied cafe rooms. The committed equivalent doses due to short-lived radon decay products were determined in different regions of the respiratory tract of non-smoker members of the public. The influence of cigarette smoke pollution, ventilation rate and exposure time on committed equivalent dose in the respiratory systems of non-smokers was investigated. Committed equivalent doses ranged from 1.15x10 -11 -2.7x10 -7 Sv.y -1 /h of exposure in the extrathoracic region and from 0.8x10 -12 -1.7x10 -8 Sv.y -1 /h of exposure in the thoracic region of the respiratory tract of non-smokers

  10. Engaging actively with issues in the responsible conduct of science: lessons from international efforts are relevant for undergraduate education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, John D; Connell, Nancy D; Dirks, Clarissa; El-Faham, Mohamed; Hay, Alastair; Heitman, Elizabeth; Stith, James H; Bond, Enriqueta C; Colwell, Rita R; Anestidou, Lida; Husbands, Jo L; Labov, Jay B

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies are demonstrating that engaging undergraduate students in original research can improve their achievement in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and increase the likelihood that some of them will decide to pursue careers in these disciplines. Associated with this increased prominence of research in the undergraduate curriculum are greater expectations from funders, colleges, and universities that faculty mentors will help those students, along with their graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, develop an understanding and sense of personal and collective obligation for responsible conduct of science (RCS). This Feature describes an ongoing National Research Council (NRC) project and a recent report about educating faculty members in culturally diverse settings (Middle East/North Africa and Asia) to employ active-learning strategies to engage their students and colleagues deeply in issues related to RCS. The NRC report describes the first phase of this project, which took place in Aqaba and Amman, Jordan, in September 2012 and April 2013, respectively. Here we highlight the findings from that report and our subsequent experience with a similar interactive institute in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Our work provides insights and perspectives for faculty members in the United States as they engage undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdoctoral fellows, to help them better understand the intricacies of and connections among various components of RCS. Further, our experiences can provide insights for those who may wish to establish "train-the-trainer" programs at their home institutions.

  11. Injury Risk Assessment of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Phase VI and Series 4000 Gloves During Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hand Manipulation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilby, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Functional Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) with high precision gloves are essential for the success of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Previous research done at NASA has shown that total strength capabilities and performance are reduced when wearing a pressurized EMU. The goal of this project was to characterize the human-space suit glove interaction and assess the risk of injury during common EVA hand manipulation tasks, including pushing, pinching and gripping objects. A custom third generation sensor garment was designed to incorporate a combination of sensors, including force sensitive resistors, strain gauge sensors, and shear force sensors. The combination of sensors was used to measure the forces acting on the finger nails, finger pads, finger tips, as well as the knuckle joints. In addition to measuring the forces, data was collected on the temperature, humidity, skin conductance, and blood perfusion of the hands. Testing compared both the Phase VI and Series 4000 glove against an ungloved condition. The ungloved test was performed wearing the sensor garment only. The project outcomes identified critical landmarks that experienced higher workloads and are more likely to suffer injuries. These critical landmarks varied as a function of space suit glove and task performed. The results showed that less forces were acting on the hands while wearing the Phase VI glove as compared to wearing the Series 4000 glove. Based on our findings, the engineering division can utilize these methods for optimizing the current space suit glove and designing next generation gloves to prevent injuries and optimize hand mobility and comfort.

  12. SI units in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, D.

    1976-10-01

    In the field of radiation protection all hitherto used units for activity, activity concentrations, exposure, absorbed dose, and dose rates have to be replaced by SI units during the next years. For this purpose graphs and conversion tables are given as well as recommendations on unit combinations preferentially to be used. As to the dose equivalent, it is suggested to introduce a new special unit being 100 times greater than the rem, instead of maintaining the rem or using the gray for both absorbed dose and dose equivalent. Measures and time schedule relating to the gradual transition to SI units in measuring techniques, training, and publishing et cetera are explained. (author)

  13. Unit Manning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGinniss, Mike

    2003-01-01

    .... This decision combines two crucial initiatives: first, transforming the Army from an individual soldier replacement system to a unit manning system that enhances cohesion and keeps trained soldiers, leaders, and commanders together longer, thereby...

  14. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  15. Drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanchik, N P; Demin, A V; Khrustalev, N N; Linnik, G N; Lovchev, S V; Rozin, M M; Sidorov, R V; Sokolov, S I; Tsaregradskiy, Yu P

    1981-01-01

    A drilling unit is proposed which includes a hydraulic lifter, hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump with valve distribution and sectional drilling pump with separators of the working and flushing fluid. In order to reduce metal consumption and the overall dimensions of the drilling unit, the working cavity of each cylinder of the hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump is equipped with suction and injection valves and is hydraulically connected to the working cavity by one of the sections of the drilling pump.

  16. Stress concentrations at structural discontinuities in active fault zones in the western United States: Implications for permeability and fluid flow in geothermal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Drew; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Faulds, James E.

    2018-01-01

    Slip can induce concentration of stresses at discontinuities along fault systems. These structural discontinuities, i.e., fault terminations, fault step-overs, intersections, bends, and other fault interaction areas, are known to host fluid flow in ore deposition systems, oil and gas reservoirs, and geothermal systems. We modeled stress transfer associated with slip on faults with Holocene-to-historic slip histories at the Salt Wells and Bradys geothermal systems in western Nevada, United States. Results show discrete locations of stress perturbation within discontinuities along these fault systems. Well field data, surface geothermal manifestations, and subsurface temperature data, each a proxy for modern fluid circulation in the fields, indicate that geothermal fluid flow is focused in these same areas where stresses are most highly perturbed. These results suggest that submeter- to meter-scale slip on these fault systems generates stress perturbations that are sufficiently large to promote slip on an array of secondary structures spanning the footprint of the modern geothermal activity. Slip on these secondary faults and fractures generates permeability through kinematic deformation and allows for transmission of fluids. Still, mineralization is expected to seal permeability along faults and fractures over time scales that are generally shorter than either earthquake recurrence intervals or the estimated life span of geothermal fields. This suggests that though stress perturbations resulting from fault slip are broadly important for defining the location and spatial extent of enhanced permeability at structural discontinuities, continual generation and maintenance of flow conduits throughout these areas are probably dependent on the deformation mechanism(s) affecting individual structures.

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission and infections in a neonatal intensive care unit despite active surveillance cultures and decolonization: challenges for infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Victor O; Budd, Alicia; Wittig, Sara M; Ross, Tracy; Aucott, Susan W; Perl, Trish M; Carroll, Karen C; Milstone, Aaron M

    2014-04-01

    To characterize the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and infections in a level IIIC neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and identify barriers to MRSA control. Retrospective cohort study in a university-affiliated NICU with an MRSA control program including weekly nares cultures of all neonates and admission nares cultures for neonates transferred from other hospitals or admitted from home. Medical records were reviewed to identify neonates with NICU-acquired MRSA colonization or infection between April 2007 and December 2011. Compliance with hand hygiene and an MRSA decolonization protocol were monitored. Relatedness of MRSA strains were assessed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of 3,536 neonates, 74 (2.0%) had a culture grow MRSA, including 62 neonates with NICU-acquired MRSA. Nineteen of 74 neonates (26%) had an MRSA infection, including 8 who became infected before they were identified as MRSA colonized, and 11 of 66 colonized neonates (17%) developed a subsequent infection. Of the 37 neonates that underwent decolonization, 6 (16%) developed a subsequent infection, and 7 of 14 (50%) that remained in the NICU for 21 days or more became recolonized with MRSA. Using PFGE, there were 14 different strain types identified, with USA300 being the most common (31%). Current strategies to prevent infections-including active identification and decolonization of MRSA-colonized neonates-are inadequate because infants develop infections before being identified as colonized or after attempted decolonization. Future prevention efforts would benefit from improving detection of MRSA colonization, optimizing decolonization regimens, and identifying and interrupting reservoirs of transmission.

  18. Staphylococcus xylosus PCR-validated Decontamination of Murine Individually Ventilated Cage Racks and Air Handling Units by Using 'Active-Closed' Exposure to Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, Natalie H; Miedel, Emily L; Gomez, Jose M; Engelman, Robert W

    2017-11-01

    Vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP) is used to decontaminate clinical, biocontainment, and research animal rooms and equipment. To assist with its implementation in a murine facility, we developed a safe and effective method of VHP sterilization of IVC racks and air handling units (AHU). Safety of VHP decontamination was assessed by ensuring VHP levels dissipated to less than 1 ppm in the room prior to personnel reentry and inside the primary enclosure prior to the return of mice; this condition occurred at least 18 h after the VHP cycle. Efficacy of VHP sterilization was assessed by using chemical indicators, biologic indicators, and PCR testing for Staphylococcus xylosus, a commensal organism of murine skin and an opportunistic pathogen, which was present in 160 of 172 (93%) of specimens from occupied IVC racks and the interior surfaces of in-use AHU. Neither mechanized washing nor hand-sanitizing eradicated S. xylosus from equipment airway interiors, with 17% to 24% of specimens remaining PCR-positive for S. xylosus. 'Static-open' VHP exposure of sanitized equipment did not ensure its sterilization. In contrast, 'active-closed' VHP exposure, in which IVC racks were assembled, sealed, and connected to AHU set to the VHP cycle, increased the proportion of chemical indicators that detected sterilizing levels of VHP inside the assembled equipment, and significantly decreased PCR-detectable S. xylosus inside the equipment. Supplementing bulk steam sterilization of the primary enclosure with VHP sterilization of the secondary housing equipment during room change-outs may help to mitigate opportunistic agents that jeopardize studies involving immunodeficient strains.

  19. Zooming into local active galactic nuclei: the power of combining SDSS-IV MaNGA with higher resolution integral field unit observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Schnorr Müller, Allan; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Greene, Jenny E.; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Kelly, Michael; Liu, Guilin; Law, David R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Thomas, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Ionized gas outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are ubiquitous in high-luminosity AGN with outflow speeds apparently correlated with the total bolometric luminosity of the AGN. This empirical relation and theoretical work suggest that in the range Lbol ˜ 1043-45 erg s-1 there must exist a threshold luminosity above which the AGN becomes powerful enough to launch winds that will be able to escape the galaxy potential. In this paper, we present pilot observations of two AGN in this transitional range that were taken with the Gemini North Multi-Object Spectrograph integral field unit (IFU). Both sources have also previously been observed within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. While the MaNGA IFU maps probe the gas fields on galaxy-wide scales and show that some regions are dominated by AGN ionization, the new Gemini IFU data zoom into the centre with four times better spatial resolution. In the object with the lower Lbol we find evidence of a young or stalled biconical AGN-driven outflow where none was obvious at the MaNGA resolution. In the object with the higher Lbol we trace the large-scale biconical outflow into the nuclear region and connect the outflow from small to large scales. These observations suggest that AGN luminosity and galaxy potential are crucial in shaping wind launching and propagation in low-luminosity AGN. The transition from small and young outflows to galaxy-wide feedback can only be understood by combining large-scale IFU data that trace the galaxy velocity field with higher resolution, small-scale IFU maps.

  20. The impact of clinical research activities on communities in rural Africa: the development of the Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Halidou; Valea, Innocent; Sorgho, Hermann; Tahita, Marc Christian; Traore, Maminata; Bihoun, Biébo; Guiraud, Issa; Kpoda, Hervé; Rouamba, Jérémi; Ouédraogo, Sayouba; Lompo, Palpouguini; Yara, Sandrine; Kabore, William; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Guiguemdé, Robert Tinga; Binka, Fred N; Ogutu, Bernhards

    2014-03-22

    The opportunities for developing new drugs and vaccines for malaria control look brighter now than ten years ago. However, there are few places in sub-Saharan Africa with the necessary infrastructure and expertise to support such research in compliance to international standards of clinical research (ICH-GCP). The Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) was founded in 2008 to provide a much-needed GCP-compliant clinical trial platform for an imminent large-scale Phase 3 malaria vaccine trial. A dynamic approach was used that entailed developing the required infrastructure and human resources, while engaging local communities in the process as key stakeholders. This provided a better understanding and ownership of the research activities by the local population. Within five years (2008-2013), the CRUN set up a fully and well-equipped GCP-compliant clinical trial research facility, which enabled to attract 25 grants. The research team grew from ten health workers prior to 2008 to 254 in 2013. A Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), which covers a total population of about 60,000 people in 24 villages was set up in the district. The local community contributed to the development of the facility through the leadership of the king and the mayor of Nanoro. As a result of their active advocacy, the government extended the national electrical grid to the new research center, and later to the entire village. This produced a positive impact on the community's quality of life. The quality of health care improved substantially, due to the creation of more elaborate clinical laboratory services and the acquisition of state-of-the-art equipment. Involving the community in the key steps of establishing the centre provided the foundation for what was to become the CRUN success story. This experience demonstrates that when clinical trials research sites are carefully developed and implemented, they can have a positive and powerful impact on local communities in

  1. The United States Special Operations Command Civil Military Engagement Program - A Model for Military-Interagency Low Cost / Small Footprint Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-02

    advance United States goals and objectives with less than optimal budgets. Gabriel Marcella provides an interagency perspective regarding the United...The Department of State mission is to “integrate 9 Gabriel Marcella , “Affairs of the State,” In...Christopher. "Implementing the QDDR." Interagency Journal 3-1 (Winter), 2012: 8. Marcella , Gabriel. Strategic Studies Institute: The Interagency

  2. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  3. Transfer of manufacturing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing and unfolding relocation of activities is one of the major trends, that calls for attention in the domain of operations management. In particular, prescriptive models outlining: stages of the process, where to locate, and how to establish the new facilities have been studied, while...... and dilemmas to be addressed when transferring manufacturing units....

  4. Whale Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Materials in this teaching unit are designed to foster an interest in whale preservation among intermediate grade and junior high school students. Several readings provide background information on various types of whales and the economic value of whales. Student activities include a true and false game, a crossword, and a mobile. A resource list…

  5. Nutritional Status Changes and Activities of Daily Living after Hip Fracture in Convalescent Rehabilitation Units: A Retrospective Observational Cohort Study from the Japan Rehabilitation Nutrition Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Shinta; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Momosaki, Ryo

    2018-07-01

    Several studies have suggested that malnutrition impedes functional recovery in patients with hip fracture, but there are few reports on improvement in nutritional status and return to activities of daily living (ADL) in these patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between change in nutritional status and recovery of ADL in malnourished patients after hip fracture and to identify predictors of functional recovery among the characteristic features of undernutrition. This was a retrospective observational cohort study. Data for patients aged ≥65 years with hip fracture and malnutrition (Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form [MNA-SF] score ≤7) at the time of admission to convalescent rehabilitation units were obtained from the Japan Rehabilitation Nutrition Database between November 2015 and August 2017. The main outcome measures were Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at discharge and the proportion of patients discharged home. Patients were divided into two groups based on MNA-SF scores at discharge: improvement in nutritional status (>7, IN group) and non-improvement in nutritional status (≤7, NN group). Clinical characteristics and outcomes were compared between the groups. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to adjust for confounders including age, sex, comorbidity, pre-fracture ADL level, and FIM score on admission. Of 876 patients, 110 met the eligibility criteria (mean age, 85 years; 78.2% female); 77 of the patients were assigned to the IN group and 33 to the NN group. The patients in the IN group were younger and had higher FIM and MNA-SF scores on admission than those in the NN group. At discharge, the median FIM score was significantly higher in the IN group than in the NN group (110 vs 83, Pnutritional status and higher FIM score at discharge (B=7.377 [B=partial regression coefficient], P=0.036) but no association with discharge to home. Mobility, neuropsychological impairment, and weight loss subscores of

  6. Initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children in Europe and the United States: comparing clinical practice to guidelines and literature evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweel, Gwenda; Saavedra-Lozano, Jesus; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; Ramilo, Octavio; de Groot, Ronald

    2006-11-01

    Several guidelines are available to guide the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children. The recommendations in these guidelines show significant variability. Because there is no well-established evidence on when to start HAART, it is left to the discretion of the pediatrician which guidelines to follow. We conducted a survey concerning the indications for starting antiretroviral therapy among pediatricians involved in the treatment of HIV-infected patients in Europe and the United States. We compared the results of this survey with the guidelines available at the time, the recently adapted guidelines and literature evidence. Our results indicate that in clinical practice HAART was initiated at higher viral loads and lower CD4 counts than recommended by the guidelines. American guidelines recommended and still recommend more aggressive treatment than the European guidelines, and this is reflected in clinical practice. Until recently all guidelines were based on long term risk analyses of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and death performed in cohort data. A recent short term risk analysis makes it possible to calculate the 6 or 12-month risk for progression to AIDS or death for an individual child. Because viral load and CD4 count are typically measured every 3 months, one can argue that it is clinically more relevant to base the decision of when to start HAART on the short term probability of disease progression. Guidelines in Europe are now based on this type of analysis. The American guidelines only adopted the thresholds for CD4 and viral load. The short term risk analysis also shows that the risk for developing AIDS varies markedly with age. This should be reflected in all guidelines. Determining the acceptable risk of disease progression is difficult and influenced by patient-, doctor- and culture-related factors. The controversy over whether or not to treat

  7. SI units in biomedical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liden, K.

    1975-01-01

    The International commission on radiation units and measurements (ICRU), during the period from 1953 to 1962 presented its definitions of the quantities absorbed dose, exposure, activity, and dose equivalent and the corresponding special units the rad, the roentgen, the curie, and the rem. At the same time an international practical system of units was developed, Le Systeme International d'Unites (SI). It was adopted by the 11th Conference Generale des Poids et Mesures (CGPM) in 1960 and is now officially introduced in almost all countries. The general implementation of the SI means difficulties for the future use of the special radiation units, because the numerical factors involved prevent their adoption as SI units. In view of this, and after having sampled the opinion in the radiological field, the ICRU prepared a Statement on Units in July, 1974 which was forwarded to the Comite International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) and its Comite Consultatif des Unites (CCU) for consideration. As a result of this statement the CIPM has now proposed, that the 15rh CGPM adopt special names for two SI units, namely the becquerel, symbol Bq, for the unit of activity of radionuclides equal to the reciprocal second, s 1- , and the gray, symbol Gy, for the unit of absorbed dose equal to the joule per kilogram, J/kg. The 15th CGPM will consider this matter in May, 1975. (author)

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Activity in Pediatric Cancer between 2008 and 2014 in the United States: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Pooja; Millard, Heather R; Thiel, Elizabeth; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Abraham, Allistair A; Auletta, Jeffery J; Boulad, Farid; Brown, Valerie I; Camitta, Bruce M; Chan, Ka Wah; Chaudhury, Sonali; Cowan, Morton J; Angel-Diaz, Miguel; Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory; Kasow, Kimberly A; Keating, Amy K; Kitko, Carrie L; MacMillan, Margaret L; Olsson, Richard F; Page, Kristin M; Seber, Adriana; Smith, Angela R; Warwick, Anne B; Wirk, Baldeep; Mehta, Parinda A

    2017-08-01

    This Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research report describes the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in pediatric patients with cancer, 4408 undergoing allogeneic (allo) and3076 undergoing autologous (auto) HSCT in the United States between 2008 and 2014. In both settings, there was a greater proportion of boys (n = 4327; 57%), children reports of transplant practices in the United States. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Treaty-Based Settlement of Terrorism-Related Disputes in the Era of Active United Nations Security Council Involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.T. Ali (Nathanael)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The United Nations Security Council has become a crucial actor in international counterterrorism by not only spurring the taking of preventive and suppressive measures against terrorist individuals and groups, but also by taking actions against states that are said to

  10. Phthalocyanines with eight oligo(ethylene oxide) alkoxy units: thermotropic phase behavior, aggregate formation and ion complexation with redox-active ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piet, D.P.; Verheij, H.J.; Zuilhof, H.

    2003-01-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of phthalocyanines (Pc's) with eight oligo(ethylene oxide) alkoxy side chains has been investigated. An increase in the number of ethylene oxide units results in a decrease in the solid-to-mesophase and isotropization temperatures. The investigated compounds display a

  11. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  12. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  13. Diversity and antifungal activity of the endophytic fungi associated with the native medicinal cactus Opuntia humifusa (Cactaceae) from the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The endophytic fungal community associated with the native cactus Opuntia humifusa in the United States was investigated and its potential for providing antifungal compounds. A total of 108 endophytic fungal isolates were obtained and identified by molecular methods into 17 different taxa of the gen...

  14. Science Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.; Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Biology, Chemistry, and Physical Science developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace relationships, learning activities with suggested…

  15. Sedentary and physically active behavior patterns among low-income African-American and white adults living in the southeastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah S Cohen

    Full Text Available Increased sedentary behavior and lack of physical activity are associated with increased risk for many chronic diseases. Differences in leisure-time physical activity between African American and white adults have been suggested to partially explain racial disparities in chronic disease outcomes, but expanding the definition of physical activity to include household and occupational activities may reduce or even eliminate racial differences in total physical activity. The objective of this study was to describe patterns of active and sedentary behaviors in black and white adults and to examine these behaviors across demographic measures. Sedentary and physically active behaviors were obtained from a validated physical activity questionnaire in 23,021 black men, 9,899 white men, 32,214 black women, and 15,425 white women (age 40-79 at enrollment into the Southern Community Cohort Study. Descriptive statistics for sedentary time; light, moderate, and vigorous household/occupational activity; sports/exercise; total activity; and meeting current physical activity recommendations via sports/exercise were examined for each race-sex group. Adjusted means were calculated using multiple linear regression models across demographic measures. Study participants spent approximately 60% of waking time in sedentary behaviors. Blacks reported more television viewing time than whites (45 minutes for females, 15 minutes for males, but when sitting time was expressed as a proportion of overall awake time, minimal racial differences were found. Patterns of light, moderate, and vigorous household/occupational activity were similar in all race/sex groups. 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans were followed by 16% of women and 25% of men independent of race. Overall, black and white men and women in this study spent the majority of their daily time in sedentary behaviors and less than one-fourth followed current guidelines for physical activity. These

  16. Microcontroller Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulaev, A.B.

    1994-01-01

    The general purpose micro controller unit based on 8-bit single-chip microcomputer of the MCS-51 family is described. The controller has the data and program memories, a serial interface and an external bus for functional I/O extensions. The controller consists of a microcomputer chip, up to 4 ROM-RAM chips and 10 SSI and MSI chips, and it measures 160x120 mm. Both hardware and software micro system debugging tools are described. (author). 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Student Success in Top 20 Courses of an Online Institution: Demographic Differences in a Multi-Semester Cross-Curricular Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Angela M.; Kupczynski, Lori; Ice, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Student success is vitally important. Without academic achievement student self-efficacy is lost, persistence is blocked, and matriculation is unachievable. Exponential growth at online institutions necessitates the inquiry into factors that play a role in student success. In this study, approximately 15,000 cases from the Top 20 enrolled courses…

  18. HISTORICAL-CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND SEXUALITY IN SCHOOL EDUCATION: CONSIDERATIONS FROM THE ANALYSIS OF SEXUALITY AS A CROSS-CURRICULAR THEME IN THE NATIONAL CURRICULUM PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Magalhães da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the theme “sexual orientation” was inserted in the Brazilian official curriculum from some assumptions of the historical-critical pedagogy, such as the definition of classical knowledge and the role that this pedagogical theory attaches to school education. Thus we question the relevance of the theme for individual development and present some considerations on how it could be taught in schools from the perspective of overcoming the capitalist society.

  19. Communities on the move: Pedestrian-oriented zoning as a facilitator of adult active travel to work in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Jamie Friedman Chriqui; Jamie Friedman Chriqui; Julien eLeider; Emily eThrun; Lisa eNicholson; Sandy eSlater; Sandy eSlater

    2016-01-01

    Background: Communities across the United States have been reforming their zoning codes to create pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods with increased street connectivity, mixed-use and higher density, open space, transportation infrastructure, and a traditional neighborhood structure. Zoning code reforms include new urbanist zoning such as the SmartCode, form-based codes, transects, transportation and pedestrian-oriented developments, and traditional neighborhood developments.Purpose: To examine...

  20. Solar unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, A M; Trushevskiy, S N; Tveryanovich, E V

    1982-01-01

    A solar unit is proposed which contains an inclined solar collector with supply and outlet pipelines, the first of which is connected to the source of a heat carrier, while the second is connected through the valve to the tank for collecting heated heat carrier equipped with a device for recovery. In order to improve the effectiveness of heating the heat carrier, it additionally contains a concentrator of solar radiation and a device for maintaining a level of the heat carrier in the collector in the zone of the focal spot of the concentrator, while the heat pipeline is connected to the source of the heat carrier with the help of a device for maintaining the level of the heat carrier.

  1. Self-reported Chlamydia testing rates of sexually active women aged 15-25 years in the United States, 2006-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Guoyu; Hoover, Karen W; Leichliter, Jami S; Peterman, Thomas A; Kent, Charlotte K

    2012-08-01

    Using the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth, we estimated a 37.9% annual chlamydia testing rate for sexually active US women aged 15 to 25 years, defined as having ≥ 1 sex partner in the past year. Our results highlight the need for increased testing among sexually active young women.

  2. United States rejoin ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.

    2003-01-01

    Upon pressure from the United States Congress, the US Department of Energy had to withdraw from further American participation in the ITER Engineering Design Activities after the end of its commitment to the EDA in July 1998. In the years since that time, changes have taken place in both the ITER activity and the US fusion community's position on burning plasma physics. Reflecting the interest in the United States in pursuing burning plasma physics, the DOE's Office of Science commissioned three studies as part of its examination of the option of entering the Negotiations on the Agreement on the Establishment of the International Fusion Energy Organization for the Joint Implementation of the ITER Project. These were a National Academy Review Panel Report supporting the burning plasma mission; a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) report confirming the role of ITER in achieving fusion power production, and The Lehman Review of the ITER project costing and project management processes (for the latter one, see ITER CTA Newsletter, no. 15, December 2002). All three studies have endorsed the US return to the ITER activities. This historical decision was announced by DOE Secretary Abraham during his remarks to employees of the Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The United States will be working with the other Participants in the ITER Negotiations on the Agreement and is preparing to participate in the ITA

  3. Karma United

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saliev, Kamolidden; Hockerts, Kai

    2013-01-01

    work with the company’s philanthropic activities. Moving on, the case describes the history of hummel and its turnaround in the 1990s from near bankruptcy. The leadership style in hummel International, 'Company Karma', is outlined and links are made to the general concept of corporate social...

  4. Understanding the complex interplay of barriers to physical activity amongst black and minority ethnic groups in the United Kingdom: a qualitative synthesis using meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshoedo, Sejlo A; Paul-Ebhohimhen, Virginia A; Jepson, Ruth G; Watson, Margaret C

    2015-07-12

    To conduct a meta-ethnographic analysis of qualitative studies to identify barriers to Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) individuals engaging in physical activity in the UK context. A qualitative synthesis using meta-ethnographic methods to synthesis studies of barriers to engaging in physical activity among BME groups in the UK. A comprehensive search strategy of multiple databases was employed to identify qualitative research studies published up to October 2012. The eleven searched databases included ASSIA, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Health Technology Assessment (HTA), NHS Scotland Library, Physical Activity Health Alliance (PAHA), PsyINFO, Social Services Abstract, Sport discuss and Web of Science. The Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic approach was undertaken to develop an inductive and interpretive form of knowledge synthesis. Fourteen papers met the inclusion criteria. The synthesis indicated that barriers to physical activity among BME individuals were influenced by four main concepts: perceptions; cultural expectations; personal barriers; and factors limiting access to facilities. BME individuals had different understandings of physical activity were influenced by migration history, experiences, cultural and health beliefs. This in turn may have a disempowering effect on BME individuals in terms of adopting or maintaining physical activity. These barriers to physical activity were explained at a higher conceptual level by a socio-ecological model. The social construct 'individual perception and understanding of physical activity' was particularly relevant to theoretical models and interventions. Interventions to promote engagement with physical activity need to address perceptions of this behaviour. The elicited concepts and contexts could be used to enhance the development of tailored effective health promotion interventions for BME individuals.

  5. A characteristic chondroitin sulfate trisaccharide unit with a sulfated fucose branch exhibits neurite outgrowth-promoting activity: Novel biological roles of fucosylated chondroitin sulfates isolated from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Miharu; Mikami, Tadahisa; Tamura, Jun-Ichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-06-03

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is a class of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that consist of repeating disaccharide unit composed of glucuronic acid (GlcA) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc). CS chains are found throughout the pericellular and extracellular spaces and contribute to the formation of functional microenvironments for numerous biological events. However, their structure-function relations remain to be fully characterized. Here, a fucosylated CS (FCS) was isolated from the body wall of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. Its promotional effects on neurite outgrowth were assessed by using isolated polysaccharides and the chemically synthesized FCS trisaccharide β-D-GalNAc(4,6-O-disulfate) (1-4)[α-l-fucose (2,4-O-disulfate) (1-3)]-β-D-GlcA. FCS polysaccharides contained the E-type disaccharide unit GlcA-GalNAc(4,6-O-disulfate) as a CS major backbone structure and carried distinct sulfated fucose branches. Despite their relatively lower abundance of E unit, FCS polysaccharides exhibited neurite outgrowth-promoting activity comparable to squid cartilage-derived CS-E polysaccharides, which are characterized by their predominant E units, suggesting potential roles of the fucose branch in neurite outgrowth. Indeed, the chemically synthesized FCS trisaccharide was as effective as CS-E tetrasaccharide in stimulating neurite elongation in vitro. In conclusion, FCS trisaccharide units with 2,4-O-disulfated fucose branches may provide new insights into understanding the structure-function relations of CS chains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sexual Activity and Function in the Year After an Acute Myocardial Infarction Among Younger Women and Men in the United States and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Abramsohn, Emily; Bueno, Hector; D'Onofrio, Gail; Lichtman, Judith H; Lorenze, Nancy P; Sanghani, Rupa Mehta; Spatz, Erica S; Spertus, John A; Strait, Kelly M; Wroblewski, Kristen; Zhou, Shengfan; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-10-01

    Most younger adults who experience an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are sexually active before the AMI, but little is known about sexual activity or sexual function after the event. To describe patterns of sexual activity and function and identify indicators of the probability of loss of sexual activity in the year after AMI. Data from the prospective, multicenter, longitudinal Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients study (conducted from August 21, 2008, to January 5, 2012) were assessed at baseline, 1 month, and 1 year. Participants were from US (n = 103) and Spanish (n = 24) hospitals and completed baseline and all follow-up interviews. Data analysis for the present study was conducted from October 15, 2014, to June 6, 2016. Characteristics associated with loss of sexual activity were assessed using multinomial logistic regression analyses. Loss of sexual activity after AMI. Of the 2802 patients included in the analysis, 1889 were women (67.4%); median (25th-75th percentile) age was 49 (44-52) years (range, 18-55 years). At all time points, 637 (40.4%) of women and 437 (54.9%) of men were sexually active. Among people who were active at baseline, men were more likely than women to have resumed sexual activity by 1 month (448 [63.9%] vs 661 [54.5%]; P trouble lubricating (273 [22.3%]) among women and erectile difficulties (156 [21.7%]) and lack of interest (137 [18.8%]) among men. Those who had not communicated with a physician about sex in the first month after AMI were more likely to delay resuming sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.11-2.05; P = .008). Higher stress levels (AOR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.83) and having diabetes (AOR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.15-3.13) were significant indicators of the probability of loss of sexual activity in the year after the AMI. Impaired sexual activity and incident sexual function problems were prevalent and more common among young women than men in the year after AMI

  7. Termination unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  8. Termination unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  9. Inspection activities of the Mexican regulatory body during the construction stage of the first unit of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado Gonzalez, Julio Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    The paper addresses the regulatory framework established for the design, construction and operation of the NPP. The regulatory bases of the inspection program are mentioned.A summary of the inspection and reviewing activities carried out by the former Nuclear Safety Management Construction area during the construction stage, taking the year 1977 as the beginning of regular inspection activities for this construction stage, and up to the year 1987, when this one is considered as practically completed, and a stage of pre-operational tests has been started. Finally, the main inspection areas are described, and a summary is given of the classification of deficiencies detected during the inspections

  10. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for

  11. The Effect of Active Learning Techniques on Class Teacher Candidates' Success Rates and Attitudes toward Their Museum Theory and Application Unit in Their Visual Arts Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmac, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect that using active learning techniques during museum and gallery visits has on teacher candidates' academic success rates in and attitudes toward their Visual Arts Course. In this study, the importance and requirement of education to take place in museums and art galleries is emphasized. The…

  12. The importance of trade in services and environmental amenities to the location of producer service activities in the western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, T.

    1991-12-31

    The use of business services has had an increasingly important effect on economic performance in many industries, with the ability of firms in a given location to respond to changes in external markets, production techniques and material supplies often determined by the local provision of business information. Consequently, an increasing research effort has focused on the characteristics and role of producer services activities at the regional and urban economies. This paper examines the nature and extent of external linkages of a sample of independent producer service firms in the two regional centers of Denver and Salt Lake City. Preliminary results are presented from a larger survey of local and regional factors important to the location of producer service activity using survey data collected from producer service activities in metropolitan and non-metropolitan places in Colorado and Utah. Findings are presented in three main areas of interest: the importance and geographic sources of subcontracting of business services by producer service establishments, particularly those establishments where scientific and technical occupations are an important location factor; the geographic and sectoral distribution of service sales; and the relative importance of various environmental amenities to the location of producer service activities.

  13. The importance of trade in services and environmental amenities to the location of producer service activities in the western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, T.

    1991-01-01

    The use of business services has had an increasingly important effect on economic performance in many industries, with the ability of firms in a given location to respond to changes in external markets, production techniques and material supplies often determined by the local provision of business information. Consequently, an increasing research effort has focused on the characteristics and role of producer services activities at the regional and urban economies. This paper examines the nature and extent of external linkages of a sample of independent producer service firms in the two regional centers of Denver and Salt Lake City. Preliminary results are presented from a larger survey of local and regional factors important to the location of producer service activity using survey data collected from producer service activities in metropolitan and non-metropolitan places in Colorado and Utah. Findings are presented in three main areas of interest: the importance and geographic sources of subcontracting of business services by producer service establishments, particularly those establishments where scientific and technical occupations are an important location factor; the geographic and sectoral distribution of service sales; and the relative importance of various environmental amenities to the location of producer service activities.

  14. Effects of Man's Activities on the Marine Environment; Committee on Commerce, United States Senate, Ninety-Fourth Congress, First Session. Committee Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Commerce.

    This report, prepared for the Committee on Commerce and the National Ocean Policy Study Committee, describes many aspects of water pollution, both national and international. Specific sections are devoted to: (1) assessing man's influence on the oceans, (2) activities that generate marine pollution, (3) specific marine pollutants, (4) policy for…

  15. Characterization of the tumor-promoting activity of m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid in SENCAR mouse skin and its inhibition by gallotannin, oligomeric proanthocyanidin, and their monomeric units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilan Chen; Elisabeth M. Perchellet; Xiao Mei Gao; Fatima K. Johnson; Amy W. Davis; Steven W. Newell; Richard W. Hemingway; Vittorio Bottari; Jean-Pierre Perchellett

    1996-01-01

    m-Chloroperoxybenzoic acid (CPBA). Which induces ornithine decarboxylase activity as much as 12-0- terradecanoyIp horbol-13-acetate (TPA ). was tested for its ability to induce DNA synthesis. bydroperoxide (HPx) production. and tumor promotion in mouse epidermis in vivo. After an early inhibition. CPBA stimulates DNA synthesis. A response which is maintained between 16...

  16. Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Childbearing of Teenagers Aged 15-19 in the United States. NCHS Data Brief. Number 209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gladys M.; Abma, Joyce C.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring sexual activity and contraceptive use among U.S. adolescents is important for understanding differences in their risk of pregnancy. In 2013, the U.S. birth rate for teenagers aged 15-19 dropped 57% from its peak in 1991, paralleling a decline in the teen "pregnancy" rate. But these rates are still higher than those in other…

  17. Organizational Member Involvement in Physical Activity Coalitions across the United States: Development and Testing of a Novel Survey Instrument for Assessing Coalition Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement…

  18. Healthy kids out of school: using mixed methods to develop principles for promoting healthy eating and physical activity in out-of-school settings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Sarah A; Sharma, Shanti; Dietz, William H; Dolan, Peter R; Nelson, Miriam E; Newman, Molly B; Rockeymoore, Maya; Economos, Christina D

    2014-12-31

    Widespread practices supporting availability of healthful foods, beverages, and physical activity in out-of-school-time (OST) settings would further obesity prevention efforts. The objective of this article was to describe principles to guide policy development in support of healthy eating and physical activity practices in out-of-school settings to promote obesity prevention. The Institute of Medicine's L.E.A.D. framework (Locate Evidence, Evaluate it, Assemble it, and Inform Decisions) was used to identify practices relevant to children's healthful eating in most OST settings: 1) locate and evaluate information from a national survey of children's perceptions of healthful-food access; published research, reports, policies and guidelines; and roundtables with OST organizations' administrators; 2) assemble information to prioritize actionable practices; and 3) inform programmatic direction. Three evidence-informed guiding principles for short-duration OST resulted: 1) drink right: choose water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages; 2) move more: boost movement and physical activity in all programs; and 3) snack smart: fuel up on fruits and vegetables. Healthy Kids Out of School was launched to support the dissemination and implementation of these guiding principles in short-duration OST settings, complementing efforts in other OST settings to shift norms around eating and physical activity.

  19. National legislative and regulatory activities: Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Ireland, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Sweden, Ukraine, United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    (Changes to site evaluation reports); Nuclear safety and radiation protection (Amendments to various laws relating to nuclear safety, Revised requirements relating to modifications of nuclear installations, New safety reporting requirements, New requirements relating to releases of radionuclides, New conditions for removal of items from regulatory control, New radiation protection requirements, New inspection procedure requirements, New procedure for compliance enforcement); Nuclear security (Establishment of a design basis threat review process). Moldova: General legislation (Co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency). Poland: General legislation (Amendments to the Atomic Law Act); Liability and compensation (New requirements for civil liability insurance); Organisation and structure (New advisory council established); Nuclear safety and radiation protection (New requirements for employees working at nuclear power plants). Portugal: General legislation (Integration of the Nuclear Technological Institute into the Technical University of Lisbon); Nuclear safety and radiation protection (Creation of the Regulatory Commission for the Safety of Nuclear Facilities). Romania: Environmental protection (Changes to fuel production regulations). Slovenia: Nuclear safety and radiation protection (New rules governing worker qualification); Sweden: Nuclear safety and radiation protection (New regulation on clearance from regulation). Ukraine: General legislation (New requirements relating to the purchase of fuel elements); Nuclear safety and radiation protection (New plans for a comprehensive safety upgrade, New community outreach requirements, New transparency and information availability requirements); Nuclear security (Changes to the state-level physical protection regime); Radioactive waste management (New centralised repository planned) United States: Radioactive waste management (Status of the high-level waste repository programme, Issuance of the Final Report of

  20. The effects of Snoezelen (multi-sensory behavior therapy) and psychiatric care on agitation, apathy, and activities of daily living in dementia patients on a short term geriatric psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Jason A; Sacks, Amanda; Matheis, Robert; Collier, Lesley; Calia, Tina; Hanif, Henry; Kofman, Eugene S

    2007-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, single-blinded, between group study of 24 participants with moderate to severe dementia was conducted on a geriatric psychiatric unit. All participants received pharmacological therapy, occupational therapy, structured hospital environment, and were randomized to receive multi sensory behavior therapy (MSBT) or a structured activity session. Greater independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) was observed for the group treated with MSBT and standard psychiatric inpatient care on the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living (KI-ADL; P = 0.05) than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone. The combination treatment of MSBT and standard psychiatric care also reduced agitation and apathy greater than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone as measured with the Pittsburgh Agitation Scale and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease (P = 0.05). Multiple regression analysis predicted that within the multi-sensory group, activities of daily living (KI-ADL) increased as apathy and agitation reduced (R2 = 0.42; p = 0.03). These data suggest that utilizing MSBT with standard psychiatric inpatient care may reduce apathy and agitation and additionally improve activities of daily living in hospitalized people with moderate to severe dementia more than standard care alone.

  1. Exploring the Cross-sectional Association between Transit-Oriented Development Zoning and Active Travel and Transit Usage in the United States, 2010-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eThrun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to traditional zoning codes that contribute to car-dependent, sprawling, and disconnected neighborhoods, communities are reforming their land use laws to create pedestrian-friendly areas that promote physical activity. One such reform is the adoption of transit-oriented developments or districts (TODs. TODs are higher-density, compact, mixed use areas located around transit stops that are designed to encourage walking.Purpose: To identify the characteristics of communities that have adopted TODs in their land use laws and examine if communities that have included TODs in their zoning codes are more likely to have adults that commute by any form of active transportation (i.e., walking, biking, or public transportation or by using public transportation specifically.Methods: Zoning codes effective as of 2010 were obtained for a purposeful sample of the largest 3,914 municipal jurisdictions located in 473 of the most populous US counties and consolidated cities within 48 states and the District of Columbia. They were evaluated to determine whether they included TOD districts or regulations using a coding tool developed by the study team. Descriptive statistics together with t-tests and Pearson’s chi-squared independence test were used to compare characteristics of jurisdictions with and without TOD zoning. Multivariate linear regressions were used to compute the adjusted association between TOD zoning and taking public or active transportation to work.Results: Jurisdictions with TOD zoning were located more in the South and West than non-TOD jurisdictions and were more populous, higher income, more racially diverse, and younger. Jurisdictions with TOD zoning had significantly higher percentages of occupied housing with no vehicle than those without TOD zoning. TOD zoning was associated with significantly higher rates of public transportation to work (β=2.10, 95% CI=0.88, 3.32 and active transportation to work (β=2.48, 95

  2. Anti-Terrorism Authority Under the Laws of the United Kingdom and the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feikert, Clare; Doyle, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This is a comparison of the laws of the United Kingdom and of the United States that govern criminal and intelligence investigations of terrorist activities Both systems rely upon a series of statutory authorizations...

  3. The Impact of Multiple Concussions on Emotional Distress, Post-Concussive Symptoms, and Neurocognitive Functioning in Active Duty United States Marines Independent of Combat Exposure or Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Bleiberg, Joseph; Tsao, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether the lingering effects of concussion on emotional, physical, and cognitive symptoms is because of the effects of brain trauma or purely to emotional factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. This study examines the independent effects of concussion on persistent symptoms. The Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment, a clinical decision support tool, was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning in 646 United States Marines, all of whom were fit for duty. Marines were assessed for concussion history, post-concussive symptoms, emotional distress, neurocognitive functioning, and deployment history. Results showed that a recent concussion or ever having experienced a concussion was associated with an increase in emotional distress, but not with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) or neurocognitive functioning. Having had multiple lifetime concussions, however, was associated with greater emotional distress, PPCS, and reduced neurocognitive functioning that needs attention and rapid discrimination, but not for memory-based tasks. These results are independent of deployment history, combat exposure, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Results supported earlier findings that a previous concussion is not generally associated with post-concussive symptoms independent of covariates. In contrast with other studies that failed to find a unique contribution for concussion to PPCS, however, evidence of recent and multiple concussion was seen across a range of emotional distress, post-concussive symptoms, and neurocognitive functioning in this study population. Results are discussed in terms of implications for assessing concussion on return from combat. PMID:25003552

  4. Pacoma: Performance assessment of the confinement of medium-active and alpha-bearing wastes. Assessment of disposal in a clay formation in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobbs, S.F.; Klos, R.A.; Martin, J.S.; Laurens, J.M.; Winters, K.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the PACOMA assessment of the radiological impact of disposal of intermediate level and alpha-bearing wastes in a hypothetical repository situated in the clay formations below the Harwell site in the United Kingdom. The assessment includes: best estimate calculations, uncertainty analyses, sensitivity analyses and model comparisons. Results of the radiological impact calculations are in the form of doses and risks to individuals and time-integrated doses to populations, for a normal evolution scenario and a number of altered evolution scenarios. The calculated risks to individuals are well below the limit recommended by the ICRP, and the calculated collective dose over the first 10,000 years after disposal is zero. Thus the radiological impact of the disposal intermediate level and alpha-bearing wastes in a clay formation is predicted to be small. The uncertainty analyses showed that, for the normal evolution scenario, the range of predicted risks to individuals is very wide. However, these results must be treated with caution because a formal methodology for eliciting judgments about model parameter values was only applied in the case of geosphere data. The sensitivity analyses and model comparisons indicated the need for improved models and data for water and radionuclide movement in the near-surface environment

  5. Modelling of a thermally activated building system (TABS) combined with free-hanging acoustic ceiling units using computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacarte, Luis Marcos Domínguez; Fan, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    . The active surfaces of TABS need to be as exposed as possible, but exposing bare concrete surfaces has a negative impact on the acoustic quality in the premises. Acoustic solutions capable of providing optimal acoustic comfort while allowing the heat exchange between the TABS and the room are desirable...... of the heat exchange between the TABS and the room and the occupants. The simulations are validated by comparison with full scale measurements in laboratory conditions. The study shows that for equivalent sound absorption levels, free-hanging vertical sound absorbers have a lower impact on the heat exchange......Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) have proven to be an energy-efficient solution to achieve optimal indoor thermal environment in buildings. This solution uses the building mass to store heat and by means of water pipes embedded in the concrete slabs adjust the temperature in the premises...

  6. A Mixed-Methods Examination of Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Overweight and Obese South Asian Men Living in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadian, Amir; Thompson, Janice

    2017-03-27

    South Asian men living in the UK have higher rates of central obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) compared with their white British counterparts. Physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) are important risk factors for the development of T2DM. The purpose of this study was to objectively measure PA, ST, and to explore the factors influencing these behaviours in this high-risk population. A mixed-methods cross-sectional research design was employed, including the quantification of PA and ST using the self-report International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)-long form and accelerometry in overweight and obese UK South Asian men (n = 54), followed by semi-structured interviews in a purposive sub-sample to explore the factors influencing PA and ST (n = 31). Accelerometer-derived moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and ST were 298.9 ± 186.6 min/week and 551.4 ± 95.0 min/day, respectively. IPAQ-derived MVPA was significantly lower than accelerometer-derived MVPA (p physically active, with group exercise identified as an important facilitator to being more active. A cultural norm of focusing on promoting education over sport participation during childhood was identified as an important factor influencing long-term PA behaviours. Work commitments and predominantly sedentary jobs were identified as the main barriers to reducing ST. Healthcare professionals and researchers need to consider the socio-cultural factors which affect PA engagement in overweight and obese South Asian men living in the UK, to ensure that advice and future interventions are tailored to address the needs of this population.

  7. Report of the United States Air Force Morale, Welfare and Recreation Task Force. Impact Analysis of Institutional Factors Impacting MWR Activities. Annex A. Appendix 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    sports arenas, you would see items such as scoreboard, refreshment stands, and small amenities bearing the logo of a commercial concern (Coke, Pepsi , STP...deprive revenue sources readily accessible to their private sector competitors. By reaching a wider audience and accepting commercial advertisements...low fees for student/general population audiences as a service, as well as higher fees for revenue generating activities. Such a study could include

  8. Study protocol: cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of a staff training intervention in inpatient mental health rehabilitation units in increasing service users' engagement in activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killaspy, Helen; Cook, Sarah; Mundy, Tim; Craig, Thomas; Holloway, Frank; Leavey, Gerard; Marston, Louise; McCrone, Paul; Koeser, Leonardo; Arbuthnott, Maurice; Omar, Rumana Z; King, Michael

    2013-08-28

    This study focuses on people with complex and severe mental health problems who require inpatient rehabilitation. The majority have a diagnosis of schizophrenia whose recovery has been delayed due to non-response to first-line treatments, cognitive impairment, negative symptoms and co-existing problems such as substance misuse. These problems contribute to major impairments in social and everyday functioning necessitating lengthy admissions and high support needs on discharge to the community. Engagement in structured activities reduces negative symptoms of psychosis and may lead to improvement in function, but no trials have been conducted to test the efficacy of interventions that aim to achieve this. This study aims to investigate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a staff training intervention to increase service users' engagement in activities. This is a single-blind, two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial involving 40 inpatient mental health rehabilitation units across England. Units are randomised on an equal basis to receive either standard care or a "hands-on", manualised staff training programme comprising three distinct phases (predisposing, enabling and reinforcing) delivered by a small team of psychiatrists, occupational therapists, service users and activity workers. The primary outcome is service user engagement in activities 12 months after randomisation, assessed using a standardised measure. Secondary outcomes include social functioning and costs and cost-effectiveness of care. The study will provide much needed evidence for a practical staff training intervention that has potential to improve service user functioning, reducing the need for hospital treatment and supporting successful community discharge. The trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials (Ref ISRCTN25898179).

  9. Activities at the electric power research institute to support the modernization of instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.

    1998-01-01

    Most nuclear power plants in the United States are operating with a vast majority of their original analog instrumentation and control (I and C) equipment. Many of the I and C systems in the plants need to be modernized in a reliable and cost-effective manner to replace obsolete equipment, to reduce operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, to improve plant performance, and to maintain safety. The major drivers for the replacement of the safety, control, and information systems in nuclear power plants are the obsolescence of the existing hardware and the need for more cost-effective power production. Competition between power producers is dictating the need for more cost-effective power production. The increasing O and M costs to maintain systems experiencing obsolescence problems is counter to the needs for more cost-effective power production and improved competitiveness. Modern technology, especially digital systems, offers improved functionality, performance, and reliability; solutions to obsolescence of equipment; reduction in O and M costs, and the potential to enhance safety. Digital I and C systems with their inherent advantages will be implemented only if reliable and cost-effective implementation and licensing acceptance is achieved and if the modernized system supports reduced power production costs. Increasing competition will continue to be a major factor in the operation of nuclear power plants. I will continue to dictate the need for improved productivity and cost-effectiveness. EPRI and its members utilities are working together on an industry-wide Instrumentation and Control Program to address I and C issues and to develop cost-effective solutions. (author)

  10. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2010 (October - December 2009). A detailed project schedule is included in the Appendix. Included tasks are: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Objective Lightning Probability Tool, Phase III, (3) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, Phase II, (4) Upgrade Summer Severe Weather Tool in Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), (5) Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) Update and Maintainability, (5) Verify 12-km resolution North American Model (MesoNAM) Performance, and (5) Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Graphical User Interface.

  11. Functional inactivation of hypocretin 1 receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex affects the pyramidal neuron activity and gamma oscillations: An in vivo multiple-channel single-unit recording study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, C; Chen, Q-H; Ye, J-N; Li, C; Yang, L; Zhang, J; Xia, J-X; Hu, Z-A

    2015-06-25

    The hypocretin signaling is thought to play a critical role in maintaining wakefulness via stimulating the subcortical arousal pathways. Although the cortical areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), receive dense hypocretinergic fibers and express its receptors, it remains unclear whether the hypocretins can directly regulate the neural activity of the mPFC in vivo. In the present study, using multiple-channel single-unit recording study, we found that infusion of the SB-334867, a blocker for the Hcrtr1, beside the recording sites within the mPFC substantially exerted an inhibitory effect on the putative pyramidal neuron (PPN) activity in naturally behaving rats. In addition, functional blockade of the Hcrtr1 also selectively reduced the power of the gamma oscillations. The PPN activity and the power of the neural oscillations were not affected after microinjection of the TCS-OX2-29, a blocker for the Hcrtr2, within the mPFC. Together, these data indicate that endogenous hypocretins acting on the Hcrtr1 are required for the normal neural activity in the mPFC in vivo, and thus might directly contribute cortical arousal and mPFC-dependent cognitive processes. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [The active offering of measles, rubella and mumps vaccine in new mothers: the experience of health facilities in one of the Local Health Unit of Rome, Lazio, Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Viviana; Pettinicchio, Valentina; Lancia, Andreina; Vazzoler, Cristiana; De Luca, Francesca; Franco, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Rubella is a contagious disease that can be very serious, especially in unvaccinated pregnant women. The best way to be protected is getting vaccinated: MMR vaccine is very effective at protecting people against measles, mumps, and rubella, and preventing the complications caused by these diseases. According to PASSI 2012-2015 (the Italian behavioral risk factor surveillance system) in the territory of ex ASL Roma C only 56% of women between 18 and 49 years were immunized against rubella, thanks to vaccination (34%) or past infection detected by rubeotest (22%); 2% was susceptible and 42% of respondents did not know their immune status against rubella. The Italian National Plan for the Elimination of Measles and Congenital Rubella (PNEMoRc) 2010-15 had the aim to reduce the prevalence of rubella susceptibility in young women (<5%), to reduce the prevalence of congenital rubella and to increase MMR vaccination coverage. This plan suggested to promote actions to spread correct information about MMR vaccine in the general population and healthcare workers and to offer this vaccine to susceptible women during every appropriate contact with the Family planning clinics. In order to ensure and monitor these recommendations, a recovery procedure for MMR vaccine was activated in 2015 for women who contacted the health facilities for their first child vaccination. A form was developed in order to collect information about women's immune status against rubella and measles. According to this tool all women who stated they had never been vaccinated for rubella or MMR and/or did not remember vaccination and/or had never had a rubeotest were considered susceptible to rubella. Women susceptible to rubella were invited to undergo vaccination. Data collected during one year activity were recorded and analyzed with Epinfo 7.0 software. We collected 1801 correctly filled forms; 88.6% (1595) of women were evaluated immune to rubella and 11.4% susceptible. The prevalence of

  13. A seasonal-scale climatological analysis correlating spring tornadic activity with antecedent fall-winter drought in the southeastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, Marshall; Mote, Thomas L; Niyogi, Dev

    2009-01-01

    Using rain gauge and satellite-based rainfall climatologies and the NOAA Storm Prediction Center tornado database (1952-2007), this study found a statistically significant tendency for fall-winter drought conditions to be correlated with below-normal tornado days the following spring in north Georgia (i.e. 93% of the years) and other regions of the Southeast. Non-drought years had nearly twice as many tornado days in the study area as drought years and were also five to six times more likely to have multiple tornado days. Individual tornadic events are largely a function of the convective-mesoscale thermodynamic and dynamic environments, thus the study does not attempt to overstate predictability. Yet, the results may provide seasonal guidance in an analogous manner to the well known Sahelian rainfall and Cape Verde hurricane activity relationships.

  14. Advantages of active love wave techniques in geophysical characterizations of seismographic station - Case studies in California and the central and eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Antony; Yong, Alan K.; Salomone, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Active-source Love waves, recorded by the multi-channel analysis of surface wave (MASLW) technique, were recently analyzed in two site characterization projects. Between 2010 and 2012, the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded GEOVision to conduct geophysical investigations at 191 seismographic stations in California and the Central Eastern U.S. (CEUS). The original project plan was to utilize active and passive Rayleigh wave-based techniques to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles to a minimum depth of 30 m and the time-averaged VS of the upper 30 meters (VS30). Early in this investigation it became clear that Rayleigh wave techniques, such as multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASRW), were not suited for characterizing all sites. Shear-wave seismic refraction and MASLW techniques were therefore applied. In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute funded characterization of 33 CEUS station sites. Based on experience from the ARRA investigation, both MASRW and MASLW data were acquired by GEOVision at 24 CEUS sites. At shallow rock sites, sites with steep velocity gradients, and, sites with a thin, low velocity, surficial soil layer overlying stiffer sediments, Love wave techniques generally were found to be easier to interpret, i.e., Love wave data typically yielded unambiguous fundamental mode dispersion curves and thus, reduce uncertainty in the resultant VS model. These types of velocity structure often excite dominant higher modes in Rayleigh wave data, but not in the Love wave data. It is possible to model Rayleigh wave data using multi- or effective-mode techniques; however, extraction of Rayleigh wave dispersion data was found to be difficult in many cases. These results imply that field procedures should include careful scrutiny of Rayleigh wave-based dispersion data in order to also collect Love wave data when warranted.

  15. Examining Influences of Parenting Styles and Practices on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors in Latino Children in the United States: Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana Cristina; Wasserman, Minerva; Muñoz, Mario A; Wallington, Sherrie F; Greaney, Mary L

    2018-01-30

    Research indicates that parents influence their children's physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors (SB) through their parenting styles and practices. The objectives of this paper were to evaluate existing research examining the associations between parenting styles, parenting practices, and PA and SB among Latino children aged between 2 and 12 years, highlight limitations of the existing research, and generate suggestions for future research. The method of this integrative review was informed by methods developed by Whittemore and Knafl, which allow for the inclusion of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods studies. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews Meta-Analyses guidelines, five electronic academic databases (PubMed, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, and CINAHL) were searched for peer-reviewed, full-text papers published in English. Of the 641 unique citations identified, 67 full-text papers were retrieved, and 16 were selected for review. The majority of the 16 reviewed studies were conducted with predominantly Mexican American or Mexican immigrant samples, and only 1 study examined the association between parenting styles and Latino children's PA and SB. Most (n=15) reviewed studies assessed the influence of parenting practices on children's PA and SB, and they provide good evidence that parenting practices such as offering verbal encouragement, prompting the child to be physically active, providing logistic support, engaging and being involved in PA, monitoring, and offering reinforcement and rewards encourage, facilitate, or increase children's PA. The examined studies also provide evidence that parenting practices, such as setting rules and implementing PA restrictions due to safety concerns, weather, and using psychological control discourage, hinder, or decrease children's PA. Because this review found a very small number of studies examining the relationship between parenting styles and Latino children's PA and SB

  16. Examining Influences of Parenting Styles and Practices on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors in Latino Children in the United States: Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Mario A; Wallington, Sherrie F; Greaney, Mary L

    2018-01-01

    Background Research indicates that parents influence their children’s physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors (SB) through their parenting styles and practices. Objective The objectives of this paper were to evaluate existing research examining the associations between parenting styles, parenting practices, and PA and SB among Latino children aged between 2 and 12 years, highlight limitations of the existing research, and generate suggestions for future research. Methods The method of this integrative review was informed by methods developed by Whittemore and Knafl, which allow for the inclusion of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods studies. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews Meta-Analyses guidelines, five electronic academic databases (PubMed, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, and CINAHL) were searched for peer-reviewed, full-text papers published in English. Of the 641 unique citations identified, 67 full-text papers were retrieved, and 16 were selected for review. Results The majority of the 16 reviewed studies were conducted with predominantly Mexican American or Mexican immigrant samples, and only 1 study examined the association between parenting styles and Latino children’s PA and SB. Most (n=15) reviewed studies assessed the influence of parenting practices on children’s PA and SB, and they provide good evidence that parenting practices such as offering verbal encouragement, prompting the child to be physically active, providing logistic support, engaging and being involved in PA, monitoring, and offering reinforcement and rewards encourage, facilitate, or increase children’s PA. The examined studies also provide evidence that parenting practices, such as setting rules and implementing PA restrictions due to safety concerns, weather, and using psychological control discourage, hinder, or decrease children’s PA. Conclusions Because this review found a very small number of studies examining the

  17. Unit Commissioning of “Belene” NPP (Bulgaria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This presentations gives detailed information about the following topics about commissioning: principles of NPP commissioning; phases of NPP commissioning; organization of commissioning activities; duties and responsibilities of the parties for carrying out unit commissioning activities; responsibility and obligations of the sides during commissioning of power unit; documentation required for power unit commissioning; quality assurance for commissioning activities

  18. 4G/5G Polymorphism of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor -1 Gene Is Associated with Mortality in Intensive Care Unit Patients with Severe Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, Anil; Hansen, Helen; Ajayi, Temitayo; Brown, Ron; Garcia, Oscar; Zhuo, HanJing; Wiemels, Joseph; Matthay, Michael A.; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine

    2011-01-01

    Background Higher plasma and pulmonary edema fluid levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are associated with increased mortality in patients with pneumonia and acute lung injury. The 4G allele of the 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene is associated with higher PAI-1 levels and an increased incidence of hospitalizations for pneumonia. The authors hypothesized that the 4G allele would be associated with worse clinical outcomes (mortality and ventilator-free days) in patients with severe pneumonia. Methods The authors enrolled patients admitted with severe pneumonia in a prospective cohort. Patients were followed until hospital discharge. DNA was isolated from blood samples, and genotyping detection for the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was carried out using Taqman-based allelic discrimination. Results A total of 111 patients were available for analysis. Distribution of genotypes was 4G/4G 26 of 111 (23%), 4G/5G 59 of 111 (53%), and 5G/5G 26 of 111 (23%). Of 111 patients, 32 (29%) died before hospital discharge and 105 patients (94%) received mechanical ventilation. Patients with the 4G/4G and the 4G/5G genotypes had higher mortality (35% vs. 8%, P = 0.007) and fewer ventilator-free days (median 4 vs. 13, P = 0.04) compared to patients with the 5G/5G genotype. Conclusions The 4G allele of the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene is associated with fewer ventilator-free days and increased mortality in hospitalized patients with severe pneumonia. These findings suggest that PAI-1 may have a role in pathogenesis and that the 4G/5G polymorphism may be an important biomarker of risk in patients with severe pneumonia. PMID:19387177

  19. 4G/5G polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene is associated with mortality in intensive care unit patients with severe pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, Anil; Hansen, Helen; Ajayi, Temitayo; Brown, Ron; Garcia, Oscar; Zhuo, HanJing; Wiemels, Joseph; Matthay, Michael A; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine

    2009-05-01

    Higher plasma and pulmonary edema fluid levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are associated with increased mortality in patients with pneumonia and acute lung injury. The 4G allele of the 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene is associated with higher PAI-1 levels and an increased incidence of hospitalizations for pneumonia. The authors hypothesized that the 4G allele would be associated with worse clinical outcomes (mortality and ventilator-free days) in patients with severe pneumonia. The authors enrolled patients admitted with severe pneumonia in a prospective cohort. Patients were followed until hospital discharge. DNA was isolated from blood samples, and genotyping detection for the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was carried out using Taqman-based allelic discrimination. A total of 111 patients were available for analysis. Distribution of genotypes was 4G/4G 26 of 111 (23%), 4G/5G 59 of 111 (53%), and 5G/5G 26 of 111 (23%). Of 111 patients, 32 (29%) died before hospital discharge and 105 patients (94%) received mechanical ventilation. Patients with the 4G/4G and the 4G/5G genotypes had higher mortality (35% vs. 8%, P = 0.007) and fewer ventilator-free days (median 4 vs. 13, P = 0.04) compared to patients with the 5G/5G genotype. The 4G allele of the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene is associated with fewer ventilator-free days and increased mortality in hospitalized patients with severe pneumonia. These findings suggest that PAI-1 may have a role in pathogenesis and that the 4G/5G polymorphism may be an important biomarker of risk in patients with severe pneumonia.

  20. Present status of reactor physics in the United States and Japan-III. 1. Recent Activities of Loading Pattern Optimization Research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio

    2001-01-01

    Because of recent enhancements of optimization algorithms and great improvements in computer hardware, loading pattern (LP) optimization methods are being used as practical design tools both in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) industries. LP optimization methods are mainly used for the following in-core fuel management activities in Japan: 1. minimization of fuel cycle costs; 2. evaluation of various in-core fuel management scenarios; 3. estimation of the number of feed assemblies needed during several successive cycles for fuel ordering; 4. evaluation of fuel bids. Although engineers can perform these analyses, the major motivations to utilize LP optimization methods are the reduction of manpower and the establishment of engineer-independent LP quality. These are important in today's in-core fuel management tasks. In the following sections, activities related to LP optimization research in Japan are briefly described. The major activity of PWR LP optimization research in Japan is development of the INSIGHT system. The INSIGHT system is an integrated scoping analysis tool for PWRs developed by Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI). The INSIGHT system is a graphical user interface (GUI)-based interactive design tool that includes LP optimization, automated multicycle analysis, an interactive LP design, core follow, an integrated database, and some auxiliary functions. The INSIGHT system was mainly written in the C++ language and consists of ∼400 000 lines of source code. The GALLOP code is the LP optimization module of the INSIGHT system. An automated multicycle analysis is performed by the MCA code in INSIGHT. The MCA code performs a fuel and burnable poison (BP) inventory search by automatically invoking the GALLOP code, which makes LPs. The MCA code can deal with various constraints that have appeared in practical in-core fuel management, e.g., limitations of fuel/BP stock, forced fuel loading/discharge, limitations of core safety

  1. Evaluation of zeolite mixtures for decontamination of high-activity-level water in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.; Campbell, D.O.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Wallace, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Mixtures of Linde Ionsiv IE-96 and Ionsiv A-51 zeolites were evaluated for use in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) that was installed at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2 (TMI-2) for decontaminating approx. 3000 m 3 (approx. 700,000 gal) of high-activity-level water in the containment building sump. Small-scale, tracer-level column tests were made using various mixtures of the zeolites to evaluate the capability for simultaneous removal of cesium and strontium. A column loading test was made in a hot cell using a mixture of equal parts of the zeolites to evaluate the performance of the mixture in removing cesium and strontium from a sample of TMI-2 sump water. A computerized mathematical model of the mixed-bed SDS system was used to evaluate the test data in order to select a zeolite mixture and predict system performance

  2. Thermal construction unit activation with supply air gains significance. Ceilings cooling - supply air heating - more than 50 % energy conservation; Thermische Bauteilaktivierung mit Zuluft gewinnt an Bedeutung. Decke kuehlen - Zuluft erwaermen - mehr als 50% Energie einsparen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Wolfgang

    2009-05-15

    In the year 2001, in Stuttgart (Federal Republic of Germany) the first office building was established which uses a thermal construction unit activation with air as cooling agent. Today, the system ''Concret-cool'' already is installed in more than 40 buildings. Computations show that due to the room heating by means of internally finned ventilation pipes embedded in concrete more than 50 % less energy in comparison to comparable systems can be used. In his Green Building project ''Skyline Tower'' in Munich (Federal Republic of Germany), also star architect Helmut Jahn uses the know-how of the manufacturer of ventilation systems from Stuttgart. As one of the first multi-storied buildings in Munich, ''Skyline Tower'' with its 23 floors was prized with the pre-certificate of the German quality seal ''sustainable building ''in gold.

  3. Dedicated education unit: student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Vicki M; Coe, Michael T; Hanita, Makoto; Moscato, Susan R

    2014-01-01

    The study compared students' perceptions of their clinical learning experiences in a dedicated education unit (DEU) with their experiences in traditional clinical education. Unlike traditional academic-instructor models, expert nurses in the DEU provide clinical education to students with faculty support. This repeated measures design used student surveys, supplemented by focus group data. Students were more likely to agree that their clinical learning experience was high quality and they had a consistent mentoring relationship during DEU rotations. Students also reported the quality of the unit's learning environment, the leadership style of the nurse manager, and the nursing care on the unit was more favorable in DEUs than traditional units. Consistent with their changed role in DEUs, faculty members were less active in helping students integrate theory and practice. These findings provide additional evidence of the value that the DEU model contributes to high-quality clinical education.

  4. A qualitative description of falls in a neuro-rehabilitation unit: the use of a standardised fall report including the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) to describe activities and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saverino, Alessia; Moriarty, Amy; Rantell, Khadija; Waller, Denise; Ayres, Rachael; Playford, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Falls are a recognised problem for people with long-term neurological conditions but less is known about fall risk in young adults. This study describes fallers' and falls' characteristics in adults less than 60 years old, in a neuro-rehabilitation unit. This single-centre, longitudinal, observational study included 114 consecutive admissions to a UK neuro-rehabilitation unit over 20 months. The demographic and clinical characteristics of eligible patients included age, sex, diagnosis, hospital length of stay and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Falls were recorded prospectively in a fall report, using the activities and environmental domains of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). A total of 34 (30%) patients reported a fall, with 50% experiencing more than one fall. The majority of falls (60%) occurred during the first 2 weeks, during day-time (90%) and during mobile activities (70%). Overall, falls rate (95% confidence interval) was 1.33 (1.04 to 1.67) per 100 d of patient hospital stay. Factors associated with increased falls included becoming a walker during admission or being cognitively impaired. There were no serious fall-related injuries. The first 2 weeks of admission is a high risk time for fallers, in particular those who become walkers or are cognitively impaired. Prevention policies should be put in place based on fall characteristics. Implications for Rehabilitation The ICF is a valuable instrument for describing subject and environmental factors during a fall-event. Falls are frequent events but do not usually cause serious injuries during inpatient rehabilitation. There is an increased fall risk for subjects with cognitive impairments or those relearning how to walk.

  5. Simulation of motor unit recruitment and microvascular unit perfusion: spatial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglevand, A J; Segal, S S

    1997-10-01

    Muscle fiber activity is the principal stimulus for increasing capillary perfusion during exercise. The control elements of perfusion, i.e., microvascular units (MVUs), supply clusters of muscle fibers, whereas the control elements of contraction, i.e., motor units, are composed of fibers widely scattered throughout muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine how the discordant spatial domains of MVUs and motor units could influence the proportion of open capillaries (designated as perfusion) throughout a muscle cross section. A computer model simulated the locations of perfused MVUs in response to the activation of up to 100 motor units in a muscle with 40,000 fibers and a cross-sectional area of 100 mm2. The simulation increased contraction intensity by progressive recruitment of motor units. For each step of motor unit recruitment, the percentage of active fibers and the number of perfused MVUs were determined for several conditions: 1) motor unit fibers widely dispersed and motor unit territories randomly located (which approximates healthy human muscle), 2) regionalized motor unit territories, 3) reversed recruitment order of motor units, 4) densely clustered motor unit fibers, and 5) increased size but decreased number of motor units. The simulations indicated that the widespread dispersion of motor unit fibers facilitates complete capillary (MVU) perfusion of muscle at low levels of activity. The efficacy by which muscle fiber activity induced perfusion was reduced 7- to 14-fold under conditions that decreased the dispersion of active fibers, increased the size of motor units, or reversed the sequence of motor unit recruitment. Such conditions are similar to those that arise in neuromuscular disorders, with aging, or during electrical stimulation of muscle, respectively.

  6. Are there differences in the catalytic activity per unit enzyme of recombinantly expressed and human liver microsomal cytochrome P450 2C9? A systematic investigation into inter-system extrapolation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewe, H K; Barter, Z E; Yeo, K Rowland; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2011-09-01

    The 'relative activity factor' (RAF) compares the activity per unit of microsomal protein in recombinantly expressed cytochrome P450 enzymes (rhCYP) and human liver without separating the potential sources of variation (i.e. abundance of enzyme per mg of protein or variation of activity per unit enzyme). The dimensionless 'inter-system extrapolation factor' (ISEF) dissects differences in activity from those in CYP abundance. Detailed protocols for the determination of this scalar, which is used in population in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE), are currently lacking. The present study determined an ISEF for CYP2C9 and, for the first time, systematically evaluated the effects of probe substrate, cytochrome b5 and methods for assessing the intrinsic clearance (CL(int) ). Values of ISEF for S-warfarin, tolbutamide and diclofenac were 0.75 ± 0.18, 0.57 ± 0.07 and 0.37 ± 0.07, respectively, using CL(int) values derived from the kinetic values V(max) and K(m) of metabolite formation in rhCYP2C9 + reductase + b5 BD Supersomes™. The ISEF values obtained using rhCYP2C9 + reductase BD Supersomes™ were more variable, with values of 7.16 ± 1.25, 0.89 ± 0.52 and 0.50 ± 0.05 for S-warfarin, tolbutamide and diclofenac, respectively. Although the ISEF values obtained from rhCYP2C9 + reductase + b5 for the three probe substrates were statistically different (p system, with the intrinsic clearance calculated from full kinetic data is recommended for generation of the CYP2C9 ISEF. Furthermore, as ISEFs have been found to be sensitive to differences in accessory proteins, rhCYP system specific ISEFs are recommended. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Welcome to Our Web: Integrating Subjects through Entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevebaugh, Tara

    2001-01-01

    Shares how the study of insects became a focal point for cross-curricular convergence in the author's classroom. Describes the design of a unit of study that focused on entomology but integrated academic areas, especially language arts. Concludes that students must develop a sense of interdependence and an understanding of possible relationships…

  8. Monarch Butterflies: Spirits of Loved Ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    The study of the beautiful monarch butterfly lends itself to a vast array of subject matter, and offers the opportunity to meet a large and varied number of standards and objectives for many grade levels. Art projects featuring monarchs may include many cross-curricular units such as math (symmetry and number graphing), science (adaptation and…

  9. The Military Emergency Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Requena, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most justified and pressing demands that society makes of the State, requiring a fast, forceful and effective response, is that it guarantees the safety of people and their assets when a disaster seriously endangers them. At the proposal of the President of the Government, the Cabinet of Ministers, in its meeting held on October 7, 2005, agreed to create the Military Emergency Unit, known since the as the UME. Its mission is to intervene anywhere in the national territory when the President of the Government, or the Minister to whom he delegates, so decides in order to assure the safety and welfare of citizens in cases of serious risk, disaster, catastrophe or any other public need. The UME is organically incorporated into the Ministry of Defense and its actions may be supported with all the available human and material needs of the Armed Forces. Availability and effectiveness, with calmness and humility, have characterized the early actions of the Military Emergency Unit and are the guidelines for future action. The first steps of this military unit have focused on a clear goal: collaboration and participation in situations whose seriousness requires the coordination of different forces in order to immediately respond to them. The UME is the States tool to join forces and, with other administration and institutions, help to rapidly and effectively deal with emergencies. It has taken its first step and achieved the capacity specified in the UME Operations Order for 2007. The 150 men and women per battalion, plus the 80 in the Gando detachment, are on active duty and have sufficient material means to deploy, if necessary and when requested by the regions, town councils an other administrative bodies, to help in the extinction of forest fires. (Author)

  10. Invitro activity of imipenem-relebactam against gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with lower respiratory tract infections in the United States in 2015 - Results from the SMART global surveillance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lob, Sibylle H; Hackel, Meredith A; Kazmierczak, Krystyna M; Hoban, Daryl J; Young, Katherine; Motyl, Mary R; Karlowsky, James A; Sahm, Daniel F

    2017-06-01

    The β-lactamase inhibitor relebactam inactivates class A β-lactamases, including KPC-type carbapenemases, and class C β-lactamases. Relebactam combined with imipenem is in clinical development for several indications, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Employing CLSI-defined broth microdilution methodology, we evaluated the activities of imipenem-relebactam (using imipenem MIC breakpoints) and comparators against non-Proteeae Enterobacteriaceae (n=853) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=598) isolated from lower respiratory tract infection samples in 20 hospital laboratories in the United States participating in the 2015 SMART (Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends) global surveillance program. Imipenem-relebactam and imipenem susceptibilities were 97.2% and 91.6% for non-Proteeae Enterobacteriaceae and 93.1% and 68.1% for P. aeruginosa. Relebactam restored imipenem susceptibility to 66.7% and 78.5% of imipenem-non-susceptible non-Proteeae Enterobacteriaceae isolates (n=72) and P. aeruginosa (n=191), respectively. Further development of imipenem-relebactam as therapy for lower respiratory tract infections is warranted given relebactam's ability to restore activity to imipenem against non-susceptible non-Proteeae Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SI units in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, P S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1978-11-01

    The proposal of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements that the special units of radiation and radioactivity-roentgen, rad, rem and curie-be replaced by the International System (SI) of Units has been accepted by international bodies. This paper reviews the resons for introducing the new units and their features. The relation between the special units and the corresponding SI units is discussed with examples. In spite of anticipated difficulties, the commission recommends a smooth and efficient changeover to the SI units in ten years.

  12. United States Army Medical Materiel Development Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-10

    and BPL were provided by the contractor to USAMMDA personnel as required. 3 ,I SAutomatic Data Processing Support: During 1988, USAMI.DA procured...PABO, and WRAIR cooperated to immunize 40,000 volunteers in a double blind study of 0. neningitidis Vaccine. Controls received a licensed Group C

  13. Survey of United States uranium marketing activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    The 1977 survey requested data on U purchase commitments, U imports and exports, reactor fuel arrangements and unfilled requirements, inventories of domestic and foreign U, and prices for existing contracts between producers and buyers. The 207 U.S. power reactors in operation, under construction, or for which orders have been placed, are covered. Information was received from 70 utilities, 38 present or potential U producers, and 5 reactor manufacturers. Net additional procurement is 83,400 tons of U 3 O 8 , with direct involvement of the purchasers in almost half the cases. During 1976, average U prices increased substantially for 1976-77 and 1980-85 deliveries, but only minor changes for 1978 and 1979. Average delivery prices remain well below prices for new procurement. 12 tables, 7 figs

  14. Space transportation activities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabris, Edward A.

    1994-01-01

    The status of the existing space transportation systems in the U.S. and options for increased capability is being examined in the context of mission requirements, options for new vehicles, cost to operate the existing vehicles, cost to develop new vehicles, and the capabilities and plans of other suppliers. This assessment is addressing the need to build and resupply the space station, to maintain necessary military assets in a rapidly changing world, and to continue a competitive commercial space transportation industry. The Department of Defense (DOD) and NASA each conducted an 'access to space' study using a common mission model but with the emphasis on their unique requirements. Both studies considered three options: maintain and improve the existing capability, build a new launch vehicle using contemporary technology, and build a new launch vehicle using advanced technology. While no decisions have been made on a course of action, it will be influenced by the availability of funds in the U.S. budget, the changing need for military space assets, the increasing competition among space launch suppliers, and the emerging opportunity for an advanced technology, low cost system and international partnerships to develop it.

  15. Survey of United States uranium marketing activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusiewski, S.V.; Thomas, D.C.; Patterson, J.A.

    1981-06-01

    In 1980 US buyers contracted for 12,500 short tons U 3 O 8 in new procurement. Nontheless, there was a net decrease of 13,100 tons in total commitments as of January 1, 1981, because of even larger changes to the delivery commitments as of January 1, 1980. The average contract price of domestic uranium was $28.15 per pound of U 3 O 8 for 1980 delivery and $30.70 for 1981 delivery. Settlements of domestic market price contracts averaged $36.75 for 1980 delivery and $46.80 for 1981 delivery. Prices of foreign uranium averaged $43.10 for 1980 delivery and $40.00 for 1981 delivery. Producers expect to be able to offer 21,800 tons U 3 O 8 for sale in the 1981 to 1985 period, about 30 percent less than was estimated in the 1980 survey. US producers also estimated that 30,600 tons U 3 O 8 would be available for sale in the 1986 to 1990 period. Utilities made sales of 800 tons U 3 O 8 for 1980 to 1981 delivery as well as loans of another 800 tons. New export commitments made in 1980 totalled 4000 tons U 3 O 8 ; however, 2500 tons of these commitments are options or delivery is contingent on price developments. Import commitments made in 1980 totalled 2300 tons U 3 O 8 . Inventories of natural and enriched uranium held by US buyers increased from 52,300 to 63,400 tons U 3 O 8 during 1980. In addition, inventories of uranium held by US producers increased from 2400 to 2700 tons U 3 O 8 . Unfilled requirements for the 1981 to 1990 period decreased from 75,300 tons U 3 O 8 , as reported in last year's survey, to 54,500 tons in this year's survey, a decrease of 20,800 tons. Responses to the 1981 survey suggest that there seems to be an adequate supply of uranium to meet US demand at least through 1986, although the apparent buyer requirements reported as of January 1, 1981 for the 1987 to 1990 period are higher than the total domestic production or supply

  16. Survey of United States uranium marketing activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, G.F. Jr.; Krusiewski, S.V.

    1980-07-01

    In 1979 US buyers contracted for a net increase of 15,400 tons U 3 O 8 in new procurement after deducting for changes to January 1, 1979, commitments. Export commitments made in 1979 totalled 2800 tons, while import commitments amounted to 1000 tons U 3 O 8 . Buyers' inventories of domestic- and foreign-origin normal and enriched uranium increased to 52,300 tons U 3 O 8 during 1979, with the larger part of the increase being in enriched uranium. The average price reported for 1979 deliveries was $23.85 per pound of U 3 O 8 . Settlements of market price contracts average $42.55 for 1979 delivery and $45.80 for 1980 delivery. Producers expect to be able to offer 33,700 tons U 3 O 8 for sale in the 1980-1985 period, about 20% less than was estimated in the 1979 survey. Utilities made sales of 500 tons U 3 O 8 for 1979-1980 delivery as well as loans of 1600 tons U 3 O 8 that are to be repaid by 1984; more than half of these sales or loans were made to uranium producers. Reactor manufacturers have sold about 1100 tons U 3 O 8 since January 1, 1979, and loaned 120 tons. Unfilled requirements have decreased more than 100,000 tons U 3 O 8 since January 1, 1978, and currently total 75,700 tons U 3 O 8 . Responses to the 1980 survey suggest that there seems to be an adequate supply of uranium to meet US demand at least through 1985

  17. Groundwater restoration long beyond closure at the Homestake-Milan and United Nuclear-Church Rock uranium mill tailings piles, New Mexico, USA: full-scale programs requiring more than 20 years of active treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, W.P.

    1998-01-01

    Since as early as 1975, groundwater contamination from New Mexico uranium mill tailings has been investigated with two sites -Homestake-Milan and United Nuclear-Church Rock -showing severe enough groundwater damage to merit listing on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund National Priority List -a nationwide list based on severity of pollution and water resource usefulness. These two sites provide valuable case studies for the first - 1950s -and second - 1970s -generations of uranium mill tailings facilities demonstrating the severity of contamination which ineffective control can allow and the challenge of full scale groundwater restoration. While the groundwater restoration at these sites began in the 1970s and 1980s, active treatment is anticipated into the 21st century. This paper summarizes the groundwater restoration programs at two of these sites - Homestake Mining Company's (HMC) Milan Mill (now called the ''Grants Project'') and United Nuclear Corporation's (UNC) Church Rock Mill. The two sites are summarized with respect to operations, groundwater impact, tailings disposal systems, hydrogeological characteristics of the site and affected areas, applicable standards, and remedial technology applied. This review provides a basis for initial comparisons with uranium mill tailings groundwater restoration challenges outside the USA. These sites provide an important benchmark the complexity of restoration at for large-scale uranium mill tailings sites. The longevity of the restoration efforts demonstrate the results of low-intensity responses to contamination upon detection and delayed enforcement actions. These ''witnesses'' to the value of effective pollution prevention in tailings design and full review and monitoring of tailings operations, have potential to be models of effective groundwater restoration. (orig.)

  18. Five-Year Summary of In Vitro Activity and Resistance Mechanisms of Linezolid against Clinically Important Gram-Positive Cocci in the United States from the LEADER Surveillance Program (2011 to 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Streit, Jennifer M; Hogan, Patricia A; Flamm, Robert K

    2017-07-01

    This report describes linezolid susceptibility testing results for 6,741 Gram-positive pathogens from 60 U.S. sites collected during 2015 for the LEADER Program. In addition, the report summarizes linezolid in vitro activity, resistance mechanisms, and molecular typing obtained for 2011 to 2015. During 2015, linezolid showed potent activity in testing against Staphylococcus aureus , inhibiting >99.9% of 3,031 isolates at ≤2 µg/ml. Similarly, linezolid showed coverage against 99.2% of coagulase-negative staphylococci, 99.7% of enterococci, and 100.0% of Streptococcus pneumoniae , virdans group, and beta-hemolytic streptococcus isolates tested. The overall linezolid resistance rate remained a modest linezolid resistance mechanisms. Increased annual trends for the presence of cfr among Staphylococcus aureus isolates were not observed, but 64.3% (9/14) of the isolates with decreased susceptibility (MIC, ≥4 µg/ml) to linezolid carried this transferrable gene (2011 to 2015). The cfr gene was detected in 21.9% (7/32) of linezolid-resistant staphylococci other than S. aureus from 2011 to 2015. The optrA gene was noted in half (2/4) of the population of linezolid-nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecalis isolates from 2011 to 2015, while linezolid-nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecium isolates showed alterations predominantly (16/16) in the 23S rRNA gene (G2576T). This report confirms a long record of linezolid activity against Gram-positive isolates in the United States since regulatory approval in 2000 and reports the oxazolidinones evolving resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Principal Areas of Activity to Improve the Monitoring of Nuclear Material Security and Accounting in the Russian Federation Ministry of Atomic Energy, within the Framework of the Program of Cooperation with the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erastov, Victor V.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.

    2004-01-01

    scientific activities. Financial support has been provided by the United States to create a regulatory basis; to supply information; increase transportation security of nuclear material; create educational centers and improve the professional skill of experts and methodology and metrology of nuclear material measurements; and develop agency MPC and A inspections.

  20. Physical protection of nuclear operational units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The general principles of and basic requirements for the physical protection of operational units in the nuclear field are established. They concern the operational units whose activities are related with production, utilization, processing, reprocessing, handling, transport or storage of materials of interest for the Brazilian Nuclear Program. (I.C.R.) [pt

  1. Unit Cost Compendium Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Unit Cost Compendium (UCC) Calculations raw data set was designed to provide for greater accuracy and consistency in the use of unit costs across the USEPA...

  2. United States housing, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman

    2013-01-01

    Provides current and historical information on housing market in the United States. Information includes trends for housing permits and starts, housing completions for single and multifamily units, and sales and construction. This report will be updated annually.

  3. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  4. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Providers, Emergency Consultations, and General Public. Contact Us Malaria Treatment (United States) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines For Clinicians (United States) Download PDF version ...

  5. In Vitro Activity of Imipenem-Relebactam against Gram-Negative ESKAPE Pathogens Isolated by Clinical Laboratories in the United States in 2015 (Results from the SMART Global Surveillance Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lob, Sibylle H; Hackel, Meredith A; Kazmierczak, Krystyna M; Young, Katherine; Motyl, Mary R; Karlowsky, James A; Sahm, Daniel F

    2017-06-01

    Relebactam (formerly MK-7655) is an inhibitor of class A and C β-lactamases, including Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC), and is currently in clinical development in combination with imipenem-cilastatin. Using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI)-defined broth microdilution methodology, we evaluated the in vitro activities of imipenem-relebactam, imipenem, and seven routinely tested parenteral antimicrobial agents against Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens (including Klebsiella pneumoniae , n = 689; Acinetobacter baumannii , n = 72; Pseudomonas aeruginosa , n = 845; and Enterobacter spp., n = 399) submitted by 21 clinical laboratories in the United States in 2015 as part of the SMART (Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends) global surveillance program. Relebactam was tested at a fixed concentration of 4 μg/ml in combination with doubling dilutions of imipenem. Imipenem-relebactam MICs were interpreted using CLSI imipenem breakpoints. The respective rates of susceptibility to imipenem-relebactam and imipenem were 94.2% (796/845) and 70.3% (594/845) for P. aeruginosa , 99.0% (682/689) and 96.1% (662/689) for K. pneumoniae , and 100% (399/399) and 98.0% (391/399) for Enterobacter spp. Relebactam restored imipenem susceptibility to 80.5% (202/251), 74.1% (20/27), and 100% (8/8) of isolates of imipenem-nonsusceptible P. aeruginosa , K. pneumoniae , and Enterobacter spp. Relebactam did not increase the number of isolates of Acinetobacter spp. susceptible to imipenem, and the rates of resistance to all of the agents tested against this pathogen were >30%. Further development of imipenem-relebactam is warranted given the demonstrated ability of relebactam to restore the activity of imipenem against current clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa that are nonsusceptible to carbapenems and its potential as a therapy for treating patients with antimicrobial-resistant Gram-negative infections. Copyright © 2017 American

  6. The United Nations at 40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The United Nations adopted a resolution expressing the hope that 1985 would mark the beginning of an era of durable and global peace and justice, social and economic development and progress and independence of all peoples. 1985 is the organization's 40th anniversary year - the United Nations Charter entered into force on 24 October 1945 - and the Assembly has chosen 'United Nations for a better world' as the anniversary theme. It also has decided to hold a brief commemorative session culminating on 24 October this year. Member States of the UN also have been urged to organize appropriate observance of the anniversary, with the widest possible participation, and to consider the creation of national committees to evaluate the contribution of the UN system over the past four decades, its continuing relevance in the current international situation, and ways in which it could be strengthened and made more effective. Among other things, the Assembly in its resolution appealed to the international mass media, both public and private, to contribute more effectively to dissemination of information on UN activities. During the commemorative session planned this October, a final document is expected to be adopted for which the Assembly has asked the Preparatory Committee for the Fortieth Anniversary of the United Nations to compose a suitable text. The Preparatory Committee had been established by the Assembly in 1983, and by December 1984, 98 countries had joined in its work, which relates to various activities

  7. The United Nations at 40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-10-01

    The United Nations adopted a resolution expressing the hope that 1985 would mark the beginning of an era of durable and global peace and justice, social and economic development and progress and independence of all peoples. 1985 is the organization's 40th anniversary year - the United Nations Charter entered into force on 24 October 1945 - and the Assembly has chosen 'United Nations for a better world' as the anniversary theme. It also has decided to hold a brief commemorative session culminating on 24 October this year. Member States of the UN also have been urged to organize appropriate observance of the anniversary, with the widest possible participation, and to consider the creation of national committees to evaluate the contribution of the UN system over the past four decades, its continuing relevance in the current international situation, and ways in which it could be strengthened and made more effective. Among other things, the Assembly in its resolution appealed to the international mass media, both public and private, to contribute more effectively to dissemination of information on UN activities. During the commemorative session planned this October, a final document is expected to be adopted for which the Assembly has asked the Preparatory Committee for the Fortieth Anniversary of the United Nations to compose a suitable text. The Preparatory Committee had been established by the Assembly in 1983, and by December 1984, 98 countries had joined in its work, which relates to various activities.

  8. Experience from the Inspection of Licensees' Outage Activities, Including Fire Protection Programmes, Event Response Inspections, and the Impact of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident on Inspection Programmes. Workshop Proceedings, Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States, 7-10 April 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-10-01

    practices, to discuss the selected topics, to discuss contemporary inspection issues, and to develop conclusions and commendable practices (CPs) on the selected topics. As part of the registration, participants were asked to respond to a questionnaire describing practices within their own countries on the workshop topics. The complete compilation of questionnaire responses is contained in the appendix (NEA/CNRA/R(2014)8/ADD1) to this document. Approximately 51 participants from 19 different countries and one participant from IAEA took part in the workshop. Countries included: Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, India, Japan, Mexico, Poland, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. Five discussion groups were established for the breakout sessions. One topic would only have one group with 11 participants instead of having two small groups. Each group consisted of inspectors from countries to ensure diversity of views for each of the topics. Discussion groups met for three separate sessions on one topic. The exchange between participants was open and active, and the groups formulated conclusions and identified CPs. Evaluation of the workshop results were based on questionnaire responses received from the participants at the closing of the workshop. The evaluation showed that, as in the past workshops, the highest value perceived, was in meeting and exchanging information with inspectors from other organisations. Responses also showed that the format selected was highly favoured and that more workshops of this type are supported in the future. The results of the evaluation also reflected that participants in exchanging information were provided a unique opportunity to 'calibrate' their own inspection methods against those from other countries. While exchanging inspection practices and learning new ideas were part of the main objectives, this

  9. La Unidad de Atención Crohn-Colitis: 3 años de actividad The Crohn-Colitis Care Unit: analysis of the first 3 years of activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisel Fontanet

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Conocer los primeros datos de actividad de la Unidad de Atención Crohn-Colitis (UACC y su línea virtual, la http://www.ua-cc.org Material y método: La UACC es un servicio de educación y promoción de la salud que se dirige a los enfermos con enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal y a su entorno. Dispone de un centro de coordinación desde donde se gestionan todas las consultas y las resoluciones gestionadas por un equipo multidisciplinario. El acceso telefónico y la web son las principales vías de contacto. Resultados: A los 3 años de funcionamiento, la UACC cuenta con 956 usuarios, el 87% de los cuales son pacientes, que han generado más de 4.500 consultas multitemáticas. Destaca la vía de atención telefónica con un 67% y los más de 500 usuarios registrados en el portal. Conclusiones: Los primeros datos descriptivos expresan un impacto significativo del proyecto, en el que destacan la atención integral y el acceso virtual como las variables más significativas.Objective: To assess the activity of the Crohn-Colitis Care Unit (CCCU and of its web site: http://www.ua-cc.org Material and method: The CCCU is a unit for the education and health promotion of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and their immediate circle. It includes a coordination center with a multidisciplinary team that manages patients' requests. The main means of contact is through telephone and the Web. Results: After 3 years, there are 956 users registered in the CCCU, of which 87% are patients who generated more than 4,500 consultations on multiple topics. Telephone consultations account for 67% of all consultations and there are 500 users registered in the Web. Conclusions: The preliminary results suggest that the integral approach of the CCCU and its web site have had a significant impact on patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Dimensão relacional da atividade de cuidado e condições de trabalho de auxiliares de enfermagem em uma unidade neonatal The relational dimension of the care activity and the working conditions in a neonatal unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Pessoa Masson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa as condições de trabalho de auxiliares de enfermagem que atuam em Unidade Neonatal, considerando a dimensão relacional da atividade de cuidado. Tendo como principais referências epistemológicas a concepção canguilhemiana de saúde e a perspectiva ergológica, a pesquisa se pautou em abordagens clínicas do trabalhar, incluindo métodos diretos (observações, indiretos (conversas e encontros sobre o trabalho com as auxiliares e análise de documentos relativos às normas antecedentes desse trabalho. Analisou-se fundamentalmente a produção linguageira dos coletivos. Entre os resultados encontrados, destacam-se: o desenvolvimento dessa atividade de cuidado implica intensa mobilização das trabalhadoras; a possibilidade de não atender às mães que chegam para ter seus bebês parece ser mais nocivo à saúde dessas profissionais do que trabalhar com um número excessivo de pacientes. Concluiu-se que as condições precárias de trabalho são potencialmente produtoras de sofrimento patogênico, uma vez que a realização prazerosa e bem-sucedida dessa atividade é dificultada.This paper focuses on the working conditions of nursing technicians of Neonatal Units, considering the relational dimension of the care activity. Having as main epistemological references Canguilhem's concept of health of and the Ergological perspective, the research was based on the clinical approaches of work, including the following methods: direct (observations and indirect (talks and meetings about work with the technicians; analysis of documents on the previous norms concerning this work. The analysis dealt basically with the groups' language production. Some results can be highlighted: the development of this care activity implies intense mobilization of workers; the possibility of not assisting the mothers who arrive to have their babies seems to be more noxious to these technicians than to work with an overload of patients; the precarious

  11. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  12. The Fulton School Recycling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Jean

    1994-01-01

    Outlines a school recycling project that started as a newspaper collection for library funds and evolved into a community service. Discusses problems that were overcome, strategies for implementation of the project, and related cross-curricular studies and activities. Contains two curriculum mind maps. (LZ)

  13. Differences in the motor unit firing rates and amplitudes in relation to recruitment thresholds during submaximal contractions of the first dorsal interosseous between chronically resistance trained and physically active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterczala, Adam J; Miller, Jonathan D; Trevino, Michael A; Dimmick, Hannah L; Herda, Trent J

    2018-02-26

    Previous investigations report no changes in motor unit (MU) firing rates during submaximal contractions following resistance training. These investigations did not account for MU recruitment or examine firing rates as a function of recruitment threshold (REC).Therefore, MU recruitment and firing rates in chronically resistance trained (RT) and physically active controls (CON) were examined. Surface electromyography signals were collected from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) during isometric muscle actions at 40% and 70% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). For each MU, force at REC, mean firing rate (MFR) during the steady force, and MU action potential amplitude (MUAPAMP) were analyzed. For each individual and contraction, the MFRs were linearly regressed against REC, whereas, exponential models were applied to the MFR vs. MUAPAMP and MUAPAMP vs. REC relationships with the y-intercepts and slopes (linear) and A and B terms (exponential) calculated. For the 40% MVC, the RT group had less negative slopes (p=0.001) and lower y-intercepts (p=0.006) of the MFR vs. REC relationships and lower B terms (p=0.011) of the MUAPAMP vs. REC relationships. There were no differences in either relationship between groups for the 70% MVC. During the 40% MVC, the RT had a smaller range of MFRs and MUAPAMPS in comparison to the CON, likely due to reduced MU recruitment. The RT had lower MFRs and recruitment during the 40% MVC that may indicate a leftward shift in the force-frequency relationship, and thus require less excitation to the motoneuron pool to match the same relative force.

  14. Generating units performances: power system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourment, C; Girard, N; Lefebvre, H

    1994-08-01

    The part of generating units within the power system is more than providing power and energy. Their performance are not only measured by their energy efficiency and availability. Namely, there is a strong interaction between the generating units and the power system. The units are essential components of the system: for a given load profile the frequency variation follows directly from the behaviour of the units and their ability to adapt their power output. In the same way, the voltage at the units terminals are the key points to which the voltage profile at each node of the network is linked through the active and especially the reactive power flows. Therefore, the customer will experience the frequency and voltage variations induced by the units behaviour. Moreover, in case of adverse conditions, if the units do not operate as well as expected or trip, a portion of the system, may be the whole system, may collapse. The limitation of the performance of a unit has two kinds of consequences. Firstly, it may result in an increased amount of not supplied energy or loss of load probability: for example if the primary reserve is not sufficient, a generator tripping may lead to an abnormal frequency deviation, and load may have to be shed to restore the balance. Secondly, the limitation of a unit performance results in an economic over-cost for the system: for instance, if not enough `cheap` units are able to load-following, other units with higher operating costs have to be started up. We would like to stress the interest for the operators and design teams of the units on the one hand, and the operators and design teams of the system on the other hand, of dialog and information exchange, in operation but also at the conception stage, in order to find a satisfactory compromise between the system requirements and the consequences for the generating units. (authors). 11 refs., 4 figs.

  15. A multiplicity logic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialkowski, J.; Moszynski, M.; Zagorski, A.

    1981-01-01

    The logic diagram principle of operation and some details of the design of the multiplicity logic unit are presented. This unit was specially designed to fulfil the requirements of a multidetector arrangement for gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The unit is equipped with 16 inputs controlled by a common coincidence gate. It delivers a linear output pulse with the height proportional to the multiplicity of coincidences and logic pulses corresponding to 0, 1, ... up to >= 5-fold coincidences. These last outputs are used to steer the routing unit working with the multichannel analyser. (orig.)

  16. ENERGY STAR Unit Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These quarterly Federal Fiscal Year performance reports track the ENERGY STAR qualified HOME units that Participating Jurisdictions record in HUD's Integrated...

  17. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory of...

  18. 31 CFR 500.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 500.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including U.S. trust territories...

  19. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory of...

  20. History of United States Energy. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Intended as a supplement to the units "Oil: Fuel of the Past" and "Coal: Fuel of the Past, Hope of the Future," this 3-4 day unit contains three activities which briefly explain the chronological development of energy resources and the formation and development of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). The…

  1. Current staffing personnel and areas of activity of the units of SSPA radio physics; Dotacion actual de personal y ambitos de actuacion de las unidades de radiofisica del SSPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo Pain, E.; Roldan Arjona, J. M.; Carrasco Rodriguez, J. L.; Guerrero Alcaide, R.; Almansa Lopez, J.; Rodriguez Castillo, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    The work arises from the Andalucia society of hospital Radiophysics as a study of the situation in the year 2012 in Andalusia, in terms of human resources and equipment in charge of services or units clinics of management of Radiophysics of the health public system of Andalusia (SSPA). Clinical management units are organizational structures established by the service Andalucia health (SAS) which are governed by agreements in the area of health care management providing that coverage. (Author)

  2. Neighbors United for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime; Virella, Irmarie

    2009-01-01

    Modeled upon the ecclesiastic community group concept of Latin America to unite and strengthen the bond between the Church and neighborhoods, a community-based organization created Vecinos Unidos por la Salud (Neighbors United for Health) to bring health messages into urban Latino neighborhoods. The model is based on five tenants, and incorporates…

  3. Smart Rocking Armour Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; Arefin, Syed Shamsil; van der Lem, Cock; van gent, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure the rocking motion of lab-scale armour units. Sensors as found in mobile phones are used. These sensors, data-storage and battery are all embedded in the model units, such that they can be applied without wires attached to them. The technique is applied to

  4. Masturbation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aniruddha

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the nationally representative National Health and Social Life Survey, this study queried the correlates of masturbation in the United States in 1992. Among those aged 18-60, 38% (CI, 35-41) of women and 61% (CI, 57-65) of men reported any masturbation over the preceding year. The system of factors underlying masturbation was similar for both genders, consistent with a convergence in gender patterns of sexual expression in the United States. Among both women and men, masturbation responded to a stable sexualized personality pattern, catalyzed by early-life factors and manifested in current sexual traits. Strikingly, the masturbation-partnered sex linkage, often conceptualized either as compensating for unsatisfying sex or complementing a satisfactory sex life, appeared to be bimodal for both genders. For some, masturbation complemented an active and pleasurable sex life, while among others, it compensated for a lack of partnered sex or satisfaction in sex.

  5. 10 CFR 20.1005 - Units of radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Units of radioactivity. 20.1005 Section 20.1005 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION General Provisions § 20.1005 Units of radioactivity. For the purposes of this part, activity is expressed in the special unit of...

  6. METRIC context unit architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    METRIC is an architecture for a simple but powerful Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC). Its speed comes from the simultaneous processing of several instruction streams, with instructions from the various streams being dispatched into METRIC's execution pipeline as they become available for execution. The pipeline is thus kept full, with a mix of instructions for several contexts in execution at the same time. True parallel programming is supported within a single execution unit, the METRIC Context Unit. METRIC's architecture provides for expansion through the addition of multiple Context Units and of specialized Functional Units. The architecture thus spans a range of size and performance from a single-chip microcomputer up through large and powerful multiprocessors. This research concentrates on the specification of the METRIC Context Unit at the architectural level. Performance tradeoffs made during METRIC's design are discussed, and projections of METRIC's performance are made based on simulation studies.

  7. Competências, sofrimento e construção de sentido na atividade de auxiliares de enfermagem em Utin Skills, suffering and construction of meaning in the activity of auxiliary nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo trata das competências requeridas/ desenvolvidas nas atividades de auxiliares de enfermagem de uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal (Utin em articulação com a saúde dessas trabalhadoras (o sofrimento→prazer no trabalho. A perspectiva da ergologia orienta o esforço investigativo, incorporando outros referenciais, como os contidos nos estudos de Zarifian e Dejours. No plano metodológico, ainda tendo o ponto de vista da atividade como operador sintético, foram feitos levantamento e análise de documentos e visitas à Utin, operando-se com o dispositivo Encontros sobre o Trabalho, da Comunidade Ampliada de Pesquisa (CAP. Concluiu-se que o coletivo de auxiliares, protagonista do trabalho em análise, construiu um patrimônio de conhecimentos práticos sobre o seu trabalho e uma base minimamente eficaz de transmissão desse patrimônio. Fazendo uso da abordagem 'Psicodinâmica do Trabalho', ressaltou-se o caráter desafiante que o trabalho em UTI Neonatal apresenta, o que envolve saber lidar não só com o sofrimento dos neonatos como também o de mães e familiares, inclusive como forma de defesa contra seu próprio sofrimento, evitando um rumo patogênico. Observou-se, por fim, que é premente a demanda de qualificação formal por parte dessas trabalhadoras, o que propiciaria, dentre outros importantes benefícios, um maior reconhecimento social, com efeitos positivos sobre sua própria saúde.The article deals with vocational training and skills required in the activity of nursing staff in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU in conjunction with the 'body-self' and the health of these workers. It discusses the issue of jurisdiction in synergy with other issues relevant to her, as the ratio of service and suffering→pleasure working. The perspective of Ergology guides the investigative effort, incorporating other materials such as Zarifian and Dejours. At the methodological level, even taking the viewpoint of activity as

  8. United Nations opens gender coordinating unit for Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K

    1999-02-06

    The UN has created a gender coordinating unit for Afghanistan in an effort to combat some problems encountered by women and girls in the country. Reports continue to come in of women in Afghanistan being denied the right to work, to be educated, and to have access to medical care. The gap in education between men and women continues to widen as a result of edicts issued by Taliban authorities banning girls from attending formal schools and female teachers from working. The situation has grown worse since the UN and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) withdrew international workers last year due to security concerns. Although a UN mission will travel to the country this week to discuss the return of international staff, the gender coordinating unit will for now have to work out of Islamabad, Pakistan. The unit will create guidelines for gender mainstreaming, a strategy in which mainstream policies and resource allocations are changed to reflect the principle of gender equality. Other goals include setting realistic objectives for gender activities, working with partners on pilot projects, and establishing minimum standards for best practices. MERLIN, a NGO with a primary health care program run by local staff in the Taliban-controlled province of Farah, welcomes the move.

  9. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakala, Mokgadi C; Bezuidenhout, Martie C; Botha, Annali D H

    2014-04-04

    Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs) are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives. The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding. Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU. Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  10. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives. Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding. Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU. Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  11. Decision unit program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madjar, N.; Pastor, C.; Chambon, B.; Drain, D.; Giorni, A.; Dauchy, A.

    1981-01-01

    A decision unit has been built to simplify the electronic logic set-up in multi-detectors experiments. This unit, designed with fast memories used as decision making tables, replaces conventional logic modules. Nine inputs are provided for receiving the fast detector signals (charged particles, gammas, neutrons, ...). Fifteen independent outputs allow the identification of the choosen events among the 2 9 possible events. A CAMAC interface between the unit and the computer, or a manual control auxiliary module, is used to load, in the memory, the pattern of the choosen events [fr

  12. Smart Rocking Armour Units

    OpenAIRE

    Hofland, B.; Arefin, Syed Shamsil; van der Lem, Cock; van gent, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure the rocking motion of lab-scale armour units. Sensors as found in mobile phones are used. These sensors, data-storage and battery are all embedded in the model units, such that they can be applied without wires attached to them. The technique is applied to double-layer units in order to compare the results to the existing knowledge for this type of armour layers. In contrast to previous research, the gyroscope reading is used to determine the (rocking)...

  13. Allocating multiple units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranæs, Torben; Krishna, Kala

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the allocation and rent distribution in multi-unit, combinatorial-bid auctions under complete information. We focus on the natural multi-unit analogue of the first-price auction, where buyers bid total payments, pay their bids, and where the seller allocates goods to maximize his...... auction, which is the multi unit analogue of a second-price auction. Furthermore, we characterize these equilibria when valuations take a number of different forms: diminishing marginal valuations, increasing average valuations, and marginal valuations with single turning points...

  14. Tax Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  15. UnitedHealth Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  16. Operable Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of operable unit data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  17. Flywheel and power unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, R.W.

    1992-10-28

    A power unit, e.g. for an electrically driven vehicle, incorporates a flywheel for storing kinetic energy and a battery for storing electrical energy. The battery is incorporated as a substantial part of the rotating mass of the flywheel. Preferably the unit further includes an electrical machine being a motor or generator or machine operable either as a motor or a generator for transferring energy between the battery and the flywheel and/or for the input or output of rotary energy therefrom or thereto. The motor may be used for powering the flywheel and may also operate in a regenerative mode for recharging the unit on de-acceleration of the vehicle. The unit of the invention may also be utilized as an electrical stored power source, e.g. wind or water driven. (author)

  18. Does size matter? Animal units and animal unit months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar Smith; Joe Hicks; Scott Lusk; Mike Hemmovich; Shane Green; Sarah McCord; Mike Pellant; John Mitchell; Judith Dyess; Jim Sprinkle; Amanda Gearhart; Sherm Karl; Mike Hannemann; Ken Spaeth; Jason Karl; Matt Reeves; Dave Pyke; Jordan Spaak; Andrew Brischke; Del Despain; Matt Phillippi; Dave Weixelmann; Alan Bass; Jessie Page; Lori Metz; David Toledo; Emily Kachergis

    2017-01-01

    The concepts of animal units, animal unit months, and animal unit equivalents have long been used as standards for range management planning, estimating stocking rates, reporting actual use, assessing grazing fees, ranch appraisal, and other purposes. Increasing size of cattle on rangelands has led some to suggest that the definition of animal units and animal unit...

  19. UniTed

    OpenAIRE

    Harma, Eero

    2010-01-01

    UniTed on Teddy boy- tyylistä inspiroitunut kevät/kesä mallisto naisille.Mallistossa yhdistyy perinteinen teddy boy- vaatetus ja klassinen feminiinisyys, sekä menneisyys ja nykyisyys. Suunnittelun lähtökohtia olivat naisellisuus, tyylikkyys ja pyrkimys luoda nykyaikaista suunnittelua menneisyydestä lainaillen. United is a teddy boy- style inspired spring/summer collection for women. The collection combines traditional Teddy boy style with classical feminity and past with the present. The b...

  20. Dixie Valley Bottoming Binary Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Dale [Terra-Gen Sierra Holdings, LLC, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-12-21

    This binary plant is the first air cooled, high-output refrigeration based waste heat recovery cycle in the industry. Its working fluid is environmentally friendly and as such, the permits that would be required with a hydrocarbon based cycle are not necessary. The unit is largely modularized, meaning that the unit’s individual skids were assembled in another location and were shipped via truck to the plant site. The Air Cooled Condensers (ACC), equipment piping, and Balance of Plant (BOP) piping were constructed at site. This project further demonstrates the technical feasibility of using low temperature brine for geothermal power utilization. The development of the unit led to the realization of low temperature, high output, and environmentally friendly heat recovery systems through domestic research and engineering. The project generates additional renewable energy, resulting in cleaner air and reduced carbon dioxide emissions. Royalty and tax payments to governmental agencies will increase, resulting in reduced financial pressure on local entities. The major components of the unit were sourced from American companies, resulting in increased economic activity throughout the country.