WorldWideScience

Sample records for units collaborative information

  1. Collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    , the activities involved in information seeking are often performed by varying subgroups of actors. Consequently, collaborative grounding is necessary to share information among collaborating actors and, thereby, establish and maintain the common ground necessary for their collaborative work. By focusing......Since common ground is pivotal to collaboration, this paper proposes to define collaborative information seeking as the combined activity of information seeking and collaborative grounding. While information-seeking activities are necessary for collaborating actors to acquire new information...... on the collaborative level, collaborative information seeking aims to avoid both individual reductionism and group reductionism, while at the same time recognizing that only some information and understanding need be shared....

  2. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  3. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  4. Reputational Information and Strategic Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Bendix, Henrik B.

    1998-01-01

    What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration......What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration...

  5. Information handling in collaborative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Collins

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available UK public policy makers have a growing interest in collaborative research, where academics work with public, private or third sector partners on a joint project which supports the partner’s aims. This paper reports on the findings of five case studies, looking at how information is sourced, managed, used and shared within collaborative research projects. It finds that researchers within collaborative projects have similar information management issues as are known to exist within academia more broadly, but that the specific conditions which govern research collaborations mean that interventions to improve or support information management must be carefully tailored.

  6. Breakdowns in collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    of the use of the electronic medication record adopted in a Danish healthcare region and of the reports of five years of medication incidents at Danish hospitals. The results show that breakdowns in collaborative information seeking is a major source of medication incidents, that most of these breakdowns......Collaborative information seeking is integral to many professional activities. In hospital work, the medication process encompasses continual seeking for information and collaborative grounding of information. This study investigates breakdowns in collaborative information seeking through analyses...... are breakdowns in collaborative grounding rather than information seeking, that the medication incidents mainly concern breakdowns in the use of records as opposed to oral communication, that the breakdowns span multiple degrees of separation between clinicians, and that the electronic medication record has...

  7. The EU-project United4Health: User-Centred Design and Evaluation of a Collaborative Information System for a Norwegian Telehealth Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaradottir, Berglind; Gerdes, Martin; Martinez, Santiago; Fensli, Rune

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the user-centred design and evaluation process of a Collaborative Information System (CIS), developed for a new telehealth service for remote monitoring of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients after hospital discharge. The CIS was designed based on the information gathered in a workshop, where target end-users described the context of use, a telehealth workflow and their preferred ways of interaction with the solution. Evaluation of the iterative refinements were made through user tests, semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire. A field trial reported results on the ease of use and user satisfaction during the interaction with the fully developed system. The implemented CIS was successfully deployed within the secured Norwegian Health Network. The research was a result of cooperation between international partners within the EU FP7 project United4Health.

  8. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfarb, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using the SCALA digital signage software system. The system is robust and flexible, allowing for the usage of scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intrascreen divisibility. The video is made available to the collaboration or public through the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video t...

  9. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfarb, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using digital signage software. The system is robust and flexible, utilizing scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intra-screen divisibility. Information is published via the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video tool. Authorisation is enforced at the level of the streaming and at th...

  10. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Steven; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using digital signage software. The system is robust and flexible, utilizing scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intra-screen divisibility. Information is published via the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video tool. Authorisation is enforced at the level of the streaming and at the web portals, using the CERN SSO system.

  11. Information Infrastructure, Information Environments, and Long-Term Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. S.; Pennington, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Information infrastructure that supports collaborative science is a complex system of people, organizational arrangements, and tools that require co-management. Contemporary studies are exploring how to establish and characterize effective collaborative information environments. Collaboration depends on the flow of information across the human and technical system components through mechanisms that create linkages, both conceptual and technical. This transcends the need for requirements solicitation and usability studies, highlighting synergistic interactions between humans and technology that can lead to emergence of group level cognitive properties. We consider the ramifications of placing priority on establishing new metaphors and new types of learning environments located near-to-data-origin for the field sciences. In addition to changes in terms of participant engagement, there are implications in terms of innovative contributions to the design of information systems and data exchange. While data integration occurs in the minds of individual participants, it may be facilitated by collaborative thinking and community infrastructure. Existing learning frameworks - from Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to organizational learning - require modification and extension if effective approaches to decentralized information management and systems design are to emerge. Case studies relating to data integration include ecological community projects: development of cross-disciplinary conceptual maps and of a community unit registry.

  12. The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: an international collaboration to inform cancer policy in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John; Foot, Catherine; Bomb, Martine; Hiom, Sara; Coleman, Michel; Bryant, Heather; Vedsted, Peter; Hanson, Jane; Richards, Mike

    2013-09-01

    The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) was initiated by the Department of Health in England to study international variation in cancer survival, and to inform policy to improve cancer survival. It is a research collaboration between twelve jurisdictions in six countries: Australia (New South Wales, Victoria), Canada (Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario), Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland, Wales). Leadership is provided by policymakers, with academics, clinicians and cancer registries forming an international network to conduct the research. The project currently has five modules examining: (1) cancer survival, (2) population awareness and beliefs about cancer, (3) attitudes, behaviours and systems in primary care, (4) delays in diagnosis and treatment, and their causes, and (5) treatment, co-morbidities and other factors. These modules employ a range of methodologies including epidemiological and statistical analyses, surveys and clinical record audit. The first publications have already been used to inform and develop cancer policies in participating countries, and a further series of publications is under way. The module design, governance structure, funding arrangements and management approach to the partnership provide a case study in conducting international comparisons of health systems that are both academically and clinically robust and of immediate relevance to policymakers.

  13. Participation and Collaboration in New Information Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Meyer, Kirsten

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the opportunities and possibilities the new information environment offers for collaboration and participation in learning processes. The findings are based on four major sources: “Scenarios in computer-mediated and net-based education” , CLIENT – Collaborative Learning...... in an International Environment , “Construction and Communication of Knowledge” and RUC-online . Because of trends in late modern society traditional ways of acquiring knowledge are no longer efficient. Instead students should collaboratively work on projects with a high degree of mo-tivation. Competencies like...

  14. Participation and Collaboration in New Information Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Meyer, Kirsten

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the opportunities and possibilities the new information environment offers for collaboration and participation in learning processes. The findings are based on four major sources: “Scenarios in computer-mediated and net-based education” , CLIENT – Collaborative Learning...... in an International Environment , “Construction and Communication of Knowledge” and RUC-online . Because of trends in late modern society traditional ways of acquiring knowledge are no longer efficient. Instead students should collaboratively work on projects with a high degree of mo-tivation. Competencies like...... negotiating of meaning, being part of dialogical communities and involving themselves in social-constructivist activities are crucial....

  15. Merging silos: collaborating for information literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Louise C; Jones, Barbara B; Graves, Rebecca S; Sievert, Maryellen Cullinan

    2010-06-01

    Collaborating across disciplines can create additive teaching-learning benefits by bringing together expertise, knowledge, and training from various perspectives. However, there are challenges to effective collaboration that need to be articulated and understood by the partners to develop a useful learning product. In this project, nurse educators and health sciences librarians developed workshops for nurses practicing in community settings. Issues that surfaced reflected a division of content and presentation style along discipline lines. Bringing together expertise involved identifying basic content to present and eliminating extra details, setting the context for learners using a practice example, and alternating handoffs to cover content and practice applications. Effective collaboration requires mutual understanding of discipline-specific information "silos" and shared negotiation of teaching and learning goals.

  16. Collaborative learning in teaching information management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natho, N.; Knipping, L.; Pfeiffer, O.; Schröder, C.; Zorn, E.; Jeschke, S.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we present the course called 'New Media in Education and Research', which employs a blended learning approach. This course is a part of a new bachelor's programme 'Natural Sciences in the Information Society' that is in place in TU Berlin. The main goal of this course is to provide the students with the appropriate information technology literacy that they will need during their studies and beyond. A more specific goal of the course is to train the students to collaborate in small groups. Tablet PCs with OneNote installed on it act as agents to communicate some of the technological aspects as well as soft skills in a blended learning scenario. We discuss the pedagogical and technological backgrounds of the course and we present the implementation of the course. We conclude with a review of our results and an outlook to future work.

  17. Distributed Collaborative Learning Communities Enabled by Information Communication Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L. Alvarez (Heidi Lee)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHow and why can Information Communication Technology (ICT) contribute to enhancing learning in distributed Collaborative Learning Communities (CLCs)? Drawing from relevant theories concerned with phenomenon of ICT enabled distributed collaborative learning, this book identifies gaps in

  18. Learning about Potential Users of Collaborative Information Retrieval Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Madhu

    2009-01-01

    One of the key components of designing usable and useful collaborative information retrieval systems is to understand the needs of the users of these systems. Our research team has been exploring collaborative information behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Our research goals have been two-fold: First, to develop a conceptual understanding of collaborative information behavior and second, gather requirements for the design of collaborative information retrieval systems. In this paper, we present a brief overview of our fieldwork in a three different organizational settings, discuss our methodology for collecting data on collaborative information behavior, and highlight some lessons that we are learning about potential users of collaborative information retrieval systems in these domains.

  19. Informed Systems: Enabling Collaborative Evidence Based Organizational Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M. Somerville

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – In response to unrelenting disruptions in academic publishing and higher education ecosystems, the Informed Systems approach supports evidence based professional activities to make decisions and take actions. This conceptual paper presents two core models, Informed Systems Leadership Model and Collaborative Evidence-Based Information Process Model, whereby co-workers learn to make informed decisions by identifying the decisions to be made and the information required for those decisions. This is accomplished through collaborative design and iterative evaluation of workplace systems, relationships, and practices. Over time, increasingly effective and efficient structures and processes for using information to learn further organizational renewal and advance nimble responsiveness amidst dynamically changing circumstances. Methods – The integrated Informed Systems approach to fostering persistent workplace inquiry has its genesis in three theories that together activate and enable robust information usage and organizational learning. The information- and learning-intensive theories of Peter Checkland in England, which advance systems design, stimulate participants’ appreciation during the design process of the potential for using information to learn. Within a co-designed environment, intentional social practices continue workplace learning, described by Christine Bruce in Australia as informed learning enacted through information experiences. In addition, in Japan, Ikujiro Nonaka’s theories foster information exchange processes and knowledge creation activities within and across organizational units. In combination, these theories promote the kind of learning made possible through evolving and transferable capacity to use information to learn through design and usage of collaborative communication systems with associated professional practices. Informed Systems therein draws from three antecedent theories to create an original

  20. Staff perceptions of collaboration on a new interprofessional unit using the Assessment of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Scale (AITCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Dawn; Jung, Bonny; Taplay, Karyn; Stobbe, Karl; Hildebrand, Lisa

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain baseline information on staff attitudes and perceptions of interprofessional collaboration on a newly formed interprofessional education unit. The Assessment of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Scale (AITCS) was administered to 54 interprofessional team members on a 30-bed medical interprofessional education (IPE) unit. We found that the team members respected each other but felt they needed more organisational support to further develop team skills. Additionally, team members noted that they did not have enough time for team reflection or to make changes to the team processes. The results obtained from this study will help to develop and refine educational strategies to assist the staff working on the IPE unit.

  1. Collaborative Information Agents on the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James R.; Mathe, Nathalie; Wolfe, Shawn; Koga, Dennis J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present DIAMS, a system of distributed, collaborative information agents which help users access, collect, organize, and exchange information on the World Wide Web. Personal agents provide their owners dynamic displays of well organized information collections, as well as friendly information management utilities. Personal agents exchange information with one another. They also work with other types of information agents such as matchmakers and knowledge experts to facilitate collaboration and communication.

  2. Obtaining informedness in collaborative networks through automated information provisioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thimm, Heiko; Rasmussen, Karsten Boye

    2013-01-01

    Successful collaboration in business networks calls for well-informed network participants. Members who know about the many aspects of the network are an effective vehicle to successfully resolve conflicts, build a prospering collaboration climate and promote trust within the network. The importa......Successful collaboration in business networks calls for well-informed network participants. Members who know about the many aspects of the network are an effective vehicle to successfully resolve conflicts, build a prospering collaboration climate and promote trust within the network...

  3. Teams motivation in units of information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Lima dos Santos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article, through the revision of literature in the areas of Information Science and Administration, sought to rescue the theoretical yardstick about leadership, motivation, team works, competences, abilities and attitudes of leader. Beyond that was elaborated an exploratory study with directors/managers of university libraries. From the analysis of literature selected and the exploratory research, infers that the leader which works in units of information can develop some actions that are going to motivate the team, to which leads, as by example: implant participatory programs; establish challenging goals; encourage works in group; promote turnaround of post and functions; create results disclosure systems; stimulate the creativity; promote a good environment at work; promote education and training individual/group; defined clearly the responsibilities; delegate authority consciously, charge results; and others possibilities. In this manner, understands that leader that works in units of information is going to know the factors that enable the motivation of the team. For so much, it is necessary observe the aspirations of his collaborators and verify if organization has been capable of satisfy them. In that sense, falls to the informational professional qualify itself for perform that function.

  4. Communicate and collaborate by using building information modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondrup, Thomas Fænø; Karlshøj, Jan; Vestergaard, Flemming

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) represents a new approach within the Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) industry, one that encourages collaboration and engagement of all stakeholders on a project. This study discusses the potential of adopting BIM as a communication...

  5. Navy Collaborative Integrated Information Technology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Information Technology Initiative (NAVCIITI, pronounced "NAV city") by creating an Advanced Communication and Information Technology Center (ACITC), on campus at Virginia Tech, integrating and leveraging the efforts of more than 60 investigators currently under contract to the Navy by providing equipment and facilities for their effort, and using the collective capabilities of NAVCIITI to support Navy initiatives in distributed computing, integrated services training, education, information dissemination, and simulation, especially for purposes

  6. The New Information Literate: Open Collaboration and Information Production in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Widespread participation in collaborative writing and public discourse on blogs, news sites, Wikipedia and other online information sources is creating a new class of information literacy skills. In a series of qualitative studies, I examined high school students' information assessment practices as they helped build a collaborative online…

  7. Procedures and Collaborative Information Seeking: A Study of Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Reddy, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Information seeking is a central and inherently collaborative activity in the emergency department (ED) which is the common entry point to hospitals for nearly all acute patients. In this paper, we investigate how ED clinicians’ collabo-rative information seeking (CIS) is shaped by the procedures...... that the clinicians follow in the ED. Based on observations in two Danish EDs, we identify four pro-cedures prominent to how CIS is accomplished: the triage procedure, the timeouts, the coordinating nurse, and the recurrent opportunities for information seeking at the whiteboard. We then discuss how CIS activities...

  8. Procedures and Collaborative Information Seeking: A Study of Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Reddy, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Information seeking is a central and inherently collaborative activity in the emergency department (ED) which is the common entry point to hospitals for nearly all acute patients. In this paper, we investigate how ED clinicians’ collabo-rative information seeking (CIS) is shaped by the procedures...... that the clinicians follow in the ED. Based on observations in two Danish EDs, we identify four pro-cedures prominent to how CIS is accomplished: the triage procedure, the timeouts, the coordinating nurse, and the recurrent opportunities for information seeking at the whiteboard. We then discuss how CIS activities...

  9. Information filtering via collaborative user clustering modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yu, Lu; Liu, Chuang; Liu, Hao; Yan, Xiao-Yong

    2014-02-01

    The past few years have witnessed the great success of recommender systems, which can significantly help users to find out personalized items for them from the information era. One of the widest applied recommendation methods is the Matrix Factorization (MF). However, most of the researches on this topic have focused on mining the direct relationships between users and items. In this paper, we optimize the standard MF by integrating the user clustering regularization term. Our model considers not only the user-item rating information but also the user information. In addition, we compared the proposed model with three typical other methods: User-Mean (UM), Item-Mean (IM) and standard MF. Experimental results on two real-world datasets, MovieLens 1M and MovieLens 100k, show that our method performs better than other three methods in the accuracy of recommendation.

  10. Collaborative Learning in Teaching Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natho, N.; Knipping, L.; Pfeiffer, O.; Schroder, C.; Zorn, E.; Jeschke, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the course called "New Media in Education and Research", which employs a blended learning approach. This course is a part of a new bachelor's programme "Natural Sciences in the Information Society" that is in place in TU Berlin. The main goal of this course is to provide the students with the…

  11. Information Filtering via Collaborative User Clustering Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Yu, Lu; Liu, Chuang; Liu, Hao; Yan, Xiao-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed the great success of recommender systems, which can significantly help users find out personalized items for them from the information era. One of the most widely applied recommendation methods is the Matrix Factorization (MF). However, most of researches on this topic have focused on mining the direct relationships between users and items. In this paper, we optimize the standard MF by integrating the user clustering regularization term. Our model considers not only the user-item rating information, but also takes into account the user interest. We compared the proposed model with three typical other methods: User-Mean (UM), Item-Mean (IM) and standard MF. Experimental results on a real-world dataset, MovieLens, show that our method performs much better than other three methods in the accuracy of recommendation.

  12. Proceedings of 1st International Workshop on Collaborative Information Seeking

    CERN Document Server

    Pickens, Jeremy; Morris, Meredith Ringel

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the workshop is to bring together researchers interested in various aspects of small-team collaborative search to share ideas, to stimulate research in the area, and to increase the visibility of this emerging area. We expect to identify promising directions for further exploration and to establish collaborative links among research groups. The workshop took place on June 20, 2008 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, in conjunction with the JCDL 2008 conference. The workshop was organized around three themes: practices, models, and evaluation. We started with a discussion (still ongoing) about terminology, about how to situate our work in the existing research space. We also wanted to motivate our modeling and design discussions with real-world examples of collaboration. We discussed examples from the healthcare domain, students, faculty members, the military, and businesses such as pharmaceutical companies that conduct research. We discussed several models of collaborative information seeking, inclu...

  13. Collaboration and Virtualization in Large Information Systems Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Ioan NITCHI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A project is evolving through different phases from idea and conception until the experiments, implementation and maintenance. The globalization, the Internet, the Web and the mobile computing changed many human activities, and in this respect, the realization of the Information System (IS projects. The projects are growing, the teams are geographically distributed, and the users are heterogeneous. In this respect, the realization of the large Information Technology (IT projects needs to use collaborative technologies. The distribution of the team, the users' heterogeneity and the project complexity determines the virtualization. This paper is an overview of these aspects for large IT projects. It shortly present a general framework developed by the authors for collaborative systems in general and adapted to collaborative project management. The general considerations are illustrated on the case of a large IT project in which the authors were involved.

  14. Proactive human-computer collaboration for information discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBona, Phil; Shilliday, Andrew; Barry, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (LM ATL) is researching methods, representations, and processes for human/autonomy collaboration to scale analysis and hypotheses substantiation for intelligence analysts. This research establishes a machinereadable hypothesis representation that is commonsensical to the human analyst. The representation unifies context between the human and computer, enabling autonomy in the form of analytic software, to support the analyst through proactively acquiring, assessing, and organizing high-value information that is needed to inform and substantiate hypotheses.

  15. Forecasting the Unit Cost of a Product with Some Linear Fuzzy Collaborative Forecasting Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toly Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting the unit cost of every product type in a factory is an important task. However, it is not easy to deal with the uncertainty of the unit cost. Fuzzy collaborative forecasting is a very effective treatment of the uncertainty in the distributed environment. This paper presents some linear fuzzy collaborative forecasting models to predict the unit cost of a product. In these models, the experts’ forecasts differ and therefore need to be aggregated through collaboration. According to the experimental results, the effectiveness of forecasting the unit cost was considerably improved through collaboration.

  16. The Work Unit Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    detl- il 𔃻’ 1hiLS. dIxam.rnt. no.y be- used in conjuctien with tlie video, or !sep1aTate’ly. 114. SUBJECT TERMS 1%. NUMLItH Of 01 AuLAS 12, yi N~I) I T...6145, (202) 274-6817, (AV) 284-6817. 1I 10. WINS AND INPUT WRAP-UP The Army Material Command has implemented its own PC-based work unit input system...extrusion and composite materials . An example of a contract search would be: Find all work units that relate to contract F33615-84-K-2458. An example

  17. Lark: coordinating co-located collaboration with information visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasz, Matthew; Isenberg, Petra; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2009-01-01

    Large multi-touch displays are expanding the possibilities of multiple-coordinated views by allowing multiple people to interact with data in concert or independently. We present Lark, a system that facilitates the coordination of interactions with information visualizations on shared digital workspaces. We focus on supporting this coordination according to four main criteria: scoped interaction, temporal flexibility, spatial flexibility, and changing collaboration styles. These are achieved by integrating a representation of the information visualization pipeline into the shared workspace, thus explicitly indicating coordination points on data, representation, presentation, and view levels. This integrated meta-visualization supports both the awareness of how views are linked and the freedom to work in concert or independently. Lark incorporates these four main criteria into a coherent visualization collaboration interaction environment by providing direct visual and algorithmic support for the coordination of data analysis actions over shared large displays.

  18. Collaborative Yet Independent: Information Practices in the Physical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Eric T; Kyriakidou-Zacharoudiou, Avgousta; Power, Lucy; Williams, Peter; Venters, Will; Terras, Melissa; Wyatt, Sally

    2011-12-31

    In many ways, the physical sciences are at the forefront of using digital tools and methods to work with information and data. However, the fields and disciplines that make up the physical sciences are by no means uniform, and physical scientists find, use, and disseminate information in a variety of ways. This report examines information practices in the physical sciences across seven cases, and demonstrates the richly varied ways in which physical scientists work, collaborate, and share information and data. This report details seven case studies in the physical sciences. For each case, qualitative interviews and focus groups were used to understand the domain. Quantitative data gathered from a survey of participants highlights different information strategies employed across the cases, and identifies important software used for research. Finally, conclusions from across the cases are drawn, and recommendations are made. This report is the third in a series commissioned by the Research Information Network...

  19. Scientific climate change information by collaborative venture and digital portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubelaar-Versluis, W.

    2010-09-01

    Klimaatportaal is the digital entry of Dutch ‘climate' knowledge centres, which are collaborated in the Platform Communication on Climate Change (PCCC). This collaborative venture was established in 2003 by the Dutch climate research community to improve the quality, efficiency and effectiveness of the communication of Dutch climate research. By now, eight Dutch knowledge centres are participating and still more want to join. The Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) supports the PCCC and the project is implemented in collaboration with the BSIK ‘Climate Changes Spatial Planning' programme. The website provides actual and background climate change information for a wide audience on the national scale from policy makers, media to general public. By supplying integral climate information, such as observations of climate change, causes and consequences of climate system, adaptation, mitigation and energy issues, a wide spectrum of target groups will be served. The information is offered in different forms, because of the needs of different target groups. Klimaatportaal contains therefore news on climate issues, frequently asked questions and popular science reports, like the annually brochure De Staat van het Klimaat (‘The State of the Climate'). Recently, also a portal for students is added, where they can find information for their assignments. Beside the website, PCCC is organising activities as symposia and workshops and is supplying information on international issues, for example the content of the Kyoto protocol and the IPCC fourth assessment report (2007). Finally, informing the public through contacts with the media is also an important part of the PCCC. The presentation will address the strengths and weaknesses of this approach which may serve as an example for combining knowledge in outreach activities in other countries.

  20. E-Government and Geographical Information Based Collaboration Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Lise; Hvingel, Line Træholt; Hansen, Henning Sten

    2010-01-01

    in regard of e-Government readiness. In Denmark the development of e-Government is characterised by a very informal, bottom-up approach, with a focus on standardisation, the use of geographic information systems (GIS) and IT-architecture. The organisational aspects have not been an issue of much attention....... A national survey conducted by the University of Aalborg and Geoforum Denmark shows that the way the different players actually collaborate is a determining factor for a successful development in the field of e-Government....

  1. Toward Collaborative Evidence Based Information Practices: Organisation and Leadership Essentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Mirijamdotter

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This commentary is based on my keynote address for the EBLIP conference held in 2009 in Stockholm, Sweden. The title was: Bridging the gap between users and systems – the potential contribution of Social Informatics to Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. In the following commentary, I focus on the application of social informatics principles to develop a collaborative evidence based approach grounded in shared workplace leadership. My remarks highlight some main contributions from the field of library and information science and social informatics and conclude with implications for practice, including further research.

  2. Canonical correlation analysis between collaborative networks and innovation: A case study in information technology companies in province of Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Jafar Nejad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase competitions as well as technological advancements have created motivation among business owners to look for more innovative ideas from outside their organizations. Many enterprises collaborate with other organizations to empower themselves through innovative ideas. These kinds of collaborations can be observed as a concept called Regional Innovation System. These collaborations include inter-firm collaborations, research organizations, intermediary institutions and governmental agencies. The primary objective of this paper is to evaluate relationships between Collaborative Networks and Innovation in information technology business units located in province of Tehran, Iran. The research method utilized for the present study is descriptive-correlation. To evaluate the relationships between independent and dependent variables, canonical correlation analysis (CCA is used. The results confirm the previous findings regarding the relationship between Collaborative Networks and Innovation. Among various dimensions of Collaboration, Collaboration with governmental agencies had a very small impact on the relationship between collaboration networks and innovation. In addition, the results show that in addition to affecting product innovation and process innovation, collaboration networks also affected management innovation.

  3. Obstacle of Team Teaching and Collaborative Learning in Information Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marn-Ling Shing

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of information security includes diverse contents such as network security and computer forensics which are highly technical-oriented topics. In addition, information forensic requires the background of criminology. The information security also includes non-technical content such as information ethics and security laws. Because the diverse nature of information security, Shing et al. has proposed the use of team teaching and collaborative learning for the information security classes. Although team teaching seems to be efficient in information security, practically it needs a few challenges. The Purdue's case mentioned in Shing's paper has funding support of National Security Agency (NSA. However, a vast amount of resources may not be available for an instructor in a normal university. In addition, many obstacles are related to the administration problems. For example, how are the teaching evaluations computed if there are multiple instructors for a single course? How will instructors in a computer forensics class prepare students (criminal justice majors and information technology majors before taking the same class with diverse background? The paper surveyed approximately 25 students in a university in Virginia concerning the satisfaction of team-teaching. Finally, this paper describes ways to meet those challenges.

  4. Studying collaborative information seeking: Experiences with three methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette Seiden; Hertzum, Morten; Hansen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    , however, benefit from a discussion of methodological issues. This chapter describes the application of three methods for collecting and analyzing data in three CIS studies. The three methods are Multidimensional Exploration, used in a CIS study of students’ in-formation behavior during a group assignment......Collaborative information seeking (CIS) has lately produced interesting empirical studies, describing CIS in real-life settings. While these studies explore how and why CIS manifests itself in different domains, discussions about how to study CIS have been scarce. The research area of CIS may......; Task-structured Observation, used in a CIS study of patent engineers; and Condensed Observation, used in a CIS study of information-systems development. The three methods are presented in the context of the studies for which they were devised, and the experiences gained using the methods are discussed...

  5. Studying collaborative information seeking: Experiences with three methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette Seiden; Hertzum, Morten; Hansen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative information seeking (CIS) has lately produced interesting empirical studies, describing CIS in real-life settings. While these studies explore how and why CIS manifests itself in different domains, discussions about how to study CIS have been scarce. The research area of CIS may......, however, benefit from a discussion of methodological issues. This chapter describes the application of three methods for collecting and analyzing data in three CIS studies. The three methods are Multidimensional Exploration, used in a CIS study of students’ in-formation behavior during a group assignment......; Task-structured Observation, used in a CIS study of patent engineers; and Condensed Observation, used in a CIS study of information-systems development. The three methods are presented in the context of the studies for which they were devised, and the experiences gained using the methods are discussed...

  6. Units of measure in clinical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadow, G; McDonald, C J; Suico, J G; Föhring, U; Tolxdorff, T

    1999-01-01

    The authors surveyed existing standard codes for units of measures, such as ISO 2955, ANSI X3.50, and Health Level 7's ISO+. Because these standards specify only the character representation of units, the authors developed a semantic model for units based on dimensional analysis. Through this model, conversion between units and calculations with dimensioned quantities become as simple as calculating with numbers. All atomic symbols for prefixes and units are defined in one small table. Huge permutated conversion tables are not required. This method is also simple enough to be widely implementable in today's information systems. To promote the application of the method the authors provide an open-source implementation of this method in JAVA. All existing code standards for units, however, are incomplete for practical use and require substantial changes to correct their many ambiguities. The authors therefore developed a code for units that is much more complete and free from ambiguities.

  7. The Measurement of Collaborative Culture in Secondary Schools: An Informal Subgroup Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Chloé; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Struyve, Charlotte; Vandecandelaere, Machteld; Gielen, Sarah; Kyndt, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Research on teacher collaboration underlines the importance of a collaborative culture for teachers' functioning. However, while scholars usually regard collaborative culture as a school team characteristic, this study argues that subgroups may be more meaningful units of analysis to conceptualize and assess teachers' perceptions of collaborative…

  8. THE INFORMATIONAL SYSTEM FOR THE COLLABORATIVE LOGISTICS NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAIANA ŢARCĂ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an informatic system designed for collaborative logistic networks. The informational system is composed of structured informational modules that can easily be modified in order to facilitate the testing of the different algorithms that are being used. The informational system has two components, in the form of web application modules, which are connected to the user-specific modules (THE CLIENT WEB APPLICATION and to the server-specific modules (THE SERVER WEB APPLICATION, respectively. These two modules operate the transmission of information, the demands of the client and the offers generated by the server. The designed informational system has been tested in actual operating conditions, by co-optating ten EMSs from the Bihor county area. Some of the elements considered positive by the users, in the testing period, were: usability, the automatic assignment of a motor vehicle according to the characteristics of the product, the automatic route generation, the selection of goods according to the cluster “route” of the system.

  9. Collaborating to optimize nursing students' agency information technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students' information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students' use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students' information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare's transformation into the digital age.

  10. [The midwife-child health nurse collaboration, a link between the maternity unit and neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallaro, Audrey; Polzin, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative work forms part of the well-treatment and improvement of quality of care approach. It is also of benefit to the medical and paramedical teams. Within the parent-child unit of Libourne hospital, the midwife and child health nurse collaborate throughout the pregnancy, and especially during the post-partum period. The teams work together notably around the care of "high-risk" births and in particular when the newborn is hospitalised in a kangaroo care unit.

  11. Economic implications of neonatal intensive care unit collaborative quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogowski, JA; Horbar, JD; Plsek, PE; Baker, LS; Deterding, J; Edwards, WH; Hocker, J; Kantak, AD; Lewallen, P; Lewis, W; Lewit, E; McCarroll, CJ; Mujsce, D; Payne, NR; Shiono, P; Soll, RF; Leahy, K

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To make measurable improvements in the quality and cost of neonatal intensive care using a multidisciplinary collaborative quality improvement model. Design. Interventional study. Data on treatment costs were collected for infants with birth weight 501 to 1500 g for the period of January

  12. Efficacy beliefs predict collaborative practice among intensive care unit nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Blanc, Pascale M.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Nap, Raoul E.

    2010-01-01

    P>Aim. This paper is a report of an investigation of whether intensive care nurses' efficacy beliefs predict future collaborative practice, and to test the potential mediating role of team commitment in this relationship. Background. Recent empirical studies in the field of work and organizational p

  13. Owner controlled data exchange in nutrigenomic collaborations: the NuGO information network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harttig, U.; Travis, A.J.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Renkema, M.; Ommen, B. van; Boeing, H.

    2009-01-01

    New 'omics' technologies are changing nutritional sciences research. They enable to tackle increasingly complex questions but also increase the need for collaboration between research groups. An important challenge for successful collaboration is the management and structured exchange of information

  14. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AS A DETERMINANT OF SMES COLLABORATION AND INNOVATIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Cvetanovic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs development around the world show that the most significant factor for increasing their numbers and improving business success is the free enterprise, as exogenous, and innovation as an endogenous variable. At the same time, the dominant view in economic theory is that innovation is a key generator of changes for which the SMEs can be considered as a kind of metaphors for a successful business over the last twenty years in a number of economies. Arguing that cooperation between SMEs is increasingly common generic strategy of their development, the paper first explains the importance of collaboration to increase innovation and competitiveness, and then provides possible models using information technology such as Workflow Management Systems (WfMS, Service Oriented Architecture (SOA and Service-Oriented Cloud Computing Architecture (SOCCA to support the collaboration of these business entities. Solutions provided are aimed at improving the innovativeness of SMEs and fully follow the requirements of the so-called fifth-generation innovation process whose key attributes are integration and flexibility.

  15. Maintaining health sector collaborations between United States non-governmental organizations and North Korea through innovation and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Eugene S; Choi, Ricky Y; VanRooyen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Humanitarian agencies in North Korea operate within a complex sociopolitical environment historically characterized by a baseline of mistrust. As a result of operating within such a heated environment, health sector collaborations between such agencies and the North Korean government have followed unpredictable courses. The factors that have contributed to successful programmatic collaborations, as perceived by United States non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and North Korean officials were investigated. A qualitative, multi-case, comparative, research design using semistructured interviews was used. Expert North Korean informants were interviewed to generate a list of factors contributing to programmatic success, defined as fulfilling mutually established objectives through collaboration. The North Korean informants were asked to identify US NGOs that fulfill these criteria ("mission-compatible NGOs"). Representatives from all of the mission compatible NGOs were interviewed. All informants provided their perspectives on the factors that contributed to successful programmatic collaborations. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for thematic content. North Korean informants identified six mission-compatible US NGOs. The North Korean and US NGO informants provided a number of factors that contributed to successful programs. These factors were grouped into the following themes: (1) responsiveness to North Korean requests; (2) resident status; (3) program monitoring; (4) sincerity (apolitical objectives); (5) information gathering; and (6) interagency collaboration. Some US NGOs have devised innovative measures to work within a unique set of parameters in North Korea. Both US NGOs and North Korean authorities have made significant concessions to maintain their programmatic partnerships. In this manner, seasoned collaborators have employed creative strategies and a form of health diplomacy to facilitate programmatic success in North Korea by

  16. Understanding Public-Private Collaboration Configurations for International Information Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration between the public and the private sector is seen as an instrument to make governance smarter, more effective, and more efficient. However, whereas there is literature on public-private collaboration, very little of it addresses how these collaborations can be shaped to make use of the

  17. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  18. Between the Local and the Global: Organized Research Units and International Collaborations in the Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Creso M.; Oleksiyenko, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    Organized research units--also known as centers, institutes, and laboratories--are increasingly prominent in the university. This paper examines how ORUs emerge to promote global agendas and international collaborations in an academic health center in North America. The roles these units play in helping researchers work across institutional and…

  19. Nanotechnology researchers' collaboration relationships: a gender analysis of access to scientific information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Felez, Africa; Woolley, Richard; Cañibano, Carolina

    2015-02-01

    Women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, particularly at higher levels of organizations. This article investigates the impact of this underrepresentation on the processes of interpersonal collaboration in nanotechnology. Analyses are conducted to assess: (I) the comparative tie strength of women's and men's collaborations, (2) whether women and men gain equal access to scientific information through collaborators, (3) which tie characteristics are associated with access to information for women and men, and (4) whether women and men acquire equivalent amounts of information by strengthening ties. Our results show that the overall tie strength is less for women's collaborations and that women acquire less strategic information through collaborators. Women and men rely on different tie characteristics in accessing information, but are equally effective in acquiring additional information resources by strengthening ties. This article demonstrates that the underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics has an impact on the interpersonal processes of scientific collaboration, to the disadvantage of women scientists.

  20. Ultra-accurate collaborative information filtering via directed user similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q.; Song, W.-J.; Liu, J.-G.

    2014-07-01

    A key challenge of the collaborative filtering (CF) information filtering is how to obtain the reliable and accurate results with the help of peers' recommendation. Since the similarities from small-degree users to large-degree users would be larger than the ones in opposite direction, the large-degree users' selections are recommended extensively by the traditional second-order CF algorithms. By considering the users' similarity direction and the second-order correlations to depress the influence of mainstream preferences, we present the directed second-order CF (HDCF) algorithm specifically to address the challenge of accuracy and diversity of the CF algorithm. The numerical results for two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, show that the accuracy of the new algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art CF algorithms. Comparing with the CF algorithm based on random walks proposed by Liu et al. (Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 20 (2009) 285) the average ranking score could reach 0.0767 and 0.0402, which is enhanced by 27.3% and 19.1% for MovieLens and Netflix, respectively. In addition, the diversity, precision and recall are also enhanced greatly. Without relying on any context-specific information, tuning the similarity direction of CF algorithms could obtain accurate and diverse recommendations. This work suggests that the user similarity direction is an important factor to improve the personalized recommendation performance.

  1. C-Mod Collaboration Informal Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth W. Gentle

    2007-12-31

    The aims of the collaboration have not changed. A specific list of tasks was agreed upon during the Fall of 2006 in preparation for the 2007 C-Mod campaign by Earl Marmar, Head of the Alcator Project, Kenneth Gentle, Principal Investigator, and William Rowan, Collaboration Coordinator with the facilitation of Adam Rosenberg (DOE grant monitor for the collaboration). The activities follow the list of tasks and are discussed in this progress report.

  2. A collaborative integrated stem teaching: Examination of a science and math teacher collaboration on an integrated stem unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Drew C.

    The integration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum in middle school science and math classrooms is a reform effort currently taking place. The teachers are being encouraged to teach integrated content through national and state standards. The teachers have not been trained to do this form of teaching, which has led to feelings of discomfort or incompetence to fulfill those standards. This has led to a need for professional developments to train these teachers. Those developing the professional developments are seeking to identify ways to encourage teachers to continue to implement integrated units. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a collaborative teaching relationship between a math and science teacher following a professional development. The teachers used a common integrated STEM unit to teach math and science standards by using engineering design as the integrator. The teachers provided lesson plans, were video recorded during implementation, interviewed pre and post-implementation, and made daily journal entries. These data were analyzed to document the collaboration and identify impacts of the collaboration.

  3. Collaborative ethnography for information systems research Studying knowledge work practices and designing supportive information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Maier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding knowledge work and supporting it with information systems (ISs are challenging tasks. Knowledge work has changed substantially recently and studies on how knowledge work is currently performed are scarce. Ethnography is the most suitable qualitative research method for studying knowledge work, yet too time-consuming, costly and unfocused for the fast changing IS domain. Moreover, results from qualitative studies need to be transformed into artefacts useful for IS requirements engineering and design. This paper proposes a procedure for collaborative ethnography to study knowledge work practices and inform IS requirements gathering and design illustrated with the case of a collaborative ethnographic study of seven organisations in four European countries performed in a large-scale international IS research and development project. The paper also critically discusses the procedure’s applicability and limitations.

  4. Collaborative for Historical Information and Analysis: Vision and Work Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zadorozhny

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article conveys the vision of a world-historical dataset, constructed in order to provide data on human social affairs at the global level over the past several centuries. The construction of this dataset will allow the routine application of tools developed for analyzing “Big Data” to global, historical analysis. The work is conducted by the Collaborative for Historical Information and Analysis (CHIA. This association of groups at universities and research institutes in the U.S. and Europe includes five groups funded by the National Science Foundation for work to construct infrastructure for collecting and archiving data on a global level. The article identifies the elements of infrastructure-building, shows how they are connected, and sets the project in the context of previous and current efforts to build large-scale historical datasets. The project is developing a crowd-sourcing application for ingesting and documenting data, a broad and flexible archive, and a “data hoover” process to locate and gather historical datasets for inclusion. In addition, the article identifies four types of data and analytical questions to be explored through this data resource, addressing development, governance, social structure, and the interaction of social and natural variables.

  5. A scenario-based study on information flow and collaboration patterns in disaster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagun, Aysu; Bouchlaghem, Dino; Anumba, Chimay J

    2009-04-01

    Disaster management (DM) is a continuous, highly collaborative process involving governments, DM organisations, responders, the construction sector, and the general public. Most research approaches to DM include the development of information and communication technologies (ICT) to support the collaboration process rather than the creation of a collaboration process to provide information flows and patterns. An Intelligent Disaster Collaboration System (IDCS) is introduced in this paper as a conceptual model to integrate ICT into DM and the mitigation process and to enhance collaboration. The framework is applicable to the collaboration process at the local, regional and national levels. Within this context, the deployment of ICT tools in DM is explored and scenario-based case studies on flooding and terrorism--examples of natural and human-induced disasters, respectively--are presented. Conclusions are drawn regarding the differences found in collaboration patterns and ICT used during natural and human-induced disasters and the differences between currently available ICT and proposed ICT.

  6. An Information Processing Perspective on Divergence and Convergence in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorczak, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of collaborative learning that takes an information processing perspective of learning by social interaction. The collaborative information processing model provides a theoretical basis for understanding learning principles associated with social interaction and explains why peer-to-peer discussion is potentially more…

  7. Developing Subject-Related Web Sites Collaboratively: The Virtual Business Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Eileen G.; White, Marilyn Domas; Kim, Soojung

    2007-01-01

    This article is a case study of the Virtual Business Information Center (VBIC), a collaborative effort since 1998 of the College of Information Studies, Robert H. Smith School of Business, and the University of Maryland Libraries. The case study traces its development, implementation, and evaluation and addresses collaboration among academic…

  8. An Information Processing Perspective on Divergence and Convergence in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorczak, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of collaborative learning that takes an information processing perspective of learning by social interaction. The collaborative information processing model provides a theoretical basis for understanding learning principles associated with social interaction and explains why peer-to-peer discussion is potentially more…

  9. Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  10. A collaborative framework to exchange and share product information within a supply chain context

    CERN Document Server

    Geryville, Hichem; Bouras, Abdelaziz; Sapidis, Nikolaos

    2007-01-01

    The new requirement for "collaboration" between multidisciplinary collaborators induces to exchange and share adequate information on the product, processes throughout the products' lifecycle. Thus, effective capture of information, and also its extraction, recording, exchange, sharing, and reuse become increasingly critical. These lead companies to adopt new improved methodologies in managing the exchange and sharing of information. The aim of this paper is to describe a collaborative framework system to exchange and share information, which is based on: (i) The Product Process Collaboration Organization model (PPCO) which defines product and process information, and the various collaboration methods for the organizations involved in the supply chain. (ii) Viewpoint model describes relationships between each actor and the comprehensive Product/Process model, defining each actor's "domain of interest" within the evolving product definition. (iii) A layer which defines the comprehensive organization and collab...

  11. Reviews of Geospatial Information Technology and Collaborative Data Delivery for Disaster Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Miyazaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that geospatial information technology is considered necessary for disaster risk management (DRM, the need for more effective collaborations between providers and end users in data delivery is increasing. This paper reviews the following: (i schemes of disaster risk management and collaborative data operation in DRM; (ii geospatial information technology in terms of applications to the schemes reviewed; and (iii ongoing practices of collaborative data delivery with the schemes reviewed. This paper concludes by discussing the future of collaborative data delivery and the progress of the technologies.

  12. Maximum joint entropy and information-based collaboration of automated learning machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, N. K.; Knuth, K. H.; Lary, D. J.

    2012-05-01

    We are working to develop automated intelligent agents, which can act and react as learning machines with minimal human intervention. To accomplish this, an intelligent agent is viewed as a question-asking machine, which is designed by coupling the processes of inference and inquiry to form a model-based learning unit. In order to select maximally-informative queries, the intelligent agent needs to be able to compute the relevance of a question. This is accomplished by employing the inquiry calculus, which is dual to the probability calculus, and extends information theory by explicitly requiring context. Here, we consider the interaction between two questionasking intelligent agents, and note that there is a potential information redundancy with respect to the two questions that the agents may choose to pose. We show that the information redundancy is minimized by maximizing the joint entropy of the questions, which simultaneously maximizes the relevance of each question while minimizing the mutual information between them. Maximum joint entropy is therefore an important principle of information-based collaboration, which enables intelligent agents to efficiently learn together.

  13. Science and society: art and science collaborations in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Stephen

    2005-12-01

    In this Perspective article, I consider ways in which the contemporary arts and sciences can interact with each other, and I outline the current opportunities for funding in the United Kingdom. I examine the view that, in an art-science collaboration, it is the artist who benefits most, and I cautiously suggest that this is an oversimplification. Evidence from interviews with scientists who have been involved in these collaborations shows that artistic experience and skills are of value in the scientific research process.

  14. A study on an information security system of a regional collaborative medical platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junping; Peng, Kun; Leng, Jinchang; Sun, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenjiang; Xue, Wanguo; Ren, Lianzhong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to share the experience of building an information security system for a regional collaborative medical platform (RCMP) and discuss the lessons learned from practical projects. Safety measures are analyzed from the perspective of system engineering. We present the essential requirements, critical architectures, and policies for system security of regional collaborative medical platforms.

  15. Strategies, Obstacles, and Attitudes: Student Collaboration in Information Seeking and Synthesis Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Chris; Shah, Chirag

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While group work that takes place in education contexts has been studied by researchers, student collaborative research behaviour has received less attention. This empirical case study examined the strategies that students use and the obstacles they encounter while working in collaborative information seeking contexts on an in-class…

  16. Information sharing and collaborative forecasting in retail supply chains

    OpenAIRE

    Småros, Johanna

    2005-01-01

    Demand distortion, also known as the bullwhip effect, is an important problem encountered in a wide range of supply chains. To counteract this problem, it has been recommended that downstream sales data be shared with upstream members of supply chains. Furthermore, it has been suggested that even greater benefits would be attained through the implementation of collaborative forecasting in supply chains. In practice, however, many companies have found it difficult to realize the suggested bene...

  17. Inter-professional collaboration in an Intensive Care Unit: Challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Rodrigues da Silva Barros

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the relationship between health professionals in an intensive care unit, to explore the inter-professional collaboration. Methods: it is a qualitative study, inspired by the Hermeneutics Phenomenology of Paul Ricoeur, for the production of knowledge. Interviews were conducted with 36 intensive care professionals of a tertiary public hospital. Results: the professionals are satisfied with the work, and there is a commitment to provide quality care despite organizational boundaries such as precarious employment relationships and turnover of professionals. The inter-professional collaboration is an indispensable factor for assistance, but in practice is not effective most of the times by the absence of provisions for the integration of the team, leadership presence, as well as the overcrowding of services that overwhelm health workers. Conclusion: while recognizing the need for inter-professional collaboration, professionals do their work even in a very individualized way, with no strategies to boost this cooperation.

  18. Supporting multi-state collaboration on privacy and security to foster health IT and health information exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banger, Alison K; Alakoye, Amoke O; Rizk, Stephanie C

    2008-11-06

    As part of the HHS funded contract, Health Information Security and Privacy Collaboration, 41 states and territories have proposed collaborative projects to address cross-state privacy and security challenges related to health IT and health information exchange. Multi-state collaboration on privacy and security issues remains complicated, and resources to support collaboration around these topics are essential to the success of such collaboration. The resources outlined here offer an example of how to support multi-stakeholder, multi-state projects.

  19. Characterizing the Networks of Digital Information that Support Collaborative Adaptive Forest Management in Sierra Nevada Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shufei; Iles, Alastair; Kelly, Maggi

    2015-07-01

    Some of the factors that can contribute to the success of collaborative adaptive management--such as social learning, open communication, and trust--are built upon a foundation of the open exchange of information about science and management between participants and the public. Despite the importance of information transparency, the use and flow of information in collaborative adaptive management has not been characterized in detail in the literature, and currently there exist opportunities to develop strategies for increasing the exchange of information, as well as to track information flow in such contexts. As digital information channels and networks have been increased over the last decade, powerful new information monitoring tools have also been evolved allowing for the complete characterization of information products through their production, transport, use, and monitoring. This study uses these tools to investigate the use of various science and management information products in a case study--the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project--using a mixed method (citation analysis, web analytics, and content analysis) research approach borrowed from the information processing and management field. The results from our case study show that information technologies greatly facilitate the flow and use of digital information, leading to multiparty collaborations such as knowledge transfer and public participation in science research. We conclude with recommendations for expanding information exchange in collaborative adaptive management by taking advantage of available information technologies and networks.

  20. Requisite Information Collaboration and Distributed Knowledge Management in Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mogens K.; Bjørn, Pernille; Frank, L.

    The paper suggests a framework advocating an integrated approach to software development stipulating the interconnection between Design, Organization and Business value networks (DOB). These three focus areas span collaborative development processes applying a range of facilitating tools, including...... distributed knowledge management product state models. The paper draws upon a series of discussion with Scandinavian IT Group (SIG). With an interest in how performance in their new organization develops SIG invited the research group to study measures of organizational performance and the use and effect...... of knowledge management tools in software development. The paper does not represent the viewpoint of SIG but outline our framework and major research questions....

  1. Moral distress, autonomy and nurse-physician collaboration among intensive care unit nurses in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikola, Maria N K; Albarran, John W; Drigo, Elio; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Kalafati, Maria; Mpouzika, Meropi; Tsiaousis, George Z; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D E

    2014-05-01

    To explore the level of moral distress and potential associations between moral distress indices and (1) nurse-physician collaboration, (2) autonomy, (3) professional satisfaction, (4) intention to resign, and (5) workload among Italian intensive care unit nurses. Poor nurse-physician collaboration and low autonomy may limit intensive care unit nurses' ability to act on their moral decisions. A cross-sectional correlational design with a sample of 566 Italian intensive care unit nurses. The intensity of moral distress was 57.9 ± 15.6 (mean, standard deviation) (scale range: 0-84) and the frequency of occurrence was 28.4 ± 12.3 (scale range: 0-84). The mean score of the severity of moral distress was 88.0 ± 44 (scale range: 0-336). The severity of moral distress was associated with (1) nurse-physician collaboration and dissatisfaction on care decisions (r = -0.215, P managerial task that could lead to the alleviation of nurses' moral distress and their retention in the profession. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Application description and policy model in collaborative environment for sharing of information on epidemiological and clinical research data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias César Araujo de Carvalho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sharing of epidemiological and clinical data sets among researchers is poor at best, in detriment of science and community at large. The purpose of this paper is therefore to (1 describe a novel Web application designed to share information on study data sets focusing on epidemiological clinical research in a collaborative environment and (2 create a policy model placing this collaborative environment into the current scientific social context. METHODOLOGY: The Database of Databases application was developed based on feedback from epidemiologists and clinical researchers requiring a Web-based platform that would allow for sharing of information about epidemiological and clinical study data sets in a collaborative environment. This platform should ensure that researchers can modify the information. A Model-based predictions of number of publications and funding resulting from combinations of different policy implementation strategies (for metadata and data sharing were generated using System Dynamics modeling. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The application allows researchers to easily upload information about clinical study data sets, which is searchable and modifiable by other users in a wiki environment. All modifications are filtered by the database principal investigator in order to maintain quality control. The application has been extensively tested and currently contains 130 clinical study data sets from the United States, Australia, China and Singapore. Model results indicated that any policy implementation would be better than the current strategy, that metadata sharing is better than data-sharing, and that combined policies achieve the best results in terms of publications. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our empirical observations and resulting model, the social network environment surrounding the application can assist epidemiologists and clinical researchers contribute and search for metadata in a collaborative environment, thus potentially

  3. The multiple viewpoints as approach to information retrieval within collaborative development context

    CERN Document Server

    Geryville, Hichem; Bouras, Abdelaziz; Sapidis, Nikolaos

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, to achieve competitive advantage, the industrial companies are considering that success is sustained to great product development. That is to manage the product throughout its entire lifecycle. Achieving this goal requires a tight collaboration between actors from a wide variety of domains, using different software tools producing various product data types and formats. The actors' collaboration is mainly based on the exchange /share product information. The representation of the actors' viewpoints is the underlying requirement of the collaborative product development. The multiple viewpoints approach was designed to provide an organizational framework following the actors' perspectives in the collaboration, and their relationships. The approach acknowledges the inevitability of multiple integration of product information as different views, promotes gathering of actors' interest, and encourages retrieved adequate information while providing support for integration through PLM and/or SCM collaborati...

  4. Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Technical Information Service NCHS Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009 Recommend on ... more likely than men to have used the Internet for health information. Women were more likely than ...

  5. The impact of health information technology on collaborative chronic care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchibroda, Janet M

    2008-03-01

    Chronic disease is a growing problem in the United States. More than 125 million Americans had at least 1 chronic care condition in 2000, and this number is expected to grow to 157 million by the year 2020.1 Some of the challenges associated with current chronic care management approaches can be addressed through the use of health information technology (IT) and health information exchange. To review the current challenges of chronic care management and explore how health IT and health information exchange efforts at the national, state, and local levels can be leveraged to address some of these challenges. Efforts to effectively manage chronic care have been hampered by a number of factors, including a fragmented health care system and the need for more coordination across the health care setting; the lack of interoperable clinical information systems, which would help provide readily available, comprehensive information about the patient to those who deliver care, those who manage care, and those who receive care, and finally, the current predominantly fee-for-service reimbursement system that rewards volume and fragmentation, and does not effectively align incentives with the goals of chronic care management. The introduction of health IT, including electronic health records and health information exchange, holds great promise for addressing many of the barriers to effective chronic care management, by providing important clinical information about the patient when it is needed, and where it is needed, in a timely, secure fashion. Having information from the care delivery process readily available through health IT and health information exchange at the national, state, and local levels supports key components of the chronic care management process, including those related to measurement, clinical decision support, collaboration and coordination, and consumer activation. Those engaged in chronic care management should seek to leverage health IT and health

  6. EPA Collaboration with Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States and Israel focus on scientific and technical collaboration to protect the environment, by exchanging scientific and technical information, arranging visits of scientific personnel, cooperating in scientific symposia and workshops, etc.

  7. An ontology-based collaborative service framework for agricultural information

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, China has developed modern agriculture energetically. An effective information framework is an important way to provide farms with agricultural information services and improve farmer's production technology and their income. The mountain areas in central China are dominated by agri...

  8. Clustering recommenders in collaborative filtering using explicit trust information

    KAUST Repository

    Pitsilis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we explore the benefits of combining clustering and social trust information for Recommender Systems. We demonstrate the performance advantages of traditional clustering algorithms like k-Means and we explore the use of new ones like Affinity Propagation (AP). Contrary to what has been used before, we investigate possible ways that social-oriented information like explicit trust could be exploited with AP for forming clusters of high quality. We conducted a series of evaluation tests using data from a real Recommender system Epinions.com from which we derived conclusions about the usefulness of trust information in forming clusters of Recommenders. Moreover, from our results we conclude that the potential advantages in using clustering can be enlarged by making use of the information that Social Networks can provide. © 2011 International Federation for Information Processing.

  9. Informal Learning Organizations as Part of an Educational Ecology: Lessons from Collaboration across the Formal-Informal Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jennifer Lin; Knutson, Karen; Crowley, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    How do informal learning organizations work with schools as part of a broader educational ecology? We examined this question through a comparative case study of two collaborative efforts whereby informal arts education organizations, a children's museum and a community-based organization, worked with an urban school district to redefine the…

  10. Interdisciplinary teamwork and the power of a quality improvement collaborative in tertiary neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Theresa R; Pallotto, Eugenia K; Brozanski, Beverly; Piazza, Anthony J; Chuo, John; Moran, Susan; McClead, Richard; Mingrone, Teresa; Morelli, Lorna; Smith, Joan R

    2015-01-01

    Significant gaps in healthcare quality and outcomes can be reduced via quality improvement collaboratives (QICs), which improve care by leveraging data and experience from multiple organizations.The Children's Hospital Neonatal Consortium Collaborative Initiatives for Quality Improvement team developed an infrastructure for neonatal QICs. We describe the structure and components of an effective multi-institutional neonatal QIC that implemented the "SLUG Bug" project designed to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).The operational infrastructure of SLUG Bug involved 17 tertiary care neonatal intensive care units with a goal to reduce CLABSI in high-risk neonates. Clinical Practice Recommendations were produced, and the Institute of Healthcare Improvement Breakthrough Series provided the framework for the collaborative. Process measures studied the effectiveness of the collaborative structure.CLABSI rates decreased by 20% during a 12-month study period. Compliance bundle reporting exceeded 80%. A QIC score of 2.5 or more ("improvement") was achieved by 94% of centers and a score 4 or more ("significant improvement") was achieved by 35%.Frequent interactive project meetings, well-defined project metrics, continual shared learning opportunities, and individual team coaching were key QIC success components. Through a coordinated approach and committed leadership, QICs can effectively implement change and improve the care of neonates with complex diagnoses and rare diseases.

  11. Improving the Context Supporting Quality Improvement in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Quality Collaborative: An Exploratory Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooms, Heather R; Froehle, Craig M; Provost, Lloyd P; Handyside, James; Kaplan, Heather C

    Successful quality improvement (QI) requires a supportive context. The goal was to determine whether a structured curriculum could help QI teams improve the context supporting their QI work. An exploratory field study was conducted of 43 teams participating in a neonatal intensive care unit QI collaborative. Using a curriculum based on the Model for Understanding Success in Quality, teams identified gaps in their context and tested interventions to modify context. Surveys and self-reflective journals were analyzed to understand how teams developed changes to modify context. More than half (55%) targeted contextual improvements within the microsystem, focusing on motivation and culture. "Information sharing" interventions to communicate information about the project as a strategy to engage more staff were the most common interventions tested. Further study is needed to determine if efforts to modify context consistently lead to greater outcome improvements.

  12. Coordinating UAV information for executing national security-oriented collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenor, Anthony W.; Allard, Yannick; Lapinski, Anna-Liesa S.; Demers, Hugues; Radulescu, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are being used by numerous nations for defence-related missions. In some cases, the UAV is considered a cost-effective means to acquire data such as imagery over a location or object. Considering Canada's geographic expanse, UAVs are also being suggested as a potential platform for use in surveillance of remote areas, such as northern Canada. However, such activities are typically associated with security as opposed to defence. The use of a defence platform for security activities introduces the issue of information exchange between the defence and security communities and their software applications. This paper explores the flow of information from the system used by the UAVs employed by the Royal Canadian Navy. Multiple computers are setup, each with the information system used by the UAVs, including appropriate communication between the systems. Simulated data that may be expected from a typical maritime UAV mission is then fed into the information system. The information structures common to the Canadian security community are then used to store and transfer the simulated data. The resulting data flow from the defence-oriented UAV system to the security-oriented information structure is then displayed using an open source geospatial application. Use of the information structures and applications relevant to the security community avoids the distribution restrictions often associated with defence-specific applications.

  13. Open Access Research Via Collaborative Educational Blogging: A Case Study from Library & Information Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Radsliff Rebmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article charts the development of activities for online graduate students in library and information science. Project goals include helping students develop competencies in understanding open access publishing, synthesizing research in the field, and engaging in scholarly communication via collaborative educational blogging. Using a design experiment approach as a research strategy, focus is placed on the design of the collaborative blogging activity, open access research as a knowledge domain, and analyses of four iterations of the project. Findings from this iterative learning design suggest several benefits of implementing collaborative educational blogging activities in distance contexts.

  14. A Proposal of Product Development Collaboration Method Using User Support Information and its Experimental Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mitsuru; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Koizumi, Hisao

    As the market changes more rapidly and new products continue to get more complex and multifunctional, product development collaboration with competent partners and leading users is getting more important to come up with new products that are successful in the market in a timely manner. ECM (engineering chain management) and SCM (supply chain management) are supply-side approaches toward this collaboration. In this paper, we propose a demand-side approach toward product development collaboration with users based on the information gathered through user support interactions. The approach and methodology proposed here was applied to a real data set, and its effectiveness was verified.

  15. Balancing entrepreneurship and business practices for e-collaboration: responsible information sharing in academic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Mark W; Porter, Mark William; Milley, David; Oliveti, Kristyn; Ladd, Allen; O'Hara, Ryan J; Desai, Bimal R; White, Peter S

    2008-11-06

    Flexible, highly accessible collaboration tools can inherently conflict with controls placed on information sharing by offices charged with privacy protection, compliance, and maintenance of the general business environment. Our implementation of a commercial enterprise wiki within the academic research environment addresses concerns of all involved through the development of a robust user training program, a suite of software customizations that enhance security elements, a robust auditing program, allowance for inter-institutional wiki collaboration, and wiki-specific governance.

  16. Capturing value from external NPD collaboration — the significant role of market information processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tandrup, Thomas

    sources.This study contributes to the existing knowledge of firms’ use of external sources in new product development. A model is presented that tests the effectiveness of external collaboration when multiple external sources have to be managed simultaneously. Also, firms’ ability to process information...... is included, as a central capability that allows them to identify the right collaborators for NPD projects, collect information from them, and disseminate that information throughout their organization. Finally, in the model, the level of novelty involved in new product development is included as a way...

  17. The roles of unit leadership and nurse-physician collaboration on nursing turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Maura; Portoghese, Igor; Battistelli, Adalgisa; Leiter, Michael P

    2013-08-01

    To report a study of the relationship between variables at the group and individual level with nurses' intention to leave their unit. Workplaces are collective environments where workers constantly interact with each other. The quality of working relationship employees develop at the unit-level influences both employee outcomes and unit performance by shaping employee attitudes. The study was a cross-sectional design with self-administered questionnaires. A questionnaire including measures of leader-member exchange and nurse-physician collaboration analysed at group-level and affective commitment and turnover intention analysed at individual level, was administered individually to 1018 nurses in five Italian hospitals. Data were collected in 2009. A total of 832 nurses (81·7% response rate) completed questionnaires. The results showed that affective commitment at individual level completely mediated the relationship between leader-member exchange at group-level and nursing turnover intention. Furthermore, the cross-level interaction was significant: at individual level, the nurses with high levels of individual affective commitment towards their unit showed low levels of turnover intention and this relationship was stronger when the nurse-physician collaboration at group-level was high. This study showed the importance for organizations to implement management practices that promote both high-quality nurse-supervisor and nurse-physician relationships, because they increase nurses' identification with their units. Individual affective commitment is an important quality for retaining a workforce and good nurses' relationship at group-level relationships with both supervisors and physicians are instrumental in developing identification with the work unit. Thus, the quality of relationship among staff members is an important factor in nurses' decision to leave. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Informational Text Comprehension: Its Challenges and How Collaborative Strategic Reading Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCown, Margaret Averill; Thomason, Gina B.

    2014-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on informational text with Common Core State Standards and the difficulty many students have with this type of text, this study examined the effects of Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR) on informational text comprehension and metacognitive awareness of fifth grade students. Participating students included a…

  19. COLLABORATION MANAGEMENT FOR SUBJECTS OF EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY IN INFORMATION-EDUCATIONAL SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury F. Telnov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a conception of collaboration of main actors in information-educational space, based on service level management process from the library of best practices ITIL, composition and procedure of information interchange between actors, responsibility of each actor, metrics and key performance indicators of each actor’s activity within educational service delivery. 

  20. Examining the Relationship between Faculty-Librarian Collaboration and First-Year Students' Information Literacy Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Veronica Arellano; Rabinowitz, Celia E.

    2016-01-01

    Using surveys, interviews, and a rubric-based assessment of student research essays, the St. Mary's College of Maryland Assessment in Action team investigated the relationship between faculty-librarian collaboration in a First Year Seminar (FYS) course and students' demonstrated information literacy (IL) abilities. In gathering information on the…

  1. Examining the Relationship between Faculty-Librarian Collaboration and First-Year Students' Information Literacy Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Veronica Arellano; Rabinowitz, Celia E.

    2016-01-01

    Using surveys, interviews, and a rubric-based assessment of student research essays, the St. Mary's College of Maryland Assessment in Action team investigated the relationship between faculty-librarian collaboration in a First Year Seminar (FYS) course and students' demonstrated information literacy (IL) abilities. In gathering information on the…

  2. Three Essays on Law Enforcement and Emergency Response Information Sharing and Collaboration: An Insider Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treglia, Joseph V.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation identifies what may be done to overcome barriers to information sharing among federal, tribal, state, and local law enforcement agencies and emergency responders. Social, technical, and policy factors related to information sharing and collaboration in the law enforcement and emergency response communities are examined. This…

  3. Assembling Collaboration:Informing the Design of Interaction Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Luff, Paul; Patel, Menisha; Kuzuoka, Hideaki; Heath, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years or so, researchers have, in a number of ways, considered how studies of talk and interaction might inform the design of new technologies. In this article, we discuss a “technical intervention” where studies of visual and material conduct informed by conversation analysis shaped the design and development of a prototype communication system: a “media space.” We conclude by briefly discussing some of the challenges and opportunities that arise when drawing from studies of...

  4. Student Affairs and Information Technology: Collaborating in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatis, Peter Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Student affairs and information technology have opportunities to partner in order to increase student satisfaction and retention rates and to assist institutions to comply with federal educational regulations. This chapter contains four examples of emerging best practices and future initiatives including: (a) the admissions pipeline, (b)…

  5. Distributed Collaborative Learning Communities Enabled by Information Communication Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L. Alvarez (Heidi Lee)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHeidi was a PhD candidate at the Department of Decision and Information Sciences at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University in the Netherlands from 2004-2006. She holds a Masters of Arts in English (1999) from Florida International University (FIU) and a Bachelor of Science in

  6. Collaborating Online To Teach Information and Multimedia Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ted; Luck, DeAnne; Buchanan, Lori

    A graduate communications course in multimedia literacy uses a completely online environment to assemble faculty and curriculum resources normally unavailable in traditional classrooms. Guided by a teacher/coordinator, a librarian teaches information literacy by examining Internet copyright and fair use issues, ethics, and the evaluation of…

  7. A Distributed Multi-Agent System for Collaborative Information Management and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James R.; Wolfe, Shawn R.; Wragg, Stephen D.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we present DIAMS, a system of distributed, collaborative agents to help users access, manage, share and exchange information. A DIAMS personal agent helps its owner find information most relevant to current needs. It provides tools and utilities for users to manage their information repositories with dynamic organization and virtual views. Flexible hierarchical display is integrated with indexed query search-to support effective information access. Automatic indexing methods are employed to support user queries and communication between agents. Contents of a repository are kept in object-oriented storage to facilitate information sharing. Collaboration between users is aided by easy sharing utilities as well as automated information exchange. Matchmaker agents are designed to establish connections between users with similar interests and expertise. DIAMS agents provide needed services for users to share and learn information from one another on the World Wide Web.

  8. Semantic representations for collaborative, distributed scientific information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantor, M.; Joslyn, C.; Kantor, M.

    1997-08-01

    It is vital for Los Alamos to respond to the challenge presented by the ongoing revolution in Information Science and Technology. Distributed Information Systems (DIS) are having a profound affect not only in science, but in society in general. In view of their increasing role in the management of scientific information, in national security and intelligence, and certainly as objects of scientific inquiry themselves, these DIS need to be designed and studied from a scientific perspective. The technological developments over the last ten years, the Internet and the World-Wide Web (www) in particular, have been breakthroughs, allowing for the construction of non-linear, hypertextually based, DIS. And yet most of these DIS are still constructed by hand, and have the properties and architectures of the prior paradigm based on books and libraries, with strictly hierarchical categorization designed with many hours of human effort. Our broader vision is based on an organismal model where DIS are adaptable and evolutionary, scalable, highly connected, high dimensional, resilient, and admitting to many complementary views and orderings. The key development necessary to support this view is the representation of semantic information in DIS. We propose a set of software developments and experiments which will both construct novel DIS with explicit semantic representations, and measure the semantic properties of existing DIS. For DIS design, we propose an architecture called Semantic Webs, where a binary multigraph representation relates a number of nodes according to a variety of semantic categories, each partially ordered. The ontological relations among the semantic categories allows a dynamic among them, and thus for the DIS to be self-modifying and adaptive, suggesting new links as a form of inference. These structures will be implemented as Java add-ons in existing browsers. Semantic categories will be represented as hypertext links, with type indicated by anchor color.

  9. Disseminating Library and Information Science Research in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Douglas

    1975-01-01

    A descriptive survey of the organizations and institutions which conduct and support current research in library and information science in the United States of America and of the major sources of research information. (Author)

  10. The Cerebral Palsy Research Registry: Development and Progress Toward National Collaboration in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Donna S.; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Msall, Michael E.; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Dewald, Julius P.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common neurodevelopmental motor disability in children. The condition requires medical, educational, social, and rehabilitative resources throughout the life span. Several countries have developed population-based registries that serve the purpose of prospective longitudinal collection of etiologic, demographic, and functional severity. The United States has not created a comprehensive program to develop such a registry. Barriers have been large population size, poor interinstitution collaboration, and decentralized medical and social systems. The Cerebral Palsy Research Registry was created to fill the gap between population and clinical-based cerebral palsy registries and promote research in the field. This is accomplished by connecting persons with cerebral palsy, as well as their families, to a network of regional researchers. This article describes the development of an expandable cerebral palsy research registry, its current status, and the potential it has to affect families and persons with cerebral palsy in the United States and abroad. PMID:21677201

  11. Promoting information literacy through collaborative service learning in an undergraduate research course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Robert; Pesut, Barbara; Erbacker, Lynnelle

    2012-11-01

    Information literacy is an important foundation for evidence-based nursing practice. Librarians, the experts in information literacy, are important collaborators in the process of teaching nursing students information literacy skills. In this article we describe a service learning project, offered in a third year nursing research course, designed to teach information literacy and to enhance students' appreciation of the role of evidence in nursing practice. Students worked in groups, and under the guidance of a nursing instructor and librarian, to answer a question posed by practice-based partners. Through the project students learned essential skills of refining a question, identifying systematic search strategies, gleaning essential information from a study and using a bibliographic management tool. Evaluation of the project indicated that although the project was challenging and labour intensive students felt they learned important skills for their future practice. Several recommendations for further enhancing the collaboration are made.

  12. Assessment of Collaboration and Interoperability in an Information Management System to Support Bioscience Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L.

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical researchers often have to work on massive, detailed, and heterogeneous datasets that raise new challenges of information management. This study reports an investigation into the nature of the problems faced by the researchers in two bioscience test laboratories when dealing with their data management applications. Data were collected using ethnographic observations, questionnaires, and semi-structured interviews. The major problems identified in working with these systems were related to data organization, publications, and collaboration. The interoperability standards were analyzed using a C4I framework at the level of connection, communication, consolidation, and collaboration. Such an analysis was found to be useful in judging the capabilities of data management systems at different levels of technological competency. While collaboration and system interoperability are the “must have” attributes of these biomedical scientific laboratory information management applications, usability and human interoperability are the other design concerns that must also be addressed for easy use and implementation. PMID:20351900

  13. Patent information retrieval: approaching a method and analysing nanotechnology patent collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Sercan; Islam, Nazrul

    2017-01-01

    Many challenges still remain in the processing of explicit technological knowledge documents such as patents. Given the limitations and drawbacks of the existing approaches, this research sets out to develop an improved method for searching patent databases and extracting patent information to increase the efficiency and reliability of nanotechnology patent information retrieval process and to empirically analyse patent collaboration. A tech-mining method was applied and the subsequent analysis was performed using Thomson data analyser software. The findings show that nations such as Korea and Japan are highly collaborative in sharing technological knowledge across academic and corporate organisations within their national boundaries, and China presents, in some cases, a great illustration of effective patent collaboration and co-inventorship. This study also analyses key patent strengths by country, organisation and technology.

  14. Assessment of collaboration and interoperability in an information management system to support bioscience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L

    2009-11-14

    Biomedical researchers often have to work on massive, detailed, and heterogeneous datasets that raise new challenges of information management. This study reports an investigation into the nature of the problems faced by the researchers in two bioscience test laboratories when dealing with their data management applications. Data were collected using ethnographic observations, questionnaires, and semi-structured interviews. The major problems identified in working with these systems were related to data organization, publications, and collaboration. The interoperability standards were analyzed using a C(4)I framework at the level of connection, communication, consolidation, and collaboration. Such an analysis was found to be useful in judging the capabilities of data management systems at different levels of technological competency. While collaboration and system interoperability are the "must have" attributes of these biomedical scientific laboratory information management applications, usability and human interoperability are the other design concerns that must also be addressed for easy use and implementation.

  15. How Digital Concept Maps about the Collaborators' Knowledge and Information Influence Computer-Supported Collaborative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Tanja; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2010-01-01

    For collaboration in learning situations, it is important to know what the collaborators know. However, developing such knowledge is difficult, especially for newly formed groups participating in a computer-supported collaboration. The solution for this problem described in this paper is to provide to group members access to the knowledge…

  16. Impact of information and communication technology on interprofessional collaboration for chronic disease management: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Neil; Vania, Diana; Randall, Glen; Mulvale, Gillian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Information and communication technology is often lauded as the key to enhancing communication among health care providers. However, its impact on interprofessional collaboration is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which it improves communication and, subsequently, enhances interprofessional collaboration in chronic disease management. Methods A systematic review of academic literature using two electronic platforms: HealthSTAR and Web of Science (core collection and MEDLINE). To be eligible for inclusion in the review, articles needed to be peer-reviewed; accessible in English and focused on how technology supports, or might support, collaboration (through enhanced communication) in chronic disease management. Studies were assessed for quality and a narrative synthesis conducted. Results The searches identified 289 articles of which six were included in the final analysis (three used qualitative methods, two were descriptive and one used mixed methods). Various forms of information and communication technology were described including electronic health records, online communities/learning resources and telehealth/telecare. Three themes emerged from the studies that may provide insights into how communication that facilitates collaboration in chronic disease management might be enhanced: professional conflict, collective engagement and continuous learning. Conclusions The success of technology in enhancing collaboration for chronic disease management depends upon supporting the social relationships and organization in which the technology will be placed. Decision-makers should take into account and work toward balancing the impact of technology together with the professional and cultural characteristics of health care teams.

  17. A review of the use of asset information standards for collaboration in the process industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan; Klingenberg, Warse; van Exel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this article the use of asset information standards for collaboration in the process industry is reviewed based on a survey of the literature and two case studies. The investigation shows that the process industry appears to have had only limited success in introducing such standards so far, desp

  18. A Collaborative Autoethnography Study to Inform the Teaching of Reflective Practice in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Young, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The paper explores a collaborative self-study, autoethnography research project, which aided in informing practice for the teaching of reflective practice in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) at an Australian university. Self-report methods were used, because it enabled the collection of a variety of self-awareness data…

  19. Collaborative Metaliteracy: Putting the New Information Literacy Framework into (Digital) Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersch, Beate; Lampner, Wendy; Turner, Dudley

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a course-integrated collaborative project between a subject librarian, a communication professor, and an instructional designer that illustrates how the TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge) framework, developed by Mishra and Koehler (2006), and the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy (Framework)…

  20. Teacher-School Library Media Specialist Collaboration through Social Marketing Strategies: An Information Behavior Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immroth, Barbara; Lukenbill, W. Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This research was supported in part though an IMLS Kent State University Grant supporting Information Literacy. Based on the importance of teacher-school library media specialist collaboration, this study seeks to advance knowledge involving the dynamics of this special relationship. The subjects were a group of student librarians--themselves…

  1. Collaborative Metaliteracy: Putting the New Information Literacy Framework into (Digital) Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersch, Beate; Lampner, Wendy; Turner, Dudley

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a course-integrated collaborative project between a subject librarian, a communication professor, and an instructional designer that illustrates how the TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge) framework, developed by Mishra and Koehler (2006), and the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy (Framework)…

  2. University/School Library Collaborations To Integrate Information Technology into Resource-Based Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Ray

    If the goal of teacher-librarians is to work with teachers to develop information literacy, then how do we model this collaboration for pre-service teachers during their teacher education program? This question was explored in a research study involving university researchers from the University of Prince Edward Island (Canada), teachers, and…

  3. A review of the use of asset information standards for collaboration in the process industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan; Klingenberg, Warse; van Exel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this article the use of asset information standards for collaboration in the process industry is reviewed based on a survey of the literature and two case studies. The investigation shows that the process industry appears to have had only limited success in introducing such standards so far,

  4. The Materials Commons: A Collaboration Platform and Information Repository for the Global Materials Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchala, Brian; Tarcea, Glenn; Marquis, Emmanuelle. A.; Hedstrom, Margaret; Jagadish, H. V.; Allison, John E.

    2016-08-01

    Accelerating the pace of materials discovery and development requires new approaches and means of collaborating and sharing information. To address this need, we are developing the Materials Commons, a collaboration platform and information repository for use by the structural materials community. The Materials Commons has been designed to be a continuous, seamless part of the scientific workflow process. Researchers upload the results of experiments and computations as they are performed, automatically where possible, along with the provenance information describing the experimental and computational processes. The Materials Commons website provides an easy-to-use interface for uploading and downloading data and data provenance, as well as for searching and sharing data. This paper provides an overview of the Materials Commons. Concepts are also outlined for integrating the Materials Commons with the broader Materials Information Infrastructure that is evolving to support the Materials Genome Initiative.

  5. Community and research staff collaboration for development of materials to inform microbicide study participants in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodsong, Cynthia; Mutsambi, John Michael; Ntshele, Smangalisa; Modikoe, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials of new vaginal products require careful communication with participants about trial requirements. Most microbicide trials have been multi-site studies conducted among women in sub-Saharan Africa, where literacy levels and understanding of scientific methods differ from those designing and conducting the trials. Microbicide trials require women to insert objects in their vagina and ensure they are present in the vagina during sex. For many women, this is a novel behaviour. These behaviours take place within the context of clinical trial participation, which is an additional novelty. Research teams must develop informational materials to help participants understand the clinical trial and input from local research staff and community members can improve the content and format of these materials. This paper discusses the development of illustrated materials developed for microbicide trial participants, presenting examples from two studies. In both studies, research staff and community advisory groups collaborated to review and revise materials. Collaborative efforts revealed insights about how to convey information about clinical trial participation and microbicide use. These insights highlighted realities of the local context, details that might be misunderstood, illustrations of a sensitive nature and concerns about blood testing. In particular, information about blood testing and product use instructions required careful consideration. Although the research team anticipated needing advice on how best to convey information on these topics to participants, some aspects of potential participant concerns about these topics were also new to the research team. Community advisors and local research staff suggested better ways to convey this information, and provided guidance on how to use the materials. The collaboration served to develop informational materials for microbicide trial participants. Furthermore, staff gained a better understanding of issues

  6. Improvement of Road Safety using Geospatial open data and collaborative users information

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Castaño, José; Cabrera García, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    This project solve the problem of warning to drivers in advance to take precautions when they are approaching a road risk. This notice cannot be sent too close or too far and it is made by icons, text and audio. The main goal is to use geospatial information in a collaborative way to improve road safety taken relevant information from vehicles, cyclists andpedestrians.

  7. Study on Collaborative SCM of Construction Enterprises Based on Information-Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianyue

    Economic globalization and the integration process has led to competition among construction enterprises become increasingly fierce, which are adjusting their development strategies and efforts to seek for the knowledge economy and network environment to promote enterprise survival and development, enhancing the competitiveness of enterprises in the new business management models and ideas. This paper first discussed the concept of the supply chain collaboration of the construction enterprise and constituted a information management platform of the general contracting project. At last, the paper puts forward tactics which aims at helping construction enterprises realize supply chain collaboration and enhance the competitiveness of enterprises.

  8. Developing an Information Literacy Assessment Rubric: A Case Study of Collaboration, Process, and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hoffman Gola

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A team of four librarians at the [Institution Name] ([Institution Initials] Libraries partnered with the [Institution Initials] Office of Institutional Effectiveness and its Director of Assessment & Accreditation Services for General Education to conduct a campus-wide, exploratory assessment of undergraduate information literacy skills. The project evaluated a selection of graduating, senior-level student papers using a rubric developed as part of the collaboration. This paper describes and discusses the collaborative rubric development and rating process, the practical implications for other librarians seeking to conduct a similar assessment, and the impact the project is having on the library instruction program.

  9. Rethinking health planning: a framework for organising information to underpin collaborative health planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudes, Ori; Kendall, Elizabeth; Yigitcanlar, Tan; Pathak, Virendra; Baum, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The field of collaborative health planning faces significant challenges created by the narrow focus of the available information, the absence of a framework to organise that information and the lack of systems to make information accessible and guide decision-making. These challenges have been magnified by the rise of the 'healthy communities movement', resulting in more frequent calls for localised, collaborative and evidence-driven health related decision-making. This paper discusses the role of decision support systems as a mechanism to facilitate collaborative health decision-making. The paper presents a potential information management framework to underpin a health decision support system and describes the participatory process that is currently being used to create an online tool for health planners using geographic information systems. The need for a comprehensive information management framework to guide the process of planning for healthy communities has been emphasised. The paper also underlines the critical importance of the proposed framework not only in forcing planners to engage with the entire range of health determinants, but also in providing sufficient flexibility to allow exploration of the local setting-based determinants of health.

  10. Building on a national health information technology strategic plan for long-term and post-acute care: comments by the Long Term Post Acute Care Health Information Technology Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory L; Alwan, Majd; Batshon, Lynne; Bloom, Shawn M; Brennan, Richard D; Derr, John F; Dougherty, Michelle; Gruhn, Peter; Kirby, Annessa; Manard, Barbara; Raiford, Robin; Serio, Ingrid Johnson

    2011-07-01

    The LTPAC (Long Term Post Acute Care) Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative consists of an alliance of long-term services and post-acute care stakeholders. Members of the collaborative are actively promoting HIT innovations in long-term care settings because IT adoption for health care institutions in the United States has become a high priority. One method used to actively promote HIT is providing expert comments on important documents addressing HIT adoption. Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT released a draft of the Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan 2011-2015 for public comment. The following brief is intended to inform about recommendations and comments made by the Collaborative on the strategic plan.

  11. The Informal Workplace Learning Experiences of Virtual Team Members: A Look at the Role of Collaborative Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frankie S.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study explored how collaborative technologies influence the informal learning experiences of virtual team members. Inputs revealed as critical to virtual informal learning were integrated, collaborative technological systems; positive relationships and trust; and organizational support and virtual team management. These inputs…

  12. Cognition to Collaboration: User-Centric Approach and Information Behaviour Theories/Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alperen M Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The objective of this paper is to review the vast literature of user-centric in-formation science and inform about the emerging themes in information behaviour science. Background:\tThe paradigmatic shift from system-centric to user-centric approach facilitates research on the cognitive and individual information processing. Various information behaviour theories/models emerged. Methodology: Recent information behaviour theories and models are presented. Features, strengths and weaknesses of the models are discussed through the analysis of the information behaviour literature. Contribution: This paper sheds light onto the weaknesses in earlier information behaviour models and stresses (and advocates the need for research on social information behaviour. Findings: Prominent information behaviour models deal with individual information behaviour. People live in a social world and sort out most of their daily or work problems in groups. However, only seven papers discuss social information behaviour (Scopus search. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: ICT tools used for inter-organisational sharing should be redesigned for effective information-sharing during disaster/emergency times. Recommendation for Researchers: There are scarce sources on social side of the information behaviour, however, most of the work tasks are carried out in groups/teams. Impact on Society: In dynamic work contexts like disaster management and health care settings, collaborative information-sharing may result in decreasing the losses. Future Research: A fieldwork will be conducted in disaster management context investigating the inter-organisational information-sharing.

  13. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: the collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. METHODS: Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h\\/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. RESULTS: From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland and the

  14. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: The collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2011-03-01

    Background. Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. Methods. Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h\\/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. Results. From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland

  15. Empowering Students in Information Literacy Practices Using a Collaborative Digital Library for School Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrizah Abdullah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the affordances that a collaborative digital library (CDL can bring to bear on supporting information literacy practices in the digital information environment. It suggests that the digital library can contribute to student empowerment in information literacy practices while searching, using and collaboratively building the digital library resources. To illustrate this, the authors have been experimenting with the implementation of an integrated information literacy model based on Eisenberg and Berkowitz’ Big 6 Model and describes the CDL features in association with the information literacy dimensions in this model. The CDL focuses on the project-based learning approach to conduct students’ project, which supports specific information behaviors that underpin research and learning such as information seeking, browsing, encountering, foraging, sharing, gathering, filtering, and using. Findings regarding teachers’ reception of the digital library are encouraging as they feel the relevance of the digital library to the current requirement of the students’ project and its potential to entrench information and resource study skills through project-based learning.

  16. Supporting interoperability of collaborative networks through engineering of a service-based Mediation Information System (MISE 2.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaben, Frederick; Mu, Wenxin; Boissel-Dallier, Nicolas; Barthe-Delanoe, Anne-Marie; Zribi, Sarah; Pingaud, Herve

    2015-08-01

    The Mediation Information System Engineering project is currently finishing its second iteration (MISE 2.0). The main objective of this scientific project is to provide any emerging collaborative situation with methods and tools to deploy a Mediation Information System (MIS). MISE 2.0 aims at defining and designing a service-based platform, dedicated to initiating and supporting the interoperability of collaborative situations among potential partners. This MISE 2.0 platform implements a model-driven engineering approach to the design of a service-oriented MIS dedicated to supporting the collaborative situation. This approach is structured in three layers, each providing their own key innovative points: (i) the gathering of individual and collaborative knowledge to provide appropriate collaborative business behaviour (key point: knowledge management, including semantics, exploitation and capitalisation), (ii) deployment of a mediation information system able to computerise the previously deduced collaborative processes (key point: the automatic generation of collaborative workflows, including connection with existing devices or services) (iii) the management of the agility of the obtained collaborative network of organisations (key point: supervision of collaborative situations and relevant exploitation of the gathered data). MISE covers business issues (through BPM), technical issues (through an SOA) and agility issues of collaborative situations (through EDA).

  17. Enabling Efficient, Responsive, and Resilient Buildings: Collaboration Between the United States and India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Chandrayee; Ghatikar, Girish

    2013-09-25

    The United States and India have among the largest economies in the world, and they continue to work together to address current and future challenges in reliable electricity supply. The acceleration to efficient, grid-responsive, resilient buildings represents a key energy security objective for federal and state agencies in both countries. The weaknesses in the Indian grid system were manifest in 2012, in the country’s worst blackout, which jeopardized the lives of half of India’s 1.2 billion people. While both countries are investing significantly in power sector reform, India, by virtue of its colossal growth rate in commercial energy intensity and commercial floor space, is better placed than the United States to integrate and test state-of-art Smart Grid technologies in its future grid-responsive commercial buildings. This paper presents a roadmap of technical collaboration between the research organizations, and public-private stakeholders in both countries to accelerate the building-to-grid integration through pilot studies in India.

  18. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE COLLABORATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM PODIO IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii V. Semenets

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Information Technologies role in the medical university management is analyzed. The importance of the application of the electronic document management in the medical universities is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. A Podio collaboration and project management cloud service features overview is presented. The methodology of the Podio capabilities usage to the medical university task management solving is developed. An approaches to the Podio Workspaces and Applications development for the faculties collaboration and project management in the departments of the medical universities are presented. The examples of the Podio features usage to the work-flow automation of the information-analytical and hardware and software support departments of the Ternopil State Medical University named after I. Ja. Horbachevsky are shown.

  19. Developing an Information Literacy Assessment Rubric: A Case Study of Collaboration, Process, and Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Hoffman Gola; Irene Ke; Kerry M. Creelman; Shawn P. Vaillancourt

    2014-01-01

    A team of four librarians at the [Institution Name] ([Institution Initials]) Libraries partnered with the [Institution Initials] Office of Institutional Effectiveness and its Director of Assessment & Accreditation Services for General Education to conduct a campus-wide, exploratory assessment of undergraduate information literacy skills. The project evaluated a selection of graduating, senior-level student papers using a rubric developed as part of the collaboration. This paper describes and ...

  20. Horizontal purchasing collaboration in developing countries : behavioural issues in public united in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhwezi, Moses

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal purchasing collaboration is a popular practice, though developing countries have hardly adopted it. The study provides an understanding of what is happening with respect to behavioural aspects in collaboration, why and how they influence collaboration and application of this understanding

  1. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F. [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  2. PMBOK® Application in project management in information units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Spudeit

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The units of information are increasingly being seen as providing services organizations whose main input is the information that adds value to the company and the intellectual capital. Indicating a need for planning to meet the informational needs of its customers. Objective: The aim of this study is to recognize the project management as an alternative to improve from planning and implementation through solutions that meet these needs. Methodology: Was conduced a bibliographic research that pursuit to enhance the use of best practices in project management for helping, and supporting the management of information units. Results: As results, it is pointed out that all ten areas of PMBOK® are applicable to units of information and it is up to the librarian, promote the implementation, monitoring and completion of these processes. Conclusions: Information units is to promote access to information sources and so it is important that best practices are adopted the PMBOK ® as accelerate the launch of products and services, reduce costs, improve quality controls and optimize resources and efforts.

  3. Ontology-Based User Profiling for Personalized Acces to Information within Collaborative Learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Amine Alimam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of modern educational technology methods has become an important area of research in order to support learning as well as collaboration. This is especially evident with the rise of internet and web 2.0 platforms that have transformed users’ role from mere content consumers to fully content consumers-producers. Furthermore, people engaged in collaborative learning capitalize on one another’s resources and skills, unlike individual learning. This paper proceeds with a categorization of the main tools and functions that characterize the personalization learning aspect, in order to discuss their trade-offs with collaborative learning systems. It proposes a framework of a personalized information research (IR within a collaborative learning system, incorporating the characterization of the research type carried by the query, as well as modeling and constructing semantic users’ profiles. We use the context of the user query into a prediction mechanism of the search type, based on a previous identification of users’ levels and interests. The paper is concluded by presenting experiment results, revealing that the use of the subject ontology extension approach satisfyingly contributes to improvement in the accuracy of system recommendations.

  4. A mental model for successful inter-disciplinary collaboration in curriculum innovation for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Detken Scheepers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pretoria introduced a compulsory Information Literacy module to address the need for delivering motivated knowledgeable employees that embrace information and have the skills to find, select and use relevant information accurately, efficiently and effectively in an explosive information age. Low class attendance, an indication of unmotivated students, as well as the limited scholarly application of information literacy skills in consecutive academic years of study have been identified as possible barriers to the application of the desired skills. A collaborative action research project based on Whole Brain principles was introduced to motivate learners through innovative learning material in the module. A deeper understanding of the role of thinking preferences and thinking avoidances is essential in selecting a team that is responsible for the planning, design, development and delivery of learning opportunities and material. This article discusses the Whole Brain Model® as a mental model that underpins the successful collaboration of multidisciplinary teams and enhances innovative curriculum design that addresses alternative approaches to the teaching of Information Literacy.

  5. Information Literacy in Postsecondary Education in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    This comparison seeks to determine if the three documents addressing information literacy skills and competence developed by professional library associations for postsecondary education in four predominantly English-speaking countries--the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand--have similar or varying conceptions of…

  6. Information Literacy in Postsecondary Education in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    This comparison seeks to determine if the three documents addressing information literacy skills and competence developed by professional library associations for postsecondary education in four predominantly English-speaking countries--the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand--have similar or varying conceptions of…

  7. Exploring the Effect of Geographical Proximity and University Quality on University-Industry Collaboration in the United Kingdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke; Salter, Ammon

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the effect of geographical proximity and university quality on university–industry collaboration in the United Kingdom, Regional Studies. This paper concerns the geographical distance between a firm and the universities in its local area. It is argued that firms' decisions to collaborat...

  8. Community and research staff collaboration for development of materials to inform microbicide study participants in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Woodsong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical trials of new vaginal products require careful communication with participants about trial requirements. Most microbicide trials have been multi-site studies conducted among women in sub-Saharan Africa, where literacy levels and understanding of scientific methods differ from those designing and conducting the trials. Microbicide trials require women to insert objects in their vagina and ensure they are present in the vagina during sex. For many women, this is a novel behaviour. These behaviours take place within the context of clinical trial participation, which is an additional novelty. Research teams must develop informational materials to help participants understand the clinical trial and input from local research staff and community members can improve the content and format of these materials. Methods: This paper discusses the development of illustrated materials developed for microbicide trial participants, presenting examples from two studies. In both studies, research staff and community advisory groups collaborated to review and revise materials. Results: Collaborative efforts revealed insights about how to convey information about clinical trial participation and microbicide use. These insights highlighted realities of the local context, details that might be misunderstood, illustrations of a sensitive nature and concerns about blood testing. In particular, information about blood testing and product use instructions required careful consideration. Although the research team anticipated needing advice on how best to convey information on these topics to participants, some aspects of potential participant concerns about these topics were also new to the research team. Community advisors and local research staff suggested better ways to convey this information, and provided guidance on how to use the materials. Conclusions: The collaboration served to develop informational materials for microbicide trial

  9. Organization of Biomedical Data for Collaborative Scientific Research: A Research Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L.

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical researchers often work with massive, detailed and heterogeneous datasets. These datasets raise new challenges of information organization and management for scientific interpretation, as they demand much of the researchers’ time and attention. The current study investigated the nature of the problems that researchers face when dealing with such data. Four major problems identified with existing biomedical scientific information management methods were related to data organization, data sharing, collaboration, and publications. Therefore, there is a compelling need to develop an efficient and user-friendly information management system to handle the biomedical research data. This study evaluated the implementation of an information management system, which was introduced as part of the collaborative research to increase scientific productivity in a research laboratory. Laboratory members seemed to exhibit frustration during the implementation process. However, empirical findings revealed that they gained new knowledge and completed specified tasks while working together with the new system. Hence, researchers are urged to persist and persevere when dealing with any new technology, including an information management system in a research laboratory environment. PMID:20543892

  10. Organization of Biomedical Data for Collaborative Scientific Research: A Research Information Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L

    2010-06-01

    Biomedical researchers often work with massive, detailed and heterogeneous datasets. These datasets raise new challenges of information organization and management for scientific interpretation, as they demand much of the researchers' time and attention. The current study investigated the nature of the problems that researchers face when dealing with such data. Four major problems identified with existing biomedical scientific information management methods were related to data organization, data sharing, collaboration, and publications. Therefore, there is a compelling need to develop an efficient and user-friendly information management system to handle the biomedical research data. This study evaluated the implementation of an information management system, which was introduced as part of the collaborative research to increase scientific productivity in a research laboratory. Laboratory members seemed to exhibit frustration during the implementation process. However, empirical findings revealed that they gained new knowledge and completed specified tasks while working together with the new system. Hence, researchers are urged to persist and persevere when dealing with any new technology, including an information management system in a research laboratory environment.

  11. Guiding Students from Consuming Information to Creating Knowledge: A Freshman English Library Instruction Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn B. Gamtso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine how faculty and librarians’ own approaches to and attitudes toward library tools, as well as their assumptions about student research practices, impede students’ ability to view learning as a recursive, creative, and ongoing inquiry. We propose first that librarians and faculty examine the assumptions of knowledge that characterize their respective university constituencies; second that they dismantle some of the disciplinary boundaries that separate these constituencies; third that they collaborate to craft analytical assignments that stress knowledge as process; and fourth that they transform library instruction from tool-based demonstrations to analytical, problem-based learning exercises. Finally, we describe how we have collaborated to craft a Freshman Composition library instruction session that moves beyond developing students’ information-gathering expertise by focusing on the development of transferable knowledge and critical thinking skills.

  12. Bangladeshi parental ethnotheories in the United Kingdom: Towards cultural collaborations in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Ruma

    2016-07-01

    Parental meaning systems (ethnotheories) constitute a very important part of the context in which children live and develop. Parental ethnotheories are in turn shaped by implicit cultural ideals that organize parental beliefs and actions and frame child-rearing practices. The article presents a qualitative research into Bangladeshi parental ethnotheories in the United Kingdom, which illustrates both the rich cultural meanings that orientate parental action and also demonstrates how parents generate new meanings following migration and culture change. Professional understandings about children's developmental needs, of child rearing and parenting, are not culture free and an examination of the cultural frames of professional theories is important as parenting is often taught as a universal technique that takes little account of the cultural context and of what parents think. An engagement with other cultural theories about child development can enhance critical reflexivity in clinical practice by provoking reflection on the cultural constructions of professional theories. Creating a context for the expression of parental ethnotheories is necessary for developing cross-cultural collaborations in clinical practice as it empowers families and redresses the power relationship between the therapist and the parent.

  13. Traffic Information Unit, Traffic Information System, Vehicle Management System, Vehicle, and Method of Controlling a Vehicle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papp, Z.; Doodeman, G.J.N.; Nelisse, M.W.; Sijs, J.; Theeuwes, J.A.C.; Driessen, B.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    A traffic information unit (MD1, MD2, MD3) according to the invention comprises a facility (MI) for tracking vehicle state information of individual vehicles present at a traffic infrastructure and a facility (T) for transmitting said vehicle state information to a vehicle (70B, 70E). A traffic

  14. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. A report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide members of the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells with information regarding collaborative opportunities in the United States. The report is designed to provide an overview of key issues and activities and to provide guidance on strategies for finding U.S. research and commercial partners and gaining access to the U.S. market. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the key drivers of policy at the federal and state government levels regarding hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and provides a perspective of the U.S. industry and key players. It also suggests three general pathways for accessing U.S. opportunities: enhancing visibility; developing vendor relationships; and establishing a formal presence in the U.S. The next sections summarize focus areas for commercial and research activity that currently are of the greatest interest in the U.S. Section 2 describes major programs within the federal government and national laboratories, and discusses various methods for identifying R and D funding opportunities, with an overview of federal acquisition regulations. Section 3 reviews the efforts of several state governments engaging the fuel cell industry as an economic driver and presents an overview of acquisition at the state level. Section 4 discusses university research and development (R and D) and university-industry partnerships. There are 12 appendices attached to the report. These appendices provide more detailed information regarding the key federal government agencies involved in fuel cells and hydrogen, state-specific policies and activities, national laboratories and universities, and other information regarding the fuel cell and hydrogen industry in the U.S. (Author)

  15. Invasive species information networks: Collaboration at multiple scales for prevention, early detection, and rapid response to invasive alien species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Annie; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Madsen, John; Westbrooks, Randy G.; Fournier, Christine; Mehrhoff, Les; Browne, Michael; Graham, Jim; Sellers, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate analysis of present distributions and effective modeling of future distributions of invasive alien species (IAS) are both highly dependent on the availability and accessibility of occurrence data and natural history information about the species. Invasive alien species monitoring and detection networks (such as the Invasive Plant Atlas of New England and the Invasive Plant Atlas of the MidSouth) generate occurrence data at local and regional levels within the United States, which are shared through the US National Institute of Invasive Species Science. The Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network's Invasives Information Network (I3N), facilitates cooperation on sharing invasive species occurrence data throughout the Western Hemisphere. The I3N and other national and regional networks expose their data globally via the Global Invasive Species Information Network (GISIN). International and interdisciplinary cooperation on data sharing strengthens cooperation on strategies and responses to invasions. However, limitations to effective collaboration among invasive species networks leading to successful early detection and rapid response to invasive species include: lack of interoperability; data accessibility; funding; and technical expertise. This paper proposes various solutions to these obstacles at different geographic levels and briefly describes success stories from the invasive species information networks mentioned above. Using biological informatics to facilitate global information sharing is especially critical in invasive species science, as research has shown that one of the best indicators of the invasiveness of a species is whether it has been invasive elsewhere. Data must also be shared across disciplines because natural history information (e.g. diet, predators, habitat requirements, etc.) about a species in its native range is vital for effective prevention, detection, and rapid response to an invasion. Finally, it has been our

  16. The Ecological Marine Units Project as a Framework for Collaborative Data Exploration, Distribution, and Knowledge Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Dawn; Sayre, Roger; Breyer, Sean; Butler, Kevin; VanGraafeiland, Keith; Goodin, Kathy; Kavanaugh, Maria; Costello, Mark; Cressie, Noel; Basher, Zeenatul; Harris, Peter; Guinotte, John

    2017-04-01

    scientific research on species distributions and their relationships to the marine physical environment. To further benefit the community and facilitate collaborate knowledge building, data products are shared openly and interoperably via www.esri.com/ecological-marine-units. This includes provision of 3D point mesh and EMU clusters at the surface, bottom, and within the water column in varying formats via download, web services or web apps, as well as generic algorithms and GIS workflows that scale from global to regional and local. A major aim is for the community members to may move the research forward with higher-resolution data from their own field studies or areas of interest, with the original EMU project team assisting with GIS implementation (especially via a new online discussion forum), or hosting of additional data products as needed.

  17. Revealing dynamics and consequences of fit and misfit between formal and informal networks in multi-institutional product development collaborations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratzer, J.; Gemuenden, Hans G.; Lettl, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The study presents a longitudinal examination about dynamics and consequences of fit and misfit between formally ascribed design interfaces and informal communication networks in two large multi-institutional product development collaborations in space industry. Findings: (1) formally ascribed desig

  18. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  19. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Retalis, S., & Sloep, P. B. (Eds.) (2009). Collection of 4 symposium papers at EC-TEL 2009. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning. September, 30, 2009, Nice,

  20. Interdisciplinary Collaboration amongst Colleagues and between Initiatives with the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.; Shaar, R.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science grand challenges often require interdisciplinary and geographically distributed scientific collaboration to make significant progress. However, this organic collaboration between researchers, educators, and students only flourishes with the reduction or elimination of technological barriers. The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the geo-, paleo-, and rock magnetic scientific community to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from studies on natural and synthetic samples. MagIC is dedicated to facilitating scientific progress towards several highly multidisciplinary grand challenges and the MagIC Database team is currently beta testing a new MagIC Search Interface and API designed to be flexible enough for the incorporation of large heterogeneous datasets and for horizontal scalability to tens of millions of records and hundreds of requests per second. In an effort to reduce the barriers to effective collaboration, the search interface includes a simplified data model and upload procedure, support for online editing of datasets amongst team members, commenting by reviewers and colleagues, and automated contribution workflows and data retrieval through the API. This web application has been designed to generalize to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences Network (http://earthref.org/SBN/), EarthRef Digital Archive (http://earthref.org/ERDA/) and EarthRef Reference Database (http://earthref.org/ERR/) will benefit from its development.

  1. Collaborative distributed sensor management and information exchange flow control for multitarget tracking using Markov decision processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akselrod, Dimitry; Kirubarajan, T.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of collaborative management of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) for multitarget tracking. In addition to providing a solution to the problem of controlling individual UAVs, we present a method for controlling the information flow among them. The latter provides a solution to one of the main problems in decentralized tracking, namely, distributed information transfer and fusion among the participating platforms. The problem of decentralized cooperative control considered in this paper is an optimization of the information obtained by a number of UAVs, carrying out surveillance over a region, which includes a number of confirmed and suspected moving targets with the goal to track confirmed targets and detects new targets in the area. Each UAV has to decide on the most optimal path with the objective to track as many targets as possible, maximizing the information obtained during its operation with the maximum possible accuracy at the lowest possible cost. Limited communication between UAVs and uncertainty in the information obtained by each UAV regarding the location of the ground targets are addressed in the problem formulation. In order to handle these issues, the problem is presented as an operation of a group of decision makers. Markov Decision Processes (MDPs) are incorporated into the solution. A decision mechanism for collaborative distributed data fusion provides each UAV with the required data for the fusion process while substantially reducing redundancy in the information flow in the overall system. We consider a distributed data fusion system consisting of UAVs that are decentralized, heterogenous, and potentially unreliable. Simulation results are presented on a representative multisensor-multitarget tracking problem.

  2. Evolution of a collaborative model between nursing and computer science faculty and a community service organization to develop an information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbeek, Jean; Carson, Anne; Troy, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Nursing and computer science students and faculty worked with the American Red Cross to investigate the potential for information technology to provide Red Cross disaster services nurses with improved access to accurate community resources in times of disaster. Funded by a national 3-year grant, this interdisciplinary partnership led to field testing of an information system to support local community disaster preparedness at seven Red Cross chapters across the United States. The field test results demonstrate the benefits of the technology and the value of interdisciplinary research. The work also created a sustainable learning and research model for the future. This article describes the collaborative model used in this interdisciplinary research and exemplifies the benefits to faculty and students of well-timed interdisciplinary and community collaboration.

  3. Information sharing between the National Health Service and criminal justice system in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Charlotte; Mason, Julie; McDonnell, Sharon; Shaw, Jenny; Senior, Jane

    2012-09-01

    Offenders with mental health problems often have complex and interrelated needs which separately challenge the criminal justice system (CJS) and National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom (U.K.). Consequently, interagency collaboration and timely information sharing are essential. This study focused on the sharing of information about people with mental health problems in contact with the CJS. Questionnaires were distributed to a range of health and criminal justice personnel. The results showed that there was a mismatch between what service user information criminal justice agencies felt they needed and what was routinely received. Prison Service staff received more information (between 15% and 37%) from health agencies than the police (between 6% and 22%). Health professionals received most of the information they needed from criminal justice agencies (between 55% and 85%). Sharing service user information was impeded by incompatible computer systems and restrictions due to data protection/confidentiality requirements. In the U.K., recent governmental publications have highlighted the importance of information sharing; however there remains a clear mismatch between what health related information about service users criminal justice agencies need, and what is actually received. Better guidance is required to encourage and empower people to share.

  4. Managing security risks for inter-organisational information systems: a multiagent collaborative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Nan; Wu, Harris; Li, Minqiang; Wu, Desheng; Chen, Fuzan; Tian, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Information sharing across organisations is critical to effectively managing the security risks of inter-organisational information systems. Nevertheless, few previous studies on information systems security have focused on inter-organisational information sharing, and none have studied the sharing of inferred beliefs versus factual observations. In this article, a multiagent collaborative model (MACM) is proposed as a practical solution to assess the risk level of each allied organisation's information system and support proactive security treatment by sharing beliefs on event probabilities as well as factual observations. In MACM, for each allied organisation's information system, we design four types of agents: inspection agent, analysis agent, control agent, and communication agent. By sharing soft findings (beliefs) in addition to hard findings (factual observations) among the organisations, each organisation's analysis agent is capable of dynamically predicting its security risk level using a Bayesian network. A real-world implementation illustrates how our model can be used to manage security risks in distributed information systems and that sharing soft findings leads to lower expected loss from security risks.

  5. Developing the level of adoption survey to inform collaborative discussion regarding educational innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Orr

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning organizations rely on collaborative information and understanding to support and sustain professional growth and development. A collaborative self-assessment instrument can provide clear articulation and characterization of the level of adoption of innovation such as the use of instructional technologies. Adapted from the “Level of Use” (LoU and “Stages of Concern” indices, the Level of Adoption (LoA survey was developed to assess changes in understanding of and competence with emerging and innovative educational technologies. The LoA survey, while reflecting the criteria and framework of the original LoU from which it was derived, utilizes a specifically structured on-line, self-reporting scale of “level of adoption” to promote collaborative self-reflection and discussion. Growth in knowledge of, and confidence with, specific emergent technologies is clearly indicated by the results of this pilot study, thus supporting the use of collaborative reflection and assessment to foster personal and systemic professional development. Résumé : Les organisations apprenantes s’appuient sur des informations et une compréhension issues de la collaboration afin de soutenir et d’entretenir la croissance et le perfectionnement professionnels. Un instrument d’auto-évaluation collaboratif permet d’articuler et de caractériser de manière explicite le niveau d’adoption des innovations, comme l’utilisation de technologies éducatives, par exemple. Adapté à partir des indices de « niveau d’utilisation » (ou « LoU » pour Level of Use et de « niveaux de préoccupation », l’instrument d’enquête sur le niveau d’adoption (ou « LoA » pour Level of Adoption a été conçu afin d’évaluer les changements qui surviennent dans la compréhension des technologies éducatives émergentes et innovatrices ainsi que dans les compétences relatives à ces technologies. L’instrument d’enquête LoA, bien qu’il refl

  6. Collaborative peer review process as an informal interprofessional learning tool: Findings from an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae Yung; Bulk, Laura Yvonne; Giannone, Zarina; Liva, Sarah; Chakraborty, Bubli; Brown, Helen

    2017-09-26

    Despite numerous studies on formal interprofessional education programes, less attention has been focused on informal interprofessional learning opportunities. To provide such an opportunity, a collaborative peer review process (CPRP) was created as part of a peer-reviewed journal. Replacing the traditional peer review process wherein two or more reviewers review the manuscript separately, the CPRP brings together students from different professions to collaboratively review a manuscript. The aim of this study was to assess whether the CPRP can be used as an informal interprofessional learning tool using an exploratory qualitative approach. Eight students from Counselling Psychology, Occupational and Physical Therapy, Nursing, and Rehabilitation Sciences were invited to participate in interprofessional focus groups. Data were analysed inductively using thematic analysis. Two key themes emerged, revealing that the CPRP created new opportunities for interprofessional learning and gave practice in negotiating feedback. The results reveal that the CPRP has the potential to be a valuable interprofessional learning tool that can also enhance reviewing and constructive feedback skills.

  7. Informed or Misinformed Consent? Abortion Policy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Cynthia R; Ferguson, Janna; Howard, Grace; Roberti, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, the United States has witnessed a dramatic expansion of state-based restrictions on abortion. The most common of these are informed consent statutes, which require that a woman seeking an abortion receive a state-authored informational packet before the abortion procedure can be performed. These laws, in addition to requiring the provision of information about alternatives to and risks of abortion, all also require details of embryological and fetal development. This article presents the findings of a comprehensive study of state-authored informed consent materials regarding embryological and fetal development. To conduct this study, we recruited a panel of experts in human anatomy to assess the accuracy of these materials in the context of the constitutional standard established inPlanned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania et al. v. Robert P. Casey et al.(505 U.S. 833 (1992)): that such information must be "truthful" and "nonmisleading." We find that nearly one-third of the informed consent information is medically inaccurate, that inaccurate information is concentrated primarily in the earlier weeks of pregnancy and is clustered around particular body systems. We discuss the implications of our findings for the question of the constitutionality of informed consent laws as they have been implemented in practice. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  8. An Evaluation of Shared Mental Models and Mutual Trust on General Medical Units: Implications for Collaboration, Teamwork, and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Sara A; Lemaster, Matthew; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Hinchey, Kevin T

    2015-02-24

    This study examines nurse-physician teamwork and collaboration, a critical component in the delivery of safe patient care, on general medical units. To that end, we assess shared mental models and mutual trust, 2 coordinating mechanisms that help facilitate teamwork, among nurses and physicians working on general medical units. Data were collected from 37 nurses and 42 physicians at an urban teaching medical center in the Northeastern United States. Shared mental model questionnaire items were iteratively developed with experts' input to ensure content validity. Mutual trust items were adapted from an existing scale; items were reliable. Data were analyzed using χ and independent 2-tailed t tests. Physicians and nurses reported significant differences in their perceptions of the professional responsible for a variety of roles (e.g., advocating for the patient [P = 0.0007], identifying a near miss/error [P = 0.003]). Medication reconciliation is only role for which nurses perceive less responsibility than physicians perceive nurses have. Regarding mutual trust, both groups reported significantly more trust within their own professions; both groups reported similar levels of trust in physicians, with physicians reporting significantly less trust in their nursing colleagues than nurses perceive (P collaboration, more work is needed. To that end, we propose increasing knowledge about their respective roles, providing opportunities for nurse and physician collaboration through rounding or committee work and enhancing the preparedness and professionalism of interactions.

  9. Feasibility Study of Implementing a Mobile Collaborative Information Platform for International Safeguards Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Doehle, Joel R.; Toomey, Christopher M.

    2014-09-30

    In response to the growing pervasiveness of mobile technologies such as tablets and smartphones, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories have been exploring the potential use of these platforms for international safeguards activities. Specifically of interest are information systems (software, and accompanying servers and architecture) deployed on mobile devices to increase the situational awareness and productivity of an IAEA safeguards inspector in the field, while simultaneously reducing paperwork and pack weight of safeguards equipment. Exploratory development in this area has been met with skepticism regarding the ability to overcome technology deployment challenges for IAEA safeguards equipment. This report documents research conducted to identify potential challenges for the deployment of a mobile collaborative information system to the IAEA, and proposes strategies to mitigate those challenges.

  10. Feasibility Study of Implementing a Mobile Collaborative Information Platform for International Safeguards Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, Zoe N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gitau, Ernest T. N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doehle, Joel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Toomey, Christopher M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In response to the growing pervasiveness of mobile technologies such as tablets and smartphones, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories have been exploring the potential use of these platforms for international safeguards activities. Specifically of interest are information systems (software, and accompanying servers and architecture) deployed on mobile devices to increase the situational awareness and productivity of an IAEA safeguards inspector in the field, while simultaneously reducing paperwork and pack weight of safeguards equipment. Exploratory development in this area has been met with skepticism regarding the ability to overcome technology deployment challenges for IAEA safeguards equipment. This report documents research conducted to identify potential challenges for the deployment of a mobile collaborative information system to the IAEA, and proposes strategies to mitigate those challenges.

  11. Performance Optimization of Multiple Interconnected Heterogeneous Sensor Networks via Collaborative Information Sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Sougata; Bellalta, Boris; Oliver, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    Interconnecting multiple sensor networks is a relatively new research field which has emerged in the Wireless Sensor Network domain. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have typically been seen as logically separate, and few works have considered interconnection and interaction between them. Interconnecting multiple heterogeneous sensor networks therefore opens up a new field besides more traditional research on, e.g., routing, self organization, or MAC layer development. Up to now, some approaches have been proposed for interconnecting multiple sensor networks with goals like information sharing or monitoring multiple sensor networks. In this paper, we propose to utilize inter-WSN communication to enable Collaborative Performance Optimization, i.e., our approach aims to optimize the performance of individual WSNs by taking into account measured information from others. The parameters to be optimized are energy consumption on the one hand and sensing quality on the other.

  12. Spanning Boundaries in an Arizona Watershed Partnership: Information Networks as Tools for Entrenchment or Ties for Collaboration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Wutich

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The need to develop successful collaborative strategies is an enduring problem in sustainable resource management. Our goal is to evaluate the relationship between information networks and conflict in the context of collaborative groundwater management in the rapidly growing central highland region of Arizona. In this region, water-management conflicts have emerged because of stakeholders’ differing geographic perspectives and competing scientific claims. Using social network analyses, we explored the extent to which the Verde River Basin Partnership (VRBP, which was charged with developing and sharing scientific information, has contributed to collaboration in the region. To accomplish this, we examined the role that this stakeholder partnership plays in reinforcing or overcoming the geographic, ideological, expert, and power conflicts among its members. Focusing on information sharing, we tested the extent to which several theoretically important elements of successful collaboration were evidenced by data from the VRBP. The structure of information sharing provides insight into ways in which barriers between diverse perspectives might be retained and elucidates weaknesses in the partnership. To characterize information sharing, we examined interaction ties among individuals with different geographic concerns, hierarchical scales of interest, belief systems (about science, the environment, and the role of the partnership, and self-identified expertise types. Results showed that the partnership’s information-sharing network spans most of these boundaries. Based on current theories of collaboration, we would expect the partnership network to be conducive to collaboration. We found that information exchanges are limited by differences in connection patterns across actor expertise and environmental-belief systems. Actors who view scientists as advocates are significantly more likely to occupy boundary-spanning positions, that appear to impede

  13. Global Drought Services: Collaborations Toward an Information System for Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, M. J.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Svoboda, M.

    2014-12-01

    Drought is a hazard that lends itself well to diligent, sustained monitoring and early warning. However, unlike most hazards, the fact that droughts typically evolve slowly, can last for months or years and cover vast areas spanning multiple political boundaries/jurisdictions and economic sectors can make it a daunting task to monitor, develop plans for, and identify appropriate, proactive mitigation strategies. The National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) and National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) have been working together to reduce societal vulnerability to drought by helping decision makers at all levels to: 1) implement drought early warning/forecasting and decision support systems; 2) support and advocate for better collection of, and understanding of drought impacts; and 3) increase long-term resilience to drought through proactive planning. The NDMC and NIDIS risk management approach has been the basis from which many partners around the world are developing a collaboration and coordination nexus with an ultimate goal of building comprehensive global drought early warning information systems (GDEWIS). The core emphasis of this model is on developing and applying useful and usable information that can be integrated and transferred freely to other regions around the globe. The High-Level Ministerial Declaration on Drought, the Integrated Drought Management Programme (IDMP) co-led by the WMO and the Global Water Partnership (GWP), and the Global Framework for Climate Services are drawing extensively from the integrated NDMC-NIDIS risk management framework. This presentation will describe, in detail, the various drought resources, tools, services, and collaborations already being provided and undertaken at the national and regional scales by the NDMC, NIDIS, and their partners. The presentation will be forward-looking, identifying improvements in existing and proposed mechanisms to help strengthen national and international drought early

  14. Let's Go to the Zoo: Guiding Elementary Students through Research; Ladders of Collaboration; Information Literacy and Assessment: Web Resources Too Good To Miss; Top Secret: Collaborative Efforts Really Do Make a Difference; What Is Collaboration to You?; Volunteering for Information Literacy; Getting an Early Start on Using Technology for Research; Collaborations: Working with Restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Lynn; Asper, Vicki; Repman, Judi; Tschamler, Addie; Thomas, Melody; Kearns, Jodi; Farmer, Lesley S. J.; Buzzeo, Toni

    2002-01-01

    Includes eight articles that address the role of the elementary school librarian in developing information literacy, focusing on collaboration between media specialists and classroom teachers. Highlights include student research, including a research planning sheet; Web resources on information literacy and assessment; and helping students use…

  15. Progress in immunization information systems - United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are confidential, computerized, population-based systems that collect and consolidate vaccination data from vaccination providers that can be used in designing and sustaining effective immunization strategies. To monitor progress toward achieving IIS program goals, CDC annually surveys immunization program grantees using the IIS Annual Report (IISAR). Results from the 2012 IISAR, completed by 54 of 56 grantees, indicate that 86% (19.5 million) of U.S. children aged <6 years, and 25% (57.8 million) of U.S. adults participated in IIS. Eight of 12 minimum functional standards for IIS published by the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) have been met by ≥90% of grantees. During 2011-2012, progress was also made in meeting three additional functional standards, including the presence of core data element fields, timeliness of vaccine records, and Health Level 7 (HL7) messaging, and will be monitored in new functional standards for IIS published in 2013. Several new and ongoing initiatives, including interoperability between IIS and electronic health records (i.e., ensuring systems can work together and exchange information), the use of IIS to support vaccine ordering and inventory management, the use of two-dimensional barcodes to record vaccination information, and collaboration with pharmacies, federal agencies, and other adult vaccination providers, will support further progress in meeting functional standards and enhance reporting of adult vaccinations to IIS.

  16. Free software: an alternative to automate information units

    OpenAIRE

    Chinchilla Arley, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    The document begins by describing the problem of budget information units and the high cost of commercial software that specializes in library automation. Describes the origins of free software and its meaning. Mentioned the three levels of automation in library: catalog automation, generation of repositories and full automation. Mentioned the various free software applications for each of the levels and offers a number of advantages and disadvantages in the use of these products. Concludes t...

  17. MASTR-MS: a web-based collaborative laboratory information management system (LIMS) for metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Adam; Dayalan, Saravanan; De Souza, David; Power, Brad; Lorrimar, Rodney; Szabo, Tamas; Nguyen, Thu; O'Callaghan, Sean; Hack, Jeremy; Pyke, James; Nahid, Amsha; Barrero, Roberto; Roessner, Ute; Likic, Vladimir; Tull, Dedreia; Bacic, Antony; McConville, Malcolm; Bellgard, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of research laboratories and core analytical facilities around the world are developing high throughput metabolomic analytical and data processing pipelines that are capable of handling hundreds to thousands of individual samples per year, often over multiple projects, collaborations and sample types. At present, there are no Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) that are specifically tailored for metabolomics laboratories that are capable of tracking samples and associated metadata from the beginning to the end of an experiment, including data processing and archiving, and which are also suitable for use in large institutional core facilities or multi-laboratory consortia as well as single laboratory environments. Here we present MASTR-MS, a downloadable and installable LIMS solution that can be deployed either within a single laboratory or used to link workflows across a multisite network. It comprises a Node Management System that can be used to link and manage projects across one or multiple collaborating laboratories; a User Management System which defines different user groups and privileges of users; a Quote Management System where client quotes are managed; a Project Management System in which metadata is stored and all aspects of project management, including experimental setup, sample tracking and instrument analysis, are defined, and a Data Management System that allows the automatic capture and storage of raw and processed data from the analytical instruments to the LIMS. MASTR-MS is a comprehensive LIMS solution specifically designed for metabolomics. It captures the entire lifecycle of a sample starting from project and experiment design to sample analysis, data capture and storage. It acts as an electronic notebook, facilitating project management within a single laboratory or a multi-node collaborative environment. This software is being developed in close consultation with members of the metabolomics research

  18. Information technology as a facilitator of suppliers’ collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in supply chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Chinomona

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness about the paramount importance of information technology within business in the context of large businesses. However, research about the investigation of the role of information technology resources in fostering collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in the small and medium enterprise sector has remained scant. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of information technology on collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in Zimbabwe’s SME sector. Five research hypotheses were posited and sample data from 162 small and medium enterprise suppliers were collected and used to empirically test the hypotheses. The results of this study showed that information technology resources positively influenced small and medium enterprise suppliers’ collaborative communication, network governance and consequential relationship longevity with their buyers in a significant way. Overall, the current study findings provided tentative support to the proposition that information technology resources, collaborative communication and network governance should be recognised as significant antecedents for improved relationship longevity between suppliers and their buyers in the SME setting. Therefore, managers in the small and medium enterprise sector and small and medium enterprise owners need to pay attention to both collaborative communication and network governance in order to optimise information technology resource impact on their relationship longevity with their business counterparts. Limitations and future research directions were also indicated.

  19. The Drupal Environmental Information Management System Provides Standardization, Flexibility and a Platform for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, C.; Vanderbilt, K.; Reid, D.; Melendez-Colom, E.; San Gil, I.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last five years several Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites have collaboratively developed a standardized yet flexible approach to ecological information management based on the open source Drupal content management system. These LTER sites adopted a common data model for basic metadata necessary to describe data sets, but also used for site management and web presence. Drupal core functionality provides web forms for easy management of information stored in this data model. Custom Drupal extensions were developed to generate XML files conforming to the Ecological Metadata Language (EML) for contribution to the LTER Network Information System (NIS) and other data archives. Each LTER site then took advantage of the flexibility Drupal provides to develop its unique web presence, choosing different themes and adding additional content to the websites. By nature, information presented is highly interlinked which can easily be modeled in Drupal entities and is further supported by a sophisticated tagging system (Fig. 1). Therefore, it is possible to provide the visitor with many different entry points to the site specific information presented. For example, publications and datasets may be grouped for each scientist, for each research project, for each major research theme at the site, making the information presented more accessible for different visitors. Experience gained during the early years was recently used to launch a complete re-write for upgrading to Drupal 7. LTER sites from multiple academic institutions pooled resources in order to partner with professional Drupal developers. Highlights of the new developments are streamlined data entry, improved EML output and integrity, support of IM workflows, a faceted data set search, a highly configurable data exploration tool with intelligent filtering and data download, and, for the mobile age, a responsive web design theme. Seven custom modules and a specific installation profile were developed

  20. Cross-Cultural Astronomy in Informal Education Settings - Collaboration with Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryboy, Nancy; Hawkins, I.; Begay, D.; Sakimoto, P.

    2008-05-01

    The richness of astronomical knowledge and traditions from diverse cultures can engage participants of all ages and backgrounds. We will present astronomy-focused programs for museums, planetariums, and community centers designed to enhance participation of underserved populations in celebrating the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) in 2009. We will share examples of how the indigenous astronomies from the Southwestern US and Mesoamerica can be juxtaposed with Western astronomy to enhance education efforts and understanding for all audiences. In these examples, the traditional knowledge has been highlighted and incorporated into the realm of innovative and unique multimedia resources that engage students and the public, and which often ignite a deeper and more authentic interest in western astronomy and astrophysics. We will discuss approaches to displaying the Navajo sky in a digital planetarium in a manner that is true to the Navajo worldview and that also presents images and information from Western astronomy. We will share multi-media resources that highlight the importance of solar alignments in architecture and in landscape within the context of the seasons. We will also discuss how we are exploring ways to protect the intellectual property rights of indigenous sky knowledge while making aspects of it available to the general public. Our collaboration upholds the integrity of both Western and Indigenous astronomy knowledge and research protocols, and honors indigenous languages. We will discuss collaborative and relationship-based evaluation strategies emerging from the above efforts and from a new effort, Cosmic Serpent, a professional development program to increase the capacity of museum practitioners to bridge indigenous and western science learning in informal settings. We will provide links and information to access products and programs to engage all audiences in the wonder, complexity, and beauty of our Universe. We acknowledge the generous

  1. Collaborative risk governance in informal urban areas: The case of Wallacedene temporary relocation area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J. Zweig

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-based disaster risk management (CBDRM is an emancipatory approach that aims to empower local communities in reducing their own risks. A community risk assessment (CRA is an essential element of CBDRM, incorporating highly participatory processes of hazard identification and vulnerability analysis. By incorporating local knowledge and insights, together with those contributed by other external role players, the nature of local risks can be more accurately identified, giving consideration to their causal factors, the nature of their realised impacts or potential effects on a local community and the challenges posed in addressing them. Reflecting on the process and outcomes of a CRA conducted in an informal settlement in the Cape Town metropolitan area, this article describes how one such risk assessment contributed to building local agency through a process of collaborative engagement. Offered as an example of possible best practice, it illustrates both the immediate and potentially longer term benefits to be derived from such a collaborative process, suggesting that a community-based risk assessment may contribute significantly to building more resilient communities. It concludes with a consideration of the challenges of sustaining longer term risk reduction efforts.

  2. Exploring the impact of health information technology on communication and collaboration in acute care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashen, Margaret S; Bradley, Victoria; Farrell, Ann; Murphy, Judy; Schleyer, Ruth; Sensmeier, Joyce; Dykes, Patricia C

    2006-01-01

    A focus group using nursing informatics experts as informants was conducted to guide development of a survey to explore the impact of health information technology on the role of nurses and interdisciplinary communication in acute care settings. Through analysis of focus group transcripts, five key themes emerged: information, communication, care coordination, interdisciplinary relationships, workflow, and practice effectiveness and efficiency. This served as the basis for development of a survey that will investigate perceptions of acute care providers across the United States regarding the impact of health information technology on the role of nurses and interdisciplinar communication in acute care settings. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of survey development including analysis of transcripts, emergence of key themes, and the processes by which the themes will be employed to inform survey development.

  3. Information Specificity Vulnerability: Comparison of Medication Information Flows in Different Health Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Eeva; Raitoharju, Reetta

    Information on patient's medication is often vital especially when patient's condition is critical. However, the information does not yet move freely between different health care units and organizations. Before reaching the point of putting into practice any system that makes the inter-organizational medication information transmission possible, some prerequisites and characteristics of the information in different user organization should be defined. There are for instance units with different level of urgency and data/information intensity (e.g. emergency department vs. medical floor). The higher the urgency level, the more vulnerable the medication information flow is to different discontinuation situations. As a conceptual framework, a scoring system based on the asset specificity in the transaction cost theory and previous literacy on information flows of different health care units is created to define the vulnerability of the information flows. As there is a national medication database under planning, the scoring system could be used to assess the prerequisites for the medication database in Finland.

  4. Revealing dynamics and consequences of fit and misfit between formal and informal networks in multi-institutional product development collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kratzer, Jan; Gemünden, Hans Georg; Lettl, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The study presents a longitudinal examination about dynamics and consequences of fit and misfit between formally ascribed design interfaces and informal communication networks in two large multi-institutional product development collaborations in space industry. Findings: (1) formally ascribed...... design interfaces and informal communication networks correlate only marginally. The main reason is that informal communication is much more dense than ascribed; (2) although the formally ascribed design interfaces change, the structure of informal communication remains largely stable throughout time; (3...

  5. Revealing dynamics and consequences of fit and misfit between formal and informal networks in multi-institutional product development collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kratzer, Jan; Gemünden, Hans Georg; Lettl, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The study presents a longitudinal examination about dynamics and consequences of fit and misfit between formally ascribed design interfaces and informal communication networks in two large multi-institutional product development collaborations in space industry. Findings: (1) formally ascribed...... design interfaces and informal communication networks correlate only marginally. The main reason is that informal communication is much more dense than ascribed; (2) although the formally ascribed design interfaces change, the structure of informal communication remains largely stable throughout time; (3...

  6. 17th April 2008 - W. W. Tichenor, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and AMS Collaboration Spokesperson S.C.C.Ting.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    17th April 2008 - W. W. Tichenor, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and AMS Collaboration Spokesperson S.C.C.Ting.

  7. Middleware and Web Services for the Collaborative Information Portal of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinderson, Elias; Magapu, Vish; Mak, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design and deployment of the middleware for the Collaborative Information Portal (CIP), a mission critical J2EE application developed for NASA's 2003 Mars Exploration Rover mission. CIP enabled mission personnel to access data and images sent back from Mars, staff and event schedules, broadcast messages and clocks displaying various Earth and Mars time zones. We developed the CIP middleware in less than two years time usins cutting-edge technologies, including EJBs, servlets, JDBC, JNDI and JMS. The middleware was designed as a collection of independent, hot-deployable web services, providing secure access to back end file systems and databases. Throughout the middleware we enabled crosscutting capabilities such as runtime service configuration, security, logging and remote monitoring. This paper presents our approach to mitigating the challenges we faced, concluding with a review of the lessons we learned from this project and noting what we'd do differently and why.

  8. Identity Orientation, Social Exchange, and Information Technology Use in Interorganizational Collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Uri; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Lyytinen, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    Advances in information technologies (IT) are creating unprecedented opportunities for interorganizational collaboration, particularly in large-scale distributed projects. The use of advanced IT in such projects can foster new forms of social exchange among organizations and change the way...... identity orientations. To address this gap, we conduct multiple case studies that describe the changing use of two-dimensional computer-aided design technology and new three-dimensional modeling technologies by a leading metal fabrication company in the architecture, engineering, and construction industry....... The case studies demonstrate that changes in the company's IT and the enactment of related IT affordances within variable interorganizational contexts enable new forms of social exchanges. These exchanges, in turn, provide the context for the rearticulation of the company's identity orientation. Based...

  9. Comprehensive yet scalable health information systems for low resource settings: a collaborative effort in sierra leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braa, Jørn; Kanter, Andrew S; Lesh, Neal; Crichton, Ryan; Jolliffe, Bob; Sæbø, Johan; Kossi, Edem; Seebregts, Christopher J

    2010-11-13

    We address the problem of how to integrate health information systems in low-income African countries in which technical infrastructure and human resources vary wildly within countries. We describe a set of tools to meet the needs of different service areas including managing aggregate indicators, patient level record systems, and mobile tools for community outreach. We present the case of Sierra Leone and use this case to motivate and illustrate an architecture that allows us to provide services at each level of the health system (national, regional, facility and community) and provide different configurations of the tools as appropriate for the individual area. Finally, we present a, collaborative implementation of this approach in Sierra Leone.

  10. Collaborative Approaches to Deepen Student Learning: Information Literacy, Curriculum Design, and Student Learning Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurvitz, Tate; Benvau, Roxane; Parry, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Creating a collaborative environment across student services and instruction is often more challenging than it may first seem. Although effective collaboration is context specific, keeping student learning at the center of the work is a powerful element in successful collaborations. Grossmont College's first year experience program has attempted…

  11. Interagency collaboration in the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains: Federal-university climate service networks for producing actionable information for climate change adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, A. J.; McNie, E.; Averyt, K.; Morisette, J. T.; Derner, J. D.; Ojima, D. S.; Dilling, L.; Barsugli, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Several federal agencies in north-central United States are each working to develop and disseminate useful climate information to enhance resilience to climate change. This talk will discuss how the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) the North Central Climate Science Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Western Water Assessment RISA, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Climate Hub, are building and managing a collaborative research and climate-service network in the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. This presentation will describe the evolution of the interagency collaboration and the partnership with universities to build a climate service network. Such collaboration takes time and intention and must include the right people and organizations to effectively bridge the gap between use-inspired research and application. In particular, we will discuss a focus on the Upper Missouri Basin, developing research to meet needs in a basin that has had relatively less attention on risks of climate change and adaptation to those risks. Each organization has its own mission, stakeholders, and priorities, but there are many commonalities and potential synergies. Together, these organizations, and their agency scientists and university partners, are fostering cross-agency collaboration at the regional scale to optimize efficient allocation of resources while simultaneously enabling information to be generated at a scale that is relevant to decision makers. By each organization knowing the others needs and priorities, there are opportunities to craft research agendas and strategies for providing services that take advantage of the strengths and skills of the different organizations. University partners are key components of each organization, and of the collaboration, who bring in expertise beyond that in the agencies, in particular connections to social scientists, extension services.

  12. Maximum Joint Entropy and Information-Based Collaboration of Automated Learning Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Malakar, N K; Lary, D J

    2011-01-01

    We are working to develop automated intelligent agents, which can act and react as learning machines with minimal human intervention. To accomplish this, an intelligent agent is viewed as a question-asking machine, which is designed by coupling the processes of inference and inquiry to form a model-based learning unit. In order to select maximally-informative queries, the intelligent agent needs to be able to compute the relevance of a question. This is accomplished by employing the inquiry calculus, which is dual to the probability calculus, and extends information theory by explicitly requiring context. Here, we consider the interaction between two question-asking intelligent agents, and note that there is a potential information redundancy with respect to the two questions that the agents may choose to pose. We show that the information redundancy is minimized by maximizing the joint entropy of the questions, which simultaneously maximizes the relevance of each question while minimizing the mutual informat...

  13. Teachers Collaborate across State Lines to Design High-Quality Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Ash; Slamp, Amy

    2016-01-01

    With states and districts across the country implementing the Common Core State Standards, teachers have more opportunities than ever to collaborate around the shared goals of strengthening curriculum design, classroom practices, and student learning. Building from this premise, the Common Assignment Study (CAS) has brought together teams of…

  14. Conjunctive patches subspace learning with side information for collaborative image retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lining; Wang, Lipo; Lin, Weisi

    2012-08-01

    Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) has attracted substantial attention during the past few years for its potential practical applications to image management. A variety of Relevance Feedback (RF) schemes have been designed to bridge the semantic gap between the low-level visual features and the high-level semantic concepts for an image retrieval task. Various Collaborative Image Retrieval (CIR) schemes aim to utilize the user historical feedback log data with similar and dissimilar pairwise constraints to improve the performance of a CBIR system. However, existing subspace learning approaches with explicit label information cannot be applied for a CIR task, although the subspace learning techniques play a key role in various computer vision tasks, e.g., face recognition and image classification. In this paper, we propose a novel subspace learning framework, i.e., Conjunctive Patches Subspace Learning (CPSL) with side information, for learning an effective semantic subspace by exploiting the user historical feedback log data for a CIR task. The CPSL can effectively integrate the discriminative information of labeled log images, the geometrical information of labeled log images and the weakly similar information of unlabeled images together to learn a reliable subspace. We formally formulate this problem into a constrained optimization problem and then present a new subspace learning technique to exploit the user historical feedback log data. Extensive experiments on both synthetic data sets and a real-world image database demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme in improving the performance of a CBIR system by exploiting the user historical feedback log data.

  15. OpenTrials: towards a collaborative open database of all available information on all clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldacre, Ben; Gray, Jonathan

    2016-04-08

    OpenTrials is a collaborative and open database for all available structured data and documents on all clinical trials, threaded together by individual trial. With a versatile and expandable data schema, it is initially designed to host and match the following documents and data for each trial: registry entries; links, abstracts, or texts of academic journal papers; portions of regulatory documents describing individual trials; structured data on methods and results extracted by systematic reviewers or other researchers; clinical study reports; and additional documents such as blank consent forms, blank case report forms, and protocols. The intention is to create an open, freely re-usable index of all such information and to increase discoverability, facilitate research, identify inconsistent data, enable audits on the availability and completeness of this information, support advocacy for better data and drive up standards around open data in evidence-based medicine. The project has phase I funding. This will allow us to create a practical data schema and populate the database initially through web-scraping, basic record linkage techniques, crowd-sourced curation around selected drug areas, and import of existing sources of structured and documents. It will also allow us to create user-friendly web interfaces onto the data and conduct user engagement workshops to optimise the database and interface designs. Where other projects have set out to manually and perfectly curate a narrow range of information on a smaller number of trials, we aim to use a broader range of techniques and attempt to match a very large quantity of information on all trials. We are currently seeking feedback and additional sources of structured data.

  16. Potential and Impact Factors of the Knowledge and Information Awareness Approach for Fostering Net-Based Collaborative Problem-Solving: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    For effective communication and collaboration in learning situations, it is important to know what the collaboration partners know. However, the acquisition of this knowledge is difficult, especially in collaborating groups with spatially distributed members. One solution is the "Knowledge and Information Awareness" approach developed by…

  17. Marketing information systems in units of business information: a proposed model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It proposes a theoretical model of marketing information system, which provides qualitiy attributes informations, such as: accuracy, economy, flexibility, reliability, relevance, simplicity and verifiability to the decision-makers of business organizations, based on the systemic vision and marketing theories. Objective: Present a model of marketing information system for business units, identifying the requirements, skills and abilities that the market demands of the librarian and his or hers integration. Methodology: Literature review that enabled the theoretic knowledge to propose the model. Results: The proposed model consists of five stages and constituent of subsystems that were not identified in existing marketing information systems, where it is confirmed that the organization of information is necessary for the development of the organization. Conclusions: It was identified that the librarian is an active agent, a mediator of information in marketing information systems in business units, must be present at all levels of the process and provide the administrators a greater credibility in the decisions taken.

  18. Cassini Information Management System in Distributed Operations Collaboration and Cassini Science Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equils, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    Launched on October 15, 1997, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft began its ambitious journey to the Saturnian system with a complex suite of 12 scientific instruments, and another 6 instruments aboard the European Space Agencies Huygens Probe. Over the next 6 1/2 years, Cassini would continue its relatively simplistic cruise phase operations, flying past Venus, Earth, and Jupiter. However, following Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI), Cassini would become involved in a complex series of tasks that required detailed resource management, distributed operations collaboration, and a data base for capturing science objectives. Collectively, these needs were met through a web-based software tool designed to help with the Cassini uplink process and ultimately used to generate more robust sequences for spacecraft operations. In 2001, in conjunction with the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and later Venustar Software and Engineering Inc., the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) was released which enabled the Cassini spacecraft and science planning teams to perform complex information management and team collaboration between scientists and engineers in 17 countries. Originally tailored to help manage the science planning uplink process, CIMS has been actively evolving since its inception to meet the changing and growing needs of the Cassini uplink team and effectively reduce mission risk through a series of resource management validation algorithms. These algorithms have been implemented in the web-based software tool to identify potential sequence conflicts early in the science planning process. CIMS mitigates these sequence conflicts through identification of timing incongruities, pointing inconsistencies, flight rule violations, data volume issues, and by assisting in Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage analysis. In preparation for extended mission operations, CIMS has also evolved further to assist in the planning and coordination of the dual playback redundancy of

  19. Collab-Analyzer: An Environment for Conducting Web-Based Collaborative Learning Activities and Analyzing Students' Information-Searching Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Hsiang; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Kuo, Fan-Ray

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have found that students might get lost or feel frustrated while searching for information on the Internet to deal with complex problems without real-time guidance or supports. To address this issue, a web-based collaborative learning system, Collab-Analyzer, is proposed in this paper. It is not only equipped with a collaborative…

  20. Towards novel community-based collaborative disaster management approaches in the new information environment: An NGO perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, M.J.C. van den; Neef, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale natural and man-made disasters are complex events involving many stakeholders. Despite the structures the national and international humanitarian system provide, still many collaboration and information gaps between stakeholders, levels of operations and phases in the disaster management

  1. Towards novel community-based collaborative disaster management approaches in the new information environment: An NGO perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, M.J.C. van den; Neef, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Large scale natural and man-made disasters are complex events involving many stakeholders. Despite the structures the national and international humanitarian system provide, still many collaboration and information gaps between stakeholders, levels of operations and phases in the disaster management

  2. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Retalis, S., & Sloep, P. B. (Eds.) (2009). Collection of 4 symposium papers at EC-TEL 2009. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning. September, 30, 2009, Nice, France. http://sunsite.informatik.rwt

  3. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Retalis, S., & Sloep, P. B. (Eds.) (2009). Collection of 4 symposium papers at EC-TEL 2009. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning. September, 30, 2009, Nice, France. http://sunsite.informatik.rwt

  4. The Collaborative Imperative: Librarians and Faculty Working Together in the Information Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspa, Dick, Ed.; Ward, Dane, Ed.

    This book of essays is about collaboration between librarians and faculty serving as a map to tomorrow's territory of higher education. Each chapter in this book explores the possibilities of librarians and faculty working together across disciplines and traditional university boundaries. Essays include: "Listening for Collaboration: Faculty and…

  5. Arkose: A Prototype Mechanism and Tool for Collaborative Information Generation and Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kevin Kyung

    2010-01-01

    The goals of this thesis have been to gain a better understanding of collaborative knowledge sharing and distilling and to build a prototype collaborative system that supports flexible knowledge generation and distillation. To reach these goals, I have conducted two user studies and built two systems. The first system, Arkose 1.0, is a…

  6. Evoking Knowledge and Information Awareness for Enhancing Computer-Supported Collaborative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Tanja; Tergan, Sigmar-Olaf; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2010-01-01

    Computer-supported collaboration by spatially distributed group members still involves interaction problems within the group. This article presents an empirical study investigating the question of whether computer-supported collaborative problem solving by spatially distributed group members can be fostered by evoking knowledge and information…

  7. Arkose: A Prototype Mechanism and Tool for Collaborative Information Generation and Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kevin Kyung

    2010-01-01

    The goals of this thesis have been to gain a better understanding of collaborative knowledge sharing and distilling and to build a prototype collaborative system that supports flexible knowledge generation and distillation. To reach these goals, I have conducted two user studies and built two systems. The first system, Arkose 1.0, is a…

  8. Arctic Forecasts Available from Polar Bear Exhibit as an Example of Formal/Informal Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, C. E.; Cervenec, J.

    2012-12-01

    A subset of the general population enjoys and frequents informal education venues, offering an opportunity for lifelong learning that also enhances and supports formal education efforts. The Byrd Polar Research Center (BPRC) at The Ohio State University collaborated with the Columbus Zoo & Aquarium (CZA) in the development of their Polar Frontier exhibit, from its initial planning to the Grand Opening of the exhibit, through the present. Of course, the addition to the Zoo of polar bears and Arctic fox in the Polar Frontier has been very popular, with almost a 7% increase in visitors in 2010 when the exhibit opened. The CZA and BPRC are now investigating ways to increase the climate literacy impact of the exhibit, and to increase engagement with the topics through follow-on activities. For example, individuals or classes anywhere in the world can check forecasts from the Polar Weather and Research Forecasting model and compare them to observed conditions-- allowing deep investigation into changes in the Arctic. In addition, opportunities exist to adapt the Zoo School experience (affecting several Central Ohio school districts) and/or to enable regular participation through social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and other forms of digital communication. BPRC's sustained engagement with the CZA is an example of a trusted and meaningful partnership where open dialogue exists about providing the best learning experience for visitors. This presentation will share some of the lessons learned from this unique partnership, and strategies that are adopted to move it forward.

  9. A collaborative and trauma-informed practice model for urban Indian child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Nancy M; Bussey, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Preventing the breakup of the American Indian family is the fundamental goal of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). However, few models exist to provide CPS workers and other practitioners with effective and practical strategies to help achieve this goal. This article presents a collaborative and trauma-informed family preservation practice model for Indian Child Welfare services with urban-based American Indian families. The model encompasses both systemic and direct practice efforts that assist families facing multiple challenges in creating a nurturing and more stable family life. System-level interventions improve the cultural responsiveness of providers, encourage partnerships between CPS and community-based providers, and support ICWA compliance. Direct practice interventions, in the form of intensive case management and treatment services, help parents/caregivers become more capable of meeting their own and their children's needs by addressing challenges such as substance abuse, trauma and other mental health challenges, domestic violence, and housing instability. Evaluation of the practice model suggests that it shows promise in preventing out-of-home placement of Native children, while at the same time improving parental capacity, family safety, child well-being, and family environment.

  10. An Information-Theoretic Approach for Energy-Efficient Collaborative Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arienzo Loredana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of collaborative tracking of mobile nodes in wireless sensor networks is addressed. By using a novel metric derived from the energy model in LEACH (W.B. Heinzelman, A.P. Chandrakasan and H. Balakrishnan, Energy-Efficient Communication Protocol for Wireless Microsensor Networks, in: Proceedings of the 33rd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS '00, 2000 and aiming at an efficient resource solution, the approach adopts a strategy of combining target tracking with node selection procedures in order to select informative sensors to minimize the energy consumption of the tracking task. We layout a cluster-based architecture to address the limitations in computational power, battery capacity and communication capacities of the sensor devices. The computation of the posterior Cramer-Rao bound (PCRB based on received signal strength measurements has been considered. To track mobile nodes two particle filters are used: the bootstrap particle filter and the unscented particle filter, both in the centralized and in the distributed manner. Their performances are compared with the theoretical lower bound PCRB. To save energy, a node selection procedure based on greedy algorithms is proposed. The node selection problem is formulated as a cross-layer optimization problem and it is solved using greedy algorithms.

  11. Information Science and integrative Science. A sistemic approach to information units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Dolores Santaella Ruiz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Structured in two parts: The Documentation like integrating science and Systematics approach to the documentary units, this work understands the Documentation from a brought integrating perspective of the twinning that supposes same modus operandi in the information systems through the use of the technologies of the communication. From the General Theory of Systems, the present work interprets this science to multidiscipline like a system formed by the technical subsystems, of elements and individuals

  12. Facilities management innovation in public-private collaborations: Danish ESCO projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to investigate how Facilities Management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public collaborative innovation within the context of FM. The driving motivation is to inform and inspire internal FM units of local...... institutions on how to navigate and manage collaboration of different, intra- and inter-organisational actors throughout ESCO projects....

  13. Card Sorting as Collaborative Method for User-Driven Information Organizing on a Website: Recommendations for Running Collaborative Group Card Sorts in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Friis Bjerre

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Card sorting is an easy-to-use, quick, inexpensive, yet powerful usability method for information organizing on a website as it generates usable input directly from end-users as to how they would expect to find information on a website. When run collaboratively in groups, the discussion between the users about the content of the cards and their relatedness provides valuable insight into the users’ mental models. Focusing on epistemic asymmetry in the group discussion, this article highlights important issues which may affect the outcome of group card sorting. It is demonstrated that group card sorting demands great attention from the test manager in relation to the composition of the group, i.e. the number of users per group and the users’ educational level and formal organizational positions, in order to ensure a result that is representative of the group as a whole.

  14. China and the United States--Global partners, competitors and collaborators in nanotechnology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Jin, Biyu; Shen, Weiyu; Sinko, Patrick J; Xie, Xiaodong; Zhang, Huijuan; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    USA and China are two leading countries engaged in nanotechnology research and development. They compete with each other for fruits in this innovative area in a parallel and compatible manner. Understanding the status and developmental prospects of nanotechnology in USA and China is important for policy-makers to decide nanotechnology priorities and funding, and to explore new ways for global cooperation on key issues. We here present the nanoscience and nanomedicine research and the related productivity measured by publications, and patent applications, governmental funding, policies and regulations, institutional translational research, industrial and enterprise growth in nanotechnology-related fields across China and USA. The comparison reveals some marked asymmetries of nanotechnology development in China and USA, which may be helpful for future directions to strengthen nanotechnology collaboration for both countries, and for the world as a whole.

  15. Development of information and collaboration platform for production service system in the mould and die industry

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhi; 李志

    2013-01-01

     This research is concerned with the transformation Mould and Die (MD) manufacturing industry from the traditional manufacturing paradigm into service-oriented manufacturing (SOM) in collaboration with leading manufacturers in the sector. It investigates how the new concept of Production Service System (PnSS) can be used and extended to integrate distributed manufacturing-oriented services (MOSs) so that all participants could efficiently and effectively collaborate in response to market...

  16. United State Collaboration working in the Atlas hall experiment (B180).

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    It's a small world; at least you might think so after a visit to Building 180. Inside, about 30 engineers and physicists weld, measure and hammer away. They hail from Pakistan, Israel, Japan, China, Russia and the United States and they work toward one common goal: the completion of the ATLAS muon chamber endcaps

  17. A collaborative Canadian-United Kingdom evaluation of an immunohistochemistry protocol to diagnose bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of domestic cattle. The disorder was reported in the United Kingdom in the late 1980s and was associated with recycling of ruminant byproducts in cattle feed. In 1996, the bovine disease was reported to be the cause of a...

  18. Information-computational platform for collaborative multidisciplinary investigations of regional climatic changes and their impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, Evgeny; Lykosov, Vasily; Krupchatnikov, Vladimir; Okladnikov, Igor; Titov, Alexander; Shulgina, Tamara

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of growing volume of related to climate change data from sensors and model outputs requires collaborative multidisciplinary efforts of researchers. To do it timely and in reliable way one needs in modern information-computational infrastructure supporting integrated studies in the field of environmental sciences. Recently developed experimental software and hardware platform Climate (http://climate.scert.ru/) provides required environment for regional climate change related investigations. The platform combines modern web 2.0 approach, GIS-functionality and capabilities to run climate and meteorological models, process large geophysical datasets and support relevant analysis. It also supports joint software development by distributed research groups, and organization of thematic education for students and post-graduate students. In particular, platform software developed includes dedicated modules for numerical processing of regional and global modeling results for consequent analysis and visualization. Also run of integrated into the platform WRF and «Planet Simulator» models, modeling results data preprocessing and visualization is provided. All functions of the platform are accessible by a user through a web-portal using common graphical web-browser in the form of an interactive graphical user interface which provides, particularly, capabilities of selection of geographical region of interest (pan and zoom), data layers manipulation (order, enable/disable, features extraction) and visualization of results. Platform developed provides users with capabilities of heterogeneous geophysical data analysis, including high-resolution data, and discovering of tendencies in climatic and ecosystem changes in the framework of different multidisciplinary researches. Using it even unskilled user without specific knowledge can perform reliable computational processing and visualization of large meteorological, climatic and satellite monitoring datasets through

  19. Infocast: A New Paradigm for Collaborative Content Distribution from Roadside Units to Vehicular Networks Using Rateless Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Sardari, Mohsen; Fekri, Faramarz; 10.1109/SAHCN.2009.5168939

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of distributing a large amount of bulk data to a sparse vehicular network from roadside infostations, using efficient vehicle-to-vehicle collaboration. Due to the highly dynamic nature of the underlying vehicular network topology, we depart from architectures requiring centralized coordination, reliable MAC scheduling, or global network state knowledge, and instead adopt a distributed paradigm with simple protocols. In other words, we investigate the problem of reliable dissemination from multiple sources when each node in the network shares a limited amount of its resources for cooperating with others. By using \\emph{rateless} coding at the Road Side Unit (RSU) and using vehicles as data carriers, we describe an efficient way to achieve reliable dissemination to all nodes (even disconnected clusters in the network). In the nutshell, we explore vehicles as mobile storage devices. We then develop a method to keep the density of the rateless codes packets as a function of d...

  20. Varicella vaccine for immunocompromised children: results of collaborative studies in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRussa, P; Steinberg, S; Gershon, A A

    1996-11-01

    Varicella vaccine in immunocompromised children was clinically evaluated in 575 US and Canadian children with leukemia in remission by the Varicella Vaccine Collaborative Study. Most children had chemotherapy stopped 1 week before and 1 week after immunization. Steroids were stopped for 3 weeks (1 week before to 2 weeks after vaccination). Varicella vaccine was safe, immunogenic, and effective in leukemic children at risk for serious disease or death from chickenpox. The major side effect was mild rash in 50% approximately 1 month after immunization. About 40% of children who developed rash were treated with acyclovir. Vaccine efficacy was judged by the degree of protection after a household exposure to varicella; of 123 exposed children, 17 (14%) developed a mild form of varicella. The vaccine protected completely against severe varicella. Leukemic vaccines were less likely to develop zoster than were comparable children with leukemia who had wild type varicella. Thus, varicella vaccine, administered carefully with close follow-up, is extremely beneficial for leukemic children.

  1. Working Collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holder, Anna; Lovett, George

    2009-01-01

    Working collaboratively is arguably an essential skill in architectural practice as the complexity of contemporary projects involves multiple agents in the conception, construction and use of architecture. This has been emphasised by recent government rhetoric. Mass collaboration has been...... identified as a transformative global force of the last decade, most notably in knowledge and information publishing, communication and creation. This paper presents a structured conversation on changing understandings of collaboration, and the realities of collaborative methodology in architectural work....... Ideas of the platforms and structures necessary to support ‘creative’ collaborations are advanced and tested, and a vocabulary of key terms is developed. The conversation extends to reflect on the role of the architecture profession in supporting or enabling collaboration in architectural works....

  2. Communication and collaboration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of columns exploring health information technology (HIT) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first column provided background information on the implementation of information technology throughout the health care delivery system, as well as the requisite informatics competencies needed for nurses to fully engage in the digital era of health care. The second column focused on information and resources to master basic computer competencies described by the TIGER initiative (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) as learning about computers, computer networks, and the transfer of data.1 This column will provide additional information related to basic computer competencies, focusing on communication and collaboration technologies. Computers and the Internet have transformed the way we communicate and collaborate. Electronic communication is the ability to exchange information through the use of computer equipment and software.2 Broadly defined, any technology that facilitates linking one or more individuals together is a collaborative tool. Collaboration using technology encompasses an extensive range of applications that enable groups of individuals to work together including e-mail, instant messaging (IM ), and several web applications collectively referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. The term Web 2.0 refers to web applications where users interact and collaborate with each other in a collective exchange of ideas generating content in a virtual community. Examples of Web 2.0 technologies include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, and mashups. Many organizations are developing collaborative strategies and tools for employees to connect and interact using web-based social media technologies.3.

  3. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  4. Collaborative tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Manickam

    2007-01-01

    @@ A successful next generation fusion experiment, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, will need experimentalists, theorists, and computational scientists to collaborate efficiently, to understand the overwhelming amount of information from experiments, codes, and theory.

  5. Fostering Sustained Climate Engagement and Collaborative Leadership through Creativity and Science-Informed Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothballer, K.; Sturges, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Join veteran artist/activist Molly Sturges for a presentation on FIREROCK: PASS THE SPARK performances and engagement processes that foster personal and collective creativity for sustained climate engagement and collaborative leadership. FIREROCK: PASS THE ROCK opens in San Francisco in October 2016. This project is an evolving, long-term, social innovation project that has been developed with faith, Indigenous and directly impacted communities as well as schools, towns and universities. Informed by science, social justice, Indigenous knowledge, and grassroots activism FIREROCK includes performances that are accompanied by a series of activities designed to build community and engineer creative spaces for dialogue and response. The FIREROCK team has found that people are excited to engage around climate when there are venues available for expressivity and meaningful exchange. FIREROCK supports us in moving from our current stance in which we are paralyzed— often not knowing what to do or how to act—to seeing ourselves as part of the solution. FIREROCK is a family-friendly catalytic musical journey inviting people into the complexity of climate change and sparking an inspired response to the mythic challenges of our time. Through story, song and unique engagement experiences, FIREROCK builds community towards action and solutions. FIREROCK provides partners with everything they need to make the project their own, including a comprehensive toolkit to assist groups in learning how to develop community partnerships, convene FIREROCK engagement activities and facilitate dialogue and skill sharing. This dynamic storytelling project is scalable and can be employed, adapted and localized by groups and communities nationwide as a powerful catalyst for climate engagement work. Molly Sturges is a national leader in arts, ecology and social change work. She is the Founding Artistic Director of Littleglobe, a diverse arts cooperative made up of artistic and cultural workers

  6. Interprofessional collaboration and family member involvement in intensive care units: emerging themes from a multi-sited ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Scott; McMillan, Sarah E; Kachan, Natasha; Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Kitto, Simon

    2015-05-01

    This article presents emerging findings from the first year of a two-year study, which employed ethnographic methods to explore the culture of interprofessional collaboration (IPC) and family member involvement in eight North American intensive care units (ICUs). The study utilized a comparative ethnographic approach - gathering observation, interview and documentary data relating to the behaviors and attitudes of healthcare providers and family members across several sites. In total, 504 hours of ICU-based observational data were gathered over a 12-month period in four ICUs based in two US cities. In addition, 56 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a range of ICU staff (e.g. nurses, doctors and pharmacists) and family members. Documentary data (e.g. clinical guidelines and unit policies) were also collected to help develop an insight into how the different sites engaged organizationally with IPC and family member involvement. Directed content analysis enabled the identification and categorization of major themes within the data. An interprofessional conceptual framework was utilized to help frame the coding for the analysis. The preliminary findings presented in this paper illuminate a number of issues related to the nature of IPC and family member involvement within an ICU context. These findings are discussed in relation to the wider interprofessional and health services literature.

  7. Influencing Tomorrow: A Study of Emerging Influence Techniques and Their Relevance to United States Information Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    groups and governmental institutions; the possibility of economic loss directed at entrepreneurs; or the prospect of United States undue influence or... INFLUENCING TOMORROW: A STUDY OF EMERGING INFLUENCE TECHNIQUES AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO UNITED STATES INFORMATION OPERATIONS A...

  8. Information Literacy in the Changing Landscape of Distance Learning: The Collaborative Design of a Flexible, Digital, Asynchronous Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Reichart

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a case study of the collaborative development of an information literacy course for students enrolled in an online, proprietary college. This credit-bearing course was created in accordance with ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education as well as the newly adopted Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The course treats information literacy as a meta-competency that encourages students to explore a variety of research tools, from social media to scholarly journals, and to develop critical thinking and research skills. In order to incorporate current best practices in information literacy pedagogy into the course itself, institutional factors needed to be addressed; these factors are reviewed here. This paper also explores implications for the future of the course, including assessment, the need to constantly adapt to the changing needs of students, and the ever-changing digital environment.

  9. Scaffolding Information Problem Solving in Web-Based Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Annelies; Schellens, Tammy; De Wever, Bram; Vanderhoven, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of different modes of scaffolding on students who are learning science through a web-based collaborative inquiry project in authentic classroom settings and explored the interaction effects with students' characteristics. The intervention study aimed to improve "domain-specific knowledge" and "metacognitive…

  10. Scaffolding Information Problem Solving in Web-Based Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Annelies; Schellens, Tammy; De Wever, Bram; Vanderhoven, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of different modes of scaffolding on students who are learning science through a web-based collaborative inquiry project in authentic classroom settings and explored the interaction effects with students' characteristics. The intervention study aimed to improve "domain-specific knowledge" and "metacognitive…

  11. Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

    2001-04-03

    While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

  12. Creating a Supportive Teaching Culture in the Research University Context: Strategic Partnering and Interdisciplinary Collaboration between a Teaching Center and Academic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Marie Kendall; Ralston, Patricia A. S.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Schreck, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes 2 "strategic partnering" and "interdisciplinary collaboration" case studies between a Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) and an academic unit at a mid-sized metropolitan research university in the American Midwest. These faculty development partnerships were developed to meet the unique needs of faculty…

  13. 长三角区域社会化信息协同共享模式研究%A Collaborative Sharing Model of Socialized Information in Yangtze River Delta Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋定福; 岳焱

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of e-government performance and to promote the construction of service-oriented government,a research on collaborative sharing model of socialized information in Yangtze River Delta Region is carried out from a collaborative perspective.This paper firstly proposed the collaborative sharing model of information based on the actuality that the government socialized information sharing is realized in Yangtze River Delta Region.Then the structure of the information collaborative sharing system is discussed.Finally,the collaborative sharing model of socialized information is studied from three perspectives: government unit,inter-government,and pure public information in Yangtze River Delta Region.%为了提升电子政务效能及推动服务型政府建设,采用协同思想对长三角区域社会化信息资源共享进行研究。文章从长三角区域间政府社会化信息共享的现实条件入手,构建信息协同共享模型,对长三角区域社会化信息协同共享体系结构进行了探讨,并从长三角区域各政府单元内、长三角区域政府间、长三角纯公共信息三个层面研究其信息协同共享模式。

  14. Web Content Management Systems, a Collaborative Environment in the Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel MICAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to analyze the main models of collaboration and the use of a Web CMS, in order to develop an online community. Taking into consideration the multitude of the existing Web CMSs on the market and their diverse functionalities, we conducted a prospective study that tests the development trends in the field, with the view of finding out which are the most important Web CMSs in practice, and which are the most important functionalities they have to possess, in order to develop a collaborative online community. The results of the study show that the most popular Web CMS is Joomla, and the most widespread programming language is PHP. Likewise, we consider that this study can help the entry-level web developers to get an overview of the most popular Web CMSs, and their functionalities.

  15. Analysing the role of information exchange for demand forecasting in collaborative supply chains

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Usha

    2010-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that supply chains, not individual organisations, are responsible for the success or failure of businesses. This has necessitated close coordination among supply chain partners. In the past few decades, in an attempt to improve the overall efficiency of the supply chain, many companies have engaged in collaboration with other supply chain members. Consequently, several supply chain management initiatives such as Vendor Managed Inventory, Efficient Consumer Response...

  16. While Collaboration Is Increasing in the Profession the LIS Dissertation Remains a Solo-Authored Monograph. A Review of: Sugimoto, C. R. (2011. Collaboration in information and library science doctoral education. Library & Information Science Research, 33, 3-11. doi:10.1016/j.lisr.2010.05.003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K. Wakimoto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate collaboration in LIS doctoral education, in particular the extent and perception of collaboration between advisors and advisees, and the dissertation as a collaborative product. Design – Quantitative and qualitative analysis of questionnaire data. Qualitative analysis of interviews. Bibliometric analysis of curricula vitae (CVs and dissertation citations.Setting – American Library Association (ALA-accredited, doctorate-granting schools in the United States and Canada. Subjects – A total of 374 full-time, tenured faculty members with the rank of associate or full professor (advisor group and 294 assistant professors (advisee group comprised the pool of faculty members (n=668 who were sent the questionnaire. Of these, 30 individuals participated in follow-up telephone interviews, which were equally split between the two groups. There were 97 faculty members from the original pool of 668 faculty members were included in the bibliometric analyses. Methods – The author developed two questionnaires, one for the advisors (associate and full professors and one for the advisees (assistant professors, and sent the surveys to faculty members at ALA-accredited schools in the United States and Canada. The questionnaires gathered information about the extent of collaboration and perceptions of collaboration in LIS doctoral education. The author also collected contact information from those interested in participating in a follow-up interview. The author selected the first 30 individuals who responded as the interview participants. The interview participants were split equally between advisors and advisees. A separate subpopulation of 97 faculty members was chosen for the bibliometric analysis phase of the study. These faculty members were chosen with the following criteria: graduation from an ALA-accredited school; full-text of dissertation available online; and a current, full CV available online. CVs were searched to

  17. An Enhanced Collaborative-Software Environment for Information Fusion at the Unit of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-07

    not fit with any existing BSO, we can draw one of two conclusions: either a brand new BSO was observed by the sensors or the BSO has moved in an...0.1, C’ = 0.4, C2 = 0.3. Pet:ntChng i As1n00Dpt 2Sesiwthlty to Base Csr ,ns P(D)-IO0% __SensA4viy to Base Cor,eotnoee. P(D)=50% P-1 A.1005% A-Pil

  18. Technological Challenges and Opportunities in the United States Education Information Network Collaboration and Service Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Donald P.

    The definition, role, and functions of "library" are changing. The National Library of Education (NLE) is in transition from a traditional library to a virtual library encompassing "one stop [any stop] shopping" through conventional and digital means. To adequately plan for the transition, the customer and potential customers…

  19. Social Marketing and the School Library: An Effective Path to Collaboration? A Review of: Immroth, Barbara and W. Bernard Lukenbill. “Teacher-School Library Media Specialist Collaboration through Social Marketing Strategies: An Information Behavior Study.” School Library Media Research 10 (2007. 22 April 2008 .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle Bogel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The study attempted to apply the strategies of social marketing theory to collaboration between school librarians andteachers. Design – Based on the 1972 theory of social marketing by Zaltman, Kotler and Kaufman, a cohort of students in a graduate-level practicum established a collaborative unit with selected teachers within their school. In addition, two focus groups were conducted in alternate schools to gauge the overall attitudes of teachers toward collaboration with school librarians.Subjects – Students (student librarians in a graduate-level certification class for Texas school librarians, and both teachers and librarians in host schools/districts for the graduate students’ practicum experiences Methods – Researchers used qualitative approaches, both case study and focus groups, to gather data about the collaborative interactions between teachers and school librarians. The interactions were designed using the social marketing AIDA model (Attention, Interest, Desire, and Action. Social marketing, based on models of commercial marketing, assumes that social goodwill is a motivator for establishing interactions between groups – or selling a service that is for the greater good. Students in a graduate-level practicum were instructed to develop a strategy based on the AIDA model to elicit and carry out a collaborative unit with teachers in their host schools. They were given specific guidelines by the principal investigators that included:• Instructions for designing announcements, leaflets, and conferences as marketing strategies • Instructional unit designs for subject content and information literacy skills• Incentive payments of $200 to be used for library resources as anincentive to collaborate.• The steps to engaging in the collaborative process • Procedural guidelines for taking field notes, unobtrusive observations and informal evidence.Summative evaluation was based on a reflective journaling exercise

  20. Value Relevance of Accounting Information in the United Arab Emirates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jamal Barzegari Khanagha

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the value relevance of accounting information in per and post-periods of International Financial Reporting Standards implementation using the regression and portfolio approaches...

  1. International Perspectives in LIS Education: Global Education, Research, and Collaboration at the SJSU School of Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Sandra; Simmons, Michelle Holschuh; Christensen, Paul; Sellar, Melanie; Stenström, Cheryl; Hagar, Christine; Bernier, Anthony; Faires, Debbie; Fisher, Jane; Alman, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The IFLA Trend Report identified five trends that will impact the information environment (IFLA, 2015), such as access to information with new technologies, online education for global learning, hyper-connected communities, and the global information environment. The faculty at San José State University (SJSU) School of Information (iSchool) is…

  2. A collaborative framework for contributing DICOM RT PHI (Protected Health Information) to augment data mining in clinical decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Ruchi; Thuptimdang, Wanwara; DeMarco, John; Liu, Brent J.

    2014-03-01

    We have built a decision support system that provides recommendations for customizing radiation therapy treatment plans, based on patient models generated from a database of retrospective planning data. This database consists of relevant metadata and information derived from the following DICOM objects - CT images, RT Structure Set, RT Dose and RT Plan. The usefulness and accuracy of such patient models partly depends on the sample size of the learning data set. Our current goal is to increase this sample size by expanding our decision support system into a collaborative framework to include contributions from multiple collaborators. Potential collaborators are often reluctant to upload even anonymized patient files to repositories outside their local organizational network in order to avoid any conflicts with HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules. We have circumvented this problem by developing a tool that can parse DICOM files on the client's side and extract de-identified numeric and text data from DICOM RT headers for uploading to a centralized system. As a result, the DICOM files containing PHI remain local to the client side. This is a novel workflow that results in adding only relevant yet valuable data from DICOM files to the centralized decision support knowledge base in such a way that the DICOM files never leave the contributor's local workstation in a cloud-based environment. Such a workflow serves to encourage clinicians to contribute data for research endeavors by ensuring protection of electronic patient data.

  3. Value Relevance of Accounting Information in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Barzegari Khanagha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the value relevance of accounting information in per and post-periods of International Financial Reporting Standards implementation using the regression and portfolio approaches for sample of the UAE companies. The results obtained from a combination of regression and portfolio approaches, show accounting information is value relevant in UAE stock market. A comparison of the results for the periods before and after adoption, based on both regression and portfolio approaches, shows a decline in value relevance of accounting information after the reform in accounting standards. It could be interpreted to mean that following to IFRS in UAE didn’t improve value relevancy of accounting information. However, results based on and portfolio approach shows that cash flows’ incremental information content increased for the post-IFRS period.

  4. Development of educational CD-ROMs in astronomy: Information on a collaborative project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frede, Valerie

    The observatory of Paris and the institute of teacher training (IUFM) in Toulouse have collaborated to develop multimedia support for astronomy lessons. The goal of this project is to provide additional didactical material such as CD-ROMs to elementary and high school teachers which will be used by children in the classroom. In this paper, we present the aims of the project and describe briefly the contents that have been developed so far. The project is a part of “Astrophysique sur Mesure”, a broader project led by the observatory of Paris which encourages the involvement of astronomers in the development of pedagogical tools.

  5. Working collaboratively to develop a patient experience definition and strategy to inform clinical commissioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Sanders

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Major reforms in the NHS in England have resulted in the creation of Clinical Commissioning Groups, which put clinicians at the forefront of commissioning services. One of the shared strategic objectives of the NHS is ‘ensuring that people have a positive experience of care’. With this in mind, a piece of work was undertaken to develop a strategy to embed patient experience in the commissioning process. Aim: The overall aim of this work was to engage with patients, service users, carers, health and social care workers and representatives from the voluntary sector in north-west London, UK, to develop a shared definition of patient experience and a patient experience strategy to influence the clinical commissioning of care. Methods: A values-based approach was used to develop the definition and strategy, working collaboratively with clinicians, commissioners, patients, service users, carers and the community. The facilitation of this work was underpinned by four principles: working collaboratively; being evidence based; being asset based; and being continuous and iterative. The principles are described and also used to critique the process and outcomes. Conclusion: This work was stimulated by the recognition that practice development approaches could be applied to different contexts and settings, including clinical commissioning. It has the potential to draw clinical commissioning and clinical provision much closer together, with engagement, collaboration and decision making focused on improving the quality of care (experience, safety and outcomes for patients and their supporters. Implications for practice: •\tA values-based approach is an effective way of capturing the voice of patients, service users, carers and the community •\tThe voices of individuals and communities are crucial in shaping and influencing the development and commissioning of new models of care •\tGreater impact may have been achieved if we had worked

  6. Collaborative Approaches to Undergraduate Research Training: Information Literacy and Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailey Mooney

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The undergraduate research experience (URE provides an opportunity for students to engage in meaningful work with faculty mentors on research projects. An increasingly important component of scholarly research is the application of research data management best practices, yet this often falls out of the scope of URE programs. This article presents a case study of faculty and librarian collaboration in the integration of a library and research data management curriculum into a social work URE research team. Discussion includes reflections on the content and learning outcomes, benefits of a holistic approach to introducing undergraduate students to research practice, and challenges of scale.

  7. First-Year Writing Teachers, Perceptions of Students’ Information Literacy Competencies, and a Call for a Collaborative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Joy Birmingham

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the shared work of teaching research and writing, research librarians and compositionists (writing teachers have not engaged regularly in dialogue about how they might collaborate in this endeavor. This project surveyed English teachers at three institutions, a private liberal arts college, a public liberal arts college, and a land grant university, concerning their perceptions of their students’ information literacy skills, as well as about the variety of strategies they used to introduce and reinforce information literacy competency in their classrooms. These strategies ranged from assigning a research project with little classroom or library support, to using up to ten different research-related activities to build the research competencies to complete a project. The authors found that teachers who employed a variety of strategies for teaching information literacy competency were significantly more satisfied with their students’ abilities to successfully complete researched projects. This paper reports on the results of this study begins a conversation about how these results might shape collaborations between librarians and first-year writing programs.

  8. Telementoring Physics: University-Community After-school Collaborations and the Mediation of the Formal/Informal Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecusay, Robert A.

    For several decades improvement of science education has been a major concern of policy makers concerned that the U.S. is a "nation at risk" owing to the dearth of students pursing careers in science. Recent policy proposals have argued that provision of broadband digital connectivity to organizations in the informal sector would increase the reach of the formal, academic sector to raise the overall level of science literacy in the country. This dissertation reports on a longitudinal study of a physics telementoring activity jointly run by a university-community collaborative at a community learning center. The activity implemented a digital infrastructure that exceeds the technical and social-institutional arrangements promoted by policy makers. In addition to broadband internet access (for tele-conferencing between students at the community center and physicists at a university), supplemented by digital software designed to promote physics education, the activity included the presence of a collaborating researcher/tutor at the community learning center to coordinate and document the instructional activities. The current research revealed a fundamental contradiction between the logic, goals, and practices of the physics instructors, and the corresponding logic, goals, and practices of the participants at the community learning center. This contradiction revolves around a contrast between the physicists' formal, logocentric ways of understanding expressed in the ability to explain the scientific rules underlying physical phenomena and the informal, pragmatic orientation of the youth and adults at the learning center. The observations in this dissertation should remind techno-enthusiasts, especially in the arena of public education policy, that there are no turnkey solutions in "distance" science education. Technically "connecting" people is not equivalent to creating conditions that expand opportunities to learn and a functioning socio-technical system that

  9. Centers for independent living and secondary transition collaboration: characteristics for enhanced service delivery for adolescents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotner, Anthony J; Shogren, Karrie A; Shaw, Leslie A; VanHorn Stinnett, Chelsea; Seo, Hyojeong

    2017-06-01

    Research involving secondary transition practices indicates a growing implementation of interagency collaboration to maximize service delivery to support students transitioning from school to adult life. Centers for Independent Living (CILs) are often excluded from collaborative partnerships and denied the opportunity to contribute as a valued stakeholder in the transition process. A total of 189 CIL professionals representing represented 38 states completed the online survey to (a) identify to what degree does the factor structure of Thompson's Collaboration Survey holds for CIL professionals and (b) explore what specific CIL professional and agency characteristics predict greater collaboration between CILs and local education agencies (LEAs). Additionally (c) researchers sought to determine the degrees to which greater self-reported collaboration predicts more frequent transition services provided to transition-age youth by CIL professionals. Results indicated that the factor structure proposed by Thompson was confirmed in a sample of CIL professionals. None of the agency or individual characteristics (i.e., number of high schools partnered with, number of students served, amount of training in transition services, and importance of collaboration between high schools and agencies for transition) predicted greater collaboration with LEAS. When analyzing the effects of degree of collaboration on the services provided, high ratings on three of the five collaborative dimensions predicted a higher likelihood of providing services to transition-age youth. This study suggests that more training and experience of CIL professionals does not necessarily lead to greater collaboration. Additionally, the findings suggest that collaborative team structure is more important than social capital collaborative dimensions in leading to frequent services from CILs to transition-age youth. Implications for rehabilitation Extant literature suggests that secondary transition

  10. Interaction of Units and Research Methods of Control Performances of Distributed Manufacturing Information System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Kai-sheng; SUN Yan-ming; ZHENG Shi-xiong

    2008-01-01

    In order to analyze the function demand of the distributed manufacturing information system as well as its control demand,and eliminate information ambiguity among system units to integrate sernantics,the abstract Agent model and computational structure of each unit was presented based on flexible coupling automata.The autonomy of each unit was investigated in this foundation.The system unit was described usmg the Web Ontology Language (OWL) ontology.And the system semantics was also integrated.On these basics the communication among the system units was analyzed with an example of interaction between a machine and a warehouse.The control performances of information system units were investigated usmg Boolean matrix as a substitute for traditional process in RWtheory,which reduced the computational complexity.This work established the foundation for the demand analysis,design and development of the distributed manufacture information system.

  11. The Future of Information Operations in the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    as Marketing Marketing tools and concepts could generate support for coalition military operations just as an advertiser promoting a commercial...military, the advanced application of marketing tools to leverage humanitarian assistance and public affairs within an Information Operations plan

  12. Global Geospatial Information Management: un'iniziativa delle Nazioni Unite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Salvemini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available What is Global Geospatial Information ManagementThere is general agreement of an urgent need for an inter-government consultative mechanism that can play a leadershiprole in setting the agenda for the development of global geospatial information and to promote its use to address key global challenges; to liaise and coordinate among Member States, and between Member States and international organizations.

  13. Enhancing Information Usefulness by Line Managers’ Involvement in Cross-Unit Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Rodgers, Waymond

    2011-01-01

    of line managers’ prior involvement with Corporate Audit using Throughput Modeling. This model allows us to understand how line managers’ cross-unit involvement influenced the way they process information received from Corporate Audit. Our results show that managers’ cross-unit involvement positively...... influences their assessment of information from Corporate Audit in a way that influences their propensity to use information from that unit. The results indicate that cross-unit involvement is more than an effective means of transmitting information – it can also be used as a means of building boundary......Organization and management scholars have long advocated that efficient use of information is critical for firms to compete successfully in the modern marketplace. This study examines whether the use of managerial cross-unit involvement in an organization enhances managers’ propensity to use useful...

  14. Making Sense of Information Sharing in E-Government Inter-Organizational Collaborations: A Malaysian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, Dolly Amy

    2011-01-01

    Information sharing is a fundamental goal of information systems (IS). Yet information sharing, although critical and much acclaimed, is complex in terms of its concepts and implementation. How to leverage this phenomenon while implementing an IS is discussed at length in the literature. Both academics and practitioners in IS are striving to…

  15. Social learning in a policy-mandated collaboration: Community wildfire protection planning in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel F. Brummel; Kristen C. Nelson; Pamela J. Jakes; Daniel R. Williams

    2010-01-01

    Policies such as the US Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA) mandate collaboration in planning to create benefits such as social learning and shared understanding among partners. However, some question the ability of top-down policy to foster successful local collaboration. Through in-depth interviews and document analysis, this paper investigates social learning and...

  16. Progress in immunization information systems - United States, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-12

    Immunization information systems (IISs) are confidential, computerized information systems that collect and consolidate vaccination data from multiple health-care providers, generate reminder and recall notifications, and assess vaccination coverage within a defined geographic area. A CDC program goal for 2010 is to achieve >or=95% participation in an IIS (defined as having two or more recorded vaccinations) among children aged Information Systems Annual Report (IISAR). All 56 grantees were asked to complete the IISAR; 52 did so for 2008. This report highlights results from the 2008 IISAR, which indicated that 75% of all U.S. children aged or=90% of IIS records (both measures are similar to 2006 results). Increased provider use of electronic health record systems can benefit IISs and their users by producing immunization records that are more timely and complete.

  17. Setting a research agenda for interprofessional education and collaborative practice in the context of United States health system reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Brandt, Barbara; Delaney, Connie; Pechacek, Judith; Cerra, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice (CP) have been prolific areas of inquiry exploring research questions mostly concerned with local program and project assessment. The actual sphere of influence of this research has been limited. Often discussed separately, this article places IPE and CP in the same conceptual space. The interface of these form a nexus where new knowledge creation may be facilitated. Rigorous research on IPE in relation to CP that is relevant to and framed by health system reform in the U.S. is the ultimate research goal of the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education at the University of Minnesota. This paper describes the direction and scope for a focused and purposive IPECP research agenda linked to improvement in health outcomes, contextualized by health care reform in the U.S. that has provided a revitalizing energy for this area of inquiry. A research agenda articulates a focus, meaningful and robust questions, and a theory of change within which intervention outcomes are examined. Further, a research agenda identifies the practices the area of inquiry is interested in informing, and the types of study designs and analytic approaches amenable to carrying out the proposed work.

  18. Contested collaboration: A descriptive model of intergroup communication in information system design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    support patterns of work activities, social groups, and personal beliefs. In these situations, design is fundamentally an interactive process that requires communication among users, designers, and developers. However, communication among these groups is often difficult although of paramount importance...... to design outcomes. Through a qualitative analysis of a house, expert system, and telecommunications network architecture and management system design situations, a descriptive model of design that characterizes communication among users, designers, and developers as they create an artifact was developed....... The model describes design phases, roles, themes, and intergroup communication networks as they evolve throughout the design process and characterizes design as a process of ''contested collaboration.'' It is a first step towards a predictive design model that suggests strategies which may help participants...

  19. Developing a Cloud-Based Online Geospatial Information Sharing and Geoprocessing Platform to Facilitate Collaborative Education and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z. L.; Cao, J.; Hu, K.; Gui, Z. P.; Wu, H. Y.; You, L.

    2016-06-01

    Efficient online discovering and applying geospatial information resources (GIRs) is critical in Earth Science domain as while for cross-disciplinary applications. However, to achieve it is challenging due to the heterogeneity, complexity and privacy of online GIRs. In this article, GeoSquare, a collaborative online geospatial information sharing and geoprocessing platform, was developed to tackle this problem. Specifically, (1) GIRs registration and multi-view query functions allow users to publish and discover GIRs more effectively. (2) Online geoprocessing and real-time execution status checking help users process data and conduct analysis without pre-installation of cumbersome professional tools on their own machines. (3) A service chain orchestration function enables domain experts to contribute and share their domain knowledge with community members through workflow modeling. (4) User inventory management allows registered users to collect and manage their own GIRs, monitor their execution status, and track their own geoprocessing histories. Besides, to enhance the flexibility and capacity of GeoSquare, distributed storage and cloud computing technologies are employed. To support interactive teaching and training, GeoSquare adopts the rich internet application (RIA) technology to create user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). Results show that GeoSquare can integrate and foster collaboration between dispersed GIRs, computing resources and people. Subsequently, educators and researchers can share and exchange resources in an efficient and harmonious way.

  20. The Effectiveness of Information Criteria in Determining Unit Root and Trend Status

    OpenAIRE

    Hacker, Scott

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of using an information criterion, such as the Akaike information criterion or the Schwarz (Bayesian) information criterion, rather than hypothesis testing in consideration of the presence of a unit root for a variable and, if unknown, the presence of a trend in that variable. The investigation is performed through Monte Carlo simulations. Properties considered are frequency of choosing the unit root status correctly, predictive performance, and frequency o...

  1. Effects of Media and Distributed Information on Collaborative Concept-Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiaolan; Tan Jing

    2005-01-01

    The present study explores the effects of media and distributed information on the performance of remotely located pairs of people's completing a concept-learning task. Sixty pairs performed a concept-learning task using either audio-only or audio-plus-video for communication. The distribution of information includes three levels:with totally same information, with partly same information, and with totally different information. The subjects' primary psychological functions were also considered in this study. The results showed a significant main effect of the amount of information shared by the subjects on the number of the negative instances selected by the subjects, and a significant main effect of media on the time taken by the subjects to complete the task.

  2. Framework for virtual collaboration emphasized by awareness information and asynchronous interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Tomo; Shibata,Naoki; Yasumoto, keiichi; Ito, Minoru

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework which allows remote users to form conversation groups based on spatial relationship in a shared virtual space. Our proposed framework can transport awareness information of real world by capturing and transferring user’s audio visual information. Our framework also provides functions useful to CSCW, which allow each user to simultaneously join different conversation groups, and communicate with others asynchronously exchanging awareness information. We sh...

  3. Psychoactive drug advertising: a comparison of technical information from three countries: Brazil, United States and United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Carvalho Mastroianni

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Studies carried out in the 1970s and 1980s showed that there were country-dependent disparities in the information given for the same drug in medical advertisements. National and international regulations have been published to do away with such disparities and to foster the rational use of drugs. The purpose of this study was to compare the information contained in psychoactive drug advertisements published in psychiatric journals in Brazil, the United States and the United Kingdom, before and subsequent to the publication of the United States Export Act, in 1986, the WHO criteria, in 1988, and the Brazilian Sanitary Surveillance Agency Resolution no. 102, in 2000. TYPE OF STUDY AND SETTING: Content analysis, at Centro Brasileiro de Informações sobre Drogas Psicotrópicas (Cebrid. METHODS: We gathered advertisements from Brazilian, American and British psychiatry periodicals published before and after each ruling. We analyzed a total of twenty-four Brazilian advertisements that were for the same psychoactive drugs as advertised in American and/or British publications from the same period. RESULTS: We observed that Brazilian advertisements omitted information on usage restrictions, such as contraindications, adverse reactions, interactions, warnings and precautions, and that such information was present in American and British advertisements. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that disparities in the information given for the same drug still persist. The information depends on the country in which each drug is marketed. The legislation is insufficient for eradicating such disparities.

  4. Progress in immunization information systems--United States, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are confidential, computerized, population-based systems that collect and consolidate vaccination data from vaccination providers and provide important tools for designing and sustaining effective immunization strategies. A Healthy People 2020 objective (IID-18) is to increase to 95% the proportion of children aged <6 years whose immunization records are in fully operational, population-based IIS. The National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) has published goals for IIS, including required and optional core data elements for which IIS should collect information. Two of the required core data elements are vaccine manufacturer and vaccine lot number. To monitor progress toward achieving these and other program goals, CDC annually surveys 56 immunization program grantees using the IIS Annual Report (IISAR). Results from the 2011 IISAR (completed by 54 grantees) indicate that 84% (19.2 million) of U.S. children aged <6 years participated in IIS, as defined by having at least two recorded vaccinations, an increase from 82% (18.8 million) in 2010. Grantees reported that an average of 63% of vaccination records for these children contained data in the field for vaccine manufacturer and 60% contained data in the field for lot number. A new project under way to capture vaccine product information, expiration date, and lot number on two-dimensional (2D) barcodes on vaccine vials might increase completeness, accuracy, and availability of these data elements in patient medical records and IIS, which in turn might enhance vaccine safety and support vaccine inventory management.

  5. Emergent Social Software Platforms for the Sharing of and Collaboration on Criminal Information and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    theft rings, fraudulent credit card operations, land swindles, and other criminal organizations. This definition would appear to cover terrorism...may also drive demand by increasing a sense of exclusivity around the program. A program being used by a robbery or homicide unit may result in an

  6. Faculty and Librarians Unite! How Two Librarians and One Faculty Member Developed an Information Literacy Strategy for Distance Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Jennifer; Bailey, Sharon; Klages, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Librarians know that collaboration with faculty is crucial when developing effective information literacy initiatives. Our case study, based on the ADDIE model of instructional design, set out to determine if a collaborative approach between faculty and librarians could effectively support students in a distance education course. Set in a small…

  7. Managing Training of Military Units: Development of a Management Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Nancy K.; Hiller, Jack H.

    An automated management information system was developed for planning and scheduling unit training in a U.S. Army infantry division. The primary goal of the project was to test the feasibility of the concept for a computer-based management information system. Specific objectives were to integrate information on personnel, training, and logistics…

  8. COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (CIT, COLLABORATIVE AUTHORSHIP AND KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTION IN TERTIARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóris Maria Luzzardi Fiss

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article approaches a research developed in the period of 2009-2012 along with licensees from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul that analyses the role of Virtual Learning Environments as tools of interaction and their effects in the production processes of public knowledge student involved from the perspective of collaborative authorship. It seeks to identify their potential as curriculum, learning and affective tools that enable the construction of qualitatively different relationships. It was sought to achieve these objectives throughout the analysis of the data generated by questionnaires, completing related aspects of the digital resources use in its academic path. We work with 28 selected reports, confronting these data to the theoretical matrix – Cesar Coll, Luciana de Souza Gracioso, Gustavo S. Saldanha and José Armando Valente. This work revealed that the use of other tools as the Virtual Learning Environments enabling the creation of learning dynamics as well as new ways of interaction between the participants modifying partially its learning processes from the offered possibilities.

  9. The eras of radiation, matter, and dark energy: new information from the Planck Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Data released by the Planck Collaboration in 2015 imply new dates for the era of radiation, the era of matter, and the era of dark energy. The era of radiation ended, and the era of matter began, when the density of radiation dropped below that of matter. This happened 51,953 \\pm 2236 years after the time of infinite redshift when the ratio a(t)/a_0 of scale factors was (2.9332 \\pm 0.0711) x 10^{-4}. The era of matter ended, and the era of dark energy began, when the density of matter dropped below that of dark energy (assumed constant). This happened 10.1928 \\pm 0.0375 Gyr after the time of infinite redshift when the scale-factor ratio was 0.7646 \\pm 0.0168. The era of dark energy started 3.606 billion years ago. In this pedagogical paper, five figures trace the evolution of the densities of radiation and matter, the scale factor, and the redshift through the eras of radiation, matter, and dark energy.

  10. A study on scientific collaboration and co-authorship patterns in library and information science studies in Iran between 2005 and 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Siamaki, Saba; Geraei, Ehsan; Zare- Farashbandi, Firoozeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Scientific collaboration is among the most important subjects in scientometrics, and many studies have investigated this concept to this day. The goal of the current study is investigation of scientific collaboration and co-authorship patterns of researchers in the field of library and information science in Iran between years 2005 and 2009. Materials and Methods: The current study uses scientometrics method. The statistical population consists of 942 documents published in Irania...

  11. ACCISS study rationale and design: activating collaborative cancer information service support for cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullard Emily

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-quality cancer information resources are available but underutilized by the public. Despite greater awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service among low-income African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians, actual Cancer Information Service usage is lower than expected, paralleling excess cancer-related morbidity and mortality for these subgroups. The proposed research examines how to connect the Cancer Information Service to low-income African-American and Hispanic women and their health care providers. The study will examine whether targeted physician mailing to women scheduled for colposcopy to follow up an abnormal Pap test can increase calls to the Cancer Information Service, enhance appropriate medical follow-up, and improve satisfaction with provider-patient communication. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in two clinics in ethnically diverse low-income communities in Chicago. During the formative phase, patients and providers will provide input regarding materials planned for use in the experimental phase of the study. The experimental phase will use a two-group prospective randomized controlled trial design. African American and Hispanic women with an abnormal Pap test will be randomized to Usual Care (routine colposcopy reminder letter or Intervention (reminder plus provider recommendation to call the Cancer Information Service and sample questions to ask. Primary outcomes will be: 1 calls to the Cancer Information Service; 2 timely medical follow-up, operationalized by whether the patient keeps her colposcopy appointment within six months of the abnormal Pap; and 3 patient satisfaction with provider-patient communication at follow-up. Discussion The study examines the effectiveness of a feasible, sustainable, and culturally sensitive strategy to increase awareness and use of the Cancer Information Service among an underserved population. The goal of linking a

  12. A survey of scientific production and collaboration rate among of medical library and information sciences in ISI, scopus and Pubmed databases during 2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefy, Alireza; Malekahmadi, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Research is essential for development. In other words, scientific development of each country can be evaluated by researchers' scientific production. Understanding and assessing the activities of researchers for planning and policy making is essential. The significance of collaboration in the production of scientific publications in today's complex world where technology is everything is very apparent. Scientists realized that in order to get their work wildly used and cited to by experts, they must collaborate. The collaboration among researchers results in the development of scientific knowledge and hence, attainment of wider information. The main objective of this research is to survey scientific production and collaboration rate in philosophy and theoretical bases of medical library and information sciences in ISI, SCOPUS, and Pubmed databases during 2001-2010. This is a descriptive survey and scientometrics methods were used for this research. Then data gathered via check list and analyzed by the SPSS software. Collaboration rate was calculated according to the formula. Among the 294 related abstracts about philosophy, and theoretical bases of medical library and information science in ISI, SCOPUS, and Pubmed databases during 2001-2010, the year 2007 with 45 articles has the most and the year 2003 with 16 articles has the least number of related collaborative articles in this scope. "B. Hjorland" with eight collaborative articles had the most one among Library and Information Sciences (LIS) professionals in ISI, SCOPUS, and Pubmed. Journal of Documentation with 29 articles and 12 collaborative articles had the most related articles. Medical library and information science challenges with 150 articles had first place in number of articles. Results also show that the most elaborative country in terms of collaboration point of view and number of articles was US. "University of Washington" and "University Western Ontario" are the most elaborative affiliation from

  13. From collision to collaboration - Integrating informal recyclers and re-use operators in Europe: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinberg, Anne; Nesić, Jelena; Savain, Rachel; Luppi, Pietro; Sinnott, Portia; Petean, Flaviu; Pop, Flaviu

    2016-09-01

    The European Union hosts some of the world's most developed waste management systems and an ambitious policy commitment to the circular economy. The existence of informal recycling and re-use activities in Europe has been vigorously denied until quite recently, and remains a very challenging subject for the European solid waste management sector, as well as for European government and private institutions. In countries ranging from Malta to Macedonia and from France to Turkey, informal recyclers excluded from legal recycling niches increasingly collide with formalised and controlled European Union approaches to urban waste management, packaging recovery schemes, formal re-use enterprises, and extended producer responsibility systems.This review focuses on the period from 2004 through the first half of 2016. The 78 sources on European (and neighbouring) informal recycling and re-use are contextualised with global sources and experience. The articles focus on informal recovery in and at the borders of the European Union, document the conflicts and collisions, and elaborate some constructive approaches towards legalisation, integration, and reconciliation. The overarching recommendation, to locate the issue of informal recovery and integration in the framework of the European circular economy package, is supported by four specific pillars of an integration strategy: Documentation, legalisation, occupational and enterprise recognition, and preparation for structural integration.

  14. Informational support to family members of intensive care unit patients: the perspectives of families and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeeni, Mina; Farahani, Mansoureh A; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Mohammadi, Nooredin

    2014-09-25

    The receiving information about the patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is classified among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. Meeting the informational needs of families is a major goal for intensive care workers. Delivering honest, intelligible and effective information raises specific challenges in the stressful setting of the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this qualitative study was to explain perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. Using a conventional content analysis approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants to explore their perspectives of providing informational support to families of ICU patients. A purposeful sampling method was used to recruit nineteen family members of thirteen patients hospitalized in the ICU and twelve nurses from three teaching hospitals. In general, 31 persons participated in this study. Data collection continued to achieve data saturation. A conventional content analysis of the data produced three categories and seven sub-categories. The three main categories were as followed, a) providing information, b) handling information and c) using information. Providing information had three sub-categories consisting of "receiving admission news", "receiving truthful and complete information" and receiving general information. Handling information had two sub-categories consisting "keeping information" and "gradual revelation". Lastly, using information has two sub-categories consisting of "support of patient" and "support of family members". The results of this study revealed perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. It also determines the nurses' need to know more about the influence of their supportive role on family's ICU patients informing. In addition, the results of present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering

  15. Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2008). Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification. Presentation at the ICWL 2008 conference. August, 20, 2008, Jinhua, China.

  16. Reconsidering information management roles and capabilities in disaster response decision-making units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharosa, N.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    When disaster strikes, the emerging task environment requires relief agencies to transform from autonomous mono-disciplinary organizations into interdependent multidisciplinary decision-making units. Evaluation studies reveal that adaptation of information management to the changing task environment

  17. Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property [and] The ERCIM Technical Reference Digital Library [and] International Information Gateway Collaboration [and] The Standards Fora for Online Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladney, Henry M.; Andreoni, Antonella; Baldacci, Maria Bruna; Biagioni, Stefania; Carlesi, Carlo; Castelli, Donatella; Pagano, Pasquale; Peters, Carol; Pisani, Serena; Dempsey, Lorcan; Gardner, Tracy; Day, Michael; van der Werf, Titia; Bacsich, Paul; Heath, Andy; Lefrere, Paul; Miller, Paul; Riley, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss the impact of the emerging digital information infrastructure on intellectual property; the implementation of a digital library for a European consortium of national research institutions; an international information gateway collaboration; and developing standards for the description and sharing of educational…

  18. Collaboration, Automation, and Information Management at Hanford High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurah, Mirwaise Y.; Roberts, Mark A.

    2013-12-12

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), operator of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms at the Hanford Site, is taking an over 20-year leap in technology, replacing systems that were monitored with clipboards and obsolete computer systems, as well as solving major operations and maintenance hurdles in the area of process automation and information management. While WRPS is fully compliant with procedures and regulations, the current systems are not integrated and do not share data efficiently, hampering how information is obtained and managed.

  19. FROM OPEN SOURCE TO OPEN INFORMATION: COLLABORATIVE METHODS IN CREATING XML-BASED MARKUP LANGUAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Rehm, G; H. Lobin

    2000-01-01

    Until the beginning of the last decade, the Internet was primarily used by scientific, educational, and military organisations for the exchange of information such as data files and electronic mail. The introduction of the easy-to-use hypertext system World Wide Web (WWW) has, however, begun a new era of the world-spanning computer network. In this paper we examine a part of the Information Marketplace (Dertouzos, 1997) that will give users of the WWW a wide range of new possibilities for gat...

  20. A Collaborative Knowledge Management Process for Implementing Healthcare Enterprise Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chen, Sao-Jie; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei

    This paper illustrates a feasible health informatics domain knowledge management process which helps gather useful technology information and reduce many knowledge misunderstandings among engineers who have participated in the IBM mainframe rightsizing project at National Taiwan University (NTU) Hospital. We design an asynchronously sharing mechanism to facilitate the knowledge transfer and our health informatics domain knowledge management process can be used to publish and retrieve documents dynamically. It effectively creates an acceptable discussion environment and even lessens the traditional meeting burden among development engineers. An overall description on the current software development status is presented. Then, the knowledge management implementation of health information systems is proposed.

  1. Supporting Active Patient and Health Care Collaboration: A Prototype for Future Health Care Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Persson, Anne; Rexhepi, Hanife; Wåhlander, Kalle

    2016-12-01

    This article presents and illustrates the main features of a proposed process-oriented approach for patient information distribution in future health care information systems, by using a prototype of a process support system. The development of the prototype was based on the Visuera method, which includes five defined steps. The results indicate that a visualized prototype is a suitable tool for illustrating both the opportunities and constraints of future ideas and solutions in e-Health. The main challenges for developing and implementing a fully functional process support system concern both technical and organizational/management aspects.

  2. [Development method of healthcare information system integration based on business collaboration model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shasha; Nie, Hongchao; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2015-02-01

    Integration of heterogeneous systems is the key to hospital information construction due to complexity of the healthcare environment. Currently, during the process of healthcare information system integration, people participating in integration project usually communicate by free-format document, which impairs the efficiency and adaptability of integration. A method utilizing business process model and notation (BPMN) to model integration requirement and automatically transforming it to executable integration configuration was proposed in this paper. Based on the method, a tool was developed to model integration requirement and transform it to integration configuration. In addition, an integration case in radiology scenario was used to verify the method.

  3. The Collaborative Coordination of Special Interest Groups on the Telemedicine University Network (RUTE) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Verde Brito, Thiago Delevidove; Baptista, Roberto Silva; de Lima Lopes, Paulo Roberto; Haddad, Ana Estela; Messina, Luiz Ary; Torres Pisa, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil the Telemedicine University Network (Rede Universitária de Telemedicina RUTE) is an initiative that among others promotes collaboration between university hospitals, universities, and health professionals through information technology infrastructure and special interest groups (SIGs) support. This paper presents results of analyses on collaboration during implementation and coordination activities of RUTE SIGs. This study is based on descriptive statistics and data visualization previously collected by RUTE national coordination relative to the status in July 2014. The analysis through collaboration graph identified the strongest collaboration RUTE units. The graph also highlights the collaborative relationship of RUTE units in form of communities, the most collaborative with each other in a communion in the same SIGs, and the less the collaborative units in the network. It should be stated that the most active units are also the oldest in the community.

  4. Functional and Behavioral Product Information Representation and Consistency Validation for Collaboration in Product Lifecycle Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Mehmet Murat

    2012-01-01

    Information models that represent the function, assembly and behavior of artifacts are critical in the conceptual development of a product and its evaluation. Much research has been conducted in this area; however, existing models do not relate function, behavior and structure in a comprehensive and consistent way. In this work, NIST's Core…

  5. How Design Experiments Can Inform Teaching and Learning: Teacher-Researchers as Collaborators in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitendra, Asha K.

    2005-01-01

    In this commentary, I summarize my own research with colleagues to affirm Dr. Gersten's call for considering design experiments prior to conducting intervention research. I describe how design experiments not only can inform teaching and the learning of innovative approaches, but also hold the promise of effectively bridging the…

  6. Changing Course: Collaborative Reflections of Teaching/Taking "Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Information Professions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Safiya U.; Austin, Jeanie; Sweeney, Miriam E.; McKeever, Lucas; Sullivan, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article is an attempt to reflect on the institutional and disciplinary context of a course on "Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Information Professions" from the perspective of instructors and students. It examines the effectiveness of a course like this as an intervention to the normative landscape of the Library and Information…

  7. Flexible information infrastructures in Dutch e-government collaboration arrangements: experiences and policy implication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHow can the flexibility of an information architecture in e-government chains - defined as a set of multi-rational agreements - be achieved, if one acknowledges the fact that the use of ICT may automate the status quo between organizations which work together in a policy chain? Research

  8. Functional and Behavioral Product Information Representation and Consistency Validation for Collaboration in Product Lifecycle Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Mehmet Murat

    2012-01-01

    Information models that represent the function, assembly and behavior of artifacts are critical in the conceptual development of a product and its evaluation. Much research has been conducted in this area; however, existing models do not relate function, behavior and structure in a comprehensive and consistent way. In this work, NIST's Core…

  9. Collaborative Group Learning and Knowledge Building to Address Information Systems Project Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Approximately half of the information systems (IS) projects implemented each year are considered failures. These failed projects cost billions of dollars annually. Failures can be due to projects being delivered late, over-budget, abandoned after significant time and resource investment, or failing to achieve desired results. More often than not,…

  10. Sharing by Design: Understanding and Supporting Personal Health Information Sharing and Collaboration within Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeels, Meredith McLain

    2010-01-01

    Friends, family, and community provide important support and help to patients who face an illness. Unfortunately, keeping a social network informed about a patient's health status and needs takes effort, making it difficult for people who are sick and exhausted from illness. Members of a patient's social network are often eager to help, but can be…

  11. Science Fair Projects Bring It All Together: Collaboration, Information Literacy, and Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the role of school library media specialists in helping students with science fair projects. Topics include selecting a topic; reviewing basic library resources, including print and electronic; remote access to databases; locating information on the Web; word processing and presentation software; and relevant Web sites. (LRW)

  12. 75 FR 64731 - Request for Information (RFI) for Consumer Health Initiative To Develop Collaborations That...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... includes evidence-based journal articles, Web articles, expert guest blog posts, and funding opportunities... Summit post-conference activities. Information of interest includes: Current journal articles, funding... sponsored summit aimed to: (1) Convene leaders across industry to open a dialogue for improving health...

  13. Information Literacy Instruction and Assessment in a Community College: A Collaborative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This article describes practical steps taken in the planning of an integrated information literacy instruction linked to a course assignment for community health majors at Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York. The library sessions integrated the Association of College and Research Libraries Framework for Information…

  14. Developing an Information Literacy Assessment Rubric: A Case Study of Collaboration, Process, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Christina H.; Ke, Irene; Creelman, Kerry M.; Vaillancourt, Shawn P.

    2014-01-01

    A team of four librarians at the University of Houston (UH) Libraries partnered with the UH Office of Institutional Effectiveness and its Director of Assessment and Accreditation Services for General Education to conduct a campus-wide, exploratory assessment of undergraduate information literacy skills. The project evaluated a selection of…

  15. The Moderating Effect of Logistics Information Systems on Interorganizational Collaboration and Performance of Korean Shipping and Logistics Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Sung Bae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to verify the moderating effect of logistics information systems (LIS on inter-organizational collaboration (IOC and performance. To achieve this aim, this research s pulled out the definitions of the variables from prior research and looked at the relationships between them. The population is the Korean shipping and logistics firms in the Republic of Korea and a survey was carried out by members of liners and international freight forwarders. The questionnaires responded by members of the sample firms were used as data for the analysis of this research. The reliability and validity of the data were tested by a factor analysis and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient. In addition, the hypotheses of this research have been verified using a multiple regression analysis. The results are as follows. LIS is confirmed as a factor in enhancing the relationship between IOC and performance. The firms perform IOC by LIS in supply chains and as a result, they can achieve high performance. This is explained by fit as moderation by Venkatraman (1989. In addition, the relationship between IOC and performance is explained by a resource-based view as is and the relationship between LIS and performance is also explained by a resource-based view. Managers grasp customer needs and disseminate the needs to organizations using superior LIS, followed by high performance. Managers structure efficient supply chain processes through IOC between organizations and improve performance in the whole process through collaboration with the partners as well as departments. If managers want to achieve high performance through IOC, they should grasp their current level of LIS. This provides information; such, what strategic decision making could improve their performance? The results of this research prove the moderating effect of LIS on IOC and performance and if managers focus on the moderating effect, they can improve performance.

  16. A Collaborative Diagonal Learning Network: The role of formal and informal professional development in elementary science reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke-Nieves, Natasha Anika

    Science education research has consistently shown that elementary teachers have a low self-efficacy and background knowledge to teach science. When they teach science, there is a lack of field experiences and inquiry-based instruction at the elementary level due to limited resources, both material and pedagogical. This study focused on an analysis of a professional development (PD) model designed by the author known as the Collaborative Diagonal Learning Network (CDLN). The purpose of this study was to examine elementary school teacher participants pedagogical content knowledge related to their experiences in a CDLN model. The CDLN model taught formal and informal instruction using a science coach and an informal educational institution. Another purpose for this research included a theoretical analysis of the CDLN model to see if its design enabled teachers to expand their resource knowledge of available science education materials. The four-month-long study used qualitative data obtained during an in-service professional development program facilitated by a science coach and educators from a large natural history museum. Using case study as the research design, four elementary school teachers were asked to evaluate the effectiveness of their science coach and museum educator workshop sessions. During the duration of this study, semi-structured individual/group interviews and open-ended pre/post PD questionnaires were used. Other data sources included researcher field notes from lesson observations, museum field trips, audio-recorded workshop sessions, email correspondence, and teacher-created artifacts. The data were analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Themes that emerged included increased self-efficacy; increased pedagogical content knowledge; increased knowledge of museum education resources and access; creation of a professional learning community; and increased knowledge of science notebooking. Implications for formal and informal

  17. Existence of an information unit as a postulate of quantum theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanes, Lluís; Müller, Markus P; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Pérez-García, David

    2013-10-08

    Does information play a significant role in the foundations of physics? Information is the abstraction that allows us to refer to the states of systems when we choose to ignore the systems themselves. This is only possible in very particular frameworks, like in classical or quantum theory, or more generally, whenever there exists an information unit such that the state of any system can be reversibly encoded in a sufficient number of such units. In this work, we show how the abstract formalism of quantum theory can be deduced solely from the existence of an information unit with suitable properties, together with two further natural assumptions: the continuity and reversibility of dynamics, and the possibility of characterizing the state of a composite system by local measurements. This constitutes a set of postulates for quantum theory with a simple and direct physical meaning, like the ones of special relativity or thermodynamics, and it articulates a strong connection between physics and information.

  18. Existence of an information unit as a postulate of quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanes, Lluís; Müller, Markus P.; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Pérez-García, David

    2013-01-01

    Does information play a significant role in the foundations of physics? Information is the abstraction that allows us to refer to the states of systems when we choose to ignore the systems themselves. This is only possible in very particular frameworks, like in classical or quantum theory, or more generally, whenever there exists an information unit such that the state of any system can be reversibly encoded in a sufficient number of such units. In this work, we show how the abstract formalism of quantum theory can be deduced solely from the existence of an information unit with suitable properties, together with two further natural assumptions: the continuity and reversibility of dynamics, and the possibility of characterizing the state of a composite system by local measurements. This constitutes a set of postulates for quantum theory with a simple and direct physical meaning, like the ones of special relativity or thermodynamics, and it articulates a strong connection between physics and information. PMID:24062431

  19. Traditional anthropology and geographical information systems in the collaborative study of Cassava in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanoff, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Cross-cultural, village-level, and farmer surveys have been used with a geographical information system to describe the distribution and relative importance of cassava (manioc, yuca, Manihot esculenta) in its cultural, economic, and ecological contexts. It presents examples of data management for mapping, sample selection, cross-tabulation of characteristics, combination of data types for indices and hypothesis testing. The methods used are reviewed, and some of the main conclusions of the study are presented.

  20. An Exploratory Case Study of Information-Sharing and Collaboration within Air Force Supply Chain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Wight (1981), respectively, focused attention on resources flow. This was further revolutionized by Taiichi Ohno’s Kanban philosophy in the...and production management is based on the Japanese philosophy of Kanban in which inventory replenishment information is communicated directly from...thus products are “pulled” to demand rather than “pushed” to the market. The Japanese Kanban philosophy indicates that excess inventory simply hides

  1. Traditional anthropology and geographical information systems in the collaborative study of Cassava in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanoff, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Cross-cultural, village-level, and farmer surveys have been used with a geographical information system to describe the distribution and relative importance of cassava (manioc, yuca, Manihot esculenta) in its cultural, economic, and ecological contexts. It presents examples of data management for mapping, sample selection, cross-tabulation of characteristics, combination of data types for indices and hypothesis testing. The methods used are reviewed, and some of the main conclusions of the study are presented.

  2. Mapping Information Literacy and Written Communication Outcomes in an Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum: A Case Study in Librarian-Faculty Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindi Miller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A syllabi study was conducted by the health science librarian and nursing faculty members in a baccalaureate nursing program to map information literacy and communication learning outcomes. Nursing course syllabi and assignments were examined for particular evidence of information literacy and communication learning outcomes in relationship to three sets of standards from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the Association of College & Research Libraries, and the rubrics of the Association of American Colleges & Universities. A crosswalk was created between the standards to identify areas where the librarian and nursing faculty could better collaborate to assist students in their achievement of these standards. The resulting analysis led to a change in the librarian’s practices with greater involvement with the nursing department. Information literacy skills are needed in a growing number of professions that value evidence-based practice, thus suggesting that similar curriculum mapping projects are useful for other academic disciplines. This project was supported by the Bloomsburg University Teaching and Learning Enhancement (TALE Pedagogy-Related Research Grant.

  3. Knowledge Sharing Cultures in Finance and Insurance Companies ཿ Needs for Improving Informal Collaborative e-Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Tanhua-Piiroinen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Working life requires employees to continuously update their competences, making lifelong learning an important but challenging part of professional development. This study aims to look for solutions to uncover the tacit and implicit knowledge within the enterprise by the means of social media. Our interest is specially focused on challenges on informal learning and refining and sharing of the tacit knowledge among these expert companies. We have so far collected data from two enterprises about their current knowledge sharing habits and procedures and found out the pitfalls they have experienced in their working culture concerning finding and sharing knowledge. The main challenges (apart from lack of time, which is quite obvious result today are defects in storing information in a way that enables its easy rediscovery and the huge amount of information from which to filter the relevant pieces of knowledge. Particularly the centralized experts in an insurance company find the lack of regular vertical interaction between the decentralized claim handlers a drawback. There exists a lot of overlapping effort as they need to tell the same issues many times to various claim handlers. Taking these challenges into account new working models will be put into practice utilizing collaborative tools, like wikis and chat forums.

  4. Registration of Individual Information in Family Unit to Disaster Information System using Regional Social Networking Service

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 猛康; 大山, 勲; 秦, 康範; 小俣, 昌樹; Takeyasu, SUZUKI; Isao, OYAMA; Yasunori, HADA; Masaki, Omata; 山梨大学大学院医学工学総合研究部工学部土木環境工学科; 山梨大学大学院医学工学総合研究部工学部コンピュータ・メディア学科; Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Univversity of Yamanashi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to disaster mitigation of local communities using regional SNS, centering on the registration of individual information. The information items to be registered to the local community group of regional SNS are extracted through workshops conducted by residents. Then, user interfaces for regional SNS are designed and built. Residents living in the community register their individual information to the system. Through such an approach, authors summarize the proces...

  5. Can we delay the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by improving collaboration between renal units and primary care teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss why nephrology teams should collaborate with primary care teams in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and explain how they can collaborate to improve the outcomes for patients who eventually need dialysis. The paper will describe the staging of CKD and will discuss evidence-based guidelines for the management of CKD in the community. Practical examples of how a specialist renal nurse can improve communication with primary care and can improve the outcome of patients with early kidney disease will be described.

  6. The Use of Health Information Technology Within Collaborative and Integrated Models of Child Psychiatry Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Sara; Vanderlip, Erik; Sarvet, Barry

    2017-01-01

    There is a consistent need for more child and adolescent psychiatrists. Despite increased recruitment of child and adolescent psychiatry trainees, traditional models of care will likely not be able to meet the need of youth with mental illness. Integrated care models focusing on population-based, team-based, measurement-based, and evidenced-based care have been effective in addressing accessibility and quality of care. These integrated models have specific needs regarding health information technology (HIT). HIT has been used in a variety of different ways in several integrated care models. HIT can aid in implementation of these models but is not without its challenges.

  7. 30 January 2012 - Ecuadorian Ambassador Gallegos Chiriboga, Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations at Geneva and San Francisco de Quito University Vice Chancellor C. Montùfar visiting CMS surface facilities and underground experimental area with CMS Collaboration L. Sulak and Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi, throughout accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Michael Hoch

    2012-01-01

    30 January 2012 - Ecuadorian Ambassador Gallegos Chiriboga, Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations at Geneva and San Francisco de Quito University Vice Chancellor C. Montùfar visiting CMS surface facilities and underground experimental area with CMS Collaboration L. Sulak and Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi, throughout accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  8. 9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  9. 4th February 2011- Polish Ambassador to the United Nations Office R. A. Henczel visiting CMS control room and underground experimental area with his daughter, guided by Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4th February 2011- Polish Ambassador to the United Nations Office R. A. Henczel visiting CMS control room and underground experimental area with his daughter, guided by Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  10. Signature of the Collaboration Agreement between THE UNITED NATIONS INSTITUTE FOR TRAINING AND RESEARCH (UNITAR), by Mr Carlos Lopes (UN Assistant Secretary-General and Executive Director of UNITAR) and by the Director General of CERN, Mr Robert Aymar

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    Signature of the Collaboration Agreement between THE UNITED NATIONS INSTITUTE FOR TRAINING AND RESEARCH (UNITAR), by Mr Carlos Lopes (UN Assistant Secretary-General and Executive Director of UNITAR) and by the Director General of CERN, Mr Robert Aymar

  11. 75 FR 409 - Privacy Act of 1974; United States Citizenship and Immigration Services-010 Asylum Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ...--010 Asylum Information and Pre-Screening System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office; DHS. ACTION: Notice... Security's inventory, entitled Unites States Citizenship and Immigration Services-010 Asylum Information... systems: The Refugees, Asylum, and Parole System and the Asylum Pre-Screening System. Refugees,...

  12. Method of sharing mobile unit state information between base station routers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, Paul Anthony; Rajkumar, Ajay; Sundaram, Ganapathy S.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of operating a first base station router. The method may include transmitting state information associated with at least one inactive mobile unit to at least one second base station router. The state information is usable to initiate an active session with the

  13. Method of sharing mobile unit state information between base station routers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, Paul Anthony; Rajkumar, Ajay; Sundaram, Ganapathy S.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of operating a first base station router. The method may include transmitting state information associated with at least one inactive mobile unit to at least one second base station router. The state information is usable to initiate an active session with the

  14. Method of sharing mobile unit state information between base station routers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.G.P.; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, Paul Anthony; Rajkumar, Ajay; Sundaram, Ganapathy S.

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of operating a first base station router. The method may include transmitting state information associated with at least one inactive mobile unit to at least one second base station router. The state information is usable to initiate an active session with the

  15. Method of sharing mobile unit state information between base station routers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.G.P.; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, Paul Anthony; Rajkumar, Ajay; Sundaram, Ganapathy S.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of operating a first base station router. The method may include transmitting state information associated with at least one inactive mobile unit to at least one second base station router. The state information is usable to initiate an active session with the

  16. 8 CFR 319.6 - United States nonprofit organizations engaged abroad in disseminating information which...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... organizations engaged abroad in disseminating information which significantly promotes U.S. interests. The... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false United States nonprofit organizations engaged abroad in disseminating information which significantly promotes U.S. interests. 319.6 Section 319...

  17. Information Consultancy in Action: A Case Study in Establishing a Library and Information Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Margaret; Henderson, Fiona

    1991-01-01

    Describes the stages of an information consultancy project that established a management resource center to provide senior managers in a major financial institution with access to material for self-development. Interviews to assess information needs are described, success factors are considered, and personal qualities needed for information…

  18. A global call from five countries to collaborate in antibiotic stewardship: united we succeed, divided we might fail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Debra A; Kullar, Ravina; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Gilchrist, Mark; Nathwani, Dilip; Cheng, Allen C; Cairns, Kelly A; Escandón-Vargas, Kevin; Villegas, Maria Virginia; Brink, Adrian; van den Bergh, Dena; Mendelson, Marc

    2017-02-01

    In February, 2016, WHO released a report for the development of national action plans to address the threat of antibiotic resistance, the catastrophic consequences of inaction, and the need for antibiotic stewardship. Antibiotic stewardship combined with infection prevention comprises a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach to optimise use of antibiotics. Efforts to mitigate overuse will be unsustainable without learning and coordinating activities globally. In this Personal View, we provide examples of international collaborations to address optimal prescribing, focusing on five countries that have developed different approaches to antibiotic stewardship-the USA, South Africa, Colombia, Australia, and the UK. Although each country's approach differed, when nurtured, individual efforts can positively affect local and national antimicrobial stewardship programmes. Government advocacy, national guidelines, collaborative research, online training programmes, mentoring programmes, and social media in stewardship all played a role. Personal relationships and willingness to learn from each other's successes and failures continues to foster collaboration. We recommend that antibiotic stewardship models need to evolve from infection specialist-based teams to develop and use cadres of health-care professionals, including pharmacists, nurses, and community health workers, to meet the needs of the global population. We also recommend that all health-care providers who prescribe antibiotics take ownership and understand the societal burden of suboptimal antibiotic use, providing examples of how countries can learn, act globally, and share best antibiotic stewardship practices.

  19. Libraries in Second Life: New Approaches to Education, Information Sharing, Learning Object Implementation, User Interactions and Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Smith Nash

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional virtual worlds such as Second Life continue to expand the way they provide information, learning activities, and educational applications. This paper explores the types of learning activities that take place in Second Life and discusses how learning takes place, with a view toward developing effective instructional strategies. As learning objects are being launched in Second Life, new approaches to collaboration, interactivity, and cognition are being developed. Many learning-centered islands appeal to individuals who benefit from interaction with peers and instructors, and who can access learning objects such as information repositories, simulations, and interactive animations. The key advantages that Second Life offers include engaging and meaningful interaction with fellow learners, media-rich learning environments with embedded video, graphics, and interactive quizzes and assessments, an engaging environment for simulations such as virtual labs, and culturally inclusive immersive environments. However, because of the steep learning curve, technical difficulties, and cultural diversity, learners may become frustrated in Second Life. Since Second Life is social learning environment that emphasizes the creation of a self, effective learning requires step-by-step empowerment of that new, constructed self.

  20. Developing an Open Source, Reusable Platform for Distributed Collaborative Information Management in the Early Detection Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Andrew F.; Verma, Rishi; Mattmann, Chris A.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Kelly, Sean; Kincaid, Heather; Hughes, Steven; Ramirez, Paul; Goodale, Cameron; Anton, Kristen; hide

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in collaboration with Dartmouth University has served as the center for informatics for the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN). The EDRN is a multi-institution research effort funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) and tasked with identifying and validating biomarkers for the early detection of cancer. As the distributed network has grown, increasingly formal processes have been developed for the acquisition, curation, storage, and dissemination of heterogeneous research information assets, and an informatics infrastructure has emerged. In this paper we discuss the evolution of EDRN informatics, its success as a mechanism for distributed information integration, and the potential sustainability and reuse benefits of emerging efforts to make the platform components themselves open source. We describe our experience transitioning a large closed-source software system to a community driven, open source project at the Apache Software Foundation, and point to lessons learned that will guide our present efforts to promote the reuse of the EDRN informatics infrastructure by a broader community.

  1. Libraries in Second Life: New Approaches to Education, Information Sharing, Learning Object Implementation, User Interactions and Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Smith Nash

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional virtual worlds such as Second Life continue to expand the way they provide information, learning activities, and educational applications. This paper explores the types of learning activities that take place in Second Life and discusses how learning takes place, with a view toward developing effective instructional strategies. As learning objects are being launched in Second Life, new approaches to collaboration, interactivity, and cognition are being developed. Many learning-centered islands appeal to individuals who benefit from interaction with peers and instructors, and who can access learning objects such as information repositories, simulations, and interactive animations. The key advantages that Second Life offers include engaging and meaningful interaction with fellow learners, media-rich learning environments with embedded video, graphics, and interactive quizzes and assessments, an engaging environment for simulations such as virtual labs, and culturally inclusive immersive environments. However, because of the steep learning curve, technical difficulties, and cultural diversity, learners may become frustrated in Second Life. Since Second Life is social learning environment that emphasizes the creation of a self, effective learning requires step-by-step empowerment of that new, constructed self.

  2. Giving information to family members of patients in the intensive care unit: Iranian nurses' ethical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mansoureh A; Gaeeni, Mina; Mohammadi, Nooreddin; Seyedfatemi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Receiving information related to patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. When health care professionals should decide whether to be honest or to give hope, giving information becomes an ethical challenge We conducted a research to study the ethical approaches of Iranian nurses to giving information to the family members of patients in the intensive care units. This research was conducted in the intensive care units of three teaching hospitals in Iran. It employed a qualitative approach involving semi-structured and in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 12 nurses to identify the ethical approaches to giving information to family members of the intensive care unit patients. A conventional content analysis of the data produced two categories and five subcategories. The two categories were as follows: a) informational support, and b) emotional support. Informational support had 2 subcategories consisting of being honest in giving information, and providing complete and understandable information. Emotional support in giving information had 3 sub-categories consisting of gradual revelation, empathy and assurance. Findings of the study indicated that ethical approaches to giving information can be in the form of either informational support or emotional support, based on patients' conditions and prognoses, their families' emotional state, the necessity of providing a calm atmosphere in the ICU and the hospital, and other patients and their families' peace. Findings of the present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering ethical guidelines in giving information to the families of patients hospitalized in the ICU.

  3. Local Nordic tobacco interests collaborated with multinational companies to maintain a united front and undermine tobacco control policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiilamo, Heikki; Glantz, Stanton A

    2013-03-01

    To analyse how local tobacco companies in the Nordic countries, individually and through National Manufacturers' Associations, cooperated with British American Tobacco and Philip Morris in denying the health hazards of smoking and undermining tobacco control. Analysis of tobacco control policies in the Nordic countries and tobacco industry documents. Nordic countries were early adopters of tobacco control policies. The multinational tobacco companies recognised this fact and mobilised to oppose these policies, in part because of fear that they would set unfavourable precedents. Since at least 1972, the Nordic tobacco companies were well informed about and willing to participate in the multinational companies activities to obscure the health dangers of smoking and secondhand smoke and to oppose tobacco control policies. Cooperation between multinational companies, Nordic national manufacturer associations and local companies ensured a united front on smoking and health issues in the Nordic area that was consistent with the positions that the multinational companies were taking. This cooperation delayed smoke-free laws and undermined other tobacco control measures. Local tobacco companies worked with multinational companies to undermine tobacco control in distant and small Nordic markets because of concern that pioneering policies initiated in Nordic countries would spread to bigger market areas. Claims by the local Nordic companies that they were not actively involved with the multinationals are not supported by the facts. These results also demonstrate that the industry appreciates the global importance of both positive and negative public health precedents in tobacco control.

  4. An Optimization Model of Multi-Intersection Signal Control for Trunk Road under Collaborative Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a signal control optimization model for urban main trunk line intersections. Four-phase intersection was analyzed and modeled based on the Cell Transmission Model (CTM. CTM and signal control model in our study had both been improved for multi-intersections by three-phase theory and information-exchanging. To achieve a real-time application, an improved genetic algorithm (GA was proposed finally, the DISCO traffic simulation software was used for numerical simulation experiment, and comparisons with the standard GA and CTM were reported in this paper. Experimental results indicate that our searching time is less than that of SGA by 38%, and our method needs only 1/3 iteration time of SGA. According to our DISCO traffic simulation processing, compared with SGA, if the input traffic flow is changed from free phase to synchronized phase, for example, less than 900 vel/h, the delay time can reduce to 87.99% by our method, and the minimum delay time is 77.76% of existing method. Furthermore, if input traffic volume is increased to 1200 vel/h or more at the synchronized phase, the summary and minimum values of average delay time are reduced to 81.16% and 75.83%, respectively, and the average delay time is reduced to 17.72 seconds.

  5. Examining the mediation of power in a collaborative community: engaging in informal science as authentic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvirajah, Anton; Verma, Geeta; Webb, Horace

    2012-06-01

    Focusing on the interplay of context and language, this study examined a group of high school students and their mentors' use of language during a robotics competition. This informal setting allowed us to gain insights into the mediation and manifestation of power within the group. Using critical discourse analysis of competition transcripts and interviews we found that both students and mentors felt a sense of ownership and community leading to symmetry in power amongst them. The shift in power led to greater student ownership and agency and created a space for authentic and meaningful science learning. The context of the robotics competition mediated discourse practices that were different from students' classroom experiences in that they were descriptive, relational, explanatory, and had an authentic evaluative dimension. This engaged the participants to co-construct and critique each other's knowledge claims thereby engaging in scientific practices that approximated the practices of scientists. Our study presents an argument that language and context reflexively influenced one another and reduced the imbalance of power amongst the participants thereby adding a new dimension to what has already been established about the conditions under which authentic science learning is likely to occur.

  6. A review of the neural and behavioral consequences for unitizing emotional and neutral information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan eMurray

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A special type of association, called a unitization, is formed when pieces of information are encoded as a single representation in memory (e.g., shirt and blue are encoded as a blue shirt; Graf & Schacter, 1989 and typically are later reactivated in memory as a single unit, allowing access to the features of multiple related stimuli at once (Bader et al., 2010; Diana et al., 2011. This review examines the neural processes supporting memory for unitizations and how the emotional content of the material may influence unitization. Although associative binding is typically reliant on hippocampal processes and supported by recollection, the first part of this review will present evidence to suggest that when two items are unitized into a single representation, memory for those bound items may be accomplished on the basis of familiarity and without reliance on the hippocampus. The second part of this review discusses how emotion may affect the processes that give rise to unitizations. Emotional information typically receives a mnemonic benefit over neutral information, but the literature is mixed on whether the presence of emotional information impedes or enhances the associative binding of neutral information (reviewed by Mather, 2007. It has been suggested that the way the emotional and neutral details are related together may be critical to whether the neutral details are enhanced or impeded (Mather, 2007; Mather & Sutherland, 2011. We focus on whether emotional arousal aides or inhibits the creation of a unitized representation, presenting preliminary data and future directions to test empirically the effects of forming and retrieving emotional and neutral unitizations.

  7. An enhancement of the role-based access control model to facilitate information access management in context of team collaboration and workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Xuan Hung; Doll, Terry; Barbosu, Monica; Luque, Amneris; Wang, Dongwen

    2012-12-01

    Although information access control models have been developed and applied to various applications, few of the previous works have addressed the issue of managing information access in the combined context of team collaboration and workflow. To facilitate this requirement, we have enhanced the Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) model through formulating universal constraints, defining bridging entities and contributing attributes, extending access permissions to include workflow contexts, synthesizing a role-based access delegation model to target on specific objects, and developing domain ontologies as instantiations of the general model to particular applications. We have successfully applied this model to the New York State HIV Clinical Education Initiative (CEI) project to address the specific needs of information management in collaborative processes. An initial evaluation has shown this model achieved a high level of agreement with an existing system when applied to 4576 cases (kappa=0.801). Comparing to a reference standard, the sensitivity and specificity of the enhanced RBAC model were at the level of 97-100%. These results indicate that the enhanced RBAC model can be effectively used for information access management in context of team collaboration and workflow to coordinate clinical education programs. Future research is required to incrementally develop additional types of universal constraints, to further investigate how the workflow context and access delegation can be enriched to support the various needs on information access management in collaborative processes, and to examine the generalizability of the enhanced RBAC model for other applications in clinical education, biomedical research, and patient care.

  8. The OIE World Animal Health Information System: the role of OIE Reference Laboratories and Collaborating Centres in disease reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Jebara, K

    2010-12-01

    One of the main objectives of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is to ensure transparency in and knowledge of the world animal health situation. To achieve this objective, the OIE relies on its network of Member Countries, which is complemented by the activities of 221 Reference Laboratories (RLs) and Collaborating Centres. The RL mandate states that, in the case of positive results for diseases notifiable to the OIE, the laboratory should inform the OIE Delegate of the Member Country from which the samples originated and send a copy of the information to OIE Headquarters. However, since 2006 the OIE has received a lower than expected number of notifications from RLs, which implies eitherthat the majority of samples are sent to national laboratories or that some RLs are not fully complying with their mandate. The OIE sent a questionnaire to RLs in preparation for the Second Global Conference of OIE Reference Laboratories and Collaborating Centres (Paris, France, 21-23 June 2010). Two main factors emerged: the need for RLs to clarify their role and responsibilities in disease reporting and the need for an awareness campaign to sensitise national Veterinary Services to the importance of conducting more surveillance (and consequently of submitting samples to RLs) for all OIE-listed diseases. Reference laboratories indicated two main reasons for not sharing more data on positive samples with the OIE: i) a perceived contradiction between their mandate as OIE RLs and the standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) dealing with confidentiality; and ii) certain Member Countries or stakeholders asking RLs not to share positive results with the OIE, for political or economic reasons. The OIE has put forward proposals to help RLs resolve these problems in future. The use of ISO standards must be clarified and there must be improved communication between the OIE and its RLs. A lack of transparency about a significant disease event can

  9. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key assum

  10. Helping people make well-informed decisions about health care: old and new challenges to achieving the aim of the Cochrane Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxman, Andrew D

    2013-09-20

    The aim of the Cochrane Collaboration is to help people make well-informed decisions about health care by preparing, maintaining and promoting the accessibility of systematic reviews of the effects of health care interventions. This aim is as relevant now as it was 20 years ago, when the Cochrane Collaboration was established. Substantial progress has been made toward addressing challenges to achieving the Collaboration's aim. At the same time, a huge amount of work remains to be done. Current challenges include improving the quality of reviews, methodological challenges, meeting the needs of contributors and users and taking on new challenges while staying focused on the Collaboration's aim. Radical thinking and substantial change may be needed to identify and implement pragmatic strategies to ensure that reviews are up-to-date and informative. Methodological challenges include the development and application of better methods for addressing explanatory factors, incorporating non-randomized evidence and making comparisons across multiple interventions. Innovations in editorial processes and strategies to meet the needs of low- and middle-income countries and diverse users of Cochrane reviews are needed. Finally, although it is important to consider broadening the aims of the Collaboration to include types of questions other than the effects of interventions and types of products other than the Cochrane Library, we should not lose sight of the aim of the Cochrane Collaboration. Addressing that aim is still a major challenge that requires the collaboration of thousands of people around the world and continuing improvements in the methods used to achieve that aim.

  11. Framework for a virtual nursing faculty and student learning collaboration between universities in Sweden and the United States: A theoretical paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wihlborg, Monne; Friberg, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A sound pedagogical framework must be explored and identified to implement opportunities for collaborative learning through international exchange. This paper identifies the framework used by two universities, in Sweden and the United States. Virtual learning environments and meaningful learning activities can be constructed using web-based learning platforms. The goal for this initiative was 'internationalisation on home plan' for nursing faculty and students that opened up internationalised learning opportunities for all students, including those who do not participate in study abroad/mobility activities. This broader opportunity supports the development of cultural awareness and understanding of global health care practices and the nursing profession on mutual topics of concern, in this case patient safety. Learning activities and learning outcomes can be stipulated. The pedagogical framework was compatible with the Bologna Process' constructive alignment, deep learning and a student focus. The student nurses were not only given the opportunity to explore the learning objective of patient safety and participate in an international collaboration with another university, but also gained university academic credit for fulfilling the task. There is a great gain in using virtual collaboration and learning modules that are embedded in courses for the purpose of 'internationalisation on home plan' since not all students can participate in student mobility activities.

  12. Effectiveness of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Implementations by Information Technology Departments within United States Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, Jon F.

    2010-01-01

    This research study examined whether the overall effectiveness of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) could be predicted by measuring multiple independent variables. The primary variables studied included the number of ITIL process modules adopted and the overall ITIL "maturity level." An online survey was used to…

  13. Effectiveness of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Implementations by Information Technology Departments within United States Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, Jon F.

    2010-01-01

    This research study examined whether the overall effectiveness of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) could be predicted by measuring multiple independent variables. The primary variables studied included the number of ITIL process modules adopted and the overall ITIL "maturity level." An online survey was used to…

  14. Coordinating collaborative joint efforts with suppliers: the effects of trust transaction specific investment and information network in the Dutch flower industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claro, D.P.; Oliveira Claro, de P.B.; Hagelaar, J.L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: It is the aim of this paper to discuss the value of trust and the effects of transaction specific investments for the relative degree of collaborative joint efforts, and also to assess the moderating effect of the information network on such joint efforts. Design/methodology/approach: The p

  15. Collab-Analyzer: An Environment for Conducting Web-Based Collaborative Learning Activities and Analyzing Students' Information-Searching Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Hsiang; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Kuo, Fan-Ray

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have found that students might get lost or feel frustrated while searching for information on the Internet to deal with complex problems without real-time guidance or supports. To address this issue, a web-based collaborative learning system, Collab-Analyzer, is proposed in this paper. It is not only equipped with a collaborative…

  16. Can Formal-Informal Collaborations Improve Science Literacy in Urban Middle Schools? The Impact of Urban Advantage. IESP Policy Brief 03-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Meryle; Ruble, Emilyn

    2011-01-01

    This brief presents findings from a study on Urban Advantage (UA), a collaboration between the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), other New York City informal science institutions, and the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) to improve the science literacy of NYC public school students. The analysis draws on a rich longitudinal…

  17. Standards-based publication and sharing of time series information in the DRIHM project: a EU-US collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Richard; Zaslavsky, Ilya; Parodi, Antonio; Gochis, David; Jha, Shantenu; Whitenack, Thomas; Valentine, David; Caumont, Olivier; Dekic, Ljiljana; Ivkovic, Marija; Molini, Luca; Bedrina, Tatiana; Gijsbers, Peter J. A.; de Rooij, Erik; Rebora, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    To enable a plug-and-play infrastructure, the European DRIHM (Distributed Research Infrastructure for Hydro-Meteorology) project aims to develop a comprehensive data publication and sharing system presenting uniform standards-based data discovery and access interfaces for hydrometeorological data collected by DRIHM partners in several European countries. This is a challenging task due to heterogeneity in types of data being collected and organized for modeling, and different semantic and structural conventions adopted by different data publishers. To meet this goal, the DRIHM project, and its DRIHM2US extension, collaborates with the recently funded US SCIHM (Standards-based Cyberinfrastructure for HydroMeteorology) project to develop a data sharing infrastructure for time series information. We report initial results of the application of the data integrating technologies developed by the NSF-funded CUAHSI HIS (Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Data, Inc., Hydrologic Information System) project, to information collected within DRIHM. The CUAHSI HIS system has been widely used in the US; it provides access to about a hundred water data collections that can be queried via uniform web services. The DRIHM partners initially implementing the system, include the CIMA Research Foundation (Italy), the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), and the Republic Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia. The collected time series information was ingested into CUAHSI Observations Data Model databases, and water data services were created for each of the partners. At the time of writing, the water data services include SOAP and REST endpoints that provide access to the time series in WaterML 1 and WaterML 2.0 formats. The former encoding, developed by CUAHSI HIS, has been adopted by a number of federal agencies and research groups in the US, while the latter, created by an international group of experts under the aegis of the Hydrology

  18. Making Science Matter: Collaborations between Informal Science Education Organizations and Schools. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the world, and for many decades, science-rich cultural institutions, such as zoos, aquaria, museums, and others, have collaborated with schools to provide students, teachers and families with opportunities to expand their experiences and understanding of science. However, these collaborations have generally failed to institutionalize:…

  19. Leveraging health information exchange to improve population health reporting processes: lessons in using a collaborative-participatory design process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revere, Debra; Dixon, Brian E; Hills, Rebecca; Williams, Jennifer L; Grannis, Shaun J

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance, or the systematic monitoring of disease within a population, is a cornerstone function of public health. Despite significant investment in information technologies (IT) to improve the public's health, health care providers continue to rely on manual, spontaneous reporting processes that can result in incomplete and delayed surveillance activities. Participatory design principles advocate including real users and stakeholders when designing an information system to ensure high ecological validity of the product, incorporate relevance and context into the design, reduce misconceptions designers can make due to insufficient domain expertise, and ultimately reduce barriers to adoption of the system. This paper focuses on the collaborative and informal participatory design process used to develop enhanced, IT-enabled reporting processes that leverage available electronic health records in a health information exchange to prepopulate notifiable-conditions report forms used by public health authorities. Over nine months, public health stakeholders, technical staff, and informatics researchers were engaged in a multiphase participatory design process that included public health stakeholder focus groups, investigator-engineering team meetings, public health survey and census regarding high-priority data elements, and codesign of exploratory prototypes and final form mock-ups. A number of state-mandated report fields that are not highly used or desirable for disease investigation were eliminated, which allowed engineers to repurpose form space for desired and high-priority data elements and improve the usability of the forms. Our participatory design process ensured that IT development was driven by end user expertise and needs, resulting in significant improvements to the layout and functionality of the reporting forms. In addition to informing report form development, engaging with public health end users and stakeholders through the participatory design

  20. Therapeutic collaboration and formalized feedback: using perspectives from Vygotsky and Bakhtin to shed light on practices in a family therapy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundet, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Patient-focused research points to the necessity of continuously monitoring process and outcome in psychotherapy to supply service users and their therapists with feedback as a way of avoiding no change and detrimental development. At the Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, therapists implement monitoring in an intensive family therapy unit inspired by postmodern and language-oriented forms of family therapy using the Session Rating Scale and the Outcome Rating Scale. Research generated descriptions of users' experiences of these scales as conversational tools are reflected upon using concepts from the work of Vygotsky and Bakhtin. Mediation, dialogicality, voice, the zone of proximal development and the metaphor of scaffolding are offered as conceptualizations that expand the inspirational sources of the unit by creating and enhancing further possibilities for collaboration between families and their therapists.

  1. Comparison of Collaborative Risk Informed Decision analysis and IWRM for a water supply case in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeuken, Ad; Gilroy, Kristin

    2017-04-01

    We have compared the Collaborative Risk Informed Decision Analysis(CRIDA) method to traditional Integrated Water Resources Management Planning (IWRM) through a water supply case study in Central Cebu, the Philippines. In 2006 an IWRM planning process was applied to the Central Cebu region with the goal to "meet demand for safe water supply and lay the foundation in addressing the related issues of water quality and watershed protection". The stakeholder led process resulted in the selection of a final water management strategy titled, "Water for all Cebuanos". While the 2006 planning study was successful in selecting a stakeholder approved water management strategy, much advancement has since been made in decision making under uncertainty. The CRIDA approach, combining a bottom up decision scaling approach with adaptation pathways, to planning under uncertainty was applied in hindsight to the same case study. This resulted in updated recommendations for the Central Cebu water supply system. The paper shows how and why by following the CRIDA methodology we may arrive at different recommended pathways for adaptation given the set of decision criteria and the methods used for incorporating long term uncertainty in the evaluation

  2. TOLKIN--Tree of Life Knowledge and Information Network: filling a gap for collaborative research in biological systematics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed S Beaman

    Full Text Available The development of biological informatics infrastructure capable of supporting growing data management and analysis environments is an increasing need within the systematics biology community. Although significant progress has been made in recent years on developing new algorithms and tools for analyzing and visualizing large phylogenetic data and trees, implementation of these resources is often carried out by bioinformatics experts, using one-off scripts. Therefore, a gap exists in providing data management support for a large set of non-technical users. The TOLKIN project (Tree of Life Knowledge and Information Network addresses this need by supporting capabilities to manage, integrate, and provide public access to molecular, morphological, and biocollections data and research outcomes through a collaborative, web application. This data management framework allows aggregation and import of sequences, underlying documentation about their source, including vouchers, tissues, and DNA extraction. It combines features of LIMS and workflow environments by supporting management at the level of individual observations, sequences, and specimens, as well as assembly and versioning of data sets used in phylogenetic inference. As a web application, the system provides multi-user support that obviates current practices of sharing data sets as files or spreadsheets via email.

  3. Non-Markovianity Measure Based on Brukner–Zeilinger Invariant Information for Unital Quantum Dynamical Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Zhu, Lie-Qiang; Li, Li

    2017-03-01

    A non-Markovianity measure based on Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information to characterize non-Markovian effect of open systems undergoing unital dynamical maps is proposed. The method takes advantage of non-increasing property of the Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information under completely positive and trace-preserving unital maps. The simplicity of computing the Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information is the advantage of the proposed measure because of mainly depending on the purity of quantum state. The measure effectively captures the characteristics of non-Markovianity of unital dynamical maps. As some concrete application, we consider two typical non-Markovian noise channels, i.e., the phase damping channel and the random unitary channel to show the sensitivity of the proposed measure. By investigation, we find that the conditions of detecting the non-Markovianity for the phase damping channel are consistent with the results of existing measures for non-Markovianity, i.e., information flow, divisibility and quantum mutual information. However, for the random unitary channel non-Markovian conditions are same to that of the information flow, but is different from that of the divisibility and quantum mutual information. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61505053, the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province under Grant No. 2015JJ3092, the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hunan Province, China under Grant No. 16B177, the School Foundation from the Hunan University of Arts and Science under Grant No. 14ZD01

  4. Inertial measurement unit-camera calibration based on incomplete inertial sensor information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong LIU; Yu-long ZHOU; Zhao-peng GU

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of estimating the relative orientation between an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a camera. Unlike most existing IMU-camera calibrations, the main challenge in this paper is that the information output from the IMU is incomplete. For example, only two tilt information can be read from the gravity sensor of a smart phone. Despite incomplete inertial information, there are strong restrictions between the IMU and camera coordinate systems. This paper addresses the incomplete information based IMU-camera calibration problem by exploiting the intrinsic restrictions among the coordinate transformations. First, the IMU transformation between two poses is formulated with the unknown IMU information. Then the defective IMU information is restored using the complementary visual information. Finally, the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm is applied to estimate the optimal calibration result in noisy environments. Experiments on both synthetic and real data show the validity and robustness of our algorithm.

  5. Advantages of SKOS for providing semantic stability to to the information resources: an example of use in a collaborative institutional web portal

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    SKOS has emerged as the W3C initiative to provide semantic stability to the Web. Although this proposal is still in development, many thesaurus management or document indexing applications already use this model. We present a proposal of use of SKOS into a collaborative information system dedicated to the Cultural management in order to improve the description level of the documents of the portal and the information retrieval effectiveness.

  6. Innovative Approaches to Collaborative Groundwater Governance in the United States: Case Studies from Three High-Growth Regions in the Sun Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megdal, Sharon B.; Gerlak, Andrea K.; Huang, Ling-Yee; Delano, Nathaniel; Varady, Robert G.; Petersen-Perlman, Jacob D.

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater is an increasingly important source of freshwater, especially where surface water resources are fully or over-allocated or becoming less reliable due to climate change. Groundwater reliance has created new challenges for sustainable management. This article examines how regional groundwater users coordinate and collaborate to manage shared groundwater resources, including attention to what drives collaboration. To identify and illustrate these facets, this article examines three geographically diverse cases of groundwater governance and management from the United States Sun Belt: Orange County Water District in southern California; Prescott Active Management Area in north-central Arizona; and the Central Florida Water Initiative in central Florida. These regions have different surface water laws, groundwater allocation and management laws and regulations, demographics, economics, topographies, and climate. These cases were selected because the Sun Belt faces similar pressures on groundwater due to historical and projected population growth and limited availability of usable surface water supplies. Collectively, they demonstrate groundwater governance trends in the United States, and illustrate distinctive features of regional groundwater management strategies. Our research shows how geophysical realities and state-level legislation have enabled and/or stimulated regions to develop groundwater management plans and strategies to address the specific issues associated with their groundwater resources. We find that litigation involvement and avoidance, along with the need to finance projects, are additional drivers of regional collaboration to manage groundwater. This case study underscores the importance of regionally coordinated and sustained efforts to address serious groundwater utilization challenges faced by the regions studied and around the world.

  7. Innovative Approaches to Collaborative Groundwater Governance in the United States: Case Studies from Three High-Growth Regions in the Sun Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megdal, Sharon B; Gerlak, Andrea K; Huang, Ling-Yee; Delano, Nathaniel; Varady, Robert G; Petersen-Perlman, Jacob D

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater is an increasingly important source of freshwater, especially where surface water resources are fully or over-allocated or becoming less reliable due to climate change. Groundwater reliance has created new challenges for sustainable management. This article examines how regional groundwater users coordinate and collaborate to manage shared groundwater resources, including attention to what drives collaboration. To identify and illustrate these facets, this article examines three geographically diverse cases of groundwater governance and management from the United States Sun Belt: Orange County Water District in southern California; Prescott Active Management Area in north-central Arizona; and the Central Florida Water Initiative in central Florida. These regions have different surface water laws, groundwater allocation and management laws and regulations, demographics, economics, topographies, and climate. These cases were selected because the Sun Belt faces similar pressures on groundwater due to historical and projected population growth and limited availability of usable surface water supplies. Collectively, they demonstrate groundwater governance trends in the United States, and illustrate distinctive features of regional groundwater management strategies. Our research shows how geophysical realities and state-level legislation have enabled and/or stimulated regions to develop groundwater management plans and strategies to address the specific issues associated with their groundwater resources. We find that litigation involvement and avoidance, along with the need to finance projects, are additional drivers of regional collaboration to manage groundwater. This case study underscores the importance of regionally coordinated and sustained efforts to address serious groundwater utilization challenges faced by the regions studied and around the world.

  8. Family members' informal roles in end-of-life decision making in adult intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jill R; Schmitt, Madeline; Baggs, Judith Gedney; Norton, Sally A; Dombeck, Mary T; Sellers, Craig R

    2012-01-01

    To support the process of effective family decision making, it is important to recognize and understand informal roles that various family members may play in the end-of-life decision-making process. To describe some informal roles consistently enacted by family members involved in the process of end-of-life decision making in intensive care units. Ethnographic study. Data were collected via participant observation with field notes and semistructured interviews on 4 intensive care units in an academic health center in the mid-Atlantic United States from 2001 to 2004. The units studied were a medical, a surgical, a burn and trauma, and a cardiovascular intensive care unit. Health care clinicians, patients, and family members. Informal roles for family members consistently observed were primary caregiver, primary decision maker, family spokesperson, out-of-towner, patient's wishes expert, protector, vulnerable member, and health care expert. The identified informal roles were part of families' decision-making processes, and each role was part of a potentially complicated family dynamic for end-of-life decision making within the family system and between the family and health care domains. These informal roles reflect the diverse responses to demands for family decision making in what is usually a novel and stressful situation. Identification and description of these informal roles of family members can help clinicians recognize and understand the functions of these roles in families' decision making at the end of life and guide development of strategies to support and facilitate increased effectiveness of family discussions and decision-making processes.

  9. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  10. Measuring the usefulness of hidden units in Boltzmann machines with mutual information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Mathias; Raiko, Tapani; Cho, Kyunghyun

    2015-04-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) and deep Boltzmann machines (DBMs) are important models in deep learning, but it is often difficult to measure their performance in general, or measure the importance of individual hidden units in specific. We propose to use mutual information to measure the usefulness of individual hidden units in Boltzmann machines. The measure is fast to compute, and serves as an upper bound for the information the neuron can pass on, enabling detection of a particular kind of poor training results. We confirm experimentally that the proposed measure indicates how much the performance of the model drops when some of the units of an RBM are pruned away. We demonstrate the usefulness of the measure for early detection of poor training in DBMs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Social and Economic Statistics in the United Kingdom: A Review of Information Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Eric; Nunez, Alfonso

    1982-01-01

    A new system is needed to monitor socioeconomic statistical data for the United Kingdom (UK). The current state of UK socioeconomic statistics, an assessment of methods used to communicate available information, and the resource requirements of a successful monitoring service are discussed. (AM)

  12. 75 FR 5849 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Claim Against the United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Claim Against the United States for the Proceeds of a Government Check AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of...

  13. Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2008). Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification. In F. W. B. Li, J. Zhao, T. K. Shih, R. W. H. Lau, Q. Li & D. McLeod (Eds.), Advances in Web Based Learning - Proceedings of the 7th

  14. Dual Embeddedness: Informal Job Matching and Labor Market Institutions in the United States and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Steve; Benton, Richard A.; Warner, David F.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the embeddedness, varieties of capitalism and macrosociological life course perspectives, we examine how institutional arrangements affect network-based job finding behaviors in the United States and Germany. Analysis of cross-national survey data reveals that informal job matching is highly clustered among specific types of individuals…

  15. 协同信息检索行为中的认知研究%A Study of Awareness in Collaborative Information Seeking Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丹; 邱瑾

    2013-01-01

    本文采用问卷调查法和半结构化访谈法等数据收集方法,以及统计分析法和内容分析法等数据分析方法在Coagmento系统上进行了用户协同信息检索实验,旨在考察协同能力和任务类型这两个因素对协同信息检索行为的情境认知、任务认知和协同认知的影响.实验结果显示,协同能力强弱对用户的情境认知和协同认知的影响较大,而任务类型不同对用户的任务认知影响较大.协同方式从横向上可分为按内容、角色或二者结合分工;从纵向上可分为动态或静态分工.信息类任务分工最为明确,最适合用协同检索系统来完成;事务类任务分工较难,最不适合用协同检索系统来完成.%In order to investigate the impacts of collaborative abilities and task types on people's context awareness, task awareness, and collaboration awareness in collaborative information seeking behaviors, we conducted a collaborative information search experiment using the Coagmento system. We also used semi-structured interview and questionnaires for data collection, and content analysis as well as statistical testing as the data analysis methods. Our results show that collaborative abilities have much greater influence on context awareness and collaboration awareness, whereas task types have much greater influence on task awareness. In addition, we find that users' collaboration strategies can be divided into content-based mission assignment, role-based mission assignment, and content-role combined mission assignment from the horizontal angle, and dynamic strategy and static strategy from the vertical angle. Since informational tasks are easy to be divided and assigned separately, they are the most suitable tasks for collaborative search, whereas transactional tasks are the least suitable tasks because they are difficult to be divided and assigned.

  16. Explaining technological change of wind power in China and the United States: Roles of energy policies, technological learning, and collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tian

    The following dissertation explains how technological change of wind power, in terms of cost reduction and performance improvement, is achieved in China and the US through energy policies, technological learning, and collaboration. The objective of this dissertation is to understand how energy policies affect key actors in the power sector to promote renewable energy and achieve cost reductions for climate change mitigation in different institutional arrangements. The dissertation consists of three essays. The first essay examines the learning processes and technological change of wind power in China. I integrate collaboration and technological learning theories to model how wind technologies are acquired and diffused among various wind project participants in China through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)--an international carbon trade program, and empirically test whether different learning channels lead to cost reduction of wind power. Using pooled cross-sectional data of Chinese CDM wind projects and spatial econometric models, I find that a wind project developer's previous experience (learning-by-doing) and industrywide wind project experience (spillover effect) significantly reduce the costs of wind power. The spillover effect provides justification for subsidizing users of wind technologies so as to offset wind farm investors' incentive to free-ride on knowledge spillovers from other wind energy investors. The CDM has played such a role in China. Most importantly, this essay provides the first empirical evidence of "learning-by-interacting": CDM also drives wind power cost reduction and performance improvement by facilitating technology transfer through collaboration between foreign turbine manufacturers and local wind farm developers. The second essay extends this learning framework to the US wind power sector, where I examine how state energy policies, restructuring of the electricity market, and learning among actors in wind industry lead to

  17. Using information theory to identify redundancy in common laboratory tests in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon; Maslove, David M

    2015-07-31

    Clinical workflow is infused with large quantities of data, particularly in areas with enhanced monitoring such as the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Information theory can quantify the expected amounts of total and redundant information contained in a given clinical data type, and as such has the potential to inform clinicians on how to manage the vast volumes of data they are required to analyze in their daily practice. The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to quantify the amounts of redundant information associated with common ICU lab tests. We analyzed the information content of 11 laboratory test results from 29,149 adult ICU admissions in the MIMIC II database. Information theory was applied to quantify the expected amount of redundant information both between lab values from the same ICU day, and between consecutive ICU days. Most lab values showed a decreasing trend over time in the expected amount of novel information they contained. Platelet, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine measurements exhibited the most amount of redundant information on days 2 and 3 compared to the previous day. The creatinine-BUN and sodium-chloride pairs had the most redundancy. Information theory can help identify and discourage unnecessary testing and bloodwork, and can in general be a useful data analytic technique for many medical specialties that deal with information overload.

  18. Design of an Innovative Information System for the Intensive Care Unit in a Public Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoromokos, Dimitrios; Tsaloukidis, Nikolaos; Dermatis, Zacharias; Gozadinos, Filippos; Lazakidou, Athina

    2016-01-01

    The health sector is increasingly focused on the use of Communication Technology (ICT) Information and Communication. New technologies which introduced in health, should lead to lower cost of procedures, saving employees' working time and immediate and secure data storages for easy future search or meta-analysis. The DPP4ICU application which presented in this document, allows at the Intensive Care Unit's nurses (ICU) to enter directly the handwritten accountability, in the Organization Information System. Through this application is accelerated the proper completion of a document and is improved data quality. The application provides the ability to authorized users to exchange information with an automated manner.

  19. Informational role self-efficacy: a validation in interprofessional collaboration contexts involving healthcare service and project teams

    OpenAIRE

    Chiocchio, François; Lebel, Paule; Dubé, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare professionals perform knowledge-intensive work in very specialized disciplines. Across the professional divide, collaboration becomes increasingly difficult. For effective teamwork and collaboration to occur, it is considered necessary for individuals to believe in their ability to draw on their expertise and provide what others need to perform their job well. To date, however, no instruments exist to measure such a construct. Methods A two-study design is used to test t...

  20. 75 FR 65700 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: R/PPR Evaluation and Measurement Unit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: R/PPR Evaluation and Measurement Unit, Evaluation Survey... of Information Collection: R/PPR Evaluation and Measurement Unit Survey Question Bank. OMB Control... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for the information collection described below....

  1. Facebook as a tool for communication, collaboration, and informal knowledge exchange among members of a multisite family health team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aisha K Lofters,1,2 Morgan B Slater,1 Emily Nicholas Angl,1 Fok-Han Leung1 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: To implement and evaluate a private Facebook group for members of a large Ontario multisite Family Health Team (FHT to facilitate improved communication and collaboration. Design: Program implementation and subsequent survey of team members. Setting: A large multisite FHT in Toronto, Ontario. Participants: Health professionals of the FHT. Main outcome measures: Usage patterns and self-reported perceptions of the Facebook group by team members. Results: At the time of the evaluation survey, the Facebook group had 43 members (37.4% of all FHT members. Activity in the group was never high, and posts by team members who were not among the researchers were infrequent throughout the study period. The content of posts fell into two broad categories: 1 information that might be useful to various team members and 2 questions posed by team members that others might be able to answer. Of the 26 team members (22.6% who completed the evaluation survey, many reported that they never logged into the Facebook page (16 respondents, and never used it to communicate with team members outside of their own site of practice (19 respondents. Only six respondents reported no concerns with using Facebook as a professional communication tool; the most frequent concerns were regarding personal and patient privacy. Conclusion: The use of social media by health care practitioners is becoming ubiquitous. However, the issues of privacy concerns and determining how to use social media without adding to provider workload must be addressed to make it a useful tool in health care. Keywords: social media, team-based care, communication, interprofessionalism, social network

  2. Shrinking Sea Ice, Thawing Permafrost, Bigger Storms, and Extremely Limited Data - Addressing Information Needs of Stakeholders in Western Alaska Through Participatory Decisions and Collaborative Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. A.; Reynolds, J.

    2015-12-01

    Communities, Tribes, and decision makers in coastal western Alaska are being impacted by declining sea ice, sea level rise, changing storm patterns and intensities, and increased rates of coastal erosion. Relative to their counterparts in the contiguous USA, their ability to plan for and respond to these changes is constrained by the region's generally meager or non-existent information base. Further, the information needs and logistic challenges are of a scale that perhaps can be addressed only through strong, strategic collaboration. Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are fundamentally about applied science and collaboration, especially collaborative decision making. The Western Alaska LCC has established a process of participatory decision making that brings together researchers, agency managers, local experts from Tribes and field specialists to identify and prioritize shared information needs; develop a course of action to address them by using the LCC's limited resources to catalyze engagement, overcome barriers to progress, and build momentum; then ensure products are delivered in a manner that meets decision makers' needs. We briefly review the LCC's activities & outcomes from the stages of (i) collaborative needs assessment (joint with the Alaska Climate Science Center and the Alaska Ocean Observing System), (ii) strategic science activities, and (iii) product refinement and delivery. We discuss lessons learned, in the context of our recent program focused on 'Changes in Coastal Storms and Their Impacts' and current collaborative efforts focused on delivery of Coastal Resiliency planning tools and results from applied science projects. Emphasis is given to the various key interactions between scientists and decision makers / managers that have been promoted by this process to ensure alignment of final products to decision maker needs.

  3. 一种协同学习信息RSS聚合器的设计%Design of a Collaborative Learning Information RSS Syndicator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志平; 周西柳

    2009-01-01

    基于Web Service的网络协同学习信息RSS聚合平台可以为网络学习支持环境中的协同学习提供信息定制服务.本文研究运用RSS技术作为网络学习支持环境中协同学习信息传递方式,使用Web Service技术为网络学习环境提供分布式信息处理,提供扩展接口和跨平台性.%Network RSS feeds information collaborative learning platform based on Web service provides customized information services for learning network to support the collaborative learning environment. This paper uses of RSS technology as a learning network to support collaborative learning environment in the transmission of information, and uses of Web service technologies for the network of distributed learning environment to provide information processing, extended interface and cross-platform.

  4. Making an IMPAKT; Improving care of Chronic Kidney Disease patients in the community through collaborative working and utilizing Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Major, Rupert; Shepherd, David; Brunskill, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a serious long-term condition, which if left untreated causes significant cardiovascular sequele. It is well recognized management of modifiable risk factors, such as blood pressure (BP), can lead to improved long-term outcomes. A novel information technology (IT) solution presents a possible solution to help clinicians in the community identify and manage at risk patients more efficiently. The IMproving Patient care and Awareness of Kidney disease progression Together (IMPAKT) IT tool was used to identify patients with CKD and uncontrolled hypertension in the community. A CKD nurse utilized the tool at primary care practices to identify patients who warranted potential intervention and disseminated this information to clinical staff. Blood pressure management targets and incidence of coded CKD were used to evaluate the project. Altogether 48 practices participated in an 18 month project from April 2014, and data from 20 practices, with a total adult population of 121,362, was available for analysis. Two full consecutive QI (Quality Improvement) audit cycles were completed. There was an increase in the mean recorded prevalence of coded CKD patients over the course of the project. Similarly, there was an increase in the percentage of patients with BP been recorded and importantly there was an accompanying significant increase in CKD patients achieving BP targets. At the end of the project an additional 345 individuals with CKD achieved better blood pressure control. This could potentially prevent 9 cardiovascular events in the CKD group, translating to a cost saving of £320,000 for the 20 practices involved. The most significant change in clinical markers occurred during cycle 1 of the audit, the improvement was maintained throughout cycle 2 of the audit. Our results show the real-life clinical impact of a relatively simple and easy to implement QI project, to help improve outcomes in patients with CKD. This was achieved through more

  5. Making an IMPAKT; Improving care of Chronic Kidney Disease patients in the community through collaborative working and utilizing Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Major, Rupert; Shepherd, David; Brunskill, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a serious long-term condition, which if left untreated causes significant cardiovascular sequele. It is well recognized management of modifiable risk factors, such as blood pressure (BP), can lead to improved long-term outcomes. A novel information technology (IT) solution presents a possible solution to help clinicians in the community identify and manage at risk patients more efficiently. The IMproving Patient care and Awareness of Kidney disease progression Together (IMPAKT) IT tool was used to identify patients with CKD and uncontrolled hypertension in the community. A CKD nurse utilized the tool at primary care practices to identify patients who warranted potential intervention and disseminated this information to clinical staff. Blood pressure management targets and incidence of coded CKD were used to evaluate the project. Altogether 48 practices participated in an 18 month project from April 2014, and data from 20 practices, with a total adult population of 121,362, was available for analysis. Two full consecutive QI (Quality Improvement) audit cycles were completed. There was an increase in the mean recorded prevalence of coded CKD patients over the course of the project. Similarly, there was an increase in the percentage of patients with BP been recorded and importantly there was an accompanying significant increase in CKD patients achieving BP targets. At the end of the project an additional 345 individuals with CKD achieved better blood pressure control. This could potentially prevent 9 cardiovascular events in the CKD group, translating to a cost saving of £320,000 for the 20 practices involved. The most significant change in clinical markers occurred during cycle 1 of the audit, the improvement was maintained throughout cycle 2 of the audit. Our results show the real-life clinical impact of a relatively simple and easy to implement QI project, to help improve outcomes in patients with CKD. This was achieved through more

  6. Dogwood anthracnose: how collaboration was used in the Southern United States to effectively deal with a new tree disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Anderson

    1998-01-01

    Dogwood anthracnose, caused by the fungus Discula destructiva was found in the Southern United States in 1987. Since that time millions of flowering dogwoods have been killed and disfigured by this disease. As soon as the disease was discovered a group of state and federal personnel formed a working group to develop an action plan for dealing with...

  7. Barriers and challenges in seeking psychiatric intervention in a General Hospital, by the collaborative child response unit, (A multidisciplinary team approach to handling child abuse A qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa Subramaniyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services. Methodology: Members of the team were recruited from different disciplines and trained by experts. A mission statement, protocol to assess the victims and provide treatment was formulated as an algorithm. The barriers to psychiatric treatment among the stakeholders were analyzed using framework method of qualitative analysis. Results (After 20 months the unit received 27 referrals in 20 months, 24 females, and 3 males. Age of the victims was between 8 months and 17 years. Two cases found to be physically abused. Penetrative sexual abuse was found in 23 cases, pregnant victims were 4. Most referrals were by police, trafficking found in 6 cases. Discussion: It was possible to provide multidisciplinary care to the victims and families. Recurrent themes of barriers to psychiatric treatment were stigma, victim blaming; focus on termination of pregnancy, minimization of abuse in males by stakeholders. Conclusion is collaboration needs more effort to integrate psychiatric services but can minimize the reduplication of services.

  8. Barriers and Challenges in Seeking Psychiatric Intervention in a General Hospital, by the Collaborative Child Response Unit, (A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Handling Child Abuse) A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa; Mital, Anukant; Rao, Chandrika; Chandra, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services. Methodology: Members of the team were recruited from different disciplines and trained by experts. A mission statement, protocol to assess the victims and provide treatment was formulated as an algorithm. The barriers to psychiatric treatment among the stakeholders were analyzed using framework method of qualitative analysis. Results (After 20 months) the unit received 27 referrals in 20 months, 24 females, and 3 males. Age of the victims was between 8 months and 17 years. Two cases found to be physically abused. Penetrative sexual abuse was found in 23 cases, pregnant victims were 4. Most referrals were by police, trafficking found in 6 cases. Discussion: It was possible to provide multidisciplinary care to the victims and families. Recurrent themes of barriers to psychiatric treatment were stigma, victim blaming; focus on termination of pregnancy, minimization of abuse in males by stakeholders. Conclusion is collaboration needs more effort to integrate psychiatric services but can minimize the reduplication of services.

  9. Avionics Collaborative Engineering Technology Delivery Order 0035: Secure Knowledge Management (SKM) Technology Research Roadmap - Technology Trends for Collaborative Information and Knowledge Management Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    International Corporation 4031 Colonel Glenn Highway Beavercreek, OH 45431-1673 Nikolaos G. Bourbakis Wright State University Information Technology...NUMBER 2432 5e. TASK NUMBER 04 6. AUTHOR(S) Russell F. Moody (Science Applications International Corporation) Nikolaos G. Bourbakis (Wright...modeling, retrieving, distributing, and publishing documents on the Web ( Bourbakis ) − Research cryptanalysis. − System security. − Self-healing

  10. Balancing digital information-sharing and patient privacy when engaging families in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Samuel M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Francis, Leslie; Halamka, John; Rozenblum, Ronen; Rubin, Eileen; Sarnoff Lee, Barbara; Sugarman, Jeremy; Turner, Kathleen; Vorwaller, Micah; Frosch, Dominick L

    2016-09-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) may lack decisional capacity and may depend on proxy decision makers (PDMs) to make medical decisions on their behalf. High-quality information-sharing with PDMs, including through such means as health information technology, could improve communication and decision making and could potentially minimize the psychological consequences of an ICU stay for both patients and their family members. However, alongside these anticipated benefits of information-sharing are risks of unwanted disclosure of sensitive information. Approaches to identifying the optimal balance between access to digital health information to facilitate engagement and protecting patient privacy are urgently needed. We identified eight themes that should be considered in balancing health information access and patient privacy: 1) potential benefits to patients from PDM data access; 2) potential harms to patients from such access; 3) the moral status of families within the patient-clinician relationship; 4) the scope of relevant information provided to PDMs; 5) issues around defining PDMs' authority; 6) methods for eliciting and documenting patient preferences about their family's information access; 7) the relevance of methods for ascertaining the identity of PDMs; and 8) the obligations of hospitals to prevent privacy breaches by PDMs. We conclude that PDMs should typically have access to health information from the current episode of care when the patient is decisionally impaired, unless the patient has previously expressed a clear preference that PDMs not have such access.

  11. [Production of data for the pre-natal information system in basic health units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aline Pinto de; Corrêa, Aurea Christina de Paula

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the process of data production for Information System Prenatal and Birth (SISPRENATAL) in Basic Health Units of Cuiabá, MT, Brazil. This qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was developed in eight units of Basic Health Coordination, through semi-structured interviews with professionals who worked with SISPRENATAL (nurses, physicians, managers and data entry) and comparative document analysis between system data and the written patient records. Data analysis revealed a lack of definition of the team's participation in the production of data and different modes of completing forms within the system. Professionals' knowledge about many aspects of the formswas divergent, completion of the forms was inadequate, and flaws in the computerized system were identified. Measures such as professional training, the review of the system and its forms are indispensible for the production of reliable information about prenatal care in the municipality.

  12. Information systems for urban and regional planning in the United Kingdom: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Worrall, L.

    1990-01-01

    Design criteria for urban and regional information systems are outlined. An attempt is made to evaluate the nationally available statistical series in the United Kingdom in the context of those design criteria and some of the systems developed in British local government to counter the deficiencies of an inadequate national data system are reviewed. Various systems for collecting local data have been instituted by particular local authorities, although the problems of using such data are ofte...

  13. Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    A number of investigations have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggest the deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. An important part of the DOE programs to develop new source technologies, in particular photovoltaic systems, is the experimental testing of complete or nearby complete power units. These experiments provide an opportunity to examine operational and integration issues which must be understood before widespread commercial deployment of these technologies can be achieved. Experiments may also be required to explicitly examine integration, operational, and control aspects of single and multiple new source technology power units within a utility system. An identification of utility information requirements, a review of planned experiments, and a preliminary determination of additional experimental needs and opportunities are presented. Other issues discussed include: (1) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on load duration curves and optimal generation mixes are considered; (2) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on utility production costs, with and without dedicated storage and with and without sellback, are analyzed; and (3) current utility rate structure experiments, rationales, policies, practices, and plans are reviewed.

  14. Security for ICT collaboration tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, E.G.; Kleinhuis, G.; Fransen, F.

    2011-01-01

    In order for collaboration tools to be productive in an operational setting, an information base that is shared across the collaborating parties is needed. Therefore, a lot of research is done for tooling to create such a common information base in a collaboration tool. However, security is often no

  15. Security for ICT collaboration tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, E.G.; Kleinhuis, G.; Fransen, F.

    2010-01-01

    In order for collaboration tools to be productive in an operational setting, an information base that is shared across the collaborating parties is needed. Therefore, a lot of research is done for tooling to create such a common information base in a collaboration tool. However, security is often

  16. A Study of a Collaborative Instructional Project Informed by Systemic Functional Linguistic Theory: Report Writing in Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisk, Maria Estela; Hodgson-Drysdale, Tracy; O'Connor, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the teaching of report writing in PreK-5 through the lens of systemic functional linguistics theory. Teachers were part of a university-public school collaboration that included professional development on teaching genres, text organization, and language features. Grounded in this knowledge, teachers explicitly taught report…

  17. Collaborative Filtering Recommendation Algorithm Incorporating Social Network Information%融合社交网络信息的协同过滤推荐算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭兰杰; 梁吉业; 赵兴旺

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problems of high data sparsity and limited recommendation precision of collaborative filtering recommendation algorithms, a collaborative filtering algorithm incorporating social network information is proposed under the framework of item_based collaborative filtering recommendation. In item similarity calculation period and user rating prediction period, social network information is utilized to fill missing values in rating matrix selectively and thus the existing rating information is utilized as much as possible. Finally, experiment is conducted on Epinions dataset. Results show that the proposed algorithm alleviates the data sparsity problem and outperforms other collaborative filtering algorithms on rating error and precision.%在推荐系统中,协同过滤推荐算法往往面临数据集的高度稀疏性和推荐精度有限的问题。为了解决上述问题,在基于物品的协同过滤推荐框架下,分别在物品相似度的计算和用户对物品的评分预测阶段,利用社交网络中朋友关系信息选择性地填充评分矩阵中的缺失值,最大化利用评分矩阵中的已有信息,提出融合社交网络信息的协同过滤推荐算法。最后,在Epinions数据集上的实验表明,文中算法在一定程度上缓解数据稀疏性问题,同时在评分误差和分类准确率两个指标上优于其它协同过滤算法。

  18. Collaborative filtering method with social network information%融合社交网络信息的协同过滤方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺超波; 汤庸; 傅城州; 沈玉利; 石玉强

    2013-01-01

    针对目前协同过滤方法存在的数据稀疏性、冷启动以及未能有效利用用户社交网络信息提高推荐质量等问题,提出一种融合用户社交网络信息的协同过滤方法,该方法以矩阵分解推荐模型为核心,可综合集成目标用户个人偏好以及社交网络中的关系用户偏好特征信息做出推荐.通过设计相应的推荐方法,并基于梯度下降法对用户以及商品特征矩阵的求解进行了优化运算.相关实验结果表明融合社交网络信息可在一定程度上提高协同过滤的推荐准确度以及缓解数据稀疏性、冷启动问题.%Collaborative filtering suffers the following problems:sparse data,cold start and ignoring the effect of the social network information among users.Aiming at improving the quality of collaborative filtering,A novel collaborative filtering method with social network information is proposed,which based on matrix factorization recommendation model and can fuse target user's and his friends' preference feature information in social network to make recommendation.The corresponding recommendation framework is designed and can factor the user-item feature matrix with optimized operation based on gradient descend method.Related experiment results show that our method can improve the accuracy of collaborative filtering and abate the problem of sparse data and cold start.

  19. Information contracting tools in a cancer specialist unit:the role of Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Marlow

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for high quality management information within the contracting process has driven many of the major developments in health service computing. These have often merged clinical and financial requirements, usually along patient-centred lines. In order to identify a common currency for a range of clinical activities that are inherently variable, price tariffs have been drawn up on the basis of 'episodes of care' within specialties. Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs were designed to meet the need for a common information currency. However, they were designed for acute care. The study on which this paper is based aims to examine their applicability to chronic care in a cancer specialist unit. The data were drawn from the patient information system within a major cancer unit. The focus of the investigation is encapsulated in the following questions: a Do HRGs really work as a grouping and costing methodology? b How relevant are HRG classifications for long-term patient care? The investigation demonstrated that not all HRGs are iso-resource within this environment. The findings from the data analysis are echoed by the NHS Executive's own evaluation . This does not negate advantages in their use. Furthermore, the development of Health Benefit Groups as information management tools, through a focus on health conditions and interventions rather than on purely on treatments, offers potential for greater validity within a chronic care situation.

  20. Flood risk awareness during the 2011 floods in the central United States: showcasing the importance of hydrologic data and interagency collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Schwein, Noreen O.; Shadie, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Floods have long had a major impact on society and the environment, evidenced by the more than 1,500 federal disaster declarations since 1952 that were associated with flooding. Calendar year 2011 was an epic year for floods in the United States, from the flooding on the Red River of the North in late spring to the Ohio, Mississippi, and Missouri River basin floods in the spring and summer to the flooding caused by Hurricane Irene along the eastern seaboard in August. As a society, we continually seek to reduce flood impacts, with these efforts loosely grouped into two categories: mitigation and risk awareness. Mitigation involves such activities as flood assessment, flood control implementation, and regulatory activities such as storm water and floodplain ordinances. Risk awareness ranges from issuance of flood forecasts and warnings to education of lay audiences about the uncertainties inherent in assessing flood probability and risk. This paper concentrates on the issue of flood risk awareness, specifically the importance of hydrologic data and good interagency communication in providing accurate and timely flood forecasts to maximize risk awareness. The 2011 floods in the central United States provide a case study of the importance of hydrologic data and the value of proper, timely, and organized communication and collaboration around the collection and dissemination of that hydrologic data in enhancing the effectiveness of flood forecasting and flood risk awareness.

  1. Autonomous Information Unit for Fine-Grain Data Access Control and Information Protection in a Net-Centric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward T.; Woo, Simon S.; James, Mark; Paloulian, George K.

    2012-01-01

    As communication and networking technologies advance, networks will become highly complex and heterogeneous, interconnecting different network domains. There is a need to provide user authentication and data protection in order to further facilitate critical mission operations, especially in the tactical and mission-critical net-centric networking environment. The Autonomous Information Unit (AIU) technology was designed to provide the fine-grain data access and user control in a net-centric system-testing environment to meet these objectives. The AIU is a fundamental capability designed to enable fine-grain data access and user control in the cross-domain networking environments, where an AIU is composed of the mission data, metadata, and policy. An AIU provides a mechanism to establish trust among deployed AIUs based on recombining shared secrets, authentication and verify users with a username, X.509 certificate, enclave information, and classification level. AIU achieves data protection through (1) splitting data into multiple information pieces using the Shamir's secret sharing algorithm, (2) encrypting each individual information piece using military-grade AES-256 encryption, and (3) randomizing the position of the encrypted data based on the unbiased and memory efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Therefore, it becomes virtually impossible for attackers to compromise data since attackers need to obtain all distributed information as well as the encryption key and the random seeds to properly arrange the data. In addition, since policy can be associated with data in the AIU, different user access and data control strategies can be included. The AIU technology can greatly enhance information assurance and security management in the bandwidth-limited and ad hoc net-centric environments. In addition, AIU technology can be applicable to general complex network domains and applications where distributed user authentication and data protection are

  2. Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

    2009-12-31

    In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

  3. Technology collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jacob [Halliburton (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Halliburton's Brazilian technology center. Halliburton has technology centers in the United States, Saudi Arabia, India, Singapore and Brazil, all of which aim at delivering accelerated innovation in the oil sector. The technology centers engage in research and development activities with the help of various universities and in collaboration with the customer or supplier. The Halliburton Brazil technology center provides its customers with timely research and development solutions for enhancing recovery and mitigating reservoir uncertainty; they are specialized in finding solutions for pre- and post-salt carbonate drilling and in the enhancement of production from mature fields. This presentation showcased the work carried out by the Halliburton Brazil technology center to help customers develop their deepwater field activities.

  4. Short communication: drug information unit as an effective tool for promoting rational drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraju, Pugazhenthan; Singh, Harmanjit

    2013-09-01

    The rapid developments in medical and biological sciences have led to emergence of huge information on drugs and various diseases. But accessing this vast information has limits and rational selection of drugs and utilization of drugs have become more complex. Information regarding the various aspects of drugs may be conveyed by drug information units which run only in specified tertiary care institutional units, to the physicians who treat the patients in the hospital and to the general practitioners outside, in emergencies and in normal situations. The queries of clients were obtained by means of phone calls from 9.00 a.m to 5. 00 pm, during 1 month's stay in a DIU. A resident of Clinical Pharmacology collected necessary data on therapeutic problems of patients (age and sex of the patient, other drugs which were taken, present diseases, whether department was in PGIMER, the place etc.). After solving the problems by using electronic databases or hardcopy sources like established facts in standard text book of medicine , pharmacology or in standard articles and with a final approval from the senior clinical pharmacologist, resident delivered the information to the clients as early as possible, without any delay (by phone). From the results, it was found that around 59% of the phone calls were regarding drug interactions and adverse reactions, 11% were regarding efficacy and that 30% were regarding the preferred routes and dosing. We concluded that the information that most of the healthcare professionals aimed to get, were the various drug interactions which had taken place during their therapeutic interventions.

  5. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. Follow up report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Fuel cell technology continues to grow in the United States, with strong sales in stationary applications and early markets such as data centers, materials handling equipment, and telecommunications sites. New fuel cell customers include Fortune 500 companies Apple, eBay, Coca-Cola, and Walmart, who will use fuel cells to provide reliable power to data centers, stores, and facilities. Some are purchasing multi-megawatt (MW) systems, including three of the largest non-utility purchases of stationary fuel cells in the world by AT and T, Apple and eBay - 17 MW, 10 MW and 6 MW respectively. Others are replacing fleets of battery forklifts with fuel cells. Sysco, the food distributor, has more than 700 fuel cell-powered forklifts operating at seven facilities, with more on order. Mega-retailer Walmart now operates more than 500 fuel cell forklifts at three warehouses, including a freezer facility. Although federal government budget reduction efforts are impacting a wide range of departments and programs, fuel cell and hydrogen technology continues to be funded, albeit at a lower level than in past years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding fuel cell and hydrogen R and D and has nearly 300 ongoing projects at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes universities. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and DOE's Market Transformation efforts have acted as a government ''catalyst'' for market success of emerging technologies. Early market deployments of about 1,400 fuel cells under the ARRA have led to more than 5,000 additional fuel cell purchases by industry with no DOE funding. In addition, interest in Congress remains high. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Coons (D-DE), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and John Hoeven (R-ND) re-launched the bipartisan Senate Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Caucus in August 2012 to promote the continued development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

  6. Mapping Webs of Information, Conversation, and Social Connections: Evaluating the Mechanics of Collaborative Adaptive Management in the Sierra Nevada Forests

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Managing within social-ecological systems at the landscape scale, such as in the national forests of the Sierra Nevada of California, is challenging to natural resource managers (e.g. the U.S. Forest Service) due to the uncertainties in natural processes and the complexities in social dynamics. Collaborative adaptive management (CAM) has been recently adopted as a viable strategy to diminish uncertainties in natural processes through iterative policy experimentations and adaptations, as well ...

  7. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore, it tr...

  8. 27 June 2012 - Ambassador K. Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Department Head P. Collier and CMS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson J. Virdee.

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 June 2012 - Ambassador K. Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Department Head P. Collier and CMS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson J. Virdee.

  9. Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    A number of investigations, including those conducted by The Aerospace Corporation and other contractors, have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggests the feasible deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. It is imperative that these integration issues be pursued in parallel with the development of each technology if the nation's electric utility systems are to effectively utilize these technologies in the near to intermediate term. Analyses of three of these issues are presented: utility information requirements, generation mix and production cost impacts, and rate structures in the context of photovoltaic units integrated into the utility system. (WHK)

  10. Scripts and information units in future planning: Interactions between a past and a future planning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Aline; Barnier, Amanda J; Sutton, John

    2016-01-01

    Research on future thinking has emphasized how episodic details from memories are combined to create future thoughts, but has not yet examined the role of semantic scripts. In this study, participants recalled how they planned a past camping trip in Australia (past planning task) and imagined how they would plan a future camping trip (future planning task), set either in a familiar (Australia) or an unfamiliar (Antarctica) context. Transcripts were segmented into information units that were coded according to semantic category (e.g., where, when, transport, material, actions). Results revealed a strong interaction between tasks and their presentation order. Starting with the past planning task constrained the future planning task when the context was familiar. Participants generated no new information when the future camping trip was set in Australia and completed second (after the past planning task). Conversely, starting with the future planning task facilitated the past planning task. Participants recalled more information units of their past plan when the past planning task was completed second (after the future planning task). These results shed new light on the role of scripts in past and future thinking and on how past and future thinking processes interact.

  11. Creating new library services through collaboration with resident groups : Aimimg at human resource development and information literacy education in ways only libraries can do : Study on activities of an NPO called Ueda Library Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Utako

    Creating new library services through collaboration with resident groups : Aimimg at human resource development and information literacy education in ways only libraries can do : Study on activities of an NPO called Ueda Library Club

  12. A Web-based multi-database system supporting distributed collaborative management and sharing of microarray experiment information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgarella, Sarah; Cattaneo, Dario; Masseroli, Marco

    2006-01-01

    We developed MicroGen, a multi-database Web based system for managing all the information characterizing spotted microarray experiments. It supports information gathering and storing according to the Minimum Information About Microarray Experiments (MIAME) standard. It also allows easy sharing of information and data among all multidisciplinary actors involved in spotted microarray experiments.

  13. Nurse-patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Groefte, Thorbjoern

    2013-01-01

    at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented......Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...

  14. Nurse–patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Grøfte, Thorbjørn;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...... at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented...

  15. Facilitating resident information seeking regarding meals in a special care unit: an environmental design intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Beth A D; Mathews, R Mark

    2004-10-01

    Repetitive questions and requests for information are common in older adults with dementia. The purpose of this environmental design intervention was to provide residents continuous access to information about common mealtime questions with the intent of decreasing agitation around mealtimes and facilitating more pleasant patient-staff and patient-patient interactions. A special care unit for residents with dementia of the Alzheimer's type was the setting. During the intervention conditions, a large clock and a sign with large lettering that identified mealtimes were hung in the dining area. Direct observations of 35 residents were conducted at mealtimes for a 5-month period. Results showed reductions from baseline to the intervention phase in food-related questions or requests. These results suggest a simple, inexpensive environmental change intervention can reduce repetitive questions commonly exhibited by individuals with dementia.

  16. OGC Collaborative Platform undercover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, G.; Arctur, D. K.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. OGC has a dedicated staff supported by a Collaborative Web Platform to enable sophisticated and successful coordination among its members. Since its origins in the early 1990s, the OGC Collaborative Web Platform has evolved organically to be the collaboration hub for standards development in the exchange of geospatial and related types of information, among a global network of thousands of technical, scientific and management professionals spanning numerous disparate application domains. This presentation describes the structure of this collaboration hub, the relationships enabled (both among and beyond OGC members), and how this network fits in a broader ecosystem of technology development and information standards organizations.

  17. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(14)-1 - Disclosure of return information to United States Customs Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employees of the United States Customs Service return information (as defined by section 6103(b)) with.... Disclosure of return information by officers or employees of the Internal Revenue Service as provided by.... (f) Use by Customs Service. Return information disclosed under this section may be used by the...

  18. Are Australian and United States Farmers Using Soil Information for Soil Health Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Lobry de Bruyn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil health is an essential requirement of a sustainable, functioning agroecosystem. Tracking soil health to determine sustainability at the local level largely falls to farmers, even though they often lack access to critical information. We examine farmers’ participation in gathering soil information at the farm and paddock scale over the last two decades in Australia and the United States, by reviewing national-level reporting of farmer use of soil testing and farm planning as well as qualitative research on farmer perspectives. The level of participation in soil testing and farm planning has remained stable in the last two decades, with only 25% and 30% of landholders, respectively, participating nationally, in either country. The review revealed national-level reporting has a number of limitations in understanding farmers’ use of soil information and, in particular, fails to indicate the frequency and intensity of soil testing as well as farmer motivation to test soil or what they did with the soil information. The main use of soil testing is often stated as “determining fertilizer requirements”, yet data show soil testing is used less commonly than is customary practice. In Australia and in the United States, customary practice is three and half times more likely for decisions on fertilizer application levels. The rhetoric is heavy on the use of soil testing as a decision tool, and that it guides best practices. However, given that only a quarter of farmers are soil testing, and doing so infrequently and in low densities, the level of information on soil health is poor. While farmers report consistent monitoring of soil conditions, few have consistent records of such. In contrast to the information on the poor state of soil health, there is strong farmer interest in procuring soil health benefits through changes in farm practices such as conservation tillage or cover crops, even if they are unable to demonstrate these soil health

  19. [Surveillance of viral hepatitis in Argentina: analysis of information from sentinel units 2007-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirsky, Sara; Silvina, Munné María; Otegui, Lucio; Altabert, Nancy; Soto, Sonia; Brajterman, Leonardo; Echenique, Horacio; González, Jorge

    2013-03-01

    In Argentina, the four strategies of epidemiological surveillance from the National System of Health Surveillance (SNVS) are Diseases of Mandatory Report (C2), Sentinel Units (SU), Laboratory Surveillance (SIVILA) and National Programs (National Plan of Blood, information from blood banks). They collect information about viral hepatitis (VH). The objective of this work was to analyze the information recorded by the SUs of VH for hepatitis B and C in the period between January 1th 2007 and December 31h 2010. In this period, out of the 1,769 cases recorded (entered by 21 of 24 SUs), 806 entries were hepatitis B, 848 hepatitis C and 115 belonged to other definitions. The relative proportions between hepatitis B and hepatitis C were heterogeneous between the SUs. The age distribution was homogeneous, being the predominant group in acute hepatitis B the 25- to 34-year-old group. In hepatitis C, the age distribution was broader. The distribution by sex and risk factors was heterogeneous between the different SUs. In hepatitis C, genotype 1 was the predominant one. In conclusion, the information provided by the SUs contributes as an evidence of the public health problem posed by this pathology in our country.

  20. Development, dissemination and implementation of a sedation and analgesic guideline in a pediatric intensive care unit...it takes creativity and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Margot; Dhanani, Sonny; Irwin, Danica; Writer, Hilary; Doherty, Dermot

    2010-01-01

    Sedation and analgesia are administered to critically ill children to provide comfort and pain relief, decrease anxiety and to promote patient safety in relation to life-saving treatments. A comprehensive practice guideline focused on ways to implement evidence-based sedation and analgesia practices was developed, disseminated and implemented by an interprofessional team in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa, Canada. The goals of this quality of care initiative were to (1) reduce inconsistent practices, (2) improve patient outcomes related to comfort, and (3) enhance collaboration among health care team members caring for critically ill children. An evidence-based sedation and analgesia management (SAM) guideline for critically ill, intubated and ventilated infants and children was developed over a six-month period by a team composed of PICU physicians, pharmacists and nurses. The quality of patient care initiative focused on consistent use of (a) validated sedation and analgesia assessment tools, (b) a goal-directed approach by identifying daily therapeutic target scores and titrating interventions accordingly, and (c) non-pharmacologic, pharmacologic and adjunctive measures. The authors describe their experience in the development, dissemination and implementation of an interprofessional guideline directed at improving sedation and analgesia and patient safety in the PICU. Tools developed to support the practice change, challenges and lessons learned are shared.

  1. From «information deluge» to explicit knowledge: how web technologies and web collaboration could support Natural Hazards Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Sabina; Rapisardi, Elena; Giardino, Marco

    2015-04-01

    "precise" resilient behavior. A "Natural Hazard Wikisaurus" (NHW) is here proposed as a "matrix" of a model to be used in "practice". The NHW is a web environment of interrelated terminological tools: glossary, thesaurus, wiki; an augmented «terminology tool» conceived as a collaborative virtual source of validated information and knowledge on Natural Hazards and Civil Protection, to sustain and support a common understanding. Thesaurus represents the building block of knowledge, enabling the "know-how" on NH, whilst the Wiki selects and organizes the praxis of natural hazards management. NHW is intended as a structured and collaborative web platform with validated information on geosciences that could be integrated in other websites; the overall aim is to propose an operational and collaborative approach for acknowledged practitioners, citizens, civil servants, media representatives, and students allowed to collaborate or to retrieve information through the collective content validated by the scientific users of the platform. Furthermore, this first step could foster a next step that will take advantage from the power of «linked data» so to contribute to a natural hazard semantic, or to a «semantic disaster resilience».

  2. Perceived quality in a dementia unit: patients' caregivers as information providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Picazo, J J; de Dios Cánovas-García, J; Antúnez, C; Marín, J; Antequera, M M; Vivancos, L; Martínez, B; Legaz, A; Navarro, D; Leal, M

    2016-10-22

    Dementia units (DU) provide comprehensive and specialised care to patients with dementia. However, assessment in these units normally focuses on patient management. The aim of this study was to determine satisfaction of the caregivers of patients managed in a DU and how they rated DU care. We created a self-administered questionnaire which was completed by 236 caregivers visiting the DU in 2015. The questionnaire included 6 dimensions (accessibility, organisation, professionalism, relationship with staff, information, and facilities); data were analysed using problem rates. A total of 53.4% caregivers completed the questionnaire; most were women, patients' spouses, or first-degree relatives. The overall problem rates was 15.0% (95% CI, 13.9-16.1), with sizeable differences between dimensions: from 0.1% (95% CI, 0.0-0.4) for 'relationship with staff' and 'professionalism' to 49.3% (95% CI, 45.4-53.2) for 'information'. Waiting times over 30minutes were perceived as excessive. Information problems were not directly related to patient management. Satisfaction was scored 8.29/10 (median 8; SD 1.45); 77.3% (95% CI, 69.8-74.8) of respondents were highly satisfied. Ninety-nine percent of the caregivers stated that they would recommend the DU. This questionnaire provides interesting data on care quality as perceived by patients' caregivers. Our results have allowed us to identify problems and implement corrective actions. Our questionnaire has proved to be a useful tool for evaluating and improving care quality in DUs. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2,' NUREG-0683.

  4. Opportunities for international collaboration in industrial pollution prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.K.; Fowler, K.M.

    1993-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe international research opportunities for in-process reduction of wastes from industrial processes. Written responses from 52 researchers were obtained from 15 different countries in mid-1992. Each researcher provided information about products to reduce waste in industrial processes and recommended joint activities and mechanisms for working collaboratively with the United States.

  5. Are We Being Informed Correctly During the Patient Transfer to the Intensive Care Units?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münire Babayiğit

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to demonstrate to what extent do the right information in patients’ inter-hospital transfers due to the intensive care indications Material and Method: In this study, 38 patients who applied to our general intensive care unit (ICU from the other hospitals were included. The demographic data of patients, declarations before ICU admission and diagnosis after admission, the reason and accuracy of the transfer, the overall stay time and the treatments in ICU were recorded. Results: Of all the patients, 17 of them (44.7% were male and 21 of them (55.3% were female. Of the people who informed the patients 50% were research assistants, 34.2% of them were medical specialists and 15.8% were paramedics. The most common causes of transfer were found to be invasive hemodynamic monitoring (52.6%, mechanical ventilation (36.8% and the need for dialysis (10.5%. As the patients were evaluated after admission to ICU, the 71.1% of the information about patients was found to be incomplete and/or misleading. The most common health problems that found to be not reported during acceptance were chronic systemic diseases (25.8%, emergent cardiac pathologies (16.1%, malignancy (12.9%, active infection (12.9%, psychiatric disorders (12.9% and neurological deficiencies (%9,7. Conclusion: This study revealed that the most of the patient transfers were made improperly with incomplete or misleading information and without the tertiary care ICU indication. In order to use ICU effectively, we believe that an efficient system which provides correct information should be used during inter-hospital patient transfer.

  6. Survey of information technology in Intensive Care Units in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallett David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Intensive Care Unit (ICU is a data-rich environment where information technology (IT may enhance patient care. We surveyed ICUs in the province of Ontario, Canada, to determine the availability, implementation and variability of information systems. Methods A self-administered internet-based survey was completed by ICU directors between May and October 2006. We measured the spectrum of ICU clinical data accessible electronically, the availability of decision support tools, the availability of electronic imaging systems for radiology, the use of electronic order entry and medication administration systems, and the availability of hardware and wireless or mobile systems. We used Fisher's Exact tests to compare IT availability and Classification and Regression Trees (CART to estimate the optimal cut-point for the number of computers per ICU bed. Results We obtained responses from 50 hospitals (68.5% of institutions with level 3 ICUs, of which 21 (42% were university-affiliated. The majority electronically accessed laboratory data and imaging reports (92% and used picture archiving and communication systems (PACS (76%. Other computing functions were less prevalent (medication administration records 46%, physician or nursing notes 26%; medication order entry 22%. No association was noted between IT availability and ICU size or university affiliation. Sites used clinical information systems from15 different vendors and 8 different PACS systems were in use. Half of the respondents described the number of computers available as insufficient. Wireless networks and mobile computing systems were used in 23 ICUs (46%. Conclusion Ontario ICUs demontrate a high prevalence of the use of basic information technology systems. However, implementation of the more complex and potentially more beneficial applications is low. The wide variation in vendors utilized may impair information exchange, interoperability and uniform data collection.

  7. Project UNITY: Cross Domain Visualization Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.; Havig, P.

    UNITY is an International Cooperative Research and Development (ICR&D) project between the United States and Great Britain under the Research and Development Projects (RDP) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). UNITYs objectives are to develop and evaluate the operational concepts and requirements for undertaking combined operations: a) pursuant to the interests of mission partners, b) develop, experiment, and demonstrate, transitionable emergent technologies, capabilities, or concepts, which facilitate the sharing of information and products between mission partners, and c) identify and define additional emerging technologies that may need to be developed to support current and future military information sharing. Collaboration between coalition partners is essentially for accurate and timely decision making in the ever increasing nature and tempo of global security. The purpose for this project is to develop engineering solutions in order to further investigate the human factors issues that arise while sharing information in a collaborative environment where security is an issue. The biggest difference between existing available solutions are in the presentation and interaction with the interface on both ends of the collaboration in order to preserve the expressed intent of shared situation awareness while also enabling markups and content on one screen that the other collaborator does not see and vice versa. The UNITY project stresses collaboration differently than all known realtime collaboration software in production, aka groupware, on the market today. The tradition of What You See Is What I See (WYSIWIS) as in typical implementations of shared whiteboards simply do not address the need for local and private information to be displayed in context with shareable data. This paper addresses the concerns, problems, and some solutions for shared 3D visualization and 2D tabular visualizations which are explored and presented within the space situation awareness problem

  8. The theta-syllable: a unit of speech information defined by cortical function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded eGhitza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A recent commentary (Oscillators and syllables: a cautionary note. Cummins, 2012 questions the validity of a class of speech perception models inspired by the possible role of neuronal oscillations in decoding speech (e.g., Ghitza 2011, Giraud & Poeppel 2012. In arguing against the approach, Cummins raises a cautionary flag from a phonetician’s point of view. Here we respond to his arguments from an auditory processing viewpoint, referring to a phenomenological model of Ghitza (2011 taken as a representative of the criticized approach. We shall conclude by proposing the theta-syllable as an information unit defined by cortical function – an alternative to the conventional, ambiguously defined syllable. In the large context, the resulting discussion debate should be viewed as a subtext of acoustic and auditory phonetics vs. articulatory and motor theories of speech reception.

  9. Top 40 priorities for science to inform conservation and management policy in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Erica; Blockstein, David E.; Hall, John A.; Mascia, Michael B.; Rudd, Murray A.; Scott, J. Michael; Sutherland, William J.; Bartuska, Ann M.; Brown, A. Gordon; Christen, Catherine A.; Clement, Joel P.; DellaSala, Dominick; Duke, Clifford D.; Fiske, Shirley J.; Gosnell, Hannah; Haney, J. Chris; Hutchins, Michael; Klein, Mary L.; Marqusee, Jeffrey; Noon, Barry R.; Nordgren, John R.; Orbuch, Paul M.; Powell, Jimmie; Quarles, Steven P.; Saterson, Kathryn A.; Stein, Bruce A.; Webster, Michael S.; Vedder, Amy

    2011-01-01

    To maximize the utility of research to decisionmaking, especially given limited financial resources, scientists must set priorities for their efforts. We present a list of the top 40 high-priority, multidisciplinary research questions directed toward informing some of the most important current and future decisions about management of species, communities, and ecological processes in the United States. The questions were generated by an open, inclusive process that included personal interviews with decisionmakers, broad solicitation of research needs from scientists and policymakers, and an intensive workshop that included scientifically oriented individuals responsible for managing and developing policy related to natural resources. The process differed from previous efforts to set priorities for conservation research in its focus on the engagement of decisionmakers in addition to researchers. The research priorities emphasized the importance of addressing societal context and exploration of trade-offs among alternative policies and actions, as well as more traditional questions related to ecological processes and functions.

  10. Tuberculosis genotyping information management system: enhancing tuberculosis surveillance in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Smita; Moonan, Patrick K; Cowan, Lauren; Grant, Juliana; Kammerer, Steve; Navin, Thomas R

    2012-06-01

    Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates (genotyping) can be used by public health programs to more readily identify tuberculosis (TB) transmission. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Tuberculosis Genotyping Service has offered M. tuberculosis genotyping for every culture-confirmed case in the United States since 2004. The TB Genotyping Information Management System (TB GIMS), launched in March 2010, is a secure online database containing genotype results linked with case characteristics from the national TB registry for state and local TB programs to access, manage and analyze these data. As of September 2011, TB GIMS contains genotype results for 89% of all culture-positive TB cases for 2010. Over 400 users can generate local and national reports and maps using TB GIMS. Automated alerts on geospatially concentrated cases with matching genotypes that may represent outbreaks are also generated by TB GIMS. TB genotyping results are available to enhance national TB surveillance and apply genotyping results to conduct TB control activities in the United States.

  11. Value of information analysis for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IT Corporation Las Vegas

    1999-11-19

    The value-of-information analysis evaluated data collection options for characterizing groundwater transport of contamination associated with the Yucca Flat and Climax Mine Corrective Action Units. Experts provided inputs for the evaluation of 48 characterization options, which included 27 component activities, 12 combinations of activities (subgroups), and 9 combinations of subgroups (groups). The options range from an individual study using existing data and intended to address a relatively narrow uncertainty to a 52-million dollar group of activities designed to collect and analyze new information to broadly address multiple uncertainties. A modified version of the contaminant transport component of the regional model was used to simulate contaminant transport and to estimate the maximum extent of the contaminant boundary, defined as that distance beyond which the committed effective dose equivalent from the residual radionuclides in groundwater will not exceed 4 millirem per year within 1,000 years. These simulations identified the model parameters most responsible for uncertainty over the contaminant boundary and determined weights indicating the relative importance of these parameters. Key inputs were identified through sensitivity analysis; the five selected parameters were flux for flow into Yucca Flat from the north, hydrologic source term, effective porosity and diffusion parameter for the Lower Carbonate Aquifer, and path length from the Volcanic Confining Unit to the Lower Carbonate Aquifer. Four measures were used to quantify uncertainty reduction. Using Bayesian analysis, the options were compared and ranked based on their costs and estimates of their effectiveness at reducing the key uncertainties relevant to predicting the maximum contaminant boundary.

  12. Educating for Social Justice: Perspectives from Library and Information Science and Collaboration with K-12 Social Studies Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Jamie Campbell; Sweeney, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Library and Information Science (LIS) as a discipline is guided by core values that emphasize equal access to information, freedom of expression, democracy, and education. Importantly, diversity and social responsibility are specifically called out as foundations of the profession (American Library Association, 2004). Following from this, there…

  13. Adoption of anesthesia information management systems by academic departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger Halbeis, Christoph B; Epstein, Richard H; Macario, Alex; Pearl, Ronald G; Grunwald, Zvi

    2008-10-01

    Information technology has been promoted as a way to improve patient care and outcomes. Whereas information technology systems for ancillary hospital services (e.g., radiology, pharmacy) are deployed commonly, it has been estimated that anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) are only installed in a small fraction of United States (US) operating rooms. In this study, we assessed the adoption of AIMS at academic anesthesia departments and explored the motivations for and resistance to AIMS adoption. Members of the Society of Academic Anesthesiology Chairs and the Association of Anesthesiology Program Directors were solicited by e-mail to participate in an online survey of AIMS adoption. Two months after closing the survey, another e-mail was sent with a single question asking for an update to their AIMS implementation status. Surveys were fully completed by 48 (34%) of the 140 Society of Academic Anesthesiology Chairs and Association of Anesthesiology Program Directors departments surveyed, with 72 (51%) providing AIMS status information. Twenty of these 72 departments have an AIMS installed, 12 are currently implementing, 11 have selected but not yet installed, and 18 are planning to purchase an AIMS in 2008 or 2009. Therefore, at least 61 (44%) of all 140 US academic anesthesia departments have committed to AIMS. This estimated adoption rate is conservative because the numerator equals the affirmative responses, whereas the denominator equals the total population of academic departments. Among adopters, the top ranked anticipated benefits from installing an AIMS included improved clinical documentation, improved data collection for clinical research, enhancement of quality improvement programs, and compliance with requirements of regulatory authorities. The hospital provided funding in almost all facilities (90%), with co-funding by the anesthesia group in 35%. At least 61 or 44% of the 140 US academic departments surveyed in this study have already

  14. Technical Perspective on Using Information Demand Pattern in a Collaborative Recommendation System for Improving E-Mail Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Stamer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Today e-mail communication information is widely used in organizations to distribute information. The increasing volume of received e-mails hinders an efficient work. It becomes more and more difficult to identify relevant e-mails inside this enormous volume of information. This work presents a solution in a multi-user environment by improving an established e-mail client extension based on information demand pattern with a recommendation system. The contributions of this work are (1 the concept and implementation of the solution for a single-user environment using information demand pattern, (2 the concept and architecture to use the solution in a multi-user environment (3 a detailed technical description about the proposed solutions.

  15. 19 CFR 10.552 - Information sharing by CBP regarding textile and apparel goods produced in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information sharing by CBP regarding textile and... Determinations § 10.552 Information sharing by CBP regarding textile and apparel goods produced in the United... textile or apparel goods are imported, if such action results in the avoidance of tariffs,...

  16. The Core Curricula of Information Systems Undergraduate Programs: A Survey of AACSB-Accredited Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    The author examines the present state of information systems undergraduate programs in the United States. He reviewed 516 institutions and collected data on 234 institutions offering information systems (IS) undergraduate programs. Of seven core courses required by the IS 2010 curriculum model, four are required by more than 50% of the programs,…

  17. An Examination of Information Technology and Its Perceived Quality Issues in Single System Hospitals in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Linda W.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and quality of healthcare is of great concern in the United States. The positive effects of information technology reported in past research, especially case studies, has encouraged expectations that information technology may increase the quality of healthcare while reducing costs of healthcare. The goals of this study was to examine…

  18. Attitude determination using a MEMS-based flight information measurement unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Der-Ming; Shiau, Jaw-Kuen; Wang, I-Chiang; Lin, Yu-Heng

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining precise attitude information is essential for aircraft navigation and control. This paper presents the results of the attitude determination using an in-house designed low-cost MEMS-based flight information measurement unit. This study proposes a quaternion-based extended Kalman filter to integrate the traditional quaternion and gravitational force decomposition methods for attitude determination algorithm. The proposed extended Kalman filter utilizes the evolution of the four elements in the quaternion method for attitude determination as the dynamic model, with the four elements as the states of the filter. The attitude angles obtained from the gravity computations and from the electronic magnetic sensors are regarded as the measurement of the filter. The immeasurable gravity accelerations are deduced from the outputs of the three axes accelerometers, the relative accelerations, and the accelerations due to body rotation. The constraint of the four elements of the quaternion method is treated as a perfect measurement and is integrated into the filter computation. Approximations of the time-varying noise variances of the measured signals are discussed and presented with details through Taylor series expansions. The algorithm is intuitive, easy to implement, and reliable for long-term high dynamic maneuvers. Moreover, a set of flight test data is utilized to demonstrate the success and practicality of the proposed algorithm and the filter design.

  19. Attitude Determination Using a MEMS-Based Flight Information Measurement Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Heng Lin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining precise attitude information is essential for aircraft navigation and control. This paper presents the results of the attitude determination using an in-house designed low-cost MEMS-based flight information measurement unit. This study proposes a quaternion-based extended Kalman filter to integrate the traditional quaternion and gravitational force decomposition methods for attitude determination algorithm. The proposed extended Kalman filter utilizes the evolution of the four elements in the quaternion method for attitude determination as the dynamic model, with the four elements as the states of the filter. The attitude angles obtained from the gravity computations and from the electronic magnetic sensors are regarded as the measurement of the filter. The immeasurable gravity accelerations are deduced from the outputs of the three axes accelerometers, the relative accelerations, and the accelerations due to body rotation. The constraint of the four elements of the quaternion method is treated as a perfect measurement and is integrated into the filter computation. Approximations of the time-varying noise variances of the measured signals are discussed and presented with details through Taylor series expansions. The algorithm is intuitive, easy to implement, and reliable for long-term high dynamic maneuvers. Moreover, a set of flight test data is utilized to demonstrate the success and practicality of the proposed algorithm and the filter design.

  20. 77 FR 71211 - Request for Information: Establish a Public-Private Collaboration, “Drug Development Initiative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... subject line: ``DDI.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: ORD has long supported a robust research portfolio of... receive additional feedback other than a non-selected notice. Special consideration will be given to...

  1. Towards optimised information about clinical trials; identification and validation of key issues in collaboration with cancer patient advocates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, P; Nilbert, M; Bendahl, P-O

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials are crucial to improve cancer treatment but recruitment is difficult. Optimised patient information has been recognised as a key issue. In line with the increasing focus on patients' perspectives in health care, we aimed to study patients' opinions about the written information used...... in three clinical trials for breast cancer. Primary data collection was done in focus group interviews with breast cancer patient advocates. Content analysis identified three major themes: comprehensibility, emotions and associations, and decision making. Based on the advocates' suggestions...... the possibility to discontinue treatment were perceived as the most important issues. Patients' views of the information in clinical trials provide new insights and identify key issues to consider in optimising future written information and may improve recruitment to clinical cancer trials....

  2. Towards optimised information about clinical trials; identification and validation of key issues in collaboration with cancer patient advocates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, P; Nilbert, M; Bendahl, P-O;

    2011-01-01

    the possibility to discontinue treatment were perceived as the most important issues. Patients' views of the information in clinical trials provide new insights and identify key issues to consider in optimising future written information and may improve recruitment to clinical cancer trials.......Clinical trials are crucial to improve cancer treatment but recruitment is difficult. Optimised patient information has been recognised as a key issue. In line with the increasing focus on patients' perspectives in health care, we aimed to study patients' opinions about the written information used...... in three clinical trials for breast cancer. Primary data collection was done in focus group interviews with breast cancer patient advocates. Content analysis identified three major themes: comprehensibility, emotions and associations, and decision making. Based on the advocates' suggestions...

  3. Information Literacy in the Changing Landscape of Distance Learning: The Collaborative Design of a Flexible, Digital, Asynchronous Course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Betsy Reichart; Christina Elvidge

    2015-01-01

    .... The course treats information literacy as a meta-competency that encourages students to explore a variety of research tools, from social media to scholarly journals, and to develop critical thinking and research skills...

  4. Energy Efficiency Collaboratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Michael [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Bryson, Joe [US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Collaboratives for energy efficiency have a long and successful history and are currently used, in some form, in more than half of the states. Historically, many state utility commissions have used some form of collaborative group process to resolve complex issues that emerge during a rate proceeding. Rather than debate the issues through the formality of a commission proceeding, disagreeing parties are sent to discuss issues in a less-formal setting and bring back resolutions to the commission. Energy efficiency collaboratives take this concept and apply it specifically to energy efficiency programs—often in anticipation of future issues as opposed to reacting to a present disagreement. Energy efficiency collaboratives can operate long term and can address the full suite of issues associated with designing, implementing, and improving energy efficiency programs. Collaboratives can be useful to gather stakeholder input on changing program budgets and program changes in response to performance or market shifts, as well as to provide continuity while regulators come and go, identify additional energy efficiency opportunities and innovations, assess the role of energy efficiency in new regulatory contexts, and draw on lessons learned and best practices from a diverse group. Details about specific collaboratives in the United States are in the appendix to this guide. Collectively, they demonstrate the value of collaborative stakeholder processes in producing successful energy efficiency programs.

  5. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...... experience was largest the higher the hypothesized ambiguity. Theoretically contribution: This research project aims at contributing to existing literature by arguing, that collaborative experience is a moderating variable which moderates the effects on collaborative outcome from the level of complexity......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...

  6. Economics of immunization information systems in the United States: assessing costs and efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urquhart Gary A

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the United States' national health objectives for 2010 is that 95% of children aged Methods Data were collected from a national sampling frame of the 56 states/cities that received federal immunization grants under U.S. Public Health Service Act 317b and completed the federal 1999 Immunization Registry Annual Report. The sampling frame was stratified by IIS functional status, children's enrollment in the IIS, and whether the IIS had been developed as an independent system or was integrated into a larger system. These sites self-reported IIS developmental and operational program costs for calendar years 1998–2002 using a standardized data collection tool and underwent on-site interviews to verify reported data with information from the state/city financial management system and other financial records. A parametric cost-per-patient-record (CPR model was estimated. The model assessed the impact of labor and non-labor resources used in development and operations tasks, as well as the impact of information technology, local providers' participation and compliance with federal IIS performance standards (e.g., ensuring the confidentiality and security of information, ensure timely vaccination data at the time of patient encounter, and produce official immunization records. Given the number of records minimizing CPR, the additional amount of resources needed to meet national health goals for the year 2010 was also calculated. Results Estimated CPR was as high as $10.30 and as low as $0.09 in operating IIS. About 20% of IIS had between 2.9 to 3.2 million records and showed CPR estimates of $0.09. Overall, CPR was highly sensitive to local providers' participation. To achieve the 2010 goals, additional aggregated costs were estimated to be $75.6 million nationwide. Conclusion Efficiently increasing the number of records in IIS would require additional resources and careful consideration of various strategies to minimize CPR

  7. Coordination theory and collaboration technology

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Gary M; Smith, John B

    2001-01-01

    The National Science Foundation funded the first Coordination Theory and Collaboration Technology initiative to look at systems that support collaborations in business and elsewhere. This book explores the global revolution in human interconnectedness. It will discuss the various collaborative workgroups and their use in technology. The initiative focuses on processes of coordination and cooperation among autonomous units in human systems, in computer and communication systems, and in hybrid organizations of both systems. This initiative is motivated by three scientific issues which have been

  8. Snow economics and the NOHRSC Snow Information System (SNOW-INFO) for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, T.; Cline, D.; Berkowitz, E.; Savage, D.

    2003-04-01

    The National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) in the National Weather Service (NWS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), provides remotely sensed and modeled snow cover products and data sets to support river and flood forecasting in the United States and also to enhance the national economy. Nationwide, on average, about 16% of the total annual precipitation occurs as snowfall. Many sectors of the U.S. economy rely on surface water from snowfall for production, including manufacturing, mining, thermoelectric power, agriculture, and others. Snow contributes 1.7 trillion annually (16%) to the Nation's gross domestic product (GDP) of 10.5 trillion. Manufacturing is by far the largest contributor to the Nation's GDP and is also the Nation's largest surface-water user. The contribution of snow to manufacturing revenue totals 1.6 trillion annually for the Nation and ranges from just a few billion dollars in the southeastern U.S. to over 200 billion each in Michigan and New York. Hydropower supplies about 10% of the electricity used in the United States, enough to serve the needs of 28 million people. Annual hydroelectric power production exceeds 250 billion kilowatt-hours with the contribution from snow exceeding 6 billion in energy revenue each year (i.e., 30% of the Nation's annual hydroelectric production of 20 billion). Seasonal snowpacks are an essential component of agricultural water supplies throughout most of the U.S. and provide much of the surface water used to irrigate over 55 million acres of U.S. farmland each year. Agriculture net revenue supported by snowmelt exceeds 33 billion annually. Surface water supplies are essential for thermoelectric power generation by coal-fired, oil-fired, and nuclear power plants. Providing about 90% of the Nation's electricity supply, thermoelectric power revenues exceed 215 billion each year while water from snow contributes about 25 billion to this revenue annually. With 1

  9. Telementoring Physics: University-Community After-School Collaborations and the Mediation of the Formal/Informal Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecusay, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    For several decades improvement of science education has been a major concern of policy makers concerned that the U.S. is a "nation at risk" owing to the dearth of students pursing careers in science. Recent policy proposals have argued that provision of broadband digital connectivity to organizations in the informal sector would…

  10. Has information technology finally been adopted in Flemish intensive care units?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steurbaut Kristof

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information technology (IT may improve the quality, safety and efficiency of medicine, and is especially useful in intensive Care Units (ICUs as these are extremely data-rich environments with round-the-clock changing parameters. However, data regarding the implementation rates of IT in ICUs are scarce, and restricted to non-European countries. The current paper aims to provide relevant information regarding implementation of IT in Flemish ICU's (Flanders, Belgium. Methods The current study is based on two separate but complementary surveys conducted in the region of Flanders (Belgium: a written questionnaire in 2005 followed by a telephone survey in October 2008. We have evaluated the actual health IT adoption rate, as well as its evolution over a 3-year time frame. In addition, we documented the main benefits and obstacles for taking the decision to implement an Intensive Care Information System (ICIS. Results Currently, the computerized display of laboratory and radiology results is almost omnipresent in Flemish ICUs, (100% and 93.5%, respectively, but the computerized physician order entry (CPOE of these examinations is rarely used. Sixty-five % of Flemish ICUs use an electronic patient record, 41.3% use CPOE for medication prescriptions, and 27% use computerized medication administration recording. The implementation rate of a dedicated ICIS has doubled over the last 3 years from 9.3% to 19%, and another 31.7% have plans to implement an ICIS within the next 3 years. Half of the tertiary non-academic hospitals and all university hospitals have implemented an ICIS, general hospitals are lagging behind with 8% implementation, however. The main reasons for postponing ICIS implementation are: (i the substantial initial investment costs, (ii integration problems with the hospital information system, (iii concerns about user-friendly interfaces, (iv the need for dedicated personnel and (v the questionable cost-benefit ratio

  11. El trabajo colaborativo a través de la historia de las TIC Collaborative Work Throughout the History of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega Adriana

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La evolución de las tecnologías de información y comunicación (TIC posibilitó el avance y consolidación de la economía globalizada propia del poscapitalismo. La historia del computador personal y de Internet está ligada al aporte de múltiples personas, que desde diversas partes del mundo dieron pasos con una serie de inventos, en medio de relaciones tejidas por consensos y disensos, desencadenando un trabajo en red y construcción colectiva. Si el proceso de desarrollo de las TIC muestra una profunda relación con el trabajo colaborativo, el nuevo modo de producción revolucionó las estructuras organizativas de empresas y organizaciones, que pasaron de jerarquías verticales a modelos horizontales, flexibles y en red. De ahí que el encuentro del desarrollo de las TIC con las nuevas necesidades organizativas haya provocado una convergencia que potencia el trabajo colaborativo en la sociedad de la información y el conocimiento, generando un gran impacto en todo tipo de relaciones. The evolution of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT has enabled progress and consolidation of a global economy, a distinctive trait of post-capitalism. The history of the personal computer and the worldwide web are linked to the contribution of multiple individuals who, from diverse world locations, stepped forward with a number of inventions amidst the relationships built by agreements and disagreements, thus giving birth to networks and collective work. As development of the ICT is deeply related to collaborative work, the new modus operandi revolutionized the structure of organizations and corporations, which evolved from vertical hierarchies to flexible horizontal model networks. Therefore, the convergence in the development of the ICT with the new organizational needs has enabled collaborative work in a society bound by information and knowledge, thus causing a significant impact in all sorts of relationships.

  12. An overview of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory's Sensor Information Testbed for Collaborative Research Environment (SITCORE) and Automated Online Data Repository (AODR) capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dennis W.; Bennett, Kelly W.

    2017-05-01

    The Sensor Information Testbed COllaberative Research Environment (SITCORE) and the Automated Online Data Repository (AODR) are significant enablers of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL)'s Open Campus Initiative and together create a highly-collaborative research laboratory and testbed environment focused on sensor data and information fusion. SITCORE creates a virtual research development environment allowing collaboration from other locations, including DoD, industry, academia, and collation facilities. SITCORE combined with AODR provides end-toend algorithm development, experimentation, demonstration, and validation. The AODR enterprise allows the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as well as other government organizations, industry, and academia to store and disseminate multiple intelligence (Multi-INT) datasets collected at field exercises and demonstrations, and to facilitate research and development (R and D), and advancement of analytical tools and algorithms supporting the Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) community. The AODR provides a potential central repository for standards compliant datasets to serve as the "go-to" location for lessons-learned and reference products. Many of the AODR datasets have associated ground truth and other metadata which provides a rich and robust data suite for researchers to develop, test, and refine their algorithms. Researchers download the test data to their own environments using a sophisticated web interface. The AODR allows researchers to request copies of stored datasets and for the government to process the requests and approvals in an automated fashion. Access to the AODR requires two-factor authentication in the form of a Common Access Card (CAC) or External Certificate Authority (ECA)

  13. Information behaviour of parents of children admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit: Constructing a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rouck, Sofie; Leys, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the concepts 'information behaviour' and 'illness trajectory' at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). On the basis of literature review and exploratory interviews with neonatologists and head nurses of Belgian NICUs a conceptual framework is presented. The 'information behaviour' of parents of infants admitted to a NICU is analytically divided into five dimensions: ways of getting information; interpersonal information sources; time-related issues; location of information transfer; and content of information. The conceptual framework equally takes the 'illness trajectory' into account. Following Corbin and Strauss the illness trajectory at a NICU is analysed in three sub-trajectories: disease course; healthcare trajectory; and sickness trajectory. By combining the respective categories of information behaviour and illness trajectory, an analytical tool is presented under the form of a classification matrix for scrutinizing the mediating role of the illness trajectory on the information behaviour of parents of infants admitted to a NICU.

  14. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    sample of firms, an establish way of measuring the outcome of product development and a new way of measuring experience. Where the previous research in this field primarily uses secondary databases, this research project collects primary data by an online questionnaire to the NPD manager from one......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...... of the new product development as a performance measure. Finally, where previous research primarily has used the number of collaborations as a measure of collaborative experience, this research includes the recency in the measure of collaborative experience. Results: Since data has not yet been collected...

  15. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    of the prototyping process, the actual prototype was used as a tool for communication or development, thus serving as a platform for the cross-fertilization of knowledge. In this way, collaborative prototyping leads to a better balance between functionality and usability; it translates usability problems into design......This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  16. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... constraints in involving the appropriate stakeholders at the right time. The paper specifically elaborates on the role of users in collaborative prototyping, which is important in order to cover all phases of the problem-solving cycle but triggers an interesting challenge due to the “reverse empathy...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  17. Assessing the level of healthcare information technology adoption in the United States: a snapshot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middleton Blackford

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensive knowledge about the level of healthcare information technology (HIT adoption in the United States remains limited. We therefore performed a baseline assessment to address this knowledge gap. Methods We segmented HIT into eight major stakeholder groups and identified major functionalities that should ideally exist for each, focusing on applications most likely to improve patient safety, quality of care and organizational efficiency. We then conducted a multi-site qualitative study in Boston and Denver by interviewing key informants from each stakeholder group. Interview transcripts were analyzed to assess the level of adoption and to document the major barriers to further adoption. Findings for Boston and Denver were then presented to an expert panel, which was then asked to estimate the national level of adoption using the modified Delphi approach. We measured adoption level in Boston and Denver was graded on Rogers' technology adoption curve by co-investigators. National estimates from our expert panel were expressed as percentages. Results Adoption of functionalities with financial benefits far exceeds adoption of those with safety and quality benefits. Despite growing interest to adopt HIT to improve safety and quality, adoption remains limited, especially in the area of ambulatory electronic health records and physician-patient communication. Organizations, particularly physicians' practices, face enormous financial challenges in adopting HIT, and concerns remain about its impact on productivity. Conclusion Adoption of HIT is limited and will likely remain slow unless significant financial resources are made available. Policy changes, such as financial incentivesto clinicians to use HIT or pay-for-performance reimbursement, may help health care providers defray upfront investment costs and initial productivity loss.

  18. Barriers over time to full implementation of health information exchange in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Regier, Verna; Rheinboldt, Kurt T

    2014-09-30

    Although health information exchanges (HIE) have existed since their introduction by President Bush in his 2004 State of the Union Address, and despite monetary incentives earmarked in 2009 by the health information technology for economic and clinical health (HITECH) Act, adoption of HIE has been sparse in the United States. Research has been conducted to explore the concept of HIE and its benefit to patients, but viable business plans for their existence are rare, and so far, no research has been conducted on the dynamic nature of barriers over time. The aim of this study is to map the barriers mentioned in the literature to illustrate the effect, if any, of barriers discussed with respect to the HITECH Act from 2009 to the early months of 2014. We conducted a systematic literature review from CINAHL, PubMed, and Google Scholar. The search criteria primarily focused on studies. Each article was read by at least two of the authors, and a final set was established for evaluation (n=28). The 28 articles identified 16 barriers. Cost and efficiency/workflow were identified 15% and 13% of all instances of barriers mentioned in literature, respectively. The years 2010 and 2011 were the most plentiful years when barriers were discussed, with 75% and 69% of all barriers listed, respectively. The frequency of barriers mentioned in literature demonstrates the mindfulness of users, developers, and both local and national government. The broad conclusion is that public policy masks the effects of some barriers, while revealing others. However, a deleterious effect can be inferred when the public funds are exhausted. Public policy will need to lever incentives to overcome many of the barriers such as cost and impediments to competition. Process improvement managers need to optimize the efficiency of current practices at the point of care. Developers will need to work with users to ensure tools that use HIE resources work into existing workflows.

  19. Neurological disorders in Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Carone, Marco; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Al-Saedy, Huda; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Burnham, Gilbert

    2012-04-01

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) recognizes 43.7 million forcibly displaced persons and asylum seekers due to conflict and persecution worldwide. Neurological disorders have rarely been described in displaced persons but likely pose a significant burden of disease. We describe the disease spectrum and health service utilization of Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers with neurological disorders using an information system developed by the UNHCR. Neurological disorders were actively monitored among the 7,642 UNHCR-registered Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers who received health and humanitarian assistance using a pilot, centralized, database called the Refugee Assistance Information System (RAIS) in the Kingdom of Jordan in 2010. There were 122 neurological diagnoses reported in 1,328 refugees (mean age 41 years, 49% female, 10% disabled, 43% with pending resettlement applications) in 2,659 health visits, accounting for 17% of all refugees who sought health assistance in RAIS. Referral to a neurologist occurred in 178 cases (13.4%). The most frequent ICD-10 neurological diagnoses were dorsalgia (back pain) (29.7% of individuals with neurological disorders), headache (13.1%), and epilepsy (12.6%). Approximately 1 in 20 Iraqi refugees with a neurological diagnosis self-reported a history of torture, which was higher than Iraqi refugees without a history of torture [66/1,328 versus 196/6,314, odds ratio (OR) = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-2.18]. Neurological disease affects a high proportion of Iraqi refugees, including victims of torture and the disabled. Refugees require dedicated care for treatment of neurological disease with a focus on pain disorders and epilepsy.

  20. Applying the ecological Shannon′s diversity index to measure research collaboration based on coauthorship: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Voutilainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the usefulness of a slightly modified Shannon's diversity index (H as a numerical measure of intragroup research collaboration diversity based on coauthorship. Altogether, 527 peer-reviewed scientific papers by two university departments were used as the study material. Nonrandom rationalized sampling was executed to enable the confirmation of the authors' affiliations. The smallest unit of collaboration, i.e., a pair of authors, was created by matching every author with each of the coauthors from the same department he or she collaborated with. H was calculated at the department level and compared with the previously published, coauthorship based measures of research collaboration: The collaborative index (CI, degree of collaboration (DC and collaboration diversity index (CDI. Obviously, H expressed a different aspect of research collaboration than the existing indexes. Compared to CI, DC, and CDI, H revealed novel aspects of collaboration when the abundance of collaboration increased and the distribution of collaborative relations between coauthors moved closer to the uniform distribution at the same time. H can provide additional information about collaborative relationships between researchers based on coauthorship, and it should be considered as a partial indicator of research collaboration.

  1. 77 FR 58173 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Explosive Materials and Blasting Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Materials and Blasting Units (Pertains to Metal and Nonmetal Underground Mines Deemed To Be Gassy AGENCY... materials and blasting units as permissible for use in the mining industry. However, since there are no permissible explosives or blasting units available that have adequate blasting capacity for some metal...

  2. [Technical and functional standards and implementation of a clinical information system in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Tello, V; Alvarez Rodríguez, J; Núñez Reiz, A; González Sánchez, J A; Hernández Abadía de Barbará, A; Martínez Fresneda, M; Morrondo Valdeolmillos, P; Nicolás Arfelis, J M; Pujol Varela, I; Calvete Chicharro, M

    2011-11-01

    Clinical Information Systems (CIS) are becoming a useful tool for managing patients and data in the ICU. However, the existing CIS differ in their capabilities and technical requirements. It is therefore essential for intensivists, as the end clients of these applications, to define the suitable minimum specifications required in order to be operative and helpful. The Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units, through its Organization and Management Workgroup, has designated a group of clinical and software experts to draft a document with the recommendable technical and operating requirements of these systems. The group was formed by ten people supported by managers or engineers from the five principal industries producing CIS in Spain. The project involved the following phases: a) Completion of a check list. This step was considered necessary in order to establish the precise current situation of CIS applications. b) Discussion of the results by the group of experts in a meeting and in online format. The requirements were grouped into four sections: technical, functional, safety and data management. All requirements were classified as basic and optional in order to allow the end user to choose among different options according to the existing budget, though ensuring a minimal set of useful characteristics. A chronogram for the installation process was also proposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. 用户合作性信息行为理论框架构建研究%Study on Construction of Theory Framework of User′s Collaborative Information Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迪莉娅

    2012-01-01

    用户合作性信息行为的研究在国内外都处于比较前沿的领域,本文以用户合作性信息行为的含义为切入点,分析了用户合作性信息行为的发展阶段和过程,并构建了其理论框架。%Collaborative information behavior of users are a forefront field at home and abroad.From the definition of collaborative information behavior of users as a starting point this paper analyses stages and process,constructs the theory framework of collaborative information.

  4. The Collaborative Learning Activity Design of The High School Information Technology Course Based on Wiki%基于Wiki的《高中信息技术》课协作学习活动设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨好利; 曲凯歌

    2013-01-01

    As one of the emerging social software of information society, Wiki supports collaborative collaboration oriented com?munity, and provides a good collaboration platform for carrying out cooperative learning. In this paper, taking the high school in?formation technology courses as an example, we design the collaborative learning activity based on Wiki from several aspects, such as the learner characteristics, learning objectives, learning tasks, learning environment and resources, study groups, the collab?oration process, and collaborative evaluation.%Wiki作为信息社会新兴的社会性软件之一,支持面向社群的协作式协作,为开展协作学习提供了良好的协作平台。文章以《高中信息技术》课为例,从学习者特征、学习目标、学习任务、学习环境和资源、学习小组、协作过程、协作评价等方面设计了基于Wiki的协作学习活动。

  5. Modern technologies for rendering information support to cogeneration steam turbine units in their design and operation stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezgin, V. I.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Chubarov, A. A.; Brezgin, D. V.

    2013-08-01

    Application of modern information technologies in different stages of the lifecycle of cogeneration turbines is considered as one of possible ways for improving their competitiveness. Specific features relating to rendering information support for steam turbine units during the periods of their design and operation, which are the main stages of their life cycle, are presented. Three-dimension modeling, adaptive, and parametric design technologies are applied in the equipment design stages. Information support technologies developed by the authors are applied during the operation stage. Information is integrated by using a product lifecycle management (PLM) system.

  6. Informal Participatory Platforms for Adaptive Management. Insights into Niche-finding, Collaborative Design and Outcomes from a Participatory Process in the Rhine Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Moellenkamp

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available New regulatory water management requirements on an international level increasingly challenge the capacity of regional water managers to adapt. Stakeholder participation can contribute to dealing with these challenges because it facilitates the incorporation of various forms of knowledge and interests into policy-making and decision-making processes. Also, by providing space for informal multi-stakeholder platforms, management experiments can be established more easily in rigid regulatory settings, allowing for social learning to take place. Stakeholder participation is currently stipulated by several legal provisions, such as the Water Framework Directive, which plays an increasingly important role in European water management. Drawing on recent experiences in a participatory process in the German Dhuenn basin, a sub-basin of the river Rhine, we explored the interplay of informal and formal settings in a participatory process. To what degree can we allow for openness and catalyze social learning in participatory processes grounded in formal management structures? To what degree can results of informal processes have an impact on practice? We analyzed three major challenges related to this interplay: (1 the niche-finding process to establish a participatory platform; (2 the co-design process by water management practitioners, researchers and consultants; and (3 the tangible outputs and learning. We found that niches for the establishment of informal participatory platforms can occur even in a rigid and strongly structured administrative environment. Further, our case study shows that collaborative process design fosters dealing with uncertainties. We conclude that in an effective participatory process, a balance should be struck between informality and formal institutional structures to catalyze experimentation and learning and to ensure that process results have an impact on management decisions.

  7. Exploration on Collaborative Innovation Model of Chinese Government, Production, Education and Research Units%我国政产学研协同创新模式的探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海燕; 徐芝亮; 魏玲玲

    2014-01-01

    There are all sorts of defects in current government-production-education-research collaboration, which is no longer favor to realize the cooperation among these four departments. To speed up the emergence and development of new collaborative innovation model among government, production, education and research units, using the collaborative theory, new collaborative innovation model was explored and designed in the paper from such aspects as the overall model design, positioning, concept innovation, institutions and mechanisms and others. This will provide references for speeding up the realization of government-production-education-research cooperation for government and research institutions (colleges and universities), and enterprises.%现有的政产学研协作模式已出现种种弊端,越来越不利于目前我国政产学研合作的开展。为了加快政产学研协同创新模式的诞生和发展,文章运用政产学研协同理论,在模型设计、目标定位、理念革新、体制机制等方面对政产学研协同创新模式进行了探索和设想,以期能够为加快政府、科研机构(高校)、企业等实现政产学研合作提供参考。

  8. Informing climate change adaptation in the Northeast and Midwest United States: The role of Climate Science Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, A. M.; Morelli, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center (NE CSC) is part of a federal network of eight Climate Science Centers created to provide scientific information and tools that managers and other parties interested in land, water, wildlife, and cultural resources can use to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change. The NE CSC partners with other federal agencies, universities, and NGOs to facilitate stakeholder interaction and delivery of scientific products. For example, NE CSC researchers have partnered with the National Park Service to help managers at Acadia National Park adapt their infrastructure, operations, and ecosystems to rising seas and more extreme events. In collaboration with the tribal College of Menominee Nation and Michigan State University, the NE CSC is working with indigenous communities in Michigan and Wisconsin to co-develop knowledge of how to preserve their natural and cultural values in the face of climate change. Recently, in its largest collaborative initiative to date, the NE CSC led a cross-institutional effort to produce a comprehensive synthesis of climate change, its impacts on wildlife and their habitats, and available adaptation strategies across the entire Northeast and Midwest region; the resulting document was used by wildlife managers in 22 states to revise their Wildlife Action Plans (WAPs). Additionally, the NE CSC is working with the Wildlife Conservation Society to help inform moose conservation management. Other research efforts include hydrological modeling to inform culvert sizing under greater rainfall intensity, forest and landscape modeling to inform tree planting that mitigates the spread of invasive species, species and habitat modeling to help identify suitable locations for wildlife refugia. In addition, experimental research is being conducted to improve our understanding of how species such as brook trout are responding to climate change. Interacting with stakeholders during all phases of

  9. Implementation of a large-scale hospital information infrastructure for multi-unit health-care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sun K; Kim, Dong Keun; Kim, Jung C; Park, Youn Jung; Chang, Byung Chul

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in demand for high quality medical services, the need for an innovative hospital information system has become essential. An improved system has been implemented in all hospital units of the Yonsei University Health System. Interoperability between multi-units required appropriate hardware infrastructure and software architecture. This large-scale hospital information system encompassed PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications Systems), EMR (Electronic Medical Records) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning). It involved two tertiary hospitals and 50 community hospitals. The monthly data production rate by the integrated hospital information system is about 1.8 TByte and the total quantity of data produced so far is about 60 TByte. Large scale information exchange and sharing will be particularly useful for telemedicine applications.

  10. Organizing for Asymmetric Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Sørensen, Henrik B.

      The vision of new organizational forms consists of less-organized networks and alliances between organizations, in which collaborative capabilities are assumed to be crucial (Miles et al., 2005). The path to such new forms may go through fragile cooperative efforts. Despite the good will of many...... complexity to already complex models, we claim that our approach has practical implications: it offers rather simple diagnostic cues to change agents that are coping with the barriers to management and collaboration among loosely coupled units....

  11. 面向创新型湖南建设的跨系统信息协同服务策略%Strategies of Cross-system Collaborative Information Service for Innovative Hunan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘雨; 刘昆雄

    2015-01-01

    创新型湖南建设必然依赖于信息和信息服务的保障,在开放竞争环境中实现信息协同服务需要讲究策略。根据湖南信息协同服务发展现状与创新主体信息需求之间的矛盾,以目标选择和路径选择对面向创新活动的信息协同服务进行重新定位,把握协同服务的三大关键要素,结合实际具体提出构建多层交互协同主体关系、加大信息服务融合、面向用户提供一站式服务、基于交互的可持续信息服务四大实现策略。%The construction of innovative Hunan relies on information and information services. To achieve information collaborative serv-ice goals in an open competitive environment needs to pay attention to strategies. Based on the gap between the status quo of information collaborative service in Hunan and the information needs of innovation bodies, using target selection and path selection to reposition the in-formation collaborative service oriented toward innovation activities, grasping the three key elements of collaborative services, combining with the actual situation, the paper proposed four implementation strategies:construction of multi-body interactive collaborative relation-ship, greater integration of information services, customized one-stop service for users and sustainable information services based on inter-action.

  12. The role of information and communication technology in community outreach, academic and research collaboration, and education and support services (IT-CARES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashish; Meza, Jane; Costa, Sergio; Puricelli Perin, Douglas Marcel; Trout, Kate; Rayamajih, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the role of information and communication technology (ICT) in enhancing community outreach, academic and research collaboration, and education and support services (IT-CARES) in an academic setting. A survey was deployed to assess the ICT needs in an academic setting. The survey was developed using the Delphi methodology. Questionnaire development was initiated by asking key stakeholders involved in community outreach, academic, research, education, and support to provide feedback on current ICT issues and future recommendations for relevant ICT tools that would be beneficial to them in their job, and to capture current ICT issues. Participants were asked to rate the level of importance of each ICT question on five-point Likert scales. The survey was sent to 359 participants, including faculty, staff, and students. The total number of respondents was 96, for a 27 percent response rate. The majority of the participants (54.1 percent, n = 46) placed a high importance on learning the available research capabilities of the college. The majority of the participants placed moderate (43.5 percent, n = 37) to high importance (40 percent, n = 34) on having an intranet that could support collaborative grant writing. A majority of the participants attributed high importance to learning to interact with the online learning management system Blackboard. A majority of the participants agreed that social media should being more actively utilized for diverse activities for academic and research purposes. The study helped to identify the current needs and challenges faced by professionals and students when interacting with ICT. More research is needed in order to effectively integrate the use of ICT in the field of higher education, especially related to the modern global public health context.

  13. Nursing Team Leader handover in the intensive care unit contains diverse information and lacks structure: An observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Spooner, A. J.; Aitken, L. M.; Corley, A.; Fraser, J.F.; Chaboyer, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite a proliferation of evidence and the development of standardised tools to improve communication at handover, evidence to guide the handover of critical patient information between nursing team leaders in the intensive care unit is limited. Objective: The study aim was to determine the content of information handed over during intensive care nursing team leader shift-to-shift handover. Design: A prospective observational study. Setting: A 21-bed medical/s...

  14. Research and Practice of Scientific Information Collaborative Service Mode for Regional Innovation%面向区域创新的科技信息协同服务模式研究与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程卫萍

    2015-01-01

    为了提升科技文献共享服务平台的综合服务能力,为区域创新开展全方位、深层次、专业化的科技信息协同服务,以浙江省科技文献共建共享平台近年来开展的科技信息协同服务实践作为研究对象,分析了科技信息协同服务的流程,总结了科技信息协同服务的模式和实践经验,从文献资源体系结构、服务机制、服务手段、服务人才和服务供需关系等方面,对科技信息协同服务的制约因素进行了探讨和分析,以期为其他省级文献平台开展协同服务提供借鉴和参考。%In order to promote the comprehensive service ability of the scientific literature sharing service platform, and to carry out comprehensive, deep, and specialized scientific information collaborative service for the regional innovation, together with the scientific information collaborative service practice of Zhejiang scientific literature sharing platform in recent years as the research object, this essay analyzed the scientific information collaborative service process, summarized the scientific information collaborative service mode and practice experiences, and discussed and analyzed restrictive factors of scientific information collaborative service, from angles of literature resource system structure, service mechanism, service means, service personnel, and relation between service supply and demand, etc., hoping to provide references for other provincial literature platforms to carry out collaborative services.

  15. A comparison of the information needs of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer in Malaysia and the United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Raja Lexshimi Raja; Beaver, Kinta; Barnett, Tony; Ismail, Nik Safiah Nik

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about the information needs of women with breast cancer in non-Western societies. This study examined the priority information needs of 100 women with breast cancer in Malaysia and compared the findings to previous work involving 150 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the United Kingdom. The study used a valid and reliable measure, the Information Needs Questionnaire (INQ). The INQ contained 9 items of information related to physical, psychological, and social care, used successfully in Canada and the United Kingdom. The INQ was shown to have cross-cultural relevance and sensitivity. For Malaysian women, information about likelihood of cure, sexual attractiveness, and spread of disease were the most important information needs. For UK women, similar priorities were evident, apart from the item on sexual attractiveness, which was ranked much lower by women in the United Kingdom. The cultural similarities and differences that emerged from this study have implications for nurses in the cancer field caring for people from a diversity of cultural backgrounds. Breast care nurses are not a feature of the Malaysian healthcare system, although the findings from this study support the view that specialist nurses have a vital role to play in meeting the psychosocial needs of women with breast cancer in non-Western societies.

  16. All for one, one for all: collaboration between NHS and Higher Education in establishing provision of a multi-disciplinary, hospital-based library and information services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Coral; Bury, Rachel

    2004-06-01

    Developing multi-disciplinary library and information services is high on the agenda for many NHS trusts and this brings with it a climate of change for both those who manage and work in services today. The development of such new services needs to be carefully managed and developed, and this presents a challenge for librarians and service managers. In the UK during 1999 and 2000, Aintree Hospital Trust, in conjunction with Edge Hill College of Higher Education, established a truly multi-disciplinary service based at its hospital site and managed by Edge Hill. This paper outlines the key stages in the development of the Library and Information Service with the focus on the management of change, collaboration and the development of a unique partnership between Higher Education and an NHS trust. The case study example will provide an outline of strategic and project planning, with insights into staff management and development, delivering user expectations and developing stakeholder relationships in the health library setting.

  17. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and communities 13.Embedding social values in tourism management: Community currencies as laboratories of social entrepreneurship? Rita Cannas 14.Improvising Economy: Everyday encounters and tourism consumption Gunnar Thór Jóhannesson and Katrín Anna Lund 15.Community and connection: Exploring the outcomes......This book employs an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral lens to explore the collaborative dynamics that are currently disrupting, re-creating and transforming the production and consumption of tourism. House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting, social enterprise...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...

  18. Collaborative Appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Michael; Neureiter, Katja; Verdezoto, Nervo;

    2016-01-01

    Previous workshops and papers have examined how individual users adopt and adapt technologies to meet their own local needs, by “completing design through use.” However, there has been little systematic study of how groups of people engage collaboratively in these activities. This workshop opens ...... a discussion for these under-studied forms of collaborative appropriation, using a broad range of perspectives including empirical data, design explorations, research, and critique....

  19. 26 CFR 1.6038-2 - Information returns required of United States persons with respect to annual accounting periods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information returns required of United States... 31, 1962. 1.6038-2 Section 1.6038-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... tangible property other than stock in trade; (C) Sales and purchases of patents, inventions, models,...

  20. Classroom Communication and National Crises: Student Information Needs in the Aftermath of the 2001 Terrorist Attacks on the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Robert R.; Hemphill, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about students' reactions to their university's attempt to manage their informational and emotional needs during a time of national crisis. A survey of students immediately following the 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States found that students wanted the university to stay open and function as a place for sense making…

  1. Collaboration rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies.

  2. Drug information service awareness program and its impact on characteristics of inquiries at DIS unit in Malaysian public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Azlina Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To study the Drug Information Service (DIS awareness program organized by a DIS unit in Malaysian hospital through utilization of provided services by the healthcare professionals, allied healthcare providers, patients and the public, and to identify the characteristics of inquiries received. Materials and Methods : An awareness program to promote the services of the DIS unit was held throughout the month of March in 2010. Drug information queries forms that have been documented six months prior to (September 2009-February 2010 and six months after (April-September 2010 the awareness program were collected and assessed. Mean monthly inquiries volumes pre- and post-program were compared to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Types of information requestors, inquiries, reference sources, and drug class information were identified and evaluated. Results: A total of 747 drug information queries forms were received during the study period. The mean total utilization of the DIS unit services after (63.67 ± 18.24 the DIS awareness program was increased but not significant (P < 0.05 when compared to records before (60.83 ± 21.49 the program. Majority of the DIS service users were the pharmacist (67.5%, followed by the doctors (24.9%. Most inquiries were regarding the dosage and route of administration of drugs (61.4%. The most frequently referred sources of information were the Micromedex and the Internet (37.3%. The most common inquiries were related to the anti-infective agents (37.8%. Conclusion: Provision of sufficient and accurate drug information to the healthcare professionals, patients, and the public is crucial to ensure optimization of therapy. The utilization of services provided by the DIS unit should be supported. Frequent DIS awareness program should be undertaken to promote and encourage the use of services.

  3. 78 FR 53478 - Proposed Information Collection; United States Park Police Personal History Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... examination, an oral interview, a medical examination and psychological evaluation, and a battery of physical fitness and agility tests. As part of this application process, we use USPP Form 1 (United States Park...-0245. Title: United States Park Police Personal History Statement. Form Number(s): USPP Form 1. Type of...

  4. My Space- a collaboration between Arts & Science to create a suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Niamh, , Dr.; McSweeney, Clair; Smith, Niall, , Dr.; O'Neill, Stephanie; Foley, Cathy; Crawley, Joanna; Phelan, Ronan; Colley, Dan; Henderson, Clare; Conroy, Lorraine

    2015-04-01

    A suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives, entitled 'MySpace' was created, to promote the importance of Earth science and Space exploration, to ignite curiosity and discover new and engaging platforms for science in the Arts & in STEM Education, and to increase awareness of careers in Ireland's Space and Earth Science industries. Site visits to research centres in Ireland & abroad, interviews with scientists, engineers, and former astronauts were conducted over a 6 month period. A suite of performance pieces emerged from this development phase, based on Dr. Shaw's personal documented journey and the dissemination of her research. These included: 1. 'To Space'- A live multimedia theatre performance aimed at the general public & young adult. Initially presented as a 'Work In Progress' event at The Festival of Curiosity, the full theatre show 'To Space' premiered at Science Gallery, Dublin as part of Tiger Dublin Fringe Arts Festival. Response to the piece was very strong, indicated by audience response, box office sales and theatre reviews in national press and online. A national and international tour is in place for 2015. To Space was performed a total of 10 times and was seen by 680 audiences. 2. An adapted piece for 13-17 year old students -'ToSpace for Secondary Schools'- to increase awareness of Ireland's involvement in Space Exploration & to encourage school leavers to dream big. This show toured nationally as part of World Space week and Science week events in conjunction with ESERO Ireland, CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory, Cork, Armagh Planetarium & Dunsink Observatory. It was performed 12 times and was seen by 570 students. 3. 'My Place in Space', created for families from the very old (60 +) to the very young (3yrs +), this highly interactive workshop highlighted the appeal of science through the wonders of our planet and its place in Space. Presented at Festival of Curiosity, the Mallow Science Fair and at Science week 2014, this

  5. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States. Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated. Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  6. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States.Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated.Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  7. The opportunity costs of informal elder-care in the United States: new estimates from the American Time Use Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Amalavoyal V; Engberg, John; Ray, Kristin N; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2015-06-01

    To provide nationally representative estimates of the opportunity costs of informal elder-care in the United States. Data from the 2011 and 2012 American Time Use Survey. Wage is used as the measure of an individual's value of time (opportunity cost), with wages being imputed for nonworking individuals using a selection-corrected regression methodology. The total opportunity costs of informal elder-care amount to $522 billion annually, while the costs of replacing this care by unskilled and skilled paid care are $221 billion and $642 billion, respectively. Informal caregiving remains a significant phenomenon in the United States with a high opportunity cost, although it remains more economical (in the aggregate) than skilled paid care. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  8. The Complex Dynamics of Collaborative Tagging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, H.; Robu, V.; Shepherd, H.

    2007-01-01

    The debate within the Web community over the optimal means by which to organize information often pits formalized classifications against distributed collaborative tagging systems. A number of questions remain unanswered, however, regarding the nature of collaborative tagging systems including wheth

  9. Creating Networks through Interinstitutional Faculty Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Sarah R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes efforts by the consortium Associated Colleges of the Midwest to support interinstitutional faculty collaboration and development. Focuses on three programs: the Global Partners Project, an information literacy grant, and an academic collaboration grant. (EV)

  10. Cooperation enabled systems for collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A. L.; Camarihna-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2011-01-01

    A fast evolution to collaborative business models requires novel strategies for the development of collaboration-based information technology (IT) solutions. The complexity of building such solutions based on heterogeneous sub-systems requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving the perspectives

  11. Proximity and Collaboration in European Nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunningham, S.W.; Werker, C.

    2011-01-01

    Collaborations are particularly important for the development and deployment of technology. We analyze the influence of organizational, technological and geographical proximity on European nanotechnology collaborations with the help of a publication dataset and additional geographical information. W

  12. A comparative analysis of information literacy curriculum standards in the educational programs of high schools in China and in the United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua; WU; Jing; GUO; Jing; SUN

    2011-01-01

    Our study aims to take a closer look at China’s current information literacy(IL)program standards at secondary schools and to analyze their level of success and/or failures in a comparative way with those of the United States in terms of fulfilling their each other’s mission-oriented mandates.Our research findings show that China’s current IL standards of high schools contain a disproportionate emphasis on information technology(IT).Moreover,the stipulations of these IL standards are narrowly construed and without being solidly grounded on a broad and comprehensive educational perspective.We also suggest that there are two underlying causes for this set of unsound IL standards in China.Firstly,there is a lack of collaboration between two major competing forces engaged in the curricular development and research of IL in China:Those professionals in educational IT discipline vis-à-vis those in Library and Information Science.Secondly,library professionals have a very limited influence on major socio-cultural policies,even at their own institutions.As a result,this paper recommends the following three possible measures,which may help remedy this situation strategically:1)Establishing a set of new IL curriculum standards based on an IL-centered educational perspective;2)establishing a teacher-librarian’s training program to promote school librarians’role in IL education;and 3)strengthening the research and development of an online IL education program and an accompanied evaluation mechanism.

  13. 用户协同信息检索行为与系统评价研究——以任务类型和协同能力为视角%A Study on Users' Collaborative Information Seeking Behavior and System Evaluation --A Perspective of Tasks and Collaborative Abilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱瑾; 吴丹

    2012-01-01

    采用系统日志法、问卷调查法、半结构化访谈法等数据收集方法,以及统计分析法和内容分析法等数据分析方法在Coagmento系统上进行用户协同信息检索实验及结果分析。实验结果显示,协同能力和任务类型均对用户的协同信息检索行为产生影响:协同能力不同的用户在“推荐”行为上差异显著;任务类型不同对用户的“浏览网页”、“检索”和“使用图片”行为影响较大。且协同能力较强的用户在实验中获得更好的检索效果,因此,协同检索系统更适合由协同能力较强的用户通过合作来完成复杂任务。%Several data collection methods such as log analysis, semi - structured interview, questionnaires and data analysis methods such as mathematical statistics, content analysis are adopted in an experiment and its result analysis of users' collaborative information search on the Coagmento system. The results show that tasks and collaborative abilities do have impacts on users' collaborative information seeking behaviors. Collaborative abilities have influence on the behavior of "Recommend" , while tasks have influence on the behaviors of "Webpage" , "Search" , and "Image". The participants with higher collaborative abilities get better retrieval effectiveness than those with lower collaborative abilities in the experi- ment. Therefore, collaborative information retrieval system is more suitable for users with strong collaborative abilities to collaborate on complex tasks.

  14. A maintenance policy for two-unit parallel systems based on imperfect monitoring information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Anne [Department Genie des Systems Industiels (GSI), Universite de technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes, Cedex (France)]. E-mail: anne.barros@utt.fr; Berenguer, Christophe [Department Genie des Systems Industiels (GSI), Universite de technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes, Cedex (France); Grall, Antoine [Department Genie des Systems Industiels (GSI), Universite de technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes, Cedex (France)

    2006-02-01

    In this paper a maintenance policy is optimised for a two-unit system with a parallel structure and stochastic dependences. Monitoring problems are taken into account in the optimisation scheme: the failure time of each unit can be not detected with a given probability. Conditions on the system parameters (unit failure rates) and on the non-detection probabilities must be verified to make the optimisation scheme valid. These conditions are clearly identified. Numerical experiments allow to show the relevance of taking into account monitoring problems in the maintenance model.

  15. Limited segregation of different types of sound localization information among classes of units in the inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Steven M; Young, Eric D

    2005-08-17

    The auditory system uses three cues to decode sound location: interaural time differences (ITDs), interaural level differences (ILDs), and spectral notches (SNs). Initial processing of these cues is done in separate brainstem nuclei, with ITDs in the medial superior olive, ILDs in the lateral superior olive, and SNs in the dorsal cochlear nucleus. This work addresses the nature of the convergence of localization information in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Ramachandran et al. (1999) argued that ICC neurons of types V, I, and O, respectively, receive their predominant inputs from ITD-, ILD-, and SN-sensitive brainstem nuclei, suggesting that these ICC response types should be differentially sensitive to localization cues. Here, single-unit responses to simultaneous manipulation of pairs of localization cues were recorded, and the mutual information between discharge rate and individual cues was quantified. Although rate responses to cue variation were generally consistent with those expected from the hypothesized anatomical connections, the differences in information were not as large as expected. Type I units provide the most information, especially about SNs in the physiologically useful range. Type I and O units provide information about ILDs, even at low frequencies at which actual ILDs are very small. ITD information is provided by a subset of all low-frequency neurons. Type V neurons provide information mainly about ITDs and the average binaural intensity. These results are the first to quantify the relative representation of cues in terms of information and suggest a variety of degrees of cue integration in the ICC.

  16. Organizational structure and operation of defense/aerospace information centers in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, H. E.; Lushina, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    U.S. Government aerospace and defense information centers are addressed. DTIC and NASA are described in terms of their history, operational authority, information services provided, user community, sources of information collected, efforts under way to improve services, and external agreements regarding the exchange of documents and/or data bases. Contents show how DTIC and NASA provide aerospace/defense information services in support of U.S. research and development efforts. In a general introduction, the importance of scientific and technical information and the need for information centers to acquire, handle, and disseminate it are stressed.

  17. Trabalho imaterial, compartilhamento de informação e produção colaborativa na sociedade da informaçãoImmaterial labour, information sharing and collaborative production in information society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis Ricardo Montenegro de Lima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho são revistos, organizados e discutidos conceitos e estratégias em torno das formas colaborativas de produção na sociedade da informação, particularmente aqueles relacionados com o trabalho imaterial e o compartilhamento de informação. O capitalismo no seu modo de desenvolvimento informacional produz mudanças nas relações entre as formas sociais de produção e as tecnologias de informação e comunicação. A produção capitalista atual centraliza os bens imateriais a informação em primeiro lugar. O compartilhamento de informação é parte de processo de produção e, ao mesmo tempo, o seu principal produto. O compartilhamento possibilita a construção de modos de organização inteligentes e solidários, e modos de produção “não-capitalistas”. O compartilhamento produz o comum, em comum. Cria-se uma densa esfera do comum, base para uma recriação incessante. Conclui-se que as formas colaborativas de produção são particularmente importantes para que se singularizem as subjetividades e se produzam modos autônomos de vida.In this work there are reviewed, organized and discussed concepts and strategies around the collaborative production forms in the information society, particularly those related with the immaterial labour and the information sharing. The capitalism in its way ofinformational development produces changes in the relationships between the social forms of production and the technologies of information and communication. The current capitalist production centralizes the immaterial goods - the information in firstplace. Information sharing is part of production process and, at the same time, its main product. Sharing makes possible the construction of intelligent and solidary organization manners, and "no-pitalists" production manners. Sharing produces the common, in common. It grows up a dense sphere of the common, base for an incessant re-creation. It is ended that collaborative production

  18. Team Collaboration Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  19. Geo-collaboration under stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Brake, G.M. te; Neerincx, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    “Most of the science and decision making involved in geo-information is the product of collaborative teams. Current geospatial technologies are a limiting factor because they do not provide any direct support for group efforts. In this paper we present a method to enhance geo-collaboration by commun

  20. Educational Programs Offered by Colleges of Pharmacy and Drug Information Centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L.; Rosenberg, Jack M.

    1984-01-01

    Surveys mailed to institutions known to be active in disseminating drug information as well as colleges of pharmacy indicated that many of today's pharmacy students may not be receiving sufficient drug information training to respond to the drug information needs of other health professionals and the public. (Author/MLW)

  1. Educational Programs Offered by Colleges of Pharmacy and Drug Information Centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L.; Rosenberg, Jack M.

    1984-01-01

    Surveys mailed to institutions known to be active in disseminating drug information as well as colleges of pharmacy indicated that many of today's pharmacy students may not be receiving sufficient drug information training to respond to the drug information needs of other health professionals and the public. (Author/MLW)

  2. Examining the Relationship of Business Operations and the Information Security Culture in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Cynthia L.

    2017-01-01

    An increase in information technology has caused and increased in threats towards information security. Threats are malware, viruses, sabotage from employees, and hacking into computer systems. Organizations have to find new ways to combat vulnerabilities and threats of internal and external threats to protect their information security and…

  3. Towards elicitation of users requirements for hospital information system: from a care process modelling technique to a web based collaborative tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staccini, Pascal M; Joubert, Michel; Quaranta, Jean-Francois; Fieschi, Marius

    2002-01-01

    Growing attention is being given to the use of process modeling methodology for user requirements elicitation. In the analysis phase of hospital information systems, the usefulness of care-process models has been investigated to evaluate the conceptual applicability and practical understandability by clinical staff and members of users teams. Nevertheless, there still remains a gap between users and analysts in their mutual ability to share conceptual views and vocabulary, keeping the meaning of clinical context while providing elements for analysis. One of the solutions for filling this gap is to consider the process model itself in the role of a hub as a centralized means of facilitating communication between team members. Starting with a robust and descriptive technique for process modeling called IDEF0/SADT, we refined the basic data model by extracting concepts from ISO 9000 process analysis and from enterprise ontology. We defined a web-based architecture to serve as a collaborative tool and implemented it using an object-oriented database. The prospects of such a tool are discussed notably regarding to its ability to generate data dictionaries and to be used as a navigation tool through the medium of hospital-wide documentation.

  4. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies (De...... learn how to improve operations in (hopefully) a win-win like manner through collaboration.......The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...... (Denmark, Italy and The Netherlands) each with three to five suppliers were involved. The CO-IMPROVE project and the thesis is based on “action research” and “action learning”. The main aim of the whole project is through actual involvement and actions make the researchers, companies and selected suppliers...

  5. Interprofessional Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, we examined the experience of interprofessional collaboration from the perspective of nursing and medical students. Seventeen medical and nursing students from two different universities participated in the study. We used guiding questions in face-to-face, conversational interviews to explore students’ experience and expectations of interprofessional collaboration within learning situations. Three themes emerged from the data: the great divide, learning means content, and breaking the ice. The findings suggest that the experience of interprofessional collaboration within learning events is influenced by the natural clustering of shared interests among students. Furthermore, the carry-forward of impressions about physician–nurse relationships prior to the educational programs and during clinical placements dominate the formation of new relationships and acquisition of new knowledge about roles, which might have implications for future practice.

  6. Barriers and Challenges in Seeking Psychiatric Intervention in a General Hospital, by the Collaborative Child Response Unit, (A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Handling Child Abuse) A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa; Mital, Anukant; Rao, Chandrika; Chandra, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services.

  7. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -called Extended Manufacturing Enterprises (EMEs). In effect, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of EMEs. Consequently, new approaches must be developed not only to enhance the business performance of EMEs, but also, in particular, the inter-organisational......Many companies have gradually moved from vertically aligned operations to horizontally aligned operations, a change implying that co-ordination is shifting from the hierarchy to the market place with emphasis on collaboration with other companies. One form of collaboration with companies is so...

  8. Quality of documentation of electronic medical information systems at primary health care units in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldin, M; Mosallam, R; Hassan, S Z

    2014-03-13

    Limited data are available about the implementation of electronic records systems in primary care in developing countries. The present study aimed to assess the quality of documentation in the electronic medical records at primary health care units in Alexandria, Egypt and to elicit physician's feedback on barriers and facilitators to the system. Data were collected at 7 units selected randomly from each administrative region and in each unit 50 paper-based records and their corresponding e-records were randomly selected for patients who visited the unit in the first 3 months of 2011. Administrative data were almost complete in both paper and e-records, but the completeness of clinical data varied between 60.0% and 100.0% across different units and types of record. The accuracy rate of the main diagnosis in e-records compared with paper-based records ranged between 44.0% and 82.0%. High workload and system complexity were the most frequently mentioned barriers to implementation of the e-records system.

  9. Researchon Collaborative Medical Service System Based on Information Platform%基于信息化平台的协同医疗服务体系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严魁; 高晓波; 李萍

    2014-01-01

    针对我国医药卫生现状,提出了协同医疗服务体系。作为新型医疗服务体系,协同医疗服务体系的目标是通过协同会诊、协同诊断、协同转诊、协同预约和协同医学教育五大业务的建设,在区域内的层级医院和区域间的对口支援医院之间建立业务协同,从根本上提升基层和偏远地区的服务水平,实现医患资源的合理分配。%According to the current status of domestic medicine and health, a collaborative medical service system is proposed. As a new medical service system, it aims to establish business collaboration between level hospitals in the region and inter-regional counterpart support hospitals by the construction of collaborative consultation, collaborative diagnosis, collaborative referral, collaborative appointment and collaborative medical education. The service level of base and remote areas can be improved to achieve the reasonable allocation of medical resources.

  10. The Impact of Acculturation on Informal and Formal Volunteering of Korean Americans in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact of acculturation on Korean Americans’ decisions to volunteer either for secular and religious organizations or informally. The results show that language difficulty and Korean identity lower the likelihood of secular volunteering, but not of informal volunteering. Koreans who are Protestants or Catholics, and those with higher levels of education, are more likely to volunteer formally, but not informally. The findings indicate formal volunteering is strongly ass...

  11. 77 FR 52739 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Integrity of Unit Prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... contracts below the simplified acquisition threshold, construction and architect-engineering services... and methodology; ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be...

  12. The Impact of Acculturation on Informal and Formal Volunteering of Korean Americans in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Soun Jang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impact of acculturation on Korean Americans’ decisions to volunteer either for secular and religious organizations or informally. The results show that language difficulty and Korean identity lower the likelihood of secular volunteering, but not of informal volunteering. Koreans who are Protestants or Catholics, and those with higher levels of education, are more likely to volunteer formally, but not informally. The findings indicate formal volunteering is strongly associated with acculturation factors, along with personal and social variables but informal volunteering appears to be independent from and not complementary of the other two types of volunteering.

  13. Cost of Informal Caregiving Associated with Stroke among Elderly in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Heesoo; Dunet, Diane O.; Fang, Jing; Wang, Guijing

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We estimated the informal caregiving hours and costs associated with stroke. Methods We selected persons aged 65 and older in 2006 and who were also included in the 2008 follow-up survey from the Health and Retirement Study. We adapted the case-control study design by using self-reported occurrence of an initial stroke event during 2006 and 2008 to classify persons into the stroke (case) and the non-stroke (control) groups. We compared informal caregiving hours between case and control groups in 2006 (pre-stroke period for case group) and in 2008 (post-stroke period for case group) and estimated incremental informal caregiving hours attributable to stroke by applying a difference-in-differences technique to propensity-score matched populations. We used a replacement approach to estimate the economic value of informal caregiving. Results The weekly incremental informal caregiving hours attributable to stroke were 8.5 hours per patient. The economic value of informal caregiving per stroke survivor was $8,211 per year, of which $4,356 (53%) was attributable to stroke. At the national level, the annual economic burden of informal caregiving associated with stroke among elderly was estimated at $14.2 billion in 2008. Conclusions Recent changes in public health and social support policies recognize the economic burden of informal caregiving. Our estimates reinforce the high economic burden of stroke in the US and provide up-to-date information for policy development and decision-making. PMID:25305152

  14. Collaborative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  15. Trusting Social Media as a Source of Health Information: Online Surveys Comparing the United States, Korea, and Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hayeon; Omori, Kikuko; Kim, Jihyun; Tenzek, Kelly E; Morey Hawkins, Jennifer; Lin, Wan-Ying; Kim, Yong-Chan; Jung, Joo-Young

    2016-03-14

    The Internet has increasingly become a popular source of health information by connecting individuals with health content, experts, and support. More and more, individuals turn to social media and Internet sites to share health information and experiences. Although online health information seeking occurs worldwide, limited empirical studies exist examining cross-cultural differences in perceptions about user-generated, experience-based information compared to expertise-based information sources. To investigate if cultural variations exist in patterns of online health information seeking, specifically in perceptions of online health information sources. It was hypothesized that Koreans and Hongkongers, compared to Americans, would be more likely to trust and use experience-based knowledge shared in social Internet sites, such as social media and online support groups. Conversely, Americans, compared to Koreans and Hongkongers, would value expertise-based knowledge prepared and approved by doctors or professional health providers more. Survey questionnaires were developed in English first and then translated into Korean and Chinese. The back-translation method ensured the standardization of questions. Surveys were administered using a standardized recruitment strategy and data collection methods. A total of 826 participants living in metropolitan areas from the United States (n=301), Korea (n=179), and Hong Kong (n=337) participated in the study. We found significant cultural differences in information processing preferences for online health information. A planned contrast test revealed that Koreans and Hongkongers showed more trust in experience-based health information sources (blogs: t451.50=11.21, Ponline support group: t455.71=9.30, Ponline health information. Further discussion is included regarding effective communication strategies in providing quality health information.

  16. A Collaborative Learning Network Approach to Improvement: The CUSP Learning Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Sallie J; Lofthus, Jennifer; Sawyer, Melinda; Greer, Lee; Opett, Kristin; Reynolds, Catherine; Wyskiel, Rhonda; Peditto, Stephanie; Pronovost, Peter J

    2015-04-01

    Collaborative improvement networks draw on the science of collaborative organizational learning and communities of practice to facilitate peer-to-peer learning, coaching, and local adaption. Although significant improvements in patient safety and quality have been achieved through collaborative methods, insight regarding how collaborative networks are used by members is needed. Improvement Strategy: The Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) Learning Network is a multi-institutional collaborative network that is designed to facilitate peer-to-peer learning and coaching specifically related to CUSP. Member organizations implement all or part of the CUSP methodology to improve organizational safety culture, patient safety, and care quality. Qualitative case studies developed by participating members examine the impact of network participation across three levels of analysis (unit, hospital, health system). In addition, results of a satisfaction survey designed to evaluate member experiences were collected to inform network development. Common themes across case studies suggest that members found value in collaborative learning and sharing strategies across organizational boundaries related to a specific improvement strategy. The CUSP Learning Network is an example of network-based collaborative learning in action. Although this learning network focuses on a particular improvement methodology-CUSP-there is clear potential for member-driven learning networks to grow around other methods or topic areas. Such collaborative learning networks may offer a way to develop an infrastructure for longer-term support of improvement efforts and to more quickly diffuse creative sustainment strategies.

  17. Use and Production of Digital Information and Knowledge in Technical University Education - Co-operation of Faculty and Support Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Kaarina Kairamo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly changing educational landscape is of increasing importance in university teaching. Universities in Finland are responsible for research and education based on research. Traditionally information and support services related to using and producing knowledge, support research, and education has mostly been seen purely from the students´ perspective. Teaching in universities is still a hidden individual activity, and, as such, challenges the support units to reach and interact with the academic community. This paper will review the aspects influencing the use and production of digital information and knowledge in technical university education; examples illustrating the experiences will be given.

  18. 75 FR 16424 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Census Coverage Measurement Final Housing Unit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... will be conducted independent of and not influence the 2010 Census operations. CCM will be conducted to... English language version of the Final Housing Unit Followup form and will be used to collect data and to conduct Quality Control for addresses in CCM stateside sample areas. The D- 1340PR is the Spanish...

  19. 76 FR 28058 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0068, Unitization, Extension of a Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ...: 1010-0068, Unitization, Extension of a Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... collection (1010-0068). SUMMARY: To comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), BOEMRE is inviting... Blundon, 381 Elden Street, MS-4024, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817. Please reference ICR 1010-0068 in...

  20. Collaborative implementation for ecological restoration on US Public Lands: implications for legal context, accountability, and adaptive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, William H; Monroe, Ashley; McCaffrey, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP), established in 2009, encourages collaborative landscape scale ecosystem restoration efforts on United States Forest Service (USFS) lands. Although the USFS employees have experience engaging in collaborative planning, CFLRP requires collaboration in implementation, a domain where little prior experience can be drawn on for guidance. The purpose of this research is to identify the ways in which CFLRP's collaborative participants and agency personnel conceptualize how stakeholders can contribute to implementation on landscape scale restoration projects, and to build theory on dynamics of collaborative implementation in environmental management. This research uses a grounded theory methodology to explore collaborative implementation from the perspectives and experiences of participants in landscapes selected as part of the CFLRP in 2010. Interviewees characterized collaborative implementation as encompassing three different types of activities: prioritization, enhancing treatments, and multiparty monitoring. The paper describes examples of activities in each of these categories and then identifies ways in which collaborative implementation in the context of CFLRP (1) is both hindered and enabled by overlapping legal mandates about agency collaboration, (2) creates opportunities for expanded accountability through informal and relational means, and, (3) creates feedback loops at multiple temporal and spatial scales through which monitoring information, prioritization, and implementation actions shape restoration work both within and across projects throughout the landscape creating more robust opportunities for adaptive management.