WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit students build

  1. Graduate Students Unite! Building an Outreach Program From Scratch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, C.; Labonte, A.

    2005-12-01

    In the spring of 2000, a group of graduate students at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) gathered and declared the need to facilitate participation in science education outreach. The result was the formation of the Scripps Community Outreach Program for Education (SCOPE, http://sioscope.ucsd.edu). SCOPE has been connecting SIO graduate students, faculty, and staff with existing outreach programs in the San Diego area ever since. While many scientists would like to commit some time to helping the general public understand the world around them, they often do not know where to begin. To make this connection, SCOPE holds meetings and operates an email listserv to announce upcoming outreach opportunities and sign up volunteers. Over the years, SCOPE has developed relationships with local science outreach groups, outreach events, schools, and teachers. There are usually at least two volunteer opportunities a month, some of which take place on the SIO campus itself. These opportunities include speaking to senior citizens, participating in a school career day, mentoring National Ocean Science Bowl teams, providing tours of SIO to minority middle and high school students, and just about anything else one can imagine. The opportunities are coordinated by one or two graduate students who graciously volunteer their time to make sure that community's and the scientist's needs are met. To keep such an organization running requires not only networking with the community but also networking within the university as well. It is necessary to keep in contact with other outreach groups on campus as well as the communication and development offices. In addition we have worked closely with the Birch Aquarium at Scripps and have played an important part of the California Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE, http://www.cacosee.net). We believe that SCOPE has been very successful and would like to share the lessons we have learned with interested members of the

  2. Mangroves Build Land. "Mangroves are a Valuable Resource." Grades 7 and 8. A Two Lesson Unit. Student Learning Activity Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, James

    This module is an activity and film-oriented unit focusing on the importance of mangroves in the South Florida ecosystem. The module is part of a series designed to be used by teachers, students, and community members to help them utilize community resources in developing and teaching environmental concepts and responsibility, and in seeking ways…

  3. Building and critiquing qualitative research websites: a cyberspace project to connect undergraduate nursing students in Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teel, Cynthia S; Shaw, Judith A

    2005-01-01

    This project had a dual purpose: 1) to facilitate student learning about qualitative research methods, and 2) to promote collegiality and professional development among senior nursing students in Canada and the United States through the use of distance technology. In each of three project years, students at St. Francis Xavier University (STFX) in Nova Scotia initiated the experience by working in small groups to develop websites about different methodological approaches in qualitative research. Site information included an overview of the selected approach, discussion of trustworthiness issues, citation of journal articles in which authors used the approach, additional references, and some personal information about the student developers. Also working in small groups, University of Kansas students identified and read related research articles, reviewed website information, and responded to the STFX groups about the usefulness of site information in increasing understanding of qualitative methods and using the information for evaluation of research. The experience promoted active use of qualitative research concepts and facilitated the development of skills in evaluating research article content and website content. Participation in the activity fostered positive perceptions about the value and use of research and helped students appreciate the similarities in courses, programs, and professional requirements and values among international peers.

  4. Commercial Buildings High Performance Rooftop Unit Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commercial Building Energy Alliances (CBEAs) are releasing a new design specification for high performance rooftop air conditioning units (RTUs). Manufacturers who develop RTUs based on this new specification will find strong interest from the commercial sector due to the energy and financial savings.

  5. Code Compliant School Buildings Boost Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B. Lumpkin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of the focus in the literature in raising student achievement has included parental involvement, principal leadership, quality of instruction, students’ socioeconomic status, curriculum, and use of technology. Limited empirical research relates the condition of the school building as a variable that affects student achievement. Furthermore, there is no research that has examined the impact of building codes on achievement outcomes in the state of Florida. This research determined whether academic achievement of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students as measured by the mathematics and reading subtests of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT increased in new school buildings compliant to the 2000 Florida State Requirements for Educational Facilities. A causal-comparative design determined whether the independent variables, old and new school building influenced student achievement as measured by students’ FCAT mathematics and reading subtest scores. The control group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in old buildings. The experimental group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in new buildings. Transition from an old school into a new school was the treatment. Two hypotheses were formulated for testing and the research question for the inquiry was whether the percentage of students passing the FCAT mathematics and reading subtests increases after transitioning from an old school building into a new 2000 UBC (Uniform Building Code compliant facility.

  6. Team-Building Tools for Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Diana; Donelan, Joseph G.

    2003-01-01

    Explains why college students need teamwork skills. Discusses how instructors can help develop those skills and design projects to improve them. Provides an action plan and team-building tools. (Author/SK)

  7. Tools students need to be skillful writers building better sentences

    CERN Document Server

    Hostmeyer, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    Build stronger writers one sentence at a time.Imagine a classroom full of enthusiastic student writers, capable of reviewing their own work with a critical eye, then crafting a polished, convincing piece. This is possible, if you take writing instruction down to its basic building block-a solid sentence-and advance from there. Phyllis Hostmeyer can show you how with Tools Students Need to Be Skillful Writers, your blueprint for effective writing instruction and unit development. Packed with lessons across grades 3-12, this indispensable

  8. Personalized, Programed Philosophy: Helping Students Build Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Gregory A.; Bailey, George W. S.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a philosophy course offered at East Carolina University through the Special Studies Program for marginally-admissable students. The program uses selected readings from Russell, James, Sartre, and others and the Personalized System of Instruction to build critical thinking, reading, and study skills, while introducing students to the…

  9. Team Building Activities for Young Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Team building activities are an excellent way to challenge students and teach them the critical communication and problem solving skills that encourage trust, empathy, and ability to work together. They create an atmosphere that enhances the ability to meet fitness and skill goals because students, regardless of skill level, will possess increased…

  10. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-30

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in U.S., including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in the U.S.

  11. Intentionally Building Rapport with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcher, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Developing rapport with students is important. Carson (1996) found that when alumni reflected on professors they had encountered 30 years ago, the quality most frequently associated with effective teachers was this: their attitude toward and relationship with students. In this article, the author shares the positive consequences of intentionally…

  12. Electrical. Teacher's Guide. Building Maintenance Units of Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This teaching guide on electrical building maintenance, one in a series of six publications designed for building maintenance instructors in Texas, is designed to give students an understanding of electricity in order to know how to make basic repairs to the electrical systems in a building. Introductory material provides teachers with information…

  13. Building Citizenship Skills in Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blozis, Cathy; Scalise, Ralph; Waterman, Cheryl E.; Wells, Melodie

    An action research project implemented a program for the development of citizenship, cultural awareness, and positive character attributes. Targeted population consisted of middle and high school students in several growing, middle class communities located in northern Illinois. Problems of lack of awareness and sensitivity are documented through…

  14. Building the United States National Vegetation Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, S.B.; Faber-Langendoen, D.; Jennings, M.; Keeler-Wolf, T.; Loucks, O.; Peet, R.; Roberts, D.; McKerrow, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Vegetation Subcommittee, the Ecological Society of America Panel on Vegetation Classification, and NatureServe have worked together to develop the United States National Vegetation Classification (USNVC). The current standard was accepted in 2008 and fosters consistency across Federal agencies and non-federal partners for the description of each vegetation concept and its hierarchical classification. The USNVC is structured as a dynamic standard, where changes to types at any level may be proposed at any time as new information comes in. But, because much information already exists from previous work, the NVC partners first established methods for screening existing types to determine their acceptability with respect to the 2008 standard. Current efforts include a screening process to assign confidence to Association and Group level descriptions, and a review of the upper three levels of the classification. For the upper levels especially, the expectation is that the review process includes international scientists. Immediate future efforts include the review of remaining levels and the development of a proposal review process.

  15. Cornerstones: Literacy Units Ready for Teachers, Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasko, Jennifer; Donahue, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Every day, teachers face the time-consuming task of adapting materials from curricula that do not meet their students' needs or match their learning styles. This article discusses ready-made literacy units specifically designed for teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students. The units were part of the Cornerstones Project, an activity of the…

  16. Modelling the heat dynamics of a residential building unit: Application to Norwegian buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.W.U. Perera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the development of a continuous time mathematical heating model for a building unit based on the first principles. The model is described in terms of the state space variables, and a lumped parameter approach is used to represent the room air temperature and air density using mass and energy balances. The one-dimensional heat equation in cartesian coordinates and spherical coordinates is discretized in order to describe the thermic characteristics of the layers of the building framework and furniture respectively. The developed model is implemented in a MATLAB environment, and mainly a theoretical approach is used to validate it for a residential building unit. Model is also validated using experimental data for a limited period. Short term simulations are used to test the energy efficiency of the building unit with regard to factors such as the operation of heat sources, ventilation, occupancy patterns of people, weather conditions, features of the building structure and heat recovery. The results are consistent and are obtained considerably fast, implying that the model can be used further in modelling the heating dynamics of complex architectural designs and in control applications.

  17. Community United Methodist Church solar classroom building. Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The new building reported is formed by three 20 foot by 70 foot modules, each with the long axis in the east-west direction and with a shed roof over each. Solar features include daylighting, fixed insulating shades over the clerestory windows to minimize heat loss during the winter, some operable clerestory windows for ventillation, thermal mass in the form of a concrete floor slab and dark concrete masonry walls on the north end of interior space, ceiling fans for air circulation and sensible cooling, and a large exhaust fan for night cooling. Backup heating is provided by a natural gas furnace, and an air-conditioning unit is included primarily for humidity control in the summer. The building is highly insulated and incorporates designs which minimize air infiltration. A cost analysis for construction of the building is included. (LEW)

  18. Dedicated Education Units: Partnerships for Building Leadership Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuska, Lee A

    2015-07-01

    To enable nurses to lead in health care transformation, nursing education must include opportunities for developing leadership, as well as clinical competencies. Dedicated education units (DEUs) provide supportive environments for competency development in undergraduate students. This study's aim was to explore the effects of a DEU experience on the leadership development of baccalaureate nursing students. A mixed-methods design included a quantitative strand, using a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest, multisite design with control groups and a qualitative strand using focus groups. Students in the DEUs demonstrated significant increases (p leadership behaviors, as measured by the Student Leadership Practice Inventory. Focus group themes illuminate how the experiences of the students contributed to their leadership growth. Findings suggest that the DEU experience may promote enhanced undergraduate leadership competency development. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. United Arab Emirates students at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    During the last two months, CERN played host to more than a hundred young physicists who attended the summer student programme. However, the difference in culture has been more pronounced for some than others: among this year's attendees have been five female theoretical physics and medical physics students from the United Arab Emirates.

  20. AQA A2 Chemistry Student Unit Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Student Unit Guides are perfect for revision. Each guide is written by an examiner and explains the unit requirements, summarises the relevant unit content and includes a series of specimen questions and answers. There are three sections to each guide:. Introduction - includes advice on how to use the guide, an explanation of the skills being tested by the assessment objectives, an outline of the unit or module and, depending on the unit, suggestions for how to revise effectively and prepare for the examination questions. Content Guidance - provides an examiner's overview of the module's key t

  1. Edexcel AS Physics Student Unit Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Student Unit Guides are perfect for revision. Each guide is written by an examiner and explains the unit requirements, summarises the relevant unit content and includes a series of specimen questions and answers. There are three sections to each guide:. Introduction - includes advice on how to use the guide, an explanation of the skills being tested by the assessment objectives, an outline of the unit or module and, depending on the unit, suggestions for how to revise effectively and prepare for the examination questions. Content Guidance - provides an examiner's overview of the module's key t

  2. Edexcel A2 Physics Student Unit Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Student Unit Guides are perfect for revision. Each guide is written by an examiner and explains the unit requirements, summarises the relevant unit content and includes a series of specimen questions and answers. There are three sections to each guide:. Introduction - includes advice on how to use the guide, an explanation of the skills being tested by the assessment objectives, an outline of the unit or module and, depending on the unit, suggestions for how to revise effectively and prepare for the examination questions. Content Guidance - provides an examiner's overview of the module's key t

  3. Auto Body Repair. Supplementary Units. Instructor Key and Student Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Linda; Muench, James F., Ed.

    These supplementary units are designed to help students with special needs learn and apply auto body repair skills. The material specifically supplements the Auto Body Repair Curriculum Guide (University of Missouri-Columbia 1988), and is intended for instructors serving the occupational needs of various categories of disadvantaged and handicapped…

  4. Low energy building with novel cooling unit using PCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber, Samar

    2012-02-13

    This thesis aims to reduce the energy consumption as well as greenhouse gases to the environment without negatively affecting the thermal comfort. In the present work, thermal, energetic and economic impacts of employing passive solar systems combined with energy conservation systems have been investigated. These energy systems have been integrated with a typical residential building located in three different climate zones in Europe and Middle East regions.Hour-by-hour energy computer simulations have been carried out using TRNSYS and INSEL programs to analyze the performance of integrated energy systems. Furthermore, IESU software module has been developed to simulate a novel cooling unit using Phase Change Material (PCM). This unit is named as Indirect Evaporative and Storage Unit (IESU). Thereafter, complete economic equations for the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) criterion have been formulated. Furthermore this criterion has been optimized for different variables as a function of thermal parameters and economic figures from local markets. An optimum design of both residential buildings and energy systems has great impact on energy consumption. In fact, results showed that the energy consumption is reduced by 85.62%, 86.33% and 74.05% in Berlin, Amman and Aqaba, respectively. Moreover, the LCC criterion is reduced by 41.85% in Berlin, 19.21% in Amman and 15.22% in Aqaba.The macro economic analysis shows that once this research is applied in one million typical residential buildings in the selected climate zones, the annual avoided CO{sub 2} emissions are estimated to be about 5.7 million Tons in Berlin. In Aqaba, around 2.96 million Tons CO{sub 2} emissions will be saved annually and in Amman about 2.98 million Tons will be reduced. The payback period from the achieved saving is 18 years, 11 years and 8.6 years in Amman, Aqaba and Berlin, respectively.

  5. Building Strong Teacher-Student Relationships in Pluralistic Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    A positive teacher-student relationship is a critical component of an engaging climate in pluralistic music classrooms. This article defines and gives examples of five strategies for building positive, cross-cultural teacher-student relationships. Teachers who take responsibility for developing these relationships begin by becoming culturally…

  6. Personal Competency: A Framework for Building Students' Capacity to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Sam

    2014-01-01

    A chief purpose of schooling is for students to master the knowledge and skills contained in the curriculum. Schools, however, can also intentionally build personal competencies that are necessary for students' success in school, the purposeful navigation of life's challenges, and the pursuit of personal interests and ambitions. A personal…

  7. Building Strong Teacher-Student Relationships in Pluralistic Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    A positive teacher-student relationship is a critical component of an engaging climate in pluralistic music classrooms. This article defines and gives examples of five strategies for building positive, cross-cultural teacher-student relationships. Teachers who take responsibility for developing these relationships begin by becoming culturally…

  8. Elementary Functions, Student's Text, Unit 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    Unit 21 in the SMSG secondary school mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics in elementary functions: functions, polynomial functions, tangents to graphs of polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and circular functions. Appendices discuss set notation, mathematical induction, significance of…

  9. Building Multicultural Residential Communities: A Model for Training Student Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Taryn; Thompson, Monita C.; Boynton, Trelawny

    2013-01-01

    The growing diversity and changing demographics within the United States increases the importance of students developing skills to engage across identity difference. The purpose of this chapter is to describe how a pre-employment course for student staff members is used as a multicultural intervention training to provide students with the…

  10. Students build glovebox at Space Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Students in the Young Astronaut Program at the Coca-Cola Space Science Center in Columbus, GA, constructed gloveboxes using the new NASA Student Glovebox Education Guide. The young astronauts used cardboard copier paper boxes as the heart of the glovebox. The paper boxes transformed into gloveboxes when the students pasted poster-pictures of an actual NASA microgravity science glovebox inside and outside of the paper boxes. The young astronauts then added holes for gloves and removable transparent top covers, which completed the construction of the gloveboxes. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  11. Developing policies for green buildings: what can the United States learn from the Netherlands?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Retzlaff

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Political jurisdictions in the United States have begun to develop plans that address green buildings, a topic on which the Netherlands has extensive experience. This article analyzes the literature on Dutch green buildings to look for lessons that might be relevant for the development of polices in the United States. Through a metasynthesis of seventeen studies on green building policies in the Netherlands, the study identifies patterns in the literature and creates a holistic interpretation. These data are compared with the literature on green building policies in the United States. The article concludes that guidance from the federal government?including a stronger research agenda for green building policy issues?could help spur innovation. Reliance on voluntary green building certification has very limited potential and stronger regulations are needed in the United States to minimize the environmental impacts of buildings. A flexible, broad policy system is also required.

  12. Robotics Intrigue Middle School Students and Build STEM Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Michael

    2013-01-01

    As science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education demands greater integration across all subject areas, technology teachers can showcase many of the cross-curricular projects already occurring inside their classrooms that intrigue students and build their STEM skills. Robotics, just one of those projects, has become an excellent…

  13. Robotics Intrigue Middle School Students and Build STEM Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Michael

    2013-01-01

    As science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education demands greater integration across all subject areas, technology teachers can showcase many of the cross-curricular projects already occurring inside their classrooms that intrigue students and build their STEM skills. Robotics, just one of those projects, has become an excellent…

  14. Commentary: Building Web Research Strategies for Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents web research strategies for teachers and students to use in building Dramatic Event, Historical Biography, and Influential Literature wiki pages for history/social studies learning. Dramatic Events refer to milestone or turning point moments in history. Historical Biographies and Influential Literature pages feature…

  15. 24 CFR 983.56 - Cap on number of PBV units in each building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cap on number of PBV units in each... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PROJECT-BASED VOUCHER (PBV) PROGRAM Selection of PBV Owner Proposals § 983.56 Cap on number of PBV units in each building. (a) 25 percent per building cap. Except as provided in paragraph (b...

  16. Soil Conservation Unit for the Advanced Crop Production and Marketing Course. Student Reference. AGDEX 570.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bob R.; And Others

    This student reference booklet is designed to accompany lessons outlined in the companion instructor's guide on soil conservation. The soil conservation unit builds on competencies gained in Agricultural Science I and II. Informative material is provided for these eight lessons: benefits of conservation, land utilization, how soils are eroded,…

  17. Veterinary Students' Perspectives on Resilience and Resilience-Building Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Jenny E; Bartram, David J

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, resilience has been lauded as a valuable, even necessary, facet of an effective veterinary practitioner. This study describes a mixed-methods research exploration of the impact of a self-care and mental well-being teaching intervention on the self-reported resilience of 105 first-year veterinary students enrolled at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey, UK. Quantitative data were obtained through a questionnaire, the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC 10), which students completed before and after the teaching intervention. The median total score on the scale increased from 27 (IQR=25-30) to 29 (IQR=26-32) (pveterinary students build greater awareness of resilience, and potentially support their development of a more resilient approach in their personal and professional lives. In this study, veterinary students felt that resilience training was a valuable addition to the veterinary curriculum, and that resilience likely plays an important role in achieving a successful veterinary career. The study also suggested that veterinary students utilize a variety of different resilience-building strategies, including drawing on past experiences, seeking help from support networks, and developing an ability to change their perspectives.

  18. Amino Acid Molecular Units: Building Primary and Secondary Protein Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido R. Silva

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to guarantee the learning quality and suitable knowledge  use  about structural biology, it is fundamental to  exist, since the beginning of  students’ formation, the possibility of clear visualization of biomolecule structures. Nevertheless, the didactic books can only bring  schematic  drawings; even more elaborated figures and graphic computation  do not permit the necessary interaction.  The representation of three-dimensional molecular structures with ludic models, built with representative units, have supplied to the students and teachers a successfully experience to  visualize such structures and correlate them to the real molecules.  The design and applicability of the representative units were discussed with researchers and teachers before mould implementation.  In this stage  it  will be presented the  developed  kit  containing the  representative  plastic parts of the main amino acids.  The kit can demonstrate the interaction among the amino acids  functional groups  (represented by colors, shapes,  sizes and  the peptidic bonds between them  facilitating the assembly and visuali zation of the primary and secondary protein structure.  The models were designed for  Ca,  amino,  carboxyl groups  and  hydrogen. The  lateral chains have  well defined models that represent their geometrical shape.  The completed kit set  will be presented in this meeting (patent requested.  In the last phase of the project will be realized  an effective evaluation  of the kit  as a facilitative didactic tool of the teaching/learning process in the Structural Molecular Biology area.

  19. Medical students as EMTs: skill building, confidence and professional formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kwiatkowski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The first course of the medical curriculum at the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, From the Person to the Professional: Challenges, Privileges and Responsibilities, provides an innovative early clinical immersion. The course content specific to the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT curriculum was developed using the New York State Emergency Medical Technician curriculum. Students gain early legitimate clinical experience and practice clinical skills as team members in the pre-hospital environment. We hypothesized this novel curriculum would increase students’ confidence in their ability to perform patient care skills and enhance students’ comfort with team-building skills early in their training. Methods: Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from first-year medical students (n=97 through a survey developed to assess students’ confidence in patient care and team-building skills. The survey was completed prior to medical school, during the final week of the course, and at the end of their first year. A paired-samples t-test was conducted to compare self-ratings on 12 patient care and 12 team-building skills before and after the course, and a theme analysis was conducted to examine open-ended responses. Results: Following the course, student confidence in patient care skills showed a significant increase from baseline (p<0.05 for all identified skills. Student confidence in team-building skills showed a significant increase (p<0.05 in 4 of the 12 identified skills. By the end of the first year, 84% of the first-year students reported the EMT curriculum had ‘some impact’ to ‘great impact’ on their patient care skills, while 72% reported the EMT curriculum had ‘some impact’ to ‘great impact’ on their team-building skills. Conclusions: The incorporation of EMT training early in a medical school curriculum provides students with meaningful clinical experiences that increase their self

  20. Demystifying the Chemistry Literature: Building Information Literacy in First-Year Chemistry Students through Student-Centered Learning and Experiment Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehl, Margaret; Pan, Denise; Ferrer-Vinent, Ignacio J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes curriculum modules developed for first-year general chemistry laboratory courses that use scientific literature and creative experiment design to build information literacy in a student-centered learning environment. Two curriculum units are discussed: Exploring Scientific Literature and Design Your Own General Chemistry…

  1. Student housing unit in a floor area without corridors

    OpenAIRE

    Cekić Nikola; Vasov Miomir; Bjelić Igor

    2013-01-01

    This paper treats the issues of position and urbarchitectonic-functional organization of a housing unit in a floor area without corridors in a student hostel. The authors advocate a new, more rational and functional concept in which the student room is not in direct contact with the corridor communication, but belongs to the housing unit, student apartment for 4-6 users. In a more rational organized volume, the living of the students is more comfortable and has a different character. Th...

  2. Secondary building units, nets and bonding in the chemistry of metal–organic frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Tranchemontagne, David J.; Mendoza-Cortés, José L.; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2009-01-01

    This critical review presents a comprehensive study of transition-metal carboxylate clusters which may serve as secondary building units (SBUs) towards construction and synthesis of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). We describe the geometries of 131 SBUs, their connectivity and composition. This contribution presents a comprehensive list of the wide variety of transition-metal carboxylate clusters which may serve as secondary building units (SBUs) in the construction and synthesis of metal–org...

  3. Real Estate Across the United States (REXUS) Inventory (Building)

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — Real Estate Across the United States (REXUS) is the primary tool used by PBS to track and manage the government's real property assets and to store inventory data,...

  4. Infusing Sustainability Across Disciplines to Build Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; O'Connell, K.; McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Larsen, K.; Kent, M.; Manduca, C. A.; Egger, A. E.; Blockstein, D.; Mogk, D. W.; Taber, J.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing relevance and effective communication are key mechanisms for building student and community engagement in a topic and can be used to promote the importance of working across disciplines to solve problems. Sustainability, including the impacts of and responses to climate change, is an inherently interdisciplinary issue and can be infused across courses and curricula in a variety of ways. Key topics such as climate change, hazards, and food, water, and energy production and sustainability are relevant to a wide audience and can be used to build student engagement. Using real-world examples, service learning, and focusing on the local environment may further boost engagement by establishing relevance between sustainability issues and students' lives. Communication plays a key role in the exchange of information across disciplines and allows for a more holistic approach to tackling the complex climate and sustainability issues our society faces. It has the power to bridge gaps, break down disciplinary silos, and build connections among diverse audiences with a wide range of expertise, including scientists, policy-makers, stakeholders, and the general public. It also aids in planning and preparation for, response to, and mitigation of issues related to sustainability, including the impacts of climate change, to lessen the detrimental effects of unavoidable events such as sea level rise and extreme weather events. Several workshops from the InTeGrate and On the Cutting Edge projects brought together educators and practitioners from a range of disciplines including geoscience, engineering, social science, and more to encourage communication and collaboration across disciplines. They supported networking, community-building, and sharing of best practices for preparing our students for a sustainable future, both in and out of the workplace, and across disciplines. Interdisciplinary teams are also working together to author curricular materials that highlight

  5. Occupational therapy students' attitudes towards inclusion education in Australia, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Keli; Brown, Ted; Peyton, Claudia G; Rodger, Sylvia; Huang, Yan-Hua; Wu, Chin-Yu; Watson, Callie; Stagnitti, Karen; Hutton, Eve; Casey, Jackie; Hong, Chia Swee

    2010-03-01

    This international, cross-cultural study investigated the attitudes of occupational therapy students from Australia, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan towards inclusive education for students with disabilities. The possible impact of professional education on students' attitudes was also explored. A total of 485 students from 11 entry-level occupational therapy education programmes from Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States and Taiwan participated in the study. Among them, 264 were freshmen (first-year students) and 221 were seniors (final-year students). Data collected from a custom-designed questionnaire were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. In general, the occupational therapy students reported having positive attitudes towards inclusion. Considerable differences, however, existed among the student groups from the four countries. Professional education appeared to have a significant impact on students' attitudes towards inclusion from first year to senior year. Although students were in favour of inclusion, they also cautioned that their support for inclusive practices depended on various factors such as adequate preparation, support and assistance to students with disabilities. Limitations of the study included the small, convenience sample and different degree structures of the participating programmes. Future research studies need to compare occupational therapy students' attitudes with students from other health care professions. A longitudinal study on the impact of the professional education programme on students' attitudes towards inclusive education is warranted.

  6. Challenges Facing Chinese International Students Studying in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Yuerong; Renes, Susan L.; McMurrow, Samantha; Simpson, Joni; Strange, Anthony T.

    2017-01-01

    Chinese international students often find it challenging to adjust to attending college in the United States (US). There is limited research addressing Chinese international college students' adjustment in the US. Drawing on what literature exists combined with research addressing Chinese immigrants' transition and international students'…

  7. Developing Student's Notion of Measurement Unit for Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuberta, Kurnia Rahmi; Zulkardi; Hartono, Yusuf; van Galen, Frans

    2011-01-01

    Many researchers found that students have difficulties in understanding area measurement. Students mostly focus on applying formula to find the area of certain shapes without knowing what the area is and why the formula works. It is important for the students to know what attribute being measured and to construct the unit for area measurement.…

  8. International Students' Psychological and Sociocultural Adaptation in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumer, Seda

    2009-01-01

    International students constitute an important cohort in the United States (U.S.) colleges and universities. In order for the U.S. colleges and universities to better accommodate the significant number of international students and to recruit them in the future, it is critical to identify factors that influence these students' acculturation and…

  9. Comparison of building energy use data between the United States and China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Jianjun; Hong, Tianzhen; Shen, Qi; Feng, Wei; Yang, Le; Im, Piljae; Lu, Alison; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-10-30

    Buildings in the United States and China consumed 41percent and 28percent of the total primary energy in 2011, respectively. Good energy data are the cornerstone to understanding building energy performance and supporting research, design, operation, and policy making for low energy buildings. This paper presents initial outcomes from a joint research project under the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency. The goal is to decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders. This paper first reviews and compares several popular existing building energy monitoring systems in both countries. Next a standard energy data model is presented. A detailed, measured building energy data comparison was conducted for a few office buildings in both countries. Finally issues of data collection, quality, sharing, and analysis methods are discussed. It was found that buildings in both countries performed very differently, had potential for deep energy retrofit, but that different efficiency measures should apply.

  10. CCEA as physics student unit guide unit 1 : forces, energy and electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Cosgrove, Ferguson

    2014-01-01

    Perfect for revision, these guides explain the unit requirements, summarise the content and include specimen questions with graded answers. Each full-colour New Edition Student Unit Guide provides ideal preparation for your unit exam:. - Feel confident you understand the unit: each guide comprehensively covers the unit content and includes topic summaries, knowledge check questions and a reference index. - Get to grips with the exam requirements: the specific skills on which you will be tested are explored and explained. - Analyse exam-style questions: graded student responses will help you fo

  11. Building Human Rights, Peace and Development within the United Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Guillermet Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available War and peace have perpetually alternated in history. Consequently, peace has always been seen as an endless project, even a dream, to be in brotherhood realized by everyone across the earth. Since the XVII century the elimination of war and armed conflict has been a political and humanitarian objective of all nations in the world. Both the League of Nations and the United Nations were conceived with the spirit of eliminating the risk of war through the promotion of peace, cooperation and solidarity among Nations. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the subsequent human rights instruments were drafted with a sincere aspiration of promoting the value of peace and human rights worldwide. International practice shows the close linkage between the disregard of human rights and the existence of war and armed conflict. It follows that the role of human rights in the prevention of war and armed conflict is very important. Since 2008 the Human Rights Council has been working on the ‘Promotion of the Right of Peoples to Peace.’ Pursuant resolutions 20/15 and 23/16 the Council decided firstly to establish, and secondly to extend the mandate of the Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG aimed at progressively negotiating a draft United Nations declaration on the right to peace. The OEGW welcomed in its second session (July 2014 the approach of the Chairperson-Rapporteur, which is basically based on the relationship between the right to life and human rights, peace and development.

  12. Teaching Students to Build Historical Buildings in Virtual Reality: A Didactic Strategy for Learning History of Art in Secondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi Biosca Frontera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a summary and conclusions of a field study carried out in a secondary education classroom with the aim of experimenting and observing how 13-year-old students learn the history of architecture by using complex virtual reality software. Within the framework ofautonomous and active learning, students act as builders of some of the historic landmarks studied during the course. Thus, students learn, for instance, the features of Romanesque and Gothic architecture as they are asked to build block by block –and with the aid of a computer equipped with virtual reality software– various buildings of the periods concerned. The student-centered approach which concentrates on students’ learning also allows for a high degreeof student autonomy and creativity. At the same time, this method fosters interactivity, and the spectacular results of virtual recreation and its stimulating activities are highly motivatingand contribute to improve student concentration and achievement alike.

  13. Integrity Analysis of Turbine Building for the MSLB Using GOTHIC code for Wolsong NPP Unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Bong-Jin; Jin, Dong-Sik; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Han, Sang-Koo [ACT, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hoon; Kho, Dong-Wook [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A break in the piping between the steam generators and the turbine can lead to rapid loss of secondary circuit inventory. A break inside the turbine building leads to pressure differentials between different areas of the turbine building. In order to improve the environmental protection of various components within the turbine building, a wall has been erected which effectively separates the area in which these components are housed from the rest of the turbine building. Relief panels installed in the turbine building ensure that the pressure differential across the wall would be less than that required to jeopardize the wall integrity. The turbine building service wing is excluded from the scope of this analysis. It is further assumed that any doors in the heavy wall are as strong as the wall itself, with no gaps or leakage around the doors. For the full scope safety analysis of turbine building for Wolsong NPP unit 2, input decks for the various objectives, which can be read by GOTHIC 7.2a, are developed and tested for the steady state simulation. The input data files provide simplified representations of the geometric layout of the turbine building (volumes, dimensions, flow paths, doors, panels, etc.) and the performance characteristics of the various turbine building subsystems.

  14. Factors related to building loss due to wildfires in the conterminous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Patricia M; Stewart, Susan I; Keuler, Nicholas S; Clayton, Murray K; Mockrin, Miranda H; Bar-Massada, Avi; Syphard, Alexandra D; Radeloff, Volker C

    2016-10-01

    Wildfire is globally an important ecological disturbance affecting biochemical cycles and vegetation composition, but also puts people and their homes at risk. Suppressing wildfires has detrimental ecological effects and can promote larger and more intense wildfires when fuels accumulate, which increases the threat to buildings in the wildland-urban interface (WUI). Yet, when wildfires occur, typically only a small proportion of the buildings within the fire perimeter are lost, and the question is what determines which buildings burn. Our goal was to examine which factors are related to building loss when a wildfire occurs throughout the United States. We were particularly interested in the relative roles of vegetation, topography, and the spatial arrangement of buildings, and how their respective roles vary among ecoregions. We analyzed all fires that occurred within the conterminous United States from 2000 to 2010 and digitized which buildings were lost and which survived according to Google Earth historical imagery. We modeled the occurrence as well as the percentage of buildings lost within clusters using logistic and linear regression. Overall, variables related to topography and the spatial arrangement of buildings were more frequently present in the best 20 regression models than vegetation-related variables. In other words, specific locations in the landscape have a higher fire risk, and certain development patterns can exacerbate that risk. Fire policies and prevention efforts focused on vegetation management are important, but insufficient to solve current wildfire problems. Furthermore, the factors associated with building loss varied considerably among ecoregions suggesting that fire policy applied uniformly across the United States will not work equally well in all regions and that efforts to adapt communities to wildfires must be regionally tailored.

  15. CCEA AS unit 2 physics student guide

    CERN Document Server

    Cosgrove, Ferguson

    2016-01-01

    Reinforce students' understanding throughout their course; clear topic summaries with sample questions and answers will improve exam technique to achieve higher grades. Written by examiners and teachers, Student Guides:· Help students identify what they need to know with a concise summary of the topics examined in the AS and A-level specification· Consolidate understanding with exam tips and knowledge check questions· Provide opportunities to improve exam technique with sample graded answers to exam-style questions· Develop independent learning and research skills · Provi

  16. Energy consumption trends of multi-unit residential buildings in the city of Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Clarissa

    The purpose of this research is to determine the average energy intensity of multi-unit residential buildings (MURBs) in Toronto, and evaluate whether certain building characteristics influence energy intensity. This information is particularly important in the Toronto market. Relative to the city's population, Toronto has an unusually high proportion of MURBs with more than half of residential dwellings in apartment buildings. Additionally, Toronto MURBs are significant consumers of energy and produce an estimated 1.3M tonnes of CO2e each year. The ultimate goal is to assess the most efficient building retrofit measures. Energy consumption data for Toronto MURBs were collected and weather normalized. Correlations between the energy data and the building characteristics were examined. Window characteristics and heating system type were found to have the most significant influence on energy intensity. Establishing energy consumption characteristics of MURBs is the first step towards improving the energy efficiency of Toronto's MURBs stock.

  17. Students' Accuracy of Measurement Estimation: Context, Units, and Logical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail; Gardner, Grant E.; Taylor, Amy R.; Forrester, Jennifer H.; Andre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study examined students' accuracy of measurement estimation for linear distances, different units of measure, task context, and the relationship between accuracy estimation and logical thinking. Middle school students completed a series of tasks that included estimating the length of various objects in different contexts and completed a test…

  18. Students' Accuracy of Measurement Estimation: Context, Units, and Logical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail; Gardner, Grant E.; Taylor, Amy R.; Forrester, Jennifer H.; Andre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study examined students' accuracy of measurement estimation for linear distances, different units of measure, task context, and the relationship between accuracy estimation and logical thinking. Middle school students completed a series of tasks that included estimating the length of various objects in different contexts and completed a test…

  19. Foreign Students and Scholars and the United States Tax System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David, II.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1992-93 school year more than 425,000 foreign students were studying in the United States. In addition, hundreds of foreign nationals were in the United States as visiting research scholars, lecturers, and professors. Offers a guide to help foreign nationals comply with the tax system while affording them the least possible tax…

  20. Brown-Skinner Model for Building Trust with At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald; Skinner, Desiree A.

    2007-01-01

    Building trust with at-risk students is a challenge for all educators. Taking a personal interest in each student is where educators need to begin. Creating meaningful communication with at-risk students shows caring for the students as individuals, and allows them to be more themselves. The authors propose that following, and mastering, the five…

  1. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings: student workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    This workbook parallels the basic manual, providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings consisting of three parts: understanding and practicing energy conservation in buildings; determining amount of energy lost or gained in a building; and determining which practices are most efficient and installing materials. A teacher guide is available to answer questions in the student workbook related to these subjects.

  2. Motivating College Students' Learning English for Specific Purposes Courses through Corpus Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin-Fang

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine how to motivate technical college students to learn English for specific purposes (ESP) courses through corpus building and enhance their language proficiency during the coursework for their majors. This study explores corpus building skills, how to simplify ESP courses by corpus building for English as second…

  3. Students' Attitudes towards Rapport-Building Traits and Practices in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert Demmon

    2012-01-01

    This research was a triangulated study of student attitudes towards instructors' rapport-building traits and their preferences amongst instructors' rapport-building practices in online learning environments. Participants were undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in courses within an educational technology program at a central Texas…

  4. Business Students' Perception of Sales Careers: Differences between Students in Switzerland, Turkey, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Fahri; Quigley, Charles; Bingham, Frank; Hari, Juerg; Nasir, Aslihan

    2014-01-01

    This research measures perceptual differences between sales and sales careers among business students studying in the United States, Switzerland, and Turkey. Earlier studies indicate that selling and a sales career are not viewed favorably by students in the United States and several other countries. This study expands on prior studies by…

  5. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  6. Aulice to Build 1,200,000 Units/Y All- steel Tires Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zao

    2012-01-01

    To adapt to the rapid development of automobile industry and to meet the market demand on high- performance tires, upon investigation, Hubei Aulice Tire Co., Ltd. intends to build all-steel radial tire production project with the output of 1,200,000 units per year.

  7. New Hydrogen Bonded Supramolecular Hydrogels Formed through Gelating Two Isomeric Building Units Simultaneously

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Wei WU; Li Ming TANG; Kai CHEN; Liang YAN; Yu Jiang WANG

    2006-01-01

    New hydrogen bonded supramolecular hydrogels were formed through simultaneously gelating two isomeric building units, 4-oxo-4-(2-pyridinylamino)butanoic acid (G1) and 4-oxo-4-(3-pyridinylamino)butanoic acid (G2) at various molar ratios in water.

  8. Using State Student Unit Record Data to Increase Community College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewell, Peter; Jenkins, Davis

    2008-01-01

    This chapter examines lessons learned by states that are using student unit record (SUR) data to improve outcomes for community college students and recommends steps states can take to strengthen their use of SUR databases to benefit students and communities. (Contains 1 exhibit.)

  9. Computer-aided modeling of aluminophosphate zeolites as packings of building units

    KAUST Repository

    Peskov, Maxim

    2012-03-22

    New building schemes of aluminophosphate molecular sieves from packing units (PUs) are proposed. We have investigated 61 framework types discovered in zeolite-like aluminophosphates and have identified important PU combinations using a recently implemented computational algorithm of the TOPOS package. All PUs whose packing completely determines the overall topology of the aluminophosphate framework were described and catalogued. We have enumerated 235 building models for the aluminophosphates belonging to 61 zeolite framework types, from ring- or cage-like PU clusters. It is indicated that PUs can be considered as precursor species in the zeolite synthesis processes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Profiles of Airborne Fungi in Buildings and Outdoor Environments in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Brian G.; Kirkland, Kimberly H.; Flanders, W. Dana; Morris, George K.

    2002-01-01

    We examined 12,026 fungal air samples (9,619 indoor samples and 2,407 outdoor samples) from 1,717 buildings located across the United States; these samples were collected during indoor air quality investigations performed from 1996 to 1998. For all buildings, both indoor and outdoor air samples were collected with an Andersen N6 sampler. The culturable airborne fungal concentrations in indoor air were lower than those in outdoor air. The fungal levels were highest in the fall and summer and l...

  11. A Dynamic Analysis of Social Capital-Building of International and UK Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienties, Bart; Johan, Novie; Jindal-Snape, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Although many international students experience transitional issues, most research assumes these issues will disappear over time. Using principles of social capital theory, this study addressed whether after three years of study students were able to build multi-national and host social capital links. In this quantitative study of 81 students from…

  12. A Dynamic Analysis of Social Capital-Building of International and UK Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienties, Bart; Johan, Novie; Jindal-Snape, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Although many international students experience transitional issues, most research assumes these issues will disappear over time. Using principles of social capital theory, this study addressed whether after three years of study students were able to build multi-national and host social capital links. In this quantitative study of 81 students from…

  13. Using a Capability Maturity Model to Build on the Generational Approach to Student Engagement Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, K.; Clarke, J.; Stoodley, I.; Creagh, T.

    2015-01-01

    The generational approach to conceptualising first-year student learning behaviour has made a useful contribution to understanding student engagement. It has an explicit focus on student behaviour and we suggest that a Capability Maturity Model interpretation may provide a complementary extension of that understanding as it builds on the…

  14. Contemplating the Future: Building Student Resilience in Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, E.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change research has largely focused on the biophysical, economic, and political aspects of the phenomenon, its projected impacts, and the possibilities for adaptation (Carey et al. 2014; Castree et al. 2014). In the classroom, too, climate change is generally presented as a scientific, technological, political, and economic challenge. However, defining climate change as physical challenge, divorced from its cultural causes and responses, forecloses some pathways of inquiry and limits the possibilities for adaptation (Adger et al. 2013). Recent perspectives by the environmental historian Mark Carey and colleagues (2014) and by the geographer Noel Castree and colleagues (2014) contend that ethnographic, narrative, social scientific, and humanistic insights are necessary additions to the climate change policy process and can contribute to deliberate, resilient responses to climate change. Among the humanistic insights needed are strategies and practices to maintain fortitude and persistence in the midst of dispiriting ecological trends. Students facing the "gloom and doom" of climate change data in environmental studies courses can experience negative states of mind such as denial, despair, burnout, and grief. Emerging research, however, demonstrates how contemplative practice can shift consciousness and promote resilience. Contemplative practices are those that consciously direct calm, focused attention. Such practices can build internal resilience, by promoting a greater sense of calm and well-being, decreasing stress, and sharpening focus and concentration. In addition, contemplative practices improve relationships with other people, through increasing compassion and flexibility in thinking. They also strengthen relationships with the surrounding world by increasing our ability to question, explore, and cope with rapid change and complexity. This presentation provides a context for incorporating contemplative practices, including mindfulness exercises

  15. Teacher Education and Black Male Students in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Richard Milner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Teacher education programs in the United States (U.S. struggle to prepare teachers to meet the complex needs of elementary and secondary students in public schools - especially those of color, those living in poverty, and those whose first language is not English. In this article, we argue for focused attention on preparing educators to teach African American male students as these students face particular institutional challenges in successfully navigating the U.S. public school system. Drawing from the significant body of research on teacher education and teacher learning for equity and social justice, four Black teacher educators discuss challenges they have faced in classes designed to prepare teachers to teach Black male students. Through an analysis of commonalities in their experiences, they propose means for teacher educators to foster greater understandings of the heterogeneity found among Black male students so that teachers can craft more responsive and responsible educational experiences for Black males.

  16. Computational design of metal-organic frameworks with paddlewheel-type secondary building units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingenschlogl, Udo; Peskov, Maxim V.; Masghouni, Nejib

    We employ the TOPOS package to study 697 coordination polymers containing paddlewheel-type secondary building units. The underlying nets are analyzed and 3 novel nets are chosen as potential topologies for paddlewheel-type metal organic frameworks (MOFs). Dicarboxylate linkers are used to build basic structures for novel isoreticular MOF series, aiming at relatively compact structures with a low number of atoms per unit cell. The structures are optimized using density functional theory. Afterwards the Grand Canonical Monte Carlo approach is employed to generate adsorption isotherms for CO2, CO, and CH4 molecules. We utilize the universal forcefield for simulating the interaction between the molecules and hosting MOF. The diffusion behavior of the molecules inside the MOFs is analyzed by molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Cation exchange at the secondary building units of metal–organic frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Brozek, Carl Kavanaugh; Dinca, Mircea

    2014-01-01

    Cation exchange is an emerging synthetic route for modifying the secondary building units (SBUs) of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). This technique has been used extensively to enhance the properties of nanocrystals and molecules, but the extent of its applications for MOFs is still expanding. To harness cation exchange as a rational tool, we need to elucidate its governing factors. Not nearly enough experimental observations exist for drawing these conclusions, so we provide a conceptual fra...

  18. Introduction to Matrix Algebra, Student's Text, Unit 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    Unit 23 in the SMSG secondary school mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics in matrix algebra: matrix operations, the algebra of 2 X 2 matrices, matrices and linear systems, representation of column matrices as geometric vectors, and transformations of the plane. Listed in the appendix are four research exercises in…

  19. Intermediate Mathematics, Student's Text, Part I, Unit 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    Unit 17 in the SMSG secondary school mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics: number systems, coordinate geometry in the plane, the function concept and the linear function, quadratic functions and equations, complex number systems, equations of the first and second degree in two variables, systems of equations in two…

  20. First Course in Algebra, Student's Text, Part I, Unit 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    Unit 9 in the SMSG's secondary school mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics in Algebra I: sets and the number line, numerals and variables, sentences and properties of operations, open sentences and English sentences, the real numbers, properties of addition, properties of multiplication, properties of order, and…

  1. Chinese International Students' Academic Stressors in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2009-01-01

    No empirical research has focused on understanding the academic stress of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examines the most stressful aspects of their academic lives in the U.S., how they characterize their academic stress, and what conditions they believe tend to account for their academic stress.…

  2. Student Perceptions of Inclusion in Unit/Course Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Elizabeth; Hicks, Owen

    2004-01-01

    Good teaching should be inclusive of all students. There are very strong arguments for making courses/units/modules as inclusive as possible, based on issues of equity and access. Inclusive teaching has been a catch cry in recent times and most universities have policies related to this issue. However, research into the effectiveness of measures…

  3. Building Students' Developmental Assets To Promote Health and School Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses research identifying and examining specific "developmental assets": positive building blocks that all children and youth need for success. Discusses the role of these assets in health promotion and risk reduction. Outlines specific actions educators can take to build 12 of these developmental assets. Notes the special place of health…

  4. Spherical TiO2 aggregates with different building units for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Su, Xunjia; Hou, Genliang; Bi, Song; Xiao, Zhou; Jia, Haipeng

    2013-09-07

    Tailoring the architectures of spherical TiO2 aggregates is crucial to obtain superior photovoltaic properties and promote their application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Herein, we synthesized spherical TiO2 aggregates using different building units, including nanocrystallites, nanorods, nanosheets, and nanotubes, via a hydrothermal method, and studied the effect of the building units on the performances of DSSCs. The aggregates assembled by uniform nanosheet and nanotube building units were synthesized with the use of spherical TiO2 nanorod aggregates as titanium sources in an alkaline hydrothermal reaction. Compared with TiO2 nanoparticles, the spherical TiO2 aggregates possess higher surface area, more efficient light scattering ability, and better electron transport properties. Among the four types of spherical TiO2 aggregates; the nanorod, nanotube, and nanosheet aggregates demonstrate better electron transport properties than the nanocrystallite aggregates; the nanotube and nanosheet aggregates exhibit more efficient light scattering than the nanocrystallite and nanorod aggregates; and the nanotube aggregates show the highest surface area. Thus the DSSC based on nanotube aggregates exhibited the highest energy conversion efficiency of 7.48%, which is 16.0%, 9.7%, and 19.5% higher than those of the DSSCs based on the nanosheet, nanorod, and nanocrystallite aggregates, respectively.

  5. The impact of school building conditions on student absenteeism in Upstate New York

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simons, Elinor; Hwang, Syni-An; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Kielb, Christine; Lin, Shao

    2010-01-01

    .... We merged data from the 2005 Building Condition Survey of Upstate New York schools with 2005 New York State Education Department student absenteeism data at the individual school level and evaluated...

  6. The impact of school building conditions on student absenteeism in Upstate New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Elinor; Hwang, Syni-An; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Kielb, Christine; Lin, Shao

    2010-09-01

    We investigated Upstate New York school building conditions and examined the associations between school absenteeism and building condition problems. We merged data from the 2005 Building Condition Survey of Upstate New York schools with 2005 New York State Education Department student absenteeism data at the individual school level and evaluated associations between building conditions and absenteeism at or above the 90th percentile. After adjustment for confounders, student absenteeism was associated with visible mold (odds ratio [OR]=2.22; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.34, 3.68), humidity (OR=3.07; 95% CI=1.37, 6.89), poor ventilation (OR=3.10; 95% CI=1.79, 5.37), vermin (OR=2.23; 95% CI=1.32, 3.76), 6 or more individual building condition problems (OR=2.97; 95% CI=1.84, 4.79), and building system or structural problems related to these conditions. Schools in lower socioeconomic districts and schools attended by younger students showed the strongest associations between poor building conditions and absenteeism. We found associations between student absenteeism and adverse school building conditions. Future studies should confirm these findings and prioritize strategies for school condition improvements.

  7. Building Bridges: Higher Degree Student Retention and Counselling Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the discussion on increasing retention rates in higher degree students. It presents evidence from the literature on the value of increasing counselling and mentoring care for higher degree research students. The creation of, and rationale for, a designated higher degree student counsellor-mentor role is described.…

  8. Career and Technical Student Organizations: Building Our Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Provides a look at the history, structure, and role of career and technical student organizations: Business Professionals of America, SkillsUSA-VICA, DECA/Delta Epsilon Chi, Health Occupations Students of America, the Technology Student Association, Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda, FFA, and Family, Career, and Community Leaders…

  9. Using Student Technical Conferences to Build Multidisciplinary Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, David L.

    2007-01-01

    An open-ended student conference project involving sophomore, junior, and senior chemical engineering students is described. The project is designed to address outcomes in each of the courses in which those students are enrolled, as well as broader "soft skills" including multidisciplinary teamwork, communications, lifelong learning, and…

  10. Helping College Students Build up Confidence in Listening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹃

    2015-01-01

    Listening is the basis of communication,so fostering students’listening ability is very important.Though improving students’listening is very difficult,to help them build up their confidence in listening is an effective way.

  11. Helping College Students Build up Confidence in Listening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹃

    2015-01-01

    Listening is the basis of communication,so fostering students’ listening ability is very important.Though improving students’ listening is very difficult,to help them build up their confidence in listening is an effective way.

  12. Regional characteristics of individual housing units in Serbia from the aspect of applied building technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović-Popović Milica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual housing units in Serbia have been studied from the aspect of applied technical solutions. Analyzed data have been collected during a field research in accordance with the current administrative regional division, and they represent a basis for definition of regional typology of individual housing units. Characteristic types of objects of each region’s typology have been further analyzed. Upon these analyses regional characteristics of individual housing units regarding applied construction types, building technologies and materials have been defined and presented. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 36034: Investigation and Systematization of Serbian Housing in Context of Globalization and European Integration in the Framework of Quality and Living-Standard Improvement

  13. Energy management handbook for building operating engineers student workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The handbook provides operating engineers with the basic information needed to implement specific energy conservation opportunities, and additional information is presented relative to the formulation and development of the energy management plan. Chapters are entitled: The Need for Energy Management (International Factors, The US Energy Situation, Energy and the Building Owner); The Fundamentals of Energy Consumption in Buildings (Energy Basics, Heat Basics, Heat Flow and the Building Envelope, Air and Comfort, Factors Affecting Energy Use In Buildings); Principles of Energy Conservation (Building Energy Consumption Characteristics); Planning the Energy Management Program (Obtaining Commitment and Support, Establishing the Energy Use Index, Organizing to Develop the Plan, Developing and Implementing the Plan); Conducting a Survey of Facilities and Operations (The Energy Audit, Preparation of Building and Systems Profile, Measurement and Instrumentation); Guidelines for Energy Conservation (Operator ECO's, Owner ECO'S); Developing the Draft Final Plan (Analyze Survey Findings, Putting the Plan on Paper, Review and Submit); Implementing the Program (Developing the Final Plan, Implementing the Plan, Monitoring and Updating the Program). A glossary is included and specific information on degree days and cooling hours for some selected cities and a computer energy study data for the New York Hilton are included in appendices. (MCW)

  14. Enabling Efficient, Responsive, and Resilient Buildings: Collaboration Between the United States and India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Chandrayee; Ghatikar, Girish

    2013-09-25

    The United States and India have among the largest economies in the world, and they continue to work together to address current and future challenges in reliable electricity supply. The acceleration to efficient, grid-responsive, resilient buildings represents a key energy security objective for federal and state agencies in both countries. The weaknesses in the Indian grid system were manifest in 2012, in the country’s worst blackout, which jeopardized the lives of half of India’s 1.2 billion people. While both countries are investing significantly in power sector reform, India, by virtue of its colossal growth rate in commercial energy intensity and commercial floor space, is better placed than the United States to integrate and test state-of-art Smart Grid technologies in its future grid-responsive commercial buildings. This paper presents a roadmap of technical collaboration between the research organizations, and public-private stakeholders in both countries to accelerate the building-to-grid integration through pilot studies in India.

  15. Expanded organic building units for the construction of highly porous metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Guo-Qiang; Han, Zhi-Da; He, Yabing; Ou, Sha; Zhou, Wei; Yildirim, Taner; Krishna, Rajamani; Zou, Chao; Chen, Banglin; Wu, Chuan-De

    2013-10-25

    Two new organic building units that contain dicarboxylate sites for their self-assembly with paddlewheel [Cu2(CO2)4] units have been successfully developed to construct two isoreticular porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), ZJU-35 and ZJU-36, which have the same tbo topologies (Reticular Chemistry Structure Resource (RCSR) symbol) as HKUST-1. Because the organic linkers in ZJU-35 and ZJU-36 are systematically enlarged, the pores in these two new porous MOFs vary from 10.8 Å in HKUST-1 to 14.4 Å in ZJU-35 and 16.5 Å in ZJU-36, thus leading to their higher porosities with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of 2899 and 4014 m(2) g(-1) for ZJU-35 and ZJU-36, respectively. High-pressure gas-sorption isotherms indicate that both ZJU-35 and ZJU-36 can take up large amounts of CH4 and CO2, and are among the few porous MOFs with the highest volumetric storage of CH4 under 60 bar and CO2 under 30 bar at room temperature. Their potential for high-pressure swing adsorption (PSA) hydrogen purification was also preliminarily examined and compared with several reported MOFs, thus indicating the potential of ZJU-35 and ZJU-36 for this important application. Studies show that most of the highly porous MOFs that can volumetrically take up the greatest amount of CH4 under 60 bar and CO2 under 30 bar at room temperature are those self-assembled from organic tetra- and hexacarboxylates that contain m-benzenedicarboxylate units with the [Cu2(CO2)4] units, because this series of MOFs can have balanced porosities, suitable pores, and framework densities to optimize their volumetric gas storage. The realization of the two new organic building units for their construction of highly porous MOFs through their self-assembly with [Cu2(CO2)4] units has provided great promise for the exploration of a large number of new tetra- and hexacarboxylate organic linkers based on these new organic building units in which different aromatic backbones can be readily incorporated

  16. Student Teachers' Experiences of Relation Building in Teaching Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Maj; Laursen, Per Fibæk

    The study explores how 22 student teachers in a Danish college of education experience and interpret their own becoming a teacher and the implied attitudes to pupils. The student teachers attending mainstream teacher education and a course in mindful awareness and relational competencies have...... – to a larger extend than the mainstream educated student teachers - learned a reflexive attitude to their state of being in teaching practice and to their relational interaction with children in class....

  17. Increasing Student Achievement and Improving Self-Esteem through a Community Building Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Concetta M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on improving students' self-esteem through community building at an elementary school in a low socioeconomic community where over 55% of the students live below the poverty line. Orefield and Yun state in their 1999 article, "Resegregation of America's schools," "school level poverty is related to many…

  18. Train Students to Solve the Practical Problem by Building Mathematics Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian-zhong

    2005-01-01

    It focuses on that students must be developed the ability to solve the practical problem by building the mathematics models and the ability to combine the theory with the practice. It also states that students must be improved the learning interests and practical experience.

  19. Students' Ability in Using Discourse Markers to Build Coherence in Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriana, Andhina W.; Rachmajanti, Sri; Mukminatien, Nur

    2016-01-01

    The study attempts to find out how Indonesian students apply Discourse Markers (DMs) to build coherence in English compositions. It employs a descriptive design, analyzing 52 target DMs and how they are used in 21 argumentative papers. The participants of the study were 21 Master's students majoring in English Language Teaching (ELT). The results…

  20. Building Word Knowledge: Opportunities for Direct Vocabulary Instruction in General Education for Students with Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Direct vocabulary instruction is 1 critical component of reading instruction. Although most students in the elementary grades need to continue building their vocabulary knowledge, students with reading difficulties are at the greatest risk of falling further behind each year in vocabulary and concept knowledge without effective instruction. This…

  1. The Writing Workshop Approach with Learning Disabled Students to Build Self-Esteem: One Teacher's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Melva

    1992-01-01

    Describes how a teacher used teaching techniques employed in a writer's workshop classroom to build self-esteem in students with learning disabilities, without changing assignments, requirements, or expectations for these students. Shows that growth in self-esteem was a by-product of growth in writing skills. (SR)

  2. LE[superscript 3]AD Academy Builds Professionalism in Vocational Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Candace

    2012-01-01

    Principal David Wheeler of Southeastern Regional Vocational-Technical High School founded LE[superscript 3]AD Academy--an innovative program that gives students the opportunity to build and run their own town in teams and with guidance from teachers. The program started in the spring of 2011, and it is innovative in many ways. The students' main…

  3. Can You Build It? Using Manipulatives to Assess Student Understanding of Food-Web Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumbine, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines an exercise that assesses student knowledge of food-web and energy-flow concepts. Students work in teams and use manipulatives to build food-web models based on criteria assigned by the instructor. The models are then peer reviewed according to guidelines supplied by the instructor.

  4. A Homochiral Multifunctional Metal-Organic Framework with Rod-Shaped Secondary Building Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Cai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A new homochiral multifunctional metal-organic framework, [Zn2(CTBA2·H2O] (JUC-112, was synthesized under solvothermal conditions, through the design of chiral ligand 4-(3-carboxy-2,2,3-trimethylcyclopentanecarboxamido benzoic acid (H2CTBA based on camphoric acid as building block. The crystal structure of the new material is a 2-dimensional (2D chiral layer packed with infinite rod-shaped secondary building units (SBUs. The homochiral framework was identified by circular dichroism (CD spectrum. Thermogravimetric measurement indicates its high thermal stability up to 450 °C. In addition, JUC-112 exhibits the capability of separating water from alcohols, second-order nonlinear optical effect, and photoluminescence.

  5. A Homochiral Multifunctional Metal-Organic Framework with Rod-Shaped Secondary Building Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kun; Zhao, Nian; Zhang, Ning; Sun, Fu-Xing; Zhao, Qing; Zhu, Guang-Shan

    2017-01-01

    A new homochiral multifunctional metal-organic framework, [Zn2(CTBA)2·H2O] (JUC-112), was synthesized under solvothermal conditions, through the design of chiral ligand 4-(3-carboxy-2,2,3-trimethylcyclopentanecarboxamido) benzoic acid (H2CTBA) based on camphoric acid as building block. The crystal structure of the new material is a 2-dimensional (2D) chiral layer packed with infinite rod-shaped secondary building units (SBUs). The homochiral framework was identified by circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. Thermogravimetric measurement indicates its high thermal stability up to 450 °C. In addition, JUC-112 exhibits the capability of separating water from alcohols, second-order nonlinear optical effect, and photoluminescence. PMID:28430135

  6. Basic building units, self-assembly and crystallization in the formation of complex inorganic open architectures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N R Rao

    2001-10-01

    Careful investigations of open-framework metal phosphates reveal that the formation of these complex architectures is likely to involve a process wherein one-dimensional ladders or chains, and possibly zero-dimens ional monomers, transform to higher dimensional structures. The one-dimensional ladder appears to be the primary building unit of these structures. At one stage of the building-up process, spontaneous self-assembly of a low-dimensional structure such as the ladder seems to occur, followed by crys tallization of a two- or three-dimensional structure. Accordingly, many of the higher dimensional structures retain the structural features of the 1D structure, indicating the occurrence of self-assembly. These findings mark the beginnings of our understan ding of complex supramolecular inorganic materials.

  7. Building capacity for Health Impact Assessment: Training outcomes from the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchter, Joseph [Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutt, Candace, E-mail: awr8@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, 4770 Buford Highway MS/F-77, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Satariano, William A. [University of California Berkeley, School of Public Health, Division of Community Health and Human Development, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seto, Edmund [University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Despite the continued growth of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in the US, there is little research on HIA capacity-building. A comprehensive study of longer-term training outcomes may reveal opportunities for improving capacity building activities and HIA practice. Methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with HIA trainees in the United States to assess their outcomes and needs. Using a training evaluation framework, we measured outcomes across a spectrum of reaction, learning, behavior and results. Results: From 2006 to 2012, four organizations trained over 2200 people in at least 75 in-person HIA trainings in 29 states. We interviewed 48 trainees, selected both randomly and purposefully. The mean duration between training and interview was 3.4 years. Trainees reported that their training objectives were met, especially when relevant case-studies were used. They established new collaborations at the trainings and maintained them. Training appeared to catalyze more holistic thinking and practice, including a range of HIA-related activities. Many trainees disseminated what they learned and engaged in components of HIA, even without dedicated funding. Going forward, trainees need assistance with quantitative methods, project management, community engagement, framing recommendations, and evaluation. Conclusions: The research revealed opportunities for a range of HIA stakeholders to refine and coordinate training resources, apply a competency framework and leverage complimentary workforce development efforts, and sensitize and build the capacity of communities. - Highlights: • We interviewed HIA trainees in the United States to assess longer-term outcomes. • Training appeared to catalyze a range of beneficial partnerships and activities. • Trainees reported outstanding needs for specific skills and competencies. • There are various opportunities to improve training and capacity-building.

  8. Utilizing Building Usage Assessment: Determining Deployment of Student Workers in an Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Ryan F.

    2014-01-01

    Generating, collecting, and analyzing building usage statistics can greatly increase the ability of an access services unit to meet the changing dynamic of patron needs in an academic library. By analyzing three different data points, the Access Services Unit in Malpass Library at Western Illinois University was able to determine the most…

  9. Building Authenticity in Social Media Tools to Recruit Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Jean Kelso; Peña, Edlyn Vallejo

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of institutions utilize social media tools, including student-written blogs, on their admission websites in an effort to enhance authenticity in their recruitment marketing materials. This study offers a framework for understanding what contributes to prospective college students' perceptions of social media authenticity…

  10. Building Authenticity in Social Media Tools to Recruit Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Jean Kelso; Peña, Edlyn Vallejo

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of institutions utilize social media tools, including student-written blogs, on their admission websites in an effort to enhance authenticity in their recruitment marketing materials. This study offers a framework for understanding what contributes to prospective college students' perceptions of social media authenticity…

  11. Building Bridges with Student Mentoring: A Design Thinking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Jesse; Parks, Rodney; Taylor, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, college students struggle to find translatable meaning in their college experiences. Following a program of study and dabbling in a few extra-curricular experiences proves to be enough to graduate, but somehow some students fail to thrive in all areas of well-being once they are at work. If this disconnect is rooted to a lack of…

  12. Galvanize Your Class! Build a Battery of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    An inexpensive and simple class participation demonstration uses students, short lengths of metal pipe, and an inexpensive digital voltmeter to make a battery of students. Data taken illustrate the combination of emfs in series and parallel. This apparatus was awarded second place and a low-cost award in the 2007 AAPT Apparatus Competition.

  13. How Students Combine Resources to Build Understanding of Complex Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    The field of Physics Education Research (PER) seeks to investigate how students learn physics and how instructors can help students learn more effectively. The process by which learners create understanding about a complex physics concept is an active area of research. My study explores this process, using solar cells as the context. To understand…

  14. Biology Students Building Computer Simulations Using StarLogo TNG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V. Anne; Duncan, Ishbel

    2011-01-01

    Confidence is an important issue for biology students in handling computational concepts. This paper describes a practical in which honours-level bioscience students simulate complex animal behaviour using StarLogo TNG, a freely-available graphical programming environment. The practical consists of two sessions, the first of which guides students…

  15. Beyond Batteries and Bulbs, Circuits and Conductors: Building Green, Activist-Oriented Student Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun-Frank, Julie; Matthews, Catherine E.; Allen, Melony Holyfield

    2012-01-01

    In this article we provide an example of how to foster an activist-oriented student community by critically examining green technology. We designed this curriculum unit to teach students about the fundamentals of electricity, green technology, and experimental design. Additionally, we viewed this activity as an opportunity for students to apply…

  16. Synthesis,characterization and catalytic properties of mesoporous MCM-48 containing zeolite secondary building units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiang; DOU Tao; ZHANG Ying; LI Yuping; WANG Shan; SUN Famin

    2007-01-01

    Mesoporous aluminosilicate MCM-48 containing zeolite secondary building units in the pore wall has been synthesized in alkaline media with a two-step procedure.The aluminosilicate precursors comprising zeolite secondary building units were first synthesized by carefully controlling reaction conditions and then were assembled using cotemplates of geminisurfactant [C18H37N(CH3)2(CH2)3-N(CH3)2C18H37]2+ (18-3-18) and triethanolamine (TEA).X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns of the as-made samples indicated that highly ordered mesostmctured MCM-48 was formed.Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images further verified the formation of MCM-48 with uniform cubic pore channel system having the pore opening diameter of about 25 A.Compared with the conventionally synthesized MCM-48,the as-synthesized MCM-48 sample showed an adsorption band at 520-600 cm-1 in its FT-IR spectrum,which was assigned to five-membered ring vibration from zeolite structure.This suggested the presence of zeolite building units in the pore wall.N2 adsorption data showed that the material had a much higher specific surface area (1 200 m2/g)than the conventional MCM-48(1 100 m2/g).Finally,the catalytic performance of the as-made MCM-48 was evaluated by hydrogenation dealkylation reaction of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons.Catalytic results showed that the as-made MCM-48 catalyst exhibited higher conversion than the conventional MCM-48 catalyst.The as-made mesostructured MCM-48 may have a potential catalytic application in the conversion of bulky molecules.

  17. Body Build Perceptions in Male and Female College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Roger C.; Hankins, Norman E.

    1979-01-01

    Results from scores on the Somatotype Rating Scale (SRS) indicated that, while there was close agreement between males and females on the measures, females exhibited more dissatisfaction with their body build and greater congruency between their self-concept and their same-sex stereotype than did males. (Author)

  18. Designing Spaces: Visualizing, Planning, and Building. Seeing and Thinking Mathematically in the Middle Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Glenn; Zweig, Karen

    In this unit of the Seeing and Thinking Mathematically series, students use geometry to analyze buildings from around the world, design and build their own house models, create plans for their designs, and build from each other's plans. Students start out the unit building with cubes and later move to other geometric shapes. As they learn to…

  19. Transferring ANDRILL Research on Antarctic Cenozoic Climate Change into the Classroom: Teaching Exercises that build Student Skills and Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, K. S.; Krissek, L. A.; Jones, M. H.; Leckie, R. M.; St. John, K.

    2009-12-01

    This set of undergraduate student-active learning exercises focuses on the status and role of Antarctica in Cenozoic climate change, and builds skills and knowledge required to evaluate sediment cores retrieved from the floor of McMurdo Sound by the ANDRILL Project. Students discover new advances in understanding late Neogene Antarctic glacial history based on recent ANDRILL results. These exercises are part of the larger suite of activities in the project “Building Core Knowledge and Reconstructing Earth History”, which use authentic data to teach foundational concepts of climate change through sediment core archives (NSF Grant # 0737335). The Antarctic exercises involve a review of the composite benthic foraminifer oxygen isotope curve, and of global climate interpretations based in part on this record. Basic geographic and geologic knowledge of Antarctica and cryospheric processes are constructed in order to build the rationale for selecting drillsites in McMurdo Sound. Student attention is then focused on the use of sedimentary facies and depositional environments in core interpretation, with particular attention to the facies associations that are diagnostic of ice-proximal and ice-distal settings in high latitudes. This is constructed through diagrams, geological reasoning, use of core images and core logs, and culminates in the construction of models for ice-retreat and ice-advance sequences. The general climate record of the entire ANDRILL 1-B core log (1285 m) is then interpreted, by characterizing each of the key lithostratigraphic sub-units in terms of the dominant depositional environments represented. Students write a brief history of the late Miocene-Pliocene climatic and environmental conditions in the Ross Sea region. Students conclude by evaluating facies patterns in the ANDRILL 1-B Pliocene sequence completing calculations that lead to interpretations of orbitally paced Pliocene ice sheet oscillations.

  20. Effects of team-building on communication and teamwork among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of team-building on communication and teamwork (i.e. teamwork skills and team effectiveness) among nursing students. Team-building is effective for improving communication and teamwork among the nursing organization. However, the effects of team-building are not well known especially in Korea. This study used a quasi-experimental design. The sample was composed of 195 junior-year nursing students in Korea. The experimental group (100 subjects) participated in team-building activities over a 100-day period, whereas no intervention was applied to the control group (95 subjects). Pretest was conducted in both groups, and post-test was conducted after the 100-day intervention. The pre-post change in mean communication competence score did not differ between the two groups. However, the mean scores for teamwork skills and team effectiveness differed significantly between the two groups after team-building activity. This study was not a double-blind test, and randomized sampling was not implemented. Caution should thus be used when interpreting the findings. Team-building activities were effective for improving the teamwork skills and team effectiveness among Korean nursing students. It is recommended that team-building activities should be included regularly as an integral educational approach in nursing education. The findings suggest that suggests that team-building for improving communication and teamwork should be designated as one of the required criteria for nursing college programme accreditation in many countries, including Korea. However team-building requires further testing to verify this across cultures. Nurses need to receive formal team-building training for improving communication and teamwork, and formal education should be included in their job training schedule. It is recommended that communication competence and teamwork be used as one of job performance evaluations in their workplace. © 2015

  1. Sizing Combined Heat and Power Units and Domestic Building Energy Cost Optimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmin Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many combined heat and power (CHP units have been installed in domestic buildings to increase energy efficiency and reduce energy costs. However, inappropriate sizing of a CHP may actually increase energy costs and reduce energy efficiency. Moreover, the high manufacturing cost of batteries makes batteries less affordable. Therefore, this paper will attempt to size the capacity of CHP and optimise daily energy costs for a domestic building with only CHP installed. In this paper, electricity and heat loads are firstly used as sizing criteria in finding the best capacities of different types of CHP with the help of the maximum rectangle (MR method. Subsequently, the genetic algorithm (GA will be used to optimise the daily energy costs of the different cases. Then, heat and electricity loads are jointly considered for sizing different types of CHP and for optimising the daily energy costs through the GA method. The optimisation results show that the GA sizing method gives a higher average daily energy cost saving, which is 13% reduction compared to a building without installing CHP. However, to achieve this, there will be about 3% energy efficiency reduction and 7% input power to rated power ratio reduction compared to using the MR method and heat demand in sizing CHP.

  2. Building workplace social capital: A longitudinal study of student nurses' clinical placement experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materne, Michelle; Henderson, Amanda; Eaton, Emma

    2017-09-01

    Quality clinical placement experiences have been associated with nurses' workplace social capital. Social capital is broadly understood as the social organisation of trust, norms and networks that benefit society. Building social capital in the workplace may benefit experiences of staff and students. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of building workplace social capital on student nurse perceptions of clinical learning experiences. A quality improvement process was measured through repeated student surveys. First, second, third year students (n = 1176) from three universities completed a validated Student Clinical Learning Culture Survey (SCLCS) following their placement, at the commencement of quality improvement initiatives and five years later. The SCLCS measured students' perceptions of social affiliation, their motivation, satisfaction and dissatisfaction with clinical contexts. The first year of systematic changes focused on increasing student numbers along with improving communication, trust and knowledge sharing, antecedents to workplace social capital. No change was evident after the first year. Six years after commencement of building workplace social capital differences across all subscales, except dissatisfaction, were significant (p social capital that enhances student placement experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. TOOLS TO INCLUDE BLIND STUDENTS IN SCHOOL BUILDING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pietzschke Abate

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the design of data collection instruments that include the opinions of blind students, in accordance with the principles of Universal Design (UD. The aim of this study is to understand the importance of adapting data collection instruments for the inclusion of disabled persons in field research in Architecture and Design, among other fields. The data collection instruments developed were a play interview with a tactile map and a 3D survey with the use of tactile models. These instruments sought to assess the school environment experienced by blind students. The study involved students from the early years of a school for the blind who had not yet mastered the Braille system. The participation of these students was evaluated. A multidisciplinary team consisting of architects, designers, educators, and psychologists lent support to the study. The results showed that the data collection instruments adapted to blind students were successful in making the group of authors examine questions regarding UD. An analysis of the participatory phase showed that the limitations resulting from blindness determine the specificities in the adaptation and implementation process of the instruments in schools. Practical recommendations for future studies related to instruments in the UD thematic are presented. This approach is in line with the global trend of including disabled persons in society based on these users’ opinions concerning what was designed by architects and designers.

  4. Legal Teaching Methods to Diverse Student Cohorts: A Comparison between the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraal, Diane

    2017-01-01

    This article makes a comparison across the unique educational settings of law and business schools in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and New Zealand to highlight differences in teaching methods necessary for culturally and ethnically mixed student cohorts derived from high migration, student mobility, higher education rankings…

  5. Building Opportunities for Environmental Education Through Student Development of Cyberinfrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Byrd, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    It is increasingly common to utilize simulations and games in the classroom, but learning opportunities can also be created by having students construct these cyberinfrastructure resources themselves. We outline two examples of such projects completed during the summer of 2014 within the NSF ACI sponsored REU Site: Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Collaborative Data Visualization Applications at Clemson University (Award 1359223). The first project focuses on the development of immersive virtual reality field trips of geologic sites using the Oculus Rift headset. This project developed a platform which will allow users to navigate virtual terrains derived from real-world data obtained from the US Geological Survey and Google Earth. The system provides users with the ability to partake in an interactive first-person exploration of a region, such as the Grand Canyon, and thus makes an important educational contribution for students without access to these environmental assets in the real world. The second project focused on providing players visual feedback about the sustainability of their practices within the web-based, multiplayer watershed management game Naranpur Online. Identifying sustainability indicators that communicate meaningful information to players and finding an effective way to visualize these data were a primary challenge faced by the student researcher working on this project. To solve this problem the student translated findings from the literature to the context of the game to develop a hierarchical set of relative sustainability criteria to be accessed by players within a sustainability dashboard. Though the REU focused on visualization, both projects forced the students to transform their thinking to address higher-level questions regarding the utilization and communication of environmental data or concepts, thus enhancing the educational experience for themselves and future students.

  6. Faring with Facets: Building and Using Databases of Student Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhyastha, Tara; Tanimoto, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A number of educational researchers have developed pedagogical approaches that involve the teacher in discovering and helping to correct misconceptions that students bring to their study of their subject matter. During the last decade, several computer systems have been developed to support teaching and learning using this kind of approach. A…

  7. Building Intercultural Competence through Intercultural Competency Certification of Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeiro, Maria G. Fabregas; Fabre, Ricardo Lopez; Nuno de la Parra, Jose Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The Intercultural Competency Certificate (CCI in Spanish) designed for the Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla (UPAEP University) is a theory based comprehensive plan to develop undergraduate students' intercultural competence. This Certificate is based in the Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) developed by…

  8. Students' Abstraction in Recognizing, Building with and Constructing a Quadrilateral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiarto, Mega Teguh; Rahaju, Endah Budi; Hartono, Sugi

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to implement empirically students' abstraction with socio-cultural background of Indonesia. Abstraction is an activity that involves a vertical reorganization of previously constructed mathematics into a new mathematical structure. The principal components of the model are three dynamic nested epistemic actions: recognizing,…

  9. Academic Library Use of Facebook: Building Relationships with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nancy Kim

    2011-01-01

    A content analysis was conducted of status messages posted by academic libraries on seventeen Facebook pages. In addition to being informational, libraries attempt to engage and establish rapport with students through Facebook. The university setting not only creates a context for messages, but also offers a mutual set of experiences and values…

  10. Building Intercultural Competence through Intercultural Competency Certification of Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeiro, Maria G. Fabregas; Fabre, Ricardo Lopez; Nuno de la Parra, Jose Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The Intercultural Competency Certificate (CCI in Spanish) designed for the Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla (UPAEP University) is a theory based comprehensive plan to develop undergraduate students' intercultural competence. This Certificate is based in the Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) developed by…

  11. Financial Capability and Asset Building in the Curricula: Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Vernon; Birkenmaier, Julie; Hageman, Sally A.

    2017-01-01

    Although social work education competencies include economic justice, and practice includes addressing client finances and assets, social work curricula lack an emphasis on these topics. Little is known about students' perceptions of the relevancy of this information or how well their program is preparing them for contemporary practice. This study…

  12. Building Empathy and Social Mastery in Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Erik K.; Moore, Lisa; Yazdgerdi, Sasha; Milberger, Kat

    2013-01-01

    Learning to recognize and express emotions appropriately is a skill of mastery in human development, and an essential component of living the good life. Because this developmental and social skill is one of the core deficits for people along the autism spectrum, anyone who works with students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) should provide them…

  13. Building Campus Communities Inclusive of International Students: A Framework for Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Helen Park; Goshit, Sunday

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides readers with a practical, how-to approach and framework for developing inclusive, intercultural training programs for student affairs professionals on college campuses in the United States.

  14. Building an Orthonormal Basis from a 3D Unit Vector Without Normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2012-01-01

    I present two tools that save the computation of a dot product and a reciprocal square root in operations that are used frequently in the core of many rendering programs. The first tool is a formula for rotating a direction sampled around the z -axis to a direction sampled around an arbitrary uni...... extracted from the first formula, namely a faster way of building an orthonormal basis from a 3D unit vector. These tools require fewer arithmetic operations than other methods I am aware of, and a performance test of the more general tool confirms that it is faster.......I present two tools that save the computation of a dot product and a reciprocal square root in operations that are used frequently in the core of many rendering programs. The first tool is a formula for rotating a direction sampled around the z -axis to a direction sampled around an arbitrary unit...... vector. This is useful in Monte Carlo rendering techniques, such as path tracing, where directions are usually sampled in spherical coordinates and then transformed to a Cartesian unit vector in a local coordinate system where the zenith direction is the z -axis. The second tool is a more general result...

  15. Landscape architecture student Christina Hicks receives recognition in James River Green Building Council's 2009 Green Spaces Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2009-01-01

    Christina Hicks of Stafford, Va., a fifth-year landscape architecture student, is the Honor Winner of the 2009 James River Green Building Council's (JRGBC) Green Spaces Competition in the student division.

  16. Teaching Standard Deviation by Building from Student Invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James; Nakahara, Hiroko; Bonn, Doug

    2010-11-01

    First-year physics laboratories are often driven by a mix of goals that includes the illustration or discovery of basic physics principles and a myriad of technical skills involving specific equipment, data analysis, and report writing. The sheer number of such goals seems guaranteed to produce cognitive overload, even when highly detailed "cookbook" instructions are given. Recent studies indicate that this approach leaves students with a poor conceptual understanding of one of the most important features of laboratory physics and of the real world of science, in general: the development of an understanding of the nature of measurement and its attendant uncertainty . While students might be able to reproduce certain technical manipulations of data, as novice thinkers they lack the mental scaffolding that allows an expert to organize and apply this knowledge.2,3 Our goal is to put novices on the path to expertise, so that they will be able to transfer their knowledge to novel situations.

  17. Student-directed assessment of knowledge building using electronic portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    van Aalst, J.; Chan, CKK

    2007-01-01

    Despite emphasis and progress in developing collaborative inquiry in computer-supported collaborative learning research, little attention has been given to examining how collective learning can be assessed in computer-supported collaborative learning classrooms, and how students can have agency in assessing their own collaborative process. We propose that assessments should capture both individual and collective aspects of learning and be designed in ways that foster collaboration. We describ...

  18. Heterogeneity within a Mesoporous Metal-Organic Framework with Three Distinct Metal-Containing Building Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Binbin; Pang, Qingqing; Ning, Erlong; Yan, Wenqing; Qi, Yi; Wu, Doufeng; Li, Qiaowei

    2015-10-28

    Materials built from multiple constituents have revealed emerging properties that are beyond linear integration of those from single components. We report a mesoporous metal-organic framework made from three geometrically distinct metal-containing secondary building units (SBUs) as a result of topological induction. The combinations of the Cu-based triangular, Zn-based octahedral, and Zn-based square pyramidal SBUs have created four types of cages in the network, despite that only one organic linker pyrazolecarboxylate was used. The longest distance for molecules maneuvering inside the largest cage is 5.2 nm. Furthermore, the complex and diversified pore environments allow the installation of various new functionalities in the framework as well as the expedited Ag nanoparticle formation in the pores. As presented in the molecule movement diagram, the crystal has provided specific arrangements of cages and apertures with distinct chemical features for guests transporting between the pores.

  19. THE EVOLUTION OF THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF MASONRY BUILDINGS IN THE UNITED STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Klingner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the process used to develop building codes in the United States of America (USA is summarized, with emphasis on masonry. Masonry materials used in the USA are discussed. Types of masonry construction in the USA are reviewed, addressing historical as well as modern masonry. Current non-structural and structural applications of masonry in the USA are reviewed. Historical development of masonry codes in the USA is summarized, with emphasis on the current Masonry Standards Joint Committee (MSJC Code and Specification. Future trends in that document are predicted. The paper closes with a list of challenges to the masonry industry, and a list of focused research topics intended to meet those challenges.

  20. Building Student Competency to Develop Power and Influence through Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buren, Harry J., III; Hood, Jacqueline N.

    2011-01-01

    The course discussed in this article uses an integrative approach in presenting the concept of social capital and power to Executive MBA students at a large public university in the southwestern United States, where a majority of the students are members of non-dominant racial, gender and ethnicity groups. The article describes the theoretical…

  1. Structures and properties of porous coordination polymers based on lanthanide carboxylate building units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yinfeng; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Liqing; Ma, Chunlin; Shen, Zhen; Song, You; You, Xiaozeng

    2010-12-06

    A series of 3-D lanthanide porous coordination polymers, [Ln(6)(BDC)(9)(DMF)(6)(H(2)O)(3)·3DMF](n) [Ln = La, 1; Ce, 2; Nd, 3], [Ln(2)(BDC)(3)(DMF)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n) [Ln = Y, 4; Dy, 5; Eu, 6], [Ln(2)(ADB)(3)(DMSO)(4)·6DMSO·8H(2)O](n) [Ln = Ce, 7; Sm, 8; Eu, 9; Gd, 10], {[Ce(3)(ADB)(3)(HADB)(3)]·30DMSO·29H(2)O}(n) (11), and [Ce(2)(ADB)(3)(H(2)O)(3)](n) (12) (H(2)BDC = benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid and H(2)ADB = 4,4'-azodibenzoic acid), have been synthesized and characterized. In 1-3, the adjacent Ln(III) ions are intraconnected to form 1-D metal-carboxylate oxygen chain-shaped building units, [Ln(4)(CO(2))(12)](n), that constructed a 3-D framework with 4 × 7 Å rhombic channels. In 4-6, the dimeric Ln(III) ions are interlinked to yield scaffolds with 3-D interconnecting tunnels. Compounds 7-10 are all 3-D interpenetrating structures with the CaB6-type topology structure. Compound 11 is constructed by ADB spacers and trinulcear Ce nodes with a NaCl-type topology structure and a 1.9-nm open channel system. In 12, the adjacent Ce(III) ions are intraconnected to form 1-D metal-carboxylate oxygen chain-shaped building units, [Ln(4)(CO(2))(12)](n), and give rise to a 3-D framework. Moreover, 6 exhibits characteristic red luminescence properties of Eu(III) complexes. The magnetic susceptibilities, over a temperature range of 1.8-300 K, of 3, 6, and 7 have also been investigated; the results show paramagnetic properties.

  2. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room

  3. Case Western Reserve U. Builds Virtual Campus to Woo Prospective Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a virtual world program that Case Western University administrators built using Second Life. It is designed for use by prospective students, who can tour the campus online. The program shows campus buildings, athletic facilities, a diner, and a virtual dormitory with window views of the athletics fields, a feature of the…

  4. College Students Constructing Collective Knowledge of Natural Science History in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chai, Ching Sing; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates whether engaging college students (n = 42) in a knowledge building environment would help them work as a community to construct their collective knowledge of history of science and, accordingly, develop a more informed scientific view. The study adopted mixed-method analyses and data mainly came from surveys and student…

  5. Teaching & Learning for International Students in a "Learning Community": Creating, Sharing and Building Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Linzi

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the culture of learning communities for effective teaching. A learning community is defined here as an environment where learners are brought together to share information, to learn from each other, and to create new knowledge. The individual student develops her/his own learning by building on learning from others. In a…

  6. Case Western Reserve U. Builds Virtual Campus to Woo Prospective Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a virtual world program that Case Western University administrators built using Second Life. It is designed for use by prospective students, who can tour the campus online. The program shows campus buildings, athletic facilities, a diner, and a virtual dormitory with window views of the athletics fields, a feature of the…

  7. Team Building through Physical Challenges in Gender-Segregated Classes and Student Self-Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Sandra L.; Ebbeck, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    It was of interest to determine if earlier research findings, where female students were particularly advantaged by the Team Building Through Physical Challenges (TBPC; Glover & Midura, 1992) program in a coeducational setting, would still be observed in gender-segregated physical education classes. A total of 260 female (n = 127) and male (n…

  8. Facebook Is a Source of Social Capital Building among University Students: Evidence From a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Syed Ali; Qazi, Wasim; Umer, Amna

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the influence of Facebook usage on building social capital among university students in Karachi by using a modified framework of technology acceptance model. Important information was gathered utilizing organized questionnaire containing items of Facebook intensity, social self-efficacy, perceived ease of use, perceived…

  9. Teachers' and Students' Perception of Instructional Supervision on Capacity Building in Electrical Installation Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Ogwa Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to ascertain teachers' and students perception of instructional supervision in relation to capacity building in electrical installation trade in technical colleges. Three research questions and a null hypothesis were employed to guide the study. Descriptive survey was adopted. A 23-item questionnaire was used to elicit…

  10. College Students Constructing Collective Knowledge of Natural Science History in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chai, Ching Sing; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates whether engaging college students (n = 42) in a knowledge building environment would help them work as a community to construct their collective knowledge of history of science and, accordingly, develop a more informed scientific view. The study adopted mixed-method analyses and data mainly came from surveys and student…

  11. Electromagnetic Radiation: A Curriculum Unit for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levandovsky, N.; Hawkins, I.; Malina, R. F.

    1994-05-01

    The main goal of the new satellite operations class offered by UC Berkeley in collaboration with San Francisco State University is to provide teachers with detailed information about the goals, phases, and results of NASA's Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite mission. One of the outcomes of this class is to create new lesson plans, curricula for elective courses, and non-traditional teaching techniques and methods, all of which may be incorporated in schools in order to develop students' cognitive interest in science. The information about this unique NASA satellite mission may be presented to high school students in many different ways: class discussions, extra-curricular research assignments, expositions for school museums of science, computer animations, science conferences, educational games, etc. Another approach is to infuse the material related to this project directly into the existing science curricula. The unit ``Electromagnetic Radiation'' presents us with a variety of opportunities to include scientific information related to the EUVE mission in the most natural way. The following issues related to modern astrophysics may be introduced and discussed in this unit: the position that EUV radiation occupies on the electromagnetic spectrum, the sources that emit this type of radiation, the properties and characteristics of this radiation in comparison with other types of electromagnetic waves, and the methods used to detect and analyze EUV and other types of radiation during NASA missions. We will present an overview and a specific detailed example related to this curriculum unit. This work has been supported by NASA contract NAS5-29298. Class support has been provided by a NASA supplemental grant for education. Travel made possible by Research Corporation.

  12. Building Interactivity in Higher Education to Support Student Engagement in Spatial Problem Solving and Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulland, E.-K.; Veenendaal, B.; Schut, A. G. T.

    2012-07-01

    Problem-solving knowledge and skills are an important attribute of spatial sciences graduates. The challenge of higher education is to build a teaching and learning environment that enables students to acquire these skills in relevant and authentic applications. This study investigates the effectiveness of traditional face-to-face teaching and online learning technologies in supporting the student learning of problem-solving and computer programming skills, techniques and solutions. The student cohort considered for this study involves students in the surveying as well as geographic information science (GISc) disciplines. Also, students studying across a range of learning modes including on-campus, distance and blended, are considered in this study. Student feedback and past studies reveal a lack of student interest and engagement in problem solving and computer programming. Many students do not see such skills as directly relevant and applicable to their perceptions of what future spatial careers hold. A range of teaching and learning methods for both face-to-face teaching and distance learning were introduced to address some of the perceived weaknesses of the learning environment. These included initiating greater student interaction in lectures, modifying assessments to provide greater feedback and student accountability, and the provision of more interactive and engaging online learning resources. The paper presents and evaluates the teaching methods used to support the student learning environment. Responses of students in relation to their learning experiences were collected via two anonymous, online surveys and these results were analysed with respect to student pass and retention rates. The study found a clear distinction between expectations and engagement of surveying students in comparison to GISc students. A further outcome revealed that students who were already engaged in their learning benefited the most from the interactive learning resources and

  13. Modelling, experimentation and simulation of a reversible HP/ORC unit to get a Positive Energy Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumont, Olivier; Carmo, Carolina; Quoilin, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    covering the building annual heating needs and, furthermore, electricity is produced thanks to the surplus of heat in a so-called HP/ORC reversible unit. This paper focus on these three main points: sizing, experimentation and simulation of the reversible unit. First, an optimal sizing of the components...... storage, the solar roof and the reversible HP/ORC unit is developed and allows to perform a sensivity analysis. Annual results show that this technology leads to a Positive Energy Building....... and fluid R134a shows promising performance with a net electrical energy produced over one year reaching 4030 kWh. Following that, a prototype has been built and has proven the feasibility of the technology. Finally, a simulation code including the building, the ground heat exchanger, the thermal energy...

  14. In e-mail to students, Annan urges communication to build understanding

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Using the original computer on which the Internet was created, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan today sent an electronic message to young people around the world urging them to keep communicating with each other to build bridges of understanding between cultures and societies" (1 page)

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LIFE BUILDING SKILLS AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT OF STUDENTS WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR COUNSELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O. ADENIYI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hearing impairment contributes greatly to social and psychological deficits of the affected individuals, which can affect their interpersonal relation. The inability to hear and communicate effectively results in adjustment problem that leads to social isolation. Objectives: The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between life building skills and social adjustment of students with hearing impairment. Methods: The study employed descriptive survey research design. The samples consisted of 150 students with hearing impairment purposively selected from two inclusive schools in Lagos state, Nigeria. The samples comprised of 65 boys and 85 girls with age range between 15 and 18 years in the Senior Secondary School. The instruments used for data collection were Life building skills inventory (adapted with reliability of 0.80 and Social adjustment scale (Self developed. The instruments consisted of two sections namely: A&B. Section A of Life building skills contained bio- data of the respondents, while B contained 3 subscales: Self-efficacy inventory adapted from Schwarzer and Jerusalem 1995 with reliability of 0.85, Decision-making inventory adapted from Rowe 1997 with reliability of 0.75, Assertiveness inventory adapted from Aberti and Emmons 1995 with reliability of 0.80. The self-constructed Social Adjustment scale contained 10 items probing questions with reliability of 0.69. Data collected was analysed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation and Multiple Regression. Results: The results revealed relative contributions of some life building skills to social adjustment of students with hearing impairment. There were joint contributions of the independent variables to dependent variable, while decision-making contributed mostly. Conclusion: This study examined relationship between life building skills and social adjustment of students with hearing impairment with a bid to provide adequate counseling services. It was

  16. Examining the Adjustment Problems of Kenyan International Students Attending Colleges and Universities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokua, Rodgers Nyandieka

    2012-01-01

    The literature on international students from Africa, and particularly Kenya, is very limited despite the significant number of Kenyan international students attending colleges and universities in the United States. Therefore, the intent of this study was to examine the adjustment problems of Kenyan international students in the United States. The…

  17. A Study of the Life and Culture of Young Korean Students Studying in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo Hyoo

    2010-01-01

    The number of young Korean students studying abroad--many moving to English-speaking countries--has increased. This article describes the lives of young Korean students studying in the United States. For data collection, unstructured interviews were conducted with young Korean students studying in the Northwestern states of the United States.…

  18. A Study of the Life and Culture of Young Korean Students Studying in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo Hyoo

    2010-01-01

    The number of young Korean students studying abroad--many moving to English-speaking countries--has increased. This article describes the lives of young Korean students studying in the United States. For data collection, unstructured interviews were conducted with young Korean students studying in the Northwestern states of the United States.…

  19. Mars Exploration Student Data Teams: Building Foundations and Influencing Students to Pursue STEM Careers through Experiences with Authentic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, D.; Grigsby, B.; Murchie, S. L.; Buczkowski, D.; Seelos, K. D.; Nair, H.; McGovern, A.; Morgan, F.; Viviano, C. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Thompson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT) immerses diverse teams of high school and undergraduate students in an authentic research Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) based experience and allows students to be direct participants in the scientific process by working with scientists to analyze data sets from NASA's Mars program, specifically from the CRISM instrument. MESDT was created by Arizona State University's Mars Education Program, and is funded through NASA's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars or CRISM, an instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Students work with teacher mentors and CRISM team members to analyze data, develop hypotheses, conduct research, submit proposals, critique and revise work. All students begin the program with basic Mars curriculum lessons developed by the MESDT education team. This foundation enables the program to be inclusive of all students. Teachers have reported that populations of students with diverse academic needs and abilities have been successful in this program. The use of technology in the classroom allows the MESDT program to successfully reach a nationwide audience and funding provided by NASA's CRISM instrument allows students to participate free of charge. Recent changes to the program incorporate a partnership with United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a CRISM sponsored competitive scholarship for two teams of students to present their work at the annual USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting. Returning MESDT teachers have attributed an increase in student enrollment and interest to this scholarship opportunity. The 2013 USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting was held in Washington DC which provided an opportunity for the students to meet with their Senators at the US Capitol to explain the science work they had done throughout the year as well as the impact that the program had had on their goals for the future. This opportunity extended to the students by the

  20. Interdisciplinary Service-Learning: Building Student Competencies through the Cross-Cultural Parent Groups Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Belliveau

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Changing demographics and an emphasis on competency-based social work education call for innovative approaches to the delivery of curricular content. In an effort to introduce BSW students to the socio-political issues facing the local Latino immigrant community, a service-learning project was developed in collaboration with the Spanish Language Department and a local middle school. An analysis of outcomes from social work student evaluations showed that students engaged with the community and issues in new and unexpected ways. Through their engagement in a cross-cultural group project, students developed greater cultural competency, honed their group practice skills in an unfamiliar context, provided a needed service to the community, and raised their awareness about the working conditions of new immigrants as part of a developing framework for social action. Details and implications of the project as a means to build student competencies are described.

  1. Making sense of data: How public health graduate students build theory through qualitative research techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Mary C

    2007-01-01

    Data interpretation and theory building are two key skills often taught in health sciences qualitative methods courses. However, little is known about how novice researchers make sense of data, as well as how their thought processes differ from those of expert researchers. In this classroom research project, the author explores how qualitative methods students in a public health graduate program describe their processes of making sense of data and building theory. She then compares these processes with "expert" guidelines to draw implications for how to enhance teaching in a qualitative research class.

  2. Acculturation Experiences of Taiwanese Students during Exchanges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annie (Ya-Ping); Bei, Lienti; DeVaney, Sharon A.

    2007-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the acculturation experience of Taiwanese students who attended universities in the United States as exchange students. Hofstede's four dimensions of culture provided a framework for developing questions. Eight exchange students were interviewed. Taiwanese students realized there was a lower power distance…

  3. Acculturation Experiences of Taiwanese Students during Exchanges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annie (Ya-Ping); Bei, Lienti; DeVaney, Sharon A.

    2007-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the acculturation experience of Taiwanese students who attended universities in the United States as exchange students. Hofstede's four dimensions of culture provided a framework for developing questions. Eight exchange students were interviewed. Taiwanese students realized there was a lower power distance…

  4. A National Benchmarking Survey of Student Counselling Centres/Units in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, C. D.; Pretorius, K.; van der Westhuizen, L. R.

    2010-01-01

    Students experience various challenges during their studies, such as personal problems, academic difficulties and mental health problems. Therefore, student counselling centres/units play a valuable role in providing support systems for students in need. The most frequent problems South African students experience are relationship problems and…

  5. International student mobility and highly skilled migration: a comparative study of Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Qianru; Wotherspoon, Terry

    2013-12-01

    Against the backdrop of demographic change and economic reconfiguration, recruiting international students, especially those at tertiary level, has drawn growing attention from advanced economies as part of a broad strategy to manage highly skilled migration. This comparative study focuses on three English speaking countries receiving international students: Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. International student policies, in particular entry and immigration regulations, and the trends in student mobility since the late 1990s are examined drawing on secondary data. By exploring the issue from the political economy perspectives, this study identifies distinct national strategies for managing student mobility, determines key factors shaping the environment of student migration in each nation, and addresses the deficiency of human capital theory in the analysis of global competition for high skills.

  6. Study on the factors that influence the intention of college students to participate in the green building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung ChienJen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of green building has been extended for a period of time on both sides of the Taiwan Strait. However, there still is curiosity and skepticism in Fujian on green building. While in Taiwan, villages are filled with green-evolved houses and modern environmental farmhouses. With Theory of Planned Behavior as the framework, this study investigates influences of college students’ attitude toward green building, subjective norms of green building and perceived behavioral control of green building on the intention to participate in the green building. Findings show that college students’ attitude toward green building and the perceived behavioral control of green building significantly influence the intention to participate in the green building, but “subjective norms of green building” doesn’t have significant influence. The reason is probably that college students are at the rebellious stage and have high self consciousness and independent viewpoints.

  7. Modelling, experimentation and simulation of a reversible HP/ORC unit to get a Positive Energy Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumont, Olivier; Carmo, Carolina; Quoilin, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative building comprising a heat pump connected to a solar roof and a geothermal heat exchanger. This unit is able to invert its cycle and operate as an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). The solar roof is producing large amount of heat throughout the year. This allows...

  8. Student Destination Choices in Higher Education: Exploring Attitudes of Brazilian Students to Study in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Cross-border education provides evidence about international student destination choice including the push and pull model of international student choice. The research upon which this article is based, into Brazilian students' decisions to study at universities in the United Kingdom, reveals some particular barriers such as cost, negative past…

  9. Parallel Execution of Functional Mock-up Units in Buildings Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmen, Ozgur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutaro, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); New, Joshua Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-30

    A Functional Mock-up Interface (FMI) defines a standardized interface to be used in computer simulations to develop complex cyber-physical systems. FMI implementation by a software modeling tool enables the creation of a simulation model that can be interconnected, or the creation of a software library called a Functional Mock-up Unit (FMU). This report describes an FMU wrapper implementation that imports FMUs into a C++ environment and uses an Euler solver that executes FMUs in parallel using Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP). The purpose of this report is to elucidate the runtime performance of the solver when a multi-component system is imported as a single FMU (for the whole system) or as multiple FMUs (for different groups of components as sub-systems). This performance comparison is conducted using two test cases: (1) a simple, multi-tank problem; and (2) a more realistic use case based on the Modelica Buildings Library. In both test cases, the performance gains are promising when each FMU consists of a large number of states and state events that are wrapped in a single FMU. Load balancing is demonstrated to be a critical factor in speeding up parallel execution of multiple FMUs.

  10. Institutional Development to Build a Succesfull Local Collective Action in Forest Management from Arau Watershed Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursidah Nursidah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to build institution model of sustainable forest management, through analysis of action arena, community attributes and forest management rules in Arau Watershed Unit Management Area.  To achieve sustainable forest management, recognition and incorporation of local institutions in forest policy formulation is very important because it had great potential for collective action and had characteristics of common pools resources sustainable management needed.  To achieve a successful local collective action, the institution must be had: the rules in use suitable with local community norms; the organization has power to give reward and punishment as well as recognized and respected by society; specific management according location; rules of the game was made participatory; there are economic incentives for owners and users; there is an instrument for controlling sustainable use; and conflict resolution through negotiations to reach an concencus agreement.  The finding of institutional models  analysis  show  that  co-management  model  between government and local communities, called Nagari Forest Management Model is more suitable, because it gives greater opportunities for indigenous rights recognition to communal forest, until the capacity of villages get better, then the choice of forest management can be shifted into Nagari Community Based Forest Management Model.Keywords: sustainable forest management, institution, collective action, nagari

  11. Covalent Organic Framework Material bearing Phloroglucinol Building Units as a Potent Anticancer Agent

    KAUST Repository

    Bhanja, Piyali

    2017-08-23

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) having periodicity in pores of nanoscale dimensions can be suitably designed for the organic building units bearing reactive functional groups at their surfaces. Thus, they are an attractive option as an anticancer agent to overcome the limitations of chemotherapy. Herein, we first report a new porous biodegradable nitrogen containing COF material, EDTFP-1 (ethylenedianiline-triformyl phloroglucinol), synthesized using 4,4\\'-ethylenedianiline and 2,4,6-triformylphloroglucinol via Schiff base condensation reaction. EDTFP-1 exhibited 3D-hexagonal porous structure with average pores of ca. 1.5 nm dimension. Here, we have explored the anti-cancer potentiality of EDTFP-1. Result demonstrated an enhanced cytotoxicity was observed against four cancer cells HCT 116, HepG2, A549, and MIA-Paca2 with significant lower IC50 on HCT116 cells. Additionally, EDTFP-1-induced cell death was associated with the characteristic apoptotic changes like cell membrane blebbing, nuclear DNA fragmentation, externalization of phosphatidylserine from the cell membrane followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential as well as modulation of pro and anti-apoptotic proteins. Further, the result depicted a direct correlation between the generations of ROS with mitochondrial-dependant apoptosis through the involvement of p53 phosphorylation upon EDTFP-1 induction, suggesting this COF material is a novel chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment.

  12. Characterization report for Area 23, Building 650 Leachfield, Corrective Action Unit Number 94, Nevada Test Site. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-27

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Number 94, Building 650 Leachfield, is an historic laboratory disposal unit located in Area 23 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. The objectives of this project were twofold: characterize subsurface conditions at the CAU with respect to the on-site disposal unit, and provide sufficient information to develop a closure strategy for the leachfield. To this end, subsurface sampling was conducted in the vicinity of the piping above the distribution box, under and around the distribution box, and within the leachfield.

  13. The Ecological Marine Units Project as a Framework for Collaborative Data Exploration, Distribution, and Knowledge Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Dawn; Sayre, Roger; Breyer, Sean; Butler, Kevin; VanGraafeiland, Keith; Goodin, Kathy; Kavanaugh, Maria; Costello, Mark; Cressie, Noel; Basher, Zeenatul; Harris, Peter; Guinotte, John

    2017-04-01

    scientific research on species distributions and their relationships to the marine physical environment. To further benefit the community and facilitate collaborate knowledge building, data products are shared openly and interoperably via www.esri.com/ecological-marine-units. This includes provision of 3D point mesh and EMU clusters at the surface, bottom, and within the water column in varying formats via download, web services or web apps, as well as generic algorithms and GIS workflows that scale from global to regional and local. A major aim is for the community members to may move the research forward with higher-resolution data from their own field studies or areas of interest, with the original EMU project team assisting with GIS implementation (especially via a new online discussion forum), or hosting of additional data products as needed.

  14. Building a "National Civilization" at Home and Abroad: International Students and Changing U.S. Political Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Fanta

    2011-01-01

    The research study examines the relationship of international students to changing U.S. political economy. The research attempts to move international students from the periphery to the center of understanding the changing U.S. political economy in the twenty-first century. I argue that international students play an important role in building a…

  15. Building a scholar in writing (BSW): A model for developing students' critical writing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Annette; Zanchetta, Margareth; Velasco, Divine; Pon, Gordon; Hassan, Aafreen

    2015-11-01

    Several authors have highlighted the importance of writing in developing reflective thinking skills, transforming knowledge, communicating expressions, and filling knowledge gaps. However, difficulties with higher order processing and critical analysis affect students' ability to write critical and thoughtful essays. The Building a Scholar in Writing (BSW) model is a 6-step process of increasing intricacies in critical writing development. Development of critical writing is proposed to occur in a processed manner that transitions from presenting simple ideas (just bones) in writing, to connecting ideas (connecting bones), to formulating a thesis and connecting key components (constructing a skeleton), to supporting ideas with evidence (adding muscle), to building creativity and originality (adding essential organs), and finally, developing strong, integrated, critical arguments (adding brain). This process symbolically represents the building of a scholar. The idea of building a scholar equates to progressively giving life and meaning to a piece of writing with unique scholarly characteristics. This progression involves a transformation in awareness, thinking, and understanding, as well as advancement in students' level of critical appraisal skills.

  16. Teaching optimization of students at design of buildings and structures foundations

    OpenAIRE

    Misura, Lid. V.; MISURA Liub. V.; Poltorachenko, N. I.

    2016-01-01

    Raising of problem. According to world statistics, more than 75 % of all violations of the normal operation of buildings and structures is due to deficiencies in the design, construction and operation of bases and foundations [1]. The costs to eliminate these negative effects can be compared only with the initial cost of construction, it speaks about the relevance of teaching subjects related to the design of foundations. On the other hand increased demands on the students' knowledge, raises ...

  17. 48 CFR 3036.104-90 - Authority for one-step turn-key design-build contracting for the United States Coast Guard (USCG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... turn-key design-build contracting for the United States Coast Guard (USCG). 3036.104-90 Section 3036... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS General 3036.104-90 Authority for one-step turn-key design-build contracting for the United States...

  18. Chinese International Students in the United States: Demographic Trends, Motivations, Acculturation Features and Adjustment Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2011-01-01

    To date, few studies have focused solely upon understanding the unique characteristics of Chinese international students in the United States. This inquiry examines what Chinese international students' demographic trends are over decades, what their motivations are for studying in the United States, what the unique features of their group…

  19. The Global Energy Situation on Earth, Student Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the student guide in a set of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. Contents of this guide are: (1) Introduction to the unit; (2) The "EARTH" program; (3) Exercises; and (4) Sources of information on the energy crisis. This guide supplements a simulation which allows students to analyze different aspects of…

  20. Water Quality Monitoring: An Environmental Studies Unit for Biology 20/30. Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Environment, Edmonton. Environmental Education Resources Branch.

    The objective of this environmental studies unit is to establish a water quality monitoring project for high school students in Alberta while simultaneously providing a unit which meets the objectives of the Biology 20 program (and which may also be used in Biology 10 and 30). Through this project, students assist in the collection,…

  1. Social Identity and the Shift of Student Affairs Staff to the Academic Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of student affairs professionals working at Arizona State University who shifted from a student affairs unit to perform similar work in an academic unit. The conceptual framework for this exploration was social identity theory (Tajfel, 1974), which asserts that individuals develop a self-concept or image that…

  2. Facilitating Students' Conceptual Change and Scientific Reasoning Involving the Unit of Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Quen; She, Hsiao-Ching

    2010-01-01

    This article reports research from a 3 year digital learning project to unite conceptual change and scientific reasoning in the learning unit of combustion. One group of students had completed the course combining conceptual change and scientific reasoning. The other group of students received conventional instruction. In addition to the…

  3. Facilitating Students' Conceptual Change and Scientific Reasoning Involving the Unit of Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Quen; She, Hsiao-Ching

    2010-01-01

    This article reports research from a 3 year digital learning project to unite conceptual change and scientific reasoning in the learning unit of combustion. One group of students had completed the course combining conceptual change and scientific reasoning. The other group of students received conventional instruction. In addition to the…

  4. Getting Their Hands Dirty: Qualitative Study on Hands-on Learning for Architectural Students in Design-build Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunaibi B. Abdullah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study provides an in-depth perspective of hands-on learning through the observation and analysis of architectural students' views in a design-build program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln during the fall semester of 2008. Qualitative data was gathered from 14 participants involved in the construction of a low energy double-storey house in the city of Lincoln, Nebraska. The study inventoried the requisite characteristics of a design-build course. Participants' views and activities were studied to ascribe the qualitative benefits of hands-on learning. In addition, students' motivation towards hands-on activities were evaluated in reference to student confidence and independence levels towards their future career as architects, designers or other design-build professionals. The findings showed the design-build course could offer a specific knowledge that link between theoretical subjects and the practical expect of building contractions.

  5. The role of polar, lamdba (Λ)-shaped building units in noncentrosymmetric inorganic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, Martin D; Gautier, Romain; Yeon, Jeongho; Moore, Donald T; Nino, Juan C; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R

    2012-05-01

    A methodology for the design of polar, inorganic structures is demonstrated here with the packing of lambda (Λ)-shaped basic building units (BBUs). Noncentrosymmetric (NCS) solids with interesting physical properties can be created with BBUs that lack an inversion center and are likely to pack into a polar configuration; previous methods to construct these solids have used NCS octahedra as BBUs. Using this methodology to synthesize NCS solids, one must increase the coordination of the NCS octahedra with maintenance of the noncentrosymmetry of the bulk. The first step in this progression from an NCS octahedron to an inorganic NCS solid is the formation of a bimetallic BBU. This step is exemplified with the compound CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7): this compound, presented here, crystallizes in an NCS structure with ordered, isolated [Cu(H(2)O)(5)](2+) cations and [VOF(4)(H(2)O)](2-) anions into Λ-shaped, bimetallic BBUs to form CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(6)·H(2)O, owing to the Jahn-Teller distortion of Cu(2+). Conversely, the centrosymmetric heterotypes with the same formula MVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7) (M(II) = Co, Ni, and Zn) exhibit ordered, isolated [VOF(4)(H(2)O)](2-) and [M(H(2)O)(6)](2+) ionic species in a hydrogen bond network. CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7) exhibits a net polar moment while the heterotypes do not; this demonstrates that Λ-shaped BBUs give a greater probability for and, in this case, lead to NCS structures.

  6. Forming Social Justice Projects: Student Activists Reflect on Coalition-Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren E. Lund

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Student activists share their experiences with racism and more specifically, their attempts to form school diversity initiatives. The author outlines a problematic lack of engagement of student activists in the scholarly literature on social justice, particularly related to their undervalued role as leaders in school-based antiracist coalitions. Excerpts from in-depth interviews with seven student participants in western Canadian schools offer new understandings on the potential of school-based activists. They explain the challenges and successes in building and sustaining activist coalitions and in pursuing their social justice efforts beyond school. Their contributions represent new voices to join the ongoing conversation in educational research and community activism.

  7. Interlocking Toy Building Blocks as Hands-On Learning Modules for Blind and Visually Impaired Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Samuel; Schreck, James O.; Griffin, Kameron; Dabke, Rajeev B.

    2016-01-01

    Interlocking toy building blocks (e.g., Lego) as chemistry learning modules for blind and visually impaired (BVI) students in high school and undergraduate introductory or general chemistry courses are presented. Building blocks were assembled on a baseplate to depict the relative changes in the periodic properties of elements. Modules depicting…

  8. Building Assets Reducing Risks: Academic Success for All Students through Positive Relationships and Use of Real-Time Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsello, Maryann; Sharma, Anu; Jerabek, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Building Assets Reducing Risks (BARR) is a social emotional model that achieves academic outcomes through combining use of real-time student data with proven relationship-building strategies and intensive teacher collaboration to prevent course failure. BARR is a recipient of US Department of Education "Investing in Innovation (i3)"…

  9. High school students' science academic achievement: The effect of the Lemov positive framing trust-building technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliette, Linda Marie

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of a trust-building technique called "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) on the level of student-teacher trust and students' science academic achievement. The existing literature was reviewed under the constructs of trust, types of trust, trust-building strategies, and student academic achievement. The identified problem is a lack of research into the effect of trust from the high school student perspective and the effect of trust on student academic achievement in science. In addition, there is no empirical evidence to support the effectiveness of the "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention. The study involved a volunteer, convenience sample of 9th-grade science students at one high school in Northern California (N=240). The study employed a quasi-experimental, pretest, posttest non-equivalent control group design to examine the level of student trust in the teacher, using the "Student trust in faculty scale" (Forsyth, Adams, & Hoy, 2011, p. 180), and the students' academic achievement, according to the Integrated Process Skills Test II (Okey, Wise, & Burns, 1982). The independent variable was the "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention; the two dependent variables were the level of student-teacher trust and student academic achievement. The composite data from the "Student trust in faculty scale" and the academic achievement test were evaluated by a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Results of this study indicated that the null hypothesis was accepted. The "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention did not have a significant effect on either the student-teacher trust level or academic achievement in science.

  10. Cigarette smoking among Korean international college students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jaesin; Seo, Dong-Chul; Nelson, Toben F; Lohrmann, David K

    2013-01-01

    This study explored (1) the prevalence of cigarette smoking among South Korean international college students in the United States, (2) differences in smoking between on- and off-campus living arrangements, and (3) predictors of an increase in smoking over time in the United States An online survey was completed by 1,201 students at 52 4-year US universities (34% response rate). The overall smoking prevalence was 43.5%. The smoking rate (29.0%) of female students was higher than that (4%) of female college students in South Korea. Sex, living place, living situation, length of stay as a student in the United States, home smoking rules, campus-wide tobacco-free policies, and levels of acculturative stress, anxiety, and depression were significantly associated with an increase in smoking (p students on US college campuses, targeted prevention efforts for these students may be warranted.

  11. Foreign Students in the United States: Is the Welcome Mat Out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Margot Sanders

    Problems facing foreign students in American colleges and universities are examined. With the number of foreign students studying in the United States increasing each year (over 203,000 in 1976-77), services for foreign students need to be expanded with more emphasis on improving orientation programs. Preadmission screening and counseling are…

  12. The Higher Education Academic Readiness of Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Ronald; McChesney, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the state of United States student academic readiness for higher education from a global perspective utilizing data from the Organization of Economic and Co-operation and Development (OECD) and Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which tests over a half a million 15 year old student's skills and knowledge.…

  13. Identity Development of Chinese Graduate Students in the United States: A Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigated the lived experiences of identity development of Chinese graduate students in the United States. Through in-depth interviews with 15 participants at a Midwestern research university, the study found that the majority of Chinese graduate students came with a strong student identity that conflated with…

  14. School Hopscotch: A Comprehensive Review of K-12 Student Mobility in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Richard O.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an integrative review of the extant literature on K-12 student mobility in the United States. Student mobility is a widespread phenomenon with significant policy implications. Changing schools is most prevalent among minority and low-income students in urban school districts. There is an ongoing debate about whether student…

  15. Beyond "Push" and "Pull" Explanations, Asian-Indian Graduate Students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sarath; Carspecken, Phil

    The findings of a qualitative study of migrant graduate students from India who now reside in the United State is presented. Through a series of interviews with students attending three U.S. universities, a model of the migratory process was developed. Much recent work on migratory theory has focused on the lack of opportunities in the students'…

  16. Edexcel A2 physics student unit 5 : physics from creation to collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Perfect for revision, these guides explain the unit requirements, summarise the content and include specimen questions with graded answers. Each full-colour New Edition Student Unit Guide provides ideal preparation for your unit exam:.; Feel confident you understand the unit: each guide comprehensively covers the unit content and includes topic summaries, knowledge check questions and a reference index.; Get to grips with the exam requirements: the specific skills on which you will be tested are explored and explained.; Analyse exam-style questions: graded student responses will help you focus

  17. Water-based synthesis and characterisation of a new Zr-MOF with a unique inorganic building unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitschat, S; Reinsch, H; Stock, N

    2016-10-20

    A new, microporous Zr-MOF was obtained using 2,5-pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (H2PzDC). The linker leads to the formation of a new 1D inorganic building unit composed of μ-OH bridged {Zr6O4(OH4)} clusters which are arranged in a hexagonal array and connected by the PzDC(2-) ions. The structure was determined from powder X-ray diffraction data.

  18. Building Bridges to China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasta, Stephanie; Scott, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Describes a theme cycle called "Building Bridges to China" developed for third grade students that focuses on the similarities between the lives of children and families in China and the United States. Explains that the theme cycle addresses the National Geography Standards and three of the National Council for the Social Studies standards. (CMK)

  19. Dubious Causes of No Interest to Students? The Development of National Union of Students in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In February 1992, the National Union of Students of the United Kingdom celebrated its 70th anniversary, however there were those within government that were determined that NUS would not see another decade. This article examines the ideological roots of this hostility to student organisations and examines NUS' response to it and the consequent…

  20. First-Year College Students' Strengths Awareness: Building a Foundation for Student Engagement and Academic Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Stubblefield, Robin

    2014-01-01

    As strengths-based approaches continue to gain steady momentum in colleges and universities, a distinct need for scholarship on the benefits of strengths-based practices has emerged. In fall 2011, all first-year students at a university in the Midwest were invited to discover their strengths by taking the Clifton StrengthsFinder. The purpose of…

  1. Building Social Change Oriented Leadership Capacity Among Student Organizations: Developing Students and Campuses Simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Acuña Avilez, Arely; Drivalas, Yianna; Wheaton, Marissiko M

    2017-09-01

    This chapter highlights nontraditional forms of leadership development in student organizations. Using the social change model for leadership as a framework, the authors discuss the ways in which collectivist and activist approaches can result in similar skills obtained through traditional forms of leadership development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  2. Building Students' Reasoning Skills by Promoting Student-Led Discussions in an Algebra II Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Anna F.; González, Gloriana

    2013-01-01

    Current research and professional organizations call for greater emphasis on reasoning and sense making in algebra (Chazan, 2000; Cuoco, Goldenberg, & Mark, 1996; Harel & Sowder, 2005; National Council of Teachers of Mathematics [NCTM], 2009, 2010). This paper illustrates how students in an Algebra II class had opportunities to develop…

  3. Engineering Encounters: The Cat in the Hat Builds Satellites. A Unit Promoting Scientific Literacy and the Engineering Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmat, Abeera P.; Owens, Marissa C.

    2016-01-01

    This column presents ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue shares information about a unit promoting scientific literacy and the engineering design process. The integration of engineering with scientific practices in K-12 education can promote creativity, hands-on learning, and an improvement in students'…

  4. Learning Styles, Socio-Demographic Variables and Academic Performance of Building Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Alducin-Ochoa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives guiding this research were to determine the dominant learning style of the first year Building engineering students (University of Seville, the influence of the style on the grades in each school subject, and if learning style is influenced by socio-demographic variables. The sample was composed of 161 students, who completed the Honey-Alonso questionnaire (CHAEA and the CDAT. Descriptive and correlational methods were used. For the analysis of the data, a univariate (one-way ANOVA descriptive study was performed, and the non-parametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests, both with a confidence level of 95% (σ=.05 were used. The results show the predominance of the reflective style, and the fact that grades as a function of styles vary depending on the school subject. No significant differences were found in the variables gender, university admission scores, type of school (private or public of the study centers attended previous to university. Significant differences were found for some styles in the variables age, type of university admission, and if a student had to work as well as to study. The conclusions highlight the need to develop teaching strategies that encompass all the styles to improve performance, as well as the need to modify the teaching practices for the students to develop the rest of the styles in a balanced manner. This latest aspect is important so that the students can freely operate professionally, as the Engineering profession requires having all four characteristic styles simultaneously.

  5. Clinical teaching of student nurses by unit managers of selected hospitals in Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LA Murathi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive nature of nurse training needs the involvement of almost all health team personnel, including unit managers to gain practical experience and learn to correlate theory and practice. The overall aim of the study was to explore and describe the experiences of unit managers regarding teaching of student nurses in the clinical area and to develop recommendations that will enhance clinical teaching, for the production of competent future nurse practitioners who will render quality care to patients. A qualitative design, which is explorative, descriptive and contextual in nature, was employed, utilizing a phenomenological approach to capture the experiences of unit managers regarding teaching of student nurses at selected hospitals, where students are allocated for their clinical exposure. Ethical measures as well as measures to ensure trustworthiness were adhered to. In-depth phenomenological interviews were conducted with unit managers who shared their experiences regarding clinical teaching of student nurses. Data analysis was done according to Tesch’s (1990 open coding method. One major theme emerged, namely that unit managers experienced problems when doing clinical teaching of student nurses. Based on the findings the following recommendations were made: Colleges should open a two-way communication with unit managers, involvement of unit managers in the activities that take place at the college like courses, seminars and workshops on clinical teaching, learning contracts should be developed for the students and issues of clinical learning should be addressed and unit managers should be included in both summative and formative evaluations.

  6. Analysis of theoretical and real values of heat consumption in units of the apartment building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavloková, Petra; Richter, Aleš; Janša, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is focused on heat consumption in the apartment building and the factors affecting it. The apartment building has three entrances and four over ground floors and one underground floor. In the entire apartment building there are 24 flats, which they are identical (kitchen, bedroom, living room and bathroom). In flats on radiators were installed the ratio heat meters according to Act 318/2012 Coll. by the Metrology Act. The ratio heat meters are used for fair billing of the heat costs for all owners. Continuous monitoring of the actual heat consumption in the flats were collected data of the real heat consumption. The theoretical values of heat consumption were counted in software ENERGIE. The apartment building is divided into24 flats and the calculation was made for each of them. The theoretical and real heat consumption was compared.

  7. Moral development of first-year pharmacy students in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie; Becket, Gordon; Wilson, Sarah Ellen

    2014-03-12

    To investigate the moral development of pharmacy students over their first academic year of study at a university in the United Kingdom. Pharmacy students completed Defining Issues Test (DIT) at the start of their first year (phase 1) and again at the end of their first year (phase 2) of the program. Pharmacy students (N=116) had significantly higher moral reasoning at the beginning of their first year than by the end of it. Scores differed by students' gender and age; however, these findings differed between phase 1 and phase 2. First-year pharmacy students in the United Kingdom scored lower on moral reasoning than did pharmacy students in the United States and Canada.

  8. Mars mission program for primary students: Building student and teacher skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Naomi; Pakakis, Michael; Christie, Ian

    2011-09-01

    The Victorian Space Science Education Centre (VSSEC) scenario-based programs, including the Mission to Mars and Mission to the Orbiting Space Laboratory, utilize methodologies such as hands-on applications, immersive learning, integrated technologies, critical thinking and mentoring. The use of a scenario provides a real-life context and purpose to what students might otherwise consider disjointed information. These programs engage students in the areas of maths and science, and highlight potential career paths in science and engineering. The introduction of a scenario-based program for primary students engages students in maths and science at a younger age, addressing the issues of basic numeracy and science literacy, thus laying the foundation for stronger senior science initiatives. Primary students absorb more information within the context of the scenario, and presenting information they can see, hear, touch and smell creates a memorable learning and sensory experience. The mission also supports development of teacher skills in the delivery of hands-on science and helps build their confidence to teach science. The Primary Mission to the Mars Base gives primary school students access to an environment and equipment not available in schools. Students wear flight suits for the duration of the program to immerse them in the experience of being an astronaut. Astronauts work in the VSSEC Space Laboratory, which is transformed into a Mars base for the primary program, to conduct experiments in areas such as robotics, human physiology, microbiology, nanotechnology and environmental science. Specialist mission control software has been developed by La Trobe University Centre for Games Technology to provide age appropriate Information and Communication Technology (ICT) based problem solving and support the concept of a mission. Students in Mission Control observe the astronauts working in the space laboratory and talk to them via the AV system. This interactive

  9. Feedback Codes and Action Plans: Building the Capacity of First-Year Students to Apply Feedback to a Scientific Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Fiona L.; Yucel, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback can build self-assessment skills in students so that they become more competent and confident to identify and self-correct weaknesses in their work. In this study, we trialled a feedback code as part of an integrated programme of formative and summative assessment tasks, which provided feedback to first-year students on their…

  10. Ten Tips for Classroom Management: How to Improve Student Engagement and Build a Positive Climate for Learning and Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Lucas Educational Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This guide addresses the practical aspects of managing a classroom, with suggestions and resources appropriate for grades K-12. Most of the tips are applicable to students of all ages, but the actual techniques will look different for the various grades. For instance, "build community" might mean playing name games with elementary students but…

  11. Technological Supports for Onsite and Distance Education and Students' Perceptions of Acquisition of Thinking and Team-Building Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jennifer D. E.; Morin, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares students' perceptions of support provided in the acquisition of various thinking and team-building skills, resulting from the various activities, resources and technologies (ART) integrated into an upper level Distributed Computing (DC) course. The findings indicate that students perceived strong support for their acquisition…

  12. Putting More "Modern" in Modern Physics Education: A Knowledge Building Approach Using Student Questions and Ideas about the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Student-generated questions and ideas about our universe are the start of a rich and highly motivating learning environment. Using their curiosity-driven questions and ideas, students form Knowledge Building groups or "communities" where they plan, set goals, design questions for research, and assess the progress of their work, tasks…

  13. Feedback Codes and Action Plans: Building the Capacity of First-Year Students to Apply Feedback to a Scientific Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Fiona L.; Yucel, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback can build self-assessment skills in students so that they become more competent and confident to identify and self-correct weaknesses in their work. In this study, we trialled a feedback code as part of an integrated programme of formative and summative assessment tasks, which provided feedback to first-year students on their…

  14. Advancing Integrated STEM Learning through Engineering Design: Sixth-Grade Students' Design and Construction of Earthquake Resistant Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Lyn D.; King, Donna; Smeed, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    As part of a 3-year longitudinal study, 136 sixth-grade students completed an engineering-based problem on earthquakes involving integrated STEM learning. Students employed engineering design processes and STEM disciplinary knowledge to plan, sketch, then construct a building designed to withstand earthquake damage, taking into account a number of…

  15. A Hands-On Activity to Build Mastery of Intermolecular Forces and Its Impacts on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    The intermolecular forces activity presented in this article is designed to foster concept-building through students' use of concrete, manipulative objects, and it was developed to be pedagogically sound. Data analysis via pre- and posttesting and subsequent exam questions indicated that students who had the opportunity to participate in the…

  16. Building visual identity of scientific and research units and the role of visualization in cooperation with business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfreda Kamińska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for commercialization of scientific research leads to the necessity of changing the orientation of scientific-research units to marketing orientation, which is characterized by, among others, conducting research aimed at learning the clients’ needs and building better communication with the recipients. What is an important element of a unit’s marketing communication is its visual identity system, which the recipients use to build their opinion and their picture of the unit. The goal of this article is an attempt to define the key rules of designing visual identity of scientific and research institutions, as well as presenting the role of visualization in their cooperation with business. In the article the notions of image, identity, corporate identity and visual identity are subject to analysis. The article also presents the significance of visualization in the functioning of research and scientific units, elements of visual identity system and the rules of designing visual identity of scientific and research institutions. An analysis of chosen research-scientific units was carried out with regard to visualization.

  17. A Multi-Unit Project for Building Scientific Confidence via Authentic Research in Identification of Environmental Bacterial Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Chatfield

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This authentic research project is designed to identify environmental isolates by metabolic phenotypes and 16s sequence analysis and with an investigation of biofilm growth is presented as implemented in an upper-level microbiology lab course. Three units were used in the lab: one for basic metabolic identification, one for the 16s rDNA sequencing and a third for biofilm growth analysis. Assessment was by weekly notebook entries detailing the outcomes of each day in lab, providing relatively on-time feedback on student understanding and learning to both the student and the instructor. The intent for these units was for each to increase the uncertainty of the project outcomes and to challenge students to design projects with open-ended results. All student groups have been able to obtain DNA sequence data in the limited 6-7 weeks of the lab project. Students report increased confidence in their abilities and a general excitement about the project methods and results. The data produced by the students can be incorporated into larger research questions posed by the faculty running the course as determined by the source of the unknown bacterial isolates.

  18. Effective Teaching Factors and Student Reading Strategies as Predictors of Student Achievement in PISA 2009: The Case of China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingqi; Muñoz, Marco; King Hess, Kristin; Liu, Shujie

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated effective teaching factors and student reading strategies as predictors of student reading achievement in the United States and China. Participants were 10,348 students in the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) study, 5115 from China and 5233 from the United States. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA)…

  19. Contribution of unit managers to the training of student nurses in the Cape Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troskie, R; Guwa, S N; Booyens, S W

    1998-12-01

    The article is based on research conducted over the period 1993 to 1996 in the Cape Peninsula. The purpose of the study was to determine the contribution of unit managers towards the training of student nurses coming to their units for clinical practica. The sample consisted of student nurses training in the four nursing colleges in the Cape Peninsula, and the unit managers working in the health services accommodating students for clinical practica in the same area. The findings revealed that the majority of unit managers were teaching students whenever they had the opportunity. Generally unit managers were prepared for their teaching function, but many students were not satisfied with some clinical learning opportunities presented to them, for example drawing up patient care plans, discussing patients' treatment plans when handing over report, giving assistance regarding care decisions and lending support when students are confronted with patient care problems. There appears to be a need to educate unit managers regarding these and other aspects of the students' training programme.

  20. The Mental Health of University Students in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann

    2013-01-01

    There are increasing concerns globally about the mental health of students. In the UK, the actual incidence of mental disturbance is unknown, although university counselling services report increased referrals. This study assesses the levels of mental illness in undergraduate students to examine whether widening participation in education has…

  1. Students' Engagement with Facebook in a University Undergraduate Policing Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Zoe; Lauchs, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies are increasingly being used to support teaching in higher education courses. However, preliminary research has shown that students are using such technologies primarily for social purposes, rather than as a means of further engaging with academic content. This study examines a cohort of tertiary students' use of a Facebook…

  2. A Hands-on Exercise in Building Darcy Tubes to Improve Student Understanding of Groundwater Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Teaching undergraduate students about sustainability typically includes discussions of water resources and the flow of groundwater in aquifers. Understanding the flow of groundwater is a fundamental step for students, but one that can easily get mired in equations (e.g., Darcy's Law). In an effort to transform Darcy's Law, which describes flow of fluid through a porous medium, from an abstract concept to a hands-on experiment, I had undergraduate students build working "Darcy tubes" and calculate hydraulic conductivity during a three-hour lab period. At the beginning of the lab period, I presented the students with the materials: three pairs of plastic soda bottles with straight sides, glass tubing, pantyhose (for screens), rubber hosing, sieved sand in three grain sizes (1-2 mm, 0.5-1.0 mm, and 0.25-0.5 mm), and various types of tape and adhesive. After we discussed the basic design of a Darcy tube (inlet and outlet, with two piezometers), the students went to work. Real-time problem-solving was an integral (and exciting) part of the exercise. Within two hours, they had built three Darcy tubes, each filled with a different sand size. The students determined the cross-sectional area of each tube (A) and the distance between the two piezometers (L). We then ran the experiments, using tinted water so that we could more easily tell when the sand in the tubes was saturated. We measured discharge (Q) through the tube and marked the height of the water in each piezometer to calculate difference in hydraulic head (Δh). With the data we had collected, the students were able to calculate hydraulic conductivity (K) using a simple form of Darcy's Law: Q = -KA (Δh/L). Despite the simplicity of the Darcy tubes, the students' K values were reasonable for the sediment types that we used. Student comments on the Darcy tube exercise were overwhelmingly positive. The Darcy tubes could be used in a subsequent lab period for exploration of more advanced concepts, such as

  3. Student Perspectives on Oncology Curricula at United States Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, Brandon C; Golden, Daniel W; Brower, Jeffrey V; Braunstein, Steve E; Hirsch, Ariel E; Mattes, Malcolm D

    2017-08-07

    Delivering a cohesive oncology curriculum to medical students is challenging due to oncology's multidisciplinary nature, predominantly outpatient clinical setting, and lack of data describing effective approaches to teaching it. We sought to better characterize approaches to oncology education at US medical schools by surveying third and fourth year medical students who serve on their institution's curriculum committee. We received responses from students at 19 schools (15.2% response rate). Key findings included the following: (1) an under-emphasis of cancer in the curriculum relative to other common diseases; (2) imbalanced involvement of different clinical subspecialists as educators; (3) infrequent requirements for students to rotate through non-surgical oncologic clerkships; and (4) students are less confident in their knowledge of cancer treatment compared to basic science/natural history or workup/diagnosis. Based on these findings, we provide several recommendations to achieve robust multidisciplinary curriculum design and implementation that better balances the clinical and classroom aspects of oncology education.

  4. Student Nurses' Learning Needs & Expectations in the Clinical Learning Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Chabeli

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes and explores the clinical learning needs and expectations of student nurses. An exploratory, descriptive and qualitative design, which is contextual in nature, was used where a focus group interview was conducted with the final year basic students undergoing a four year comprehensive diploma course leading to registration as a professional nurse. Tecsh’s (in Cresswell, 1994:155 method of data analysis was employed. Eight categories were identified as follows: communication; role modelling; up-to-date knowledge and experience; continuous supervision; assessment and evaluation; scientific process; management; professional practice and student status. A recommendation deduced from the conclusions made on the identified clinical learning needs and expectations of the students should enable teachers to address the long standing problem of how students should learn.

  5. Breaking the Chain of Stereotyping. Building Student Awareness of the Effects of Sex-Role Stereotyping (Grades 7-12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysong, H. Eugene

    The five units for grades 7 through 12 contained in this booklet are intended to assist students in developing awareness of sex-role stereotyping barriers that they might erect and that could affect them and others as they make career-related decisions. All units are designed for groups composed of males and females. Each unit has these…

  6. A Unit on Deterministic Chaos for Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, D.; Assimopoulos, S.; Skordoulis, C.

    2013-01-01

    A unit aiming to introduce pre-service teachers of primary education to the limited predictability of deterministic chaotic systems is presented. The unit is based on a commercial chaotic pendulum system connected with a data acquisition interface. The capabilities and difficulties in understanding the notion of limited predictability of 18…

  7. Features of Knowledge Building in Biology: Understanding Undergraduate Students' Ideas about Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Katelyn; Wince, Tyler; Meddleton, Shanice; Bolger, Molly S

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that teaching and learning in molecular and cellular biology (MCB) is difficult. We used a new lens to understand undergraduate reasoning about molecular mechanisms: the knowledge-integration approach to conceptual change. Knowledge integration is the dynamic process by which learners acquire new ideas, develop connections between ideas, and reorganize and restructure prior knowledge. Semistructured, clinical think-aloud interviews were conducted with introductory and upper-division MCB students. Interviews included a written conceptual assessment, a concept-mapping activity, and an opportunity to explain the biomechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Student reasoning patterns were explored through mixed-method analyses. Results suggested that students must sort mechanistic entities into appropriate mental categories that reflect the nature of MCB mechanisms and that conflation between these categories is common. We also showed how connections between molecular mechanisms and their biological roles are part of building an integrated knowledge network as students develop expertise. We observed differences in the nature of connections between ideas related to different forms of reasoning. Finally, we provide a tentative model for MCB knowledge integration and suggest its implications for undergraduate learning.

  8. TEACHING OPTIMIZATION OF STUDENTS AT DESIGN OF BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES FOUNDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MISURA Lid. V.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. According to world statistics, more than 75 % of all violations of the normal operation of buildings and structures is due to deficiencies in the design, construction and operation of bases and foundations [1]. The costs to eliminate these negative effects can be compared only with the initial cost of construction, it speaks about the relevance of teaching subjects related to the design of foundations. On the other hand increased demands on the students' knowledge, raises the amount of information that needs to absorb at constant periods of instruction, which makes the current process optimization study of these disciplines. Purpose. The aim of the article is to present the software package that allows to facilitate and accelerate the calculation and check the parameters of foundations and bases for the design of buildings and structures. The software product is designed as an educational complex, which allows the student to help with the calculations in different levels of difficulty and test his knowledge. Conclusion. The program complex, which consists of a program for dimensioning the foundations, the program for calculating the parameters of the bases, of the database. It is confirmed stable operation of the school complex (the program, measures were taken to test the program, helped to make it stable. The training complex is designed only for shallow foundations, so the work will be continued.

  9. Alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland and the United Kingdom from 2002 to 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoren, M.P.; Demant, Jakob Johan; Shiely, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is a leading cause of global suffering. Europe reports the uppermost volume of alcohol consumption in the world, with Ireland and the United Kingdom reporting the highest levels of binge drinking and drunkenness. Levels of consumption are elevated among university students. Thus......, this literature review aims to summarise the current research on alcohol consumption among university students in the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom....

  10. Factors related to building loss due to wildfires in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia M. Alexandre; Susan I. Stewart; Nicholas S. Keuler; Murray K. Clayton; Miranda H. Mockrin; Avi Bar-Massada; Alexandra D. Syphard; Volker C. Radeloff

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire is globally an important ecological disturbance affecting biochemical cycles and vegetation composition, but also puts people and their homes at risk. Suppressing wildfires has detrimental ecological effects and can promote larger and more intense wildfires when fuels accumulate, which increases the threat to buildings in the wildland- urban interface...

  11. Contribution of unit managers to the training of student nurses in the Cape Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Troskie

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on research conducted over the period 1993 to 1996 in the Cape Peninsula. The purpose of the study was to determine the contribution of unit managers towards the training of student nurses coming to their units for clinical practice. The sample consisted of student nurses training in the four nursing colleges in the Cape Peninsula, and the unit managers working in the health services accommodating students for clinical practice in the same area. The findings revealed that the majority of unit managers were teaching students whenever they had the opportunity. Generally unit managers were prepared for their teaching function, but many students were not satisfied with some clinical learning opportunities presented to them, for example drawing up patient care plans, discussing patients’ treatment plans when handing over report, giving assistance regarding care decisions and lending support when students are confronted with patient care problems. There appears to be a need to educate unit managers regarding these and other aspects of the students’ training programme.

  12. High Rates of Tuberculosis and Opportunities for Prevention among International Students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jeffrey M; Reves, Randall R; Belknap, Robert W

    2016-04-01

    Foreign-born persons traveling on a student visa are not currently screened for tuberculosis on entry into the United States, despite residing in the United States for up to several years. To characterize the risk of tuberculosis in international students entering the United States and to identify strategies for early diagnosis and prevention in this population. Data were collected in 18 tuberculosis control jurisdictions in the United States. A cohort of 1,268 foreign-born patients of known visa status, diagnosed with active tuberculosis between 2004 and 2007, was used for analysis. Incidence rates were estimated on the basis of immigration data from study jurisdictions. Tuberculosis was diagnosed in 46 student residents, providing an annual estimate of 308 cases nationally. The estimated tuberculosis case rate in student residents was 48.1 cases per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval, 35.6-64.8), more than twice that of the general foreign-born population. Students identified by tuberculosis screening programs were more likely to be diagnosed within 6 months of U.S. arrival (75 vs. 6%; P students, 71% were diagnosed more than 1 year after U.S. arrival and only 6% were previously treated for latent tuberculosis infection. The tuberculosis case rate in foreign-born students is significantly higher than in other foreign-born individuals. Screening this group after arrival to the United States is an effective strategy for earlier diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

  13. [NIC as a tool for assessing competences of nursing students in clinical placement at surgical units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celma Vicente, Matilde; Ajuria-Imaz, Eloisa; Lopez-Morales, Manuel; Fernandez-Marín, Pilar; Menor-Castro, Alicia; Cano-Caballero Galvez, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the utility of a NIC standardized language to assess the extent of nursing student skills at Practicum in surgical units To identify the nursing interventions classification (NIC) that students can learn to perform in surgical units. To determine the level of difficulty in learning interventions, depending on which week of rotation in clinical placement the student is. Qualitative study using Delphi consensus technique, involving nurses with teaching experience who work in hospital surgical units, where students undertake the Practicum. The results were triangulated through a questionnaire to tutors about the degree of conformity. A consensus was reached about the interventions that students can achieve in surgical units and the frequency in which they can be performed. The level of difficulty of each intervention, and the amount of weeks of practice that students need to reach the expected level of competence was also determined. The results should enable us to design better rotations matched to student needs. Knowing the frequency of each intervention that is performed in each unit determines the chances of learning it, as well as the indicators for its assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Students Are As Mayflies: Strategies For Building Institutional Relationships To Enhance Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Students are like mayflies, they graduate. While undergraduate research programs, especially summer programs, may motivate individuals to take up science as a career, their impact is fleeting on the institutions that they come from. I will describe programs I created to meet this challenge. The NASA/Goddard Faculty and Student Team (FaST) grew out of the NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. The Center selected a faculty based on a short research proposal, CV, and letters of recommendation. Those applying tended to come from primarily undergraduate or smaller universities where research opportunities were limited. The faculty member selected a student, who was also supported by FaST. Among the pleasant surprises was how this motivated the faculty to find funding for additional students. Another surprise was that the faculty member acted as a mentor to summer research students from other programs working in the same laboratory. This occurred because the visiting faculty were in the lab full time without administrative duties and they were used to working with and advising undergraduates. To build the relationship the program funded travel for the NASA colleague to the team's university in the Fall. The NSF sponsored Partnership for Research and Education in Materials is run by the Division of Materials Research. It links together research universities and minority serving institutions. Our PREM at Howard incorporated both Johns Hopkins and Prince Georges Community College. In the last two years, Gallaudet University, a university for the deaf, has become a partner. As part of the five years award renewal, our research university partner has changed and is now Cornell. The PREM runs a summer research program that supports undergraduates from Howard, PGCC and Gallaudet. Howard and PGCC students have spent summers at Hopkins or Cornell. PGCC students first spend a summer at Howard. The PGCC and Gallaudet faculty select their students who will participate in the

  15. Using the arts in teaching and learning: building student capacity for community-based work in health psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Mulvey, Anne

    2008-03-01

    Perspectives have emerged within health psychology that focus on the social constitution of health and emphasize community development and social change strategies to reduce human suffering and improve quality of life. Education and training are needed to build student capacity in these areas. Our analysis, grounded in theoretical, empirical, and experiential evidences, suggests that the arts may play a leading role in building this student capacity for community research and action. Major themes are that the arts promote student understandings of the values, goals, and practices of community-based work and enable meaningful student roles in community-based partnerships. Narrative accounts of our use of creative writing, visual arts, poetry, film, and theater in classroom and community-based practice with students illustrate these themes.

  16. Optimization of a thermal storage unit combined with a biomass bioler for heating buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Butala, Vincenc; Stritih, Uroš

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a boiler with a built-in thermal storage unit is presented.The thermal storage unit is an insulated water tank that absorbs surplus heat from the boiler. The stored heat in the thermal storage unit makes it possible to heat even when the boiler is not operating, thus increasing the heating efficiency. A system with three components is described. The model of the system and the mathematical model were made using the TRNSYS program package and a test reference year (TRY). The...

  17. Coordinating Numeric and Linear Units: Elementary Students' Strategies for Locating Whole Numbers on the Number Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Geoffrey B.; Shaughnessy, Meghan M.; Gearhart, Maryl; Haldar, Lina Chopra

    2013-01-01

    Two investigations of fifth graders' strategies for locating whole numbers on number lines revealed patterns in students' coordination of numeric and linear units. In Study 1, we investigated the effects of context on students' placements of three numbers on an open number line. For one group ("n"?=?24), the line was presented in a…

  18. Graduate Study in Chemistry in the United States: A Guide for Non-U.S. Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Judy Diane; Fernando, Quintus

    A guide to help students from other countries pursue graduate education in chemistry in the United States is presented. The process of gaining admission to U.S. universities is emphasized, and the nature of graduate education is briefly explained. It is noted that students majoring in chemistry are expected to have a sound background in…

  19. School Climate and the Experience of LGBT Students: A Comparison of the United States and Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizmony-Levy, Oren; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the school experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in the United States and Israel. Through comparison of the sociocultural and edu-cational contexts, the authors assess whether school experience of LGBT students differs or operates similarly across countries. The authors use data from the…

  20. Coordinating Numeric and Linear Units: Elementary Students' Strategies for Locating Whole Numbers on the Number Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Geoffrey B.; Shaughnessy, Meghan M.; Gearhart, Maryl; Haldar, Lina Chopra

    2013-01-01

    Two investigations of fifth graders' strategies for locating whole numbers on number lines revealed patterns in students' coordination of numeric and linear units. In Study 1, we investigated the effects of context on students' placements of three numbers on an open number line. For one group ("n"?=?24), the line was presented in a…

  1. La Comunicacion (Communication). Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series. Curriculum Unit [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Gene T.

    This 10-lesson curriculum unit provides teachers with some basic tools to help Latino students improve their communication skills. Primary goals are to help students analyze how a person's belief system affects the communication process, and to develop and improve decision-making and communication skills. The following key components are included…

  2. Famous Georgians and Their Homes: A Social Studies Unit for Upper Elementary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Susan B.

    This upper-elementary level social studies curriculum guide is designed to: (1) teach students to understand and appreciate the built (man made) environment; (2) instruct students about Georgia's history and heritage; and (3) introduce the basic concepts of historic preservation. The unit highlights 10 architectural styles of the homes of famous…

  3. The Factors That Influence Dietary Habits among International Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakaam, Amir A.; Castellanos, Diana C.; Bodzio, Jessica; Harrison, Lee

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the dietary intake changes and factors related to dietary acculturation in international students attending an urban university in the United States. The researchers administered seven focus groups of college-age international students (n = 32) between June and August 2012. The participants were enrolled in Northeastern and…

  4. A Survey of Postsecondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigal, Meg; Hart, Debra; Weir, Cate

    2012-01-01

    The authors present findings from a 2009 survey of postsecondary education (PSE) programs for students with an intellectual disability (ID) conducted in the United States. The survey was designed to collect descriptive information on characteristics and practices of existing PSE programs for students with an ID. The survey consisted of 63 items…

  5. The United States History = Lich Su Hoa Ky. [34 Self-Learning Packets for Vietnamese Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhi, Do Dien; And Others

    Designed primarily for Indochinese students in grades 9-12, 34 United States history self-learning packets are presented in eight sections. The publication could be used by mainstream teachers who have a number of limited English proficient (LEP) Vietnamese students in their classes or by parents to tutor their children. The packets were adapted…

  6. School Climate and the Experience of LGBT Students: A Comparison of the United States and Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizmony-Levy, Oren; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the school experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in the United States and Israel. Through comparison of the sociocultural and edu-cational contexts, the authors assess whether school experience of LGBT students differs or operates similarly across countries. The authors use data from the…

  7. Famous Georgians and Their Homes: A Social Studies Unit for Upper Elementary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Susan B.

    This upper-elementary level social studies curriculum guide is designed to: (1) teach students to understand and appreciate the built (man made) environment; (2) instruct students about Georgia's history and heritage; and (3) introduce the basic concepts of historic preservation. The unit highlights 10 architectural styles of the homes of famous…

  8. The Efficacy of a Three-Week Stress Management Unit for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Glenn E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A study used psychometric information to determine the efficacy of a stress management unit in a high school health class. Students who took the unit showed improvement in knowledge, attitudes, and the ability to relax, as demonstrated on tests of heart rate and muscular tension. (PP)

  9. In Search of Our Past: Units in Women's History. World History Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Suzanne, Ed.; And Others

    This junior high school level student manual contains three units on the role of women in world history. The units, designed to supplement what is customarily taught in world history courses at this level, are entitled Women Under Feudalism: Western Europe and China, Women in the Industrial Revolution, and Women in Change: 20th Century Women in…

  10. Cigarette Smoking among Korean International College Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jaesin; Seo, Dong-Chul; Nelson, Toben F.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective and Participants: This study explored (1) the prevalence of cigarette smoking among South Korean international college students in the United States, (2) differences in smoking between on- and off-campus living arrangements, and (3) predictors of an increase in smoking over time in the United States Methods: An online survey was…

  11. Engine Tune-Up Service. Unit 5: Fuel and Carburetion Systems. Student Guide. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ludy

    This student guide is for Unit 5, Fuel and Carburetion Systems, in the Engine Tune-Up Service portion of the Automotive Mechanics Curriculum. It deals with inspecting and servicing the fuel and carburetion systems. A companion review exercise book and posttests are available separately as CE 031 218-219. An introduction tells how this unit fits…

  12. An unprecedented Co(II) cuboctahedron as the secondary building unit in a Co-based metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Rebecca J; Kay, Marika; Korobkov, Ilia; Kadantsev, Eugene; Boyd, Peter G; Aharen, Tomoko; Desgreniers, Serge; Woo, Tom K; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-05-25

    A cubic metal-organic framework with an unprecedented octanuclear secondary building unit (SBU) was isolated. The obtained SBU is composed of 8 Co(II) ions at each vertex, 6 μ4-OH groups at each face, and 12 cpt(-) ligands framing the metal core. The cuboctahedra arrange in a ubt framework topology, eliciting a highly symmetrical MOF structure. Magnetic measurements as well as DFT calculations on this crystalline MOF reveal intramolecular antiferromagnetic coupling between Co(II) ions in the octanuclear SBU.

  13. METHODOLOGY OF PRACTICE-ORIENTED RESEARCH ACTIVITIES OF STUDENTS DURING PEDAGOGICAL INTERNSHIP: BUILDING NATIONAL IDENTITY IN MULTICULTURAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana L. Oskolova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to develop integrated practice-orientedresearch assignments for students – upcoming teachers for the period of teaching practice. Proposed investigation is based on formal requirements of national education including analysis of specific educational activities in ethnically and culturally diverse society.Methods. Axiological and anthropological approaches are used as the methodological basis of the study that reveal value and meaning of multicultural education and focus on development of multicultural personality of students in the learning process at the university. The work contains theoretical analysis of the Russian Federation State Program «Development of Education» for 2013–2020.Results. The characteristics of culturally sensitive and culturally insensitive teaching technology are given in the article. Pedagogical factors of building tolerant environment which enables friendly interaction of multicultural students are revealed. Technology of multicultural teaching aimed at humanistic positive transformation of students’ personality and educational environment embracing cultural diversity is suggested.Scientific novelty. The concept «practice-orientation of education» is offered to define as the ability to establish links between the teachers’ knowledge, skills and significant social and personal problems of students. In the context students’ research activity, practice-orientation is supposed to involve the study of working with students in a diversified environment taking into account their cognitive, ethno-cultural, linguistic differences, degree of tolerance towards peers and the level of intercultural competence.Practical significance. Basic algorithm of teacher’s work in a multicultural environment is proposed. The algorithm is based on the following uniting values: caring for others and compassion; striving for success by fair means; honesty and integrity; team spirit

  14. The Cuba–United States Thaw: Building Bridges through Science and Global Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Daniel G.; Kouri, Vivian; Resik, Sonia; Acosta, Belsy; Guillen, Gerardo; Goraleski, Karen; Espinal, Marcos; Guzman, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Beginning in 2014, there has been significant progress in normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States. Herein, we discuss the history and recent progress in scientific collaboration between the two countries as well as the continued challenges. Science and global health diplomacy can be key tools in reestablishing a trusting and productive relationship of mutual and global benefit, bringing about better and healthier lives for people in both Cuba and the United States. PMID:28719268

  15. The Cuba-United States Thaw: Building Bridges Through Science and Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Daniel G; Kouri, Vivian; Resik, Sonia; Acosta, Belsy; Guillen, Gerardo; Goraleski, Karen; Espinal, Marcos; Guzman, Maria G

    2017-06-01

    AbstractBeginning in 2014, there has been significant progress in normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States. Herein, we discuss the history and recent progress in scientific collaboration between the two countries as well as the continued challenges. Science and global health diplomacy can be key tools in reestablishing a trusting and productive relationship of mutual and global benefit, bringing about better and healthier lives for people in both Cuba and the United States.

  16. Building innovation capability in an intergovernmental aid organization: A case study of UNICEF s Innovation Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Harald

    2015-01-01

    In order to be an efficient and relevant intergovernmental organization, United Nations Children s Fund (UNICEF) has since 2007 made the innovation turn and has become a leader in innovation activity in the UN body. The embracement and assimilation of technology and innovation are a marked shift in the way the organization works, compared to earlier times. The purpose of this study is two-sided: Firstly, to examine what innovation practices UNICEF s HQ Innovation Unit uses in their aid work...

  17. Competency Capacity Building Needs of Agricultural Science Teachers in Utilization of School Farm for Skill Acquisition among Secondary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawal O.I

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to identify the competency capacity building needs of teachers of agricultural science in the utilization of school farm for skill acquisition among secondary school students in Ondo State, Nigeria. Four research questions guided the study. The study adopted the survey research design. The population used was 422, made up of teachers of agricultural science in senior secondary schools in Ondo State and 46 lecturers of agricultural education in tertiary institutions in Ondo and Ekiti States. The entire population was used for the study, hence there was no sampling. A - 33 competency items questionnaire was developed and used for data collection. The questionnaire was validated by three experts from the Department of Vocational Teachers Education (Agricultural Education Unit, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Cronbach alpha reliability method was used to determine the internal consistency of the instrument. A reliability coefficient of 0.81 was obtained. 422 copies of the questionnaire were administered on the respondents and 406 copies were retrieved and analyzed using weighted mean and improvement need index (INI to answer the research questions. It was found out that teachers of agricultural science in Ondo State needed capacity building in all the 33 competency items identified in the following areas, planning and organizing school farm, implementing school farm practical, coordinating and evaluating school farm practical. It was recommended, among others, that the competencies identified in this study should be utilized in organizing retraining programmes inform of seminars, workshop or long vacation courses for teachers of agricultural science in secondary schools in all states of the federation.

  18. Building interdisciplinary teamwork among allied health students through live clinical case simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Janet R; Rathsack, Christi; Downs, David; Jorgensen, Kathy; Karges, Joy R; Nelson, Debralee

    2008-01-01

    A limited, yet growing, body of research suggests that health care students educated in interdisciplinary teamwork may become more collaborative professionals in the workplace, which, in turn, may foster more productive and satisfied health care professionals. Researchers also have identified lower mortality and morbidity rates, fewer hospitalizations, decreased costs, and improved function by patients among significant health benefits of interdisciplinary teamwork, especially when it is applied to underserved and geriatric populations. Such positive outcomes have prompted medical schools and accreditation boards of many allied health professions to add interdisciplinary education into their training requirements. Meeting these requirements has challenged universities, where there are multiple allied health programs and limited time, faculty, and financial resources to coordinate interdisciplinary education. The challenges have been magnified by insufficient research on the most effective methods to educate university students about interdisciplinary teamwork. This article presents the background, evolution, and key building blocks of one such method: a simulation-based workshop designed at our university over 7 years to educate its allied health students about various health professions through shared learning, interaction, and collaboration.

  19. Energy Consumption Evaluation of United States Navy Leed Certified Building For Fiscal Year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    inclusion in this study was the ability to provide at least one full year of measured post - occupancy energy usage data for the entire LEED project...the Federal Energy Management Program. 4. Fowler, K. M. and Rauch, E. M. (2008). “A Post - Occupancy Evaluation of 12 GSA Buildings”. PNNL-17393...the Cascadia Region: A Post Occupancy Evaluation Report”. January 30, 2006. Cascadia Region Green Building Council. http://cascadiagbc.org

  20. Energy performance modelling and heat recovery unit efficiency assessment of an office building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmati Norbert L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates and analyzes a typical multi-zone office building’s annual energy performance for the location and climate data of central Belgrade. The aim is to evaluate the HVAC system’s and HR unit’s performance in order to conduct the most preferable heating and cooling solution for the typical climate of Belgrade city. The energy performance of four HVAC system types (heat pump - air to air, gas-electricity, electrical and fan coil system was analyzed, compared and evaluated on a virtual office building model in order to assess the total annual energy performance and to determine the efficiency of the HR unit’s application. Further, the parameters of an energy efficient building envelope, HVAC system, internal loads, building operation schedules and occupancy intervals were implemented into the multi-zone analysis model. The investigation was conducted in EnergyPlus simulation engine using system thermodynamic algorithms and surface/air heat balance modules. The comparison and evaluation of the obtained results was achieved through the conversion of the calculated total energy demand into primary energy. The goal is conduct the most preferable heating and cooling solution (Best Case Scenario for the climate of Belgrade city and outline major criteria in qualitative enhancement.

  1. Professionalism among multicultural medical students in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Mahera; Alsalehi, Shahd; Husain, Zahra S M; Nair, Satish C; Carrick, Frederick Robert

    2017-01-01

    Moral competencies and ethical practices of medical professionals are among the desired outcomes of academic training. Unfortunately, academic dishonesty and misconduct are reported from medical colleges across the world. This study investigates the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. Validated and customized version of Dundee Polyprofessionalism Inventory-1 detailing lapses of professionalism in undergraduate health professions education was used to determine the perceived prevalence and self-reported lapses of academic integrity in this study. This study shows that the majority (458/554, 83%) of medical students have admitted to acts of academic dishonesty mentioned in the questionnaire. Approximately 42% (231/554) of the students have given proxy for attendance and 71% of them considered this as an offense. Similarly, 12% (66/554) have copied from the record books of others, and 86% (477/554) have considered it unethical. In addition, 5% (28/554) of the students revealed forging a teacher's signature in their record or logbooks, with 16% (91/554) of them reporting that they have seen others forge signatures. This is the first multi-center, multi-cultural and multi-ethnic study involving a large number of participants that addresses academic professionalism among medical students in the Middle East. Certainly, the paucity of data limits definitive conclusions about the best approach to prevent academic misconduct in the UAE medical schools. Yet, the results of our study are anticipated not only to benefit the UAE but also to find application in the Arab world, with similar medical school programs, values, culture and tradition.

  2. Experimental analysis of an air-to-air heat recovery unit for balanced ventilation systems in residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Diz, Ruben; Uhia, Francisco J.; Dopazo, Alberto; Ferro, Jose M. [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende No. 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of an air-to-air heat recovery unit equipped with a sensible polymer plate heat exchanger (PHE) for balanced ventilation systems in residential buildings. The PHE is arranged in parallel triangular ducts. An experimental facility was designed to reproduce the typical outdoor and exhaust air conditions with regard to temperature and humidity. The unit was tested under balanced operation conditions, as commonly used in practice. A set of tests was conducted under the reference operating conditions to evaluate the PHE performance. Afterwards, an experimental parametric analysis was conducted to investigate the influence of changing the operating conditions on the PHE performance. Experiments were carried out varying the inlet fresh air temperature, the exhaust air relative humidity and the air flow rate. The experimental results are shown and discussed in this paper. (author)

  3. Understanding Teacher-Student Relationships, Student-Student Relationships, and Conduct Problems in China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, George G.; Yang, Chunyan; Glutting, Joseph; Huang, Xishan; He, Xianyou; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have found that Chinese students perceive teacher-student relationships and student-student relationships more favorably than American students. In this study we examined if the same holds true with respect to teachers' perceptions. Also examined were both students' and teachers' perceptions of conduct problems. The sample…

  4. Reconfiguring REU programs to build links between institutions is an efficiient way of expanding student participation in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    There is good evidence that STEM career recruiting would be bettered by a shift in REU programs from an individual student focus to building institutional links with faculty participation. This would improve recruiting, duration and the scientific productivity of the REU system. Student commitment would benefit from a more sophisticated and productive project that this would enable as would research groups and mentors at all institutions. Such programs build long lasting links between the institutions and individual faculty. For teaching institutions, scientifically centered collaborations bring faculty and students into the research culture. Faculty who teach at such institutions will maintain their research skills as well as their links to the field and gain respect both internally and externally. Visibility of the collaboration at the non-research centered institution will attract other students into the area. An on-going collaboration offers benefits to the research institution as well. First, recruitment becomes less hit and miss because the partners have observed and taught their students. Second partners will provide appropriate training and context before the summer starts for new students. Third, the availability of partners to help mentoring the students during the summer and into the academic year makes it easier for graduate students, post-docs and the research university faculty as well. Fourth, a good collaboration builds respect and understanding on all sides, which, since many in the research group will go on to teach at teaching centered institutions is important. Building respect for transfer students from Community Colleges and smaller teaching institutions among the research faculty is another benefit. I will describe programs that I have designed an led that successfully implement these ideas.

  5. Analytic Geometry. Student's Text, Unit No. 64. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayre, H. Glenn; And Others

    This text provides a one-semester study of analytic geometry for secondary school students. It is designed for use at the 12th grade level. A deliberate effort was made to tie this text to previous SMSG texts; the usual language of sets, ordered pairs, number properties, etc. are included. This flavor is what distinguishes this book from others in…

  6. Australian Students' Perceptions of Racial Attitudes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Anna M.; Evans, Virden; Evans, Adeline L.

    1998-01-01

    This survey of the perceptions of Australian high school students toward racism in America indicates that a majority knew little about cultural diversity; had various cultural backgrounds; were influenced more by television than other forms of media; and believed African Americans do not have equal access to education, equal opportunity to…

  7. Teaching Students to Build Historical Buildings in Virtual Reality: A Didactic Strategy for Learning History of Art in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Eloi Biosca

    2009-01-01

    This article is a summary and conclusions of a field study carried out in a secondary education classroom with the aim of experimenting and observing how 13-year-old students learn the history of architecture by using complex virtual reality software. Within the framework of autonomous and active learning, students act as builders of some of the…

  8. Challenges Faced by Korean Transnational Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Adrian; Nam, Sang; Han, Shini

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to help parents, educators, and policymakers understand how to help transnational children adjust to their psychological challenges at school in the United States. A total of 109 Korean transnational adolescents aged 11 to 19 participated in this study. They had been staying in the country alone or with one of their…

  9. A Unit on Hitler and Nazism for Advanced Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elinor C.

    1993-01-01

    This unit on Hitler, the Third Reich, and its echoes in Germany today is based on original source material, such as "Mein Kampf," as well as more recent reports by those directly affected, such as Sichrovsky's "Schuldig Geboren." Teachers of advanced high school or college classes are introduced to some appropriate materials…

  10. A Unit on Hitler and Nazism for Advanced Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elinor C.

    1993-01-01

    This unit on Hitler, the Third Reich, and its echoes in Germany today is based on original source material, such as "Mein Kampf," as well as more recent reports by those directly affected, such as Sichrovsky's "Schuldig Geboren." Teachers of advanced high school or college classes are introduced to some appropriate materials and offered…

  11. [Software CMAP TOOLS ™ to build concept maps: an evaluation by nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paula Barreto; Cohrs, Cibelli Rizzo; De Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes

    2012-08-01

    Concept mapping (CM) is a teaching strategy that can be used to solve clinical cases, but the maps are difficult to write. The objective of this study was to describe the challenges and contributions of the Cmap Tools® software in building concept maps to solve clinical cases. To do this, a descriptive and qualitative method was used with junior nursing students from the Federal University of São Paulo. The teaching strategy was applied and the data were collected using the focal group technique. The results showed that the software facilitates and guarantees the organization, visualization, and correlation of the data, but there are difficulties related to the handling of its tools initially. In conclusion, the formatting and auto formatting resources of Cmap Tools® facilitated the construction of concept maps; however, orientation strategies should be implemented for the initial stage of the software utilization.

  12. The role of personnel marketing in the process of building corporate social responsibility strategy of a scientific unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Jarosławska-Sobór

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to discuss the significance of human capital in the process of building the strategy of social responsibility and the role of personnel marketing in the process. Dynamically changing social environment has enforced a new way of looking at non-material resources. Organizations have understood that it is human capital and social competences that have a significant impact on the creation of an organization’s value, generating profits, as well as gaining competitive advantage in the 21st century. Personnel marketing is now a key element in the process of implementation of the CSR concept and building the value of contemporary organizations, especially such unique organizations as scientific units. In this article you will find a discussion concerning the basic values regarded as crucial by the Central Mining Institute in the context of their significance for the paradigm of social responsibility. Such an analysis was carried out on the basis of the experiences of Central Mining Institute (GIG in the development of strategic CSR, which takes into consideration the specific character of the Institute as a scientific unit.

  13. The reaction of the building structure with window unit to the explosiveimpact on the basis of dynamic equation solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doronin Fedor Leonidovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing residential buildings, additional measures for increasing the strength at dynamic effects indoors are not foreseen. The walls of the structure fixed in the framework are not designed for shock wave caused by explosion of utility gas. When designing a building, the task of the special dynamic load is often reduced to the calculation of the safe shock pressure, exceeding of which leads to the destruction of the structures. The wall with the window area under dynamic effects is a blast relief panel, which reduces the excess pressure inside the room. The proposed method of calculating a design with a window unit allows determining the dynamic reaction of the wall on explosive pulse. The proposed calculation technique of the constructions at shock loads allows tracing the changes of the inertial forces and displacements at any stage of dynamic response. The reaction to dynamic loads can be also set for non-monolithic structures, consisting of different materials with different conditions of fastening. Elastoplastic reaction of a brick wall with glass units was determined using step-by-step method of linear acceleration. The calculation of stress-strain state of brick walls with window panes determined the strength properties of the structures close to the monolithic version. The proposed technique of numerical solution of dynamic equations is applied only in the analysis of elastic systems, in which the dynamic characteristics remain unchanged throughout the reaction process.

  14. Parental Involvement with College Students in Germany, Hong Kong, Korea, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerman, Karen L.; Cheng, Yen-Pi; Kim, Kyungmin; Fung, Helene H.; Han, Gyounghae; Lang, Frieder R.; Lee, Wonkyung; Wagner, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Rates of college attendance have increased throughout the world. This study asked whether students across nations experience high involvement with parents (frequent contact and support) and how satisfied they are with parental involvement. College students from four major Western and Asian economies participated: Germany (n = 458), Hong Kong (n = 276), Korea (n = 257), and the United States (n = 310). Consistent with solidarity theory, students across nations reported frequent contact with parents and receiving several forms of social support (e.g., practical, emotional, and advice) every month. Multilevel models revealed Asian students received more frequent parental support than German or US students, but were less satisfied with that support. Students in Hong Kong resided with parents more often and gave more support to parents than students in other cultures. Discussion focuses on cultural (i.e., filial obligation) and structural (i.e., coresidence) factors explaining parental involvement. PMID:27594722

  15. Planning, Development, and Change in Bristol Bay: A High School Curriculum. Teacher Guide and Student Text. Unit V: Oil and Gas Development. Unit VI: Minerals and Mining. Unit VII: State Land Disposal. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Jerry; Willer, Cristy

    Written with the broad goal of involving high school students in Bristol Bay, Alaska, in the planning and design of their region's future, this combined teacher guide and student text contains the final three units of a seven-unit curriculum. Unit V looks at oil development in the Bering Sea, covering topics such as Alaska's dependence on oil,…

  16. Planning, Designing, Building, and Moving a Large Volume Maternity Service to a New Labor and Birth Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Heather; Legorreta, Kimberly; Maher, Mary Ann; Lavin, Melanie M

    Our health system recognized the need to update facility space and associated technology for the labor and birth unit within our large volume perinatal service to improve the patient experience, and enhance safety, quality of care, and staff satisfaction. When an organization decides to invest $30 million dollars in a construction project such as a new labor and birth unit, many factors and considerations are involved. Financial support, planning, design, and construction phases of building a new unit are complex and therefore require strong interdisciplinary collaboration, leadership, and project management. The new labor and birth unit required nearly 3 years of planning, designing, and construction. Patient and family preferences were elicited through consumer focus groups. Multiple meetings with the administrative and nursing leadership teams, staff nurses, nurse midwives, and physicians were held to generate ideas for improvement in the new space. Involving frontline clinicians and childbearing women in the process was critical to success. The labor and birth unit moved to a new patient tower in a space that was doubled in square footage and geographically now on three separate floors. In the 6 months prior to the move, many efforts were made in our community to share our new space. The marketing strategy was very detailed and creative with ongoing input from the nursing leadership team. The nursing staff was involved in every step along the way. It was critical to have champions as workflow teams emerged. We hosted simulation drills and tested scenarios with new workflows. Move day was rehearsed with representatives of all members of the perinatal team participating. These efforts ultimately resulted in a move time of ~5 hours. Birth volumes increased 7% within the first 6 months. After 3 years in our new space, our birth volumes have risen nearly 15% and are still growing. Key processes and roles responsible for a successful build, efficient and safe move

  17. Molecular structure of basic oligomeric building units of heparan-sulfate glycosaminoglycans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remko, Milan; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.; Broer, Ria

    2010-01-01

    This study reports in detail the results of systematic large-scale theoretical investigations of the acidic dimeric structural units (D-E, E-F, F-G, and G-H) and pentamer D-E-F-G-H (fondaparinux) of the glycosaminoglycan heparin, and their anionic forms. The geometries and energies of these oligomer

  18. Building a Potential Wetland Restoration Indicator for the Contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetlands provide key functions in the landscape from improving water quality, to regulating flows, to providing wildlife habitat. Over half of the wetlands in the contiguous United States (CONUS) have been converted to agricultural and urban land uses. However, over the last seve...

  19. A Methodology for Building Faculty Support for the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloni, Michael J.; Smith, Shane D.; Napshin, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from extant literature indicates that faculty support is a critical driver for implementing the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME), particularly for schools pursuing an advanced, cross-disciplinary level of sustainability integration. However, there is limited existing research offering insight into how…

  20. Why We Need to Build a Culture of Health in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

    2015-07-01

    The United States spends $2.7 trillion a year on health care, more than any other country by far, and yet the U.S. population is not healthy. In fact, the United States loses $227 billion in productivity each year because of poor health. This is not sustainable-and it is the reason behind the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Culture of Health initiative. Culture of Health means so much more than simply not being sick. It means embracing a definition of health as outlined by the World Health Organization-a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being. And it means shifting the values-and the actions-in the United States so that health becomes a part of everything we do. Health is the bedrock of personal fulfillment. It is the backbone of prosperity and the key to creating a strong and competitive nation. With health, children can grow up making the most of life's opportunities. Businesses can rely on the vitality of workers to stay competitive, and the military can perform at its highest level. But there is no single way to cultivate health. This Commentary explores the principles behind the Culture of Health initiative and examines the role of academic medicine in achieving this vision. Different communities must come up with the approaches that serve them best. Only by working toward a common goal in unique ways will a true Culture of Health be attainable in the United States.

  1. A Methodology for Building Faculty Support for the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloni, Michael J.; Smith, Shane D.; Napshin, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from extant literature indicates that faculty support is a critical driver for implementing the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME), particularly for schools pursuing an advanced, cross-disciplinary level of sustainability integration. However, there is limited existing research offering insight into how…

  2. Position Paper. Safety for K-12 students: United States policy concerning LGBT student safety must provide inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Sanders

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT are at risk for harassment due to their sexual orientation or gender identification with over 85% of LGBT students in the United States (US reporting such harassment. These statistics demonstrate one aspect of the significance of this issue, but the cost of human life in some instances has revealed another layer of importance related to a need for safety policies for LGBT students. Even though a need exists for such policies, the practice of heteronormativity found in US policymaking regarding bullying does not protect victims or curb the violence. This essay highlights several recent developments in anti-bullying policy in US schools that shows the existence of heteronormativity, which is not helping to pro-tect LGBT students. By understanding the discrimination encouraged by current policy, future policy can be better shaped to protect LGBT students.

  3. Addressing the Mental Health Problems of Chinese International College Students in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirong Liu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies unique mental health problems experienced by Chinese international students in the United States. The uniqueness of these problems suggests the need to address them independently from other Chinese and international student communities. First, an overview of the common sources of mental health problems and specific stressors these students face is provided. This article then develops culturally sensitive programming recommendations to improve collaborative efforts between health providers, mental health social workers, faculty, and academic staff within universities to serve these students more effectively.

  4. Undocumented College Students in the United States: In-State Tuition Not Enough to Ensure Four-Year Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Dylan; Chellman, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    Using restricted-access data from one of the largest urban public university systems in the United States--where many undocumented students are eligible for in-state tuition--we review the literature on undocumented college students in the United States and provide a comparison of the performance of undocumented students to that of U.S. citizens…

  5. Labour Movement and Labour Law: Development of Two Introductory Units for Secondary Students. ERIBC Reports. Report No. 79:1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labour Advisory Committee, Terrace (British Columbia).

    Introductory teaching units for secondary students on the history of the Canadian labor movement and labor law are presented in this report. Five units are outlined, addressing the following questions: (1) How do students perceive organized labor, its position in today's society, and its historical development?; (2) What knowledge do students have…

  6. An Interactive Multimedia Tutorial Teaching Unit and Its Effects on Student Perception and Understanding of Chemical Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtacnik, M.; Sajovec, M.; Dolnicar, D.; Pucko-Razdevsek, C.; Glazar, A.; Brouwer, N. Zupancic

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the effects of teaching with an interactive tutorial multimedia unit on students' understanding of concepts presented in the unit and their perceptions of the learning environment. Discusses the results and concludes that the multimedia unit shows promising effects on students' acquisition of knowledge. (CMK)

  7. Building social capital with interprofessional student teams in rural settings: A service-learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Pippa L; Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally

    2016-08-01

    To describe outcomes of a model of service learning in interprofessional learning (IPL) aimed at developing a sustainable model of training that also contributed to service strengthening. A total of 57 semi-structured interviews with key informants and document review exploring the impacts of interprofessional student teams engaged in locally relevant IPL activities. Six rural towns in South East New South Wales. Local facilitators, staff of local health and other services, health professionals who supervised the 89 students in 37 IPL teams, and academic and administrative staff. Perceived benefits as a consequence of interprofessional, service-learning interventions in these rural towns. Reported outcomes included increased local awareness of a particular issue addressed by the team; improved communication between different health professions; continued use of the team's product or a changed procedure in response to the teams' work; and evidence of improved use of a particular local health service. Given the limited workforce available in rural areas to supervise clinical IPL placements, a service-learning IPL model that aims to build social capital may be a useful educational model. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  8. Building on a Foundation of Strength: Fiscal Year 2012 United States Army Annual Financial Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Command ( WTC ) was created to ensure focused and effective management across all aspects of the WCTP. In FY 2012, the Army dedicated $800 million to...and support staffs coordinating care in warrior transition units (WTUs) and community-based WTUs (CBWTU). With the WTC leading the way, the Army...mass destruction , civil affairs, information operations, counter-explosive hazards, and operational law. TaBle 6. individual Training1 initial military

  9. The United States Government Interagency Process and the Failure of Institution Building in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-12

    LTG Martin Dempsey, to make the case for an increase in the investment by the United States Government (USG) in the development of a self-sufficient...the exception of 5 Feil , Scott R. “The Failure of Incrementalism: Interagency Coordination Challenges and Responses.” In The Interagency and...society invested in establishing a stable democratic, and economically viable Iraq.” (SIGIR-06-045, 2007) 35 Interview, Scott Feil , 27 November 2007. 22

  10. Build-a-Polypeptide: A Hands-On Worksheet to Enhance Student Learning in an Introductory Biology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Hall

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many introductory biology students have a weak (or nonexistent chemistry background. Due to this apparent knowledge gap, many students struggle to understand the process of polypeptide formation via dehydration synthesis as well as the interactions between individual polypeptide chains. This inability to reason about how individual amino acids interact with one another prevents students from making the cognitive leap from primary to secondary structure. In turn, students do not fully understand how even higher levels of organizations (i.e., tertiary and quaternary interactions form the final three-dimensional configurations of proteins.  We designed Build-a-Polypeptide in an attempt to help fill the part of the knowledge gap.  In this activity, students physically represent the process of polypeptide synthesis and R group interactions using a paper model. Essentially, this is a simple cut and paste project that allows students to build a beginner's (i.e., highly truncated and simplified model of protein folding. Previous research has shown that physical modeling can aid student understanding of complex topics (1,2.  With that in mind, we developed this interactive activity to improve student understanding of protein synthesis and structure formation. This activity requires no laboratory equipment and can be completed within one (50 minute class. Our worksheets were designed for use in introductory college-level biology courses, but could easily be adapted for high school or AP biology classes.

  11. Impact of the FY 2009 Building Technologies Program on United States Employment and Earned Income

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2008-06-17

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose input-output model called ImSET is used in this study of 14 Building Technologies Program subprograms in the EERE final FY 2009 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget in February 2008. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2025. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 258,000 jobs and about $3.7 billion in earned income (2007$) by the year 2025.

  12. Student Satisfaction and Student Perceptions of Quality at International Branch Campuses in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Melodena Stephens; Huisman, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    The international branch campus has emerged as a popular form of transnational higher education but to date little research has been undertaken on student perceptions and experiences, other than the student feedback evaluations conducted by institutions. This research employed a survey questionnaire to investigate student perceptions of study at…

  13. Elementary School Counselors' Perceptions of Reality Play Counseling in Students' Relationship Building and Problem-Solving Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric S.; Clark, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    In this qualitative study, eight school counselors participated in a series of reality play counseling trainings introducing techniques appropriate for counseling upper-grade elementary school students to enhance positive relationship building and problem solving skills. Participants were interviewed and their transcripts were analyzed using…

  14. Unity in the Elementary School Classroom: Building Community Through Increasing Positive Social Interactions Between and Among Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt-Jaeger, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Children's sense of a community is essential in elementary schools. This helps gives students a sense of belonging and control over their environment. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of several strategies from the Toolbox Project and their effect on building community in the classroom. Collin (2003b) discusses his Toolbox…

  15. Adapting and Implementing a School-Based Resilience-Building Curriculum among Low-Income Racial and Ethnic Minority Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Roya; Marlotte, Lauren; Garcia, Ediza; Aralis, Hilary; Lester, Patricia; Escudero, Pia; Kataoka, Sheryl

    2017-01-01

    Although youth are at risk for exposure to adversity and trauma, many youth, especially ethnic and racial minorities, do not have access to mental health care. Resilience-building curriculums can teach important internal resilience skills and provide support to students who may not receive prevention or treatment services. We adapted a resilience…

  16. Indoor environmental quality in school buildings, and the health and wellbeing of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Mari; Toyinbo, Oluyemi; Putus, Tuula; Nevalainen, Aino; Shaughnessy, Richard; Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla

    2014-09-01

    Poor indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in classrooms may be a risk for health symptoms and cause absence from school. We conducted a comprehensive study in order to assess the connection between IEQ in Finnish elementary school buildings and the health and academic performance of sixth grade students. The specific aim of the present paper was to study the school- or grade-level prevalence of symptoms in relation to IEQ. The school- or grade-level (i.e. group level) prevalence of self-reported symptoms and perceived IEQ was studied using data collected by a health questionnaire comprising 37 questions. The health questionnaire was sent to all 6th grade students in a stratified random sample of 355 elementary schools in Finland. Indoor environmental conditions were assessed with measurements of ventilation rate and thermal conditions of classrooms in a subsample of 56 schools. Altogether 297 elementary schools participated in the health questionnaire study and a total of 4248 questionnaires were returned (estimated response rate 62.6%). The most common weekly symptoms in the spring semester were fatigue (7.7%), stuffy nose (7.3%), and headache (5.5%). However, both mean prevalence values for different symptoms among all 6th grade students and group-level prevalence values for specific symptoms varied considerably. On the group level, the prevalence values most frequently found above 95% CI (calculated for N=15) were wheezing, cough with wheezing, and fever over 37°C. The most frequently reported IEQ factors causing daily inconvenience in classrooms were noise (11.0%) and stuffy air/poor indoor air quality (IAQ) (7.0%), which were also found most frequently above 95% CI on the group level (calculated for N=15), together with self-reported high indoor temperature and dust or dirtiness. Self-reported daily stuffiness/poor IAQ was significantly correlated with measured mean temperatures and ventilation rates in classrooms. High prevalence of students' self

  17. "The Military Taught Me How to Study, How to Work Hard": Helping Student-Veterans Transition by Building on Their Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaauw-Hara, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges are experiencing growing numbers of student veterans. Unfortunately, much training for faculty and staff tends to stem from a deficit mindset: the focus is on remediating what student veterans lack rather than building on their unique strengths. Training programs, courses, and college interventions that acknowledge and build on…

  18. "The Military Taught Me How to Study, How to Work Hard": Helping Student-Veterans Transition by Building on Their Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaauw-Hara, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges are experiencing growing numbers of student veterans. Unfortunately, much training for faculty and staff tends to stem from a deficit mindset: the focus is on remediating what student veterans lack rather than building on their unique strengths. Training programs, courses, and college interventions that acknowledge and build on…

  19. Teaching English to Immigrant Students in the United States: A Brief Summary of Programs and Methods

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Nearly ten per cent of the students currently attending public schools in the United States are classified as English Language Learners (ELL); that is to say, students who are learning English. The most important challenge this population brings to the educational authorities of their school districts and the schools they attend, is to find the most effective ways to teach them both English and the academic content pertaining to their grade. Since the methods traditionally used did not ...

  20. Two Principles of Reticular Chemistry Uncovered in a Metal-Organic Framework of Heterotritopic Linkers and Infinite Secondary Building Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarineu, Noelle R; Schoedel, Alexander; Urban, Philipp; Morla, Maureen B; Trickett, Christopher A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-31

    Structural diversity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been largely limited to linkers with at most two different types of coordinating groups. MOFs constructed from linkers with three or more nonidentical coordinating groups have not been explored. Here, we report a robust and porous crystalline MOF, Zn3(PBSP)2 or MOF-910, constructed from a novel linker PBSP (phenylyne-1-benzoate, 3-benzosemiquinonate, 5-oxidopyridine) bearing three distinct types of coordinative functionality. The MOF adopts a complex and previously unreported topology termed tto. Our study suggests that simple, symmetric linkers are not a necessity for formation of crystalline extended structures and that new, more complex topologies are attainable with irregular, heterotopic linkers. This work illustrates two principles of reticular chemistry: first, selectivity for helical over straight rod secondary building units (SBUs) is achievable with polyheterotopic linkers, and second, the pitch of the resulting helical SBUs may be fine-tuned based on the metrics of the polyheterotopic linker.

  1. Differentiated Instructional Strategies on Space Education for Sustained Capacity Building of Underprivileged School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    Although innovations in space education were introduced in many developing countries with good intentions, too many changes and challenges in the existing system have often penalized those who needed them the most. Consequently, the students and teachers in the underprivileged schools face isolation, neglect and coupled with inadequate pedagogic attention, poor infrastructure and insufficient resources, inadvertently suffer. Surprisingly, these deprived school students possess cognitive capabilities of comprehending nature. One of the most compelling situations in Indian school education is that the syllabus is often modified haphazardly without the necessary groundwork and infrastructure to implement it. Apparently, there has neither been teaching nor learning on applied knowledge. Despite the growth in communication and technology applications in space education, inequalities continue to exist in developing countries. In our present society many crucial services are provided by space and it becomes imperative that students have a comprehensive knowledge of space and space based technologies. To realize these objectives, we have adopted a comprehensive and holistic capacity building mechanism which incorporates differentiated instructional strategy on teaching space education in underprivileged schools. Because differentiation and scaffolding techniques yield similar instructional goals, we have blended together both the approaches to the point of being indistinguishable and this proved successful. Initiation was done through the setting up of an Astronomy Club in a backward area in Hyderabad and necessary infrastructure was provided by one of the authors. A state of the art audio-visual room with LCD Projector for ICT mode of presentations of various astronomy and space topics, having a seating capacity of 50 students is in place. A laptop, printer and Wi-Fi connection exists. In addition, visual charts on various celestial phenomena and objects, inspirational

  2. Life-Cycle Analysis of Building Retrofits at the Urban Scale—A Case Study in United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Afshari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A consensus is forming among experts that the best way to achieve emissions’ reduction in the near and mid-term is increasing the demand-side energy efficiency—this is especially true in developing countries where the potential for demand reduction is significant and achievable at relatively lower cost. Enhanced energy efficiency also reduces energy costs and can result in a financial benefit to end-users, if the life-cycle value of energy savings offsets the upfront cost of implementing the measure. At the same time, reducing energy demand translates into lower pull for fossil fuel import and supply/distribution capacity expansion. An ideal candidate for the implementation of demand-side energy efficiency measures is the building sector, since it contributes to a large extent to the total amount of greenhouse gases (GHGs emitted worldwide. In most developing countries, the contribution of the building sector to the total national GHG emissions is significantly higher than the worldwide average. This is in part due to the lower level of industrial activity. Other drivers of the high emissions of the building sector are the inefficiency of the envelope and technical systems of the existing buildings, as well as harsh climatic conditions requiring the use of energy intensive air-conditioning equipment. The United Arab Emirates (UAE currently have the highest ecological footprint per capita in the world. The Emirate of Abu Dhabi, the focus of this study, can be expected to have a footprint that is even higher, being the largest economy and the major oil producer among the seven Emirates. In addition to the environmental consequences of unrestrained energy consumption, the fact that energy prices are heavily subsidized in Abu Dhabi results in a significant financial burden for the government. In the UAE and the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, the air-conditioning load in buildings is the ideal target for demand-side management because it constitutes more

  3. The Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) - building the STEM workforce by providing exciting, multi-disciplinary, student-led suborbital flight projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) recognizes that suborbital carriers play a vital role in training our country's future science and technology leaders. SMD created the Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) to offer students the opportunity to design, build, and fly instruments on NASA's unique suborbital research platforms. This paper explores the projects, the impact, and the lessons learned of USIP. USIP required undergraduate teams to design, build, and fly a scientific instrument in 18 months or less. Students were required to form collaborative multidisciplinary teams to design, develop and build their instrument. Teams quickly learned that success required skills often overlooked in an academic environment. Teams quickly learned to share technical information in a clear and concise manner that could be understood by other disciplines. The aggressive schedule required team members to hold each other accountable for progress while maintaining team unity. Unanticipated problems and technical issues led students to a deeper understanding of the need for schedule and cost reserves. Students exited the program with a far deeper understanding of project management and team dynamics. Through the process of designing and building an instrument that will enable new research transforms students from textbook learners to developers of new knowledge. The initial USIP project funded 10 undergraduate teams that flew a broad range of scientific instruments on scientific balloons, sounding rockets, commercial rockets and aircraft. Students were required to prepare for and conduct the major reviews that are an integral part of systems development. Each project conducted a Preliminary Design Review, Critical Design Review and Mission Readiness review for NASA officials and flight platform providers. By preparing and presenting their designs to technical experts, the students developed a deeper understanding of the technical and programmatic project pieces that

  4. United States Air Force Graduate Student Summer Support Program 1986. Program Technical Report. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT Building 410 ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. NO. Bolling AFB, DC 20332 6l1O2F 33(. 5 11. TITLE (Inclusde Security Clasification ) us...H Byfr *(.. *’i ~rvs Vari ance arlu jt s A~ :i Z. 1r _ _:_F ’easureamerts cf EEG Act i vi t Y, �. 4,, Carie . f.R. G3. anrd ;:rost, .£.*"QSil

  5. The Interlanguage Interference on the Difficulties of Building Question Sentences by the Second Year Students of MA As Soorkaty Salatiga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Famularsih

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to elaborate the interlanguage interference of the difficulties which are faced by 40 second year students of MA As Soorkaty Salatiga in academic year of 2004-2005 in building question sentences and the sources of difficulties. The research is conducted by such kind of test. The total number of test are 20 items, consist of 5 yes-no questions, 5 W-H questions, and 10 tag questions which is done in a written essay form. Based on the analysis, the result shows some conclusions. Firstly, the researcher finds the types of difficulties problems are faced by the students in building question mastery, such as: (1 building yes-no question sentences in translation the word “apakah”, that is related with the use of to be. (2 Building interrogative word question sentences in translation the words “apa”, “kapan”, “milik siapa”, etc. That are related with the use of “what”, “when”, “whose”, etc. (3 Completing the tag question sentences with the proper auxiliary based on tense of the sentences. The most difficulties in building question sentences are especially in yes-no question form by using the word “apakah”. In the term of interlanguage, the students’ errors are mostly included in expressing meaning by the words and grammar of the first language. The source of difficulties which have been analyzed are mostly caused by inter lingual and intra lingual transfer.

  6. Impact of a hybrid TGfU-Sport Education unit on student motivation in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Arias, Alexander; Harvey, Stephen; Cárceles, Adrián; Práxedes, Alba; Del Villar, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) and Sport Education (SE) pedagogical models share several objectives and pedagogical processes. Despite this seemingly uncanny relationship, few studies have examined the efficacy of a hybrid TGfU/SE pedagogical model, particularly how a teacher's utilization of such a model impacts on student motivation. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect a hybrid TGfU/SE unit, in comparison to direct instruction, on students' perceptions of various aspects of their motivation to engage in physical education (autonomous motivation, basic psychological needs, enjoyment and intention to be physically active). A crossover design was utilized, using the technique of counterbalancing. One group experienced a hybrid SE/TGfU unit first, followed by a unit of direct instruction. A second group experienced the units in the opposite order. Participants were 55 students. The intervention was conducted over a total of 16 lessons. The hybrid unit was designed according to the characteristics of SE by using seasons, roles, persistent teams, etc. Learning tasks set by the teacher during individual lessons, however, were designed according to the pedagogical principles of TGfU. Student motivation data was generated using validated questionnaires. Results showed that regardless of the order of intervention, the two groups showed significant improvements in autonomy, competence and enjoyment when they were taught using the hybrid model. Instead, in the variables autonomous motivation, relatedness and intention to be physically active there were no significant improvements in one group. These results demonstrate that it is possible to design varied learning situations in which affiliation, leadership and trust are fostered, while tasks are adapted to the characteristics of the students. All this can cause greater autonomous motivation, and consequently, perceived competence in the student, a positive image of the sport to

  7. Sport Education and Direct Instruction Units: Comparison of Student Knowledge Development in Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José; Araújo, Rui; Farias, Cláudio; Bessa, Cristiana; Mesquita, Isabel

    2016-12-01

    This study conducted a comparative analysis of students' knowledge development on athletics in Sport Education and in a Direct Instruction unit taking into account sex and initial skill level. The participants were an experienced Physical Education teacher and two sixth-grade classes totaling 47 students (25 boys and 22 girls). Each class was randomly placed in either Sport Education or Direct Instruction classes and participated in 20, 45-minutes lessons focused on shot put, hurdles and triple jump. Knowledge on athletics was assessed through a 25-items written and video-based test. The inter-group differences and improvements across time in the knowledge test were analyzed through the Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, respectively. There were significant knowledge improvements in both instructional approaches irrespective of students' gender and skill level. In Direct Instruction, the type of task organization, the high rates of repetition of movement patterns and feedback by the teacher were beneficial to student learning. In Sport Education, the autonomy granted to students in the control of the pace of task transitions by making on-going judgments on achievement of performance criteria, implicated students affectively and cognitively with the learning content. It was further supported that several models and teaching strategies should be taken into consideration when teaching Physical Education. Different approaches should be perceived as alternatives and teachers should retain the best in each according with the moment in the unit, student developmental stage, and the specific learning objectives in the task.

  8. Experiences by student nurses during clinical placement in psychiatric units in a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J.C. Van Rhyn

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory study was conducted with the aim of discovering and describing experiences of psychiatric nursing students during clinical placement in a psychiatric unit. For the purpose of the study an unstructured interview was conducted with each participant during their first placement in a psychiatric unit to identify the factors experienced as stressful. The results indicated that all eight participants experienced average to high stress. Sources of stress identified included, among others, ineffective teaching and learning programmes, poor managerial governance of the service, detachment of professional nurses from their teaching role, poor relationships among staff, overreliance on the medical model of care and patient neglect. Psychiatric nursing students sampled indicated universal support for in-service education and training for professional nurses, attitude change of professional nurses towards students, support for student initiatives, student involvement in patient care and adequate allocation of resources for patient care and nurse training. The exploration and description of experiences of the psychiatric nursing students will help nurse educators plan clinical learning opportunities in such a way that they are less stressful, thus ensuring that psychiatric nursing students are equipped to utilise themselves as therapeutic instruments.

  9. Building coalitions to support women's health and rights in the United States: South Carolina and Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Theresa

    2007-05-01

    There is a health care crisis in the United States and women, particularly low-income women and women of colour, are paying the price. The politicisation of pregnancy, sexuality and women's reproductive rights has created a uniquely contradictory situation in many states. Policymakers are working to control women's reproductive choices and sexuality, and restricting sex education, but doing little to address the overall lack of access to quality reproductive health care. This article describes a new reproductive rights advocacy model that was implemented starting in 2003 in two US states, South Carolina and Florida. In-depth research on the status of reproductive health and rights in each state, analysed by race, economic status, county and state policy initiatives relevant to women's health, showed that in both states access to contraception and abortion, cervical and breast cancer screening and treatment, HIV/AIDS-related care and pregnancy care were poor, with African American and Hispanic women faring even worse than white women. Implementing the advocacy model involved identifying and bringing together a diverse set of health care professionals, academics and activists who formed coalitions and are now working together and developing advocacy strategies in support of policies to improve access to reproductive health care and protect reproductive rights in both states.

  10. Tobacco Use Among Middle and High School Students--United States, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tushar; Arrazola, René A; Corey, Catherine G; Husten, Corinne G; Neff, Linda J; Homa, David M; King, Brian A

    2016-04-15

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States; if current smoking rates continue, 5.6 million Americans aged students. In 2015, e-cigarettes were the most commonly used tobacco product among middle (5.3%) and high (16.0%) school students. During 2011-2015, significant increases in current use of e-cigarettes and hookahs occurred among middle and high school students, whereas current use of conventional tobacco products, such as cigarettes and cigars decreased, resulting in no change in overall tobacco product use. During 2014-2015, current use of e-cigarettes increased among middle school students, whereas current use of hookahs decreased among high school students; in contrast, no change was observed in use of hookahs among middle school students, use of e-cigarettes among high school students, or use of cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, pipe tobacco, or bidis among middle and high school students. In 2015, an estimated 4.7 million middle and high school students were current tobacco product users, and, therefore, continue to be exposed to harmful tobacco product constituents, including nicotine. Nicotine exposure during adolescence, a critical period for brain development, can cause addiction, might harm brain development, and could lead to sustained tobacco product use among youths. Comprehensive and sustained strategies are warranted to prevent and reduce the use of all tobacco products among U.S. youths.

  11. Residential building energy conservation and avoided power plant emissions by urban and community trees in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Nathaniel Appleton; Alexis Ellis; Eric Greenfield

    2017-01-01

    Urban trees and forests alter building energy use and associated emissions from power plants by shading buildings, cooling air temperatures and altering wind speeds around buildings. Field data on urban trees were combined with local urban/community tree and land cover maps, modeling of tree effects on building energy use and pollutant emissions, and state energy and...

  12. The Organic Secondary Building Unit: Strong Intermolecular π Interactions Define Topology in MIT-25, a Mesoporous MOF with Proton-Replete Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sarah S; Hendon, Christopher H; Fielding, Alistair J; Walsh, Aron; O'Keeffe, Michael; Dincă, Mircea

    2017-03-15

    The structure-directing role of the inorganic secondary building unit (SBU) is key for determining the topology of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here we show that organic building units relying on strong π interactions that are energetically competitive with the formation of common inorganic SBUs can also play a role in defining the topology. We demonstrate the importance of the organic SBU in the formation of Mg2H6(H3O)(TTFTB)3 (MIT-25), a mesoporous MOF with the new ssp topology. A delocalized electronic hole is critical in the stabilization of the TTF triad organic SBUs and exemplifies a design principle for future MOF synthesis.

  13. Student Transfer Policies and Practices in the United States and Europe: Mobility without Loss of Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Megan M.

    2010-01-01

    As student mobility continues to rise, the United States is challenged to increase transferability between institutions of higher education. Creating courses that are recognizable across institutions can increase the number of degrees and aid the knowledge-based economy. Europe addressed this issue a decade ago when they initiated the Bologna…

  14. The Moral Reasoning of Sports Management Students in the United States and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Almerinda

    2013-01-01

    The researcher analyzed the moral reasoning ability of Sports Management students in the United States and Italy. The researcher statistically analyzed data collected through a survey questionnaire designed to measure moral reasoning. The Defining Issues Test (DIT) developed by James Rest using Kohlberg's six stages of moral judgment was used in…

  15. Students' Beliefs about Mobile Devices vs. Desktop Computers in South Korea and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Eunmo; Mayer, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    College students in the United States and in South Korea completed a 28-item multidimensional scaling (MDS) questionnaire in which they rated the similarity of 28 pairs of multimedia learning materials on a 10-point scale (e.g., narrated animation on a mobile device Vs. movie clip on a desktop computer) and a 56-item semantic differential…

  16. The challenges of multiple disabilities - A look at a Specialized Unit for students with multiple disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefânia Barroso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The creation of Specialized Units for students with multiple disabilities and congenital deafness-blindness in schools has been one of the implemented measures during the last past years to promote inclusive education. To understand the problem of multiple disabilities and inclusive education for students with multiple disabilities which must ascertain the views of Regular Education teachers who have students with multiple disabilities included in their classes and Special Education teachers about the presence of a Supporting Unit in grouping multiple disabilities they are teaching. To achieve this goal the methodology that seemed most appropriate was the case study and the instruments that have been used to collect data were participant observation and questionnaire. During the investigation it was observed how the Special Unit for Students with Multiple Disabilities was working and it was analyzed the opinions of 24 teachers participating in the samples selected for this study. The results obtained in the empirical component of this study support the conclusion that the teachers surveyed for the Special Unit are the best educational response for children with multiple disabilities to perform both learning and their socialization. We conclude that Special Education teachers feel more prepared to work with this type of audience than teachers from Regular Teaching; and opinions on these issues do not differ substantially between teachers of Special Education and Regular Education teachers .

  17. Distance Higher Education Experiences of Arab Gulf Students in the United States: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harthi, Aisha S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a phenomenological research study that was undertaken to provide cultural understanding about the nature of distance education experiences of Arab graduate students pursuing degree programs in the United States. As a theoretical framework, Hofstede's international difference dimensions and Hall's concept of low and high…

  18. The Moral Reasoning of Sports Management Students in the United States and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Almerinda

    2013-01-01

    The researcher analyzed the moral reasoning ability of Sports Management students in the United States and Italy. The researcher statistically analyzed data collected through a survey questionnaire designed to measure moral reasoning. The Defining Issues Test (DIT) developed by James Rest using Kohlberg's six stages of moral judgment was used in…

  19. Generalizability of Diagnostic-Prescriptive Teaching Strategies across Student Locus of Control and Multiple Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jean S.; Yeany, Russell H.

    Reported is a study that explores the effect on student achievement of diagnostic-prescriptive instructional strategies on preservice elementary education majors (N=43) enrolled in an introductory biology course. Factors of pre-treatment achievement and locus of control were analyzed as well. Units on Mendelian genetics, modern genetics, and…

  20. Introducing Blended Learning: An Experience of Uncertainty for Students in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Linzi J.

    2013-01-01

    The cultural dimension of Uncertainty Avoidance is analysed in this study of an introduction to blended learning for international students. Content analysis was conducted on the survey narratives collected from three cohorts of management undergraduates in the United Arab Emirates. Interpretation of certainty with blended learning was found in:…

  1. Acculturative Stress, Perfectionism, Years in the United States, and Depression among Chinese International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meifen; Heppner, P. Paul; Mallen, Michael J.; Ku, Tsun-Yao; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin; Wu, Tsui-Feng

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined whether maladaptive perfectionism (i.e., discrepancy between expectations and performance) and length of time in the United States moderated the association between acculturative stress and depression. Data were collected through online surveys from 189 Chinese international students from China and Taiwan attending a…

  2. Students' Beliefs about Mobile Devices vs. Desktop Computers in South Korea and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Eunmo; Mayer, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    College students in the United States and in South Korea completed a 28-item multidimensional scaling (MDS) questionnaire in which they rated the similarity of 28 pairs of multimedia learning materials on a 10-point scale (e.g., narrated animation on a mobile device Vs. movie clip on a desktop computer) and a 56-item semantic differential…

  3. Paranormal Beliefs and Their Implications in University Students from Finland and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacyk, Jerome J.; Pirttila-Backman, Anna-Maija

    1992-01-01

    Compares 117 Finnish and 351 southern U.S. college students for the following: (1) paranormal beliefs; (2) personality adjustment constructs (anomie, death concerns, alienation, and death threat); and (3) relationships between the beliefs and constructs. The secularization process, further advanced in Finland than the United States, moderates…

  4. Investigating Knowledge Acquisition and Developing Misconceptions of High School Students Enrolled in an Invasion Games Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Molly K.; Graber, Kim C.

    2007-01-01

    Grounded within constructivist theory, the purpose of this investigation was to investigate knowledge acquisition and developing conceptions of high school-aged students during a unit of instruction in badminton. Six different qualitative methods were utilized: (a) observations, (b) formal interviews, (c) informal interviews, (d) think aloud…

  5. Paranormal Beliefs and Their Implications in University Students from Finland and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacyk, Jerome J.; Pirttila-Backman, Anna-Maija

    1992-01-01

    Compares 117 Finnish and 351 southern U.S. college students for the following: (1) paranormal beliefs; (2) personality adjustment constructs (anomie, death concerns, alienation, and death threat); and (3) relationships between the beliefs and constructs. The secularization process, further advanced in Finland than the United States, moderates…

  6. The Senegal Project: A Cultural Foods Unit for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The Senegal Project is the culminating project in a unit on cultural foods in an 8th grade family and consumer sciences (FCS) course. Initially, students take a quick world tour by studying and cooking foods from Mexico, Italy, China, and India followed by a "more depth and less breadth" study of Senegal, a country with a culture vastly…

  7. Initial Adjustment of Taiwanese Students to the United States: The Impact of Postarrival Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yu-Wen; Liese, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the adjustment of 172 Taiwanese students during their first months in the United States. A multidimensional model is used that accounts for 39% of the variance of adjustment. Mediating factors of the model include demographics, personality, number and severity of problems experienced, prearrival preparation, social support, language…

  8. Promoting Students' Conceptual Understanding of Plant Defense Responses Using the Fighting Plant Learning Unit (FPLU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantawanit, Nantawan; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

    2012-01-01

    Most students think animals are more interesting than plants as a study topic believing that plants are inferior to animals because they are passive and unable to respond to external challenges, particularly biological invaders such as microorganisms and insect herbivores. The purpose of this study was to develop an inquiry-based learning unit,…

  9. Schooling and the Construction of Identity among Minority Students in Spain and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Beth; Arnaiz, Pilar; Klingner, Janette; Sturges, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Based on a study of the special education placement process in a large city in the United States and two studies in different regions of Spain, the authors offer a comparative analysis of the relationship between professional beliefs and practices and the achievement of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students. The data focus on…

  10. The Moral Reasoning of Sports Management Students in the United States and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Almerinda

    2013-01-01

    The researcher analyzed the moral reasoning ability of Sports Management students in the United States and Italy. The researcher statistically analyzed data collected through a survey questionnaire designed to measure moral reasoning. The Defining Issues Test (DIT) developed by James Rest using Kohlberg's six stages of moral judgment was used…

  11. Mathematics for Junior High School, Volume 2, Student's Text, Part I. Unit 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This fifth unit in the SMSG junior high mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics: rational numbers and coordinates; equations; scientific notation, decimals, and the metric system; constructions, congruent triangles, and the Pythagorean property; relative error; and real numbers. (DT)

  12. The Evolution of Building a Diverse Geosciences in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; Houlton, Heather; Leahy, P. Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Since the 1960s, the United States has had numerous systematic efforts to support diversity in all parts of society. The American Geosciences Institute has had active ongoing research and diversity promotion programs in the geosciences since 1972. Over this time, the drivers and goals of promoting a diverse discipline have evolved, including in the scope and definition of diversity. The success of these efforts have been mixed, largely driven by wildly different responses by specific gender and racial subsets of the population. Some critical cultural barriers have been solidly identified and mitigation approaches promoted. For example, the use of field work in promotion of geoscience careers and education programs is viewed as a distinct negative by many African American and Hispanic communities as it equates geoscience as non-professional work. Similarly, efforts at improving gender diversity have had great success, especially in the private sector, as life-balance policies and mitigations of implicit biases have been addressed. Yet success in addressing some of these cultural and behavioral issues has also started to unveil other overarching factors, such as the role of socio-economic and geographic location. Recent critical changes in the definition of diversity that have been implemented will be discussed. These include dropping Asian races as underrepresented, the introduction of the multiracial definition, evolution of the nature of gender, and the increased awareness of persons with disabilities as a critical diverse population. This has been coupled with dramatic changes in the drivers for promoting diversity in the geosciences in the U.S. from a moral and ethical good to one of economic imperative and recognizing the way to access the best talent in the population as the U.S. rapidly approaches being a majority minority society. These changes are leading to new approaches and strategies, for which we will highlight specific programmatic efforts both by AGI

  13. Enhanced teaching and student learning through a simulator-based course in chemical unit operations design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasem, Nayef

    2016-07-01

    This paper illustrates a teaching technique used in computer applications in chemical engineering employed for designing various unit operation processes, where the students learn about unit operations by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of unit operation processes through simulators. A case study presenting the teaching method was evaluated using student surveys and faculty assessments, which were designed to measure the quality and effectiveness of the teaching method. The results of the questionnaire conclusively demonstrate that this method is an extremely efficient way of teaching a simulator-based course. In addition to that, this teaching method can easily be generalised and used in other courses. A student's final mark is determined by a combination of in-class assessments conducted based on cooperative and peer learning, progress tests and a final exam. Results revealed that peer learning can improve the overall quality of student learning and enhance student understanding.

  14. Reflections of physiotherapy students in the United Arab Emirates during their clinical placements: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shamlan Amal

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Western models of education are being used to establish health professional programs in non-Western countries, little is known about how students in these countries perceive their learning experiences. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the reflections of physiotherapy students from a Middle East culture during their clinical placements and to compare them to reflections of physiotherapy students from a Western culture. Methods Subjects were six senior students (3 females, 3 males, mean age 22.6 years and 15 junior, female students (mean age 20.1 years in the baccalaureate physiotherapy program at a university in the United Arab Emirates (UAE. They wrote weekly entries in a journal while in their clinical placements. They described an event, their reaction to it, and how it might affect their future behavior. Two evaluators independently read and coded the content of all the journals, and then worked together to categorize the data and develop themes. A third evaluator, an UAE national, independently read the journals to validate the content analysis. A feedback session with students was used to further validate the data interpretation. The themes were compared to those derived from a similar study of Canadian physiotherapy students. Results The content of the students' reflections were grouped into 4 themes: professional behavior, awareness of learning, self-development and shift to a patient orientation, and identification and analysis of ethical issues. Although the events were different, students from the UAE considered many of the same issues reflected on by Canadian students. Conclusion Physiotherapy students from a Middle East culture consider many of the same issues as students from a Western culture when asked to reflect on their clinical experience. They reflect on their personal growth, on how they learn in a clinical setting, and on the ethical and professional behaviors of themselves

  15. The 2009 Space Science Component of UNH Project SMART and High School Students Building a High-Altitude Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. W.; Broad, L.; Chen, L.; Farrugia, C. J.; Frederick-Frost, K.; Goelzer, S.; Kucharek, H.; Messeder, R.; Moebius, E.; Puhl-Quinn, P. A.; Torbert, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    For the past 19 years the University of New Hampshire has offered a unique research and education opportunity to motivated high-school students called Project SMART (Science and Mathematics Achievement through Research Training). The Space Science module is strongly research based. Students work in teams of two on real research projects carved from the research programs of the faculty. The projects are carefully chosen to match the abilities of the students. The students receive classes in basic physics as well as lectures in space science to help them with their work. This year the research included the analysis of magnetic reconnection observations and Crater FTE observation, both by the CLUSTER spacecraft, the building of Faraday cups for thermal ion measurements in our thermal vacuum facility, and analysis of the IBEX star sensor. In addition to this, the students work on one combined project and for the past several years this project has been the building of a payload for a high-altitude balloon. The students learn to integrate telemetry and GPS location hardware while they build several small experiments that they then fly to the upper reaches of the Earth's atmosphere. This year the payload included a small video camera and the payload flew to 96,000 feet, capturing images of weather patterns as well as the curvature of the Earth, thickness of the atmosphere, and black space. In addition to still photos, we will be showing 2- and 7-minute versions of the 90-minute flight video that include footage from peak altitude, the bursting of the balloon, and initial descent.

  16. Preparing students for careers in food-supply veterinary medicine: a review of educational programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, R Daniel; Hoffsis, Glen F; Cullor, James S; Naylor, Jonathan M; Chaddock, Michael; Ames, Trevor R

    2012-01-01

    The real and/or perceived shortage of veterinarians serving food-supply veterinary medicine has been a topic of considerable discussion for decades. Regardless of this debate, there are issues still facing colleges of veterinary medicine (CVMs) about the best process of educating future food-supply veterinarians. Over the past several years, there have been increasing concerns by some that the needs of food-supply veterinary medicine have not adequately been met through veterinary educational institutions. The food-supply veterinary medical curriculum offered by individual CVMs varies depending on individual curricular design, available resident animal population, available food-animal caseload, faculty, and individual teaching efforts of faculty. All of the institutional members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) were requested to share their Food Animal Veterinary Career Incentives Programs. The AAVMC asked all member institutions what incentives they used to attract and educate students interested in, or possibly considering, a career in food-supply veterinary medicine (FSVM). The problem arises as to how we continue to educate veterinary students with ever shrinking budgets and how to recruit and retain faculty with expertise to address the needs of society. Several CVMs use innovative training initiatives to help build successful FSVM programs. This article focuses on dairy, beef, and swine food-animal education and does not characterize colleges' educational efforts in poultry and aquaculture. This review highlights the individual strategies used by the CVMs in the United States.

  17. Participation in Online and Face-to-Face Discussions: Perceptions of Female Saudi Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazy, Manal M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the Saudi government started a new scholarship program that sent many female and male students to some Western countries including the United States of America. When Saudi female students enroll in universities in the United States and register for mixed-gender (face-to-face and online) classes, they have to participate in the classroom.…

  18. 1.1 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2003. Issue Brief. NCES 2004-115

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princiotta, Daniel; Bielick, Stacey; Chapman, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This brief uses data from the 2003 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES) to estimate the number of homeschooled students in the United States in 2003 and to discuss the reasons parents decide to homeschool their children. Overall, from 1999 to 2003, the number of homeschooled students in the United States increased, as did the…

  19. 1.5 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2007. Issue Brief. NCES 2009-030

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This Issue Brief provides estimates of the number and percentage of homeschooled students in the United States in 2007 and compares these estimates to those from 1999 and 2003. From 1999 to 2007, the number of homeschooled students in the United States increased, as did the homeschooling rate. In 2007, parents homeschooled their children for a…

  20. Emergy-based life cycle assessment (Em-LCA of multi-unit and single-family residential buildings in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Reza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction and building process depends on substantial consumption of natural resources with far-reaching impacts beyond their development area. In general, a significant portion of annual resource consumption by the building and construction industry is a result of applying traditional building strategies and practices such as designing and selecting types of development (e.g. multi-unit condo and single-family house, etc., building materials and structure, heating/cooling systems, and planning renovation and maintenance practices. On the other hand, apart from structural suitability, building developers mostly consider the basic requirements of public owners or private occupants of the buildings, where the main criteria for selecting building strategies are costs, and long-term environmental and socio-economic impacts are generally ignored. The main purpose of this paper is to develop an improved building sustainability assessment framework to measure and integrate different sustainability factors, i.e. long-term environmental upstream and downstream impacts and associated socio-economic costs, in a unified and quantitative basis. The application of the proposed framework has been explained through a case study of single-family houses and multi-unit residential buildings in Canada. A comprehensive framework based on the integration of emergy synthesis and life cycle assessment (LCA has been developed and applied. The results of this research prove that the proposed emergy-based life cycle assessment (Em-LCA framework offers a practical sustainability assessment tool by providing quantitative and transparent results for informed decision-making.

  1. Ask! Your Library at the HUB: Penn State Libraries’ Experiences Providing Reference Services at the Campus Student Union Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Charlotte Behler

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Web 2.0 generation presents many service challenges to libraries. College students of today have work styles that emphasize collaboration, preference for flexible and comfortable spaces, and independent discovery of information. Given that challenge, it is important for libraries to experiment with new and unique models of service. Librarians and Staff at the Penn State University Libraries explored offering library service at the main campus’s student union building during two trials, during the Spring and Fall semesters of 2006.

  2. International students in United States' medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Jashodeep; Miller, Bonnie M

    2012-01-01

    Matriculation of international students to United States' (US) medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. While these students' numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools - both public and private - to support international students' education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to healthcare disparity eradication, minority health issues, and service in

  3. Computer availability and students' science achievement in Taiwan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Meichun Lydia

    The purpose of the study was to examine the differences associated with nationality, computer availability at school, and computer availability at home on eighth-grade students' science achievement. Achievement scores were obtained from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study---Repeat dataset for Taiwan and the United States (U.S.) students. One hundred thirty-seven schools in Taiwan and 152 schools in the U.S. were selected with 5270 Taiwanese students and 6236 American students. A three-way analysis of variance was conducted using house weight to weight the selected sample. The dependent variable was TIMSS 1999 science overall score, and the independent variables were nationality, four levels of number of students per computer, and two levels of computer availability at home. An Omega Squared (o2) was calculated for each of the significant main effects. Follow-up analyses were included for statistically significant interactions. Descriptive statistics revealed that the average class size in Taiwan was significantly larger than the class size in the U.S. The statistical analysis found a difference in mean science achievement score between Taiwan and the United States, among the four levels of number of students per computer, and between the two levels of computer availability at home. Taiwanese students performed significantly better than American students (o2 = 5.8%). Students in the group with the least number of students per computer performed significantly better than rest of the three groups (o 2 = 0.3%). The statistically significant difference among the levels of computer availability at school might be due to large sample size rather than true differences among groups because of the small amount of variance accounted. Furthermore, students who had a computer at home had significantly higher achievement in science than those without a computer at home (o 2 = 4.8%). Statistically significant interactions were found between (1) nationality and

  4. DIYModeling: a place for students and faculty to build their own game-quality simulations to enhance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sones, Bryndol; Wattenberg, Frank

    2009-03-01

    DIYModeling (Do it Yourself Modeling) aims to improve both the quality of learning in the STEM disciplines and the extent to which the very best STEM learning reaches all students by leveraging the power of game- quality modeling and simulation. It builds on earlier work by many people using platforms like Java, Flash and game quality simulations like the Federation of American Scientists' Immune Attack. DIYModeling adds a new element that enables students and faculty to build their own game-quality simulations by specifying the underlying scientific and mathematical models without getting into the details of programming. The DIYModeling team is a consortium of math and basic science faculty from six universities teamed up with the software development company Tietronix Software (an 8a certified company), which does contract work for NASA to build complex software systems including game-quality immersive simulations. The goal of the program is to enable curriculum developers and students to develop game- quality, three-dimensional immersive simulations with educational benefit. Current applications under development include a first-person shooter game environment for use in data collection and statistical analysis, orbital mechanics in executing the Hohlman transfer, and solar power generation. Some pilot tests are planned for use in the spring semester.

  5. Six Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers assembled from a similar binuclear building unit: tunable structures and luminescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyan; Rong, Lulu; Hu, Guoli; Jin, Suo; Jia, Wei-Guo; Liu, Ji; Yuan, Guozan

    2015-04-21

    Six Zn(ii) and Cd(ii) coordination polymers were constructed by treating a 2-substituted 8-hydroxyquinolinate ligand containing a pyridyl group with zinc or cadmium salts, and characterized by a variety of techniques. Interestingly, based on a similar binuclear Zn(ii) or Cd(ii) building unit, the supramolecular structures of the six coordination polymers () exhibit an unprecedented structural diversification due to the different choices of metal salts. and represent a novel 2D framework containing 1D infinite right- and left-handed helical chains. and are 2D coordination frameworks based on binuclear Cd(ii) building units. For and , the L ligands can bridge binuclear building units forming a 1D infinite chain. Interestingly, the adjacent Cd2O2 planes of the 1D chain in are in parallel with each other, while the dihedral angle between the two Zn2O2 planes in is 83.43°. Photoluminescence properties revealed that the six coordination polymers exhibit redshifted emission maximum compared with the free ligand HL, which can be ascribed to an increased conformational rigidity and the fabrication of coplanar binuclear building units M2L2 in . Coordination polymers also display distinct fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields because of their different metal centers and supramolecular structures.

  6. Grades, Student Satisfaction and Retention in Online and Face-to-Face Introductory Psychology Units: A Test of Equivalency Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt-Reed, David; Roberts, Lynne D.; Heritage, Brody

    2016-01-01

    There has been a recent rapid growth in the number of psychology courses offered online through institutions of higher education. The American Psychological Association has highlighted the importance of ensuring the effectiveness of online psychology courses (Halonen et al., 2013). Despite this, there have been inconsistent findings regarding student grades, satisfaction, and retention in online psychology units. Equivalency Theory (Simonson, 1999; Simonson et al., 1999) posits that online and classroom-based learners will attain equivalent learning outcomes when equivalent learning experiences are provided. We present a study of an online introductory psychology unit designed to provide equivalent learning experiences to the pre-existing face-to-face version of the unit. Using quasi-experimental methods, academic performance, student feedback, and retention data from 866 Australian undergraduate psychology students were examined to assess whether the online unit developed to provide equivalent learning experiences produced comparable outcomes to the ‘traditional’ unit delivered face-to-face. Student grades did not significantly differ between modes of delivery, except for a group-work based assessment where online students performed more poorly. Student satisfaction was generally high in both modes of the unit, with group-work the key source of dissatisfaction in the online unit. The results provide partial support for Equivalency Theory. The group-work based assessment did not provide an equivalent learning experience for students in the online unit highlighting the need for further research to determine effective methods of engaging students in online group activities. Consistent with previous research, retention rates were significantly lower in the online unit, indicating the need to develop effective strategies to increase online retention rates. While this study demonstrates successes in presenting students with an equivalent learning experience, we

  7. Grades, Student Satisfaction and Retention in Online and Face-to-Face Introductory Psychology Units: A Test of Equivalency Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt-Reed, David; Roberts, Lynne D; Heritage, Brody

    2016-01-01

    There has been a recent rapid growth in the number of psychology courses offered online through institutions of higher education. The American Psychological Association has highlighted the importance of ensuring the effectiveness of online psychology courses (Halonen et al., 2013). Despite this, there have been inconsistent findings regarding student grades, satisfaction, and retention in online psychology units. Equivalency Theory (Simonson, 1999; Simonson et al., 1999) posits that online and classroom-based learners will attain equivalent learning outcomes when equivalent learning experiences are provided. We present a study of an online introductory psychology unit designed to provide equivalent learning experiences to the pre-existing face-to-face version of the unit. Using quasi-experimental methods, academic performance, student feedback, and retention data from 866 Australian undergraduate psychology students were examined to assess whether the online unit developed to provide equivalent learning experiences produced comparable outcomes to the 'traditional' unit delivered face-to-face. Student grades did not significantly differ between modes of delivery, except for a group-work based assessment where online students performed more poorly. Student satisfaction was generally high in both modes of the unit, with group-work the key source of dissatisfaction in the online unit. The results provide partial support for Equivalency Theory. The group-work based assessment did not provide an equivalent learning experience for students in the online unit highlighting the need for further research to determine effective methods of engaging students in online group activities. Consistent with previous research, retention rates were significantly lower in the online unit, indicating the need to develop effective strategies to increase online retention rates. While this study demonstrates successes in presenting students with an equivalent learning experience, we

  8. Building a Student-Centered Culture in Times of Natural Disaster: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Karen Ramey

    2013-01-01

    Increased rates of student success and persistence have been positively linked to community colleges with student-centered cultures. A student-centered culture is one in which policies and practices promote a consistent message of concern and respect while expecting high standards of academic accomplishment. Developing a student-centered culture…

  9. Building a Student-Centered Culture in Times of Natural Disaster: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Karen Ramey

    2013-01-01

    Increased rates of student success and persistence have been positively linked to community colleges with student-centered cultures. A student-centered culture is one in which policies and practices promote a consistent message of concern and respect while expecting high standards of academic accomplishment. Developing a student-centered culture…

  10. Educational awareness of biotechnology issues among undergraduate students at the United Arab Emirates University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuQamar, Synan; Alshannag, Qasim; Sartawi, Abdelaziz; Iratni, Rabah

    2015-01-01

    Due to its valuable benefits and potential risks, there is a progressing debate among opponents and proponents of biotechnology in recent decades. Previous studies have shown that lack of knowledge about biotechnology remains the concern about genetically modified organisms/food (GMO/GMF). This study assessed levels of educational awareness perceptions and attitudes of United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) students towards biotechnology. An electronic survey including literacy, environmental, social, and economic domains associated with biotechnology was administered to obtain data from undergraduate students in different colleges of the university. Responses from students (n = 1,104) were gathered and statistically analyzed. Results indicated that educational awareness in biotechnology literacy and environmental domains were significantly different according to the enrolled college and the academic achievement of the student. In general, a poor overall performance of our students' understanding was concluded. Aware groups most likely accepted accurate biotechnology information delivered by reliable sources from internet or lectures; they grasped their knowledge from surrounding people as a secondary source. Since UAEU students have several concept misunderstandings of biotechnology and its ethics, our results suggest that awareness plays a crucial role in forming a "clear-cut" opinion about this technology. Because education can shape public attitudes toward biotechnology, priorities on university curricula and teaching strategies should be extensively given, and therefore, improve in respect to this topic. Ultimately, this promotes the students' perception in understanding the new technology. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Computer use and vision-related problems among university students in ajman, United arab emirate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantakumari, N; Eldeeb, R; Sreedharan, J; Gopal, K

    2014-03-01

    The extensive use of computers as medium of teaching and learning in universities necessitates introspection into the extent of computer related health disorders among student population. This study was undertaken to assess the pattern of computer usage and related visual problems, among University students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. A total of 500 Students studying in Gulf Medical University, Ajman and Ajman University of Science and Technology were recruited into this study. Demographic characteristics, pattern of usage of computers and associated visual symptoms were recorded in a validated self-administered questionnaire. Chi-square test was used to determine the significance of the observed differences between the variables. The level of statistical significance was at P visual problems reported among computer users were headache - 53.3% (251/471), burning sensation in the eyes - 54.8% (258/471) and tired eyes - 48% (226/471). Female students were found to be at a higher risk. Nearly 72% of students reported frequent interruption of computer work. Headache caused interruption of work in 43.85% (110/168) of the students while tired eyes caused interruption of work in 43.5% (98/168) of the students. When the screen was viewed at distance more than 50 cm, the prevalence of headaches decreased by 38% (50-100 cm - OR: 0.62, 95% of the confidence interval [CI]: 0.42-0.92). Prevalence of tired eyes increased by 89% when screen filters were not used (OR: 1.894, 95% CI: 1.065-3.368). High prevalence of vision related problems was noted among university students. Sustained periods of close screen work without screen filters were found to be associated with occurrence of the symptoms and increased interruptions of work of the students. There is a need to increase the ergonomic awareness among students and corrective measures need to be implemented to reduce the impact of computer related vision problems.

  12. Sport Education and Direct Instruction Units: Comparison of Student Knowledge Development in Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José; Araújo, Rui; Farias, Cláudio; Bessa, Cristiana; Mesquita, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This study conducted a comparative analysis of students’ knowledge development on athletics in Sport Education and in a Direct Instruction unit taking into account sex and initial skill level. The participants were an experienced Physical Education teacher and two sixth-grade classes totaling 47 students (25 boys and 22 girls). Each class was randomly placed in either Sport Education or Direct Instruction classes and participated in 20, 45-minutes lessons focused on shot put, hurdles and triple jump. Knowledge on athletics was assessed through a 25-items written and video-based test. The inter-group differences and improvements across time in the knowledge test were analyzed through the Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, respectively. There were significant knowledge improvements in both instructional approaches irrespective of students’ gender and skill level. In Direct Instruction, the type of task organization, the high rates of repetition of movement patterns and feedback by the teacher were beneficial to student learning. In Sport Education, the autonomy granted to students in the control of the pace of task transitions by making on-going judgments on achievement of performance criteria, implicated students affectively and cognitively with the learning content. It was further supported that several models and teaching strategies should be taken into consideration when teaching Physical Education. Different approaches should be perceived as alternatives and teachers should retain the best in each according with the moment in the unit, student developmental stage, and the specific learning objectives in the task. Key points The results in this study showed that regardless of students’ sex, both DI and SE were efficient in the promotion of improvements in students’ content knowledge of athletics. Both boys and girls improved from the pre-test to the post-test in SE and DI. SE was particularly beneficial to lower skill-level. On the contrary, in the DI unit

  13. Classroom Communication and National Crises: Student Information Needs in the Aftermath of the 2001 Terrorist Attacks on the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Robert R.; Hemphill, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about students' reactions to their university's attempt to manage their informational and emotional needs during a time of national crisis. A survey of students immediately following the 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States found that students wanted the university to stay open and function as a place for sense making…

  14. Universal Beliefs and Specific Practices: Students' Math Self-Efficacy and Related Factors in the United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    This study intends to compare and contrast student and school factors that are associated with students' mathematics self-efficacy in the United States and China. Using hierarchical linear regressions to analyze the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 data, this study compares math self-efficacy, achievement, and variables…

  15. The Classification of the Probability Unit Ability Levels of the Eleventh Grade Turkish Students by Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Ozcan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the probability unit ability levels of the eleventh grade Turkish students were classified through cluster analysis. The study was carried out in a high school located in Trabzon, Turkey during the fall semester of the 2011-2012 academic years. A total of 84 eleventh grade students participated. Students were taught about…

  16. Integrating psychological research on girls with feminist activism: a model for building a liberation psychology in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kathryn E; Finkelstein, Jo-Ann S; Lyons, Aoife L

    2003-03-01

    A liberation psychology is needed to bridge the gap between psychology's focus on individual distress and broad social forces that foster such distress. We offer a model for bridging this gap by focusing on a specific area of psychology (psychological research on girls) and a specific social movement (feminist activism). Psychological research on girls and feminist activism share the common goal of improving the lives of girls and women. However, both have fallen short of this goal. This is due, in part, to the weaknesses associated with each endeavor and to the fact that the complementary strengths of each have remained isolated from the other. In this paper, we propose a common language and shared framework to integrate psychological research with feminist activism. First, we review the basic strengths and weaknesses associated with psychological research and feminist activism, with a particular focus on how they are distinct from one another. Second, we provide a taxonomic framework for integrating these two areas on the basis of the stress paradigm, with specific examples provided from our recent reviews of the literature and our own empirical work with adolescent girls. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for future work needed to integrate psychological research on girls with feminist activism toward the goal of building a liberation psychology in the United States.

  17. Field assessment of the urban density of air conditioning use in the United Kingdom in non domestic buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caeiro, Jorge A.J. [The Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Brown, Neil [Inst. of Energy and Sustainable Development, De Montfort Univ., Leicester (United Kingdom); Altan, Hasim [School of Architecture, Building Energy Analysis Unit, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    Increasing sales of air conditioning (AC) will exacerbate future heat waves, paradoxically with positive feedback, since the resulting augmented emission of greenhouse effect gases will in turn contribute to global warming. According to a research study carried out in 2000 (Hitchin, E.R et al), the total air-conditioned UK building area, under both cooling and reverse systems, was estimated to have almost doubled over the previous decade and is projected to nearly double again by 2020. This has now become an urgent concern. However the estimated increase is based on sales data and the detailed patterns of increase in urban density of air conditioning use in service and retail sectors in the UK are largely unknown. Energy use information was collected from a major study carried out in the early 1990s. Since then there have been many changes in these sectors, with shifts in location patterns, and increased use of air conditioning in offices and shops. Unfortunately, AC unit sales figures may not indicate which stock is new, and which is sold as replacement. In this paper, the results of surveys of over 2000 retail premises and offices are presented. These are derived from ongoing surveys with the goal of a statistically representative picture of AC usage within the UK.

  18. Fast food perceptions: a pilot study of college students in Spain and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Rachel; Dundes, Lauren

    2008-09-01

    Comparing survey data of college students from Spain and the United States provides insight into how perceptions about fast food are culture and gender-specific. More American college males (61%) considered value (amount of food for the money) to be a priority than did other respondents (35%) and relatively few American college males (29%) cited nutritional status as important (versus 60% of other college respondents). Convenience of fast food is more important to Americans (69%) than Spaniards (48%) while more Spanish college students (49%) than Americans (18%) objected to the proliferation of fast food establishments in their own countries.

  19. Building an open academic environment - a new approach to empowering students in their learning of anatomy through 'Shadow Modules'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jonathan L; Moxham, Bernard J; Rutherford, Stephen M

    2014-03-01

    Teaching and learning in anatomy is undertaken by a variety of methodologies, yet all of these pedagogies benefit from students discussing and reflecting upon their learning activities. An approach of particular potency is peer-mediated learning, through either peer-teaching or collaborative peer-learning. Collaborative, peer-mediated, learning activities help promote deep learning approaches and foster communities of practice in learning. Students generally flourish in collaborative learning settings but there are limitations to the benefits of collaborative learning undertaken solely within the confines of modular curricula. We describe the development of peer-mediated learning through student-focused and student-led study groups we have termed 'Shadow Modules'. The 'Shadow Module' takes place parallel to the formal academically taught module and facilitates collaboration between students to support their learning for that module. In 'Shadow Module' activities, students collaborate towards curating existing online open resources as well as developing learning resources of their own to support their study. Through the use of communication technologies and Web 2.0 tools these resources are able to be shared with their peers, thus enhancing the learning experience of all students following the module. The Shadow Module activities have the potential to lead to participants feeling a greater sense of engagement with the subject material, as well as improving their study and group-working skills and developing digital literacy. The outputs from Shadow Module collaborative work are open-source and may be utilised by subsequent student cohorts, thus building up a repository of learning resources designed by and for students. Shadow Module activities would benefit all pedagogies in the study of anatomy, and support students moving from being passive consumers to active participants in learning.

  20. Teaching Modules to Build HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Safer Sex Skills among African-American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, Amar; Sharma, Manoj

    2011-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic has taken a tremendous toll on the population of the United States. College students, including African-Americans aged 13-24 years, across the nation are susceptible to contracting sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS as they participate in unsafe sex practices. The purpose of this article is to provide teaching…

  1. Summary of proceedings of the first meeting of the executive committee on building and community systems. Electricity council Research Centre, Capenhurst, United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) meeting on Building and Community Systems was conducted in three phases. First, participants toured the Electricity Council Research Centre (ECRC) research facilities to observe the ECRC's building research activities and to receive information on their ongoing research into energy usage in buildings. The final meeting of the Experts Group on Building and Community Systems was then held on May 4. During this meeting, analysts discussed the progress of their analysis of office buildings that has been conducted since the October, 1976, Experts Group meeting in Stockholm. In accordance with IEA rules, this Experts Group was then abolished and an Executive Committee on Buildings and Community Systems created to direct further work in this project area. This action reflects the signing in March of the Implementing Agreement on Building and Community Systems and Annex I on Thermal Characteristics by the United States, Canada, and Italy. The discussion of study activities, begun by the Experts Group, was continued at this Executive Committee meeting. Sections I and II describe the meetings of the Experts Group and Executive Committee. Section III describes the field trip at the ECRC.

  2. Biomedical Ph.D. students enrolled in two elite universities in the United kingdom and the United States report adopting multiple learning relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Kemp

    Full Text Available The ability to form multiple learning relationships is a key element of the doctoral learning environment in the biomedical sciences. Of these relationships, that between student and supervisor has long been viewed as key. There are, however, limited data to describe the student perspective on what makes this relationship valuable. In the present study, we discuss the findings of semi-structured interviews with biomedical Ph.D. students from the United Kingdom and the United States to: i determine if the learning relationships identified in an Australian biomedical Ph.D. cohort are also important in a larger international student cohort; and ii improve our understanding of student perceptions of value in their supervisory relationships.32 students from two research intensive universities, one in the United Kingdom (n = 17, and one in the United States (n = 15 were recruited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Verbatim transcripts were transcribed, validated and analysed using a Miles and Huberman method for thematic analysis.Students reported that relationships with other Ph.D. students, post-doctoral scientists and supervisors were all essential to their learning. Effective supervisory relationships were perceived as the primary source of high-level project guidance, intellectual support and confidence. Relationships with fellow students were viewed as essential for the provision of empathetic emotional support. Technical learning was facilitated, almost exclusively, by relationships with postdoctoral staff.These data make two important contributions to the scholarship of doctoral education in the biomedical sciences. Firstly, they provide further evidence for the importance of multiple learning relationships in the biomedical doctorate. Secondly, they clarify the form of a 'valued' supervisory relationship from a student perspective. We conclude that biomedical doctoral programs should be designed to contain a minimum level

  3. Building Student Networks with LinkedIn: The Potential for Connections, Internships, and Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robert M.; Dover, Howard F.

    2014-01-01

    Networking is a chance to interact with people, build friendships or business partners, identify opportunities, and create value. Technology has made this process easier, since individuals can readily contact others who were previously unknown. In the professional world, LinkedIn has become the standard way to build virtual and personal networks.…

  4. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Jones, Bhavan Prasad Rai Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, UK Purpose: Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. Materials and methods: An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Results: Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%. Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (P<0.01. Seventy-eight percent of the study group agreed that clinical simulation is a good learning tool for clinical examination. Seventy percent of students felt junior doctors were as able as senior doctors to teach. Lack of confidence was identified as the commonest barrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. Conclusion: This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the

  5. Building Cultural Competence: The Lived Experience of Semester Study Abroad Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lauren; Crump, Lauren; Struwing, Renee; Gillum, Deborah; Abraham, Sam

    College students who participate in semester abroad programs have diverse but positive experiences. Variables such as the educational institution attended by the students and the location of the study abroad can affect the experiences of the students. There is minimal research concerning students from Christian colleges who study abroad. The purpose of this study was to investigate the lived experiences of college students participating in a semester abroad program in a developing country. Seven college students were interviewed regarding their experiences by three senior nursing students who also participated in the study abroad program. Results indicated that major factors influencing students' experiences were related to cultural immersion, role relationships, challenges encountered, and personal growth. Students reported that relationships with people and faith in Christ were strengthened through the experience.

  6. Men's body depilation: an exploratory study of United States college students' preferences, attitudes, and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basow, Susan A; O'Neil, Katherine

    2014-09-01

    Young men in Western cultures frequently engage in body depilation practices, but little is known regarding how such bodies are perceived. This exploratory study asked United States college students (N=238) to view six pictures of the same male body with different amounts of visible body hair and to indicate which body was most sexually attractive to themselves, to most men, and to most women. Both men and women chose a relatively hairless male body as the most sexually attractive. Women, however, thought men would choose a hairier body than men actually did. Most of the men reduced or removed body hair, especially from the pubic area. Questionnaire responses indicated that men and women had similar attitudes toward men's body hair, with both hair reduction and hair retention being socially acceptable. Men's body depilation, while still optional, may be becoming normative, at least among United States college students.

  7. International students in United States’ medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashodeep Datta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matriculation of international students to United States’ (US medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. Methods: While these students’ numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. Results: These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools – both public and private – to support international students’ education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME. However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. Conclusion: By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to

  8. Embedding Evolution: Exploring Changes in Students' Conceptual Development, Beliefs, and Motivations in a Population Ecology Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nancy L.

    The purpose of this study was to explore student changes in conceptual development, epistemology, and motivations when evolution concepts are embedded and explicit reflective discourse is used in a unit for population ecology. The two research problems were: (1) What changes are observed in student's conceptual development, epistemology, and motivations when there is explicit reflective discourse within a population ecology unit with embedded evolution?, and (2) In what ways does explicit reflection influence students' mental models within a population ecology unit with embedded evolution? This mixed-method, quasi-experimental study assessed two regular high school biology classes in a small, urban, Midwestern high school. Students in this study had not studied evolution within any formal chapters, but had been immersed in a curriculum with embedded evolution. The study was conducted over a four-week period in a population ecology unit near the beginning of second semester. Instruction emphasized basic conceptions in population ecology. Five key intervention activities included evolutionary concepts as part of an embedded curriculum. The independent variable was explicit reflective discourse with one or two intervention questions after completion of these activities. Data included pre- and posttest surveys measuring (a) evolutionary understanding of natural selection, (b) science beliefs, and (c) science motivations. Written artifacts included (a) explanations to scenarios, (b) pre- and post-argument reflections revealing student's science beliefs and science motivations resultant from two argumentations, and (c) three, pre-, post-, and 6-week final concept maps constructed from 12 concepts. All data sources provided descriptive data. Conceptual change was interpreted from an ontological, epistemological, and motivational perspective. The experimental class receiving explicit reflective discourse showed greater overall increases in conceptual development. Students

  9. The use of Global Positioning System units and ArcGIS Online to engage K-12 Students in Research Being Done in their Local Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, C. E.; Sparrow, E. B.; Clucas, T.

    2015-12-01

    Incorporating K-12 students in scientific research processes and opportunities in their communities is a great way to bridge the gap between research and education and to start building science research capacity at an early age. One goal of the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Alaska Adapting to Changing Environments project is to engage the local community in the research as well as to share results with the people. By giving K-12 students Global Positioning System (GPS) units, and allowing them to collect and map their own data, they are being exposed to some of the research methods being used by scientists in the Alaska ACE project. This hands-on, minds-on method has been successfully used in formal education settings such as a Junior High School classroom in Nuiqsut, Alaska as well as in informal education settings such as summer camps in Barrow, Alaska and Kenai, Alaska. The students progress from mapping by hand to collecting location data with their GPS units and cameras, and imputing this information into ArcGIS Online to create map products. The data collected were from sites ranging from important places in the community to sites visited during summer camps, with students reflecting on data and site significance. Collecting data, using technology, and creating map products contribute to science skills and practices students need to conduct research of their own and to understand research being done around them. The goal of this education outreach implementation is to bring students closer to the research, understand the process of science, and have the students continue to collect data and contribute to research in their communities. Support provided for this work from the Alaska EPSCoR NSF Award #OIA-1208927 and the state of Alaska is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Improving Reading Achievement of Chapter 1 Pull-Out Students through Self-Esteem Building Classes Involving Buddy Group and Teacher Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershfield, Marlene

    A practicum attempted to improve the low reading achievement of Chapter 1 students in a low socioeconomic fifth-grade class by implementing a self-esteem building program. Activities were designed in a workbook format to complement class instruction in self-esteem building exercises. An emphasis on critical thinking skills was incorporated into…

  11. The benefits and challenges of providing nursing student clinical rotations in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinny, Betsy; Brady, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    The goal of providing a clinical rotation in a basic nursing program is to integrate skills and knowledge from the classroom setting into the clinical practice setting. In the intensive care unit (ICU), nursing students have the ability to learn about the complex health issues of critically ill patients, practice selected technical skills, and develop communication skills. There are both benefits and challenges to having nursing students in the intensive care setting. With preparation, the student is able to immerse in the ICU environment, acquire new knowledge and skills, and participate alongside the nurse caring for critically ill patients. The staff nurse must balance patient care with the added responsibilities of helping the student meet the clinical goals. It is optimal to have faculty that are also intensive care clinically competent and can facilitate the clinical experience. The school, the hospital, and the ICU need to collaborate to provide a positive clinical experience that is safe for the patient. In return, the hospital can recruit student nurses and clinical faculty. Planned with thought and intention, rotations in the ICU can be an ideal clinical setting for upper-level student nurses to learn the role of the registered nurse.

  12. Introducing blended learning: An experience of uncertainty for students in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linzi J. Kemp

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cultural dimension of Uncertainty Avoidance is analysed in this study of an introduction to blended learning for international students. Content analysis was conducted on the survey narratives collected from three cohorts of management undergraduates in the United Arab Emirates. Interpretation of certainty with blended learning was found in: student skills with technology; student acknowledgement of course organisation; and student appreciation of online feedback. Uncertainty with the introduction of blended learning was found: when membership was assigned for group work, higher quality research methods were introduced; where course structure lacked detail, increased time was required for new and different online activities. These international students, from countries with a high score on Uncertainty Avoidance, exhibited that dimension when introduced to blended learning. The implications of these findings are discussed, and strategies suggested for introducing blended learning to international students. The limitations of the study are considered, and a direction for future research is suggested. This is the first study on undergraduates in the Middle East for the effects of a cultural dimension when introducing blended learning. The findings increase the body of knowledge that relates to learning technology in the international business classroom.

  13. Building organizational capacity for effective mentorship of pre-registration nursing students during placement learning: Finnish and British mentors' conceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokelainen, Merja; Jamookeeah, David; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2011-10-01

    Health-care organizations have a key role in improving the quality of student mentorship in placements. This study presents the findings of Finnish and British mentors' conceptions of how to build organizational capacity for the provision of effective mentorship for pre-registration nursing students during placement learning. The data obtained from nine semistructured focus group interviews were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach. Three categories of description are presented. Organizations were mainly perceived as optimizers of investments in developing clear strategies for the provision of sufficient resources and professional support for mentors. The creation of a positive mentorship culture within a development-oriented, student-centred and goal-directive atmosphere was seen as essential. Furthermore, providing well-prepared placements for clinical practice of students was emerged as crucial, which included adequate working conditions and stakeholders as well as arrangements of learning opportunities. It is concluded that effective student mentorship requires health-care organizations to invest in financial and human resources in order to promote the quality of the placement learning environments. Such provision will enhance students' recruitment, retention and effectiveness, leading to safe practice and cost-benefits for health-care organizations in the longer term. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Predictors of Students` Desire to be an Entrepreneur: Kyrgyzstan, Georgia, and the United States

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    Barry A. FRIEDMAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is an important element of national economic growth, and college business students represent an important feeder pool for a nation’s supply of entrepreneurs. The purpose of this study is to identify and contrast predictors of students’ desire to be entrepreneurs in Kyrgyzstan, Georgia, and the United States. Three hundred and five undergraduate business students in Kyrgyzstan, Georgia, and the United States completed the Aspiring Entrepreneurial Motives Questionnaire (Aziz, Friedman & Sayfullin, 2012. While the recognition motive was important for all students, predictors of their desire to be entrepreneurs differed across the three countries. In contrast to Kyrgyzstan and the United States, students’ in Georgia overall desire to be entrepreneurs was more complex as finance, recognition, freedom, marketing opportunities and economic conditions reached significance. National initiatives that recognize entrepreneurial accomplishments may therefore encourage more individuals to start and manage businesses. A more complex strategy may be required in Georgia, as the decision to be an entrepreneur appeared to be more multidimensional.

  15. Indoor air quality in green buildings: A case-study in a residential high-rise building in the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Youyou; Krogmann, Uta; Mainelis, Gediminas; Rodenburg, Lisa A; Andrews, Clinton J

    2015-01-01

    Improved indoor air quality (IAQ) is one of the critical components of green building design. Green building tax credit (e.g., New York State Green Building Tax Credit (GBTC)) and certification programs (e.g., Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED)) require indoor air quality measures and compliance with allowable maximum concentrations of common indoor air pollutants. It is not yet entirely clear whether compliance with these programs results in improved IAQ and ultimately human health. As a case in point, annual indoor air quality measurements were conducted in a residential green high-rise building for five consecutive years by an industrial hygiene contractor to comply with the building's GBTC requirements. The implementation of green design measures resulted in better IAQ compared to data in references of conventional homes for some parameters, but could not be confirmed for others. Relative humidity and carbon dioxide were satisfactory according to existing standards. Formaldehyde levels during four out of five years were below the most recent proposed exposure limits found in the literature. To some degree, particulate matter (PM) levels were lower than that in studies from conventional residential buildings. Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) with known permissible exposure limits were below levels known to cause chronic health effects, but their concentrations were inconclusive regarding cancer health effects due to relatively high detection limits. Although measured indoor air parameters met all IAQ maximum allowable concentrations in GBTC and applicable LEED requirements at the time of sampling, we argue that these measurements were not sufficient to assess IAQ comprehensively because more sensitive sampling/analytical methods for PM and VOCs are needed; in addition, there is a need for a formal process to ensure rigor and adequacy of sampling and analysis methods. Also, we suggest that a comprehensive IAQ assessment should

  16. Promoting skill building and confidence in freshman nursing students with a "Skills-a-Thon".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Susan T; Vignato, Julie A; Moore, Joan L; Madden, Carol A

    2009-08-01

    Freshman nursing students returning for their second semester after summer break benefited by reviewing previously learned clinical skills presented in a Skills-a-Thon. Skills stations were established and facilitated by faculty and senior students. Senior students were first trained in mentoring and specific steps in skills competencies. Freshman students demonstrated skills in various mock clinical situations including catheter insertion, sterile dressings, medications, and physical assessment. The strategy reinforced learning and provided an opportunity for students to experience risk-free skills performance among peers. Freshman students gained proficiency and appreciated guidance by senior students without the pressures of testing. Seniors benefited from a condensed version of the program to review their own skills prior to the event. Responses were positive, with students reporting improved performance and confidence with hands-on application in a non-threatening environment. Nursing faculty observed improvement in skill performance and competence, and plan to offer future events.

  17. Clinical neuro-oncology formal education opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Karan S; Nicholas, Martin Kelly; Lukas, Rimas V

    2014-12-01

    To develop an understanding of the availability of the formal clinical neuro-oncology educational opportunities for medical students. The curriculum websites of all medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education were reviewed for the presence of clinical neuro-oncology electives as well as other relevant data. Ten (6.8%) of medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education offer formal neuro-oncology electives. Half are clustered in the Midwest. Forty percent are at institutions with neuro-oncology fellowships. All are at institutions with neurosurgery and neurology residency programs. Formal clinical neuro-oncology elective opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada are limited. Additional such opportunities may be of value in the education of medical students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Building the Emotional Intelligence and Effective Functioning of Student Work Groups: Evaluation of an Instructional Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christina Hamme

    2012-01-01

    Group-based learning is common practice in university classrooms. Despite the frequent student complaint of social loafing from teammates, methods for teaching students how to address teamwork issues are rarely incorporated into group assignments. Students are instructed on their final product, rather than their group process. In this article, an…

  19. A Survey of Student Attitudes on the Use of Social Networking to Build Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Post-secondary students are increasingly receiving instruction by distance learning. This mode of learning can result in the students learning in isolation, with bad results in learning outcomes. The same type of isolation can occur for part-time students and those who are working while taking classes. In such circumstances, we believe that it…

  20. Nobody Says No: Student Self-Censorship in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alan; Nason, Rod

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores student self-censorship within an online learning environment. Self-censorship in group activity can be seen as a two-edged sword. While it can be advantageous that a student censor personal frustration and angst when working with others, if the self-censorship impacts on the cognitive contribution a student makes then this may…

  1. Building Scholarly Writers: Student Perspectives on Peer Review in a Doctoral Writing Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Margaret Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Peer review was used as a primary pedagogical tool in a scholarly writing course for social work doctoral students. To gauge student response to peer review and learning as a result of peer review, the instructor used narrative analysis to organize student comments into themes. Themes identified included initial trepidation, "no pain, no…

  2. The Evolution of My Rapport: One Professor's Journey to Building Successful Instructor/Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often struggle to find the right balance of sternness and leniency with their students, especially in the beginning stages of their careers. An instructor who is too casual risks being overrun by students who do not take him or her seriously. The professor who is too strict might inadvertently thwart students' creativity and stifle…

  3. Tactics of Interventions: Student Mobility and Human Capital Building in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Hitherto, research on transnational higher education student mobility tended to narrowly present hard statistics on student mobility, analysing these in terms of "trends" and the implication this has on policy and internationalizing strategies. What is missing from this "big picture" is a close-up analysis of the micropolitics of student mobility…

  4. The Evolution of My Rapport: One Professor's Journey to Building Successful Instructor/Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often struggle to find the right balance of sternness and leniency with their students, especially in the beginning stages of their careers. An instructor who is too casual risks being overrun by students who do not take him or her seriously. The professor who is too strict might inadvertently thwart students' creativity and stifle…

  5. Using data to help increase STEM retention rates for at-risk students; Student expectations and skill building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D. E.; Jones, G.; Heaney, A.

    2013-12-01

    Retention in the STEM fields is often a focus for higher education due to a shortage of trained workforce members. In particular, much effort has been spent on first year retention rates and introductory level courses under the assumption that students are more likely to drop out of STEM majors early in their higher education degree progress. While the retention rates of women, minorities, and low income students have been a priority by both the National Science Foundation and the private sector, we are interested in at-risk first year students for this study. The University of Wyoming Synergy Program's goal is to promote academic success and retention for underprepared and at-risk students by creating a series of first semester curricula as theme-based college transition skills courses that are paired with English courses. This creates a cohort group of courses for the students with increased communication between instructors at the same time allowing greater development of student social networks. In this study we are highlighting the results of the STEM students as compared with other at-risk participants in the program. The Synergy Program enrolls approximately 144 students each year with pre- and post-course surveys that directly measure which college skills students select as important as well as student expectations of the amount of time required for STEM courses. Follow-up surveys track the same queries for students who persist to their junior and senior year. In addition, instructors complete a summative survey about skills they find important to student success and individual student's challenges and successes with a variety of skills. Our results show a large gap in skills between those identified as important by students and those identified by their instructors. Expectations for the amount of time required to complete work for STEM courses and the reported time spent on course work are not constant when progressing throughout college. This analysis

  6. Impact of individualized learning plans on United States senior medical students advanced clinical rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Guardiola

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The individualized learning plan (ILP is a tool that promotes self-directed learning. The aim of this pilot study was to look at the perception of the ILPs in United States senior medical school students as a way to improve their learning experience during their advanced practice clerkship. We conducted a survey of graduating medical students that contained both quantitative and open-ended questions regarding the students’ experiences with the ILP during their advanced practice clerkship from July 2014 to March 2016. We systematically identified and compiled themes among the qualitative responses. Responses from 294 out of 460 subjects were included for analysis (63.9%. Ninety students (30.6% reported that the ILP was definitely reviewed at the midpoint and 88 (29.9% at the final evaluation. One hundred sixty one students (54.8% felt the ILP provided a framework for learning. One hundred sixty one students (61.6% felt it was a useful tool in helping open a discussion between the student and faculty. The qualitative data was grouped by areas most mentioned and these areas of concern centered on lack of faculty knowledge about ILP, time to complete ILP, and uncertainty of appropriate goal setting. The majority of students perceive the ILP to be helpful. Our results suggest that active intervention is needed by dedicated and trained faculty to improve ILP utilization. It is recommended that faculty gives students examples of learning goals to create their own learning framework and encourages them to discuss and review the ILP.

  7. Tobacco use among middle and high school students --- United States, 2000-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    Tobacco use continues to be the single leading preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. More than 80% of established adult smokers begin smoking before age 18 years. To monitor trends in tobacco use among middle and high school students, CDC analyzed 2000-2009 data from the National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS), a school-based survey that collects information on tobacco use and related behaviors and attitudes from middle school (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) students. This analysis indicated that in 2009, 8.2% of middle school students and 23.9% of high school students reported current use of any tobacco product; 5.2% of middle school students and 17.2% of high school students reported current use of cigarettes. Overall prevalence did not decrease from 2006 to 2009 for use of any tobacco product among either group. During 2000-2009, the prevalence of current tobacco use among middle school students declined (15.1% to 8.2%), as did current cigarette use (11.0% to 5.2%) and cigarette smoking experimentation (29.8% to 15.0%). Similar trends were observed for high school students (current tobacco use: 34.5% to 23.9%; current cigarette use: 28.0% to 17.2%; cigarette smoking experimentation: 39.4% to 30.1%). Overall, no change in susceptibility to initiate cigarette smoking was observed for either group. To further decrease tobacco use and susceptibility to use among youths, restrictions on advertising, promotion, and availability of tobacco products to youths should be combined with full implementation of evidence-based, communitywide, comprehensive tobacco control policies.

  8. Building Inclusive Pedagogy: Recommendations from a National Study of Students of Color in Higher Education and Student Affairs Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Chris; Harris, Jessica C.; Allen, Evette L.; Hubain, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we share the racialized experiences of 29 students of color in higher education and student affairs graduate programs, focusing specifically on their relationships with faculty, their experiences in classrooms, and the strategies they recommend for inclusion. Participants indicated that they are expected to serve as the racial…

  9. Developing and Implementing Comprehensive Student Support Services for Online Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Marwin; Rush, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Student retention in higher education has become a critical focus in recent years. This paper describes the efforts of Lone Star College-Online and its Online Student Support Services unit to build and implement a comprehensive suite of services for online students with the intention of enhancing the

  10. International genetic counseling students' perspective on their training experience in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadini, Marta; Naldi, Mariana; Packman, Wendy; Youngblom, Janey; Weil, Jon

    2013-12-01

    International students face social, psychological and academic challenges upon moving to a foreign country to pursue higher education. Clinical disciplines such as genetic counseling present additional challenges adapting to an unfamiliar health care system and different interactions and expectations with patients and colleagues. This study used semi-structured interviews to identify challenges that international genetic counseling students face during training in the United States. Eight international genetic counseling alumni who graduated from U.S.-accredited programs were interviewed. Participants stated that the U.S. academic system was unfamiliar-class participation and paper-writing required the greatest adjustment. There was a need for help in understanding social norms in academic settings. Clinically, they were unfamiliar with the dynamics and communication style of U.S. families. Non-native English speakers experienced greater difficulty in all areas. Most participants reported that they were uncomfortable asking for help in transitioning to life, study and work. Participants identified mentorship programs for international students as potentially useful in clarifying expectations in academic and clinical settings. These results may assist international students preparing to study genetic counseling in the U.S. and may help genetic counseling training programs identify the academic and clinical challenges faced by international students.

  11. Preparing students to be academicians: a national student-led summer program in teaching, leadership, scholarship, and academic medical career-building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Michelle M; Blatt, Benjamin; Greenberg, Larrie

    2012-12-01

    Medical schools have the responsibility of producing future leaders in academic medicine, yet few students choose academic medicine as a career. In 2009, the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) and the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences joined forces to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to careers in academic medicine through the redesign of an existing annual summer program for medical students. Since 2004, AMSA had hosted the Medical Education Leadership Institute, a weeklong program that attracted medical students from across the country who were interested in gaining teaching skills. In the redesigned sixth annual program, the authors expanded the curriculum to include principles of leadership, of medical education scholarship (or project development), and of academic medicine career-building. The purpose of this article is to describe the features of this comprehensive program and to share the lessons learned from its development and implementation. The authors also describe the multifaceted approach they used to evaluate the program, which featured a rubric they derived from social cognitive career theory.

  12. Embedding academic-professional collaborations that build student confidence for essay writing: Student perceptions and quality outcomes. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliey Beckman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the ability for effective written communication is an essential graduate attribute, there is misalignment of student perceptions of expected writing styles and levels between secondary and tertiary education.  This problem may be compounded by an apparent dearth of hands-on writing and related learning modalities for the vast majority of transiting students.  This may be due to a range of interacting factors, including the increased numbers and concomitant diversity of students entering higher education, a reluctance among academics to hand over teaching to professional staff, and a lack of opportunities to establish collaborations between academics and co-curricular professions, namely library and learning skills professionals. This paper reports on the development, implementation and outcomes of a collaboration among these groups on an essay writing intervention for commencing students in a very large enrolment first year science subject.

  13. Vocabulary Instruction and Mexican-American Bilingual Students: How Two High School Teachers Integrate Multiple Strategies to Build Word Consciousness in English Language Arts Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significance of vocabulary knowledge to student learning, limited studies have examined English language arts (ELA) teachers' skills and practices that may be effective for building word consciousness in high school Mexican-American bilingual students. The research objective of the present study is to examine how two high school ELA…

  14. The Adjustment Problems Faced by International Students in the United States: A Comparison of International Students and Administrative Perceptions at Two Private, Religiously Affiliated Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Fred J.; Jenkins, John R.

    2005-01-01

    International students and the faculty and administrators charged with their oversight were surveyed at two religiously affiliated, private universities to determine the extent of their adjustment problems in the United States. Although the international students were found to have only minor adjustment problems in the twelve areas covered by the…

  15. Alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland and the United Kingdom from 2002 to 2014: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alcohol is a leading cause of global suffering. Europe reports the uppermost volume of alcohol consumption in the world, with Ireland and the United Kingdom reporting the highest levels of binge drinking and drunkenness. Levels of consumption are elevated among university students. Thus, this literature review aims to summarise the current research on alcohol consumption among university students in the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. Methods: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE a...

  16. Building a Peer-Learning Service for Students in an Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Mary; Garrison, Julie; Merry, Brian; Torreano, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Academic libraries are well lauded for offering supportive spaces for students' self-directed study, and significant resources are dedicated to librarian instruction in the classroom. What many academic libraries lack, however, is a middle ground, a routine way for students to help one another using best practices in peer-to-peer learning theory.…

  17. To Build an Ecosystem: An Introductory Lab for Environmental Science & Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Daniel; Finnerty, John R.

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis-driven laboratory is described that introduces students to the complexities of ecosystem function. Students work with live algae, brine shrimp, and sea anemones to test hypotheses regarding the trophic interactions among species, the exchange of nutrients and gases, and the optimal ratio of producers to consumers and predators in…

  18. Building Resiliency in Students with Special Education Needs: A Journey of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Alan; Stevenson, Rosalie

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an action research project, based within a school, to develop and increase the social resiliency of students with special education needs in both school and community settings. The programme included role-plays, scenarios and problem solving. An assessment tool was developed to measure self-esteem amongst the students and…

  19. Engaging Student Interpreters in Vocabulary Building: Web Search with Computer Workbench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lily

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the usefulness of Web portals in a workbench for assisting student interpreters in the search for and collection of vocabulary. The experiment involved a class of fifteen English as a Foreign Language (EFL) student interpreters, who were required to equip themselves with the appropriate English vocabulary to handle an…

  20. Greenhouse Schools: How Schools Can Build Cultures Where Teachers and Students Thrive. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNTP, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Successful teachers make successful schools. Yet some schools are better than others at accelerating student learning by developing and keeping great teachers, even compared to schools that serve the same population of students and have access to the same resources. These schools are called "greenhouse schools"--schools with carefully fostered…

  1. Greenhouse Schools: How Schools Can Build Cultures Where Teachers and Students Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNTP, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Successful teachers make successful schools. Yet some schools are better than others at accelerating student learning by developing and keeping great teachers, even compared to schools that serve the same population of students and have access to the same resources. These schools are called "greenhouse schools"--schools with carefully…

  2. Tactics of Interventions: Student Mobility and Human Capital Building in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Hitherto, research on transnational higher education student mobility tended to narrowly present hard statistics on student mobility, analysing these in terms of "trends" and the implication this has on policy and internationalizing strategies. What is missing from this "big picture" is a close-up analysis of the micropolitics…

  3. Strategies for Building Positive Student-Instructor Interactions in Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Oscar J.; Turner, Windi D.

    2016-01-01

    Although large classes in and of themselves are pragmatic for universities, they can be challenging for both students and instructors. The purpose of this study was to investigate pedagogical strategies that instructors teaching large classes can utilize to create positive student-instructor interactions to counter these challenges. Both…

  4. Supporting Inclusive Practicum Experiences for International Students across the Social Sciences: Building Industry Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Kathleen; Harrison, Gai

    2017-01-01

    Practicum experiences are critical learning environments for developing requisite skills, knowledge, behaviours and attitudes across the professions. Evidence suggests that international students in professional social and behavioural science programs struggle across a number of dimensions while on practicum. Key issues for these students coalesce…

  5. Reaching New Heights in Middle School Science: Straw Tower Competition Builds Student Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliskow, Tia

    2008-01-01

    Science educators face the challenge of piquing students' interest in subjects whose concepts are often entirely foreign to them. The author wanted to give her students a hands-on, "real world" experience rooted in scientific concepts. What evolved was an engineering design competition. The point of the project was two-fold: to work on real-world…

  6. Building an International Student Market: Educational-Balanced Scorecard Solutions for Regional Australian Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Linda; Hamilton, John

    2004-01-01

    There is an international student market suitable for regional Australia, but each region is different. Hence, each region must determine, target and niche market to its best potential international student customer base. For international education there remains scant, relevant, data for regional Australia, hence complete regional approaches to…

  7. Give Students an Engineering Edge--Add a Measurable Outcome to Bridge-Building Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Samuel E.; Calkins, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Problem-solving activities let students use knowledge gained in various areas of their academic education. They bring together skills and knowledge from such areas as science, math, art, and English by simulating activities and projects students will encounter later in career and life experiences. A very important feature of most problem-solving…

  8. Give Students an Engineering Edge: Add a Measurable Outcome to Bridge-Building Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Samuel E.; Calkins, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Problem-solving activities let students use knowledge gained in various areas of their academic education. They bring together skills and knowledge from such areas as science, math, art, and English by simulating activities and projects students will encounter later in career and life experiences. A very important feature of most problem-solving…

  9. Building Successes out of At-Risk Students: The Role of a Biology Foundations Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeber, Carla; Biermann, Carol A.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of students arriving at Kingsborough Community College with hopes of entering the nursing, physical therapist assistant, and other allied health programs (concentrations in pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, pre-pharmacy, and pre-physician's assistant) are at-risk students. A Foundations of Human Anatomy and Physiology…

  10. Building Pathways to Transfer: Community Colleges That Break the Chain of Failure for Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Patricia; Alvarado, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Anne; Orfield, Gary

    2012-01-01

    It has been well established that the high schools students attend contribute significantly to how well they do in college, and even if they choose to attend college at all (Lee & Frank, 1990). Low performing high schools tend to under-prepare their students for post-secondary education and contribute to the very high percentages of students…

  11. First Step in Building an Astronomy Learning Progression: Analyzing Student Conceptions of Astronomical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Christopher; Petula, J.; Plummer, J.; Flarend, A.; Goldsborough, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Earth and Space Science Partnership (ESSP) collaborated with Pennsylvania teachers to research how grades 4-9 students learned selected topics in Earth and Space Science. Prior to a professional development workshop in astronomy, held during the summer of 2011 at the Pennsylvania State University, 15 participating teachers gave their students a pilot astronomy assessment with questions on the Sun-Earth-Moon system, scale of the Solar System, phases of the Moon, perspective view of the celestial sphere, and planetary orbital velocities. Analysis of students' work revealed cross-cutting themes: patterns, scale, position and relations, time, and motion in the context of these solar system phenomena. Further analysis of students' responses may facilitate the development of an empirical "learning progression" that reveals the pathways students follow as they progress from novice to expert understanding of the underlying astronomical phenomena (e.g., lunar phases) related to these questions. This poster presents initial analysis, data, and findings based on the student work obtained during the summer of 2011. During subsequent project years, the assessment will be iteratively refined and distributed to additional students in our partner school districts, and this large database of student responses will be used to refine the learning progression. We expect also to use these student work samples to produce a set of performance standards that teachers can use to evaluate the location of students progression from novice to expert understanding of essential astronomical phenomena. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NSF from a Targeted Math Science Partnership award DUE#0962792.

  12. 《灵通英语》第二册Unit 4“Build it!”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴真

    2005-01-01

    Contents:Let’s learn and play in class.Aims and demands:1.Help the students to hear,say and read the sentences:How many…do you have?I have…2.Help the students to use them in the daily life.3.Help the students to have the spirit of cooperation and creation.

  13. Building BRIDGES: A Design Experiment to Improve Reading and United States History Knowledge of Poor Readers in Eighth Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Rollanda E.; Beach, Kristen D.; Sanchez, Victoria M.; Bocian, Kathleen M.; Flynn, Lindsay J.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the effects of teaching reading skills through U.S. history content for 38 eighth-grade poor readers whose reading ability ranged from second-to fourth-grade levels. Half of the students received special education services, and half of the students were English language learners. Students were taught to decode multisyllabic words, learn…

  14. Improving medical student intensive care unit communication skills: a novel educational initiative using standardized family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Scott; Rho, Lisa; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Nierman, David M

    2006-09-01

    To determine whether intensive care unit (ICU) communication skills of fourth-year medical students could be improved by an educational intervention using a standardized family member. Prospective study conducted from August 2003 to May 2004. Tertiary care university teaching hospital. All fourth-year students were eligible to participate during their mandatory four-week critical care medicine clerkship. The educational intervention focused on the initial meeting with the family member of an ICU patient and included formal teaching of a communication framework followed by a practice session with an actor playing the role of a standardized family member of a fictional patient. At the beginning of the critical care medicine rotation, the intervention group received the educational session, whereas students in the control group did not. At the end of each critical care medicine rotation, all students interacted with a different standardized family member portraying a different fictional scenario. Sessions were videotaped and were scored by an investigator blinded to treatment assignment using a standardized grading tool across four domains: a) introduction; b) gathering information; c) imparting information; and d) setting goals and expectations. A total of 106 (97% of eligible) medical students agreed to participate in the study. The total mean score as well as the scores for the gathering information, imparting information, setting goals, and expectations domains for the intervention group were significantly higher than for the control group (p communication skills of fourth-year medical students can be improved by teaching and then practicing a framework for an initial ICU communication episode with a standardized family member.

  15. Capacity-Building Programs Under the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States signed the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) in August 2004 with five Central American countries (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua) and the Dominican Republic.

  16. An interactive web-based learning unit to facilitate and improve intrapartum nursing care of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdprasert, Sailom; Pruksacheva, Tassanee; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

    2011-07-01

    First clinical exposures are stressful situations for nursing students, especially, when practicing on the labour ward. The purpose of this study was to develop intrapartum nursing care web-based learning to facilitate students' acquisition of conceptual knowledge and performance skills. This web-based learning unit integrated the 5E-model and information technology with the lecture content. Eighty four nursing students were recruited in the study. The control group received traditional teaching, while the experimental group was supplemented with the web-based learning unit on intrapartum nursing care. The results showed that the students in the experimental group had significant higher scores in conceptual knowledge and performance skill. The students also had significant lower scores in ignorance - related stress when compared to those of the control group. The students supplemented with the web-based course showed a strong positive attitude toward the new learning method.

  17. Development and validation of the Acculturative Stress Scale for Chinese College Students in the United States (ASSCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jieru

    2016-04-01

    Chinese students are the biggest ethnic group of international students in the United States. This study aims to develop a reliable and valid scale to accurately measure their acculturative stress. A 72-item pool was sent online to Chinese students and a five-factor scale of 32 items was generated by exploratory factor analysis. The five factors included language insufficiency, social isolation, perceived discrimination, academic pressure, and guilt toward family. The Acculturative Stress Scale for Chinese Students demonstrated high reliability and initial validity by predicting depression and life satisfaction. It was the first Chinese scale of acculturative stress developed and validated among a Chinese student sample in the United States. In the future, the scale can be used as a diagnostic tool by mental health professionals and a self-assessment tool by Chinese students. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Building Self-Efficacy for Exercise among Rural High School Students: It Takes Ongoing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortz, Brian; Petosa, R. Lingyak; Grim, Melissa L.; Stevens, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-efficacy has been associated with adolescent exercise. Previous studies have revealed that self-efficacy is relatively resistant to change. Effective strategies to build self-efficacy among adolescents are needed. Purpose: To describe the changes in self-efficacy and leisure time exercise produced by the "Planning to be…

  19. Students' Environmental Responsibility and Their Willingness to Pay for Green Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaran, Sharmin; Celik, Bilge Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore environmental attitudes and how such attitudes, when combined with a specific cost, can affect environmental behavior. Environmental attitudes are important to study due to the rising belief by building occupants that they are owed safe, healthy, environmentally responsible, and comfortable living…

  20. Video Productions as Learning Resources in Students' Knowledge Building in the Ubiquitous Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Andreasen, Lars Birch; Ørngreen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    The chapter investigates how video productions may facilitate students’ knowledge building. The video productions in question may either be existing video productions directly aimed for educational use, video productions created in other contexts, but used in educational settings, or video produc...

  1. The disclosure of dyslexia in clinical practice: experiences of student nurses in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David K; Turnbull, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    Heightened awareness and increasingly sophisticated psychological tests have seen a dramatic rise in the numbers of people diagnosed with dyslexia. Accordingly, there is a reported increase in the numbers of students with dyslexia entering Higher Education (HE) in the United Kingdom (UK) [Singleton, C.H., Chair, 1999. Dyslexia in higher education: policy, provision and practice. Report of the national working party on dyslexia in higher education. University of Hull on behalf of the Higher Education Funding Councils of England and Scotland, Hull], [Higher Education Statistics Agency. HESA. Available from: (accessed 21.12.05)]. Studies researching the effects of dyslexia on the clinical practice of nurses are almost non-existent. This paper reports part of a UK study exploring the clinical experiences of student nurses with dyslexia. In depth interviewing of 18 adult branch student nurses revealed a range of difficulties encountered and a variety of coping mechanisms to manage these. Other than in exceptional circumstances there is no legal requirement to disclose a dyslexia diagnosis. The decision to conceal or disclose their dyslexia was particularly prominent and contentious for these participants. This related to the attitudes of co-workers, concerns for patient safety, expectations of support, confidentiality issues and potential discrimination. Dyslexia continues to attract an unwarranted stigma and can adversely affect the learning experience. The need for disability awareness training in the workplace and improved education/service partnerships to support these students is considered crucial.

  2. Tobacco use among middle and high school students - United States, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrazola, René A; Singh, Tushar; Corey, Catherine G; Husten, Corinne G; Neff, Linda J; Apelberg, Benjamin J; Bunnell, Rebecca E; Choiniere, Conrad J; King, Brian A; Cox, Shanna; McAfee, Tim; Caraballo, Ralph S

    2015-04-17

    Tobacco use and addiction most often begin during youth and young adulthood. Youth use of tobacco in any form is unsafe. To determine the prevalence and trends of current (past 30-day) use of nine tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco pipes, snus, dissolvable tobacco, and bidis) among U.S. middle (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) students, CDC and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) analyzed data from the 2011-2014 National Youth Tobacco Surveys (NYTS). In 2014, e-cigarettes were the most commonly used tobacco product among middle (3.9%) and high (13.4%) school students. Between 2011 and 2014, statistically significant increases were observed among these students for current use of both e-cigarettes and hookahs (ptobacco use. Consequently, 4.6 million middle and high school students continue to be exposed to harmful tobacco product constituents, including nicotine. Nicotine exposure during adolescence, a critical window for brain development, might have lasting adverse consequences for brain development, causes addiction, and might lead to sustained tobacco use. For this reason, comprehensive and sustained strategies are needed to prevent and reduce the use of all tobacco products among youths in the United States.

  3. Interprofessional anatomy education in the United Kingdom and Ireland: Perspectives from students and teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire F; Hall, Samuel; Border, Scott; Adds, Philip J; Finn, Gabrielle M

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of multiprofessional learning in anatomy and its role in medical and healthcare professions. This study utilized two components to investigate anatomy interprofessional education (AIPE) in the United Kingdom and Ireland. First, a survey involving qualitative and quantitative components asked Heads of Anatomy to report on their institutions' uptake of AIPE. Second, a series of case studies explored the experiences of students by using evaluation forms and an in-depth analysis of thematic concepts to understand the learners' perspectives on designing and delivering AIPE. Out of the 13 institutions that took part in the survey, eight did not offer an AIPE program. Between the remaining five institutions that deliver AIPE programs, 10 different modules are offered with the majority involving healthcare professions. The AIPE component is rated highly by students. The themes from the case studies highlight how valuable AIPE is from the student perspective both in terms of engaging them in anatomy as well as in the broader skills of teamwork and communication. The case studies also revealed how AIPE can be engaging for groups of students who might not have previously had access to cadaveric anatomy, for example, engineers and archeologists. The results of this study have implications for curriculum design in medicine and healthcare but also for further engagement of professional groups from non-healthcare backgrounds. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. Social and Business Entrepreneurship as Career Options for University Students in the United Arab Emirates: The Drive-Preparedness Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Sanaa

    2016-01-01

    With limited employment opportunities, entrepreneurship is becoming a viable option to combat unemployment. This study explores undergraduate students' attitudes towards business and social entrepreneurship in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), assuming that the lack of awareness among students regarding social entrepreneurship and the lack of…

  5. Growing Student Identities and School Competences in Sojourning: Japanese Children's Lived Experiences across Japan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Nari

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand student identities of five Japanese children (the second through sixth grade) and the processes of identity negotiation within their sojourning experiences between Japan and the United States. An increasing number of Japanese elementary students internationally sojourn in today's globalized societies, and…

  6. An Examination of Individual Level Factors in Stress and Coping Processes: Perspectives of Chinese International Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2011-01-01

    No empirical research has focused solely upon understanding the stress and coping processes of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examines the individual-level variables that affect the stress-coping process of Chinese international students and how they conceptualize and adapt to their stress at an…

  7. Musical Preference, Identification, and Familiarity: A Multicultural Comparison of Secondary Students from Singapore and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Hargreaves, David J.; Lee, June

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigate whether there were significant differences in preferences for, familiarity with, and identification of Chinese, Malay, and Indian music between adolescent students from Singapore (n = 78) and the United Kingdom (n = 53). Also explored are the relationships among these three variables. Students were asked to rate their…

  8. Coordinating Numeric and Linear Units: Elementary Students' Strategies for Locating Whole Numbers on the Number Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Geoffrey B.; Shaughnessy, Meghan M.; Gearhart, Maryl; Haldar, Lina Chopra

    2013-01-01

    Two investigations of fifth graders' strategies for locating whole numbers on number lines revealed patterns in students' coordination of numeric and linear units. In Study 1, we investigated the effects of context on students' placements of three numbers on an open number line. For one group ("n"?=?24), the line was…

  9. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 2: Le Chatelier's Principle. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, A. Keith

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on Le Chatelier's principle includes objectives, prerequisites, pretest, instructions for executing the computer program, and…

  10. An Examination of Individual Level Factors in Stress and Coping Processes: Perspectives of Chinese International Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2011-01-01

    No empirical research has focused solely upon understanding the stress and coping processes of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examines the individual-level variables that affect the stress-coping process of Chinese international students and how they conceptualize and adapt to their stress at an…

  11. Teachers and Students' Perceptions of a Hybrid Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility Learning Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rio, Javier; Menendez-Santurio, Jose Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess students and teachers' perceptions concerning their participation in an educational kickboxing learning unit based on a hybridization of two pedagogical models: Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility. Method: Seventy-one students and three physical education teachers…

  12. Trends in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Risk Behaviors among High School Students--United States, 1991-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Nancy; Kann, Laura; Lowry, Richard; Wechsler, Howell; Romero, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    This paper examined changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related risk behaviors among high school students in the United States during 1991-2005. Data from 8 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys conducted during that period were analyzed. During 1991-2005, the percentage of US high school students engaging in HIV-related sexual risk…

  13. High School Students' Experiences in a Sport Education Unit: The Importance of Team Autonomy and Problem-Solving Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Katelyn; Xihe Zhu,

    2011-01-01

    This study examined high school students' experiences in a Sport Education unit being implemented with smaller teams and fewer roles. The participants included one physical education teacher and her 70 ninth-grade students. Each week, we conducted two to three observations and four to six informal interviews with the participants for over eight…

  14. Solutions, Unit 2: Molarity, Molality, Concentration Conversions. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Morris

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student manual for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student module for this solution concentration unit includes objectives, prerequisites, pretest, discussion, and 20 problem sets. Included in the teacher's guide…

  15. Sick Building Syndrome Among Junior High School Students in Japan in Relation to the Home and School Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Motoko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Norbäck, Dan

    2015-06-12

    There is an increasing concern about sick building syndrome (SBS), especially in Asia. The aim of this study is to investigate associations between SBS and the home, school environment and personal factors among Japanese junior high school students. We investigated students in four junior high schools in Hyogo in Kansai area, Japan. A questionnaire study was performed among students (n=1056), 12-15 years old. Temperature and relative air humidity was measured in the classrooms and dust was collected from the classroom floors and air and was analysed for cat and dog allergens. Associations were analysed by multi-level logistic regression. Mucosal symptoms (45.4%), general symptoms (38.9%) and skin symptoms (22.6%) were common. Totally 8.8% reported cat allergy, 6.1% dog allergy, 6.0% mold allergy and 25.7% pollen allergy. Atopy, window pane condensation, floor dampness and odor at home and high relative air humidity in the classrooms were associated with SBS. The prevalence of SBS symptoms was high and associated with both home and school environment. Window pane condensation and floor dampness at home can increase the risk for SBS symptoms in students. Moreover high relative air humidity at school may increase the risk for SBS.

  16. Longitudinal change in East Timorese tertiary student attitudes to national identity and nation building, 2002-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Leach

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The attitudes of the tertiary students who are likely to comprise the next generation of leaders are pivotal to understanding the challenges of nation-building and national identity formation in post-conflict settings such as Timor-Leste. This article examines post-independence debates over national identity in Timor-Leste, presenting the findings of a longitudinal survey (Dili, 2002, 2007 and 2010 of East Timorese tertiary student attitudes to national identity. In particular, in the wake of the 2006 political-military crisis, the paper examines the evidence for differences in attitudes between students from eastern and western districts, concluding that the few significant differences in attitudes peaked in the 2007 survey, and were associated with the overt politicization of regional identity within Dili, and concerns over post-independence leadership, rather than any genuine ‘ethnic’ or ‘regional’ variation in attitudes. The paper also examines significant changes in some youth attitudes since independence, including a significant increase in the acceptance of the co-official status of the Portuguese language in the tertiary student demographic since the early years of independence. The survey also highlights the ongoing importance of tradition and adat in understandings of political community, but reveals significant gender differences in attitudes towards the role of traditional authorities.

  17. Horizontal and vertical individualism and collectivism among college students in the United States, Taiwan, and Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, J S

    2001-10-01

    Among college students in the United States, Taiwan, and Argentina, the author examined the strength of 4 cultural patterns (horizontal collectivism, vertical collectivism, horizontal individualism, vertical individualism; H. C. Triandis, 1995). A 3-group confirmatory factor analysis established the measurement equivalence among the 3 samples before the comparison. The Taiwanese and the Argentine samples were more vertically collectivist than the U.S. sample. The U.S. and the Taiwanese samples were more vertically individualistic than the Argentine sample. The U.S. sample was more horizontally individualistic than the Argentine sample, which, in turn, was more horizontally individualistic than the Taiwanese sample.

  18. Medical Student Core Clinical Ultrasound Milestones: A Consensus Among Directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Vi Am; Lakoff, Daniel; Hess, Jamie; Bahner, David P; Hoppmann, Richard; Blaivas, Michael; Pellerito, John S; Abuhamad, Alfred; Khandelwal, Sorabh

    2016-02-01

    Many medical schools are implementing point-of-care ultrasound in their curricula to help augment teaching of the physical examination, anatomy, and ultimately clinical management. However, point-of-care ultrasound milestones for medical students remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to formulate a consensus on core medical student clinical point-of-care ultrasound milestones across allopathic and osteopathic medical schools in the United States. Directors who are leading the integration of ultrasound in medical education (USMED) at their respective institutions were surveyed. An initial list of 205 potential clinical ultrasound milestones was developed through a literature review. An expert panel consisting of 34 USMED directors across the United States was used to produce consensus on clinical ultrasound milestones through 2 rounds of a modified Delphi technique, an established anonymous process to obtain consensus through multiple rounds of quantitative questionnaires. There was a 100% response rate from the 34 USMED directors in both rounds 1 and 2 of the modified Delphi protocol. After the first round, 2 milestones were revised to improve clarity, and 9 were added on the basis of comments from the USMED directors, resulting in 214 milestones forwarded to round 2. After the second round, only 90 milestones were found to have a high level of agreement and were included in the final medical student core clinical ultrasound milestones. This study established 90 core clinical milestones that all graduating medical students should obtain before graduation, based on consensus from 34 USMED directors. These core milestones can serve as a guide for curriculum deans who are initiating ultrasound curricula at their institutions. The exact method of implementation and competency assessment needs further investigation. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. The Currency of Gender: Student and Institutional Responses to the First Gender Unit in an Australian Journalism Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Louise

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and implementation of the first unit in an Australian university undergraduate journalism program to specifically examine the gendered nature of both news content and production processes. The paper outlines why such a unit is important to addressing entrenched industry bias, the core content, and student and…

  20. The Development of a Socioscientific Issues-Based Curriculum Unit for Middle School Students: Global Warming Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabey, Nejla; Topçu, Mustafa Sami

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed at developing "Human and Environment" unit around SSI based instruction. We followed action research methodology in development and implementation of the unit. The participants of this study were 24 seventh graders students and the instruction was extended to eight and a half weeks, taking four hours in a week.…

  1. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach

    OpenAIRE

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete’s behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample ...

  2. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete's behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample included data from 165 student-athletes from two universities. Results from structural equation modeling indicate support for the effect of coaching practices on commitment to the coach. Results also support the effect of commitment to the coach on the student-athletes' role behaviour and performance. By showing that coaching practices impact commitment to the coach, and that commitment to the coach impacts student-athlete role behaviour and performance, the findings have important implications for a better understanding of the determinants of coaches' and athletes' performance. The managerial significance of this research rests in the insight provided into how coaching practices influence athlete's behaviour through commitment to the coach. This study contributes to the literature on coach-athlete relationship within universities and colleges by applying the concept of commitment to the coach. This helps diversity research approaches to understanding coach-athlete relationships and extends prior research on commitment by looking at the context of the relationship between the student-athlete and their coach.

  3. Tobacco product use among middle and high school students--United States, 2011 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Nearly 90% of adult smokers in the United States began smoking by age 18 years. To assess current tobacco product use among youths, CDC analyzed data from the 2012 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS). This report describes the results of that analysis, which found that, in 2012, the prevalence of current tobacco product use among middle and high school students was 6.7% and 23.3%, respectively. After cigarettes, cigars were the second most commonly used tobacco product, with prevalence of use at 2.8% and 12.6%, respectively. From 2011 to 2012, electronic cigarette use increased significantly among middle school (0.6% to 1.1%) and high school (1.5% to 2.8%) students, and hookah use increased among high school students (4.1% to 5.4%). During the same period, significant decreases occurred in bidi and kretek use among middle and high school students, and in dissolvable tobacco use among high school students. A substantial proportion of youth tobacco use occurs with products other than cigarettes, so monitoring and prevention of youth tobacco use needs to incorporate other products, including new and emerging products. Implementing evidence-based interventions can prevent and reduce tobacco use among youths as part of comprehensive tobacco control programs. In addition, implementation of the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, which granted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the authority to regulate the manufacture, distribution, and marketing of tobacco products, also is critical to addressing this health risk behavior.

  4. Tobacco use among middle and high school students--United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrazola, René A; Neff, Linda J; Kennedy, Sara M; Holder-Hayes, Enver; Jones, Christopher D

    2014-11-14

    Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of disease and death in the United States, and nearly all tobacco use begins during youth and young adulthood. Among U.S. youths, cigarette smoking has declined in recent years; however, the use of some other tobacco products has increased, and nearly half of tobacco users use two or more tobacco products. CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Youth Tobacco Survey to determine the prevalence of ever (at least once) and current (at least 1 day in the past 30 days) use of one or more of 10 tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars, hookahs, smokeless tobacco, electronic cigarettes [e-cigarettes], pipes, snus, bidis, kreteks, and dissolvable tobacco) among U.S. middle school (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) students. In 2013, 22.9% of high school students reported current use of any tobacco product, and 12.6% reported current use of two or more tobacco products; current use of combustible products (i.e., cigarettes, cigars, pipes, bidis, kreteks, and/or hookahs) was substantially greater (20.7%) than use of other types of tobacco. Also, 46.0% of high school students reported having ever tried a tobacco product, and 31.4% reported ever trying two or more tobacco products. Among middle school students, 3.1% reported current use of cigars, and 2.9% reported current use of cigarettes, with non-Hispanic black students more than twice as likely to report current use of cigars than cigarettes. Monitoring the prevalence of the use of all available tobacco products, including new and emerging products, is critical to support effective population-based interventions to prevent and reduce tobacco use among youths as part of comprehensive tobacco prevention and control programs.

  5. Video Productions as Learning Resources in Students' Knowledge Building in the Ubiquitous Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Andreasen, Lars Birch; Ørngreen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    The chapter investigates how video productions may facilitate students’ knowledge building. The video productions in question may either be existing video productions directly aimed for educational use, video productions created in other contexts, but used in educational settings, or video...... perspective on teaching and educational design. We conclude by arguing where and why there is a need for more knowledge about video productions' potential as learning resources....

  6. Intelligibility of American English vowels and consonants spoken by international students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Su-Hyun; Liu, Chang

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the intelligibility of English consonants and vowels produced by Chinese-native (CN), and Korean-native (KN) students enrolled in American universities. METHOD 16 English-native (EN), 32 CN, and 32 KN speakers participated in this study. The intelligibility of 16 American English consonants and 16 vowels spoken by native and nonnative speakers of English was evaluated by EN listeners. All nonnative speakers also completed a survey of their language backgrounds. RESULTS Although the intelligibility of consonants and diphthongs for nonnative speakers was comparable to that of native speakers, the intelligibility of monophthongs was significantly lower for CN and KN speakers than for EN speakers. Sociolinguistic factors such as the age of arrival in the United States and daily use of English, as well as a linguistic factor, difference in vowel space between native (L1) and nonnative (L2) language, partially contributed to vowel intelligibility for CN and KN groups. There was no significant correlation between the length of U.S. residency and phoneme intelligibility. CONCLUSION Results indicated that the major difficulty in phonemic production in English for Chinese and Korean speakers is with vowels rather than consonants. This might be useful for developing training methods to improve English intelligibility for foreign students in the United States.

  7. Building of Environmental Literacy among Middle School Students: The Role of In-School, Out of School, and Psychological Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kathryn Tate

    Solving environmental challenges will require an environmentally literate citizenry, equipped with ecological knowledge, pro-environmental attitudes, problem-solving skills, and motivation toward environmentally responsible behaviors. This dissertation addresses three approaches to building environmental literacy (EL) among middle school students: through schools (Chapter 1), through activities outside of school (Chapter 2), and through understanding psychological factors that affect environmental perceptions (Chapter 3). Chapter 1. This study examined school-wide EE programs among middle schools in North Carolina, including the use of published EE curricula and time outdoors while controlling for teacher education level and experience, student demographics, and school attributes. Our sample included an EE group selected from schools with registered schoolwide EE programs, and a control group randomly selected from NC middle schools that were not registered as EE schools. Students were given an EL survey at the beginning and end of the spring 2012 semester. Use of published EE curricula, time outdoors, and having teachers with advanced degrees and mid-level teaching experience (between 3 and 5 years) were positively related with EL whereas minority status (Hispanic and black) was negatively related with EL. Results suggest that though school-wide EE programs may vary in effectiveness, the use of published EE curricula paired with time outdoors represents a promising strategy. Further, investments in both new and veteran teachers to build and maintain enthusiasm for EE may help to boost student EL levels. Middle school represents a pivotal time for influencing EL, as improvement was slower among older students. Differences in EL levels based on gender suggest boys and girls may possess complementary skills sets when approaching environmental issues. Our findings suggest ethnicity related disparities in EL levels may be mitigated by time spent in nature, especially

  8. Environmental Discourse: Helping Graduate Students Build Effective Deliberation and Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, D. N.; Downard, J.; Nielsen, E.

    2015-12-01

    The environmental sciences are at the forefront of critical issues facing society in the coming decades. As a result, many graduates in the environmental sciences find themselves working with the public to help inform the democratic process of making reasonable public policies. In order to be successful, students need to be confronted with the same kinds of questions and problems that practicing scientists face when they are working at the intersection of science and public policy. Otherwise, they lack the skills and confidence needed to work effectively with the public—especially on hotly contested environmental issues when the skills are needed the most. As part of a new Professional Science Master's (PSM) Program in Climate Science and Solutions at Northern Arizona University we have developed a three-semester course series focused on framing discussions on climate change mitigation and adaptation. Each semester, students use a deliberative model to design, frame, and facilitate a public discussion on a targeted issue of regional and local interest. The deliberative model is built around an approach to practical dilemmas that enables students to isolate and clarify the various sources of conflict around the issue. Working in an iterative manner, students learn to identify and untangling some of the sources of disagreement (e.g., policy, ethics and ideals, difference in scientific understanding) around and issue. As a result, students are in a much better position to clarify the key questions and sort through the competing solutions. The course series helps to improve the communication skills of students and promote productive public discourse with individuals from diverse backgrounds within the community. This type of experiential learning provides unique training to our students that not only broadens there understanding of complex issues surrounding climate change, but also provides them with professional skills that are transferrable to their careers.

  9. Experiential Education Builds Student Self-Confidence in Delivering Medication Therapy Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. Parker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the impact of advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE on student self-confidence related to medication therapy management (MTM, fourth-year pharmacy students were surveyed pre/post APPE to: identify exposure to MTM learning opportunities, assess knowledge of the MTM core components, and assess self-confidence performing MTM services. An anonymous electronic questionnaire administered pre/post APPE captured demographics, factors predicted to impact student self-confidence (Grade point average (GPA, work experience, exposure to MTM learning opportunities, MTM knowledge and self-confidence conducting MTM using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = Not at all Confident; 5 = Extremely Confident. Sixty-two students (26% response rate responded to the pre-APPE questionnaire and n = 44 (18% to the post-APPE. Over 90% demonstrated MTM knowledge and 68.2% completed MTM learning activities. APPE experiences significantly improved students’ overall self-confidence (pre-APPE = 3.27 (0.85 SD, post-APPE = 4.02 (0.88, p < 0.001. Students engaging in MTM learning opportunities had higher self-confidence post-APPE (4.20 (0.71 vs. those not reporting MTM learning opportunities (3.64 (1.08, p = 0.05. Post-APPE, fewer students reported MTM was patient-centric or anticipated engaging in MTM post-graduation. APPE learning opportunities increased student self-confidence to provide MTM services. However, the reduction in anticipated engagement in MTM post-graduation and reduction in sensing the patient-centric nature of MTM practice, may reveal a gap between practice expectations and reality.

  10. Laurel Clark Earth Camp: Building a Framework for Teacher and Student Understanding of Earth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colodner, D.; Buxner, S.; Schwartz, K.; Orchard, A.; Titcomb, A.; King, B.; Baldridge, A.; Thomas-Hilburn, H.; Crown, D. A.

    2013-04-01

    Laurel Clark Earth Camp is designed to inspire teachers and students to study their world through field experiences, remote sensing investigations, and hands on exploration, all of which lend context to scientific inquiry. In three different programs (for middle school students, for high school students, and for teachers) participants are challenged to understand Earth processes from the perspectives of both on-the ground inspection and from examination of satellite images, and use those multiple perspectives to determine best practices on both a societal and individual scale. Earth Camp is a field-based program that takes place both in the “natural” and built environment. Middle School Earth Camp introduces students to a variety of environmental science, engineering, technology, and societal approaches to sustainability. High School Earth Camp explores ecology and water resources from southern Arizona to eastern Utah, including a 5 day rafting trip. In both camps, students compare environmental change observed through repeat photography on the ground to changes observed from space. Students are encouraged to utilize their camp experience in considering their future course of study, career objectives, and lifestyle choices. During Earth Camp for Educators, teachers participate in a series of weekend workshops to explore relevant environmental science practices, including water quality testing, biodiversity surveys, water and light audits, and remote sensing. Teachers engage students, both in school and after school, in scientific investigations with this broad based set of tools. Earth Stories from Space is a website that will assist in developing skills and comfort in analyzing change over time and space using remotely sensed images. Through this three-year NASA funded program, participants will appreciate the importance of scale and perspective in understanding Earth systems and become inspired to make choices that protect the environment.

  11. English-as-a-second language (ESL) nursing students: strategies for building verbal and written language skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhde, Jacqueline A

    2003-01-01

    With the growing number of foreign-born residents in the United States, nurse educators face the challenge of educating students who may have difficulty with the English language. There are an estimated 28.4 million foreign-born residents in the United States, which is the largest number in the history of this country (U.S. Census Bureau, 2001). The U.S. census report (2001) shows that the Hispanic/Latino population has increased by 57.9% since 1990 and now accounts for 12.5% of the total population. Another fast growing group is the Asian population that has increased by 48.3% since 1990 and now accounts for 3.6% of the total population. The Annual Report of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN, 2001) shows that the minority representation in baccalaureate programs has also increased with the Hispanic/Latino students at 4.8% and the Asian/Pacific Islander/Hawaiian students at 4.7% of the undergraduate nursing student population. Several authors (Abriam-Yago, Yoder, & Kataoka-Yahiro, 1999; Lester, 1998; Davidhizar, Dowd, & Geiger, 1998; Dowell, 1996; Andrews, 1992) have discussed the importance of increasing the number of ethnic minority nurses to insure the quality of healthcare to an increasingly diverse population. As the nursing shortage deepens, recruiting minorities into nursing is essential to meet the increasing demand. This change presents unique challenges and opportunities in nursing education. Colleges and universities will need to develop innovative programs to attract these nontraditional students, and support programs to help them complete the nursing curriculum.

  12. Student and school factors associated with school suspension: A multilevel analysis of students in Victoria, Australia and Washington State, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheryl, A Hemphill; Stephanie, M Plenty; Herrenkohl, Todd I; Toumbourou, John W; Catalano, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    One of the common issues schools face is how best to handle challenging student behaviors such as violent behavior, antisocial behavior, bullying, school rule violations, and interrupting other students' learning. School suspension may be used to remove students engaging in challenging behaviors from the school for a period of time. However, the act of suspending students from school may worsen rather than improve their behavior. Research shows that suspensions predict a range of student outcomes, including crime, delinquency, and drug use. It is therefore crucial to understand the factors associated with the use of school suspension, particularly in sites with different policy approaches to problem behaviors. This paper draws on data from state-representative samples of 3,129 Grade 7 and 9 students in Washington State, United States and Victoria, Australia sampled in 2002. Multilevel modeling examined student and school level factors associated with student-reported school suspension. Results showed that both student (being male, previous student antisocial and violent behavior, rebelliousness, academic failure) and school (socioeconomic status of the school, aggregate measures of low school commitment) level factors were associated with school suspension and that the factors related to suspension were similar in the two states. The implications of the findings for effective school behavior management policy are that, rather than focusing only on the student, both student and school level factors need to be addressed to reduce the rates of school suspension.

  13. Practice and experience of the United States biodefense capability building%美国生物防御能力建设的特点与启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田德桥; 朱联辉; 王玉民; 郑涛

    2011-01-01

    Biological weapons, bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases are serious international security problems. The United States attaches great importance to capacity building for biodefense and incorporates it into national security strategies, continuously improving biodefense capabilities. This paper analyzes the practice of U. S. Biodefense capacity building, including its clear biodefense strategy, adequate prevention and warning preparedness, effective consequence response ability, and strong technological support. It is hoped that China can learn something from the united states concerning biodefense capacity building.%生物武器、生物恐怖和新发传染病是当今国际社会面临的重大安全问题.美国高度重视生物防御能力建设,将生物防御能力建设纳入国家安全战略,不断提升其国家生物防御能力水平.本文简要分析了美国生物防御能力建设的主要特点,包括明确的生物防御战略、充分的预防预警准备、有效的后果处置能力、强大的科技支撑体系等,希望能对我国及其他发展中国家的生物防御能力建设有所启示.

  14. Reticular Chemistry at Its Best: Directed Assembly of Hexagonal Building Units into the Awaited Metal-Organic Framework with the Intricate Polybenzene Topology, pbz-MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alezi, Dalal; Spanopoulos, Ioannis; Tsangarakis, Constantinos; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; O Keeffe, Michael; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Trikalitis, Pantelis N

    2016-10-05

    The ability to direct the assembly of hexagonal building units offers great prospective to construct the awaited and looked-for hypothetical polybenzene (pbz) or "cubic graphite" structure, described 70 years ago. Here, we demonstrate the successful use of reticular chemistry as an appropriate strategy for the design and deliberate construction of a zirconium-based metal-organic framework (MOF) with the intricate pbz underlying net topology. The judicious selection of the perquisite hexagonal building units, six connected organic and inorganic building blocks, allowed the formation of the pbz-MOF-1, the first example of a Zr(IV)-based MOF with pbz topology. Prominently, pbz-MOF-1 is highly porous, with associated pore size and pore volume of 13 Å and 0.99 cm(3) g(-1), respectively, and offers high gravimetric and volumetric methane storage capacities (0.23 g g(-1) and 210.4 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3) at 80 bar). Notably, the pbz-MOF-1 pore system permits the attainment of one of the highest CH4 adsorbed phase density enhancements at high pressures (0.15 and 0.21 g cm(-3) at 35 and 65 bar, respectively) as compared to benchmark microporous MOFs.

  15. Reticular Chemistry at Its Best: Directed Assembly of Hexagonal Building Units into the Awaited Metal-Organic Framework with the Intricate Polybenzene Topology, pbz-MOF

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2016-10-05

    The ability to direct the assembly of hexagonal building units offers great prospective to construct the awaited and looked-for hypothetical polybenzene (pbz) or “cubic graphite” structure, described 70 years ago. Here, we demonstrate the successful use of reticular chemistry as an appropriate strategy for the design and deliberate construction of a zirconium-based metal–organic framework (MOF) with the intricate pbz underlying net topology. The judicious selection of the perquisite hexagonal building units, six connected organic and inorganic building blocks, allowed the formation of the pbz-MOF-1, the first example of a Zr(IV)-based MOF with pbz topology. Prominently, pbz-MOF-1 is highly porous, with associated pore size and pore volume of 13 Å and 0.99 cm3 g–1, respectively, and offers high gravimetric and volumetric methane storage capacities (0.23 g g–1 and 210.4 cm3 (STP) cm–3 at 80 bar). Notably, the pbz-MOF-1 pore system permits the attainment of one of the highest CH4 adsorbed phase density enhancements at high pressures (0.15 and 0.21 g cm–3 at 35 and 65 bar, respectively) as compared to benchmark microporous MOFs.

  16. Diversity of United States medical students by region compared to US census data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith MM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mark M Smith,1 Steven H Rose,1 Darrell R Schroeder,2 Timothy R Long1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA Purpose: Increasing the diversity of the United States (US physician workforce to better represent the general population has received considerable attention. The purpose of this study was to compare medical student race data to that of the US general population. We hypothesized that race demographics of medical school matriculants would reflect that of the general population. Patients and methods: Published race data from the United States Census Bureau (USCB 2010 census and the 2011 Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC allopathic medical school application and enrollment by race and ethnicity survey were analyzed and compared. Race data of enrolled medical students was compared to race data of the general population within geographic regions and subregions. Additionally, race data of medical school applicants and matriculants were compared to race data of the overall general population. Results: Race distribution within US medical schools was significantly different than race distribution for the overall, regional, and subregional populations of the US (P<0.001. Additionally, the overall race distribution of medical school applicants differed significantly to the race distribution of the general population (P<0.001. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that race demographics of US medical school applicants and matriculants are significantly different from that of the general population, and may be resultant of societal quandaries present early in formal education. Initiatives targeting underrepresented minorities at an early stage to enhance health care career interest and provide academic support and mentorship will be required to address the racial disparity that exists in US

  17. Towards Building a Computer Aided Education System for Special Students Using Wearable Sensor Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Majid Mehmood

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human computer interaction is a growing field in terms of helping people in their daily life to improve their living. Especially, people with some disability may need an interface which is more appropriate and compatible with their needs. Our research is focused on similar kinds of problems, such as students with some mental disorder or mood disruption problems. To improve their learning process, an intelligent emotion recognition system is essential which has an ability to recognize the current emotional state of the brain. Nowadays, in special schools, instructors are commonly use some conventional methods for managing special students for educational purposes. In this paper, we proposed a novel computer aided method for instructors at special schools where they can teach special students with the support of our system using wearable technologies.

  18. Tackling complex problems, building evidence for practice, and educating doctoral nursing students to manage the tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C

    2013-01-01

    The mandate for evidence-based practice (EBP) arose in response to, among other catalysts, several Institute of Medicine reports beginning in the late 1990s. At the same time, the National Institutes of Health and others have recognized that the most complex, important, and challenging problems, termed "wicked problems," are inherently transdisciplinary and require thinking beyond the limits of existing theories. When nursing students are prepared for EBP, they operate within a fairly stable set of assumptions and they exercise a past orientation. Wicked problem-solving occurs within a context that is characterized as dynamic and ambiguous and requires a future orientation to imagine potential solutions to questions of "what if?" Both skills, EBP, and wicked problem-solving, are essential within the discipline of nursing. Students at all levels need to understand when each scientific approach is required. PhD students must be prepared to participate in wicked problem-solving.

  19. Investigation on Building a Simulated Skill Training Platform for the E-commerce Students and Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available To determine the need for simulated training of e-commerce activities prior to working in the real environment, we studied the views of undergraduates and college teachers from several aspects. Two hundred university students while also 200 college teachers were asked what the real problem was when they learned or taught in the e-commerce courses. Next, they were surveyed to inquire what knowledge they really need when students go to work positions and what type of job do they expect to have. Finally, they were asked whether using a simulated training platform would be beneficial. Through analysis, the aspects which are contained above we know that simulation should be incorporated into the education of e-commerce to students as a tool to practice their hands-on abilities prior to working. And from the survey we also obtain some useful information and references that may help us to design our electronic commerce training platform.

  20. Towards Building a Computer Aided Education System for Special Students Using Wearable Sensor Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Raja Majid; Lee, Hyo Jong

    2017-02-08

    Human computer interaction is a growing field in terms of helping people in their daily life to improve their living. Especially, people with some disability may need an interface which is more appropriate and compatible with their needs. Our research is focused on similar kinds of problems, such as students with some mental disorder or mood disruption problems. To improve their learning process, an intelligent emotion recognition system is essential which has an ability to recognize the current emotional state of the brain. Nowadays, in special schools, instructors are commonly use some conventional methods for managing special students for educational purposes. In this paper, we proposed a novel computer aided method for instructors at special schools where they can teach special students with the support of our system using wearable technologies.

  1. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-08-14

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in

  2. Current Practices in Assessing Professionalism in United States and Canadian Allopathic Medical Students and Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittur, Nandini

    2017-01-01

    Professionalism is a critically important competency that must be evaluated in medical trainees but is a complex construct that is hard to assess. A systematic review was undertaken to give insight into the current best practices for assessment of professionalism in medical trainees and to identify new research priorities in the field. A search was conducted on PubMed for behavioral assessments of medical students and residents among the United States and Canadian allopathic schools in the last 15 years. An initial search yielded 594 results, 28 of which met our inclusion criteria. Our analysis indicated that there are robust generic definitions of the major attributes of medical professionalism. The most commonly used assessment tools are survey instruments that use Likert scales tied to attributes of professionalism. While significant progress has been made in this field in recent years, several opportunities for system-wide improvement were identified that require further research. These include a paucity of information about assessment reliability, the need for rater training, a need to better define competency in professionalism according to learner level (preclinical, clerkship, resident etc.) and ways to remediate lapses in professionalism. Student acceptance of assessment of professionalism may be increased if assessment tools are shifted to better incorporate feedback. Tackling the impact of the hidden curriculum in which students may observe lapses in professionalism by faculty and other health care providers is another priority for further study. PMID:28652951

  3. Computer Phobia in Higher Education: A Comparative Analysis of United Kingdom and Turkish University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk Ursavaş

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The possession or acquisition of a range of computer skills is an implicit assumption related to many undergraduate study programmes, and use of university computer facilities may impact on overall academic performance and employability beyond graduation. This study therefore tested levels of computer anxiety (CARS and computer thoughts (CTS in Turkish and United Kingdom undergraduates with reference to culture group difference, regularity of use (or home use and use of university computer facilities. A substantial minority of students (32-33% reported computer anxiety in both groups, but more UK (41% than Turkish students (21% were deficient in positive self-concept (CTS. Reference to the subscales in the two measures pinpointed cultural differences disguised at scale level, and gender differences were evident across rather than within culture groups. As expected, positive self-concept was associated with use of computer facilities (r’s = 0 to 0.25, p < .001, and anxiety was associated more weakly with avoidance (r’s = 0 to -0.18, p < .001. Results suggest that computer confidence (implying motivation and engagement should not be assumed to exist in the agenda for wider participation. Also within and between group differences indicate that there is no typical or stereotypical student profile in approach to computer activity

  4. Energy drinks, soft drinks, and substance use among United States secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry-McElrath, Yvonne M; OʼMalley, Patrick M; Johnston, Lloyd D

    2014-01-01

    Examine energy drink/shot and regular and diet soft drink use among United States secondary school students in 2010-2011, and associations between such use and substance use. We used self-reported data from cross-sectional surveys of nationally representative samples of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students and conducted multivariate analyses examining associations between beverage and substance use, controlling for individual and school characteristics. Approximately 30% of students reported consuming energy drinks or shots; more than 40% reported daily regular soft drink use, and about 20% reported daily diet soft drink use. Beverage consumption was strongly and positively associated with past 30-day alcohol, cigarette, and illicit drug use. The observed associations between energy drinks and substance use were significantly stronger than those between regular or diet soft drinks and substance use. This correlational study indicates that adolescent consumption of energy drinks/shots is widespread and that energy drink users report heightened risk for substance use. This study does not establish causation between the behaviors. Education for parents and prevention efforts among adolescents should include education on the masking effects of caffeine in energy drinks on alcohol- and other substance-related impairments, and recognition that some groups (such as high sensation-seeking youth) may be particularly likely to consume energy drinks and to be substance users.

  5. Building technology and information competences among university students through an academic contest and social networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Eugenia Ruiz-Molina

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Spanish universities have recently adapted their studies to the requirements of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA. As part of these requirements, the development of computer and informational skills must be considered as an academic objective. Amongst other activities geared towards developing these skills, an informational video was disseminated. The design of the communication campaign promoting this video, developed through viral marketing and social networking sites, was the result of empirical research carried out by students of the University of Valencia. This paper describes the research objectives, questions, techniques and main findings of the study. A survey was conducted on a sample of 844 valid questionnaires completed by students after watching the video, following a non-probability procedure of quota sampling (gender and type of studies and convenience sampling in order to achieve a representative sample of the total population. After processing data through descriptive analysis techniques, we were given a fairly detailed picture of the most commonly used electronic devices, social networking sites and activities developed by students using Web 2.0. In particular, personal computers were the most commonly used electronic devices for access to the Internet. Regarding the most commonly used social networking services, Tuenti and Facebook are the most popular websites among students, the majority of whom use social networks several times a day for chatting and sending messages. Concerning the students’ opinions about the video, most of them liked the video and its individual elements (music, images, story, etc.. They also find the message easy to understand. However, differences observed across gender and type of studies suggest the need to include several social networks as well as video features in order to effectively reach these different groups of students. This information enables the design of a communication plan to

  6. Content Delivery Using Augmented Reality to Enhance Students' Performance in a Building Design and Assembly Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Arezoo; Behzadan, Amir H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees has been generally decreasing. An extensive body of research cites the lack of motivation and engagement in the learning process as a major underlying reason of this decline. It has been discussed that if properly…

  7. Web 2.0 Technologies and Building Online Learning Communities: Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, Mariam Mousa Matta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to explore students' perspectives regarding using Web 2.0 technologies to develop a community of learners. The course described in this study was a fully online course in an Educational Learning Technologies master's program at a medium-sized university in the U.S. Southwest. A variety of Web 2.0 tools…

  8. Multiple Science Text Processing: Building Comprehension Skills for College Student Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderholm, Tracy; Therriault, David J.; Kwon, Heekyung

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine which reading instruction improves multiple science text comprehension for college student readers. The authors first identified the cognitive processing strategies that are predictive of multiple science text comprehension (Study 1) and then used what they learned to experimentally test the…

  9. Building Connections: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Qualitative Research Students' Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robin; Fleischer, Anne; Cotton, Fatima A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a phenomenological study in which the authors explored students' experiences learning qualitative research in a variety of academic fields. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with six participants from various academic fields who had completed at least one post-secondary-school-level qualitative research course…

  10. Building Virtual Cities, Inspiring Intelligent Citizens: Digital Games for Developing Students' Problem Solving and Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness digital game-based learning (DGBL) on students' problem solving, learning motivation, and academic achievement. In order to provide substantive empirical evidence, a quasi-experimental design was implemented over the course of a full semester (23 weeks). Two ninth-grade Civics and Society classes, with a…

  11. Toward a Pedagogy of Border Thinking: Building on Latin@ Students' Subaltern Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Soon, Claudia G.; Carrillo, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Based on Walter Mignolo's (2000) notion of border thinking, that is, the subaltern knowledge generated from the exterior borders of the modern/colonial world system, this article extends current conceptual frameworks for the implementation of a decolonizing border pedagogy with Latin@ students in secondary schools. In particular, Cervantes-Soon…

  12. Building Insider Knowledge: Teaching Students to Read, Write, and Think within ELA and across the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Emily; Moje, Elizabeth Birr

    2012-01-01

    We offer this article to support ELA and other subject-area teachers as they think about why disciplinary literacy teaching is important and how to enact it in robust ways. We argue that it is critical for the improvement of students' academic literacy development and overall learning that all teachers and literacy researchers attend to the…

  13. Enhance Ideological Political Education Work for Ethnic Minority Students and Build up Harmonious Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    To accelerate the development of the ethnic minority regions and cultivate ethnic minority talent, the state has successively implemented policies of setting up the Tibet Class and the Xinjiang Class in institutions of higher learning in China's interior regions ("neidi"), enabling some of the finest young students among the ethnic…

  14. Role of Significant Life Experiences in Building Environmental Knowledge and Behavior among Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kathryn T.; Peterson, M. Nils; Carrier, Sarah J.; Strnad, Renee L.; Bondell, Howard D.; Kirby-Hathaway, Terri; Moore, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Significant life experience research suggests that the presence of role models, time outdoors, and nature-related media foster pro-environmental behavior, but most research is qualitative. Based on a random sample of middle school students in North Carolina, USA, we found limited positive associations between presence of a role model and time…

  15. Building an Understanding of the Role of Media Literacy for Latino/a High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boske, Christa; McCormack, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Popular media is a social phenomenon, especially for young audiences. This qualitative study examined how eleven Latino/a high school students and a Latino teacher understood the impact of media messages in an animated children's film. Findings suggest participants identified negative cultural messages embedded throughout the film regarding…

  16. Diverse Students with Learning Disabilities: Building Coherence in Personal and Fictional Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celinska, Dorota K.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared oral personal and fictional narratives of diverse (African American and Caucasian) students with and without learning disabilities. Naturalistic conversation with embedded narrative prompts and supports provided the context for narrative elicitation. The participants were 82 fourth to seventh graders from urban and suburban…

  17. Building on What Works: Supporting Underprepared Students through a Low-Cost Counseling Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Blaire; Schulthes, Gretchen; Hull, Michael F.; Bailey, Billie J.; Brown, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Higher education institutions are often concerned about retention rates, particularly among underprepared students. This study examines the effects of Counselors providing Resources, Integration, Skill Development, and Psychosocial Support (CRISP), which is a low-cost counseling model focused on increasing the academic success and retention of…

  18. Building a Culture of Academic Integrity: What Students Perceive and Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jessica A.; Glanzer, Perry L.

    2017-01-01

    McCabe, Butterfield, & Treviño (2012) recently proposed a model for helping universities cultivate a moral culture of academic integrity. This qualitative study examined how a national sample of 75 students perceived the moral culture within their university using the McCabe et al. model as a basis for analysis. The analysis revealed that…

  19. More than an Ally: A Successful White Teacher Who Builds Solidarity with His African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Michael Lee, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study provides a counternarrative to the literature of White teachers who are unsuccessful in bridging the achievement gap and disrupts the assumed meaning of solidarity between successful White teachers and their African American students. As part of successful classroom practice, this teacher interrogated his own whiteness…

  20. Positive Experiences with Negative Numbers: Building on Students in and out of School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of negative numbers should mean that mathematics can be twice as much fun, but unfortunately they are a source of confusion for many students. Difficulties occur in moving from intuitive understandings to formal mathematical representations of operations with negative and positive integers. This paper describes a series of…

  1. Teaching for the Millennial Generation: Student and Teacher Perceptions of Community Building and Individual Pedagogical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Sue; Sears, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    As a new generation of learners enters higher education classrooms, effective teaching strategies must adapt to match their learning styles. This research explored student and teacher perceptions of effectiveness of teaching methods, with particular comparison between techniques emphasizing community versus individual learning. Fifteen psychology…

  2. Building on Successes: Reflections from Two Approaches to Study Abroad for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Sandra; McGaha, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This essay offers suggestions for faculty who are designing study abroad (SA) experiences by outlining a three-week Maymester study abroad to Reggio Emilia, Italy, and a semester-long study abroad to Brussels, Belgium. The authors reflect on commonalities in planning, recruiting, preparing students, and conducting each trip, as well as some of the…

  3. Building an Understanding of the Role of Media Literacy for Latino/a High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boske, Christa; McCormack, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Popular media is a social phenomenon, especially for young audiences. This qualitative study examined how eleven Latino/a high school students and a Latino teacher understood the impact of media messages in an animated children's film. Findings suggest participants identified negative cultural messages embedded throughout the film regarding…

  4. Boston Shifts Learning into High Gear: Certificate Program Accelerates Student Learning by Building Teacher Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jill Harrison; Miller, Lesley Ryan; Souvanna, Phomdaen

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the past two decades, Boston Public Schools has seen strong, steady improvement, recently demonstrated through student gains on NAEP's Trial Urban District Assessment in math and recognized through the award of the 2006 Broad Prize for Urban Education. Teacher leaders have played an important role in Boston's improvement. As team…

  5. Building South African Women's Leadership: A Cohort Model for the PhD in Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Dawn; Saunders, Katherine; Oganesian, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Despite the presence of a historically male-dominated culture in leadership, gender-mediated obstacles and challenges, black women in South Africa have the passion to develop professionally and move to higher levels as educational leaders. The current study assessed female students' perceptions regarding a joint pilot doctoral programme between…

  6. [Empathy-building of physicians. Part III. Students exposure to literature, theatre, film and the arts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska-Rudowicz, Elzbieta; Kładna, Aleksandra

    2010-11-01

    Literature, theatrical performances, films and the arts could be used to enhance empathy among students of medicine and residents. The use of these media enables them to learn how feelings are expressed. Through study of literature and the performing arts students can also gain new insights into their own emotional responses to illness and suffering as well as into the moral and ethical issues posed by medical practice. The objective of this paper is to describe ways in which literature, film, drama, and the arts are used in medical schools to enhance empathy in students of medicine. We also want to show the rational purpose for the inclusion of these media in medical school training. We searched PubMed, ProQuest, ERIC, MedLine, and Polish Medical Bibliography (Polska Bibliografia Lekarska) published from 1990 to the present--for studies that address use of literature, drama, film and the arts for teaching empathy to medical students. Analysis of papers reporting use of different forms of literary, artistic, and performing arts productions within the context of medical education indicates that exposure to these types of media, when used properly, may trigger attitude change, foster understanding of the illness experience and enhance empathy for the patients.

  7. Building Rapport Between International Graduate Students and Their Faculty Advisors: Cross-Cultural Mentoring Relationships at the University of Guelph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Omar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring graduate students is very challenging, even when both the student and faculty have similar cultural values. Many international students have a different culture from that of Canadian. Their challenge is adapting to their new environment, and for their faculty advisors to understand and work well with them. This research explored the relationships, experience, and challenges of international graduate students and their faculty advisors at the University of Guelph, through focus group discussions, semi-structured face-to-face interviews and online surveys. Language barriers and financial difficulties were among the major challenges international students face adapting to their academic and social environment and working with their faculty advisors. We found that building good student-advisor relationship requires understanding graduate student and advisor formal responsibilities and expectations. Le mentorat des étudiants de cycles supérieurs pose tout un défi, même dans les cas où l’étudiant et le professeur ont tous deux des valeurs culturelles semblables. De nombreux étudiants internationaux viennent d’une culture différente de ce que nous connaissons au Canada. Leur défi est de s’adapter à leur nouvel environnement et pour leurs conseillers pédagogiques, de les comprendre et de collaborer avec eux. Cette recherche explore les relations de travail, l’expérience et les défis auxquels sont confrontés les étudiants internationaux de cycles supérieurs et leurs conseillers pédagogiques à l’Université de Guelph par le biais de discussions de groupes de consultation, d’entrevues face à face semi-structurées et d’un sondage en ligne. Les barrières linguistiques et les difficultés financières s’avèrent comme étant les défis principaux auxquels font face les étudiants internationaux lors de leur adaptation à leur environnement académique et social et dans leurs interactions avec leurs conseillers p

  8. Dutch care innovation units in elderly care: A qualitative study into students' perspectives and workplace conditions for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeren, Miranda; Volbeda, Patricia; Niessen, Theo J H; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-03-01

    To promote workplace learning for staff as well as students, a partnership was formed between a residential care organisation for older people and several nursing faculties in the Netherlands. This partnership took the form of two care innovation units; wards where qualified staff, students and nurse teachers collaborate to integrate care, education, innovation and research. In this article, the care innovation units as learning environments are studied from a student perspective to deepen understandings concerning the conditions that facilitate learning. A secondary analysis of focus groups, held with 216 nursing students over a period of five years, revealed that students are satisfied about the units' learning potential, which is formed by various inter-related and self-reinforcing affordances: co-constructive learning and working, challenging situations and activities, being given responsibility and independence, and supportive and recognisable learning structures. Time constraints had a negative impact on the units' learning potential. It is concluded that the learning potential of the care innovation units was enhanced by realising certain conditions, like learning structures and activities. The learning potential was also influenced, however, by the non-controllable and dynamic interaction of various elements within the context. Suggestions for practice and further research are offered.

  9. Building medical ethics education to improve Japanese medical students' attitudes toward respecting patients' rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yukiko; Kudo, Yasushi; Shibuya, Akitaka; Satoh, Toshihiko; Higashihara, Masaaki; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    In medical education, it is important for medical students to develop their ethics to respect patients' rights. Some physicians might make light of patients' rights, because the increased awareness of such rights might make it more difficult for them to conduct medical practice. In the present study, predictors significantly associated with "a sense of resistance to patients' rights" were examined using anonymous self-administered questionnaires. For these predictors, we produced original items with reference to the concept of ethical development and the teachings of Mencius. The subjects were medical students at the Kitasato University School of Medicine, a private university in Japan. A total of 518 students were analyzed (response rate, 78.4%). The average age of enrolled subjects was 22.5 ± 2.7 years (average age ± standard deviation). The average age of 308 male subjects was 22.7 ± 2.8 years, while that of 210 female subjects was 22.1 ± 2.5 years. The item, "Excessive measures to pass the national examination for medical practitioners," was significantly associated with "a sense of resistance to patients' rights." However, other items, including basic attributes such as age and gender, were not significant predictors. If students spent their school time only focusing on the national examination, they would lose the opportunity to receive the ethical education that would allow them to respect patients' rights. That ethical development cannot easily be evaluated with written exams. Thus, along with the acquisition of medical knowledge, educational programs to promote medical students' ethics should be developed.

  10. Diabetes Mellitus-Related Knowledge among University Students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nelofer; Gomathi, Kadayam G; Shehnaz, Syed Ilyas; Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess diabetes mellitus (DM)-related knowledge and practices among university students enrolled in non-health care related professional courses in the United Arab Emirates. A pre-tested questionnaire assessing the knowledge of DM was administered to the above-mentioned students. Data collected were transferred to PASW Statistics (Chicago, IL, USA, Version 18) and analysed. Data on 168 university students (47 males and 121 females) were included in the analysis. Of the participants, 25% were overweight or obese and only 27% exercised regularly. Regarding their knowledge of DM, 70% knew that it is characterised by high blood sugar levels and identified family history as a major risk factor. Surprisingly, only just over half could link obesity and physical inactivity as risk factors for developing DM, or could identify an excessive feeling of thirst, frequent urination, and weight loss as symptoms. Knowledge of the complications of diabetes, including gangrene, loss of sensation in limbs, oral and dental complications, recurrent infections, and risk for cardiovascular disease got a moderate response. Knowledge of diabetes was found to be higher in females compared to males. No significant differences were observed in the health behaviour of participants with or without a family history of DM. Our study revealed that in spite of exposure to various sources of information, the participants' level of DM-related knowledge was not adequate. We recommend the engagement of health professionals in educational settings in order to enhance health-related knowledge and inculcate healthy lifestyle practices in students.

  11. Assessment of Breast Cancer Awareness among Female University Students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharbatti, Shatha S; Shaikh, Rizwana B; Mathew, Elsheba; Al-Biate, Mawahib A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess female university students' knowledge of breast cancer and its preventative measures and to identify their main misconceptions regarding breast cancer. This cross-sectional study was conducted between April 2011 and June 2012 and included female students from three large universities in Ajman, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A stratified random sampling procedure was used. Data were collected through a validated, pilot-tested, self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included 35 questions testing knowledge of risk factors, warning signs and methods for the early detection of breast cancer. Participants' opinions regarding breast cancer misconceptions were also sought. The participants (n = 392) were most frequently between 18 and 22 years old (63.5%), non-Emirati (90.1%) and never married (89%). A family history of breast cancer was reported by 36 (9.2%) of the students. The percentage of participants who had low/below average knowledge scores regarding risk factors, warning signs and methods for early detection of breast cancer was 40.6%, 45.9% and 86.5%, respectively. Significantly higher knowledge scores on risk factors were noticed among participants with a family history of breast cancer (P = 0.03). The misconception most frequently identified was that "treatment for breast cancer affects a woman's femininity" (62.5%). A profound lack of knowledge about breast cancer was noted among female university students in the three UAE universities studied. The most prominent gaps in knowledge identified were those concerning breast cancer screening methods.

  12. Building a Multicontextual Model of Latino College Enrollment: Student, School, and State-Level Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Anne-Marie; Kim, Dongbin

    2012-01-01

    Latinos' college enrollment rates, particularly in four-year institutions, have not kept pace with their population growth in the United States. Using three-level hierarchical generalized linear modeling, this study analyzes data from the Educational Longitudinal Study (ELS) to examine the influence of high school and state contexts, in addition…

  13. Resilience Building in Students: The Role of Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy relates to an individual's perception of their capabilities. It has a clear self-evaluative dimension leading to high or low perceived self-efficacy. Individual differences in perceived self-efficacy have been shown to be better predictors of performance than previous achievement or ability and seem particularly important when individuals face adversity. The study investigated the nature of the association between academic self-efficacy (ASE) and academic resilience. Undergraduate student participants (N = 435) were exposed to an adverse situation case vignette describing either personal or vicarious academic adversity. ASE was measured pre-exposure and academic resilience was measured post-exposure. ASE was correlated with, and a significant predictor of, academic resilience and students exhibited greater academic resilience when responding to vicarious adversity compared to personal adversity. Identifying constructs that are related to resilience and establishing the precise nature of how such constructs influence academic resilience will assist the development of interventions aimed at promoting resilience in students. PMID:26640447

  14. Effect of culturally relevant pedagogy on Latino students' engagement and content mastery on states of matter unit in physical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jennifer

    This research, in response to the lack of empirical evidence of the impact of culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) on Latino students in science education, examined the effect CRP on Latino students' engagement and content mastery. Quantitative research was conducted with a treatment group that received an intervention unit on states of matter with CRP approaches and a comparison group that did not receive the intervention. The sample comprised approximately 189 eighth-grade students from a Southern Californian middle school. The research findings reveal that CRP approaches had a statistically significant positive effect on student engagement of all ethnic groups in this study, particularly Latino students, while CRP approaches had a statistically significant negative effect on Latino students' content mastery. Three recommendations result from this study, including professional development of CRP for educators, professional development of CRP for educational leaders, and using CRP to address multiculturalism.

  15. Student-Led Services in a Hospital Aged Care Temporary Stay Unit: Sustaining Student Placement Capacity and Physiotherapy Service Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Madelyn; Fairbrother, Michele; Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; Blackford, Julia; Sheepway, Lyndal; Penman, Merrolee; McAllister, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Through a collaborative university-hospital partnership, a student-led service model (SLS-model) was implemented to increase student placement capacity within a physiotherapy department of a 150 bed Sydney hospital. This study investigates the perceived barriers and enablers to increasing student placement capacity through student-led services…

  16. Sexual satisfaction and sexual health among university students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jenny A; Mullinax, Margo; Trussell, James; Davidson, J Kenneth; Moore, Nelwyn B

    2011-09-01

    Despite the World Health Organization's definition of sexual health as a state of well-being, virtually no public health research has examined sexual well-being outcomes, including sexual satisfaction. Emerging evidence suggests that sexual well-being indicators are associated with more classic measures of healthy sexual behaviors. We surveyed 2168 university students in the United States and asked them to rate their physiological and psychological satisfaction with their current sexual lives. Many respondents reported that they were either satisfied (approximately half) or very satisfied (approximately one third). In multivariate analyses, significant (P self-comfort, self-esteem (especially among men), relationship status, and sexual frequency. To enhance sexual well-being, public health practitioners should work to improve sexual self-comfort, alleviate sexual guilt, and promote longer term relationships.

  17. What Do Elementary Students Know about Insects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview-based study of (n=56) elementary school students. Determines students' understanding about insect characteristics, life cycles, environmental conditions, and impact on humans. Suggests building units of instruction based on students' personal questions about insects. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  18. Ab Initio Study of the Adsorption of Small Molecules on Metal-Organic Frameworks with Oxo-centered Trimetallic Building Units: The Role of the Undercoordinated Metal Ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Boese, A Daniel; Fink, Karin; Heine, Thomas; Klopper, Wim

    2015-09-08

    The interactions of H2, CO, CO2, and H2O with the undercoordinated metal centers of the trimetallic oxo-centered M3(III)(μ3-O)(X) (COO)6 moiety are studied by means of wave function and density functional theory. This trimetallic oxo-centered cluster is a common building unit in several metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as MIL-100, MIL-101, and MIL-127 (also referred to as soc-MOF). A combinatorial computational screening is performed for a large variety of trimetallic oxo-centered units M3(III)O (M = Al(3+), Sc(3+), V(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Rh(3+), In(3+), Ir(3+)) interacting with H2O, H2, CO, and CO2. The screening addresses interaction energies, adsorption enthalpies, and vibrational properties. The results show that the Rh and Ir analogues are very promising materials for gas storage and separations.

  19. Performance of a reversible heat pump/organic Rankine cycle unit coupled with a passive house to get a positive energy building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumont, Olivier; Carmo, Carolina; Fontaine, Valentin;

    2016-01-01

    and generate electricity, coupled to a solar thermal collector roof. This reversible HP/organic Rankine cycle unit presents three operating modes: direct heating, HP and organic Rankine cycle. This work focuses on describing the dynamic model of the multi-component system followed by a techno-economic analysis...... of the system under different operational conditions. Sensitivity studies include: building envelope, climate, appliances, lighting and heat demand profiles. It is concluded that the HP/ORC unit can turn a single-family house into a PEB under certain weather conditions (electrical production of 3012 k......Wh/year and total electrical consumption of 2318 kWh/year) with a 138.8 m2 solar roof in Denmark....

  20. Publishing Time-Frame Evaluation for Doctoral Students in United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrada Elena URDA-CÎMPEAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The first objective of the study was to compute the time to completion and publication of original scientific publications for medical doctoral students in the UK. A second objective was to evaluate if PhD theses format (monograph or publication-based can influence the time to completion and publication of original scientific publications. We assessed a small sample of free full text medical doctoral theses from universities in the United Kingdom (mostly from the University of Manchester, which have produced at least 2 original scientific publications by the end of the doctoral studies. The time elapsed between 2 consecutive publications from the same thesis was considered an approximation of the time to completion and publication of the second publication. In the case of prospective theses, the median time to completion and publication of original scientific publications from medical doctoral theses was 10.17 months. We found that there was a statistically significant difference between the time (to completion and publication medians of the publications from traditional theses format and of the publications from publication-based theses format. Time to completion and publication of original scientific publications for medical doctoral students needs to be further evaluated on a larger scale, based on more theses from several medical faculties in the UK.