WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit safety culture

  1. Patient safety culture: the nursing unit leader's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Christine Elizabeth; James, Barbara R

    2011-09-30

    Discussions about a culture of patient safety abound, yet nurse leaders continue to struggle to achieve such a culture in today's complex and fast-paced healthcare environment. In this article the authors discuss the concept of a patient safety culture, present a fictional scenario describing what happened in a hospital that lacked a culture of patient safety, and explain what should have happened in the above scenario. This discussion is offered within a framework consisting of seven driving factors of patient safety. These factors include leadership, evidence-based practice, teamwork, communication, and a learning, just, and patient-centered culture. Throughout, an emphasis is placed on leadership at the unit level. Nurse managers will find practical examples illustrating how leaders can help their teams establish a culture that offers the patient quality care in a safe environment.

  2. Safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, L.J. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Safety culture has become a topic of increasing interest for industry and regulators as issues are raised on safety problems around the world. The keys to safety culture are organizational effectiveness, effective communications, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages the identification and resolution of safety issues. The necessity of a strong safety culture places an onus on all of us to continually question whether the safety measures already in place are sufficient, and are being applied. (author)

  3. Improving safety culture on adult medical units through multidisciplinary teamwork and communication interventions: the TOPS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, M A; Sehgal, N L; Alldredge, B K; Gearhart, S; Auerbach, A A; Wachter, R M

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this project was to improve unit-based safety culture through implementation of a multidisciplinary (pharmacy, nursing, medicine) teamwork and communication intervention. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used to determine the impact of the training with a before-after design. Surveys were returned from 454 healthcare staff before the training and 368 staff 1 year later. Five of eleven safety culture subscales showed significant improvement. Nurses perceived a stronger safety culture than physicians or pharmacists. While it is difficult to isolate the effects of the team training intervention from other events occurring during the year between training and postevaluation, overall the intervention seems to have improved the safety culture on these medical units.

  4. Patient safety culture in a Dutch pediatric surgical intensive care unit: an evaluation using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, Marten J; van der Starre, Cynthia; van den Bos, Ada; van Dijk, Monique; Tibboel, Dick

    2011-11-01

    Nowadays, the belief is widespread that a safety culture is crucial to achieving patient safety, yet there has been virtually no analysis of the safety culture in pediatric hospital settings so far. Our aim was to measure the safety climate in our unit, compare it with benchmarking data, and identify potential deficiencies. Prospective longitudinal survey study at two points in time. Pediatric surgical intensive care unit at a Dutch university hospital. All unit personnel. To measure the safety climate, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire was administered to physicians, nurses, nursing assistants, pharmacists, technicians, and ward clerks in both May 2006 and May 2007. This questionnaire assesses caregiver attitudes through use of the six following scales: teamwork climate, job satisfaction, perceptions of management, safety climate, working conditions, and stress recognition. Earlier research showed that the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire has good psychometric properties and produced benchmarking data that can be used to evaluate strengths and weaknesses in a given clinical unit against peers. The response rates for the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire were 85% (May 2006) and 74% (May 2007). There were mixed findings regarding the difference between physicians and nurses: on three scales (i.e., teamwork climate, safety climate, and stress recognition), physicians scored better than nurses at both points in time. On another two scales (i.e., perceptions of management and working conditions), nurses consistently had higher mean scale scores. Probably due to the small number of physicians, only some of these differences between physicians and nurses reached the level of statistical significance. Compared to benchmarking data, scores on perceptions of management were higher than expected (p culture in our unit was good when compared to benchmark data, there is still room for improvement. This requires us to continue working on interventions intended to improve the safety

  5. CNE article: safety culture in Australian intensive care units: establishing a baseline for quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Chamberlain, Di; Hewson-Conroy, Karena; Grealy, Bernadette; Elderkin, Tania; Brittin, Maureen; McCutcheon, Catherine; Longbottom, Paula; Thalib, Lukman

    2013-03-01

    Workplace safety culture is a crucial ingredient in patients' outcomes and is increasingly being explored as a guide for quality improvement efforts. To establish a baseline understanding of the safety culture in Australian intensive care units. In a nationwide study of physicians and nurses in 10 Australian intensive care units, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire intensive care unit version was used to measure safety culture. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the mean scores for the 6 subscales of the questionnaire, and generalized-estimation-equations models were used to test the hypotheses that safety culture differed between physicians and nurses and between nurse leaders and bedside nurses. A total of 672 responses (50.6% response rate) were received: 513 (76.3%) from nurses, 89 (13.2%) from physicians, and 70 (10.4%) from respondents who did not specify their professional group. Ratings were highest for teamwork climate and lowest for perceptions of hospital management and working conditions. Four subscales, job satisfaction, teamwork climate, safety climate, and working conditions, were rated significantly higher by physicians than by nurses. Two subscales, working conditions and perceptions of hospital management, were rated significantly lower by nurse leaders than by bedside nurses. Measuring the baseline safety culture of an intensive care unit allows leaders to implement targeted strategies to improve specific dimensions of safety culture. These strategies ultimately may improve the working conditions of staff and the care that patients receive.

  6. Professional attitudes toward patient safety culture in a bone marrow transplant unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, Vivian Costa; Radünz, Vera; Rosa, Luciana Martins da; Marinho, Monique Mendes

    2016-03-01

    Objective To identify the attitude of health professionals toward the patient safety culture at a bone marrow transplant unit. Methods Quantitative research approach, cross-sectional survey conducted at a bone marrow transplant unit in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Data were collected using a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire with 33 health professionals in August and September of 2013. A total of 37 attitudes were assessed according to six safety dimensions of patient safety culture. Data were analysed by applying descriptive and inferential statistics, ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test with a p value equal to or under 0.05. Results Attitudes regarding the dimension "job satisfaction" were positive for the patient safety culture, and there was a significant difference between the professionals in this dimension (p-value 0.05). The other dimensions were not assessed positively. Conclusion The attitudes of health professionals toward patient safety must be strengthened.

  7. What Does a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Reveal About Patient Safety Culture of Surgical Units Compared With That of Other Units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Qin; Cai, Miao; Tao, Hong-Bing; Cheng, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Jing; Hu, Yin-Huan; Li, Gang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the strengths and weaknesses of surgical units as compared with other units, and to provide an opportunity to improve patient safety culture in surgical settings by suggesting targeted actions using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) investigation.A Hospital Survey on Patient Safety questionnaire was conducted to physicians and nurses in a tertiary hospital in Shandong China. 12 patient safety culture dimensions and 2 outcome variables were measured.A total of 23.5% of respondents came from surgical units, and 76.5% worked in other units. The "overall perceptions of safety" (48.1% vs 40.4%, P < 0.001) and "frequency of events reported" (63.7% vs 60.7%, P = 0.001) of surgical units were higher than those of other units. However, the communication openness (38.7% vs 42.5%, P < 0.001) of surgical units was lower than in other units. Medical workers in surgical units reported more events than those in other units, and more respondents in the surgical units assess "patient safety grade" to be good/excellent. Three dimensions were considered as strengths, whereas 5 other dimensions were considered to be weaknesses in surgical units. Six dimensions have potential to aid in improving events reporting and patient safety grade. Appropriate working times will also contribute to ensuring patient safety. Medical staff with longer years of experience reported more events.Surgical units outperform the nonsurgical ones in overall perception of safety and the number of events reported but underperform in the openness of communication. Four strategies, namely deepening the understanding about patient safety of supervisors, narrowing the communication gap within and across clinical units, recruiting more workers, and employing the event reporting system and building a nonpunitive culture, are recommended to improve patient safety in surgical units in the context of 1 hospital.

  8. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Tomazoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units.METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121.RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument.CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

  9. [Analysis of the safety culture in a Cardiology Unit managed by processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raso-Raso, Rafael; Uris-Selles, Joaquín; Nolasco-Bonmatí, Andreu; Grau-Jornet, Guillermo; Revert-Gandia, Rosa; Jiménez-Carreño, Rebeca; Sánchez-Soriano, Ruth M; Chamorro-Fernández, Carlos I; Marco-Francés, Elvira; Albero-Martínez, José V

    2017-04-03

    The safety culture is one of the requirements to prevent the occurrence of adverse effects, however has not been studied in the field of cardiology. The objective is to evaluate the safety culture in a cardiology unit has implemented and certified an integrated quality and risk management for patient safety system. A transversal observational study was made in 2 consecutive years using the survey "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" of the "Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality" in its Spanish version (42 items grouped into 12 dimensions) in all staff. The percentage of positive responses in each dimension in 2014 and 2015 were compared, as well as national data and United States data, following the established rules. The overall assessment of a possible 5, was 4.5 in 2014 and 4.7 in 2015. We identified seven dimensions as a fortress. The worst rated were: staffing, management support and teamwork between units. The comparison showed superiority in all dimensions respect to national data, and 8 respect to American data. The safety culture in a Cardiology Unit with an integrated quality and risk management and patient safety system is high, higher than the national in all its dimensions and in most of them respect to the United States. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Results by Primary Work Unit, Organizational Work Setting, and Primary Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth; Kear, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety culture is critical to the achievement of patient safety. In 2014, a landmark national study was conducted to investigate patient safety culture in nephrology nurse practice settings. In this secondary analysis of data from that study, we report the status of patient safety culture by primary work unit (chronic hemodialysis unit, acute hemodialysis unit, peritoneal dialysis unit) and organizational work setting (for-profit organization, not-for-profit organization), and compare the perceptions of direct care nurses and managers/administrators on components of patient safety culture.

  11. The Safety Organizing Scale: development and validation of a behavioral measure of safety culture in hospital nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogus, Timothy J; Sutcliffe, Kathleen M

    2007-01-01

    Evidence that medical error is a systemic problem requiring systemic solutions continues to expand. Developing a "safety culture" is one potential strategy toward improving patient safety. A reliable and valid self-report measure of safety culture is needed that is both grounded in concrete behaviors and is positively related to patient safety. We sought to develop and test a self-report measure of safety organizing that captures the behaviors theorized to underlie a safety culture and demonstrates use for potentially improving patient safety as evidenced by fewer reported medication errors and patient falls. A total of 1685 registered nurses from 125 nursing units in 13 hospitals in California, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, and Ohio completed questionnaires between December 2003 and June 2004. The authors conducted a cross-sectional assessment of factor structure, dimensionality, and construct validity. The Safety Organizing Scale (SOS), a 9-item unidimensional measure of self-reported behaviors enabling a safety culture, was found to have high internal reliability and reflect theoretically derived and empirically observed content domains. The measure was shown to discriminate between related concepts like organizational commitment and trust, vary significantly within hospitals, and was negatively associated with reported medication errors and patient falls in the subsequent 6-month period. The SOS not only provides meaningful, behavioral insight into the enactment of a safety culture, but because of the association between SOS scores and reported medication errors and patient falls, it also provides information that may be useful to registered nurses, nurse managers, hospital administrators, and governmental agencies.

  12. Measuring patient safety culture: an assessment of the clustering of responses at unit level and hospital level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wal, van der G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the claim that the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures patient safety culture instead of mere individual attitudes and to determine the most appropriate level (individual, unit or hospital level) for interventions aimed at improving the culture of patient s

  13. Measuring patient safety culture : an assessment of the clustering of responses at unit level and hospital level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wal, G. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To test the claim that the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures patient safety culture instead of mere individual attitudes and to determine the most appropriate level (individual, unit or hospital level) for interventions aimed at improving the culture of patient s

  14. Organizational culture and climate for patient safety in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Thaiana Helena Roma; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Objective To assess the perception of health professionals about patient safety climate and culture in different intensive care units (ICUs) and the relationship between scores obtained on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) and the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Method A cross-sectional study conducted at a teaching hospital in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in March and April 2014. As data gathering instruments, the HSOPSC, SAQ and a questionnaire with sociodemographic and professional information about the staff working in an adult, pediatric and neonatal ICU were used. Data analysis was conducted with descriptive statistics. Results The scales presented good reliability. Greater weaknesses in patient safety were observed in the Working conditions andPerceptions of management domains of the SAQ and in the Nonpunitive response to error domain of the HSOPSC. The strengths indicated by the SAQ wereTeamwork climate and Job satisfactionand by the HSOPC, Supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety and Organizational learning-continuous improvement. Job satisfaction was higher among neonatal ICU workers when compared with the other ICUs. The adult ICU presented lower scores for most of the SAQ and HSOPSC domains. The scales presented moderate correlation between them (r=0.66). Conclusion There were differences in perception regarding patient safety among ICUs, which corroborates the existence of local microcultures. The study did not demonstrate equivalence between the SAQ and the HSOPSC.

  15. 2013 Traffic Safety Culture Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... death in the United States. 2013 Traffic Safety Culture Index January 2014 607 14th Street, NW, Suite ... org | 202-638-5944 Title 2013 Traffic Safety Culture Index (January 2014) About the Sponsor AAA Foundation ...

  16. Republished paper: Improving safety culture on adult medical units through multidisciplinary teamwork and communication interventions: the TOPS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, M A; Sehgal, N L; Alldredge, B K; Gearhart, S; Auerbach, A A; Wachter, R M

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project was to improve unit-based safety culture through implementation of a multidisciplinary (pharmacy, nursing, medicine) teamwork and communication intervention. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used to determine the impact of the training with a before-after design. Surveys were returned from 454 healthcare staff before the training and 368 staff 1 year later. Five of eleven safety culture subscales showed significant improvement. Nurses perceived a stronger safety culture than physicians or pharmacists. While it is difficult to isolate the effects of the team training intervention from other events occurring during the year between training and postevaluation, overall the intervention seems to have improved the safety culture on these medical units.

  17. Safety Culture in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in the Gaza Strip, Palestine: A Need for Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-El-Noor, Nasser Ibrahim; Hamdan, Motasem Abduallah; Abu-El-Noor, Mysoon Khalil; Radwan, Abdal-Karim Said; Alshaer, Ahmed Ali

    Assessment of the prevailing safety culture within the Gazan health care system can be used to identify problem areas. Specifically, the need for improvements, raising awareness about patient safety, the identification and evaluation of existing safety programs and interventions for improving the safety culture. This study aims to assess the safety culture in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Gaza Strip hospitals and to assess the safety culture in regards to caregivers' characteristics. In a cross-sectional study using a census sample, we surveyed all nurses and physicians working in at all the NICUs in the Gaza Strip, Palestine. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) which includes six scales was used to assess participants' attitudes towards safety culture. The overall score for SAQ was 63.9. Domains' scores ranged between 55.5 (perception of management) and 71.8 (stress recognition). The scores reported by our participants fell below the 75 out of a possible score of 100, which was considered as a cut-off point for a positive score. Moreover, our results revealed substantial variation in safety culture domain scores among participating NICUs. These results should be an indicator to our health care policy makers to modify current or adopt new health care policies to improve safety culture. It should also be a call to design customized programs for improving the safety culture in NICUs in the Gaza Strip. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Employee Engagement and a Culture of Safety in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Susan L; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Siedlecki, Sandra L; Dolansky, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    A descriptive, retrospective design was used to explore the relationship between employee engagement and culture of safety in ICUs within a large Midwestern healthcare system. Results demonstrated a strong positive relationship between total engagement score and total patient safety score (r = 0.645, P engagement score and the 12 safety culture dimensions. These findings have implications for improving managerial strategies relative to employee engagement that may ultimately impact perceptions of a safety culture.

  19. Patient safety culture among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammouri, A A; Tailakh, A K; Muliira, J K; Geethakrishnan, R; Al Kindi, S N

    2015-03-01

    Patient safety is considered to be crucial to healthcare quality and is one of the major parameters monitored by all healthcare organizations around the world. Nurses play a vital role in maintaining and promoting patient safety due to the nature of their work. The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' perceptions about patient safety culture and to identify the factors that need to be emphasized in order to develop and maintain the culture of safety among nurses in Oman. A descriptive and cross-sectional design was used. Patient safety culture was assessed by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture among 414 registered nurses working in four major governmental hospitals in Oman. Descriptive statistics and general linear regression were employed to assess the association between patient safety culture and demographic variables. Nurses who perceived more supervisor or manager expectations, feedback and communications about errors, teamwork across hospital units, and hospital handoffs and transitions had more overall perception of patient safety. Nurses who perceived more teamwork within units and more feedback and communications about errors had more frequency of events reported. Furthermore, nurses who had more years of experience and were working in teaching hospitals had more perception of patient safety culture. Learning and continuous improvement, hospital management support, supervisor/manager expectations, feedback and communications about error, teamwork, hospital handoffs and transitions were found to be major patient safety culture predictors. Investing in practices and systems that focus on improving these aspects is likely to enhance the culture of patient safety in Omani hospitals and others like them. Strategies to nurture patient safety culture in Omani hospitals should focus upon building leadership capacity that support open communication, blame free, team work and continuous organizational learning. © 2014 International

  20. Patient Safety Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Solvejg

    of health care professional’s behaviour, habits, norms, values, and basic assumptions related to patient care; it is the way things are done. The patient safety culture guides the motivation, commitment to and know-how of the safety management, and how all members of a work place interact. This thesis......Patient safety is highly prioritised in the Danish health care system, never the less, patients are still exposed to risk and harmed every day. Implementation of a patient safety culture has been suggested an effective mean to protect patients against adverse events. Working strategically...... with assessment and development of the patient safety culture is in early days in Denmark. It depends upon valid, reliable and effective methods. The patient safety culture represents a wide range of social phenomena permeating the way of life in a health care. In essence, the safety culture is an aggregation...

  1. A Comparison of Safety Culture Associated with Three Engineered Systems in Japan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuhiro, Akira

    The internationally reported nuclear criticality accident at JCO in Tokaimura, Japan has further eroded public confidence in nuclear energy, its related facilities and the (Japanese) government’s ability to handle such a crisis. The JCO accident marked the sixth nuclear-related incident since 1995. The existing state of “safety culture” is being questioned and re-evaluated at a national level. In this work the safety culture associated with engineered systems (ES) such as the automobile, commercial airplane and nuclear power plants (NPP) are evaluated based on a scale-analysis (SA), via proposition of two fundamental parameters called eigenmetrics. The identified eigenmetrics are time- (τ) and number-scales (N) describing both ES and human factors, at the individual and/or societal levels. The SA approach is appropriate because human perception of risk (POR), perception of benefit (POB) and level of (technology) acceptance (LOA) are inherently subjective, therefore “fuzzy” and rarely quantifiable in exact magnitude. POR expressed in terms of the psychometric factors “dread risk” and “unknown risk”, contain both time- and number-scale elements. The JCO accident, as well as auto-fatalities, commercial airline accidents and hypothetical NPP accidents are characterized in terms of τ, N and two additional derived parameters of relevance, Nτ and N/τ. We contend that LOA infers a POB at least two orders of magnitude larger than POR. The “amplification” influence of mass-media is also deduced as being 100 to 1000 fold the actual number of fatalities/serious injuries in a nuclear-related accident.

  2. Organizational Culture and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.

    2003-01-01

    '..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

  3. Challenging patient safety culture: survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellings, Johan; Schrooten, Ward; Klazinga, Niek; Vleugels, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to measure patient safety culture in five Belgian general hospitals. Safety culture plays an important role in the approach towards greater patient safety in hospitals. The Patient Safety Culture Hospital questionnaire was distributed hospital-wide in five general hospitals. It evaluates ten patient safety culture dimensions and two outcomes. The scores were expressed as the percentage of positive answers towards patient safety for each dimension. The survey was conducted from March through November 2005. In total, 3,940 individuals responded (overall response rate = 77 per cent), including 2,813 nurses and assistants, 462 physicians, 397 physiotherapists, laboratory and radiology assistants, social workers and 64 pharmacists and pharmacy assistants. The dimensional positive scores were found to be low to average in all the hospitals. The lowest scores were "hospital management support for patient safety" (35 per cent), "non-punitive response to error" (36 per cent), "hospital transfers and transitions" (36 per cent), "staffing" (38 per cent), and "teamwork across hospital units" (40 per cent). The dimension "teamwork within hospital units" generated the highest score (70 per cent). Although the same dimensions were considered problematic in the different hospitals, important variations between the five hospitals were observed. A comprehensive and tailor-made plan to improve patient safety culture in these hospitals can now be developed. Results indicate that important aspects of the patient safety culture in these hospitals need improvement. This is an important challenge to all stakeholders wishing to improve patient safety.

  4. Organizational culture, safety culture, and safety performance at research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, William S.

    2000-07-30

    Organizational culture surveys of research facilities conducted several years ago and archival occupational injury reports were used to determine whether differences in safety performance are related to general organizational factors or to ''safety culture'' as reflected in specific safety-related dimensions. From among the organizations surveyed, a pair of facilities was chosen that were similar in size and scientific mission while differing on indices of work-related injuries. There were reliable differences in organizational style between the facilities, especially among workers in environment, safety, and health functions; differences between the facilities (and among job categories) on the safety scale were more modest and less regular.

  5. Patient safety: Safety culture and patient safety ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marlene Dyrløv

    2006-01-01

    and interviews with staff and management in four hospital departments. The appendix contains the Patient Safety Culture Questionnaire tool that I have developed, tested and revised for use in theDanish hospital setting based on the research projects on safety culture described in papers 3, 4 and 5. Paper 6......Patient safety - the prevention of medical error and adverse events - and the initiative of developing safety cultures to assure patients from harm have become one of the central concerns in quality improvement in healthcare both nationally andinternationally. This subject raises numerous...... the problems, and suggest possible solutions for improving patient safety through the promotion of safety culture and ethics. I seek to illuminate theissues of patient safety from several perspectives; the organizational healthcare system, in particular the healthcare workers perspectives and experiences...

  6. Regulatory Expectations for Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Oh, Jang Jin; Choi, Young Sung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The oversight of licensee's safety culture becomes an important issue that attracts great public and political concerns recently in Korea. Beginning from the intended violation of rules, a series of corruptions, documents forgery and disclosure of wrong-doings made the public think that the whole mindset of nuclear workers has been inadequate. Thus, they are demanding that safety culture shall be improved and that regulatory body shall play more roles and responsibilities for the improvements and oversight for them. This paper introduces, as an effort of regulatory side, recent changes in the role of regulators in safety culture, regulatory expectations on the desired status of licensee's safety culture, the pilot inspection program for safety culture and research activity for the development of oversight system. After the Fukushima accident in Japan 2011, many critics has searched for cultural factors that caused the unacceptable negligence pervaded in Japan nuclear society and the renewed emphasis has been placed on rebuilding safety culture by operators, regulators, and relevant institutions globally. Significant progress has been made in how to approach safety culture and led to a new perspective different from the existing normative assessment method both in operators and regulatory side. Regulatory expectations and oversight of them are based on such a new holistic concept for human, organizational and cultural elements to maintain and strengthen the integrity of defense in depth and consequently nuclear safety.

  7. Leadership and safety culture. Leadership for safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Erwin; Nithack, Eckhard [PreussenElektra GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The meaning of leadership for safety in the nuclear industry is pointed out. This topic has became an increasing rank since the German ''Energiewende''. Despite the phase-out of the German NPP's nuclear safety and the belonging safety culture needs to be well maintained. A challenge for the whole organisation. Following the challenge to operate nuclear power plants towards Operational Excellence a highly skilled and motivated organisation is needed. Therefore Leadership is a valuable success factor.

  8. Patient safety culture lives in departments and wards: Multilevel partitioning of variance in patient safety culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofoss Dag

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of study was to document 1 that patient safety culture scores vary considerably by hospital department and ward, and 2 that much of the variation is across the lowest level organizational units: the wards. Setting of study: 500-bed Norwegian university hospital, September-December 2006. Methods Data collected from 1400 staff by (the Norwegian version of the generic version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ Short Form 2006. Multilevel analysis by MLwiN version 1.10. Results Considerable parts of the score variations were at the ward and department levels. More organization level variation was seen at the ward level than at the department level. Conclusions Patient safety culture improvement efforts should not be limited to all-hospital interventions or interventions aimed at entire departments, but include involvement at the ward level, selectively aimed at low-scoring wards. Patient safety culture should be studied as closely to the patient as possible. There may be such a thing as "hospital safety culture" and the variance across hospital departments indicates the existence of department safety cultures. However, neglecting the study of patient safety culture at the ward level will mask important local variations. Safety culture research and improvement should not stop at the lowest formal level of the hospital (wards, out-patient clinics, ERs, but proceed to collect and analyze data on the micro-units within them.

  9. Relationship of safety culture and process safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olive, Claire [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States); O' Connor, T. Michael [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States); Mannan, M. Sam [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States)]. E-mail: mannan@tamu.edu

    2006-03-17

    Throughout history, humans have gathered in groups for social, religious, and industrial purposes. As the conglomeration of people interact, a set of underlying values, beliefs, and principles begins to develop that serve to guide behavior within the group. These 'guidelines' are commonly referred to as the group culture. Modern-day organizations, including corporations, have developed their own unique cultures derived from the diversity of the organizational interests and the background of the employees. Safety culture, a sub-set of organizational culture, has been a major focus in recent years. This is especially true in the chemical industry due to the series of preventable, safety-related disasters that occurred in the late seventies and eighties. Some of the most notable disasters, during this time period, occurred at Bhopal, Flixborough, and Seveso. However, current events, like the September 11th terrorist attacks and the disintegration of the Columbia shuttle, have caused an assessment of safety culture in a variety of other organizations.

  10. Tractor Safety. Unit A-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Vernon D.; Backlund, Paul

    This document is a teacher's guide for a unit in tractor and machinery safety for college freshmen. It is intended to be used for 10 hours of instruction for freshmen who are intending to work on or around machinery. Safety hazards directly and indirectly related to many types of machinery are covered in addition to tractors. The objectives of the…

  11. Measuring patient safety culture in Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen I-Chi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is a critical component to the quality of health care. As health care organizations endeavour to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. In this research, the authors use the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire to assess the culture of patient safety in Taiwan and attempt to provide an explanation for some of the phenomena that are unique in Taiwan. Methods The authors used HSOPSC to measure the 12 dimensions of the patient safety culture from 42 hospitals in Taiwan. The survey received 788 respondents including physicians, nurses, and non-clinical staff. This study used SPSS 15.0 for Windows and Amos 7 software tools to perform the statistical analysis on the survey data, including descriptive statistics and confirmatory factor analysis of the structural equation model. Results The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSOPSC survey was 64%, slightly higher than the average positive response rate for the AHRQ data (61%. The results showed that hospital staff in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture in their organization. The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was "Teamwork within units", similar to the results reported in the US. The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was "Staffing". Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Taiwan and the US in three dimensions, including "Feedback and communication about error", "Communication openness", and "Frequency of event reporting". Conclusions The HSOPSC measurement provides evidence for assessing patient safety culture in Taiwan. The results show that in general, hospital staffs in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture within their organization. The existence of discrepancies between the US data and the Taiwanese data

  12. Integrated Safety Culture Model and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪磊; 孙瑞山; 刘汉辉

    2009-01-01

    A new safety culture model is constructed and is applied to analyze the correlations between safety culture and SMS. On the basis of previous typical definitions, models and theories of safety culture, an in-depth analysis on safety culture's structure, composing elements and their correlations was conducted. A new definition of safety culture was proposed from the perspective of sub-cuhure. 7 types of safety sub-culture, which are safety priority culture, standardizing culture, flexible culture, learning culture, teamwork culture, reporting culture and justice culture were defined later. Then integrated safety culture model (ISCM) was put forward based on the definition. The model divided safety culture into intrinsic latency level and extrinsic indication level and explained the potential relationship between safety sub-culture and all safety culture dimensions. Finally in the analyzing of safety culture and SMS, it concluded that positive safety culture is the basis of im-plementing SMS effectively and an advanced SMS will improve safety culture from all around.

  13. [A safety culture in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Johan F; Dekker-van Doorn, Connie M; Haerkens, Mark H T M; Klein, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety is currently a central issue in health care. Many principles of patient safety, such as a safety management system, have been copied from high-risk industries. However, without a fundamental understanding of the differences between health care and industry, most incentives and instruments will translate into bureaucracy, control and repression. The necessary risk reduction for the patient can only be achieved through changes in the culture and hierarchical structure within the health care system. This requires breaking through professional and departmental barriers and reshaping the traditional hierarchy.

  14. Cultural safety and its importance for Australian midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiri, Jasten; Dietsch, Elaine; Bonner, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Cultural safety is an important concept in health care that originated in Aotearoa (New Zealand) to address Maori consumer dissatisfaction with health care. In Australia and internationally, midwives are now expected to provide culturally safe midwifery care to all women. Historically, Australia has received large numbers of immigrants from the United Kingdom, European countries and the Middle East. There have also been refugees and immigrants from South-East Asia, and most recently, from Africa. Australia continues to become more culturally diverse and yet to date no studies have explored the application of cultural safety in Australian midwifery practice. This paper explores how cultural safety has evolved from cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity. It examines the importance of cultural safety in nursing and midwifery practice. Finally, it explores the literature to determine how midwives can apply the concept of cultural safety to ensure safe and woman centred care.

  15. Dimensions of patient safety culture in family practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; O'Beirne, Maeve; Sterling, Pam; Zwicker, Karen; Harding, Brianne K; Casebeer, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Safety culture has been shown to affect patient safety in healthcare. While the United States and United Kingdom have studied the dimensions that reflect patient safety culture in family practice settings, to date, this has not been done in Canada. Differences in the healthcare systems between these countries and Canada may affect the dimensions found to be relevant here. Thus, it is important to identify and compare the dimensions from the United States and the United Kingdom in a Canadian context. The objectives of this study were to explore the dimensions of patient safety culture that relate to family practice in Canada and to determine if differences and similarities exist between dimensions found in Canada and those found in previous studies undertaken in the United States and the United Kingdom. A qualitative study was undertaken applying thematic analysis using focus groups with family practice offices and supplementary key stakeholders. Analysis of the data indicated that most of the dimensions from the United States and United Kingdom are appropriate in our Canadian context. Exceptions included owner/managing partner/leadership support for patient safety, job satisfaction and overall perceptions of patient safety and quality. Two unique dimensions were identified in the Canadian context: disclosure and accepting responsibility for errors. Based on this early work, it is important to consider differences in care settings when understanding dimensions of patient safety culture. We suggest that additional research in family practice settings is critical to further understand the influence of context on patient safety culture.

  16. Understanding and Exploring Safety Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guldenmund, F.W.

    2010-01-01

    The match between safety and culture was made around 1986, when the INSAG delivered its initial report on the Chernobyl accident. Whether the marriage is a happy one is still a matter of debate, but it is most definitely a fruitful one. In the past twenty years, many researchers have devoted much ef

  17. Patient safety culture lives in departments and wards: Multilevel partitioning of variance in patient safety culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hofoss Dag; Deilkås Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Aim of study was to document 1) that patient safety culture scores vary considerably by hospital department and ward, and 2) that much of the variation is across the lowest level organizational units: the wards. Setting of study: 500-bed Norwegian university hospital, September-December 2006. Methods Data collected from 1400 staff by (the Norwegian version of) the generic version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ Short Form 2006). Multilevel analysis by MLwiN vers...

  18. A literature review of safety culture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Kerstan Suzanne; Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Wenner, Caren A.

    2013-03-01

    Workplace safety has been historically neglected by organizations in order to enhance profitability. Over the past 30 years, safety concerns and attention to safety have increased due to a series of disastrous events occurring across many different industries (e.g., Chernobyl, Upper Big-Branch Mine, Davis-Besse etc.). Many organizations have focused on promoting a healthy safety culture as a way to understand past incidents, and to prevent future disasters. There is an extensive academic literature devoted to safety culture, and the Department of Energy has also published a significant number of documents related to safety culture. The purpose of the current endeavor was to conduct a review of the safety culture literature in order to understand definitions, methodologies, models, and successful interventions for improving safety culture. After reviewing the literature, we observed four emerging themes. First, it was apparent that although safety culture is a valuable construct, it has some inherent weaknesses. For example, there is no common definition of safety culture and no standard way for assessing the construct. Second, it is apparent that researchers know how to measure particular components of safety culture, with specific focus on individual and organizational factors. Such existing methodologies can be leveraged for future assessments. Third, based on the published literature, the relationship between safety culture and performance is tenuous at best. There are few empirical studies that examine the relationship between safety culture and safety performance metrics. Further, most of these studies do not include a description of the implementation of interventions to improve safety culture, or do not measure the effect of these interventions on safety culture or performance. Fourth, safety culture is best viewed as a dynamic, multi-faceted overall system composed of individual, engineered and organizational models. By addressing all three components of

  19. Formal Safety versus Real Safety: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Safety Culture – Evidence from Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Järvis Marina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines differences between formal safety and real safety in Estonian small and medium-sized enterprises. The results reveal key issues in safety culture assessment. Statistical analysis of safety culture questionnaires showed many organisations with an outstanding safety culture and positive safety attitudes. However, qualitative data indicated some important safety weaknesses and aspects that should be included in the process of evaluation of safety culture in organisations.

  20. Nurses' perceptions of patient safety culture in Jordanian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, W A; Akhu-Zaheya, L M; Al-Mahasneh, S I; Khater, R

    2015-03-01

    Patients' safety culture is a key aspect in determining healthcare organizations' ability to address and reduce risks of patients. Nurses play a major role in patients' safety because they are accountable for direct and continuous patient care. There is little known information about patients' safety culture in Jordanian hospitals, particularly from the perspective of healthcare providers. The study aimed to assess patient safety culture in Jordanian hospitals from nurses' perspective. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was utilized. A total number of 658 nurses participated in the current study. Data were collected using an Arabic version of the hospital survey of patients' safety culture. Teamwork within unit dimensions had a high positive response, and was perceived by nurses to be the only strong suit in Jordanian hospitals. Areas that required improvement, as perceived by nurses, are as follows: communication openness, staffing, handoff and transition, non-punitive responses to errors, and teamwork across units. Regression analysis revealed factors, from nurses' perspectives, that influenced patients' safety culture in Jordanian hospital. Factors included age, total years of experience, working in university hospitals, utilizing evidence-based practice and working in hospitals that consider patient safety to be a priority. Participants in this study were limited to nurses. Therefore, there is a need to assess patient safety culture from other healthcare providers' perspectives. Moreover, the use of a self-reported questionnaire introduced the social desirability biases. The current study provides insight into how nurses perceive patient safety culture. Results of this study have revealed that there is a need to replace the traditional culture of shame/blame with a non-punitive culture. Study results implied that improving patient safety culture requires a fundamental transformation of nurses' work environment. New policies to improve collaboration between

  1. The association between EMS workplace safety culture and safety outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Matthew D; Wang, Henry E; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Patterson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies have highlighted wide variation in emergency medical services (EMS) workplace safety culture across agencies. To determine the association between EMS workplace safety culture scores and patient or provider safety outcomes. We administered a cross-sectional survey to EMS workers affiliated with a convenience sample of agencies. We recruited these agencies from a national EMS management organization. We used the EMS Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (EMS-SAQ) to measure workplace safety culture and the EMS Safety Inventory (EMS-SI), a tool developed to capture self-reported safety outcomes from EMS workers. The EMS-SAQ provides reliable and valid measures of six domains: safety climate, teamwork climate, perceptions of management, working conditions, stress recognition, and job satisfaction. A panel of medical directors, emergency medical technicians and paramedics, and occupational epidemiologists developed the EMS-SI to measure self-reported injury, medical errors and adverse events, and safety-compromising behaviors. We used hierarchical linear models to evaluate the association between EMS-SAQ scores and EMS-SI safety outcome measures. Sixteen percent of all respondents reported experiencing an injury in the past three months, four of every 10 respondents reported an error or adverse event (AE), and 89% reported safety-compromising behaviors. Respondents reporting injury scored lower on five of the six domains of safety culture. Respondents reporting an error or AE scored lower for four of the six domains, while respondents reporting safety-compromising behavior had lower safety culture scores for five of the six domains. Individual EMS worker perceptions of workplace safety culture are associated with composite measures of patient and provider safety outcomes. This study is preliminary evidence of the association between safety culture and patient or provider safety outcomes.

  2. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics.

  3. KHNP Safety Culture Framework based on Global Standard, and Lessons learned from Safety Culture Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Younggab; Hur, Nam Young; Jeong, Hyeon Jong [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In order to eliminate the vague fears of the people about the nuclear power and operate continuously NPPs, a strong safety culture of NPPs should be demonstrated. Strong safety culture awareness of workers can overcome social distrust about NPPs. KHNP has been a variety efforts to improve and establish safety culture of NPPs. Safety culture framework applying global standards was set up and safety culture assessment has been carried out periodically to enhance safety culture of workers. In addition, KHNP developed various safety culture contents and they are being used in NPPs by workers. As a result of these efforts, safety culture awareness of workers is changed positively and the safety environment of NPPs is expected to be improved. KHNP makes an effort to solve areas for improvement derived from safety culture assessment. However, there are some areas to take a long time in completing the work. Therefore, these actions are necessary to be carried out consistently and continuously. KHNP also developed recently safety culture enhancement system based on web. All information related to safety culture in KHNP will be shared through this web system and this system will be used to safety culture assessment. In addition to, KHNP plans to develop safety culture indicators for monitoring the symptoms of safety culture weakening.

  4. Patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive patient safety culture is a main prerequisite for patient safety and improvement initiatives. Until now, patient safety culture (PSC) research was mainly focused on hospital care, however, it is of equal importance in primary care. Measuring PSC informs practices on their s

  5. Objective and character of safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aastrand, K. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    The main topics of the lecture include: (1) concepts of safety culture introduced in INSAG-4, (2) stages of development of safety culture, (3) general practises to develop organizational effectiveness as a means of implementing and improving safety culture, (4) specific practises to develop safety culture applying to all stages of a nuclear installation's life cycle, (5) suggestions on assessing the progress of development of safety culture in an organization and on evaluating the influence of major environmental and internal organizational factors on that culture, and (6) guidance on the detection of incipient weaknesses in safety culture that may be of particular interest to regulators and those responsible for self-assessment in organization.

  6. Determinants for conducting food safety culture research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyarugwe, Shingai P.; Linnemann, Anita; Hofstede, Gert Jan; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Luning, Pieternel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Foodborne outbreaks continue to occur regardless of existing food safety measures indicating the shortcomings of these measures to assure food safety. This has led to the recognition of food safety culture as a key contributory factor to the food safety performance of food

  7. Determinants for conducting food safety culture research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyarugwe, Shingai P.; Linnemann, Anita; Hofstede, Gert Jan; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Luning, Pieternel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Foodborne outbreaks continue to occur regardless of existing food safety measures indicating the shortcomings of these measures to assure food safety. This has led to the recognition of food safety culture as a key contributory factor to the food safety performance of food establishmen

  8. Decreasing Ambiguity of the Safety Culture Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Shiichiro; Hosoda, Satoshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Monta, Kazuo; Kameda, Akiyuki

    2001-06-17

    The status of the concept of ''safety culture'' is reviewed. It has not sufficiently taken root. One cause for this is the abstract nature of the concept. Organizations must become aware of the necessity of improving safety and have sufficient power to promote this. The culture of safety must be instilled in each employee, so that each of them will feel responsible for identifying weak points in plant safety. The authors devised a tool for a self-assessment of the safety culture. The tool will bring to light information divides, communication gaps, etc. Recognizing the vulnerabilities of the organization by themselves and discussing these weak points among them is the first step to decrease the ambiguity of the safety culture. The next step is to make these gaps known along with agreed-upon countermeasures. The concept of safety culture will be greatly clarified in this way and lead to safer nuclear power plants.

  9. Advantages and disadvantages by using safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhrberg, Mette Bang

    2003-01-01

    Safety culture is a major issue in accident research. A recently finished ph.d.-study has evaluated the symbolic safety culture approach and found four advantages and two disadvantages. These are presented and discussed in this contribution. It is concluded that the approach can be useful...... in the planning of accident prevention activities if focus is maintained on prevention of accidents and not on changing of the safety culture....

  10. Advantages and disadvantages by using safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhrberg, Mette Bang

    2003-01-01

    Safety culture is a major issue in accident research. A recently finished ph.d.-study has evaluated the symbolic safety culture approach and found four advantages and two disadvantages. These are presented and discussed in this contribution. It is concluded that the approach can be useful...... in the planning of accident prevention activities if focus is maintained on prevention of accidents and not on changing of the safety culture....

  11. The role of patient safety culture in the causation of unintended events in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Timmermans, D.R.; Wal, G. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives. To examine whether the relationship between specialty and patient safety is mediated by safety culture. Background. Research has shown that patient safety in hospitals varies by specialty. The safety culture among healthcare professionals in hospital units is believed to influen

  12. The role of patient safety culture in the causation of unintended events in hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Wal, G. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To examine whether the relationship between specialty and patient safety is mediated by safety culture. Background: Research has shown that patient safety in hospitals varies by specialty. The safety culture among healthcare professionals in hospital units is believed to influen

  13. Incorporating organisational safety culture within ergonomics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim; Tappin, David

    2010-10-01

    This paper conceptualises organisational safety culture and considers its relevance to ergonomics practice. Issues discussed in the paper include the modest contribution that ergonomists and ergonomics as a discipline have made to this burgeoning field of study and the significance of safety culture to a systems approach. The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics work with regard to the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process, and implications for participatory ergonomics approaches, are also discussed. A potential user-friendly, qualitative approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented, based on a recently published conceptual framework that recognises the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of safety culture. The paper concludes by considering the use of such an approach, where an understanding of different aspects of safety culture within an organisation is seen as important to the success of ergonomics projects. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics practice is a key focus of this paper, including its relationship with the systems approach, participatory ergonomics and the ergonomics analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process. An approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented.

  14. The awareness of employees in safety culture through the improved nuclear safety culture evaluation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ga; Sung, Chan Ho; Jung, Yeon Sub [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, nuclear safety culture terminology was at first introduced emphasizing the importance of employees' attitude and organizational safety. The concept of safety culture was spread by INSAG 4 published in 1991. From that time, IAEA had provided the service of ASCOT for the safety culture assessment. However, many people still are thinking that safety culture is abstract and is not clear. It is why the systematic and reliable assessment methodology was not developed. Assessing safety culture is to identify what is the basic assumption for any organization to accept unconsciously. Therefore, it is very difficult to reach a meaningful conclusion by a superficial investigation alone. KHNP had been doing the safety culture assessment which was based on ASCOT methodology every 2 years. And this result had contributed to improving safety culture. But this result could not represent the level of organization's safety culture due to the limitation of method. So, KHNP has improved the safety culture method by benchmarking the over sea assessment techniques in 2011. The effectiveness of this improved methodology was validated through a pilot assessment. In this paper, the level of employees' safety culture awareness was analyzed by the improved method and reviewed what is necessary for the completeness and objectivity of the nuclear safety culture assessment methodology.

  15. Integration, differentiation and ambiguity in safety cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Anne; Koch, Christian

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses safety cultures, drawing on the differentiation, integration and ambiguity-scheme introduced by scholars of organizational culture. An ethnographic approach has been applied in the study of meaning and symbols relating to work, hazards, occupational accidents and prevention....... The application of this approach is demonstrated through a multifacetted analysis of safety cultures. Case studies in Danish manufacturing show that it usually is necessary to differentiate between several safety cultures dispersed throughout the shop floor and other parts of the manufacturing organization...

  16. 78 FR 53790 - Public Forum-Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Culture; Organizational Leadership Perspectives on Safety Culture; Safety Culture Management and Oversight... effective safety cultures within their industries. There will also be a review of some recent organizational... SAFETY BOARD Public Forum--Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety On Tuesday and...

  17. Assessment of patient safety culture: what tools for medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaneliere, M; Jacquet, F; Occelli, P; Touzet, S; Siranyan, V; Colin, C

    2016-09-29

    The assessment of patient safety culture refers mainly to surveys exploring the perceptions of health professionals in hospitals. These surveys have less relevance when considering the assessment of the patient safety culture of medical students, especially at university or medical school. They are indeed not fully integrated in care units and constitute a heterogeneous population. This work aimed to find appropriate assessment tools of the patient safety culture of medical students. Systematic review of the literature. Surveys related to a care unit were excluded. A typology of the patient safety culture of medical students was built from the included surveys. Eighteen surveys were included. In our typology of patient safety culture of medical students (15 dimensions), the number of dimensions explored by survey (n) ranged from 1 to 12, with 6 "specialized" tools (n ≤ 4) and 12 "global" tools (N ≥ 5). These surveys have explored: knowledge about patient safety, acknowledgment of the inevitability of human error, the lack of skills as the main source of errors, the errors reporting systems, disclosure of medical errors to others health professionals or patients, teamwork and patient involvement to improve safety in care. We recommend using Wetzel's survey for making an overall assessment of the patient safety culture of medical students at university. In a specific purpose-e.g. to assess an educational program on medical error disclosure-the authors recommend to determine which dimensions of patient safety will be taught, to select the best assessment tool. Learning on patient safety should however be considered beyond the university. International translations of tools are required to create databases allowing comparative studies.

  18. Patient safety culture in Norwegian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondevik, Gunnar Tschudi; Hofoss, Dag; Husebø, Bettina Sandgathe; Deilkås, Ellen Catharina Tveter

    2017-06-20

    Patient safety culture concerns leader and staff interaction, attitudes, routines, awareness and practices that impinge on the risk of patient-adverse events. Due to their complex multiple diseases, nursing home patients are at particularly high risk of adverse events. Studies have found an association between patient safety culture and the risk of adverse events. This study aimed to investigate safety attitudes among healthcare providers in Norwegian nursing homes, using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - Ambulatory Version (SAQ-AV). We studied whether variations in safety attitudes were related to professional background, age, work experience and mother tongue. In February 2016, 463 healthcare providers working in five nursing homes in Tønsberg, Norway, were invited to answer the SAQ-AV, translated and adapted to the Norwegian nursing home setting. Previous validation of the Norwegian SAQ-AV for nursing homes identified five patient safety factors: teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, working conditions and stress recognition. SPSS v.22 was used for statistical analysis, which included estimations of mean values, standard deviations and multiple linear regressions. P-values homes. In multiple linear regression analysis, we found that increasing age and job position among the healthcare providers were associated with significantly increased mean scores for the patient safety factors teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction and working conditions. Not being a Norwegian native speaker was associated with a significantly higher mean score for job satisfaction and a significantly lower mean score for stress recognition. Neither professional background nor work experience were significantly associated with mean scores for any patient safety factor. Patient safety factor scores in nursing homes were poorer than previously found in Norwegian general practices, but similar to findings in out-of-hours primary care clinics. Patient safety culture

  19. Assessment of safety culture maturity in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Madelyn P; Zimmerman, Rosanne; Baker, G Ross; Smith, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The Manchester Patient Safety Culture Assessment Tool (MaPSCAT) was used to examine the levels of safety culture maturity in four programs across one large healthcare organization. The MaPSCAT is based on a theoretical framework that was developed in the United Kingdom through extensive literature reviews and expert input. It provides a view of safety culture on 10 dimensions (continuous improvement, priority given to safety, system errors and individual responsibility, recording incidents, evaluating incidents, learning and effecting change, communication, personnel management, staff education and teamwork) at five progressive levels of safety maturity. These levels are pathological ("Why waste our time on safety?"), reactive ("We do something when we have an incident"), bureaucratic ("We have systems in place to manage safety"), proactive ("We are always on alert for risks") and generative ("Risk management is an integral part of everything we do"). This article highlights the use of a new tool, the results of a study completed with this tool and how the results can be used to advance safety culture.

  20. A qualification of the concept safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhrberg, Mette Bang

    The number of accidents at work in Denmark has not declined in the last decade, despite different types of preventions methods. Traditionally preventions have been based on regulation of human behaviour or machinery. Recently safety culture has been presented as a new approach for the prevention ...... of occupational accidents. The implicit models of organisation and man within mainstream safety culture approaches seem to be too rationalistic compared with day to day life of organisations. A safety culture concept is presented where the basis is symbolism.......The number of accidents at work in Denmark has not declined in the last decade, despite different types of preventions methods. Traditionally preventions have been based on regulation of human behaviour or machinery. Recently safety culture has been presented as a new approach for the prevention...

  1. [Patient safety culture in Family practice residents of Galicia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela Romero, Manuel; Bugarín González, Rosendo; Rodríguez Calvo, María Sol

    To determine the views held by Family practice (FP) residents on the different dimensions of patient safety, in order to identify potential areas for improvement. A cross-sectional study. Seven FP of Galicia teaching units. 182 FP residents who completed the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was chosen because it is translated, validated, and adapted to the Spanish model of Primary Care. The results were grouped into 12 composites assessed by the mentioned questionnaire. The study variables were the socio-demographic dimensions of the questionnaire, as well as occupational/professional variables: age, gender, year of residence, and teaching unit of FP of Galicia. The "Organisational learning" and "Teamwork" items were considered strong areas. However, the "Patient safety and quality issues", "Information exchange with other settings", and "Work pressure and pace" items were considered areas with significant potential for improvement. First-year residents obtained the best results and the fourth-year ones the worst. The results may indicate the need to include basic knowledge on patient safety in the teaching process of FP residents in order to increase and consolidate the fragile patient safety culture described in this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The current status of the patient safety culture in intensive care unit nurses and influencing factors%ICU护士患者安全文化认知水平现状及其影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文婷; 尹安春

    2016-01-01

    目的 了解ICU护士对患者安全文化的认知现状,并分析其影响因素.方法 采用一般资料调查表、患者安全文化调查问卷、护理不良事件报告障碍问卷、工作授能条件量表,对大连市6家综合性医院373名ICU护士进行调查.结果 ICU护士患者安全文化各维度积极反应率均值为68.08%,其中科室内团队合作的积极反应率最高(89.95%),人员配置的积极反应率最低(35.53%).多元回归分析显示,报告意义、惩罚性文化、正式授权、机会授权、资源授权、急诊ICU科室对ICU护士患者安全文化有显著影响(P<0.05).结论 ICU护士患者安全文化平均积极反应率总体呈中等水平,仍有待进一步提升;护理管理者应结合影响因素,合理制订干预措施,提高ICU护士患者安全文化水平,增强安全文化意识,进而提升危重症护理服务质量.%Objective To investigate the current status of cognitive level of patient safety culture in intensive care unit (ICU) nurses and analyze the influencing factors.Methods Totally 373 ICU nurses were investigated with the general information questionnaire,the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument (HSOPSC),the Report Barriers Questionnaire and the Condition of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire (CWEQ-Ⅱ).Results The mean rate of positive response on safety culture dimensions was 68.08% in ICU nurses,Organizational learning-continuous improvement was the safety culture dimension with the highest positive response(89.95%),the lowest positive response was staffing(35.53%).Multiple regression analysis showed that the meaning of report,punitive culture,resources,opportunity,formal empowerment and ICU department were influencing factors of patient safety culture (P < 0.05).Conclusions The level of patient safety culture in ICU nurses was medium,it remains a further improvement.Nursing managers should take targeted measures according to the influencing factors to

  3. Safety Culture in Indian Hospitals: A Cultural Adaptation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saharsh; Wu, Albert W

    2016-06-01

    Patient safety is increasingly recognized as a global health concern because of a staggering number of health care-related injuries and deaths. Although many hospitals are attempting to promote a patient safety agenda, there are relatively few options to track progress. The aims of this study were to translate and culturally adapt the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) into Gujarati and to provide evidence for its reliability and validity in hospitals in Gujarat, India. We also present preliminary data on the safety culture in these organizations. The first phase was the cultural adaptation and translation of the SAQ into Gujarati. The second phase was a cross-sectional survey of safety attitudes in 4 private hospitals. The survey was distributed to 424 health care workers and elicited an overall response rate of 79%. The questionnaire showed acceptable reliability and preliminary evidence for construct validity among health care workers in 4 private hospitals of varying size. The initial culture score results showed outcomes similar to international standards, with two-thirds of the respondents describing teamwork climate positively and more than half of the respondents describing safety climate positively. This study reveals promising initial results for patient safety culture in India, but further study is needed. The development and validation of the SAQ-Gujarati allow additional hospitals to evaluate their patient safety culture. As the first rendition of the SAQ to an Indian setting, the tool could help to initiate safety discourse and improve the potential for institutions to provide feedback to their staff members.

  4. Safety culture in design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macchi, L.; Pietikaeinen, E.; Liinasuo, M.; Savioja, P.; Reiman, T.; Wahlstroem, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kahlbom, U. [Risk Pilot AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Rollenhagen, C. [Vattenfall, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    In this report we approach design from a safety culture approach As this research area is new and understudied, we take a wide scope on the issue. Different theoretical perspectives that can be taken when improving safety of the design process are considered in this report. We suggest that in the design context the concept of safety culture should be expanded from an organizational level to the level of the network of organizations involved in the design activity. The implication of approaching the design process from a safety culture perspective are discussed and the results of the empirical part of the research are presented. In the interview study in Finland and Sweden we identified challenges and opportunities in the design process from safety culture perspective. Also, a small part of the interview study concentrated on state of the art human factors engineering (HFE) practices in Finland and the results relating to that are presented. This report provide a basis for future development of systematic good design practices and for providing guidelines that can lead to safe and robust technical solutions. (Author)

  5. Nurses' perceptions of and factors promoting patient safety culture in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Emine; Baykal, Ulku; Intepeler, Seyda Seren; Altuntas, Serap

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive and cross-sectional study included 561 nurses in hospitals located in Istanbul, Turkey. The Patient Safety Questionnaire was used for data collection. The type of hospital and the amount of education nurses obtained about patient safety and quality improvement were positively associated with patient safety culture. Conversely, the type of work unit negatively affected workers' behaviors and adverse event reporting in terms of patient safety culture.

  6. A Methodology for Evaluating Quantitative Nuclear Safety Culture Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kiyoon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Through several accidents of NPPs including the Fukushima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernobyl accidents in 1986, nuclear safety culture has been emphasized in reactor safety world-widely. In Korea, KHNP evaluates the safety culture of NPP itself. KHNP developed the principles of the safety culture in consideration of the international standards. A questionnaire and interview questions are also developed based on these principles and it is used for evaluating the safety culture. However, existing methodology to evaluate the safety culture has some disadvantages. First, it is difficult to maintain the consistency of the assessment. Second, the period of safety culture assessment is too long (every two years) so it has limitations in preventing accidents occurred by a lack of safety culture. Third, it is not possible to measure the change in the risk of NPPs by weak safety culture since it is not clearly explains the effect of safety culture on the safety of NPPs. In this study, Safety Culture Impact Assessment Model (SCIAM) is developed overcoming these disadvantages. In this study, SCIAM which overcoming disadvantages of exiting safety culture assessment method is developed. SCIAM uses SCII to monitor the statues of the safety culture periodically and also uses RCDF to quantify the safety culture impact on NPP's safety. It is significant that SCIAM represents the standard of the healthy nuclear safety culture, while the exiting safety culture assessment presented only vulnerability of the safety culture of organization. SCIAM might contribute to monitoring the level of safety culture periodically and, to improving the safety of NPP.

  7. Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akselsson, R.; Koornneef, F.; Stewart, S.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 2: Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations The European Commission HILAS project (Human Integration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems - a project supported by the European Commission’s 6th Framework between 2005-2009) was focused on using human factors knowledge and

  8. Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akselsson, R.; Koornneef, F.; Stewart, S.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 2: Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations The European Commission HILAS project (Human Integration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems - a project supported by the European Commission’s 6th Framework between 2005-2009) was focused on using human factors knowledge and methodo

  9. Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akselsson, R.; Koornneef, F.; Stewart, S.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 2: Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations The European Commission HILAS project (Human Integration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems - a project supported by the European Commission’s 6th Framework between 2005-2009) was focused on using human factors knowledge and methodo

  10. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    This report documents a study with the objective of enhancing safety culture in the Swedish nuclear power industry. A primary objective of this study was to ensure that the latest thinking on human factors principles was being recognised and applied by nuclear power operators as a means of ensuring optimal safety performance. The initial phase of the project was conducted as a pilot study, involving the senior management group at one Swedish nuclear power-producing site. The pilot study enabled the project methodology to be validated after which it was repeated at other Swedish nuclear power industry sites, providing a broad-ranging analysis of opportunities across the industry to enhance safety culture. The introduction to this report contains an overview of safety culture, explains the background to the project and sets out the project rationale and objectives. The methodology used for understanding and analysing the important safety culture issues at each nuclear power site is then described. This section begins with a summary of the processes used in the information gathering and data analysis stage. The six components of the Management Workshops conducted at each site are then described. These workshops used a series of presentations, interactive events and group exercises to: (a) provide feedback to site managers on the safety culture and safety leadership issues identified at their site, and (b) stimulate further safety thinking and provide 'take-away' information and leadership strategies that could be applied to promote safety culture improvements. Section 3, project Findings, contains the main observations and output from the project. These include: - a brief overview of aspects of the local industry operating context that impinge on safety culture; - a summary of strengths or positive attributes observed within the safety culture of the Swedish nuclear industry; - a set of identified opportunities for further improvement; - the aggregated

  11. Surveys of organizational culture and safety culture in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Walter S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2000-07-30

    The results of a survey of organizational culture at a nuclear power plant are summarized and compared with those of a similar survey which has been described in the literature on ''high-reliability organizations''. A general-purpose cultural inventory showed a profile of organizational style similar to that reported in the literature; the factor structure for the styles was also similar to that of the plant previously described. A specialized scale designed to measure ''safety culture'' did not distinguished among groups within the organization that would be expected to differ.

  12. Hermeneutic notions augment cultural safety education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Deb G

    2005-09-01

    Nurses are beginning to demand educational approaches that confront racism, rather than teach cultural diversity. One example of the latter approach is the introduction of kawa whakaruruhau, or cultural safety, in nursing and midwifery education in New Zealand. In the nursing and midwifery context of kawa whakaruruhau, nurses and midwives recognize, respect, and nurture the unique cultural identity of New Zealand's indigenous people, the tangata whenua, and safely meets their needs, expectations, and rights. In this article, I integrate literature pertaining to the implementation of cultural safety with the findings of a hermeneutic project that described the experience of nursing people from cultures other than one's own, and argue that the Gadamerian notions of "horizon," "prejudice," and "play" can be used to facilitate understanding of the tensions and contradictions inherent in cross-cultural practice. In addition, I recommend strategies that enable students to explore the prejudices, paradoxes, and possibilities experienced personally and professionally. As Gadamer noted, the art is in seeing what is questionable. There is also art in knowing how to question in a manner that makes new understanding possible.

  13. The first study of patient safety culture in Iranian primary health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizchi, Narges; Sedaghat, Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    Although the error in health care has received attention recently, patient safety culture in health centers has been relatively neglected. To measure the patient safety culture in primary health centers. A cross-sectional study, utilizing the modified version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and a demographic questionnaire. Healthcare staffs from health centers were participated in the survey. The patient safety culture score including subscores on 11 dimensions and 39 items; patient safety grade and number of events reported. The overall positive response rate of patient safety culture was 57 ± 16.8 (CI (95)55%-59%). The dimensions that received higher positive response rate were "Teamwork across units of health center", "Teamwork within units", "Head of center support for patient safety". The lowest percentage of positive responses was "Non punitive response to error". There were no relationship between working years and patients safely culture score. Similarly, no relationship was found between professional, gender and total patients safely culture score. Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Iranian health centers and the US hospitals in three dimensions. For improving patient safety culture in health centers, it is necessary to have enough staff and establish an environment to be open and fair with staff which helps report errors spontaneously and without any fear. The findings of this study could be used to measure changes in patient safety culture over the time.

  14. The First Study of Patient Safety Culture in Iranian Primary Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Sedaghat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the error in health care has received attention recently, patient safety culture in health centers has been relatively neglected. To measure the patient safety culture in primary health centers. A cross-sectional study, utilizing the modified version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ and a demographic questionnaire. Healthcare staffs from health centers were participated in the survey. The patient safety culture score including subscores on 11 dimensions and 39 items; patient safety grade and number of events reported. The overall positive response rate of patient safety culture was 57 ±16.8 (CI 9555%-59%. The dimensions that received higher positive response rate were "Teamwork across units of health center", "Teamwork within units", "Head of center support for patient safety". The lowest percentage of positive responses was "Non punitive response to error". There were no relationship between working years and patients safely culture score. Similarly, no relationship was found between professional, gender and total patients safely culture score. Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Iranian health centers and the US hospitals in three dimensions. For improving patient safety culture in health centers, it is necessary to have enough staff and establish an environment to be open and fair with staff which helps report errors spontaneously and without any fear. The findings of this study could be used to measure changes in patient safety culture over the time.

  15. Safety culture and networks of influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Carlos Henrique V.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Vieira Neto, Antonio S., E-mail: carloshvp@usp.br, E-mail: barroso@ipen.br, E-mail: asvneto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper analyzes the social networks that influence the formation and maintenance of the safety culture within the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP). From the mapping and analysis of social networks, actors with a significant degree of influence were identified. Later using a questionnaire, the beliefs of the population sample were mapped. Thus, the importance of key actors in the network analysis could be confirmed statistically. Therefore, based on the mentioned methods we could demonstrate our hypothesis, that there are some social networks that are important in the formation of safety culture, as well as the fact that the influence of some distinguished actors plays an essential role in this amalgam. (author)

  16. A NEW METHOD FOR SAFETY CULTURE EVALUATION IN PROCESS SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho,Paulo Victor Rodrigues de; VIDAL, Mario Cesar Rodríguez; GRECCO, Cláudio Henrique dos Santos; Cosenza, Carlos Alberto Nunes

    2014-01-01

    The culture of any organization that deals with safe-critical processes should be centered on safety. Safety culture reflects human awareness of the significant destructive capability of process plants when control is lost, and the recognition that strict attention to safety is essential to achieve the expected benefits. Safety culture appeared as paradigmatic change in the safety approach for process plants in the aftermath of the Chernobyl and Bhopal accidents. The Internati...

  17. Safety sans Frontières: An International Safety Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Tom W; Noort, Mark C; Shorrock, Steven; Kirwan, Barry

    2015-05-01

    The management of safety culture in international and culturally diverse organizations is a concern for many high-risk industries. Yet, research has primarily developed models of safety culture within Western countries, and there is a need to extend investigations of safety culture to global environments. We examined (i) whether safety culture can be reliably measured within a single industry operating across different cultural environments, and (ii) if there is an association between safety culture and national culture. The psychometric properties of a safety culture model developed for the air traffic management (ATM) industry were examined in 17 European countries from four culturally distinct regions of Europe (North, East, South, West). Participants were ATM operational staff (n = 5,176) and management staff (n = 1,230). Through employing multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, good psychometric properties of the model were established. This demonstrates, for the first time, that when safety culture models are tailored to a specific industry, they can operate consistently across national boundaries and occupational groups. Additionally, safety culture scores at both regional and national levels were associated with country-level data on Hofstede's five national culture dimensions (collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, and long-term orientation). MANOVAs indicated safety culture to be most positive in Northern Europe, less so in Western and Eastern Europe, and least positive in Southern Europe. This indicates that national cultural traits may influence the development of organizational safety culture, with significant implications for safety culture theory and practice.

  18. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    This report documents a study with the objective of enhancing safety culture in the Swedish nuclear power industry. A primary objective of this study was to ensure that the latest thinking on human factors principles was being recognised and applied by nuclear power operators as a means of ensuring optimal safety performance. The initial phase of the project was conducted as a pilot study, involving the senior management group at one Swedish nuclear power-producing site. The pilot study enabled the project methodology to be validated after which it was repeated at other Swedish nuclear power industry sites, providing a broad-ranging analysis of opportunities across the industry to enhance safety culture. The introduction to this report contains an overview of safety culture, explains the background to the project and sets out the project rationale and objectives. The methodology used for understanding and analysing the important safety culture issues at each nuclear power site is then described. This section begins with a summary of the processes used in the information gathering and data analysis stage. The six components of the Management Workshops conducted at each site are then described. These workshops used a series of presentations, interactive events and group exercises to: (a) provide feedback to site managers on the safety culture and safety leadership issues identified at their site, and (b) stimulate further safety thinking and provide 'take-away' information and leadership strategies that could be applied to promote safety culture improvements. Section 3, project Findings, contains the main observations and output from the project. These include: - a brief overview of aspects of the local industry operating context that impinge on safety culture; - a summary of strengths or positive attributes observed within the safety culture of the Swedish nuclear industry; - a set of identified opportunities for further improvement; - the aggregated

  19. Improving patient safety culture in general practice: An interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verbakel (Natasha J.); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.J. Verheij; C. Wagner (Cordula); D.L.M. Zwart (Dorien Lyd Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground When improving patient safety a positive safety culture is key. As little is known about improving patient safety culture in primary care, this study examined whether administering a culture questionnaire with or without a complementary workshop could be used as an interventio

  20. Culture related to road traffic safety: a comparison of eight countries using two conceptualizations of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordfjærn, Trond; Şimşekoğlu, Özlem; Rundmo, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    The majority of previous cross-country studies of human factors relevant to traffic safety have not operationalized and measured culture. Also studies in this vein have mostly been carried out in Europe and the United States. The aim of the study was to examine country cluster differences, based on the Culture's Consequences framework, in road traffic risk perception, attitudes towards traffic safety and driver behaviour in samples from Norway, Russia, India, Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda, Turkey and Iran. An additional aim was to examine cluster differences in road traffic culture as symbol use and to investigate whether this theoretical cultural framework predicts risk perception, attitudes towards traffic safety and driver behaviour in the country clusters. The sample consisted of a total of 2418 individuals who were obtained by convenience sampling in the different countries. The countries segmented into four Culture's Consequences clusters; Norway, Russia and India, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Near East countries. The findings showed that Norwegians reported overall safer attitudes towards traffic safety and driver behaviour than the remaining country clusters. Individuals in Africa reported the highest risk perception. The countries also differed substantially in road traffic culture as symbol use. Contrary to established cultural theory, prediction models revealed that cultural factors were stronger predictors of driver behaviour than of risk perception. Also, the social cognitive risk constructs (i.e. risk perception and attitudes) solely explained variance in driver behaviour in the Norwegian and Russia/India clusters. Previous empirical efforts, which aimed to demonstrate that culture is important for the risk perception criterion, may have focused on a criterion variable that is not strongly related to driver behaviour. Furthermore, countermeasures aimed to influence social cognition may have stronger applicability in countries with a more individualistic western

  1. Cultural traits as units of analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Michael J.; Lyman, R. Lee; Mesoudi, Alex; VanPool, Todd L.

    2010-01-01

    Cultural traits have long been used in anthropology as units of transmission that ostensibly reflect behavioural characteristics of the individuals or groups exhibiting the traits. After they are transmitted, cultural traits serve as units of replication in that they can be modified as part of an individual's cultural repertoire through processes such as recombination, loss or partial alteration within an individual's mind. Cultural traits are analogous to genes in that organisms replicate them, but they are also replicators in their own right. No one has ever seen a unit of transmission, either behavioural or genetic, although we can observe the effects of transmission. Fortunately, such units are manifest in artefacts, features and other components of the archaeological record, and they serve as proxies for studying the transmission (and modification) of cultural traits, provided there is analytical clarity over how to define and measure the units that underlie this inheritance process. PMID:21041205

  2. Cultural traits as units of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Michael J; Lyman, R Lee; Mesoudi, Alex; VanPool, Todd L

    2010-12-12

    Cultural traits have long been used in anthropology as units of transmission that ostensibly reflect behavioural characteristics of the individuals or groups exhibiting the traits. After they are transmitted, cultural traits serve as units of replication in that they can be modified as part of an individual's cultural repertoire through processes such as recombination, loss or partial alteration within an individual's mind. Cultural traits are analogous to genes in that organisms replicate them, but they are also replicators in their own right. No one has ever seen a unit of transmission, either behavioural or genetic, although we can observe the effects of transmission. Fortunately, such units are manifest in artefacts, features and other components of the archaeological record, and they serve as proxies for studying the transmission (and modification) of cultural traits, provided there is analytical clarity over how to define and measure the units that underlie this inheritance process.

  3. Physician leadership: essential in creating a culture of safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Paul A

    2010-09-01

    Advances in patient safety require a receptive culture that values transparency, communication, and mutual respect. The Safety Attitude Questionnaire is an effective tool that can be used to assess the safety culture in a variety of clinical settings. Transformational leadership is essential in promoting a culture of safety. There are several strategies available to these leaders that will improve patient safety including Patient Safety Leadership Walkrounds, briefings, huddles, debriefings, and conflict resolution. Finally, leaders must maintain a "just culture" that recognizes most errors involve system deficiencies not human error and that disruptive behavior cannot be tolerated.

  4. The Impact of Information Culture on Patient Safety Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Santtu; Saranto, Kaija; Bates, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background An organization’s information culture and information management practices create conditions for processing patient information in hospitals. Information management incidents are failures that could lead to adverse events for the patient if they are not detected. Objectives To test a theoretical model that links information culture in acute care hospitals to information management incidents and patient safety outcomes. Methods Reason’s model for the stages of development of organizational accidents was applied. Study data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of 909 RNs who work in medical or surgical units at 32 acute care hospitals in Finland. Structural equation modeling was used to assess how well the hypothesized model fit the study data. Results Fit indices indicated a good fit for the model. In total, 18 of the 32 paths tested were statistically significant. Documentation errors had the strongest total effect on patient safety outcomes. Organizational guidance positively affected information availability and utilization of electronic patient records, whereas the latter had the strongest total effect on the reduction of information delays. Conclusions Patient safety outcomes are associated with information management incidents and information culture. Further, the dimensions of the information culture create work conditions that generate errors in hospitals.

  5. Strengthening leadership as a catalyst for enhanced patient safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Christensen, Karl Bang; Jaquet, Annette

    2016-01-01

    rated job satisfaction lower than the staff staying on (ppatient safety culture are remarkable, and imply that strengthening the leadership can act as a significant catalyst for patient safety culture improvement. Further studies using......OBJECTIVES: Current literature emphasises that clinical leaders are in a position to enable a culture of safety, and that the safety culture is a performance mediator with the potential to influence patient outcomes. This paper aims to investigate staff's perceptions of patient safety culture...... in a Danish psychiatric department before and after a leadership intervention. METHODS: A repeated cross-sectional experimental study by design was applied. In 2 surveys, healthcare staff were asked about their perceptions of the patient safety culture using the 7 patient safety culture dimensions...

  6. Evaluation of Patient Safety Culture and Organizational Culture as a Step in Patient Safety Improvement in a Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Afrisya Iriviranty; Dumilah Ayuningtyas; Misnaniarti Misnaniarti

    2016-01-01

    .... As such, assessment of patient safety culture in hospitals is of paramount importance. Patient safety culture is an inherent component of organizational culture, so that the study of organizational culture is required in developing patient safety...

  7. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire as a tool for benchmarking safety culture in the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, Jochen; Etchegaray, Jason; Petersen, Laura A; Sexton, J Bryan; Hysong, Sylvia J; Mei, Minghua; Thomas, Eric J

    2012-03-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) safety culture, as measured by the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), varies widely. Associations with clinical outcomes in the adult intensive care unit setting make the SAQ an attractive tool for comparing clinical performance between hospitals. Little information is available on the use of the SAQ for this purpose in the NICU setting. To determine whether the dimensions of safety culture measured by the SAQ give consistent results when used as a NICU performance measure. Cross-sectional survey of caregivers in 12 NICUs, using the six scales of the SAQ: teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition, perceptions of management and working conditions. NICUs were ranked by quantifying their contribution to overall risk-adjusted variation across the scales. Spearman rank correlation coefficients were used to test for consistency in scale performance. The authors then examined whether performance in the top four NICUs in one scale predicted top four performance in others. There were 547 respondents in 12 NICUs. Of 15 NICU-level correlations in performance ranking, two were >0.7, seven were between 0.4 and 0.69, and the six remaining were tool for comparative performance assessments among NICUs.

  8. Evaluation of the culture of safety: survey of clinicians and managers in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronovost, P J; Weast, B; Holzmueller, C G; Rosenstein, B J; Kidwell, R P; Haller, K B; Feroli, E R; Sexton, J B; Rubin, H R

    2003-12-01

    Despite the emphasis on patient safety in health care, few organizations have evaluated the extent to which safety is a strategic priority or their culture supports patient safety. In response to the Institute of Medicine's report and to an organizational commitment to patient safety, we conducted a systematic assessment of safety at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) and, from this, developed a strategic plan to improve safety. The specific aims of this study were to evaluate the extent to which the culture supports patient safety at JHH and the extent to which safety is a strategic priority. During July and August 2001 we implemented two surveys in disparate populations to assess patient safety. The Safety Climate Scale (SCS) was administered to a sample of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other ICU staff. SCS assesses perceptions of a strong and proactive organizational commitment to patient safety. The second survey instrument, called Strategies for Leadership (SLS), evaluated the extent to which safety was a strategic priority for the organization. This survey was administered to clinical and administrative leaders. We received 395 completed SCS surveys from 82% of the departments and 86% of the nursing units. Staff perceived that supervisors had a greater commitment to safety than senior leaders. Nurses had higher scores than physicians for perceptions of safety. Twenty three completed SLS surveys were received from 77% of the JHH Patient Safety Committee members and 50% of the JHH Management Committee members. Management Committee responses were more positive than Patient Safety Committee, indicating that management perceived safety efforts to be further developed. Strategic planning received the lowest scores from both committees. We believe this is one of the first large scale efforts to measure institutional culture of safety and then design improvements in health care. The survey results suggest that strategic planning of patient safety needs

  9. Multilevel psychometric properties of the AHRQ hospital survey on patient safety culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was designed to assess staff views on patient safety culture in hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the multilevel psychometric properties of the survey. Methods Survey data from 331 U.S. hospitals with 2,267 hospital units and 50,513 respondents were analyzed to examine the psychometric properties of the survey's items and composites. Item factor loadings, intraclass correlations (ICCs), design effects, internal consistency reliabilities, and multilevel confirmatory factor analyses (MCFA) were examined as well as intercorrelations among the survey's composites. Results Psychometric analyses confirmed the multilevel nature of the data at the individual, unit and hospital levels of analysis. Results provided overall evidence supporting the 12 dimensions and 42 items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture as having acceptable psychometric properties at all levels of analysis, with a few exceptions. The Staffing composite fell slightly below cutoffs in a number of areas, but is conceptually important given its impact on patient safety. In addition, one hospital-level model fit indicator for the Supervisor/Manager Expectations & Actions Promoting Patient Safety composite was low (CFI = .82), but all other psychometrics for this scale were good. Average dimension intercorrelations were moderate at .42 at the individual level, .50 at the unit level, and .56 at the hospital level. Conclusions Psychometric analyses conducted on a very large database of hospitals provided overall support for the patient safety culture dimensions and items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The survey's items and dimensions overall are psychometrically sound at the individual, unit, and hospital levels of analysis and can be used by researchers and hospitals interested in assessing patient safety culture

  10. [Out of hospital emergencies towards a safety culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-del Pozo, M I; Obón-Azuara, B; Valderrama-Rodríguez, M; Revilla-López, C; Brosed-Yuste, C; Fajardo-Trasobares, E; Garcés-Baquero, P; Mateo-Clavería, J; Molina-Estrada, I; Perona-Flores, N; Salcedo-de Dios, S; Tomé-Rey, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the degree of safety culture (CS) among healthcare professional workers of an out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service. Most patient safety studies have been conducted in relation to the hospital rather than pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services. The objective is to analyze the dimensions with lower scores in order to plan futures strategies. A descriptive study using the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) questionnaire. The questionnaire was delivered to all healthcare professionals workers of 061 Advanced Life Support Units of Aragón, during the month of August 2013. The response rate was 55%. Main strengths detected: an adequate number of staff (96%), good working conditions (89%), tasks supported from immediate superior (77%), teamwork climate (74%), and non-punitive environment to report adverse events (68%). Areas for improvement: insufficient training in patient safety (53%) and lack of feedback of incidents reported (50%). The opportunities for improvement identified focus on the training of professionals in order to ensure safer care, while extending the safety culture. Also, the implementation of a system of notification and registration of adverse events in the service is deemed necessary. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. A Computer Program for Assessing Nuclear Safety Culture Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kiyoon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Through several accidents of NPP including the Fukushima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernobyl accidents in 1986, a lack of safety culture was pointed out as one of the root cause of these accidents. Due to its latent influences on safety performance, safety culture has become an important issue in safety researches. Most of the researches describe how to evaluate the state of the safety culture of the organization. However, they did not include a possibility that the accident occurs due to the lack of safety culture. Because of that, a methodology for evaluating the impact of the safety culture on NPP's safety is required. In this study, the methodology for assessing safety culture impact is suggested and a computer program is developed for its application. SCII model which is the new methodology for assessing safety culture impact quantitatively by using PSA model. The computer program is developed for its application. This program visualizes the SCIs and the SCIIs. It might contribute to comparing the level of the safety culture among NPPs as well as improving the management safety of NPP.

  12. Patient safety culture in two Finnish state-run forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuosmanen, Anssi; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Eronen, Markku; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture refers to the way patient safety is regarded and implemented within an organization and the structures and procedures in place to support this. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient safety culture, identify areas for improvement, and establish a baseline for improving state hospitals in Finland. Cross-sectional design data were collected from two state-run forensic hospitals in Finland using an anonymous, Web-based survey targeted to hospital staff based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The response rate was 43% (n = 283). The overall patient safety level was rated as excellent or very good by 58% of respondents. The highest positive grade was for "teamwork within units" (72%). The lowest rating was for "nonpunitive response to errors" (26% positive). Good opportunities for supplementary education had a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on 9 of 12 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture dimensions. Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences in patient safety culture were also found in the staff's educational background, manager status, and between the two hospitals. These findings suggest there are a number of patient safety problems related to cultural dimensions. Supplementary education was shown to be a highly significant factor in transforming patient safety culture and should therefore be taken into account alongside sufficient resources.

  13. Effects of Implemented Initiatives on Patient Safety Culture in Fateme Al-zahra Hospital in Najafabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Izadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety improvement requires ongoing culture. This cultural change is the most important challenge that managers are faced with in creation of a safe system. This study aims to show the results of initiatives to improvement in patient safety culture in Fateme Al-zahra hospital. Method: In the quasi-experimental research, patient safety culture was measured using the Persian questionnaire on adaptation of the hospital survey on patient safety culture in 12 dimensions. The research was conducted before (January 2010 and after (September 2012 the improvement initiatives. In this study, all units were determined and no sampling method was used. Reliability of the questionnaire was tested by Alpha Chronbakh (0.83. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics indices and Independent T-Test by SPSS Software (version 18. Results: 350 questionnaires were distributed in each phaseand overall response rate was 58 and 56 percent, respectively. According to Independent T-test, Management expectations and actions, Organizational learning, Management support, Feedback and communication about error, Communication openness, Overall Perceptions of Safety, Non-punitive Response to Error, Frequency of Event Reporting, and Patient safety culture showed significant differences (P-value0.05. The mean score of Patient safety culture was 2.27 (from 5 and it was increased to 2.46 after initiatives that showed a significant difference (P-value<0.05. Conclusion: Although, improvement in patient safety culture needs teamwork and continuous attempts, the study showed that initiatives implemented in the case hospital had been effective in some dimensions. However, Teamwork within hospital units, Teamwork across units, Hospital handoffs and transitions, and Staffing dimensions were recognized for further intervention. Hospital could improve the patient safety culture with planning and measures in these dimensions.

  14. Predictors and outcomes of patient safety culture in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaafar Maha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing a patient safety culture was one of the recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine to assist hospitals in improving patient safety. In recent years, a multitude of evidence, mostly originating from developed countries, has been published on patient safety culture. One of the first efforts to assess the culture of safety in the Eastern Mediterranean Region was by El-Jardali et al. (2010 in Lebanon. The study entitled "The Current State of Patient Safety Culture: a study at baseline" assessed the culture of safety in Lebanese hospitals. Based on study findings, the objective of this paper is to explore the association between patient safety culture predictors and outcomes, taking into consideration respondent and hospital characteristics. In addition, it will examine the correlation between patient safety culture composites. Methods Sixty-eight hospitals and 6,807 respondents participated in the study. The study which adopted a cross sectional research design utilized an Arabic-translated version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC. The HSOPSC measures 12 patient safety composites. Two of the composites, in addition to a patient safety grade and the number of events reported, represented the four outcome variables. Bivariate and mixed model regression analyses were used to examine the association between the patient safety culture predictors and outcomes. Results Significant correlations were observed among all patient safety culture composites but with differences in the strength of the correlation. Generalized Estimating Equations for the patient safety composite scores and respondent and hospital characteristics against the patient safety grade and the number of events reported revealed significant correlations. Significant correlations were also observed by linear mixed models of the same variables against the frequency of events reported and the overall perception of safety

  15. A nationwide hospital survey on patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals: setting priorities at the launch of a 5-year patient safety plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree; Peleman, Hilde; Schrooten, Ward

    2012-09-01

    To measure patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals and to examine the homogeneous grouping of underlying safety culture dimensions. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed organisation-wide in 180 Belgian hospitals participating in the federal program on quality and safety between 2007 and 2009. Participating hospitals were invited to submit their data to a comparative database. Homogeneous groups of underlying safety culture dimensions were sought by hierarchical cluster analysis. 90 acute, 42 psychiatric and 11 long-term care hospitals submitted their data for comparison to other hospitals. The benchmark database included 55 225 completed questionnaires (53.7% response rate). Overall dimensional scores were low, although scores were found to be higher for psychiatric and long-term care hospitals than for acute hospitals. The overall perception of patient safety was lower in French-speaking hospitals. Hierarchical clustering of dimensions resulted in two distinct clusters. Cluster I grouped supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety, organisational learning-continuous improvement, teamwork within units and communication openness, while Cluster II included feedback and communication about error, overall perceptions of patient safety, non-punitive response to error, frequency of events reported, teamwork across units, handoffs and transitions, staffing and management support for patient safety. The nationwide safety culture assessment confirms the need for a long-term national initiative to improve patient safety culture and provides each hospital with a baseline patient safety culture profile to direct an intervention plan. The identification of clusters of safety culture dimensions indicates the need for a different approach and context towards the implementation of interventions aimed at improving the safety culture. Certain clusters require unit level improvements, whereas others demand a hospital-wide policy.

  16. Application of a Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program in critical care: the royal exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren E; Flanders, Sonya A

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the history of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) and how it is used to foster a culture of safety. CUSP involves interdisciplinary teamwork and empowers nurses at all levels to pioneer changes and develop leadership skills. A case study is presented to show how CUSP was used effectively in critical care to create a standardized handover of patients from the operating room to the intensive care unit.

  17. Evaluation of Patient Safety Culture and Organizational Culture as a Step in Patient Safety Improvement in a Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Afrisya Iriviranty; Dumilah Ayuningtyas; Misnaniarti Misnaniarti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Establishment of patient safety culture is the first step in the improvement of patient safety. As such, assessment of patient safety culture in hospitals is of paramount importance. Patient safety culture is an inherent component of organizational culture, so that the study of organizational culture is required in developing patient safety. This study aimed to evaluate patient safety culture among the clinical staff of a hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia and identify organizationa...

  18. Variation in emergency medical services workplace safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Huang, David T; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Simeone, Scott; Weaver, Matthew; Wang, Henry E

    2010-01-01

    Workplace attitude, beliefs, and culture may impact the safety of patient care. This study characterized perceptions of safety culture in a nationwide sample of emergency medical services (EMS) agencies. We conducted a cross-sectional survey involving 61 advanced life support EMS agencies in North America. We administered a modified version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), a survey instrument measuring dimensions of workplace safety culture (Safety Climate, Teamwork Climate, Perceptions of Management, Job Satisfaction, Working Conditions, and Stress Recognition). We included full-time and part-time paramedics and emergency medical technicians. We determined the variation in safety culture scores across EMS agencies. Using hierarchical linear models, we determined associations between safety culture scores and individual and EMS agency characteristics. We received 1,715 completed surveys from 61 EMS agencies (mean agency response rate 47%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 10%, 83%). There was wide variation in safety culture scores across EMS agencies [mean (minimum, maximum)]: Safety Climate 74.5 (min 49.9, max 89.7), Teamwork Climate 71.2 (min 45.1, max 90.1), Perceptions of Management 67.2 (min 31.1, max 92.2), Job Satisfaction 75.4 (min 47.5, max 93.8), Working Conditions 66.9 (min 36.6, max 91.4), and Stress Recognition 55.1 (min 31.3, max 70.6). Air medical EMS agencies tended to score higher across all safety culture domains. Lower safety culture scores were associated with increased annual patient contacts. Safety Climate domain scores were not associated with other individual or EMS agency characteristics. In this sample, workplace safety culture varies between EMS agencies.

  19. PATIENT SAFETY CULTURE AND PATIENT SAFETY IMPLEMENTATION IN STELLA MARIS HOSPITAL DURING NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE ERA

    OpenAIRE

    Rivai, Fridawaty

    2017-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety in hospital is influenced by several factors such as culture of patient safety. The aim of the research was to analyze the effect of patient safety culture on the implementation of patient safety in Stella Maris Hospital in 2016. The research was a quantitative studyusinganalytic operationaldesign withcross-sectional approach. The samples consisted of 234people selected using proportional stratified random sampling technique. The results of the research ...

  20. Assessing the relationship between patient safety culture and EHR strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric W; Silvera, Geoffrey A; Kazley, Abby S; Diana, Mark L; Huerta, Timothy R

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between hospitals' electronic health record (EHR) adoption characteristics and their patient safety cultures. The "Meaningful Use" (MU) program is designed to increase hospitals' adoption of EHR, which will lead to better care quality, reduce medical errors, avoid unnecessary cost, and promote a patient safety culture. To reduce medical errors, hospital leaders have been encouraged to promote safety cultures common to high-reliability organizations. Expecting a positive relationship between EHR adoption and improved patient safety cultures appears sound in theory, but it has yet to be empirically demonstrated. Design/methodology/approach - Providers' perceptions of patient safety culture and counts of patient safety incidents are explored in relationship to hospital EHR adoption patterns. Multi-level modeling is employed to data drawn from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's surveys on patient safety culture (level 1) and the American Hospital Association's survey and healthcare information technology supplement (level 2). Findings - The findings suggest that the early adoption of EHR capabilities hold a negative association to the number of patient safety events reported. However, this relationship was not present in providers' perceptions of overall patient safety cultures. These mixed results suggest that the understanding of the EHR-patient safety culture relationship needs further research. Originality/value - Relating EHR MU and providers' care quality attitudes is an important leading indicator for improved patient safety cultures. For healthcare facility managers and providers, the ability to effectively quantify the impact of new technologies on efforts to change organizational cultures is important for pinpointing clinical areas for process improvements.

  1. Applying importance-performance analysis to patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yii-Ching; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Hsieh, Wan-Lin; Weng, Shao-Jen; Hsieh, Liang-Po; Huang, Chih-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    The Sexton et al.'s (2006) safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) has been widely used to assess staff's attitudes towards patient safety in healthcare organizations. However, to date there have been few studies that discuss the perceptions of patient safety both from hospital staff and upper management. The purpose of this paper is to improve and to develop better strategies regarding patient safety in healthcare organizations. The Chinese version of SAQ based on the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation is used to evaluate the perceptions of hospital staff. The current study then lies in applying importance-performance analysis technique to identify the major strengths and weaknesses of the safety culture. The results show that teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition and working conditions are major strengths and should be maintained in order to provide a better patient safety culture. On the contrary, perceptions of management and hospital handoffs and transitions are important weaknesses and should be improved immediately. Research limitations/implications - The research is restricted in generalizability. The assessment of hospital staff in patient safety culture is physicians and registered nurses. It would be interesting to further evaluate other staff's (e.g. technicians, pharmacists and others) opinions regarding patient safety culture in the hospital. Few studies have clearly evaluated the perceptions of healthcare organization management regarding patient safety culture. Healthcare managers enable to take more effective actions to improve the level of patient safety by investigating key characteristics (either strengths or weaknesses) that healthcare organizations should focus on.

  2. Healthcare professionals’ views of feedback on patient safety culture assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Hendriks, M.; Hoogervorst-Schilp, J.; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: By assessing patient safety culture, healthcare providers can identify areas for improvement in patient safety culture. To achieve this, these assessment outcomes have to be relevant and presented clearly. The aim of our study was to explore healthcare professionals’ views on the feedbac

  3. Assessing patient safety culture in hospitals across countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Smits, M.; Sorra, J.; Huang, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is believed that in order to reduce the number of adverse events, hospitals have to stimulate a more open culture and reflective attitude towards errors and patient safety. The objective is to examine similarities and differences in hospital patient safety culture in three countries: t

  4. Assessing patient safety culture in hospitals across countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Smits, M.; Sorra, J.; Huang, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: It is believed that in order to reduce the number of adverse events, hospitals have to stimulate a more open culture and reflective attitude towards errors and patient safety. The objective is to examine similarities and differences in hospital patient safety culture in three countries: t

  5. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  6. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  7. Investigating the Relationship between Employee Safe Behavior and Safety Culture in a Livestock Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirazeh Arghami

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational incidents still account for a high percentage of causes of death and disability. A study was designed to determine the relationship between employee safe behavior and safety culture. Methods: In this analytical study, all employees of an industrial livestock units of Tehran participated (n = 200. The data on the employee behavior was evaluated using the safety sampling technique based on the ANSI Dangerous Acts List (Modified Form. A standard questionnaire was used to assess the safety culture. Data were analyzed by the SPSS software, at the significance level of 0.05. Results: The mean safety score of people (138 was acceptable. The rate of unsafe behaviors was 35%. The most unsafe behaviors were due to improper manual handling (83%. A reverse correlation between unsafe behavior and safety culture score (P value = 0.001 was seen. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that there is a significant negative reciprocal relationship between safety culture and unsafe behavior, that is, with the increase in the safety culture, the rate of unsafe behavior decreases. As a result, by promoting the level of safety culture, the rate of unsafe behavior can be reduced.

  8. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization.

  9. SAFETY CULTURE ASSESSMENT – OPTIMIZATION OF EXISTING PRACTICE

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    Mirela Valenta Grebenšek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving aviation safety has always been a priority for the aviation industry. While in recent decades the reliability of machinery and computers dramatically improved the reliability of the people and the organizational aspect of safety did not change much. Many of air accident investigations have shown that one of the causal factors, which increase the probability and severity of accidents, is exactly poor safety culture. The purpose of this paper is to present the concept of safety culture assessment and the overview and review of different methods of measuring the safety culture in aviation. This research provides the suggestion that by use of different methods of assessment (evaluation of the results, more credible insight into the level of safety culture in the organization can be obtained. It also provides an understanding of how measurement systems in order to guide future performance can be used proactively.

  10. Child care work. Organizational culture and health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabro, K S; Bright, K A; Cole, F L; Mackey, T; Lindenberg, J; Grimm, A

    2000-10-01

    A nonrandom sample of child care workers was surveyed to assess whether child care work represented an "at risk" health and safety culture and to measure the organizational dimensions contributing to the health and safety culture. The child care workers in Houston, Texas, were surveyed by mail, using an instrument developed by the research team. The sample population represented 34 child care centers (n = 240 respondents). The analysis yielded five factors related to determinants of health and safety culture. The participants had a favorable perception of the five health and safety determinants. The participants also reported high levels of injury and illness in their environments, suggesting a less than favorable situation. A culture, work, and health model was useful in examining the relationship between health and safety and organizational culture.

  11. The perception of safety culture among nurses in a tertiary hospital in Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonazi, Aisha A; Saeed, Elshazaly; Mohamed, Sarar

    2016-01-01

    Developing a patient safety culture was one of the recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to assist hospitals in improving patient safety. Nurses are the key to safety improvements in hospitals. It is necessary to know their awareness and perception regarding institutional safety climate. The aim of this study is to explore perceptions of patient safety among nursing staff in a tertiary hospital in Central Saudi Arabia in different discipline units. The current study was conducted at Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), a tertiary center in Riyadh, Central Saudi Arabia. In November 2014, five hundred nurses were randomly selected to participate in this study. A survey questionnaire with Likert scale was adopted covering characteristics of participants together with their views on patient safety issues. Two hundred and twenty-four participants filled the questionnaire with a response rate of 44.8%. The overall perception of patient safety among participants was (57.9%). The majority (74.1%) thought that the existing system is good at preventing errors and only one third indicated that they have patient safety problems. Most of the participants were happy with the existing patient safety culture including organizational learning/continuous improvement (95.5%), and errors feedback and communication (76.64%). In conclusion, this study showed that perception of patient safety was sub-optimal among nurses and there are several areas for improvement regarding safety culture. PMID:28096559

  12. Event Safety-A Culture of Responsibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Alexander Buschhoff

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the author introduces the concept of events and the importance of safety. And what is emphasized is that guests must set up the safety awareness in the process of the implementation of the safety, to ensure that every guest can move in the area according to their will, and won't produce any risk.

  13. Patient Safety Culture: Nurses’ Attitude in Marvdasht Shahid Motahary Hospital, 1392

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Improving the safety culture has been implemented as a key strategy to improve patient safety in health care systems. Several surveys have shown that assessment of patient safety attitude and examining to what extent these attitudes exist could be used as an effective tool for promoting patient safety and such data meet the managers’ information needs over time. Thus, considering the importance of patient safety as a basic principle in improving the quality of clinical services and patient satisfaction, this study was aimed to examine nurse’s attitudes towards the safety culture. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study the study population included nurses who were working in Marvdasht Shahid Motahary hospital, 2013. The sample size was selected by using a stratified randomization method as 114. The data were collected through HSOPSC questionnaire that has been introduced by the Health Care Research and Quality agency in 2004. The questionnaire is composed of eight parts. One part is about demographic and career information and other parts are about different dimensions of the patient safety culture. The collected data were then analyzed using the SPSS software and descriptive statistical tests. Results: The obtained results showed that the manager and supervisor expectations and actions in order to promote patient safety and the overall understanding of patient safety dimensions received the highest rating. On the other hand, staffing and non-punitive response to errors dimensions received the lowest score among the 12 dimensions of patient safety culture. Nonetheless, 44% of the studied population considered the patient safety status in their units as acceptable. However, 39% of the population had not reported any errors in the past 12 months. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, the need to improve the safety culture at different dimensions seems necessary. Also, the culture of error reporting

  14. Disentangling the roles of safety climate and safety culture: Multi-level effects on the relationship between supervisor enforcement and safety compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitta, Laura; Probst, Tahira M; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Ghezzi, Valerio

    2017-02-01

    Despite increasing attention to contextual effects on the relationship between supervisor enforcement and employee safety compliance, no study has yet explored the conjoint influence exerted simultaneously by organizational safety climate and safety culture. The present study seeks to address this literature shortcoming. We first begin by briefly discussing the theoretical distinctions between safety climate and culture and the rationale for examining these together. Next, using survey data collected from 1342 employees in 32 Italian organizations, we found that employee-level supervisor enforcement, organizational-level safety climate, and autocratic, bureaucratic, and technocratic safety culture dimensions all predicted individual-level safety compliance behaviors. However, the cross-level moderating effect of safety climate was bounded by certain safety culture dimensions, such that safety climate moderated the supervisor enforcement-compliance relationship only under the clan-patronage culture dimension. Additionally, the autocratic and bureaucratic culture dimensions attenuated the relationship between supervisor enforcement and compliance. Finally, when testing the effects of technocratic safety culture and cooperative safety culture, neither safety culture nor climate moderated the relationship between supervisor enforcement and safety compliance. The results suggest a complex relationship between organizational safety culture and safety climate, indicating that organizations with particular safety cultures may be more likely to develop more (or less) positive safety climates. Moreover, employee safety compliance is a function of supervisor safety leadership, as well as the safety climate and safety culture dimensions prevalent within the organization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A culture of safety: a business strategy for medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, James W; Finkelstein, Maggie M; Marles, Adam F

    2012-01-01

    Physician practices can enhance their economics by taking patient safety to a new level within their practices. Patient safety has a lot to do with systems and processes that occur not only at the hospital but also within a physician's practice. Historically, patient safety measures have been hospital-focused and -driven, largely due to available resources; however, physician practices can impact patient safety, efficiently and effectively, with a methodical plan involving assessment, prioritization, and compliance. With the ever-increasing focus of reimbursement on quality and patient safety, physician practices that implement a true culture of safety now could see future economic benefits using this business strategy.

  16. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant

  17. Measuring Safety Culture on Ships Using Safety Climate: A Study among Indian Officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogendra Bhattacharya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Workplace safety continues to be an area of concern in the maritime industry due to the international nature of the operations. The effectiveness of extensive legislation to manage shipboard safety remains in doubt. The focus must therefore shift towards the human element - seafarers and their perceptions of safety. The study aims to understand the alignment that exists between safety culture and safety climate on board ships as perceived by seafarers. The underlying factors of safety climate were identified using factor analysis which isolated seven factors - Support on Safety, Organizational Support, Resource Availability, Work Environment, Job Demands, ‘Just’ Culture, and Safety Compliance. The perception of safety level of seafarers was found to be low indicating the existence of misalignments between safety culture values and the actual safety climate. The study also reveals that the safety perceptions of officers employed directly by ship owners and those by managers do not differ significantly, nor do they differ between senior and junior officers. A shift in perspective towards how seafarers themselves feel towards safety might provide more effective solutions – instead of relying on regulations - and indeed aid in reducing incidents on board. This paper details practical suggestions on how to identify the factors that contribute towards a better safety climate on board ships.

  18. Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Initial Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth; Kear, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety culture has been studied in many practice settings, but there is a dearth of information on the culture of safety in nephrology nurse practice settings. This research study employed the use of an online survey to assess patient safety cultures in nephrology nurse practice settings. The survey was created using items from two Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) survey assessment tools--the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Select items from these tools were combined to address the safety of care delivered in hospital and outpatient nephrology nurse practice settings. Almost 1,000 nephrology nurses responded to the survey. Analysis of results and comparison with AHRQ comparative data found high ratings for teamwork, but indicted a continued needfor additional education and attention related to hand hygiene, medication administration safety, communication, and prioritization in nephrology practice settings. Nurses in all nephrology nurse practice settings need to routinely assess and positively contribute to the culture of patient safety in their practice settings, and lead and engage in efforts to ensure that patients are safe.

  19. Creating a culture for health care quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Velma; Perryman, Martha M

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 67% of hospital quality indicators require some type of laboratory testing to monitor compliance. Unfortunately, in many hospitals, laboratory data information systems remain an untapped resource in eliminating medical errors and improving patient safety. Using case scenarios, this article demonstrates potential consequences for patient safety and quality of care when information sharing between medical technologists and nurses is not a part of a hospital's culture. The outcome for this patient could have been avoided if a more inclusive health care quality and safety culture existed. Creating a culture for health care quality and safety requires consensus building by clinical and administrative leaders. Consensus building occurs by managing relationships among and between a team of independent, autonomous physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, and health care administrators. These relationships are built on mutual respect and effective communication. Creating a quality culture is a challenging but necessary prerequisite for eliminating medical errors and ensuring patient safety. Physician leaders promoting and advancing cultural change in clinical care from one of exclusive decision making authority to a culture that is based on shared decision making are a necessary first step. Shared decision making requires mutual respect, trust, confidentiality, responsiveness, empathy, effective listening, and communication among all clinical team members. Physician and administrative leaders with a focus on patient safety and a willingness to change will ensure a culture of health care quality and safety.

  20. Measuring and comparing safety climate in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Daniel J; Greevy, Robert A; Liu, Xulei; Burgess, Hayley; Dittus, Robert S; Weinger, Matthew B; Speroff, Theodore

    2010-03-01

    Learning about the factors that influence safety climate and improving the methods for assessing relative performance among hospital or units would improve decision-making for clinical improvement. To measure safety climate in intensive care units (ICU) owned by a large for-profit integrated health delivery systems; identify specific provider, ICU, and hospital factors that influence safety climate; and improve the reporting of safety climate data for comparison and benchmarking. We administered the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to clinicians, staff, and administrators in 110 ICUs from 61 hospitals. A total of 1502 surveys (43% response) from physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, mangers, and other ancillary providers. The survey measured safety climate across 6 domains: teamwork climate; safety climate; perceptions of management; job satisfaction; working conditions; and stress recognition. Percentage of positive scores, mean scores, unadjusted random effects, and covariate-adjusted random effect were used to rank ICU performance. The cohort was characterized by a positive safety climate. Respondents scored perceptions of management and working conditions significantly lower than the other domains of safety climate. Respondent job type was significantly associated with safety climate and domain scores. There was modest agreement between ranking methodologies using raw scores and random effects. The relative proportion of job type must be considered before comparing safety climate results across organizational units. Ranking methodologies based on raw scores and random effects are viable for feedback reports. The use of covariate-adjusted random effects is recommended for hospital decision-making.

  1. Cultural safety as an ethic of care: a praxiological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEldowney, Rose; Connor, Margaret J

    2011-10-01

    New writings broadening the construct of cultural safety, a construct initiated in Aotearoa New Zealand, are beginning to appear in the literature. Therefore, it is considered timely to integrate these writings and advance the construct into a new theoretical model. The new model reconfigures the constructs of cultural safety and cultural competence as an ethic of care informed by a postmodern perspective. Central to the new model are three interwoven, co-occurring components: an ethic of care, which unfolds within a praxiological process shaped by the context. Context is expanded through identifying the three concepts of relationality, generic competence, and collectivity, which are integral to each client-nurse encounter. The competence associated with cultural safety as an ethic of care is always in the process of development. Clients and nurses engage in a dialogue to establish the level of cultural safety achieved at given points in a care trajectory.

  2. Does lean management improve patient safety culture? An extensive evaluation of safety culture in a radiotherapy institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Pascale A M; Houben, Ruud; Vlayen, Annemie; Hellings, Johan; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Marneffe, Wim; Vandijck, Dominique

    2015-02-01

    The importance of a safety culture to maximize safety is no longer questioned. However, achieving sustainable culture improvements are less evident. Evidence is growing for a multifaceted approach, where multiple safety interventions are combined. Lean management is such an integral approach to improve safety, quality and efficiency and therefore, could be expected to improve the safety culture. This paper presents the effects of lean management activities on the patient safety culture in a radiotherapy institute. Patient safety culture was evaluated over a three year period using triangulation of methodologies. Two surveys were distributed three times, workshops were performed twice, data from an incident reporting system (IRS) was monitored and results were explored using structured interviews with professionals. Averages, chi-square, logistical and multi-level regression were used for analysis. The workshops showed no changes in safety culture, whereas the surveys showed improvements on six out of twelve dimensions of safety climate. The intention to report incidents not reaching patient-level decreased in accordance with the decreasing number of reports in the IRS. However, the intention to take action in order to prevent future incidents improved (factorial survey presented β: 1.19 with p: 0.01). Due to increased problem solving and improvements in equipment, the number of incidents decreased. Although the intention to report incidents not reaching patient-level decreased, employees experienced sustained safety awareness and an increased intention to structurally improve. The patient safety culture improved due to the lean activities combined with an organizational restructure, and actual patient safety outcomes might have improved as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Status of patient safety culture in Arab countries: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almashrafi, Ahmed; Banarsee, Ricky

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To explore the status of patient safety culture in Arab countries based on the findings of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSPSC). Design Systematic review. Methods We performed electronic searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ProQuest and PsychINFO, Google Scholar and PubMed databases, with manual searches of bibliographies of included articles and key journals. We included studies that were conducted in the Arab countries that were focused on patient safety culture. 2 reviewers independently verified that the studies met the inclusion criteria and critically assessed the quality of the studies. Results 18 studies met our inclusion criteria. The review identified that non-punitive response to error is seen as a serious issue which needs to be improved. Healthcare professionals in the Arab countries tend to think that a ‘culture of blame’ still exists that prevents them from reporting incidents. We found an overall similarity between the reported composite score for dimension of teamwork within units in all of the reviewed studies. Teamwork within units was found to be better than teamwork across hospital units. All of the reviewed studies reported that organisational learning and continuous improvement was satisfactory as the average score of this dimension for all studies was 73.2%. Moreover, the review found that communication openness seems to be a concerning issue for healthcare professionals in the Arab countries. Conclusions There is a need to promote patient safety culture as a strategy for improving the patient safety in the Arab world. Improving patient safety culture should include all stakeholders, like policymakers, healthcare providers and those responsible for medical education. This review was limited only to English language publications. The varied settings in which the HSPSC was used may have influenced the areas of strengths and weaknesses as healthcare workers' perception of safety culture may differ. PMID

  4. Safety Cultures in Water-Based Outdoor Activities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren; Arvidsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the study Safe in Nature (Tryg i naturen) in which the aim was to analyze and discuss risk and safety related to outdoor recreation in the coastal regions of Denmark. A cultural perspective is applied to risk management and the safety cultures related to three selected...... water-based outdoor activities: small boat fishing, sea kayaking, and kite surfing. The theoretical framework used was cultural analysis and the methodological approach was mixed methods using case studies with survey and qualitative interviews. The study indicates that safety is a complex matter...

  5. The effect of organisational culture on patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gerri; McCaughan, Dorothy

    This article explores the links between organisational culture and patient safety. The key elements associated with a safety culture, most notably effective leadership, good teamwork, a culture of learning and fairness, and fostering patient-centred care, are discussed. The broader aspects of a systems approach to promoting quality and safety, with specific reference to clinical governance, human factors, and ergonomics principles and methods, are also briefly explored, particularly in light of the report of the public inquiry into care failings at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust.

  6. [Quality management and safety culture in medicine: context and concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischet, Werner; Eitzinger, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    The publication of the IOM report "To err is human: building a safer health system" in 1999 put spotlight on the primacy of the principle of primum non nocere and made patient safety a central topic of quality management. A key conclusion of the report was the need for a well-developed safety culture. While concepts of quality management have evolved along the lines of ISO and Total Quality Management over the last decades patient safety still has not got the same amount of attention (PubMed). Evidence from other safety-critical areas but also from the field of medicine itself suggests that an efficient culture of safety is a conditio sine qua non for the sustainable improvement of patient safety. Considering these arguments the present paper aims at emphasizing the importance of an efficient culture of safety for patient safety and quality management in healthcare. In addition, key instruments of safety culture as well as their limitations will be presented.

  7. The culture of patient safety from the perspective of the pediatric emergency nursing team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taise Rocha Macedo

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the patient safety culture in pediatric emergencies from the perspective of the nursing team. METHOD A quantitative, cross-sectional survey research study with a sample composed of 75 professionals of the nursing team. Data was collected between September and November 2014 in three Pediatric Emergency units by applying the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument. Data were submitted to descriptive analysis. RESULTS Strong areas for patient safety were not found, with areas identified having potential being: Expectations and actions from supervisors/management to promote patient safety and teamwork. Areas identified as critical were: Non-punitive response to error and support from hospital management for patient safety. The study found a gap between the safety culture and pediatric emergencies, but it found possibilities of transformation that will contribute to the safety of pediatric patients. CONCLUSION Nursing professionals need to become protagonists in the process of replacing the current paradigm for a culture focused on safety. The replication of this study in other institutions is suggested in order to improve the current health care scenario.

  8. Enculturation of unsafe attitudes and behaviors: student perceptions of safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Chelsea; Neeman, Naama; Sehgal, Niraj L

    2013-06-01

    Safety culture may exert an important influence on the adoption and learning of patient safety practices by learners at clinical training sites. This study assessed students' perceptions of safety culture and identified curricular gaps in patient safety training. A total of 170 fourth-year medical students at the University of California, San Francisco, were asked to complete a modified version of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture in 2011. Students responded on the basis of either their third-year internal medicine or surgery clerkship experience. Responses were recorded on a five-point Likert scale. Percent positive responses were compared between the groups using a chi-square test. One hundred twenty-one students (71% response rate) rated "teamwork within units" and "organizational learning" highest among the survey domains; "communication openness" and "nonpunitive response to error" were rated lowest. A majority of students reported that they would not speak up when witnessing a possible adverse event (56%) and were afraid to ask questions if things did not seem right (55%). In addition, 48% of students reported feeling that mistakes were held against them. Overall, students reported a desire for additional patient safety training to enhance their educational experience. Assessing student perceptions of safety culture highlighted important observations from their clinical experiences and helped identify areas for curricular development to enhance patient safety. This assessment may also be a useful tool for both clerkship directors and clinical service chiefs in their respective efforts to promote safe care.

  9. Multilevel psychometric properties of the AHRQ hospital survey on patient safety culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorra Joann S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was designed to assess staff views on patient safety culture in hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the multilevel psychometric properties of the survey. Methods Survey data from 331 U.S. hospitals with 2,267 hospital units and 50,513 respondents were analyzed to examine the psychometric properties of the survey's items and composites. Item factor loadings, intraclass correlations (ICCs, design effects, internal consistency reliabilities, and multilevel confirmatory factor analyses (MCFA were examined as well as intercorrelations among the survey's composites. Results Psychometric analyses confirmed the multilevel nature of the data at the individual, unit and hospital levels of analysis. Results provided overall evidence supporting the 12 dimensions and 42 items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture as having acceptable psychometric properties at all levels of analysis, with a few exceptions. The Staffing composite fell slightly below cutoffs in a number of areas, but is conceptually important given its impact on patient safety. In addition, one hospital-level model fit indicator for the Supervisor/Manager Expectations & Actions Promoting Patient Safety composite was low (CFI = .82, but all other psychometrics for this scale were good. Average dimension intercorrelations were moderate at .42 at the individual level, .50 at the unit level, and .56 at the hospital level. Conclusions Psychometric analyses conducted on a very large database of hospitals provided overall support for the patient safety culture dimensions and items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The survey's items and dimensions overall are psychometrically sound at the individual, unit, and hospital levels of analysis and can be used by researchers and hospitals interested in assessing

  10. Safety culture assessment among laboratory personnel of a petrochemical company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shekari

    2014-05-01

    .Conclusion: Strong and positive safety culture among laboratory personnel would prevent incidence of many occupational accidents. In another word, it would help organizations to facilitate access to higher standards.

  11. Developing safety culture-rocket science or common sense?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    Despite evidence of significant management contributions to the causes of major accidents, recent events at Millstone Nuclear Power Station in the US and Ontario Hydro in Canada might lead one to conclude that the significance of safety culture, and the role of management in developing and maintaining an appropriate safety culture, is either not being understood or not being taken serious as integral to the safe operation of some complex, high-reliability operations. It is the purpose of this paper to address four aspects of management that are particularly important to safety culture, and to illustrate how development of an appropriate safety culture is more a matter of common sense than rocket science.

  12. Safety Culture : analyse van de kosten en baten : eindrapport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozuwa, J.; Gort, J.; Koningsveld, E.; Devillers, E.; Smit, G.

    2004-01-01

    In opdracht van het Ministerie van Verkeer en Waterstaat (Direcoraat Generaal Goederenvervoer, Directie Transportveiligheid) hebben ECORYS Transport en TNO Arbeid onderzoek verricht om naast de maatschappelijke effecten inzicht te geven in de bedrijfseconomische effecten van Safety Culture. Op basis

  13. Relationship between organisational safety culture dimensions and crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmazyar, Sakineh; Mortazavi, Seyed Bagher; Arghami, Shirazeh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Knowing about organisational safety culture in public transportation system can provide an appropriate guide to establish effective safety measures and interventions to improve safety at work. The aim of this study was investigation of association between safety culture dimensions (leadership styles and company values, usage of crashes information and prevention programmes, management commitment and safety policy, participation and control) with involved self-reported crashes. The associations were considered through Spearman correlation, Pearson chi-square test and logistic regression. The results showed an association among self-reported crashes (occurrence or non-occurrence) and factors including leadership styles and company values; management commitment and safety policy; and control. Moreover, it was found a negative correlation and an odds ratio less than one between control and self-reported crashes.

  14. Information security as part of the nuclear safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitnica, A., E-mail: demetrkj@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Co., 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    No industry, organization, individual or even the government is immune to the information security risks which are associated with nuclear power. It can no longer be ignored, delayed or treated as unimportant. Nuclear safety is paramount to our industry, and cyber security must be woven into the fabric of our safety culture in order to succeed. Achieving this in an environment which has remained relatively unchanged and conservative prior to digitalisation demands a shift in behavior and culture. (Author)

  15. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period.

  16. Attitude is everything? The impact of workload, safety climate, and safety tools on medical errors: a study of intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyrer, Johannes; Schiffinger, Michael; Huber, Clemens; Valentin, Andreas; Strunk, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals face an increasing pressure toward efficiency and cost reduction while ensuring patient safety. This warrants a closer examination of the trade-off between production and protection posited in the literature for a high-risk hospital setting (intensive care). On the basis of extant literature and concepts on both safety management and organizational/safety culture, this study investigates to which extent production pressure (i.e., increased staff workload and capacity utilization) and safety culture (consisting of safety climate among staff and safety tools implemented by management) influence the occurrence of medical errors and if/how safety climate and safety tools interact. A prospective, observational, 48-hour cross-sectional study was conducted in 57 intensive care units. The dependent variable is the incidence of errors affecting those 378 patients treated throughout the entire observation period. Capacity utilization and workload were measured by indicators such as unit occupancy, nurse-to-patient/physician-to-patient ratios, levels of care, or NEMS scores. The safety tools considered include Critical Incidence Reporting Systems, audits, training, mission statements, SOPs/checklists, and the use of barcodes. Safety climate was assessed using a psychometrically validated four-dimensional questionnaire.Linear regression was employed to identify the effects of the predictor variables on error rate as well as interaction effects between safety tools and safety climate. Higher workload has a detrimental effect on safety, whereas safety climate-unlike the examined safety tools-has a virtually equal opposite effect. Correlations between safety tools and safety climate as well as their interaction effects on error rate are mostly nonsignificant. Increased workload and capacity utilization increase the occurrence of medical error, an effect that can be offset by a positive safety climate but not by formally implemented safety procedures and policies.

  17. Improving Patient Safety Culture in Primary Care: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J. M.; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient safety culture, described as shared values, attitudes and behavior of staff in a health-care organization, gained attention as a subject of study as it is believed to be related to the impact of patient safety improvements. However, in primary care, it is yet unknown, which effec

  18. Variations in hospital worker perceptions of safety culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Nap, Raoul E.; Johnson, Addie

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To compare the attitudes toward and perceptions of institutional practices that can influence patient safety between all professional groups at a university medical center. Design. A questionnaire measuring nine dimensions of organizational and safety culture was distributed to all hospit

  19. Assessing safety culture in NICU: psychometric properties of the Italian version of Safety Attitude Questionnaire and result implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenere, Alessandra; Zanolin, M Elisabetta; Negri, Roberta; Moretti, Francesca; Grassi, Mario; Tardivo, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are a high-risk setting. The Safety Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ) is a widely used tool to measure safety culture. The aims of the study are to verify the psychometric properties of the Italian version of SAQ, to evaluate safety culture in the NICUs and to identify improvement interventions. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 6 level III NICUs. The SAQ was translated into Italian and adapted to the context, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed to validate the questionnaire. 193 questionnaires were collected. The mean response rate was 59.7% (range 44.5%-95.7%). The answers were analysed according to six factors: f1 - teamwork climate, f2 - safety climate, f3 - job satisfaction, f4 - stress recognition, f5 - perception of management, f6 - working conditions. The CFA indexes were adequate (McDonald's omega indexes varied from 0.74 to 0.94, the SRMR index was equal to 0.79 and the RMSEA index was 0.070, 95% CI = 0.063-0.078). The mean composite score was 57.6 (SD 17.9), ranging between 42.3 and 69.7 on a standardized 100-point scale. We highlighted significant differences among units and professions (P tool to evaluate and compare the safety culture in the NICUs. The obtained scores significantly varied both within and among the NICUs. The organizational and structural characteristics of the involved hospitals probably affect the safety culture perception by the staff. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Comparative Qualitative Research Distinguishing Safety Features Among Aviation Safety Action Programs in the United States Airlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilakalapudi, Naga Swathi Kiran

    Over the years, aviation safety has been influenced by continuous implementations of both proactive and reactive policies by both regulatory boards and also, aviation service providers. This achievement has been possible mainly because of the safety management tools like the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP) which derives its roots from the much earlier Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) provides guidelines and procedures for installation and development of an ASAP, for every airline in the United States. In this study, how different United States air carriers apply ASAP in their organizations is investigated.

  1. [Patient safety culture - knowledge and knowledge needs of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toennessen, B; Swart, E; Marx, Y

    2013-12-01

    Ten years after the publication of "To Err is Human" in November1999, the development of patient safety efforts has been summa-rised in the statement "Ten years later, a million lives lost, billions of dollars wasted." This leads to the question why, despite evidence-based mea-sures for greater patient safety, they are not implemented or only implemented on a small scale. One approach to promote patient safety is the implementation of a safety culture. Such a safety culture is based on knowledge of employees about safe behaviour and their willingness to implement it. In this context it is interesting to explore the knowledge and the needs of medical students concerning patient safety. At the University of -Magdeburg 354 medical students in their clinical semesters were asked about their knowledge of specific recommendations on patient safety and about their attitude to patient safety and risk man-agement as well as their subjective need for knowledge on this subject. Only 16.7 % of the PJ (practical year) students and 11.7 % of students in all other clinical semester indicated to know the recommenda-tions for patient safety. This correlated with the answers to questions about single recommenda-tions. The importance of risk management during medical education was considered to be important by 53.3 % of the students of all clinical semesters and in particular 80.6 % of the surveyed PJ students. The answers to most questions showed a high demand for general information on patient safety. This is seen throughout all questions, especially with increasing clinical experience, and the need for information on single recommendations, such as critical incident reporting systems (CIRS), or Team Time Out. The establishment of a safety culture is described as a useful way to fewer patient injuries. This includes knowledge on recommendations for patient safety, which may contribute to the implementation of a safety culture to reduce medical errors. Our survey shows the

  2. A multilevel model of patient safety culture: cross-level relationship between organizational culture and patient safety behavior in Taiwan's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Chi; Ng, Hui-Fuang; Li, Hung-Hui

    2012-01-01

    As health-care organizations endeavor to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. The main objective of this study was to investigate the cross-level influences of organizational culture on patient safety behavior in Taiwan's hospitals. The authors measured organizational culture (bureaucratic, supportive and innovative culture), patient safety culture and behavior from 788 hospital workers among 42 hospitals in Taiwan. Multilevel analysis was applied to explore the relationship between organizational culture (group level) and patient safety behavior (individual level). Patient safety culture had positive impact on patient safety behavior in Taiwan's hospitals. The results also indicated that bureaucratic, innovative and supportive organizational cultures all had direct influence on patient safety behavior. However, only supportive culture demonstrated significant moderation effect on the relationship between patient safety culture and patient safety behavior. Furthermore, organizational culture strength was shown correlated negatively with patient safety culture variability. Overall, organizational culture plays an important role in patient safety activities. Safety behaviors of hospital staff are partly influenced by the prevailing cultural norms in their organizations and work groups. For management implications, constructed patient priority from management commitment to leadership is necessary. For academic implications, research on patient safety should consider leadership, group dynamics and organizational learning. These factors are important for understanding the barriers and the possibilities embedded in patient safety. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Globalization and the cultural safety of an immigrant Muslim community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Cynthia

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a study the aim of which was to further understanding of cultural safety by focusing on the social health of a small immigrant community of Muslims in a relatively homogeneous region of Canada following the terror attacks on 11 September 2001 (9/11). The aftermath of 9/11 negatively affected Muslims living in many centers of Western Europe and North America. Little is known about the social health of Muslims in smaller areas with little cultural diversity. Developed by Maori nurses, the cultural safety concept captures the negative health effects of inequities experienced by the indigenous people of New Zealand. Nurses in Canada have used the concept to understand the health of Aboriginal peoples. It has also been used to investigate the nursing care of immigrants in a Canadian metropolitan centre. Findings indicated, however, that the dichotomy between culturally safe and unsafe groups was blurred. The methodology was qualitative, based on the constructivist paradigm. A purposive sample of 26 Muslims of Middle Eastern, Indian or Pakistani origin and residing in the province of New Brunswick, Canada were interviewed in 2002-2003. Findings. Participants experienced a sudden transition from cultural safety to cultural risk following 9/11. Their experience of cultural safety included a sense of social integration in the community and invisibility as a minority. Cultural risk stemmed from being in the spotlight of an international media and becoming a visible minority. Cultural risk is not necessarily rooted in historical events and may be generated by outside forces rather than by longstanding inequities in relationships between groups within the community. Nurses need to think about the cultural safety of their practices when caring for members of socially disadvantaged cultural minority groups as this may affect the health services delivered to them.

  4. Organizational safety culture and medical error reporting by Israeli nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ilya; Barnoy, Sivia

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association between patient safety culture (PSC) and the incidence and reporting rate of medical errors by Israeli nurses. Self-administered structured questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 247 registered nurses enrolled in training programs at Tel Aviv University (response rate = 91%). The questionnaire's three sections examined the incidence of medication mistakes in clinical practice, the reporting rate for these errors, and the participants' views and perceptions of the safety culture in their workplace at three levels (organizational, departmental, and individual performance). Pearson correlation coefficients, t tests, and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Most nurses encountered medical errors from a daily to a weekly basis. Six percent of the sample never reported their own errors, while half reported their own errors "rarely or sometimes." The level of PSC was positively and significantly correlated with the error reporting rate. PSC, place of birth, error incidence, and not having an academic nursing degree were significant predictors of error reporting, together explaining 28% of variance. This study confirms the influence of an organizational safety climate on readiness to report errors. Senior healthcare executives and managers can make a major impact on safety culture development by creating and promoting a vision and strategy for quality and safety and fostering their employees' motivation to implement improvement programs at the departmental and individual level. A positive, carefully designed organizational safety culture can encourage error reporting by staff and so improve patient safety. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Attitudes to safety culture among professional divers and offshore workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, L.M.; Adie, W.; Cairns, J.

    2003-07-01

    This report investigates the importance professional divers and offshore workers give to safety culture in reducing accident probability. Using a conjoint analysis method 'accident risk' scenarios were used to estimate weights for influence of safety culture, quality of workplace supervision, time pressure and worker competency. The 'expected' weighting, if all factors were equally significant was 1.0 for each factor. All four factors contributed significantly to participants' assessment of accident probability but highest weighting was given to quality of supervision (1.48). Safety culture was given significantly lower weighting by offshore divers (0.74) than offshore workers (0.97). Time/financial pressure and worker competency were given close to expected weightings. Weightings were not influenced by supervisory status, accident history or being in current offshore industry employment. Participants were also asked to define safety culture in their own words. Definitions of safety culture were associated with the role of the organisation/company, the role of management, individual safety awareness, equipment and team/group interaction. (author)

  6. New Institutional Theory and a Culture of Safety in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Brandi; Nonnenmann, Matthew W

    2017-01-01

    Health and safety professionals often call for an improved safety culture in agriculture. Such a shift would result in agricultural practices that prioritize safe work habits and see safety as both an effective means to improve production and a goal worth pursuing in its own right. This article takes an anthropological approach and demonstrates the potential for new institutional theory to conceptualize broader cultural change in agriculture. New institutional theory examines the roles of organizations and the ways that they inform and support broad social institutions. Using preliminary data from the agricultural lending industry in Iowa and integrated poultry production in Texas, this article considers the ability of these organizations to contribute to systemic change and an improved culture of safety in agriculture.

  7. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Hauptmanns, Ulrich [Department of Plant Design and Safety, Otto-Von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  8. A Socio-cultural Perspective on Patient Safety

    CERN Document Server

    Rowley, Emma

    2011-01-01

    This edited volume of original chapters brings together researchers from around the world who are exploring the facets of health care organization and delivery that are sometimes marginal to mainstream patient safety theories and methodologies but offer important insights into the socio-cultural and organizational context of patient safety. By examining these critical insights or perspectives and drawing upon theories and methodologies often neglected by mainstream safety researchers, this collection shows we can learn more about not only the barriers and drivers to implementing patient safety

  9. Patient safety culture in teaching hospitals in Iran: assessment by the hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zakaria Kiaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety culture is an important part of improvement in the safety of health care. Knowing its present status is required for development of safety culture. The present study aimed to evaluate the current status of Patient safety culture in hospitals of three central provinces of Iran. Method: The present cross-sectional study was performed in teaching hospitals of Tehran, Alborz, and Qazvin provinces. The standard HSOPSC questionnaire was used for evaluation of the patient safety culture from the viewpoint of 522(Qazvin: 200, Tehran: 312, Alborz: 40 individuals who were randomly selected as workers of the hospitals. The collected data were analyzed using Chi-square and ANOVA tests. Results:The mean positive response to 12 aspects of the patient safety was 62.9%. “Organizational learning” had the highest proportion of positive response (71.18% and “Handoffs & Transitions” had the lowest (54.49%. There was a statistically significant difference in scores of “Teamwork within Units”(p=0.006(,”Manager Expectations & actions promoting”(p=0.014,”organizational learning and continuous improvement”(p=0.001, “Management support”(p=0.007, “Feedback and communication”(p=0.012, and “Communication openness”(p=0.003 among the provinces, respectively. Conclusion: We performed a full assessment of the patient safety culture in the studied provinces. Organizational learning was satisfactory in the hospitals. The studied hospitals need arrangement of safety-based programs and supports of senior administrators to perform more sophisticated efforts and improve the patient safety culture.

  10. Towards an occupational safety and health culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Steijger, N.

    2014-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) is a highly regulated area that appears to be based on rational planning and logical management approaches, e.g. OSM Management Systems: employers and employees of organisations should be aware of OSH risks, assess these risks systematically, provide the necessar

  11. Culture, language, and patient safety: Making the link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2006-10-01

    It has been well recognized internationally that hospitals are not as safe as they should be. In order to redress this situation, health care services around the world have turned their attention to strategically implementing robust patient safety and quality care programmes to identify circumstances that put patients at risk of harm and then acting to prevent or control those risks. Despite the progress that has been made in improving hospital safety in recent years, there is emerging evidence that patients of minority cultural and language backgrounds are disproportionately at risk of experiencing preventable adverse events while in hospital compared with mainstream patient groups. One reason for this is that patient safety programmes have tended to underestimate and understate the critical relationship that exists between culture, language, and the safety and quality of care of patients from minority racial, ethno-cultural, and language backgrounds. This article suggests that the failure to recognize the critical link between culture and language (of both the providers and recipients of health care) and patient safety stands as a 'resident pathogen' within the health care system that, if not addressed, unacceptably exposes patients from minority ethno-cultural and language backgrounds to preventable adverse events in hospital contexts. It is further suggested that in order to ensure that minority as well as majority patient interests in receiving safe and quality care are properly protected, the culture-language-patient-safety link needs to be formally recognized and the vulnerabilities of patients from minority cultural and language backgrounds explicitly identified and actively addressed in patient safety systems and processes.

  12. A Methodology To Incorporate The Safety Culture Into Probabilistic Safety Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sunghyun; Kim, Namyeong; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to incorporate organizational factors into PSA, a methodology needs to be developed. Using the AHP to weigh organizational factors as well as the SLIM to rate those factors, a methodology is introduced in this study. The safety issues related to nuclear safety culture have occurred increasingly. The quantification tool has to be developed in order to include the organizational factor into Probabilistic Safety Assessments. In this study, the state-of-the-art for the organizational evaluation methodologies has been surveyed. This study includes the research for organizational factors, maintenance process, maintenance process analysis models, a quantitative methodology using Analytic Hierarchy Process, Success Likelihood Index Methodology. The purpose of this study is to develop a methodology to incorporate the safety culture into PSA for obtaining more objective risk than before. The organizational factor considered in nuclear safety culture might affect the potential risk of human error and hardware-failure. The safety culture impact index to monitor the plant safety culture can be assessed by applying the developed methodology into a nuclear power plant.

  13. [Analysis of the patient safety culture in hospitals of the Spanish National Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, P J; Da Silva Gama, Z A; de Oliveira-Sousa, S L; Fonseca, Y A; de Souza-Oliveira, A C; Castillo, Carmen; López, M José; Ramón, Teresa; Carrillo, Andrés; Iranzo, M Dolores; Soria, Victor; Saturno, Pedro J; Parra, Pedro; Gomis, Rafael; Gascón, Juan José; Martinez, José; Arellano, Carmen; Gama, Zenewton A Da Silva; de Oliveira-Sousa, Silvana L; de Souza-Oliveira, Adriana C; Fonseca, Yadira A; Ferreira, Marta Sobral

    2008-12-01

    A safety culture is essential to minimize errors and adverse events. Its measurement is needed to design activities in order to improve it. This paper describes the methods and main results of a study on safety climate in a nation-wide representative sample of public hospitals of the Spanish NHS. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of health professionals in a representative sample of 24 hospitals, proportionally stratified by hospital size. Results are analyzed to provide a description of safety climate, its strengths and weaknesses. Differences by hospital size, type of health professional and service are analyzed using ANOVA. A total of 2503 responses are analyzed (response rate: 40%, (93% from professionals with direct patient contact). A total of 50% gave patient safety a score from 6 to 8 (on a 10-point scale); 95% reported safety" (61.8 [1.7]) have the highest percentage of positive answers. "Staffing", "Teamwork across hospital units", "Overall perceptions of safety" and "Hospital management support for patient safety" could be identified as weaknesses. Significant differences by hospital size, type of professional and service suggest a generally more positive attitude in small hospitals and Pharmacy services, and a more negative one in physicians. Strengths and weaknesses of the safety climate in the hospitals of the Spanish NHS have been identified and they are used to design appropriate strategies for improvement.

  14. The value of process safety culture for inspection in major hazard industies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Bezemer, R.; Guldener, V.

    2015-01-01

    Safety culture is increasingly recognised as the third important determinant of safety, complementary to technology and safety organisation. There are no legal requirements with respect to safety culture, except for nuclear power plants. Safety culture is and remains therefore a responsibility of th

  15. Agricultural Leaders' Influence on the Safety Culture of Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Frank A

    2017-01-01

    Most US farmers are small, independent owner-operators, many of whom are exempt from safety regulation and enforcement, as well as age restrictions relative to family members performing hazardous tasks. These smaller farms account for a disproportionate share of the total fatality and injury statistics from farming incidents, contributing to an agriculture-industry death rate that is seven times greater than all occupations combined. In contrast, large agricultural enterprises that employ larger numbers of non-family workers are more regulated and more highly incentivized by economic, supply chain, and societal factors to implement cultures of safety, and are more readily influenced by agricultural opinion leaders, agribusinesses, farm organizations, and agricultural media. These agricultural influencer institutions must find ways to play more significant roles in changing the culture on operations that use only family labor. They will find willing partners in safety organizations such as the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America (ASHCA), Agricultural Extension, and other health and safety advocates, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-funded agricultural research centers. The overall workplace injury statistics for agriculture remain alarming; however, with leadership from the larger farm operations, and help from ASHCA, academia, the healthcare community, and others, the current culture of workplace safety and health in agriculture can be impacted in positive ways.

  16. Hospital Safety Culture in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey Using Chinese Version Safety Attitude Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Wui-Chiang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safety activities have been initiated at many hospitals in Taiwan, but little is known about the safety culture at these hospitals. The aims of this study were to verify a safety culture survey instrument in Chinese and to assess hospital safety culture in Taiwan. Methods The Taiwan Patient Safety Culture Survey was conducted in 2008, using the adapted Safety Attitude Questionnaire in Chinese (SAQ-C. Hospitals and their healthcare workers participated in the survey on a voluntary basis. The psychometric properties of the five SAQ-C dimensions were examined, including teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, perception of management, and working conditions. Additional safety measures were asked to assess healthcare workers' attitudes toward their collaboration with nurses, physicians, and pharmacists, respectively, and perceptions of hospitals' encouragement of safety reporting, safety training, and delivery delays due to communication breakdowns in clinical areas. The associations between the respondents' attitudes to each SAQ-C dimension and safety measures were analyzed by generalized estimating equations, adjusting for the clustering effects at hospital levels. Results A total of 45,242 valid questionnaires were returned from 200 hospitals with a mean response rate of 69.4%. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.792 for teamwork climate, 0.816 for safety climate, 0.912 for job satisfaction, 0.874 for perception of management, and 0.785 for working conditions. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated a good model fit for each dimension and the entire construct. The percentage of hospital healthcare workers holding positive attitude was 48.9% for teamwork climate, 45.2% for perception of management, 42.1% for job satisfaction, 37.2% for safety climate, and 31.8% for working conditions. There were wide variations in the range of SAQ-C scores in each dimension among hospitals. Compared to those without positive attitudes

  17. Modeling safety culture as a socially emergent phenomenon: a case study in aircraft maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passenier, D.F.; Mols, C.; Bím, J.; Sharpanskykh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Safety culture is often understood as encompassing organizational members’ shared attitudes, beliefs, perceptions and values associated with safety. Safety culture theory development is fraught with inconsistencies and superficiality of measurement methods, because the dynamic and political nature

  18. Patient Safety Culture Status From The Perspective Medical Staff Of Yasuj Hospitals In 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: One of the most important problems in the health sector, particularly in clinical centers, is the quality of healthcare. Patient safety is one of the most important elements in creating health care quality due to the fact that it is a critical component to the quality of health care and many errors are present in patient care and treatment practices..                                                               Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the status of the patient safety culture and its relationship with events reported in Yasuj hospitals. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 361 medical staff of Yasuj hospitals. The data were collected through a hospital survey on patient safety culture. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS statistics soft ware version 21, using Descriptive methods, Pearson Coefficient, ANOVA, and T-Test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the teamwork among hospital units (71/89percent, with expectations and management measures (66/38% in the case of safety obtained the most score and non-punitive response to errors (48/79% and manager support (55/88 percent obtained the least score. 73/7% of employees of three hospitals in the past 12 months did not report any event. In addition, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between the total score of safety culture and reporting the events. In this study, 15.5 % of respondents assess their safety culture in work as good, 44.3 % as acceptable and 30.5 percent reported poor. The overall safety culture among the three studied hospitals was 61.81 %. Results confirmed that the culture safety of patient in studied hospitals was average. Conclusions: The hospitals may rely on their strong points in terms of patient safety culture and try to remove their weak points to form a safe environment and appropriate

  19. Critical Ethnography, Cultural Safety, and International Nursing Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean N. Harrowing PhD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical qualitative methodology provides a strategy to examine the human experience and its relationship to power and truth. Cultural safety is a concept that has been applied to nursing education and practice and refers to interactions that acknowledge and respect the unique cultural background of patients. It recognizes power inequities between caregivers who belong to dominant cultures and patients who may belong to oppressed groups. Culture is interpreted from a critical constructivist perspective as a fluid relational process that is enacted contextually. The purpose of this paper is to examine the congruence between and

  20. Psychometric model for safety culture assessment in nuclear research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, C.S. do, E-mail: claudio.souza@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2468, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, D.A., E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mesquita, R.N. de, E-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A psychometric model to evaluate ‘safety climate’ at nuclear research facilities. • The model presented evidences of good psychometric qualities. • The model was applied to nuclear research facilities in Brazil. • Some ‘safety culture’ weaknesses were detected in the assessed organization. • A potential tool to develop safety management programs in nuclear facilities. - Abstract: A safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants depends not only on technical performance, but also on the people and on the organization. Organizational factors have been recognized as the main causal mechanisms of accidents by research organizations through USA, Europe and Japan. Deficiencies related with these factors reveal weaknesses in the organization’s safety culture. A significant number of instruments to assess the safety culture based on psychometric models that evaluate safety climate through questionnaires, and which are based on reliability and validity evidences, have been published in health and ‘safety at work’ areas. However, there are few safety culture assessment instruments with these characteristics (reliability and validity) available on nuclear literature. Therefore, this work proposes an instrument to evaluate, with valid and reliable measures, the safety climate of nuclear research facilities. The instrument was developed based on methodological principles applied to research modeling and its psychometric properties were evaluated by a reliability analysis and validation of content, face and construct. The instrument was applied to an important nuclear research organization in Brazil. This organization comprises 4 research reactors and many nuclear laboratories. The survey results made possible a demographic characterization and the identification of some possible safety culture weaknesses and pointing out potential areas to be improved in the assessed organization. Good evidence of reliability with Cronbach's alpha

  1. Patient safety culture in a district hospital in South Africa: An issue of quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeng, Lorraine M; Wolvaardt, Jacqueline E

    2015-11-05

    The Nursing Act 33 of 2005 holds nurse practitioners responsible for all acts and omissions in the delivery of quality patient care. But quality patient care is influenced by a number of factors beyond the control of nurse practitioners. Patient safety culture is one such factor and is seldom explored in hospitals in developing countries. This article describes the patient safety culture of a district hospital in South Africa. The study identified and analysed the factors that influence the patient safety culture by using the Manchester Patient Safety Framework at the National District Hospital, Bloemfontein, Free State Province. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted and included the total population of permanent staff; community service health professionals; temporarily employed health professionals and volunteers. The standard Manchester Patient Safety Framework questionnaire was distributed with a response rate of 61%. Less than half of the respondents (42.4%; n = 61) graded their units as acceptable. Several quality dimensions were statistically significant for the employment profile: overall commitment to quality (p = 0.001); investigating patient incidents (p = 0.031); organisational learning following incidents (p < 0.001); communication around safety issues (p = 0.001); and team working around safety issues (p = 0.005). These same quality dimensions were also statistically significant for the professional profiles. Medical doctors had negative perceptions of all the safety dimensions. The research measured and described patient safety culture (PSC) amongst the staff at the National District Hospital (NDH). This research has identified the perceived inadequacies with PSC and gives nurse managers a clear mandate to implement change to ensure a PSC that fosters quality patient care.

  2. Patient safety culture in a district hospital in South Africa: An issue of quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine M. Mayeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Nursing Act 33 of 2005 holds nurse practitioners responsible for all acts and omissions in the delivery of quality patient care. But quality patient care is influenced by a number of factors beyond the control of nurse practitioners. Patient safety culture is one such factor and is seldom explored in hospitals in developing countries. This article describes the patient safety culture of a district hospital in South Africa.Objectives: The study identified and analysed the factors that influence the patient safety culture by using the Manchester Patient Safety Framework at the National District Hospital, Bloemfontein, Free State Province.Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted and included the total population of permanent staff; community service health professionals; temporarily employed health professionals and volunteers. The standard Manchester Patient Safety Framework questionnaire was distributed with a response rate of 61%.Results: Less than half of the respondents (42.4%; n = 61 graded their units as acceptable. Several quality dimensions were statistically significant for the employment profile: overall commitment to quality (p = 0.001; investigating patient incidents (p = 0.031; organisational learning following incidents (p < 0.001; communication around safety issues (p = 0.001; and team working around safety issues (p = 0.005. These same quality dimensions were also statistically significant for the professional profiles. Medical doctors had negative perceptions of all the safety dimensions.Conclusion: The research measured and described patient safety culture (PSC amongst the staff at the National District Hospital (NDH. This research has identified the perceived inadequacies with PSC and gives nurse managers a clear mandate to implement change to ensure a PSC that fosters quality patient care.

  3. Equivalent Culture-Anchored Units Translation? The Phraseological Units Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Paweł Jaskot

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent Culture-Anchored Units Translation? The Phraseological Units Issue This article examines a question that has been of long-standing interest to linguists working in the fields of cross-linguistic phraseology and the translation of idiosyncratic language units, such as phraseological units (PUs. The challenge of translating PUs, which are understood as "patterns sanctioned by a given culture", involves the translation of culturemes. Therefore, a good translator must be able to assess the importance of the elements containing cultural references in the source language while "moving" them to the target language. When translating PUs, it is desirable that interlingual (cross-linguistic equivalence be achieved. The fact that translations of a PU can be very different (the translator can paraphrase the text, creatively change it, or simply eliminate the PU implies that the translational equivalence of PUs must be functional. While a cross-linguistic comparison (and the achievement of translational equivalence of PUs can be made by omitting the form parameter, it is desirable to preserve the extension and semantic structure, the connotative-pragmatic component, and the phrase combinatorics.   Ekwiwalencja jedostek "kulturowo zakotwiczonych"? Kwestia jednostek frazeologicznych Artykuł porusza zagadnienie, które od kilkudziesięciu lat cieszy się zainteresowaniem językoznawców zajmujących się konfrontacją językową frazeologii oraz tłumaczeniem idiosynkratycznych jednostek językowych, takich jak jednostki frazeologiczne (JF. Wyzwaniem podczas tłumaczenia JF, rozumianych jako "wzorce sankcjonowane przez daną kulturę", jawi się konieczność tłumaczenia kulturemów. Tłumacz zatem stoi w obliczu konieczności prawidłowej oceny danego elementu pod względem jego odniesień kulturowych w języku źródłowym podczas przekładania JF na język docelowy. Podczas tłumaczenia JF pożądane jest osiągnięcie międzyjęzykowej (cross

  4. Development of a Novel Nuclear Safety Culture Evaluation Method for an Operating Team Using Probabilistic Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sangmin; Lee, Seung Min; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    IAEA defined safety culture as follows: 'Safety Culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance'. Also, celebrated behavioral scientist, Cooper, defined safety culture as,'safety culture is that observable degree of effort by which all organizational members direct their attention and actions toward improving safety on a daily basis' with his internal psychological, situational, and behavioral context model. With these various definitions and criteria of safety culture, several safety culture assessment methods have been developed to improve and manage safety culture. To develop a new quantitative safety culture evaluation method for an operating team, we unified and redefined safety culture assessment items. Then we modeled a new safety culture evaluation by adopting level 1 PSA concept. Finally, we suggested the criteria to obtain nominal success probabilities of assessment items by using 'operational definition'. To validate the suggested evaluation method, we analyzed the collected audio-visual recording data collected from a full scope main control room simulator of a NPP in Korea.

  5. Building a culture of safety through team training and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lily; Galla, Catherine

    2013-05-01

    Medical errors continue to occur despite multiple strategies devised for their prevention. Although many safety initiatives lead to improvement, they are often short lived and unsustainable. Our goal was to build a culture of patient safety within a structure that optimised teamwork and ongoing engagement of the healthcare team. Teamwork impacts the effectiveness of care, patient safety and clinical outcomes, and team training has been identified as a strategy for enhancing teamwork, reducing medical errors and building a culture of safety in healthcare. Therefore, we implemented Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS), an evidence-based framework which was used for team training to create transformational and/or incremental changes; facilitating transformation of organisational culture, or solving specific problems. To date, TeamSTEPPS (TS) has been implemented in 14 hospitals, two Long Term Care Facilities, and outpatient areas across the North Shore LIJ Health System. 32 150 members of the healthcare team have been trained. TeamSTEPPS was piloted at a community hospital within the framework of the health system's organisational care delivery model, the Collaborative Care Model to facilitate sustainment. AHRQ's Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, (HSOPSC), was administered before and after implementation of TeamSTEPPS, comparing the perception of patient safety by the heathcare team. Pilot hospital results of HSOPSC show significant improvement from 2007 (pre-TeamSTEPPS) to 2010. System-wide results of HSOPSC show similar trends to those seen in the pilot hospital. Valuable lessons for organisational success from the pilot hospital enabled rapid spread of TeamSTEPPS across the rest of the health system.

  6. Decisions about Product Safety. A Multidisciplinary Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    A multidisciplinary educational unit featuring product safety decisions made by businesses and consumers is presented. teach critical thinking and decision making while supplementing the science, home economics, social studies, and economics curricula. The activities rely extensively, though not exclusively, on Procter & Gamble's experiences…

  7. Decisions about Product Safety. A Multidisciplinary Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    A multidisciplinary educational unit featuring product safety decisions made by businesses and consumers is presented. teach critical thinking and decision making while supplementing the science, home economics, social studies, and economics curricula. The activities rely extensively, though not exclusively, on Procter & Gamble's experiences in…

  8. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice: a cluster randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting A three-arm cluster randomised trial was

  9. Exploring patient safety culture in Dutch primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Melle, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design Cross-sectional survey: Setting: Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants:

  10. Methodological issues and pitfalls of short safety culture questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagtman, H.M.; Koornneef, F.; Akselsson, R.; Stewart, S.

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture surveys have been fielded in many different sectors of industrial activities. Many of these surveys consist of a long list of questions which is time consuming for the respondents. As part of the FP6 HILAS project a shorter survey has been developed, which aimed at getting a high resp

  11. Inclusion and Exclusion in the safety culture at sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Sisse

    and linking acts inspired from research in social capital, and supplemented with acts of exclusion, all to describe the power conflicts which includes and excludes members in the unitary, divided or fragmented safety cultures that I met on board. The data shows that foreign seafarers are treated equally...

  12. Safety culture at ANAV; Cultura de seguridad en ANAV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Madrid, B.

    2010-07-01

    Recent safety culture assessments detected various actions, paractices and behaviours that did not follow the standards, expectations and guidelines that are essentiall for all safe and highly reliable companies, as we aim to be. For this reason, as parto of the PROCURA project, a wide range of actions have been undertaken o reinforce certain individual, group and organisational behaviours. (Author).

  13. [Assessment of the patient-safety culture in a healthcare district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo Muñoz, F; Padilla Marín, V

    2013-01-01

    1) To describe the frequency of positive attitudes and behaviours, in terms of patient safety, among the healthcare providers working in a healthcare district; 2) to determine whether the level of safety-related culture differs from other studies; and 3) to analyse negatively valued dimensions, and to establish areas for their improvement. A descriptive, cross-sectional study based on the results of an evaluation of the safety-related culture was conducted on a randomly selected sample of 247 healthcare providers, by using the Spanish adaptation of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) designed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), as the evaluation tool. Positive and negative responses were analysed, as well as the global score. Results were compared with international and national results. A total of 176 completed survey questionnaires were analysed (response rate: 71.26%); 50% of responders described the safety climate as very good, 37% as acceptable, and 7% as excellent. Strong points were: «Teamwork within the units» (80.82%) and «Supervisor/manager expectations and actions» (80.54%). Dimensions identified for potential improvement included: «Staffing» (37.93%), «Non-punitive response to error» (41.67%), and «Frequency of event reporting» (49.05%). Strong and weak points were identified in the safety-related culture of the healthcare district studied, together with potential improvement areas. Benchmarking at the international level showed that our safety-related culture was within the average of hospitals, while at the national level, our results were above the average of hospitals. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. The validity of the Nordic patient safety culture questionnaire (TUKU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Teemu; Silla, Inmaculada; Pietikäinen, Elina

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety culture (PSC) has been postulated to have a significant influence on the quality of health care. This study aims to evaluate the psychometric properties of the TUKU PSC questionnaire. The questionnaire development was based on the view that patient safety constitutes not only the absence of adverse events, but also the presence of certain organizational attributes that enable safety. The TUKU questionnaire has two parts: a measure of psychological dimensions, and a measure of employees' perceptions of organizational functions. The TUKU questionnaire was validated using a sample of 1162 health care professionals from seven Finnish health care organizations. Two studies were carried out, one focusing on construct validity and the other on criterion validity. Regarding construct validity, the empirical model matched the theory quite well. The results of Study 2 concerning criterion validity were more ambiguous. Four of the organizational dimensions and two of the psychological dimensions were related to patient safety incidents occurring 16 months after administering the questionnaire. The study provided evidence on the key organizational dimensions that comprise patient safety culture and affect patient safety. The study further contributed towards validation of an instrument for measuring these dimensions.

  15. Development of the Continued Improvement System for Nuclear Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H. C.; Park, H. G.; Park, Y. W.; Park, J. Y. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It has been found that almost 80 % of the incidents and accidents occurred recently, such as the Fukushima Daiichi disaster and Domestic SBO accident etc. were analyzed to be caused from human errors. (IAEA NES NG-G-2.1) Which strongly claims the importance of the safety culture system. Accordingly, it should be away from a cursory approach like one-off field survey or Snap shop which were being conducted at present for the continued improvement of safety culture. This study introduces an analytical methodology which approaches the generic form of the safety both consciously and unconsciously expressed with behavior, thoughts, and attitude etc. This study was implemented only for open materials such as Inspection report, incidents and accidents reports, QA documents because of the limitation in accessibility to data. More effective use with securing operational data will be possible in future.

  16. Factors Contribute to Safety Culture in the Manufacturing Industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ong Choon Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain the role of safety culture in the manufacturing industry in Malaysia and identify factors contribute to safety culture. It is suggested in this study that leadership support, management commitment and safety management system are important factors that contribute to safety culture. This study also provides theoretical implications to guide future research and offers practical implications to the managers in the development of safety culture. Given that ...

  17. The Need for Cultural Safety in Injury Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Audrey R; Hognestad, Sarah; Brooks, Lauren A

    2015-01-01

    Public health nurses are on the front line of injury prevention initiatives. However, within injury prevention interventions and research, issues pertaining to culture are often addressed through the employment of one of the three approaches: cultural competency, cultural appropriateness, and/or cultural sensitivity. When using these approaches, it is often suggested that it is only those who are the recipients of an intervention or the focus of research that "have" culture. The injury prevention designer's/provider's/researcher's own culture, as well as the ways in which it may influence the interventions or research, is typically rendered invisible. In this paper, we provide an overview and illustrations of the use of cultural competency, cultural appropriateness, and cultural sensitivity in injury prevention initiatives, as well as each approach's shortcomings. We then introduce cultural safety, an approach that has not yet gained traction in injury prevention but has had significant uptake within nursing in general, and argue that it has the potential to overcome many other approaches' shortcomings and thus may lead to more effective and socially just injury prevention initiatives.

  18. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in a Selected Number of Pharmacies Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jamili

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of this study, commitment of healthcare authorities to patient safety culture is the most important factor in the promotion of organizational patient safety. Considering that the lowest score of patient safety culture belonged to the dimension of “overall perceptions of patient safety”,it is recommended that related training interventions be implemented for healthcare staff in order to establish and promote the patient safety culture in pharmacies.

  19. [Operational units for health risk management (patient safety)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo Hernández, A; Claveria Fontán, A; García Urbaneja, M; López Barba, J

    2008-12-01

    In 1995 INSALUD began to develop performance measures in the field of risk management, and following transfer of powers to the regions, these led to the development of operational units in individual healthcare centres. These units, which consist of a group of health professionals, including managers, aim to identify, evaluate, analyse and deal with health risks, to enhance patient safety. Their organisational structure can vary in accordance with the needs, resources and philosophy of each individual organisation. This paper presents the experience of the risk management units developed in four Spanish regions: Madrid, the Basque Country, Galicia and INGESA (Ceuta and Melilla). It also includes reflections on assessment of their impact and on their future role in improving safety in healthcare services.

  20. The Impact of Language and Culture Diversity in Occupational Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus-Rivas, Mayra; Conlon, Helen Acree; Burns, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing plays a critical part in improving the safety of foreign labor workers. The development and implementation of safety training programs do not always regularly take into account language barriers, low literacy levels, or cultural elements. This oversight can lead to more injuries and fatalities among this group. Despite established health and safety training programs, a significant number of non-native English speakers are injured or killed in preventable, occupation-related accidents. Introducing safety programs that use alternative teaching strategies such as pictograms, illustrations, and hands-on training opportunities will assist in addressing challenges for non-English laborers. Occupational health nursing has an opportunity to provide guidance on this subject and assist businesses in creating a safer and more productive work environment.

  1. A study on Impact of Safety Culture on Safety Behavior: Moderating effect of Prevention Focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sun Chul; Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In modern society, it has been acknowledged that disasters caused by civilization became inevitable. With growing attention to role of human as one component of the system to cope with accident to prevent disasters, various efforts have been deployed to keep safety. Most of the industries with high hazard have adopted the term as their banner in the efforts to promote safety in their installations and operations. Recently, the Fukushima nuclear power plants(NPPs) accident happened in Japan in 2011 resulted in great impact over the world and have highlighted the importance of safety culture again.

  2. DISPELLING MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS TO IMPLEMENT A SAFETY CULTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potts, T. Todd; Smith, Ken; Hylko, James M.

    2003-02-27

    Industrial accidents are typically reported in terms of technological malfunctions, ignoring the human element in accident causation. However, over two-thirds of all accidents are attributable to human and organizational factors (e.g., planning, written procedures, job factors, training, communication, and teamwork), thereby affecting risk perception, behavior and attitudes. This paper reviews the development of WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program that addresses human and organizational factors from a top-down, bottom-up approach. This approach is derived from the Department of Energy's Integrated Safety Management System. As a result, dispelling common myths and misconceptions about safety, while empowering employees to ''STOP work'' if necessary, have contributed to reducing an unusually high number of vehicle, ergonomic and slip/trip/fall incidents successfully. Furthermore, the safety culture that has developed within WESKEM, LLC's workforce consists of three common characteristics: (1) all employees hold safety as a value; (2) each individual feels responsible for the safety of their co-workers as well as themselves; and (3) each individual is willing and able to ''go beyond the call of duty'' on behalf of the safety of others. WESKEM, LLC as a company, upholds the safety culture and continues to enhance its existing ES&H program by incorporating employee feedback and lessons learned collected from other high-stress industries, thereby protecting its most vital resource - the employees. The success of this program is evident by reduced accident and injury rates, as well as the number of safe work hours accrued while performing hands-on field activities. WESKEM, LLC (Paducah + Oak Ridge) achieved over 800,000 safe work hours through August 2002. WESKEM-Paducah has achieved over 665,000 safe work hours without a recordable injury or lost workday case since it started operations on

  3. Focusing on patient safety in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Chatziioannidis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Patient safety in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU environment is an under-researched area, but recently seems to get high priority on the healthcare quality agenda worldwide. NICU, as a highly sensitive and technological driven environment, signals the importance for awareness in causation of mistakes and accidents. Adverse events and near misses that comprise the majority of human errors, cause morbidity often with devastating results, even death. Likewise in other organizations, errors causes are multiple and complex. Other high reliability organizations, such as air force and nuclear industry, offer examples of how standardized/homogenized work and removal of systems weaknesses can minimize errors. It is widely accepted that medical errors can be explained based on personal and/or system approach. The impact/effect of medical errors can be reduced when thorough/causative identification approach is followed by detailed analysis of consequences and prevention measures. NICU’s medical and nursing staff should be familiar with patient safety language, implement best practices, and support safety culture, maximizing efforts for reducing errors. Furthermore, top management commitment and support in developing patient safety culture is essential in order to assure the achievement of the desirable organizational safety outcomes. The aim of the paper is to review patient safety issues in the NICU environment, focusing on development and implementation of strategies, enhancing high quality standards for health care.

  4. Workforce Perceptions of Hospital Safety Culture: Development and Validation of the Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara; Meterko, Mark; Baker, Laurence; Gaba, David; Falwell, Alyson; Rosen, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of an instrument for assessing workforce perceptions of hospital safety culture and to assess its reliability and validity. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected between March 2004 and May 2005. Personnel from 105 U.S. hospitals completed a 38-item paper and pencil survey. We received 21,496 completed questionnaires, representing a 51 percent response rate. Study Design Based on review of existing safety climate surveys, we developed a list of key topics pertinent to maintaining a culture of safety in high-reliability organizations. We developed a draft questionnaire to address these topics and pilot tested it in four preliminary studies of hospital personnel. We modified the questionnaire based on experience and respondent feedback, and distributed the revised version to 42,249 hospital workers. Data Collection We randomly divided respondents into derivation and validation samples. We applied exploratory factor analysis to responses in the derivation sample. We used those results to create scales in the validation sample, which we subjected to multitrait analysis (MTA). Principal Findings We identified nine constructs, three organizational factors, two unit factors, three individual factors, and one additional factor. Constructs demonstrated substantial convergent and discriminant validity in the MTA. Cronbach's α coefficients ranged from 0.50 to 0.89. Conclusions It is possible to measure key salient features of hospital safety climate using a valid and reliable 38-item survey and appropriate hospital sample sizes. This instrument may be used in further studies to better understand the impact of safety climate on patient safety outcomes. PMID:17850530

  5. [Nursing professionals and health care assistants' perception of patient safety culture in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernalte-Martí, Vicente; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    To assess nursing professionals and health care assistants' perceptions, opinions and behaviours on patient safety culture in the operating room of a public hospital of the Spanish National Health Service. To describe strengths and weaknesses or opportunities for improvement according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality criteria, as well as to determine the number of events reported. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted using the Spanish version of the questionnaire Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The sample consisted of nursing professionals, who agreed to participate voluntarily in this study and met the selection criteria. A descriptive and inferential analysis was performed depending on the nature of the variables and the application conditions of statistical tests. Significance if p < .05. In total, 74 nursing professionals responded (63.2%). No strengths were found in the operating theatre, and improvements are needed concerning staffing (64.0%), and hospital management support for patient safety (52.9%). A total of 52.3% (n = 65) gave patient safety a score from 7 to 8.99 (on a 10 point scale); 79.7% (n = 72) reported no events last year. The total variance explained by the regression model was 0.56 for "Frequency of incident reporting" and 0.26 for "Overall perception of safety". There was a more positive perception of patient safety culture at unit level. Weaknesses have been identified, and they can be used to design specific intervention activities to improve patient safety culture in other nearby operating theatres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. [Patient safety culture in family and community medicine residents in Aragon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cogollo, R; Paredes-Alvarado, I R; Galicia-Flores, T; Barrasa-Villar, J I; Castán-Ruiz, S

    2014-01-01

    having an appropriate patient safety culture is the first recommendation to improve it. The aim of this article is to determine the safety culture in family medicine residents and then to identify improvement strategies. an online cross-sectional survey of residents in family medicine teaching units of Aragon using the translated, validated and adapted to Spanish, Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPS) questionnaire. The results were grouped in 12-dimensional responses for analysis, and the mean value of each dimension was calculated. Perceptions were described by Percentages of Positive (PRP) and Negative Responses (PRN) to each dimension. positive results were seen in «the Patient Care Tracking/Follow-up». There were significant differences in the «Information Exchange With Other Settings», «Staff Training» and «Overall Perceptions of Patient Safety and Quality». Study participants viewed «Work Pressure and Pace» negatively. the institutions providing health services, as well as their staff, are increasingly aware of the importance of improving Patient Safety, and the results of this study allowed us to present information that helps identify weaknesses, and to design initiatives and strategies to improve care practices. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of an Evaluation Method for Team Safety Culture Competencies using Social Network Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Min; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, team safety culture competency of a team was estimated through SNA, as a team safety culture index. To overcome the limit of existing safety culture evaluation methods, the concept of competency and SNA were adopted. To estimate team safety culture competency, we defined the definition, range and goal of team safety culture competencies. Derivation of core team safety culture competencies is performed and its behavioral characteristics were derived for each safety culture competency, from the procedures used in NPPs and existing criteria to assess safety culture. Then observation was chosen as a method to provide the input data for the SNA matrix of team members versus insufficient team safety culture competencies. Then through matrix operation, the matrix was converted into the two meaningful values, which are density of team members and degree centralities of each team safety culture competency. Density of tem members and degree centrality of each team safety culture competency represent the team safety culture index and the priority of team safety culture competency to be improved.

  8. Changing An Electrical Safety Culture - The Importance of Understanding Why.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Richard Thomas [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-12-01

    Abstract – Electrical workers, regardless of experience, are faced with a major barrier when first introduced to NFPA 70E, “The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace,” and an erroneous electrical safety culture pre-exists. This paper describes, from the author’s point of view, the barrier that he and other electrical workers have experienced and his insight into overcoming the barrier. The author in conclusion will present a series of techniques that can be used to assist other electrical workers in overcoming the barrier.

  9. Introducing the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program for mechanically ventilated patients in Saudi Arabian Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raymond M.; Aljuaid, Maha; Aqeel, Hanan; Aboudeif, Mohammed M.; Elatwey, Shaimaa; Shehab, Rajeh; Mandourah, Yasser; Maghrabi, Khalid; Hawa, Hassan; Khalid, Imran; Qushmaq, Ismael; Latif, Asad; Chang, Bickey; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Tayar, Sultan; Al-Harbi, Khloud; Yousef, Amin; Amr, Anas A.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been major improvements to the care of mechanically ventilated patients (MVPs). Earlier initiatives used the concept of ventilator care bundles (sets of interventions), with a primary focus on reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, recent evidence has led to a more comprehensive approach: The ABCDE bundle (Awakening and Breathing trial Coordination, Delirium management and Early mobilization). The approach of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) was developed by patient safety researchers at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and is supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to improve local safety cultures and to learn from defects by utilizing a validated structured framework. In August 2015, 17 Intensive Care Units (ICUs) (a total of 271 beds) in eight hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia joined the CUSP for MVPs (CUSP 4 MVP) that was conducted in 235 ICUs in 169 US hospitals and led by the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. The CUSP 4 MVP project will set the stage for cooperation between multiple hospitals and thus strives to create a countrywide plan for the management of all MVPs in Saudi Arabia. PMID:28197216

  10. Introducing the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program for mechanically ventilated patients in Saudi Arabian Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond M Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, there have been major improvements to the care of mechanically ventilated patients (MVPs. Earlier initiatives used the concept of ventilator care bundles (sets of interventions, with a primary focus on reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, recent evidence has led to a more comprehensive approach: The ABCDE bundle (Awakening and Breathing trial Coordination, Delirium management and Early mobilization. The approach of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP was developed by patient safety researchers at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and is supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to improve local safety cultures and to learn from defects by utilizing a validated structured framework. In August 2015, 17 Intensive Care Units (ICUs (a total of 271 beds in eight hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia joined the CUSP for MVPs (CUSP 4 MVP that was conducted in 235 ICUs in 169 US hospitals and led by the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. The CUSP 4 MVP project will set the stage for cooperation between multiple hospitals and thus strives to create a countrywide plan for the management of all MVPs in Saudi Arabia.

  11. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in Primary Health Care Settings in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Mohamed Ghobashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Patient safety is critical component of health care quality. We aimed to assess the awareness of primary healthcare staff members about patient safety culture and explore the areas of deficiency and opportunities for improvement concerning this issue.Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study surveyed 369 staff members in four primary healthcare centers in Kuwait using self-administered “Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture” adopted questionnaire. The total number of respondents was 276 participants (response rate = 74.79%.Results: Five safety dimensions with lowest positivity (less than 50% were identified and these are; the non – punitive response to errors, frequency of event reporting, staffing, communication openness, center handoffs and transitions with the following percentages of positivity 24%, 32%, 41%, 45% and 47% respectively. The dimensions of highest positivity were teamwork within the center’s units (82% and organizational learning (75%.Conclusion: Patient safety culture in primary healthcare settings in Kuwait is not as strong as improvements for the provision of safe health care. Well-designed patient safety initiatives are needed to be integrated with organizational policies, particularly the pressing need to address the bioethical component of medical errors and their disclosure, communication openness and emotional issues related to them and investing the bright areas of skillful organizational learning and strong team working attitudes.    

  12. Associations between safety culture and employee engagement over time: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty Biddison, Elizabeth Lee; Paine, Lori; Murakami, Peter; Herzke, Carrie; Weaver, Sallie J

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of the patient safety movement and development of methods to measure workforce health and success have come multiple modes of assessing healthcare worker opinions and attitudes about work and the workplace. Safety culture, a group-level measure of patient safety-related norms and behaviours, has been proposed to influence a variety of patient safety outcomes. Employee engagement, conceptualised as a positive, work-related mindset including feelings of vigour, dedication and absorption in one's work, has also demonstrated an association with a number of important worker outcomes in healthcare. To date, the relationship between responses to these two commonly used measures has been poorly characterised. Our study used secondary data analysis to assess the relationship between safety culture and employee engagement over time in a sample of >50 inpatient hospital units in a large US academic health system. With >2000 respondents in each of three time periods assessed, we found moderate to strong positive correlations (r=0.43-0.69) between employee engagement and four Safety Attitudes Questionnaire domains. Independent collection of these two assessments may have limited our analysis in that minimally different inclusion criteria resulted in some differences in the total respondents to the two instruments. Our findings, nevertheless, suggest a key area in which healthcare quality improvement efforts might be streamlined. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Validity and reliability of Turkish version of "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" and perception of patient safety in public hospitals in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Emel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS is used to assess safety culture in many countries. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Turkish for the study of patient safety culture in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study is threefold: to determine the validity and reliability of the translated form of HSOPS, to evaluate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety in Turkish public hospitals, and to compare finding with U.S. hospital settings. Methods Physicians and nurses working in all public hospitals in Konya, a large city in Turkey, were asked to complete a self-administrated patient safety culture survey (n = 309. Data collection was carried out using the Turkish version of HSOPS, developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ. Data were summarized as percentages, means, and SD values. Factor analysis, correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha, ANOVA, and t tests were employed in statistical analyses. Items on patient safety were categorized into 10 factors. Factor loadings and internal consistencies of dimension items were high. Results Most of the scores related to dimensions, and the overall patient safety score (44% were lower than the benchmark score. "Teamwork within hospital units" received the highest score (70%, and the lowest score belonged to the "frequency of events reported" (15%. The study revealed that more than three quarters of the physicians and nurses were not reporting errors. Conclusion The Turkish version of HSOPS was found to be valid and reliable in determining patient safety culture. This tool will be helpful in tracking improvements and in heightening awareness on patient safety culture in Turkey.

  14. Evaluation of Patient Safety Culture and Organizational Culture as a Step in Patient Safety Improvement in a Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrisya Iriviranty

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Establishment of patient safety culture is the first step in the improvement of patient safety. As such, assessment of patient safety culture in hospitals is of paramount importance. Patient safety culture is an inherent component of organizational culture, so that the study of organizational culture is required in developing patient safety. This study aimed to evaluate patient safety culture among the clinical staff of a hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia and identify organizational culture profile. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive, qualitative study was conducted in a hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia in 2014. Sample population consisted of nurses, midwives, physicians, pediatricians, obstetrics and gynecology specialists, laboratory personnel, and pharmacy staff (n=152. Data were collected using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ and Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI. Results: Teamwork within units” was the strongest dimension of patient safety culture (91.7%, while “staffing” and “non-punitive response to error” were the weakest dimensions (22.7%. Moreover, clan culture was the most dominant type of organizational culture in the studied hospital. This culture serves as a guide for the changes in the healthcare organization, especially in the development of patient safety culture. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, healthcare providers were positively inclined toward the patient safety culture within the organization. As such, the action plan was designed through consensus decision-making and deemed effective in articulating patient safety in the vision and mission of the organization.

  15. The Impact of Seafarers’ Perceptions of National Culture and Leadership on Safety Attitude and Safety Behavior in Dry Bulk Shipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Shan Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to examine the effects of national culture and leadership style on safety performance in bulk shipping companies. Survey data collected from 322 respondents working in dry bulk carriers was used, a multiple regression analysis was conducted to analyze the influence of national culture and leadership styles (i.e. transformational, passive management, and contingent reward on safety attitude and safety behavior. The results indicate that national culture dimensions such as power distance, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism, and long-term orientation had a positive influence on safety behaviour. Long-term orientation had a positive influence on safety attitude, whereas masculinity had a negative influence on safety attitude of seafarers. Specifically, this research found that transformational leadership had a positive influence on safety attitude and safety behaviour of seafarers. Moreover, practical implication from the research findings to improve ship safety in dry bulk shipping were discussed.

  16. Culture of Safety among Nurses in a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Nurses, Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), Safety culture, Working conditions,. Teamwork ... tools evaluate five dimensions of patient safety ... A study from Egypt measuring the ... number of all items in that scale to create scores.

  17. The willingness to relocate to another country: the impact of cultural similarity, destination safety, and financial incentive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Michael R; Westaby, James D

    2009-08-01

    Because of increased concerns about terrorism around the globe, international organizations are very interested in understanding how safety and cultural issues impact their employees' willingness to relocate abroad. This has been especially true for international companies based in the United States, given the recent salience of US activities around the world. Additionally, questions remain regarding the efficacy of financial incentives to motivate individuals' willingness to relocate when the destination may be dangerous. Therefore, the factors impacting willingness to relocate from the US to another country were examined experimentally in this study. Based upon theory and research in social and organizational psychology, it was hypothesized that cultural similarity, destination safety, and financial incentives would have direct effects on individuals' willingness to accept relocation offers. It was also predicted that cultural similarity and destination safety would moderate the effects of incentives upon willingness to relocate. The study used a 2 × 2 × 3 between-subjects design manipulating destination similarity (similar, different), destination safety (safe, dangerous), and bonus for relocating (0% bonus, 20% bonus, 40% bonus). Results from 196 participants at a university in the northeastern part of the US revealed that financial incentives and safety perceptions directly impacted willingness to relocate. In line with moderator predictions, financial incentives had a stronger effect on willingness to relocate when the destination was culturally different from the United States than when it was similar. Against expectations, there was no interaction between financial incentives and safety. Destination safety perceptions were relatively strong determinants of willingness to relocate.

  18. Better medical office safety culture is not associated with better scores on quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, Benjamin; Singer, Mendel E; Curry-Smith, Anne C; Nottingham, Kelly; Hickner, John

    2012-03-01

    A strong safety culture is an essential element of safe medical practice. Few studies, however, have studied the link between safety culture and clinical quality outcomes. In this study, we examined the association between safety culture and quality measures in primary care offices. A total of 24 primary care offices in Cleveland, Ohio. The Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety was administered to clinicians and support staff to rate 12 dimensions of safety culture and a single overall patient safety rating. An average of the 12 safety culture dimension scores was calculated to produce an aggregated patient safety score. Using linear correlation, we calculated the association between the 2 summary safety measures (overall patient safety rating and aggregated patient safety score) and 2 composite quality measures, a chronic disease score, and a prevention score. The survey response rate was 79% (387/492). There was considerable variation in both safety culture scores and quality scores from office to office. There was no association between the chronic disease score and either summary measure of safety culture. There were small but statistically significant negative associations between the prevention score and the overall patient safety rating (β = -0.087, P = 0.002) as well as the aggregated patient safety score (β = -0.004, P = 0.007). Although safety theory predicts a positive association between safety culture and quality, we found no meaningful associations between safety culture and currently accepted measures of primary care clinical quality. Larger studies across several health care organizations are needed to determine whether these findings are reproducible. If so, it may be necessary to reconsider the dimensions of safety culture in primary care as well as the relationship between safety culture and primary care clinical quality.

  19. The culture of patient safety from the perspective of the pediatric emergency nursing team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Taise Rocha; Rocha, Patricia Kuerten; Tomazoni, Andreia; Souza, Sabrina de; Anders, Jane Cristina; Davis, Karri

    2016-01-01

    To identify the patient safety culture in pediatric emergencies from the perspective of the nursing team. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey research study with a sample composed of 75 professionals of the nursing team. Data was collected between September and November 2014 in three Pediatric Emergency units by applying the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument. Data were submitted to descriptive analysis. Strong areas for patient safety were not found, with areas identified having potential being: Expectations and actions from supervisors/management to promote patient safety and teamwork. Areas identified as critical were: Non-punitive response to error and support from hospital management for patient safety. The study found a gap between the safety culture and pediatric emergencies, but it found possibilities of transformation that will contribute to the safety of pediatric patients. Nursing professionals need to become protagonists in the process of replacing the current paradigm for a culture focused on safety. The replication of this study in other institutions is suggested in order to improve the current health care scenario. Identificar a cultura de segurança do paciente em emergências pediátricas, na perspectiva da equipe de enfermagem. Pesquisa quantitativa, tipo survey transversal. Amostra composta por 75 profissionais da equipe de enfermagem. Dados coletados entre setembro e novembro de 2014, em três Emergências Pediátricas, aplicando o instrumento Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Dados submetidos à análise descritiva. Não foram encontradas áreas de força para a segurança do paciente, sendo identificadas áreas com potencial de assim se tornarem: Expectativas e ações do supervisor/chefia para promoção da segurança do paciente e Trabalho em equipe. Como área crítica identificaram-se: Resposta não punitiva ao erro e Apoio da gestão hospitalar para segurança do paciente. O estudo apontou distanciamento

  20. [Attitudes towards patient safety culture in a hospital setting and related variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Abellán, Ramon; Falcó-Pegueroles, Anna; de la Puente-Martorell, María Luisa

    To describe attitudes towards patient safety culture among workers in a hospital setting and determine the influence of socio-demographic and professional variables. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed among a sample of professionals and nursing assistants. A dimension was considered a strength if positive responses exceeded 75% and an opportunity for improvement if more than 50% of responses were negative. 59% (n=123) of respondents rated safety between 7 and 8. 53% (n=103) stated that they had not used the notification system to report any incidents in the previous twelve months. The strength identified was "teamwork in the unit/service" and the opportunity for improvement was "staffing". A more positive attitude was observed in outpatient services and among nursing professionals and part-time staff. This study has allowed us to determine the rating of the hospital in patient safety culture. This is vital for developing improvement strategies. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Measuring organisational-level Aboriginal cultural climate to tailor cultural safety strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladman, Justin; Ryder, Courtney; Walters, Lucie K

    2015-01-01

    Australian medical schools have taken on a social accountability mandate to provide culturally safe contexts in order to encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to engage in medical education and to ensure that present and future clinicians provide health services that contribute to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Many programs have sought to improve cultural safety through training at an individual level; however, it is well recognised that learners tend to internalise the patterns of behaviour to which they are commonly exposed. This project aimed to measure and reflect on the cultural climate of an Australian rural clinical school (RCS) as a whole and the collective attitudes of three different professional groups: clinicians, clinical academics and professional staff. The project then drew on Mezirow's Transformative Learning theory to design strategies to build on the cultural safety of the organisation. Clinicians, academic and professional staff at an Australian RCS were invited to participate in an online survey expressing their views on Aboriginal health using part of a previously validated tool. Survey response rate was 63%. All three groups saw Aboriginal health as a social priority. All groups recognised the fundamental role of community control in Aboriginal health; however, clinical academics were considerably more likely to disagree that the Western medical model suited the health needs of Aboriginal people. Clinicians were more likely to perceive that they treated Aboriginal patients the same as other patients. There was only weak evidence of future commitments to Aboriginal health. Importantly, clinicians, academics and professional staff demonstrated differences in their cultural safety profile which indicated the need for a tailored approach to cultural safety learning in the future. Through tailored approaches to cross-cultural training opportunities we are likely to ensure

  2. 75 FR 15611 - Safety Zone; United Portuguese SES Centennial Festa, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; United Portuguese SES Centennial Festa, San... United Portuguese SES Centennial Festa. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety... Spectaculars is sponsoring the United Portuguese SES Centennial Festa, which will include a fireworks...

  3. Safety culture in the gynecology robotics operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Melissa D; McCarroll, Michele L; Mendise, Thomas M; Ferris, Edward F; Roulette, G D; Zolton, Jessica; Andrews, Stephen J; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    To measure the safety culture in the robotics surgery operating room before and after implementation of the Robotic Operating Room Computerized Checklist (RORCC). Prospective study. Gynecology surgical staff (n = 32). An urban community hospital. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire domains examined were teamwork, safety, job satisfaction, stress recognition, perceptions of management, and working conditions. Questions and domains were described using percent agreement and the Cronbach alpha. Paired t-tests were used to describe differences before and after implementation of the checklist. Mean (SD) staff age was 46.7 (9.5) years, and most were women (78%) and worked full-time (97%). Twenty respondents (83% of nurses, 80% of surgeons, 66% of surgical technicians, and 33% of certified registered nurse anesthetists) completed the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; 6 were excluded because of non-matching identifiers. Before RORCC implementation, the highest quality of communication and collaboration was reported by surgeons and surgical technicians (100%). Certified registered nurse anesthetists reported only adequate levels of communication and collaboration with other positions. Most staff reported positive responses for teamwork (48%; α = 0.81), safety (47%; α = 0.75), working conditions (37%; α = 0.55), stress recognition (26%; α = 0.71), and perceptions of management (32%; α = 0.52). No differences were observed after RORCC implementation. Quality of communication and collaboration in the gynecology robotics operating room is high between most positions; however, safety attitude responses are low overall. No differences after RORCC implementation and low response rates may highlight lack of staff support. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Patient Safety Culture Based on Medical Staff Attitudes in Khorasan Razavi Hospitals, Northeastern Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Davoodi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since establishing a safety culture in an organization is considered as the first step in patient safety improvement, there is always a need for updated field evaluation to better plan future decisions.We performed a cross-sectional, analytic-descriptive study in 25 hospitals related to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS during a 3-month period from April to June 2012. A questionnaire, designed by previous patient safety culture studies with confirmed validity and reliability, was used and distributed among a sample of 922 staff, chosen randomly from the mentioned hospitals. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16."Organizational learning - continuous improvement" and "teamwork within unit" had the highest percentage of positive results as 79.85 ± 12.03% and 71.92 ± 17.08%, respectively; whereas "non-punitive response" to errors (21.57 ± 6.42 and "staffing" (26.36 ± 16.84 came out as the least important factors. There were no meaningful statistical relation between general features of the understudy hospitals including the number of beds, educational level or proficiency status with the general safety culture score.Most of the safety culture aspects were reported as low to moderate in terms of importance. If something needs to be modified interventionally in this respect, "the approach to confront errors" would be a wise choice. This could be achieved by establishing an atmosphere of open communication and continuous learning through elimination of the fear for reporting errors and installing a more acceptable approach in hospitals.

  5. Patient Safety Culture Based on Medical Staff Attitudes in Khorasan Razavi Hospitals, Northeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, Rozita; Mohammadzadeh Shabestari, Mahmoud; Takbiri, Afsaneh; Soltanifar, Azadeh; Sabouri, Golnaz; Rahmani, Shaghayegh; Moghiman, Toktam

    2013-11-01

    Since establishing a safety culture in an organization is considered as the first step in patient safety improvement, there is always a need for updated field evaluation to better plan future decisions. We performed a cross-sectional, analytic-descriptive study in 25 hospitals related to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS) during a 3-month period from April to June 2012. A questionnaire, designed by previous patient safety culture studies with confirmed validity and reliability, was used and distributed among a sample of 922 staff, chosen randomly from the mentioned hospitals. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16. "Organizational learning - continuous improvement" and "teamwork within unit" had the highest percentage of positive results as 79.85 ± 12.03% and 71.92 ± 17.08%, respectively; whereas "non-punitive response" to errors (21.57 ± 6.42) and "staffing" (26.36 ± 16.84) came out as the least important factors. There were no meaningful statistical relation between general features of the understudy hospitals including the number of beds, educational level or proficiency status with the general safety culture score. Most of the safety culture aspects were reported as low to moderate in terms of importance. If something needs to be modified interventionally in this respect, "the approach to confront errors" would be a wise choice. This could be achieved by establishing an atmosphere of open communication and continuous learning through elimination of the fear for reporting errors and installing a more acceptable approach in hospitals.

  6. Safety Culture in Modern Aviation Systems – Civil and Military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin-Marian IORDACHE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding important aspects of the safety culture should be the main objective for identifying hazards, mitigate and manage risk and find solutions to problems before accidents and incidents occur. The two defining elements of aeronautical decision-making are hazard and risk; risk management is an important component of decisional process and by understanding some issues regarding risk and safety, we will be able to realize the feasible solutions that we may have to apply in flight or ground operations. As aviation is in continous development and worldwide expansion, in order to better understand the associated risks and mitigate them, proper control methods which can give a thoroughly comprehension of the aeronautical system must be used.

  7. [Organisational responsibility versus individual responsibility: safety culture? About the relationship between patient safety and medical malpractice law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    The contribution is concerned with the correlations between risk information, patient safety, responsibility and liability, in particular in terms of liability law. These correlations have an impact on safety culture in healthcare, which can be evaluated positively if--in addition to good quality of medical care--as many sources of error as possible can be identified, analysed, and minimised or eliminated by corresponding measures (safety or risk management). Liability influences the conduct of individuals and enterprises; safety is (probably) also a function of liability; this should also apply to safety culture. The standard of safety culture does not only depend on individual liability for damages, but first of all on strict enterprise liability (system responsibility) and its preventive effects. Patient safety through quality and risk management is therefore also an organisational programme of considerable relevance in terms of liability law.

  8. Does health care role and experience influence perception of safety culture related to preventing infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Barbara I; Harris, Anthony D; Richards, Cheryl L; Belton, Beverly M; Dembry, Louise-Marie; Morton, David J; Xiao, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Growing evidence reveals the importance of improving safety culture in efforts to eliminate health care-associated infections. This multisite, cross-sectional survey examined the association between professional role and health care experience on infection prevention safety culture at 5 hospitals. The findings suggest that frontline health care technicians are less directly engaged in improvement efforts and safety education than other staff and that infection prevention safety culture varies more by hospital than by staff position and experience.

  9. [Relationship between job satisfaction and patient safety culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Plaza, María José; Carrera-Hueso, Francisco Javier; Roca-Castelló, María Rosa; Morro-Martín, María Dolores; Martínez-Asensi, Amparo; Fikri-Benbrahim, Narjis

    2017-05-19

    To evaluate the relationship between safety culture and job satisfaction in a medium-stay hospital, showing the relationships between the dimensions that define both constructs and identifying the dimensions with the greatest impact on both variables. Cross-sectional study conducted in 2015, using the Basque Health Service Job Satisfaction Survey and the Spanish version of the «Hospital Survey on Patient Safety» questionnaire (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality). Result Variables: high job satisfaction and high degree of perceived security (score ≥75th percentile). Predictor variables: socio-demographic characteristics and perception of the evaluated dimensions. The association between variables was quantified by adjusted odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval. The mean job satisfaction was 7.21 (standard deviation [SD]: 2.01) and the mean of perceived safety was 7.48 (SD=1.98). The 75th percentile of the distribution in both cases was 9. The socio-demographic variables had little significance, while a positive perception of many of the considered dimensions, was associated with high perception of the result variables. In the data analysis were obtained multiple significant correlations and cross-relations between the dimensions that define both constructs, as well as between the degree of satisfaction of the dimensions considered and the outcome variables. The results obtained evidenced the relationship between job satisfaction and safety culture and quantify the association degree between the studied variables. The adjusted OR identifies the variables most strongly associated with the effect and helps to select improvement areas. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture: Benchmarking Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner, Sheryl J; Rawlings, Julia E; Swartzendruber, Kelly; Delate, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    This study's objective was to assess the patient safety culture in a large, integrated health delivery system's pharmacy department to allow for benchmarking with other health systems. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in a pharmacy department consisting of staff members who provide dispensing, clinical, and support services within an integrated health delivery system. The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's 11-composite, validated Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was transcribed into an online format. All departmental staff members were invited to participate in this anonymous survey. Cronbach α and overall results and contrasts between dispensing and clinical services staff and dispensing pharmacists and technicians/clerks as percentage positive scores (PPSs) are presented. Differences in contrasts were assessed with χ tests of association. Completed questionnaires were received from 598 (69.9%) of 855 employees. Cronbach α ranged from 0.55 to 0.90. Overall, the highest and lowest composite PPSs were for patient counseling (94.5%) and staffing and work pressure (44.7%), respectively. Compared with dispensing service, the clinical service participants had statistically higher PPSs for all composites except patient counseling, communication about mistakes, and staffing and work pressure (all P > 0.05). The technicians/clerks had a statistically higher PPS compared with the pharmacists for communication about mistakes (P = 0.007). All other composites were equivalent between groups. Patient counseling consistently had the highest PPS among composites measured, but opportunities existed for improvement in all aspects measured. Future research should identify and assess interventions targeted to improving the patient safety culture in pharmacy.

  11. Changing Operating Room Culture: Implementation of a Post-Operative Debrief and Improved Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Stephen T; Wang, Doris D; Rutledge, W Caleb; Lau, Darryl; Berger, Mitchel S; Sankaran, Sujatha; Lau, Catherine Y; Imershein, Sarah G

    2017-08-23

    Patient safety is foundational to neurosurgical care. Post-procedural "debrief" checklists have been proposed to improve patient safety, but there is limited data about their use in neurosurgery. Here, we implemented an initiative to routinely perform post-operative debriefs and evaluated the impact of debriefing on operating room (OR) safety culture. A 10-question safety attitude questionnaire (SAQ) was sent to neurosurgical operating room staff at a major academic medical center before and 18-months after implementation of a post-operative debriefing initiative. Rates of debrief compliance and changes in attitudes before and after the survey were evaluated. The survey utilized a Likert scale and analyzed with standard statistical methods. After the debrief initiative, the rate of debriefing increased from 51% to 86% of cases for the neurosurgery service. Baseline SAQ responses found that neurosurgeons had a more favorable perception of OR safety than anesthesiologists and nurses. Following implementation of the post-operative debriefing process, perceptions of OR safety significantly improved for neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists and nurses. Furthermore, the disparity between nurses and surgeons was no longer significant. After debrief implementation, neurosurgical OR staff had improved perceptions of patient safety compared to surgical services that did not commonly perform debriefing. Debriefing identified OR efficiency concerns in 26.9% of cases and prevention of potential adverse events/near misses were reported in 8% of cases. Post-operative debriefing can be effectively introduced into the operating room and improves the safety culture after implementation. Debriefing is an effective tool to identify OR inefficiencies and potential adverse events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety culture and accident analysis--a socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Suman

    2007-04-11

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, the key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization--seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly.

  13. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in a Selected Number of Pharmacies Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS)

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Jamili; Hossein Ebrahimipour; Elaheh Hooshmand; Habibollah Esmaeli; Ali Vafaee Najar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient safety culture plays a pivotal role in the improvement of patient safety level in health centers. This study aimed to assess patient safety culture in the pharmacies affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran using a standard questionnaire developed by the American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Materials and Methods This analytic, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted on 108 pharmacists and pharmacy technicians in Mashha...

  14. Relationship of hospital organizational culture to patient safety climate in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christine W; Meterko, Mark; Rosen, Amy K; Shibei Zhao; Shokeen, Priti; Singer, Sara; Gaba, David M

    2009-06-01

    Improving safety climate could enhance patient safety, yet little evidence exists regarding the relationship between hospital characteristics and safety climate. This study assessed the relationship between hospitals' organizational culture and safety climate in Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals nationally. Data were collected from a sample of employees in a stratified random sample of 30 VA hospitals over a 6-month period (response rate = 50%; n = 4,625). The Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations (PSCHO) and the Zammuto and Krakower surveys were used to measure safety climate and organizational culture, respectively. Higher levels of safety climate were significantly associated with higher levels of group and entrepreneurial cultures, while lower levels of safety climate were associated with higher levels of hierarchical culture. Hospitals could use these results to design specific interventions aimed at improving safety climate.

  15. Developing Measures for Assessing the Causality of Safety Culture in a Petrochemical Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, T.-C., E-mail: tcwu@sunrise.hk.edu.t [HungKuang University, Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering (China); Lin, C.-H.; Shiau, S.-Y. [HungKuang University, Institute of Occupational Safety and Hazard Prevention (China)

    2009-12-15

    This paper discusses safety culture in the petrochemical sector and the causes and consequences of safety culture. A sample of 520 responses selected by simple random sampling completed questionnaires for this survey, the return rate was 86.75%. The research instrument comprises four sections: basic information, the safety leadership scale (SLS), the safety climate scale (SCS), and the safety performance scale (SPS). SPSS 12.0, a statistical software package, was used for item analysis, validity analysis, and reliability analysis. Exploratory factor analysis indicated that (1) SLS abstracted three factors such as safety caring, safety controlling, and safety coaching; (2) SCS comprised three factors such as emergency response, safety commitment, and risk perception; and (3) SPS was composed of accident investigation, safety training, safety inspections, and safety motivation. We conclude that the SLS, SCS, and SPS developed in this paper have good construct validity and internal consistency and can serve as the basis for future research.

  16. Patient safety culture measurement in general care: clinimetric properties of 'SCOPE'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, D.L.M.; Langelaan, M.; Vooren, R.C. van de; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Kalkman, C.J.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A supportive patient safety culture is considered to be an essential condition for improving patient safety. Assessing the current safety culture in general practice may be a first step to target improvements. To that end, we studied internal consistency and construct validity of a safet

  17. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bruijne, M.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey conducte

  18. Identifying influential individuals on intensive care units: using cluster analysis to explore culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Allan; Clark, Lindsey; Cheng, Tianyi; Franklin, Ella; Fernandez, Nicole; Ratwani, Raj; Parker, Sarah Henrickson

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify attribute patterns of influential individuals in intensive care units using unsupervised cluster analysis. Despite the acknowledgement that culture of an organisation is critical to improving patient safety, specific methods to shift culture have not been explicitly identified. A social network analysis survey was conducted and an unsupervised cluster analysis was used. A total of 100 surveys were gathered. Unsupervised cluster analysis was used to group individuals with similar dimensions highlighting three general genres of influencers: well-rounded, knowledge and relational. Culture is created locally by individual influencers. Cluster analysis is an effective way to identify common characteristics among members of an intensive care unit team that are noted as highly influential by their peers. To change culture, identifying and then integrating the influencers in intervention development and dissemination may create more sustainable and effective culture change. Additional studies are ongoing to test the effectiveness of utilising these influencers to disseminate patient safety interventions. This study offers an approach that can be helpful in both identifying and understanding influential team members and may be an important aspect of developing methods to change organisational culture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Quality management and safety culture in medicine - Do standard quality reports provide insights into the human factor of patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischet, Werner; Schusterschitz, Claudia

    2009-12-15

    In 1999 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published the landmark report "To err is human: building a safer healthcare system" highlighting critical deficiencies within the area of patient safety. As a consequence, safety culture evolved as a core component of quality management in medicine. Purpose of the investigation at hand was to find out to what extent this is reflected in standard quality reports issued by German hospitals providing maximum medical care. Reports issued for the year 2006 were analysed with respect to the appearance of indicators for the presence of a safety culture. Results suggest that despite the huge awareness for patient safety caused by the IOM report, the topic of safety culture does not get the anticipated attention within the quality reports. This may indicate that the current requirements for the quality reports do not facilitate transparency when it comes to the human factor of patient safety.

  20. Patient safety culture in a large teaching hospital in Riyadh: baseline assessment, comparative analysis and opportunities for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Sheikh, Farheen; Garcia, Nereo A; Jamal, Diana; Abdo, Ayman

    2014-03-12

    In light of the immense attention given to patient safety, this paper details the findings of a baseline assessment of the patient safety culture in a large hospital in Riyadh and compares results with regional and international studies that utilized the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. This study also aims to explore the association between patient safety culture predictors and outcomes, considering respondent characteristics and facility size. This cross sectional study adopted a customized version of the HSOPSC and targeted hospital staff fitting sampling criteria (physicians, nurses, clinical and non-clinical staff, pharmacy and laboratory staff, dietary and radiology staff, supervisors, and hospital managers). 3000 questionnaires were sent and 2572 were returned (response rate of 85.7%). Areas of strength were Organizational Learning and Continuous Improvement and Teamwork within units whereas areas requiring improvement were hospital non-punitive response to error, staffing, and Communication Openness. The comparative analysis noted several areas requiring improvement when results on survey composites were compared with results from Lebanon, and the United States. Regression analysis showed associations between higher patient safety aggregate score and greater age (46 years and above), longer work experience, having a Baccalaureate degree, and being a physician or other health professional. Patient safety practices are crucial toward improving overall performance and quality of services in healthcare organizations. Much can be done in the sampled organizations and in the context of KSA in general to improve areas of weakness and further enhance areas of strength.

  1. Organisational culture: variation across hospitals and connection to patient safety climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speroff, T; Nwosu, S; Greevy, R; Weinger, M B; Talbot, T R; Wall, R J; Deshpande, J K; France, D J; Ely, E W; Burgess, H; Englebright, J; Williams, M V; Dittus, R S

    2010-12-01

    Bureaucratic organisational culture is less favourable to quality improvement, whereas organisations with group (teamwork) culture are better aligned for quality improvement. To determine if an organisational group culture shows better alignment with patient safety climate. Cross-sectional administration of questionnaires. Setting 40 Hospital Corporation of America hospitals. 1406 nurses, ancillary staff, allied staff and physicians. Competing Values Measure of Organisational Culture, Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), Safety Climate Survey (SCSc) and Information and Analysis (IA). The Cronbach alpha was 0.81 for the group culture scale and 0.72 for the hierarchical culture scale. Group culture was positively correlated with SAQ and its subscales (from correlation coefficient r = 0.44 to 0.55, except situational recognition), ScSc (r = 0.47) and IA (r = 0.33). Hierarchical culture was negatively correlated with the SAQ scales, SCSc and IA. Among the 40 hospitals, 37.5% had a hierarchical dominant culture, 37.5% a dominant group culture and 25% a balanced culture. Group culture hospitals had significantly higher safety climate scores than hierarchical culture hospitals. The magnitude of these relationships was not affected after adjusting for provider job type and hospital characteristics. Hospitals vary in organisational culture, and the type of culture relates to the safety climate within the hospital. In combination with prior studies, these results suggest that a healthcare organisation's culture is a critical factor in the development of its patient safety climate and in the successful implementation of quality improvement initiatives.

  2. Linking nursing unit's culture to organizational effectiveness: a measurement tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Organizational culture consists of the deep underlying assumptions, beliefs, and values that are shared by members of the organization and typically operate unconsciously. The four organizational culture traits of the Denison Organizational Culture Model (DOCM) are characteristics of organizational effectiveness, which include adaptability, involvement, consistency, and mission. Effective organizations demonstrate high levels of the four cultural traits which reflect their ability to balance the dynamic tension between the need for stability and the need for flexibility within the organization. The Denison Organizational Culture Survey (DOCS) is a measurement tool that was founded on the theoretical framework of the DOCM, and in the field of business, is one of the most commonly used tools for measuring organizational culture. The DOCS offers a promising approach to operationalizing and measuring the link between organizational culture and organizational effectiveness in the context of nursing units.

  3. The Challenges of Safety Culture: No more risk!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Melnikova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available According to A. Maslow’s [1] hierarchy of human needs the need for safety and security is a priority for mankind. The concept ‘safety culture’ appeared only in 1986, when theChernobyldisaster made the whole world muse upon human relationship with technology [2]. This global catastrophe was a caution, but not for everyone. Potent academic systems and elaborated instruments of a huge economical value have been invoked in maintaining the satisfaction of biogenetic needs, whereas any manual on safety topic has not been issued yet. Even such progressive communities as the European Union, elaborating long-term strategic decisions, do not find clear and reasonable principles that would encourage to choose safe technologies with respect to present and future generations. Giving way to the ostensible effectiveness of centralized technologies such as equipment, communication, energetic that are well-disposed to big business, the majority of politicians and even scientists are not able to estimate the risk that is programmed in the choice of dangerous and insecure technical decisions. It is not still realized that none of the technologies is worth a human life or safety.The level of social maturity is a factor stipulating the merge of two concepts ‘safety’ and „a person“. At the time when industrial priorities were dominant the concept ‘safety techniques’ had been used putting stress on peculiarities of working with technical devices and on the ways manpower could be adjusted to them. Later the term ‘Safety of labour’ appeared. It drew attention to the labour process and its peculiarities. The assimilation of European culture has determined the introduction of the notion ‘personnel safety and health’ to labour relations. The postindustrial stage of humanity development brings the new understanding of major values. Individual is now identified as a personality as well as human life is understood as the major value. The natural

  4. 75 FR 42818 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Collection of Safety Culture Data for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ...; Collection of Safety Culture Data for Program Evaluation AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology... Culture Data for Program Evaluation. Type of Request: Approval of a new information collection. OMB... separate OMB approval for the collection of the remaining safety culture surveys because of changes to the...

  5. SAFETY

    CERN Document Server

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  6. Differences in Perceptions of Patient Safety Culture between Charge and Noncharge Nurses: Implications for Effectiveness Outcomes Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deleise Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of evidence-based practice guidelines can be influenced by nurses’ perceptions of the organizational safety culture. Shift-by-shift management of each nursing unit is designated to a subset of staff nurses (charge nurses, whom are often recruited as champions for change. The findings indicate that compared to charge nurses, noncharge nurses were more positive about overall perceptions of safety (=.05 and teamwork (<.05. Among charge nurses, significant differences were observed based on the number of years’ experience in charge: perception of teamwork within units [(3,365=3.52, <.01]; overall perceptions of safety, [(3,365=4.20, <.05]; safety grade for work area [(3,360=2.61, <.05]; number of events reported within the last month [(3,362=3.49, <.05]. These findings provide important insights to organizational contextual factors that may impact effectiveness outcomes research in the future.

  7. [Real-time safety audits in a neonatal unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergon-Sendin, Elena; Perez-Grande, María Del Carmen; Lora-Pablos, David; Melgar-Bonis, Ana; Ureta-Velasco, Noelia; Moral-Pumarega, María Teresa; Pallas-Alonso, Carmen Rosa

    2017-09-01

    Random audits are a safety tool to help in the prevention of adverse events, but they have not been widely used in hospitals. The aim of the study was to determine, through random safety audits, whether the information and material required for resuscitation were available for each patient in a neonatal intensive care unit and determine if factors related to the patient, time or location affect the implementation of the recommendations. Prospective observational study conducted in a level III-C neonatal intensive care unit during the year 2012. The evaluation of written information on the endotracheal tube, mask and ambu bag prepared of each patient and laryngoscopes of the emergency trolley were included within a broader audit of technological resources and study procedures. The technological resources and procedures were randomly selected twice a week for audit. Appropriate overall use was defined when all evaluated variables were correctly programmed in the same procedure. A total of 296 audits were performed. The kappa coefficient of inter-observer agreement was 0.93. The rate of appropriate overall use of written information and material required for resuscitation was 62.50% (185/296). Mask and ambu bag prepared for each patient was the variable with better compliance (97.3%, P=.001). Significant differences were found with improved usage during weekends versus working-day (73.97 vs. 58.74%, P=.01), and the rest of the year versus 3(rd) quarter (66.06 vs. 52%, P=.02). Only in 62.5% of cases was the information and the material necessary to attend to a critical situation urgently easily available. Opportunities for improvement were identified through the audits. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Improving patient safety: Usefulness of safety checklists in a neonatal unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga Redondo, María; Sanz López, Ester; Rodríguez Sánchez de la Blanca, Ana; Marsinyach Ros, Itziar; Collados Gómez, Laura; Díaz Redondo, Alicia; Sánchez Luna, Manuel

    2017-01-27

    Due to the complexity and characteristics of their patients, neonatal units are risk areas for the development of adverse events (AE). For this reason, there is a need to introduce and implement some tools and strategies that will help to improve the safety of the neonatal patient. Safety check-lists have shown to be a useful tool in other health areas but they are not sufficiently developed in Neonatal Units. A quasi-experimental prospective study was conducted on the design and implementation of the use of a checklist and evaluation of its usefulness for detecting incidents. The satisfaction of the health professionals on using the checklist tool was also assessed. The compliance rate in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was 56.5%, with 4.03 incidents per patient being detected. One incident was detected for every 5.3 checklists used. The most frequent detected incidents were those related to medication, followed by inadequate alarm thresholds, adjustments of the monitors, and medication pumps. The large majority (75%) of the NICU health professionals considered the checklist useful or very useful, and 68.75% considered that its use had managed to avoid an AE. The overall satisfaction was 83.33% for the professionals with less than 5 years working experience, and 44.4% of the professionals with more than 5 years of experience were pleased or very pleased. The checklists have shown to be a useful tool for the detection of incidents, especially in NICU, with a positive assessment from the health professionals of the unit. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. The United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN): Enhancing Microbial Genomics Research through Living Microbe Culture Collections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boundy-Mills, K.; Hess, Matthias; Bennett, A. R.; Ryan, Matthew; Kang, Seogchan; Nobles, David; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Torok, Tamas; Brown, Daniel R; Cho, Juliana; Wertz, John E.; Mukherjee, Supratim; Cady, Sherry L.; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN; http://usccn.org) is "to facilitate the safe and responsible utilization of microbial resources for research, education, industry, medicine, and agriculture for the betterment of human kind." Microbial culture collections are a key component of life science research, biotechnology, and emerging global biobased economies. Representatives and users of several microbial culture collections from the United States and Europe gathered at the University of California, Davis, to discuss how collections of microorganisms can better serve users and stakeholders and to showcase existing resources available in public culture collections.

  10. Understanding the relationship between safety culture dimensions and safety performance of construction projects through partial least square method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latief, Yusuf; Machfudiyanto, Rossy A.; Arifuddin, Rosmariani; Yogiswara, Yoko

    2017-03-01

    Based on the data, 32% of accidental cases in Indonesia occurs on constructional sectors. It is supported by the data from Public Work and Housing Department that 27.43% of the implementation level of Safety Management System policy at construction companies in Indonesia remains unsafe categories. Moreover, there are dimensions of occupational safety culture formed including leadership, behavior, strategy, policy, process, people, safety cost, value and contract system. The aim of this study is to determine the model of an effective safety culture and know the relationship between dimensions in construction industry. The method used in this research was questionnaire survey which was distributed to the sample of construction companies either in a national private one in Indonesia. The result of this research is supposed to be able to illustrate the development of the relationship among occupational safety culture dimensions which have influences to the performances of constructional companies in Indonesia.

  11. Safety culture assessment in community pharmacy: development, face validity, and feasibility of the Manchester Patient Safety Assessment Framework

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashcroft, D M; Morecroft, C; Parker, D; Noyce, P R

    2005-01-01

    To develop a framework that could be used by community pharmacies to self-assess their current level of safety culture maturity, which has high face validity and is both acceptable and feasible for use in this setting...

  12. Safety culture assessment in community pharmacy: development, face validity, and feasibility of the Manchester Patient Safety Assessment Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Ashcroft, D; Morecroft, C; D. Parker; Noyce, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a framework that could be used by community pharmacies to self-assess their current level of safety culture maturity, which has high face validity and is both acceptable and feasible for use in this setting.

  13. Attitude toward the Patient Safety Culture in healthcare systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoon Laal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient Safety Culture (PSC involves a harmonious pattern of individual and organization behaviors based on common beliefs and values. This study aimed to evaluate the attitude of healthcare providers toward PSC in the hospitals and clinics of Zabol city, Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. Sample population consisted of the physicians, nurses, and paraclinical staff (radiologists and laboratory experts engaged in different healthcare centers of Zabol city, Iran. Data were collected using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.22 at the significance level of 0.05. Results: In total, 231 healthcare practitioners were enrolled in this study. Participants were divided into three groups of physicians, nurses, and paraclinical staff (n=77, 33.33%. Mean of age and clinical experience was 29.94 and 6.23 years, respectively. Among the main aspects of PSC, “general understanding of patient safety” had the highest mean score (13.53, and the lowest mean score was achieved in “non-punitive response to error” (8.89. In the aspect of “manager expectations and actions promoting safety”, a significant difference was observed in the mean scores of the study groups (P=0.030. Moreover, our results showed a significant difference between the mean scores of physicians and nurses in the aspect of “openness and honesty in communication” (P=0.023. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, improvement of PSC is necessary for the efficient management of hospitals and clinics. This is attainable through collaborative and instructive workshops, developing educational programs, and designing incident reporting systems.

  14. Developing Expert Teams with a Strong Safety Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Would you like to lead a world renowned team that draws out all the talents and expertise of its members and consistently out performs all others in the industry? Ever wonder why so many organizations fail to truly learn from past mistakes only to repeat the same ones at a later date? Are you a program/project manager or team member in a high-risk organization where the decisions made often carry the highest of consequences? Leadership, communication, team building, critical decision-making and continuous team improvement skills and behaviors are mere talking points without the attitudes, commitment and strategies necessary to make them the very fabric of a team. Developing Expert Teams with a Strong Safety Culture, will provide you with proven knowledge and strategies to take your team soaring to heights you may have not thought possible. A myriad of teams have applied these strategies and techniques within their organization team environments: military and commercial aviation, astronaut flight crews, Shuttle flight controllers, members of the Space Shuttle Program Mission Management Team, air traffic controllers, nuclear power control teams, surgical teams, and the fire service report having spectacular success. Many industry leaders are beginning to realize that although the circumstances and environments of these teams may differ greatly to their own, the core elements, governing principles and dynamics involved in managing and building a stellar safety conscious team remain identical.

  15. Developing Expert Teams with a Strong Safety Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Would you like to lead a world renowned team that draws out all the talents and expertise of its members and consistently out performs all others in the industry? Ever wonder why so many organizations fail to truly learn from past mistakes only to repeat the same ones at a later date? Are you a program/project manager or team member in a high-risk organization where the decisions made often carry the highest of consequences? Leadership, communication, team building, critical decision-making and continuous team improvement skills and behaviors are mere talking points without the attitudes, commitment and strategies necessary to make them the very fabric of a team. Developing Expert Teams with a Strong Safety Culture, will provide you with proven knowledge and strategies to take your team soaring to heights you may have not thought possible. A myriad of teams have applied these strategies and techniques within their organization team environments: military and commercial aviation, astronaut flight crews, Shuttle flight controllers, members of the Space Shuttle Program Mission Management Team, air traffic controllers, nuclear power control teams, surgical teams, and the fire service report having spectacular success. Many industry leaders are beginning to realize that although the circumstances and environments of these teams may differ greatly to their own, the core elements, governing principles and dynamics involved in managing and building a stellar safety conscious team remain identical.

  16. [Patient safety culture and related factors in a network of Spanish public hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Zenewton André da Silva; Oliveira, Adriana Catarina de Souza; Hernández, Pedro Jesus Saturno

    2013-02-01

    The objectives were to describe Patient Safety Culture (PSC) in a regional network of public hospitals, according to the perceptions of health professionals, and analyze the influence of socio-professional factors. A survey was conducted with 1,113 professionals from eight Spanish hospitals, using a questionnaire that explores 12 dimensions of PSC. Perceptions were described through the Percentage of Positive (PPR) and Negative Responses (PNR) by dimension, and the association of factors was analyzed using multivariate linear regression. The dimension "Teamwork within the same Unit" had the highest PPR (73.5), and "Staffing" the highest PNR (61). The variables "Service" (Pharmacy, Surgical Center) and "Profession" (Nurses) were significantly associated to positive assessments. Thus, strategies to improve PSC should prioritize rational distribution of human resources, and take advantage of the positive perceived relationship within Units. Moreover, pharmaceutical and surgical services, as well as nurses should probably be benchmarked by other services and professionals.

  17. Safety culture and accident analysis-A socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Suman [Risk Analyst (India)]. E-mail: sumanashokrao@yahoo.co.in

    2007-04-11

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, Key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization-seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly.

  18. Safety culture in a pharmacy setting using a pharmacy survey on patient safety culture: a cross-sectional study in China

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, P L; Zhang, L. H.; Zhang, M.M; Zhang, L.L.; Zhang,C.; Qin, S F; Li, X. L.; Liu, K. X.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the attitudes and perceptions of patient safety culture for pharmacy workers in China by using a Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (PSOPSC), and to assess the psychometric properties of the translated Chinese language version of the PSOPSC. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Data were obtained from 20 hospital pharmacies in the southwest part of China. Methods We performed χ2 test to explore the differences on pharmacy staff in different hospital and quali...

  19. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice : A cluster randomised trial a cluster randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim: To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting: A three-arm cluster randomised trial

  20. Safety culture assessment in community pharmacy: development, face validity, and feasibility of the Manchester Patient Safety Assessment Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, D M; Morecroft, C; Parker, D; Noyce, P R

    2005-12-01

    To develop a framework that could be used by community pharmacies to self-assess their current level of safety culture maturity, which has high face validity and is both acceptable and feasible for use in this setting. An iterative review process in which the framework was developed and evaluated through a series of 10 focus groups with a purposive sample of 67 community pharmacists and support staff in the UK. Development of the framework and qualitative process feedback on its acceptability, face validity, and feasibility for use in community pharmacies. Using this process, a version of the Manchester Patient Safety Assessment Framework (MaPSAF) was developed that is suitable for application to community pharmacies. The participants were able to understand the concepts, recognised differences between the five stages of safety culture maturity, and concurred with the descriptions from personal experience. They also indicated that they would be willing to use the framework but recognised that staff would require protected time in order to complete the assessment. In practice the MaPSAF is likely to have a number of uses including raising awareness about patient safety and illustrating any differences in perception between staff, stimulating discussion about the strengths and weaknesses of patient safety culture within the pharmacy, identifying areas for improvement, and evaluating patient safety interventions and tracking changes over time. This will support the development of a mature safety culture in community pharmacies.

  1. Cultural differences between construction professionals in Denmark and United Kingdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, M.R.

    This report presents the results of an investigation into cultural differences between professional members of the construction sector of Denmark and the United Kingdom. In particular it refers to differences between Arkitekter/Architects, Civilingeniører/Civil Engineers and Bygningskonstruktører...

  2. Unit 1 Cultural relics课程设计(英文)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑亮; 杨玲

    2011-01-01

    Teaching content:Unit 1 cultural relicsreading Teaching goals:1)Train the students’reading ability 2 )Learn som ething aboutthe Amber Room 3 )Learn som e useful phrases Teaching Methods & Aids:1)Task-based learning 2 ) CAI (multi-media,com puter,tape recorder,blackboard)

  3. A Multi-Cultural Women's History Elementary Curriculum Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomin, Barbara; Burgoa, Carol

    This curriculum unit for elementary students contains five short biographies of American women from different cultural groups. (1) Mary Shadd Cary--teacher, newspaper editor, and lawyer--was a free Black active as an abolitionist, a proponent of black migration to Canada before the Civil War, and a suffragist; (2) Frances Willard--teacher and the…

  4. Workplace engagement and workers' compensation claims as predictors for patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Jonathon; Baqai, Waheed; Witters, Dan; Harter, Jim; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Kanitkar, Kirti; Pappas, James

    2012-12-01

    Demonstrate the relationship between employee engagement and workplace safety for predicting patient safety culture. Patient safety is an issue for the U.S. health-care system, and health care has some of the highest rates of nonfatal workplace injuries. Understanding the types of injuries sustained by health-care employees, the type of safety environment employees of health-care organizations work in, and how employee engagement affects patient safety is vital to improving the safety of both employees and patients. The Gallup Q survey and an approved, abbreviated, and validated subset of questions from the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture were administered to staff at a large tertiary academic medical center in 2007 and 2009. After controlling for demographic variables, researchers conducted a longitudinal, hierarchical linear regression analysis to study the unique contributions of employee engagement, changes in employee engagement, and employee safety in predicting patient safety culture. Teams with higher baseline engagement, more positive change in engagement, fewer workers' compensation claims, and fewer part-time associates in previous years had stronger patient safety cultures in 2009. Baseline engagement and change in engagement were the strongest independent predictors of patient safety culture in 2009. Engagement and compensation claims were additive and complimentary predictors, independent of other variables in the analysis, including the demographic composition of the workgroups in the study. A synergistic effect exists between employee engagement and decreased levels of workers' compensation claims for improving patient safety culture. Organizations can improve engagement and implement safety policies, procedures, and devices for employees with an ultimate effect of improving patient safety culture.

  5. Studying the Relationship between Individual and Organizational Factors and Nurses' Perception of Patient Safety Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Abdolahzadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Safety culture is considered as an important factor in improving patient safety. Therefore, identifying individual and organizational factors affecting safety culture is crucial. This study was carried out to determine individual and organizational factors associated with nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Methods: The present descriptive study included 940 nurses working in four training hospitals affiliated with Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran. Data was collected through the self-report questionnaire of patient safety culture. Descriptive (number, percent, mean, and standard deviation and inferential (t-test and analysis of variance statistics were used to analyze the data in SPSS. Results: Nurses' perception of patient safety culture was significantly correlated with marital status, workplace, and overtime hours. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that some individual and organizational factors can impact on nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Nursing authorities should thus pay more attention to factors which promote patient safety culture and ultimately the safety of provided services.

  6. Characteristics of organizational culture at the maintenance units of two Nordic nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, Teemu [VTT Industrial Systems, P.O. Box 1301, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)]. E-mail: teemu.reiman@vtt.fi; Oedewald, Pia [VTT Industrial Systems, P.O. Box 1301, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Rollenhagen, Carl [Maelardalen University, P.O. Box 325, SE-631 05 Eskilstuna (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    This study aims to characterize and assess the organizational cultures of two Nordic nuclear power plant (NPP) maintenance units. The research consisted of NPP maintenance units of Forsmark (Sweden) and Olkiluoto (Finland). The study strives to anticipate the consequences of the current practices, conceptions and assumptions in the given organizations to their ability and willingness to fulfill the organizational core task. The methods utilized in the study were organizational culture and core task questionnaire (CULTURE02) and semi-structured interviews. Similarities and differences in the perceived organizational values, conceptions of one's own work, conceptions of the demands of the maintenance task and organizational practices at the maintenance units were explored. The maintenance units at Olkiluoto and Forsmark had quite different organizational cultures, but they also shared a set of dimensions such as strong personal emphasis placed on safety. The authors propose that different cultural features and organizational practices may be equally effective from the perspective of the core task. The results show that due to the complexity of the maintenance work, the case organizations tend to emphasize some aspects of the maintenance task more than others. The reliability consequences of these cultural solutions to the maintenance task are discussed. The authors propose that the organizational core task, in this case the maintenance task, should be clear for all the workers. The results give implications that this has been a challenge recently as the maintenance work has been changing. The concepts of organizational core task and organizational culture could be useful as management tools to anticipate the consequences of organizational changes.

  7. Culture of human cells in experimental units for spaceflight impacts on their behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Moscheni, Claudia; Maier, Jeanette Am; Castiglioni, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Because space missions produce pathophysiological alterations such as cardiovascular disorders and bone demineralization which are very common on Earth, biomedical research in space is a frontier that holds important promises not only to counterbalance space-associated disorders in astronauts but also to ameliorate the health of Earth-bound population. Experiments in space are complex to design. Cells must be cultured in closed cell culture systems (from now defined experimental units (EUs)), which are biocompatible, functional, safe to minimize any potential hazard to the crew, and with a high degree of automation. Therefore, to perform experiments in orbit, it is relevant to know how closely culture in the EUs reflects cellular behavior under normal growth conditions. We compared the performances in these units of three different human cell types, which were recently space flown, i.e. bone mesenchymal stem cells, micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells are only slightly and transiently affected by culture in the EUs, whereas these devices accelerate mesenchymal stem cell reprogramming toward osteogenic differentiation, in part by increasing the amounts of reactive oxygen species. We conclude that cell culture conditions in the EUs do not exactly mimic what happens in a culture dish and that more efforts are necessary to optimize these devices for biomedical experiments in space. Impact statement Cell cultures represent valuable preclinical models to decipher pathogenic circuitries. This is true also for biomedical research in space. A lot has been learnt about cell adaptation and reaction from the experiments performed on many different cell types flown to space. Obviously, cell culture in space has to meet specific requirements for the safety of the crew and to comply with the unique environmental challenges. For these reasons, specific devices for cell culture in space have been developed. It is important to clarify whether these

  8. Effectiveness evaluation methodology for safety processes to enhance organisational culture in hazardous installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengolini, A; Debarberis, L

    2008-06-30

    Safety performance indicators are widely collected and used in hazardous installations. The IAEA, OECD and other international organisations have developed approaches that strongly promote deployment of safety performance indicators. These indicators focus mainly on operational performance, but some of them also address organisational and safety culture aspects. However, operators of hazardous installations, in particular those with limited resources and time constraints, often find it difficult to collect the large number of different safety performance indicators. Moreover, they also have difficulties with giving a meaning to the numbers and trends recorded, especially to those that should reflect a positive safety culture. In this light, the aim of this article is to address the need to monitor and assess progress on implementation of a programme to enhance safety and organisational culture. It proposes a specific process-view approach to effectiveness evaluation of organisational and safety culture indicators by means of a multi-level system in which safety processes and staff involvement in defining improvement activities are central. In this way safety becomes fully embedded in staff activities. Key members of personnel become directly involved in identifying and supplying leading indicators relating to their own daily activity and become responsible and accountable for keeping the measurement system alive. Besides use of lagging indicators, particular emphasis is placed on the importance of identifying and selecting leading indicators which can be used to drive safety performance for organisational and safety culture aspects as well.

  9. 75 FR 1656 - Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public Comments; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... COMMISSION Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public Comments; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Issuance of draft safety culture policy statement and notice of opportunity for public comment; Extension of comment period. SUMMARY: On November...

  10. Safety Culture Assessment in Petrochemical Industry: A Comparative Study of Two Algerian Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assia Boughaba

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: The comparison between the two petrochemical plants of the group Sonatrach confirms these results in which Company A, the managers of which are English and Norwegian, distinguishes itself by the maturity of their safety culture has significantly higher evaluations than the company B, who is constituted of Algerian staff, in terms of safety management practices and safety performance.

  11. A Survey of Occupational Safety & Health Libraries in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Karen S.

    There is very little published information available about occupational safety and health libraries. This study identified, described, and compared the occupational safety and health libraries in the United States. The questionnaire first filtered out those libraries that did not fit the definition of an occupational safety and health library;…

  12. Assessment of patient safety culture among healthcare providers at a teaching hospital in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Fotouh, A M; Ismail, N A; Ez Elarab, H S; Wassif, G O

    2012-04-01

    A previous study in Cairo, Egypt highlighted the need to improve the patient safety culture among health-care providers at Ain Shams University hospitals. This descriptive cross-sectional study assessed healthcare providers' perceptions of patient safety culture within the organization and determined factors that played a role in patient safety culture. A representative sample of 510 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, technicians and labourers in different departments answered an Arabic version of the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality hospital survey for patient safety culture. The highest mean composite positive score among the 12 dimensions was for the organizational learning for continuous improvement (78.2%), followed by teamwork (58.1%). The lowest mean score was for the dimension of non-punitive response to error (19.5%). Patient safety culture still has many areas for improvement that need continuous evaluation and monitoring to attain a safe environment both for patients and health-care providers.

  13. 77 FR 74781 - Safety Zones; Columbia Grain and United Grain Corporation Facilities; Columbia and Willamette Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Columbia Grain and United Grain.... SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing temporary safety zones around the Columbia Grain facility on the Willamette River in Portland, OR, and the United Grain Corporation facility on the Columbia River in...

  14. The effects of organizational commitment and structural empowerment on patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Sujin K; Horwitz, Irwin B

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between patient safety culture and two attitudinal constructs: affective organizational commitment and structural empowerment. In doing so, the main and interaction effects of the two constructs on the perception of patient safety culture were assessed using a cohort of physicians. Design/methodology/approach Affective commitment was measured with the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire, whereas structural empowerment was assessed with the Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II. The abbreviated versions of these surveys were administered to a cohort of 71 post-doctoral medical residents. For the data analysis, hierarchical regression analyses were performed for the main and interaction effects of affective commitment and structural empowerment on the perception of patient safety culture. Findings A total of 63 surveys were analyzed. The results revealed that both affective commitment and structural empowerment were positively related to patient safety culture. A potential interaction effect of the two attitudinal constructs on patient safety culture was tested but no such effect was detected. Research limitations/implications This study suggests that there are potential benefits of promoting affective commitment and structural empowerment for patient safety culture in health care organizations. By identifying the positive associations between the two constructs and patient safety culture, this study provides additional empirical support for Kanter's theoretical tenet that structural and organizational support together helps to shape the perceptions of patient safety culture. Originality/value Despite the wide recognition of employee empowerment and commitment in organizational research, there has still been a paucity of empirical studies specifically assessing their effects on patient safety culture in health care organizations. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first

  15. International Safety Management – Safety Management Systems and the Challenges of Changing a Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Hanchrow

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past generation, the ISM code has brought forth tremendous opportunities to investigate and enhance the human factor in shipping through the implementation of Safety Management Systems. One of the critical factors to this implementation has been mandatory compliance and a requirement for obtaining a Document of Compliance (DOC for vessels operating globally or at least internationally. A primary objective of these systems is to maintain them as “living” or “dynamic” systems that are always evolving. As the ISM code has evolved, there have been instances where large organizations have opted to maintain a voluntary DOC from their respective class society. This has been accomplished with a large human factor element as typically an organizational culture does not always accept change readily especially if there is not a legal requirement to do so. In other words, when considering maritime training is it possible that organizations may represent cultural challenges? The intent of this paper will be to research large maritime operations that have opted for a document of compliance voluntarily and compare them to similar organizations that have been mandated by international law to do the same. The result should be to gain insight into the human factors that must contribute to a culture change in the organization for the purposes of a legal requirement versus the human factors that contribute to a voluntary establishment of a safety management system. This analysis will include both the executive decision making that designs a system implementation and the operational sector that must execute its implementation. All success and failures of education and training can be determined by the outcome. Did the training achieve its goal? Or has the education prepared the students to embrace a new idea in conjunction with a company goal or a new regulatory scheme? In qualifying the goal of a successful ISM integration by examining both

  16. Safety culture in a pharmacy setting using a pharmacy survey on patient safety culture: a cross-sectional study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, P L; Zhang, L H; Zhang, M M; Zhang, L L; Zhang, C; Qin, S F; Li, X L; Liu, K X

    2014-06-30

    To explore the attitudes and perceptions of patient safety culture for pharmacy workers in China by using a Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (PSOPSC), and to assess the psychometric properties of the translated Chinese language version of the PSOPSC. Cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from 20 hospital pharmacies in the southwest part of China. We performed χ(2) test to explore the differences on pharmacy staff in different hospital and qualification levels and countries towards patient safety culture. We also computed descriptive statistics, internal consistency coefficients and intersubscale correlation analysis, and then conducted an exploratory factor analysis. A test-retest was performed to assess reproducibility of the items. A total of 630 questionnaires were distributed of which 527 were responded to validly (response rate 84%). The positive response rate for each item ranged from 37% to 90%. The positive response rate on three dimensions ('Teamwork', 'Staff Training and Skills' and 'Staffing, Work Pressure and Pace') was higher than that of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) data (ppatient safety culture at different hospital and qualification levels. The internal consistency of the total survey was comparatively satisfied (Cronbach's α=0.89). The results demonstrated that among the pharmacy staffs surveyed in China, there was a positive attitude towards patient safety culture in their organisations. Identifying perspectives of patient safety culture from pharmacists in different hospital and qualification levels are important, since this can help support decisions about action to improve safety culture in pharmacy settings. The Chinese translation of the PSOPSC questionnaire (V.2012) applied in our study is acceptable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  18. Validity and reliability of Turkish version of "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" and perception of patient safety in public hospitals in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Filiz Emel; Bodur Said

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) is used to assess safety culture in many countries. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Turkish for the study of patient safety culture in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study is threefold: to determine the validity and reliability of the translated form of HSOPS, to evaluate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety in Turkish public hospitals, and to compare finding with U.S. hospit...

  19. Preventing Harm in the ICU-Building a Culture of Safety and Engaging Patients and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Kevin C; Schwarz, Jennifer J; Gross, A Kendall; Anderson, Wendy G; Liu, Kathleen D; Romig, Mark C; Schell-Chaple, Hildy; Pronovost, Peter J; Sapirstein, Adam; Gropper, Michael A; Lipshutz, Angela K M

    2017-09-01

    Preventing harm remains a persistent challenge in the ICU despite evidence-based practices known to reduce the prevalence of adverse events. This review seeks to describe the critical role of safety culture and patient and family engagement in successful quality improvement initiatives in the ICU. We review the evidence supporting the impact of safety culture and provide practical guidance for those wishing to implement initiatives aimed at improving safety culture and more effectively integrate patients and families in such efforts. Literature review using PubMed including evaluation of key studies assessing large-scale quality improvement efforts in the ICU, impact of safety culture on patient outcomes, methodologies for quality improvement commonly used in healthcare, and patient and family engagement. Print and web-based resources from leading patient safety organizations were also searched. Our group completed a review of original studies, review articles, book chapters, and recommendations from leading patient safety organizations. Our group determined by consensus which resources would best inform this review. A strong safety culture is associated with reduced adverse events, lower mortality rates, and lower costs. Quality improvement efforts have been shown to be more effective and sustainable when paired with a strong safety culture. Different methodologies exist for quality improvement in the ICU; a thoughtful approach to implementation that engages frontline providers and administrative leadership is essential for success. Efforts to substantively include patients and families in the processes of quality improvement work in the ICU should be expanded. Efforts to establish a culture of safety and meaningfully engage patients and families should form the foundation for all safety interventions in the ICU. This review describes an approach that integrates components of several proven quality improvement methodologies to enhance safety culture in the ICU and

  20. Evaluation of patient safety culture among Malaysian retail pharmacists: results of a self-reported survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandy, Palanisamy; Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Wei, Tan Tyng; Loon, Tan Wee; Yee, Lim Chong

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety is a major public health issue, and the knowledge, skills, and experience of health professionals are very much essential for improving patient safety. Patient safety and medication error are very much associated. Pharmacists play a significant role in patient safety. The function of pharmacists in the medication use process is very different from medical and nursing colleagues. Medication dispensing accuracy is a vital element to ensure the safety and quality of medication use. To evaluate the attitude and perception of the pharmacist toward patient safety in retail pharmacies setup in Malaysia. A Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was used to assess patient safety culture, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the convenience sampling method was adopted. The overall positive response rate ranged from 31.20% to 87.43%, and the average positive response rate was found to be 67%. Among all the eleven domains pertaining to patient safety culture, the scores of "staff training and skills" were less. Communication openness, and patient counseling are common, but not practiced regularly in the Malaysian retail pharmacy setup compared with those in USA. The overall perception of patient safety of an acceptable level in the current retail pharmacy setup. The study revealed that staff training, skills, communication in patient counseling, and communication across shifts and about mistakes are less in current retail pharmacy setup. The overall perception of patient safety should be improved by educating the pharmacists about the significance and essential of patient safety.

  1. Adverse events analysis as an educational tool to improve patient safety culture in primary care: A randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramil-Hermida Luis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is a leading item on the policy agenda of both major international health organizations and advanced countries generally. The quantitative description of the phenomena has given rise to intense concern with the issue in institutions and organizations, leading to a number of initiatives and research projects and the promotion of patient safety culture, with training becoming a priority both in Spain and internationally. To date, most studies have been conducted in a hospital setting, even though primary care is the type most commonly used by the public, in our experience. Our study aims to achieve the following: - Assess the registry of adverse events as an education tool to improve patient safety culture in the Family and Community Teaching Units of Galicia. - Find and analyze educational tools to improve patient safety culture in primary care. - Evaluate the applicability of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Spanish version, in the context of primary health care. Design and methods Design Experimental unifactorial study of two groups, control and intervention. Study population Tutors and residents in Family and Community Medicine in last year of studies in Galicia, Spain. Sample From the population universe through voluntary participation. Twenty-seven tutor-resident units in each group required, randomly assigned. Intervention Residents and their respective tutor (tutor-resident pair in teaching units on Family and Community Medicine from throughout Galicia will be invited to participate. Tutor-resident pair that agrees to participate will be sent the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Then, tutor-resident pair will be assigned to each group-either intervention or control-through simple random sampling. The intervention group will receive specific training to record the adverse effects found in patients under their care, with subsequent

  2. Developing a safety culture questionnaire based on a customized modeling in a car manufacturing industry in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Toori

    2013-05-01

    Conclusion: So far, there was no exclusive tool for evaluating safety culture based on a customized model. The findings of the present study showed that evaluating safety culture using the administered questionnaire is valid and reliable in the understudied industry.

  3. Cultural Safety Circles and Indigenous Peoples' Perspectives: Inclusive Practices for Participation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseron, Johnnie; Greymorning, S. Neyooxet; Miller, Adrian; Wilde, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous experiences, as found within traditional ways and cultural practices, are an acknowledgement of traditional methods for sharing, learning, and collective knowledge development and maintenance. The application of Cultural Safety Circles can help provide a collective space where definitions for cultural and educational exchange can take…

  4. The relationship between nurses’ job satisfaction and patient safety culture in the hospitals of Rasht city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ooshaksaraie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Provision of high quality nursing care for patients, has made patient safety culture as an important issue for improving the quality of health care in the country. This study aimed to determine the relationship between nurses’ job satisfaction and patient safety culture in hospitals of Rasht city, Iran. Material and Method: This research is a descriptive-analytical, cross-sectional, and field data collection study. Nurses working in public and private hospitals in Rasht City comprised the study population, of whom 322 subjects were selected randomly as the study sample. The Wakefield questionnaire and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality questionnaire were employed to investigate nurses’ job satisfaction and patient safety culture, respectively. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used for statistical hypothesis testing, employing SPSS software version 19. Result: The results showed that according to the respondents’ viewpoints, scores of job satisfaction (Mean(SD:3.59±0.68 and patient safety culture (Mean(SD:54/0±31/3 Rasht city hospitals were at the average level. Furthermore, there was a significant direct relationship between nurses’ job satisfaction and patient safety culture with the correlation coefficient of 0.643 at the 0.01 level of significance. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is necessary to improve study nurses’ job satisfaction and patient safety culture. Moreover, according to statistical correlation between research variables, increasing nurses’ job satisfaction results in improvement of patient safety culture.

  5. Triangulation and the importance of establishing valid methods for food safety culture evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Lone; Wallace, Carol A

    2017-10-01

    The research evaluates maturity of food safety culture in five multi-national food companies using method triangulation, specifically self-assessment scale, performance documents, and semi-structured interviews. Weaknesses associated with each individual method are known but there are few studies in food safety where a method triangulation approach is used for both data collection and data analysis. Significantly, this research shows that individual results taken in isolation can lead to wrong conclusions, resulting in potentially failing tactics and wasted investments. However, by applying method triangulation and reviewing results from a range of culture measurement tools it is possible to better direct investments and interventions. The findings add to the food safety culture paradigm beyond a single evaluation of food safety culture using generic culture surveys. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Views on safety culture at Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants; Syn paa saekerhetskultur vid svenska och finska kaernkraftverk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammar, L. [ES-konsulent, (Sweden); Wahlstroem, B.; Kettunen, J. [VTT Automation (Finland)

    2000-02-01

    The report presents the results of interviews about safety culture at Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants. The aim is to promote the safety work and increase the debate about safety in nuclear power plants, by showing that the safety culture is an important safety factor. The interviews point out different threats, which may become real. It is therefor necessary that the safety aspects get support from of the society and the power plant owners. (EHS)

  7. Exploring the Effects of Cultural Variables in the Implementation of Behavior-Based Safety in Two Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumstead, Alaina; Boyce, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    The present case study examines how culture can influence behavior-based safety in different organizational settings and how behavior-based safety can impact different organizational cultures. Behavior-based safety processes implemented in two culturally diverse work settings are described. Specifically, despite identical implementation plans,…

  8. Cultural safety and maternity care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruske, Sue; Kildea, Sue; Barclay, Lesley

    2006-09-01

    To discuss cultural safety and critique the provision of culturally appropriate maternity services to remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia. The literature and policies around 'culture' and 'cultural safety' are discussed and applied to the provision of maternity services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in remote areas of Australia. The current provision of maternity services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, particularly those living in remote Australia, appears largely inadequate. The provision of culturally safe maternity care requires health system reform at all levels including: the individual practitioner response; the educational preparation of practitioners; the delivery of maternity services and the development of policy at local, state and national level. This paper considers the changes that can be made from the individual practitioner through to the design and implementation of maternity services. Cultural safety provides a useful framework to improve the delivery of maternity services to remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their families.

  9. Safety culture assessment in petrochemical industry: a comparative study of two algerian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughaba, Assia; Hassane, Chabane; Roukia, Ouddai

    2014-06-01

    To elucidate the relationship between safety culture maturity and safety performance of a particular company. To identify the factors that contribute to a safety culture, a survey questionnaire was created based mainly on the studies of Fernández-Muñiz et al. The survey was randomly distributed to 1000 employees of two oil companies and realized a rate of valid answer of 51%. Minitab 16 software was used and diverse tests, including the descriptive statistical analysis, factor analysis, reliability analysis, mean analysis, and correlation, were used for the analysis of data. Ten factors were extracted using the analysis of factor to represent safety culture and safety performance. The results of this study showed that the managers' commitment, training, incentives, communication, and employee involvement are the priority domains on which it is necessary to stress the effort of improvement, where they had all the descriptive average values lower than 3.0 at the level of Company B. Furthermore, the results also showed that the safety culture influences the safety performance of the company. Therefore, Company A with a good safety culture (the descriptive average values more than 4.0), is more successful than Company B in terms of accident rates. The comparison between the two petrochemical plants of the group Sonatrach confirms these results in which Company A, the managers of which are English and Norwegian, distinguishes itself by the maturity of their safety culture has significantly higher evaluations than the company B, who is constituted of Algerian staff, in terms of safety management practices and safety performance.

  10. Differing perceptions of safety culture across job roles in the ambulatory setting: analysis of the AHRQ Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickner, John; Smith, Scott A; Yount, Naomi; Sorra, Joann

    2016-08-01

    Experts in patient safety stress the importance of a shared culture of safety. Lack of consensus may be detrimental to patient safety. This study examines differences in patient safety culture perceptions among providers, management and staff in a large national survey of safety culture in ambulatory practices in the USA. The US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS) assesses perceptions about patient safety issues and event reporting in medical offices (ie, ambulatory practices). Using the 2014 data, we analysed responses from medical offices with at least five respondents. We calculated differences in perceptions of patient safety culture across six job positions (physicians, management, nurse practitioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs), nurses, clinical support staff and administrative/clerical staff) for 10 survey composites, the average of the 10 composites and an overall patient safety rating using multivariate hierarchical linear regressions. We analysed data from 828 medical offices with responses from 15 523 providers and staff, with an average 20 completed surveys per medical office (range: 5-367) and an average medical office response rate of 65% (range: 3%-100%). Management had significantly more positive patient safety culture perceptions on nine of 10 composite scores compared with all other job positions, including physicians. The composite that showed the largest difference was Communication Openness; Management (85% positive) was 22% points more positive than other clinical and support staff and administrative/clerical staff. Physicians were significantly more positive than PAs/NPs, nursing staff, other clinical and support staff and administrative/clerical staff on four composites: Communication About Error, Communication Openness, Staff Training and Teamwork, ranging from 3% to 20% points more positive. These findings suggest that managers need to pay attention to the training needs

  11. Safety culture in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear industries - history and present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    The report presents results from an interview study that examined the characteristics of the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The study also tested the theoretical model of safety culture developed by the authors. The interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16). Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). The study gave insight into the nature of safety culture in the nuclear industry. It provided an overview on the variety of factors that people in the industry consider important for safety. The respondents rather coherently saw such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and safety and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Some of the respondents described a certain Nordic orientation towards safety. One characteristic was a sense of personal responsibility for safety. However, there was no clear agreement on the existence of a shared Nordic nuclear safety culture. Sweden and Finland were seen different for example in the way the co-operation between plants and nuclear safety authorities was arranged and re-search activities organized. There were also perceived differences in the way everyday activities like decision making were carried out in the organizations. There are multiple explanations for the differences. The industry in Sweden has been driven by the strong supplier. In Finland the regulator's role in shaping the culture has been more active. Other factors creating differences are e.g. national culture and company culture and the type of the power plant. Co-operation between Nordic nuclear power organizations was viewed valuable yet challenging from safety point of view. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide under-standing of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as

  12. Report for spreading culture of medical radiation safety in Korea: Mainly the activities of the Korean alliance for radiation safety and culture in medicine (KARSM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yong Su; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Ji Hyun; Choi, In Seok [Dept. of Radiologic Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Dong Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Soo [Dept. of Radiation Safety, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    There are many concerns about radiation exposure in Korea after Fukushima Nuclear Plant Accident on 2011 in Japan. As some isotope materials are detected in Korea, people get worried about the radioactive material. In addition, the mass media create an air of anxiety that jump on the people’s fear instead of scientific approach. Therefore, for curbing this flow, health, medical institute from the world provide a variety of information about medical radiation safety and hold the campaign which can give people the image that medical radiation is safe. At this, the Korean Food and Drug Administration(KFDA) suggested that make the alliance of medical radiation safety and culture on August, 2011. Seven societies and institutions related medical radiation started to research and advertise the culture of medical radiation safety in Korea. In this report, mainly introduce the activities of the Korean Alliance for Radiation Safety and Culture in Medicine(KARSM) for spreading culture of medical radiation safety from 2011 to 2012.

  13. Safety improvement and preservation of typical sensory qualities of traditional dry fermented sausages using autochthonous starter cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine; Lebert, Isabelle; Giammarinaro, Philippe; Chacornac, Jean-Paul; Latorre-Moratalla, Mariluz; Vidal-Carou, Carmen; Zanardi, Emanuela; Conter, Mauro; Lebecque, Annick

    2008-08-15

    Traditional dry fermented sausages are manufactured without addition of starter cultures in small-scale processing units, their fermentation relying on indigenous microflora. Characterisation and control of these specific bacteria are essential for the sensory quality and the safety of the sausages. The aim of this study was to develop an autochthonous starter culture that improves safety while preserving the typical sensory characteristics of traditional sausages. An autochthonous starter composed of Lactobacillus sakei, Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus succinus isolated from a traditional fermented sausage was developed. These strains were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and their production of biogenic amines. This starter was evaluated in situ at the French traditional processing unit where the strains had been isolated. Effects of the autochthonous starter were assessed by analysing the microbial, physico-chemical, biochemical and sensory characteristics of the sausages. Inoculation with the chosen species was confirmed using known species-specific PCR assays for L. sakei and S. equorum and a species-specific PCR assay developed in this study for S. succinus. Strains were monitored by pulse-field gel electrophoresis typing. Addition of autochthonous microbial starter cultures improved safety compared with the traditional natural fermentation of sausages, by inhibiting the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, decreasing the level of biogenic amines and by limiting fatty acid and cholesterol oxidation. Moreover, autochthonous starter did not affect the typical sensory quality of the traditional sausages. This is the first time to our knowledge that selection, development and validation in situ of autochthonous starter cultures have been carried out, and also the first time that S. equorum together with S. succinus have been used as starter cultures for meat fermentation. Use of autochthonous starter cultures is an effective tool for limiting

  14. 76 FR 34773 - Final Safety Culture Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    .... Some monetary incentive or other rewards programs could work against making a safe decision. Current... of Employees in the Nuclear Industry to Raise Safety Concerns Without Fear of Retaliation'' (61 FR... authority establish and maintain safety-conscious work environments in which employees feel free to raise...

  15. University Safety Culture: A Work-in-Progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Safety management systems in Australian higher education organisations are under-researched. Limited workplace safety information can be found in the various reports on university human resources benchmarking programs, and typically they show only descriptive statistics. With the commencement of new consultation-focused regulations applying to…

  16. Impact of a continuing professional development intervention on midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Tania; Creedy, Debra K; West, Roianne

    2017-06-01

    Cultural safety in higher education learning and teaching environments is paramount to positive educational outcomes for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (hereafter called First Peoples) students. There is a lack of research evaluating the impact of continuing professional development on midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety. To implement and evaluate a continuing professional development intervention to improve midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety in supporting First Peoples midwifery students success. A pre-post intervention mixed methods design was used. Academics (n=13) teaching into a Bachelor of Midwifery program agreed to participate. The intervention consisted of two workshops and five yarning circles across a semester. Data included the Awareness of Cultural Safety Scale, self-assessment on cultural safety and perceptions of racism, evaluation of the intervention, participants' journal entries, and researcher's reflections. Responses on the Awareness of Cultural Safety Scale revealed significant improvement in participants' awareness of cultural safety. There was an upward trend in self-assessment ratings. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention or workshops and yarning circles. Participants' journal entries revealed themes willingness to participate and learn, confidence as well as anger and distress. Increased awareness of cultural safety can be transformative for midwifery academics. Workshops and yarning circles can support academics in moving beyond a 'sense of paralysis' and engage in challenging conversations to transform their learning and teaching and in turn foster a culturally safe learning and teaching environment for First Peoples midwifery students towards success. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cultural safety, diversity and the servicer user and carer movement in mental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Leonie G; Simpson, Alan

    2015-12-01

    This study will be of interest to anyone concerned with a critical appraisal of mental health service users' and carers' participation in research collaboration and with the potential of the postcolonial paradigm of cultural safety to contribute to the service user research (SUR) movement. The history and nature of the mental health field and its relationship to colonial processes provokes a consideration of whether cultural safety could focus attention on diversity, power imbalance, cultural dominance and structural inequality, identified as barriers and tensions in SUR. We consider these issues in the context of state-driven approaches towards SUR in planning and evaluation and the concurrent rise of the SUR movement in the UK and Australia, societies with an intimate involvement in processes of colonisation. We consider the principles and motivations underlying cultural safety and SUR in the context of the policy agenda informing SUR. We conclude that while both cultural safety and SUR are underpinned by social constructionism constituting similarities in principles and intent, cultural safety has additional dimensions. Hence, we call on researchers to use the explicitly political and self-reflective process of cultural safety to think about and address issues of diversity, power and social justice in research collaboration.

  18. Redirecting traditional professional values to support safety: changing organisational culture in health care

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, J.; Quijada, M.

    2004-01-01

    Professionals in healthcare organisations who seek to enhance safety and quality in an increasingly demanding industry environment often identify culture as a barrier to change. The cultural focus on individual autonomy, for example, seems to conflict with desired norms of teamwork, problem reporting, and learning. We offer a definition and explication of why culture is important to change efforts. A cultural analysis of health care suggests professional values that can be redirected to suppo...

  19. Safety Culture And Best Practices At Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); King, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Takase, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Oshima, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Sukegawa, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  20. Safety Culture and Best Practices at Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, Keith [PPPL

    2014-05-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  1. Assessing the status of airline safety culture and its relationship to key employee attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Edward L.

    The need to identify the factors that influence the overall safety environment and compliance with safety procedures within airline operations is substantial. This study examines the relationships between job satisfaction, the overall perception of the safety culture, and compliance with safety rules and regulations of airline employees working in flight operations. A survey questionnaire administered via the internet gathered responses which were converted to numerical values for quantitative analysis. The results were grouped to provide indications of overall average levels in each of the three categories, satisfaction, perceptions, and compliance. Correlations between data in the three sets were tested for statistical significance using two-sample t-tests assuming equal variances. Strong statistical significance was found between job satisfaction and compliance with safety rules and between perceptions of the safety environment and safety compliance. The relationship between job satisfaction and safety perceptions did not show strong statistical significance.

  2. [Patient safety culture in directors and managers of a health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Júlvez, Teresa; Hernández-García, Ignacio; Aibar-Remón, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Cía, Isabel; Febrel-Bordejé, Mercedes

    To assess patient safety culture in directors/managers. Cross-sectional descriptive study carried out from February to June 2011 among the executive/managing staff of the Aragón Health Service through semi-structured interviews. A total of 12 interviews were carried out. All the respondents admitted that there were many patient safety problems and agreed that patient safety was a priority from a theoretical rather than practical perspective. The excessive changes in executive positions was considered to be an important barrier which made it difficult to establish long-term strategies and achieve medium-term continuity. This study recorded perceptions on patient safety culture in directors, an essential factor to improve patient safety culture in this group and in the organisations they run. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  4. Indigenous Healing Knowledge and Infertility in Indonesia: Learning about Cultural Safety from Sasak Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Linda Rae

    2017-01-01

    In this article I demonstrate what can be learned from the indigenous healing knowledge and practices of traditional Sasak midwives on Lombok island in eastern Indonesia. I focus on the treatment of infertility, contrasting the differential experiences of Sasak women when they consult traditional midwives and biomedical doctors. Women's and midwives' perspectives provide critical insight into how cultural safety is both constituted and compromised in the context of reproductive health care. Core components of cultural safety embedded in the practices of traditional midwives include the treatment of women as embodied subjects rather than objectified bodies, and privileging physical contact as a healing modality. Cultural safety also encompasses respect for women's privacy and bodily dignity, as well as two-way and narrative communication styles. Local understandings of cultural safety have great potential to improve the routine practices of doctors, particularly in relation to doctor-patient communication and protocols for conducting pelvic exams.

  5. Examining the Prevalence of Self-Reported Foodborne Illnesses and Food Safety Risks among International College Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyonga, Agnes Ngale; Eighmy, Myron A.; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Foodborne illness and food safety risks pose health threats to everyone, including international college students who live in the United States and encounter new or unfamiliar foods. This study assessed the prevalence of self-reported foodborne illness among international college students by cultural regions and length of time in the United…

  6. 77 FR 50722 - Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants... regulatory guide (DG), DG-1208, ``Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software used in Safety Systems... entitled ``Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear...

  7. Creating a safety culture at the Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoor, Katrina N; Taylor, Annemarie; Northway, Tracie L; Hudson, Denise G; Van Stolk, Dori E; Shearer, Kim J; McDougall, Debbie L; Miller, Georgene

    2007-02-01

    The Children's' and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia (C&W) is the largest hospital providing specialized care to women and children across the province of British Columbia in Canada. The values of quality and safety are threaded throughout the C&W strategic plan which emphasizes that safety is vital for better health. At C&W, a multifaceted approach is used to create and sustain a culture of safety. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) has developed tools to facilitate the development of safety cultures within hospital settings. This article describes the implementation of some of these tools, such as the Safety Briefings Model and Patient Safety Leadership Walkrounds. We will discuss how we adapted these strategies to our pediatric settings; what we learned through the implementation process-our successes and challenges; and implications for future success.

  8. Organizational Culture for Safety, Security, and Safeguards in New Nuclear Power Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This chapter will contain the following sections: Existing international norms and standards for developing the infrastructure to support new nuclear power programs The role of organizational culture and how it supports the safe, secure, and peaceful application of nuclear power Identifying effective and efficient strategies for implementing safety, security and safeguards in nuclear operations Challenges identified in the implementation of safety, security and safeguards Potential areas for future collaboration between countries in order to support nonproliferation culture

  9. Is Scores Derived from the Most Internationally Applied Patient Safety Culture Assessment Tool Correct?

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Moghri; Ali Akbari Sari; Mehdi Yousefi; Hasan Zahmatkesh; Ranjbar Mohammad Ezzatabadi; Pejman Hamouzadeh; Satar Rezaei; Jamil Sadeghifar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, known as HSOPS, is an internationally well known and widely used tool for measuring patient safety culture in hospitals. It includes 12 dimensions with positive and negative wording questions. The distribution of these questions in different dimensions is uneven and provides the risk of acquiescence bias. The aim of this study was to assess the questionnaire against this bias. Methods Three hundred nurses were assigned into study ...

  10. Redirecting traditional professional values to support safety: changing organisational culture in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J S; Quijada, M A

    2004-12-01

    Professionals in healthcare organisations who seek to enhance safety and quality in an increasingly demanding industry environment often identify culture as a barrier to change. The cultural focus on individual autonomy, for example, seems to conflict with desired norms of teamwork, problem reporting, and learning. We offer a definition and explication of why culture is important to change efforts. A cultural analysis of health care suggests professional values that can be redirected to support change. We offer examples of organisations that drew upon cultural strengths to create new ways of working and gradually shifted the culture.

  11. [Analysis and modelling of safety culture in a Mexican hospital by Markov chains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Martínez, J D; Cruz-Suárez, H; Santos-Reyes, J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse and model the safety culture with Markov chains, as well as predicting and/or prioritizing over time the evolutionary behaviour of the safety culture of the health's staff in one Mexican hospital. The Markov chain theory has been employed in the analysis, and the input data has been obtained from a previous study based on the Safety Attitude Questionnaire (CAS-MX-II), by considering the following 6 dimensions: safety climate, teamwork, job satisfaction, recognition of stress, perception of management, and work environment. The results highlighted the predictions and/or prioritisation of the approximate time for the possible integration into the evolutionary behaviour of the safety culture as regards the "slightly agree" (Likert scale) for: safety climate (in 12 years; 24.13%); teamwork (8 years; 34.61%); job satisfaction (11 years; 52.41%); recognition of the level of stress (8 years; 19.35%); and perception of the direction (22 years; 27.87%). The work environment dimension was unable to determine the behaviour of staff information, i.e. no information cultural roots were obtained. In general, it has been shown that there are weaknesses in the safety culture of the hospital, which is an opportunity to suggest changes to the mandatory policies in order to strengthen it. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in Primary Health Care Settings in Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Maha Mohamed Ghobashi; Hanan Abdel Ghani El-ragehy; Hanan Mosleh Ibrahim; Fatma Abdullah Al-Doseri

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety is critical component of health care quality. We aimed to assess the awareness of primary healthcare staff members about patient safety culture and explore the areas of deficiency and opportunities for improvement concerning this issue.Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study surveyed 369 staff members in four primary healthcare centers in Kuwait using self-administered “Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture” adopted questionnaire. The total number of resp...

  13. Patient Safety Culture and the Association with Safe Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S.; Hyer, Kathryn; Castle, Nicholas G.; Branch, Laurence G.; Andel, Ross; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Studies have shown that patient safety culture (PSC) is poorly developed in nursing homes (NHs), and, therefore, residents of NHs may be at risk of harm. Using Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome (SPO) model, we examined the relationships among top management's ratings of NH PSC, a process of care, and safety outcomes.…

  14. 76 FR 35861 - Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant AGENCY: Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. ACTION... Treatment and Immobilization Plant located at the Hanford site in the state of Washington. DATES: Comments... Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. Sec....

  15. Food safety culture assessment using a comprehensive mixed-methods approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyarugwe, Shingai P.; Linnemann, Anita; Nyanga, Loveness K.; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Luning, Pieternel A.

    2018-01-01

    Food safety challenges are a global concern especially in emerging economies, which are in the midst of developmental changes. The challenges are directly or indirectly related to the behaviour and decision-making of personnel, and to an organisation's food safety culture. This study evaluated the

  16. Trends in cultural psychiatry in the United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2013-01-01

    Cultural psychiatry in the United Kingdom exhibits unique characteristics closely related to its history as a colonial power, its relationship with Commonwealth countries and the changing socio-demographic characteristics of its diverse population throughout the centuries. It is not surprising, therefore, that the emergence of this discipline was centred around issues of race and religion. After a brief historical review of the development of cultural psychiatry and the mention of pioneering intellectual and academic figures, as well as the evolvement of the field in organizations such as the Royal College of Psychiatrists, this chapter examines the need of a critical cultural psychiatry, more than a narrative social science distanced from the realities of clinical practice. In such context, issues such as policies and experience with efforts to delivering race equality, and address inequities in a renewed public health approach seem to confer British cultural psychiatry with a defined socially active role aimed at the pragmatic management, understanding and improvement of diverse and alternative systems of care and care practices.

  17. United States import safety, environmental health, and food safety regulation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambok, Edward O; Kastner, Justin J

    2012-01-01

    China boasts a rapidly growing economy and is a leading food exporter. Since China has dominated world export markets in food, electronics, and toys, many safety concerns about Chinese exports have emerged. For example, many countries have had problems with Chinese food products and food-processing ingredients. Factors behind food safety and environmental health problems in China include poor industrial waste management, the use of counterfeit agricultural inputs, inadequate training of farmers on good farm management practices, and weak food safety laws and poor enforcement. In the face of rising import safety problems, the U.S. is now requiring certification of products and foreign importers, pursuing providing incentives to importers who uphold good safety practices, and considering publicizing the names of certified importers.

  18. Implementation of unit-based interventions to improve teamwork and patient safety on a medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kevin J; Creden, Amanda J; Slade, Maureen E; Landler, Matthew P; Kulkarni, Nita; Lee, Jungwha; Vozenilek, John A; Pfeifer, Pamela; Eller, Susan; Wayne, Diane B; Williams, Mark V

    2015-01-01

    In a prior study involving 2 medical units, Structured Interdisciplinary Rounds (SIDRs) improved teamwork and reduced adverse events (AEs). SIDR was implemented on 5 additional units, and a pre- versus postintervention comparison was performed. SIDR combined a structured format for communication with daily interprofessional meetings. Teamwork was assessed using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (score range = 0-100), and AEs were identified using queries of information systems confirmed by 2 physician researchers. Paired analyses for 82 professionals completing surveys both pre and post implementation revealed improved teamwork (mean 76.8 ± 14.3 vs 80.5 ± 11.6; P = .02), which was driven mainly by nurses (76.4 ± 14.1 vs 80.8 ± 10.4; P = .009). The AE rate was similar across study periods (3.90 vs 4.07 per 100 patient days; adjusted IRR = 1.08; P = .60). SIDR improved teamwork yet did not reduce AEs. Higher baseline teamwork scores and lower AE rates than the prior study may reflect a positive cultural shift that began prior to the current study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Safety culture in nuclear power plants. Proceedings; Sicherheitskultur im Kernkraftwerk. Seminarbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    As a consequence of the INSAG-4 report on `safety culture`, published by the IAEA in 1991, the Federal Commission for the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants (KSA) decided to hold a one-day seminar as a first step in this field. The KSA is an advisory body of the Federal Government and the Federal Department of Transport and Energy (EVED). It comments on applications for licenses, observes the operation of nuclear power plants, assists with the preparation of regulations, monitors the progress of research in the field of nuclear safety, and makes proposals for research tasks. The objective of this seminar was to familiarise the participants with the principles of `safety culture`, with the experiences made in Switzerland and abroad with existing concepts, as well as to eliminate existing prejudices. The main points dealt with at this seminar were: - safety culture from the point of view of operators, - safety culture from the point of view of the authorities, - safety culture: collaboration between power plants, the authorities and research organisations, - trends and developments in the field of safety culture. Invitations to attend this seminar were extended to the management boards of companies operating Swiss nuclear power plants, and to representatives of the Swiss authorities responsible for the safety of nuclear power plants. All these organisations were represented by a large number of executive and specialist staff. We would like to express our sincerest thanks to the Head of the Federal Department of Transport and Energy for his kind patronage of this seminar. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  20. Second periodic safety review of Angra Nuclear Power Station, unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Carlos F.O.; Crepaldi, Roberto; Freire, Enio M., E-mail: ottoncf@tecnatom.com.br, E-mail: emfreire46@gmail.com, E-mail: robcrepaldi@hotmail.com [Tecnatom do Brasil Engenharia e Servicos Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Campello, Sergio A., E-mail: sacampe@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the second Periodic Safety Review (PSR2-A1) of Angra Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, prepared by Eletrobras Eletronuclear S.A. and Tecnatom do Brasil Engenharia e Servicos Ltda., during Jul.2013-Aug.2014, covering the period of 2004-2013. The site, in Angra dos Reis-RJ, Brazil, comprises: Unit 1, (640 MWe, Westinghouse PWR, operating), Unit 2 (1300 MWe, KWU/Areva, operating) and Unit 3 (1405 MWe, KWU/Areva, construction). The PSR2-A1 attends the Standards 1.26-Safety in Operation of Nuclear Power Plants, Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CNEN), and IAEA.SSG.25-Periodic Safety Review of Nuclear Power Plants. Within 18 months after each 10 years operation, the operating organization shall perform a plant safety review, to investigate the evolution consequences of safety code and standards, regarding: Plant design; structure, systems and components behavior; equipment qualification; plant ageing management; deterministic and probabilistic safety analysis; risk analysis; safety performance; operating experience; organization and administration; procedures; human factors; emergency planning; radiation protection and environmental radiological impacts. The Review included 6 Areas and 14 Safety Parameters, covered by 33 Evaluations.After document evaluations and discussions with plant staff, it was generated one General and 33 Specific Guide Procedures, 33 Specific and one Final Report, including: Description, Strengths, Deficiencies, Areas for Improvement and Conclusions. An Action Plan was prepared by Electronuclear for the recommendations. It was concluded that the Unit was operated within safety standards and will attend its designed operational lifetime, including possible life extensions. The Final Report was submitted to CNEN, as one requisite for renewal of the Unit Permanent Operation License. (author)

  1. Safe patient care – safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St. Pierre, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization’s vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture (“top-down process”. A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization’s maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization’s general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed “informed culture”. An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. “Incident reporting systems” are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization’s safe surgery checklist” is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate

  2. Effects of a team-based assessment and intervention on patient safety culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, B; Müller, V; Rochon, J

    2014-01-01

    culture and decided on about 10 actions per practice to improve it. After 12 months, no significant differences were found between intervention and control groups in terms of error management (competing probability = 0.48, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.63, p = 0.823), 11 further patient safety culture indicators...

  3. 77 FR 75443 - Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... culture as the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individuals... draft policy statement would apply to all lessees, the owners or holders of operating rights, designated... and easement, and contractors. The BSEE is requesting comments on the Draft Safety Culture...

  4. Occupational Safety and Health culture assessment - A review of main approaches and selected tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, T.N.; Eeckeleaert, L.; Starren, A.; Scheppingen, A. van; Fox, D.; Bruck, C.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational safety and health culture, or more briefly 'OSH culture', can be seen as a concept for exploring how informal organisational aspects influence OSH in a positive or negative way. The aim is to convey up-to-date information on this complex topic in a straightforward, condensed way, trying

  5. Study on safety operation for large hydroelectric generator unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z. G.; Cui, T.; Zhou, L. J.; Zhi, F. L.; Wang, Z. W.

    2012-11-01

    Hydroelectric generator unit is a complex mechanical system which is composed of hydraulic turbine and electric generator. Rotary system is supported by the bearing bracket and the reinforced concrete structures, and vibration problem can't be avoided in the process of operating. Many large-scale hydroelectric units have been damaged because of the vibration problem in recent years. As the increase of the hydraulic turbine unit capacity and water head, the safe operation of hydraulic turbine has become a focus research in many countries. The operating characteristics of the hydraulic turbine have obvious differences at different working conditions. Based on the combination of field measurement and theoretical calculation, this paper shows a deep research on the safe operation of a large-scale Francis turbine unit. Firstly, the measurements of vibration, swing, pressure fluctuation and noise were carried out at 4 different heads. And also the relationships between vibrations and pressure fluctuations at different heads and working conditions were analysed deeply. Then the scientific prediction of safe operation for the unit at high head were done based on the CFD numerical calculation. Finally, this paper shows the division of the operating zone for the hydroelectric unit. According to the experimental results (vibrations, swings, pressure fluctuations and noise) as well as the theoretical results, the operating zone of the unit has been divided into three sections: prohibited operating zone, transition operating zone and safe operating zone. After this research was applied in the hydropower station, the security and economic efficiency of unit increased greatly, and enormous economic benefits and social benefits have been obtained.

  6. Are nurse presenteeism and patient safety culture associated: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brborović, Hana; Brborović, Ognjen; Brumen, Vlatka; Pavleković, Gordana; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2014-06-01

    Working as a nurse involves great dedication and sacrifice: working night shifts, working overtime, and coming to work sick. The last is also known as presenteeism. Research has shown that poor nurse performance can affect both caregiver's and patient's safety. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether nurse presenteeism affected patient safety culture and to look deeper into the characteristics of nurse presenteeism and patient safety culture in Croatia. The study was conducted in one general hospital in Croatia over April and May 2012 and specifically targeted medical nurses as one of the largest groups of healthcare professionals. They were asked to fill two questionnaires: the six-item Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC). We found no association between presenteeism and patient safety culture. Overall positive perception of safety was our sample's strength, but other dimensions were positively rated by less than 65 % of participants. The lowest positive response concerned "nonpunitive response to error", which is consistent with previous studies. Presenteeist nurses did not differ in their characteristics from nurses without presenteeism (gender, age, years of experience, working hours, contact with patients and patient safety grades). Our future research will have to include a broader healthcare population for us to be able to identify weak spots and suggest improvements toward high-quality and cost-effective health care.

  7. Evaluation of patient safety culture among Malaysian retail pharmacists: results of a self-reported survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivanandy P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Palanisamy Sivanandy,1 Mari Kannan Maharajan,1 Kingston Rajiah,1 Tan Tyng Wei,2 Tan Wee Loon,2 Lim Chong Yee2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, 2School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Patient safety is a major public health issue, and the knowledge, skills, and experience of health professionals are very much essential for improving patient safety. Patient safety and medication error are very much associated. Pharmacists play a significant role in patient safety. The function of pharmacists in the medication use process is very different from medical and nursing colleagues. Medication dispensing accuracy is a vital element to ensure the safety and quality of medication use.Objective: To evaluate the attitude and perception of the pharmacist toward patient safety in retail pharmacies setup in Malaysia.Methods: A Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was used to assess patient safety culture, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the convenience sampling method was adopted.Results: The overall positive response rate ranged from 31.20% to 87.43%, and the average positive response rate was found to be 67%. Among all the eleven domains pertaining to patient safety culture, the scores of “staff training and skills” were less. Communication openness, and patient counseling are common, but not practiced regularly in the Malaysian retail pharmacy setup compared with those in USA. The overall perception of patient safety of an acceptable level in the current retail pharmacy setup.Conclusion: The study revealed that staff training, skills, communication in patient counseling, and communication across shifts and about mistakes are less in current retail pharmacy setup. The overall perception of patient safety should be improved by educating the pharmacists about the significance and essential of patient safety. Keywords

  8. 'Would you eat cultured meat?': Consumers' reactions and attitude formation in Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Marcu, Afrodita; Rutsaert, Pieter; Gaspar, Rui; Seibt, Beate; Fletcher, Dave; Barnett, Julie

    2015-04-01

    Cultured meat has evolved from an idea and concept into a reality with the August 2013 cultured hamburger tasting in London. Still, how consumers conceive cultured meat is largely an open question. This study addresses consumers' reactions and attitude formation towards cultured meat through analyzing focus group discussions and online deliberations with 179 meat consumers from Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom. Initial reactions when learning about cultured meat were underpinned by feelings of disgust and considerations of unnaturalness. Consumers saw few direct personal benefits but they were more open to perceiving global societal benefits relating to the environment and global food security. Both personal and societal risks were framed in terms of uncertainties about safety and health, and possible adverse societal consequences dealing with loss of farming and eating traditions and rural livelihoods. Further reflection pertained to skepticism about 'the inevitable' scientific progress, concern about risk governance and control, and need for regulation and proper labeling.

  9. Characterization and improvement of the nuclear safety culture through self-assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, H.A. [Synergy Consulting Services Corp., Great Falls, VA (United States); McGehee, R.B. [Wise Carter Child & Caraway, Jackson, MS (United States); Cottle, W.T. [Houston Lighting & Power, Wadsworth, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Organizational culture has a powerful influence on overall corporate performance. The ability to sustain superior results in ensuring the public`s health and safety is predicated on an organization`s deeply embedded values and behavioral norms and how these affect the ability to change and seek continuous improvement. The nuclear industry is developing increased recognition of the relationship of culture to nuclear safety performance as a critical element of corporate strategy. This paper describes a self-assessment methodology designed to characterize and improve the nuclear safety culture, including processes for addressing employee concerns. This methodology has been successfully applied on more than 30 occasions in the last several years, resulting in measurable improvements in safety performance and quality and employee motivation, productivity, and morale. Benefits and lessons learned are also presented.

  10. Studying Patient Safety Culture from the Viewpoint of Nurse in educational hospitals Ilam City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Borji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety culture is the first necessary step to reduce medical errors and improve patient's condition. In this context, this article aims at studying the condition of patient safety culture in hospitals in Elam in 2016. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 150 nurses in Ilam were randomly selected. The Culture Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPSC was used and its reliability and validity had been confirmed by the previous studies. The data were analyzed by SPSS17. Results: The results showed that the nurses' safety was at positive(62.37± 8.70 and there could be found no significant difference in patient safety among the studied hospitals in this article (P<.05. Extra-organizational teamwork and non-punitive response, among the aspects of patient safety, had the lowest means and organizational learning and general understanding had the highest. Conclusion: Considering the importance of patient safety, the interventions need to be performed in order to improve the patient safety condition among nurses, especially in two aspects of extra-organizational teamwork and non-punitive response that had the lowest means.

  11. Public safety risk management at socio-economic and / or historic-cultural significant dam sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, Gordon D.; Ryan, Katherine; Pyykonen, Nicole K.; Pitts, Lucas [Otonabee Region Conservation Authority, Peterborough, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The Lang Dam and adjoining gristmill, located near Peterborough are integral parts of the Lang Pioneer Village museum. Activities occurring within close proximity to the dam have led to safety issues. The owner (ORCA) has developed and implemented public safety management plans (PSMPs) for each of its water control structures, including the Lang Dam. ORCA gave special attention to the social, economic, aesthetic, historic and cultural dimensions associated the implementation of public safety management plans. These factors play a significant role in how well public safety measures (PSMs) are received by stakeholder groups and the general public. This paper reported the challenges of developing and implementing a PSMP for the Lang Dam, with the focus on property site-specific PSMS while preserving socio-economic and historic-cultural character and values. It was demonstrated that the dam owners, regulatory authorities, control agencies and preservationists need to come together to develop a holistic public safety management process.

  12. Study of Evaluation OSH Management System Policy Based On Safety Culture Dimensions in Construction Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latief, Yusuf; Armyn Machfudiyanto, Rossy; Arifuddin, Rosmariani; Mahendra Fira Setiawan, R.; Yogiswara, Yoko

    2017-07-01

    Safety Culture in the construction industry is very influential on the socio economic conditions that resulted in the country’s competitiveness. Based on the data, the accident rate of construction projects in Indonesia is very high. In the era of the Asian Economic Community (AEC) Indonesian contractor is required to improve competitiveness, one of which is the implementation of the project without zero accident. Research using primary and secondary data validated the results of the literature experts and questionnaire respondents were analyzed using methods SmartPLS, obtained pattern of relationships between dimensions of safety culture to improve the performance of Safety. The results showed that the behaviors and Cost of Safety into dimensions that significantly affect the performance of safety. an increase in visible policy-based on Regulation of Public Work and Housing No 5/PRT/M/2014 to improve to lower the accident rate.

  13. Assessing elements of patient safety culture in Kermanshah health care and educational centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siros Kabodi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually, many accidents and preventable events happen for the patients hospitalized in treatment centers. Therefore, the related causing factors should be recognized in order to reduce the medical errors. Accordingly, the present study aimed to assess the relationship between patient’s safety culture elements and medical errors and also the ways to tackle them. Material and Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 380 employees working in the education and treatment centers affiliated with Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015. The hospital version of patient safety culture questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were analyzed by SPSS software, version 19 using different statistical tests including multivariate analysis of variance and Pearson’s correlation. Result: The patient safety culture was at an undesirable level in the study centers. Of the elements related to safety culture, the lowest positive scores belonged to ‘issues related to employees’, and ‘reporting’ with scores of 23% and 26%, respectively. On the other hand, ‘team working in the organizations’ (59% and ‘organizational learning’ (57% obtained the highest positive scores. Fifty-eight percent of the respondents did not report any errors. Conclusion: The results of present study emphasize on creating a desirable organizational atmosphere, the need for staff participation in various levels of decision making, and creating the culture of reporting errors in order to recognize the causing factors and to promote patient safety culture.

  14. Patient safety culture measurement in general practice. Clinimetric properties of 'SCOPE'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwart Dorien LM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A supportive patient safety culture is considered to be an essential condition for improving patient safety. Assessing the current safety culture in general practice may be a first step to target improvements. To that end, we studied internal consistency and construct validity of a safety culture questionnaire for general practice (SCOPE which was derived from a comparable questionnaire for hospitals (Dutch-HSOPS. Methods The survey was conducted among caregivers of Dutch general practice as part of an ongoing quality accreditation process using a 46 item questionnaire. We conducted factor analyses and studied validity by calculating correlations between the subscales and testing the hypothesis that respondents' patient safety grade of their practices correlated with their scores on the questionnaire. Results Of 72 practices 294 respondents completed the questionnaire. Eight factors were identified concerning handover and teamwork, support and fellowship, communication openness, feedback and learning from error, intention to report events, adequate procedures and staffing, overall perceptions of patient safety and expectations and actions of managers. Cronbach's alpha of the factors rated between 0.64 and 0.85. The subscales intercorrelated moderately, except for the factor about intention to report events. Respondents who graded patient safety highly scored significantly higher on the questionnaire than those who did not. Conclusions The SCOPE questionnaire seems an appropriate instrument to assess patient safety culture in general practice. The clinimetric properties of the SCOPE are promising, but future research should confirm the factor structure and construct of the SCOPE and delineate its responsiveness to changes in safety culture over time.

  15. Measurable improvement in patient safety culture: A departmental experience with incident learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Aaron S; Nyflot, Matthew J; Zeng, Jing; Sponseller, Patricia A; Ermoian, Ralph; Jordan, Loucille; Carlson, Joshua; Novak, Avrey; Kane, Gabrielle; Ford, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous use of departmental incident learning is integral to improving patient safety and quality of care. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of a high-volume, departmental incident learning system on patient safety culture. A prospective, voluntary, electronic incident learning system was implemented in February 2012 with the intent of tracking near-miss/no-harm incidents. All incident reports were reviewed weekly by a multiprofessional team with regular department-wide feedback. Patient safety culture was measured at baseline with validated patient safety culture survey questions. A repeat survey was conducted after 1 and 2 years of departmental incident learning. Proportional changes were compared by χ(2) or Fisher exact test, where appropriate. Between 2012 and 2014, a total of 1897 error/near-miss incidents were reported, representing an average of 1 near-miss report per patient treated. Reports were filed by a cross section of staff, with the majority of incidents reported by therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. Survey response rates at baseline and 1 and 2 years were 78%, 80%, and 80%, respectively. Statistically significant and sustained improvements were noted in several safety metrics, including belief that the department was openly discussing ways to improve safety, the sense that reports were being used for safety improvement, and the sense that changes were being evaluated for effectiveness. None of the surveyed dimensions of patient safety culture worsened. Fewer punitive concerns were noted, with statistically significant decreases in the worry of embarrassment in front of colleagues and fear of getting colleagues in trouble. A comprehensive incident learning system can identify many areas for improvement and is associated with significant and sustained improvements in patient safety culture. These data provide valuable guidance as incident learning systems become more widely used in radiation oncology. Copyright © 2015

  16. 33 CFR 147.T08-849 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Safety Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore... DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Safety Zone. (a) Location. All areas within 500 meters (1640... area surrounds the DEEPWATER HORIZON, a Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), that sank in...

  17. Creating a Culture of Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangho; Park, Jungsun; Park, Mijin

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of occupational injuries and diseases associated with industrialization has declined markedly following developments in science and technology, such as engineering controls, protective equipment, safer machinery and processes, and greater adherence to regulations and labor inspections. Although the introduction of health and safety management systems has further decreased the incidence of occupational injuries and diseases, these systems are not effective unless accompanied by a positive safety culture in the workplace. The characteristics of work in the 21(st) century have given rise to new issues related to workers' health, such as new types of work-related disorders, noncommunicable diseases, and inequality in the availability of occupational health services. Overcoming these new and emerging issues requires a culture of prevention at the national level. The present paper addresses: (1) how to change safety cultures in both theory and practice at the level of the workplace; and (2) the role of prevention culture at the national level.

  18. Creating a Culture of Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangho Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of occupational injuries and diseases associated with industrialization has declined markedly following developments in science and technology, such as engineering controls, protective equipment, safer machinery and processes, and greater adherence to regulations and labor inspections. Although the introduction of health and safety management systems has further decreased the incidence of occupational injuries and diseases, these systems are not effective unless accompanied by a positive safety culture in the workplace. The characteristics of work in the 21st century have given rise to new issues related to workers' health, such as new types of work-related disorders, noncommunicable diseases, and inequality in the availability of occupational health services. Overcoming these new and emerging issues requires a culture of prevention at the national level. The present paper addresses: (1 how to change safety cultures in both theory and practice at the level of the workplace; and (2 the role of prevention culture at the national level.

  19. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek-van Noord, Inge; de Bruijne, Martine C; Zwijnenberg, Nicolien C; Jansma, Elise P; van Dyck, Cathy; Wagner, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012. The Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews was used to assess the risk of bias in the individual studies. In total, 22 manuscripts were included for review. Training settings, study designs, and evaluation methods varied widely. Most studies reporting only a selection of culture dimensions found mainly positive results, whereas studies reporting all safety culture dimensions of the particular survey found mixed results. On average, studies were at moderate risk of bias. Evidence of the effectiveness of Crew Resource Management training in health care on safety culture is scarce and the validity of most studies is limited. The results underline the necessity of more valid study designs, preferably using triangulation methods.

  20. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, D.; Wensing, M.; Esmail, A.; Valderas, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. OBJECTIVE: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance

  1. Psychometric properties of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Yvonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a management perspective, it is necessary to examine how a hospital's top management assess the patient safety culture in their organisation. This study examines whether the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M has the same psychometric properties as the HSOPS for hospital employees does. Methods In 2008, a questionnaire survey including the HSOPS_M was conducted with 1,224 medical directors from German hospitals. When assessing the psychometric properties, we performed a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. Additionally, we proved construct validity and internal consistency. Results A total of 551 medical directors returned the questionnaire. The results of the CFA suggested a satisfactory global data fit. The indices of local fit indicated a good, but not satisfactory convergent validity. Analyses of construct validity indicated that not all safety culture dimensions were readily distinguishable. However, Cronbach's alpha indicated that the dimensions had an acceptable level of reliability. Conclusion The analyses of the psychometric properties of the HSOPS_M resulted in reasonably good levels of property values. Although the set of dimensions within the HSOPS_M needs further scale refinement, the questionnaire covers a broad range of sub-dimensions and supplies important information on safety culture. The HSOPS_M, therefore, is eligible to measure safety culture from the hospital management's points of view and could be used in nationwide hospital surveys to make inter-organisational comparisons.

  2. A report on developing a checklist to assess company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijger, N.; Starren, H.; Keus, M.; Gort, J.; Vervoort, M.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the process of developing a checklist to asses company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture. These plans are part of a programme initiated by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment aiming at improving the safety performance of co

  3. Globalization and Culture: the Case of Canada and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin V. MULCAHY

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With a liberal political culture that is characterized by limited government, internationalism and an open society, Canada stands somewhere between France and the United States in its degree of cultural protectionism and overall intensity of cultural politics. The United States, of course, is the great cultural exception with a regnant popular culture that is able to indemnify its production costs over a populous and prosperous society which is largely immune to cultural expressions that do not project an American sensibility. In effect, the United States can afford to have a “cultural open-door policy” because it has little to fear from foreign competition. For Canada, however, cultural free-trade raises the specter of standing unprotected against the forces of American cultural annexation. This discussion will survey the debate over U.S. cultural imperialism and Canadian concerns for its cultural sovereignty with particular reference to the international trade agreements of the past decade.

  4. Evaluation of Policy Implementation at Norm Strategy Criteria Procedure Safety Management System that Influence the Safety Culture in Building Construction, Housing, Waterworks, Road and Bridge Project in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Latief

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Unideal Safety culture in Indonesia requires an evaluation of policy implementation refers to the construction safety regulation, Ministry Regulation 05/PRT/2014. Out of Norms, Standards, Procedures and Criteria (NSPK, we only have Norms and Procedure. As for Standard and Criteria are still being planned. This research on building, housing, water resource, roads and bridges construction at the Ministry of General Works and Housing resulted in having significant relation between safety policy implementation dimension (Monitoring and sanction / penalty and safety culture dimensions (behavior, safety cost, policy, leadership, man, and strategy. Recommendations for policy improvement are obtained from review and implementation strategy of the significant relation between safety policy implementation dimension and safety culture dimensions.

  5. What causes an improved safety climate among the staff of a dialysis unit? Report of an evaluation in a large network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Attilio; Pelliccia, Francesco; Moretti, Manuela; d'Orsi, Wanda; Starace, Fernando; Scatizzi, Laura; Parisotto, Maria Teresa; Marcelli, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Clinical staff's safety perception is considered an important indicator of the implementation level of safety climate and safety culture. For this purpose, the Safety Climate Survey Questionnaire was submitted to the dialysis clinics staff of the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) network in Italy. Moreover, to explore how standard procedures implementation influences staff opinion of safety levels, the Universal Hygiene Precautions Questionnaire was also submitted. Safety Climate Survey and Universal Hygiene Precautions questionnaires were based on 19 and 14 statements, respectively. Staff members (n=346) of 33 dialysis units were involved: 21.4% physicians, 58.1% registered nurses and 20.5% health care assistants (HCAs). Safety Climate mean total score was 81.9%. Medical directors (91.5%) and quality-responsible head nurses (QHRNs) (87.4%) showed higher scores in comparison with staff physicians (82.4%), nurses responsible for hygiene (81.1%) and HCAs (78.8%). Staff nurses (78.9%) showed a significant difference (pHygiene Precautions mean total score was 90.8%, not significantly different among medical directors (92%), staff physicians (91.4%), QHRNs (93.2%), nurses responsible for hygiene (91.7%) and staff nurses (91.4%). Only HCAs reported a significantly (pSafety Climate was evaluated within the FME network of Italian dialysis clinics. Management showed higher Safety Climate scores than frontline staff. Fostering communication and implementation of training programs are considered valid tools to improve safety.

  6. Too individualistic for safety culture? Non-traffic related work safety among heavy goods vehicle drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grytnes, Regine; Shibuya, Hitomi; Dyreborg, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This article reports on a study of non-traffic related work safety among drivers of heavy goods vehicles in Denmark. In the heavy goods vehicle transport (HGV) sector only 6.4% of workplace accidents involving drivers are traffic related. HGV work is characterised by solitary work...... values and attitudes as well as organisational and technical aspects in relation to how individualist or collectivist understandings of risk and safety influence the working environment in HGVs. Method The study applied a mixed methods approach and in this article the qualitative interviews conducted...... their understandings and attitudes towards hazards and safety practices. The analysis points to risk-taking and unsafe practices as prevalent among HGV drivers, who often refer to risk as trivial and the management of such risks as one's own responsibility. Knowledge of how to manage risks in everyday practice...

  7. CHANGING THE SAFETY CULTURE IN HANFORD TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERRIOCHOA MV; ALCALA LJ

    2009-01-06

    In 2000 the Hanford Tank Farms had one of the worst safety records in the Department of Energy Complex. By the end of FY08 the safety performance of the workforce had turned completely around, resulting in one of the best safety records in the DOE complex for operations of its kind. This paper describes the variety of programs and changes that were put in place to accomplish such a dramatic turn-around. The U.S. Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford Site in Washington State was established during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project to develop nuclear materials to end the war. For the next several decades it continued to produce plutonium for the nation's defense, leaving behind vast quantities of radioactive and chemical waste. Much of this waste, 53,000,000 gallons, remains stored in 149 aging single-shell tanks and 28 newer double-shell tanks. One of the primary objectives at Hanford is to safely manage this waste until it can be prepared for disposal, but this has not always been easy. These giant underground tanks, many of which date back to the beginning of the Manhattan Project, range in size from 55,000 gallons up to 1.1 million gallons, and are buried beneath 10 feet of soil near the center of the site. Up to 67 of the older single-shell tanks have leaked as much as one million gallons into the surrounding soil. Liquids from the single-shell tanks were removed by 2003 but solids remain in the form of saltcake, sludges and a hardened heel at the bottom of some tanks. The Department of Energy's Office of River Protection was established to safely manage this waste until it could be prepared for disposal. For most of the last seven years the focus has been on safely retrieving waste from the 149 aging single-shell and moving it to the newer double-shell tanks. Removing waste from the tanks is a difficult and complex task. The tanks were made to put waste in, not take it out. Because of the toxic nature of the waste, both

  8. Cross-cultural variation in gelotophobia within the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin D. Lampert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the first international study of gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at, Proyer et al. (2009 administered an established measure of gelotophobia, the GELOPH, to 93 different samples across 73 countries, including six samples from the United States. In the original study, the researchers reported notable response similarities across a core set of GELOPH items, referred to as the GELOPH. The present study takes a closer look at ethnic differences within these original United States samples, focusing specifically on the differences between European and Asian American respondents to two types of items on the GELOPH, which we identified as self-perception and social reaction items. Based on prior research dealing with self-concept and social anxiety, we predicted that individuals with a more interdependent self-construal (Asian Americans would be more likely than those with an independent self-construal (European Americans to report greater concern over revealing themselves as foolish or ridiculous in public. However, because of the greater importance for their own self concept to maintain positive social relations, Asian Americans would not be more likely than European Americans to report greater avoidance of or discomfort with social encounters involving laughter. Comparisons of the GELOPH items related to self-perceptions and social reactions supported these expectations, and we discuss how these results highlight how sets of items on the GELOPH may vary in their sensitivity to cultural differences.

  9. Evaluation of the association between Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures and catheter-associated infections: results of two national collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Reichert, Heidi; Greene, M Todd; Safdar, Nasia; Krein, Sarah L; Olmsted, Russell N; Watson, Sam R; Edson, Barbara; Albert Lesher, Mariana; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has funded national collaboratives using the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program to reduce rates of two catheter-associated infections—central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), using evidence-based intervention bundles to improve technical aspects of care and socioadaptive approaches to foster a culture of safety. Objective Examine the association between hospital units' results for the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) and catheter-associated infection rates. Methods We analysed data from two prospective cohort studies from acute-care intensive care units (ICUs) and non-ICUs participating in the AHRQ CLABSI and CAUTI collaboratives. National Healthcare Safety Network catheter-associated infections per 1000 catheter-days were collected at baseline and quarterly postimplementation. The HSOPS was collected at baseline and again 1 year later. Infection rates were modelled using multilevel negative binomial models as a function of HSOPS components over time, adjusted for hospital-level characteristics. Results 1821 units from 1079 hospitals (CLABSI) and 1576 units from 949 hospitals (CAUTI) were included. Among responding units, infection rates declined over the project periods (by 47% for CLABSI, by 23% for CAUTI, unadjusted). No significant associations were found between CLABSI or CAUTI rates and HSOPS measures at baseline or over time. Conclusions We found no association between results of the HSOPS and catheter-associated infection rates when measured at baseline and postintervention in two successful large national collaboratives focused on prevention of CLABSI and CAUTI. These results suggest that it may be possible to improve CLABSI and CAUTI rates without making significant changes in safety culture, particularly as measured by instruments like HSOPS. PMID:27222593

  10. The association between event learning and continuous quality improvement programs and culture of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Lukasz; Chera, Bhishamjit; Mosaly, Prithima; Taylor, Kinley; Tracton, Gregg; Johnson, Kendra; Comitz, Elizabeth; Adams, Robert; Pooya, Pegah; Ivy, Julie; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    To present our approach and results from our quality and safety program and to report their possible impact on our culture of patient safety. We created an event learning system (termed a "good catch" program) and encouraged staff to report any quality or safety concerns in real time. Events were analyzed to assess the utility of safety barriers. A formal continuous quality improvement program was created to address these reported events and make improvements. Data on perceptions of the culture of patient safety were collected using the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality survey administered before, during, and after the initiatives. Of 560 good catches reported, 367 could be ascribed to a specific step on our process map. The calculated utility of safety barriers was highest for those embedded into the pretreatment quality assurance checks performed by physicists and dosimetrists (utility score 0.53; 93 of 174) and routine checks done by therapists on the initial day of therapy. Therapists and physicists reported the highest number of good catches (24% each). Sixty-four percent of events were caused by performance issues (eg, not following standardized processes, including suboptimal communications). Of 31 initiated formal improvement events, 26 were successfully implemented and sustained, 4 were discontinued, and 1 was not implemented. Most of the continuous quality improvement program was conducted by nurses (14) and therapists (7). Percentages of positive responses in the patient safety culture survey appear to have increased on all dimensions (p quality improvement programs can be successfully implemented and that there are contemporaneous improvements in the culture of safety. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A holistic approach for assessing traffic safety in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Nurul; Hawas, Yaser E; Maraqa, Munjed A

    2012-03-01

    Traffic accident and fatality rates can be utilized as indicators of traffic safety, but cannot reflect the overall status of traffic safety in a country. This paper uses a holistic perspective approach to investigate traffic safety in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Initially, 12 potential items were selected to investigate the issue of traffic safety in the country. The investigation included data collection and analyses from official police reports, survey among road-users and interview of traffic safety experts. Based on data analysis and interpretation, the main factors affecting traffic safety in the UAE along with their level of deficiency were identified. The study revealed that the main factors contributing to traffic safety in the UAE are driving behaviour, awareness, education and training, infrastructure, vehicle, law enforcement, coordination and quality of resources. Among these factors, a major deficiency was found in the "driving behaviour", a minor deficiency in "vehicle safety", and a moderate deficiency in the others. Based on the deficiency level of the factors recommendations were proposed to improve the status of traffic safety in the country.

  12. Public perceptions of the pharmaceutical industry and drug safety: implications for the pharmacovigilance professional and the culture of safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Axel K; Whalen, Matthew D

    2009-01-01

    A survey of the US public titled 'Consumer Perceptions on Drug Safety' was conducted in October 2006. The survey was undertaken at that time because of the heightened public awareness of drug safety concerns over rofecoxib (Vioxx(R)) and pediatric antidepressant use. The survey was designed with questions related to public perception of the pharmaceutical industry, the US FDA, Congress and whether the US public perceived there to be a safety crisis. The survey consisted of 1726 US men and women aged 18 years and over. The survey results showed that the FDA, Congress and US pharmaceutical companies are perceived as having a notable amount of responsibility to ensure safety (by 75%, 41% and 70% of respondents, respectively). Additionally, 96% of the survey respondents indicated that they had some level of concern about adverse reactions to prescription drugs that are taken as directed. Seventy-six percent of the respondents were 'fairly' to 'extremely' concerned about adverse reactions, while approximately 42% of the survey respondents' opinions ranged from 'somewhat distrusting' to 'strongly distrusting' of the pharmaceutical companies that develop drugs. These findings are comparable to those in surveys conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation in 2005 and PriceWaterhouseCoopers in 2007. These surveys suggest that about half the respondents believe there is both the need and desire for reform in drug safety by the pharmaceutical industry and the FDA. In reports from 2006 and 2007, the Institute of Medicine challenges the healthcare system and the FDA to adopt the principles of the culture of safety. While there have been steps taken to address the recommendations of the reports, as exemplified by the FDA Amendment Act of 2007 and the Pharmacoepidemiological Research on Outcomes of Therapeutics by a European Consortium, true reform across the life sciences sector will only come through broad adoption of these principles. Thus, it is particularly important for

  13. A safety culture assessment by mixed methods at a public maternity and infant hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listyowardojo TA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tita Alissa Listyowardojo,1 Xiaoling Yan,2,3 Stephen Leyshon,1 Bobbie Ray-Sannerud,1 Xin Yan Yu,4 Kai Zheng,4 Tao Duan2,3 1Life Sciences Program, Group Technology and Research, DNV GL, Hovik, Norway; 2Quality and Safety Department, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, 3Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 4Healthcare Department, Business Assurance, DNV GL, Beijing, China Objective: To assess safety culture at a public maternity hospital in Shanghai, China, using a sequential mixed methods approach. The study was part of a bigger study looking at the application of the mixed methods approach to assess safety culture in health care in different organizations and countries.Methodology: A mixed methods approach was utilized by first distributing the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire measuring six safety culture dimensions and five independent items to all hospital staff (n=1482 working in 18 departments at a single hospital. Afterward, semistructured interviews were conducted using convenience sampling, where 48 hospital staff from nine departments at the same hospital were individually interviewed.Results: The survey received a response rate of 96%. The survey findings show significant differences between the hospital departments in almost all safety culture dimensions and independent items. Similarly, the interview findings revealed that there were different, competing priorities between departments perceived to result in a reduced quality of collaboration and bottlenecks in care delivery. Another major finding was that staff who worked more hours per week would perceive working conditions significantly more negatively. Issues related to working conditions were also the most common concerns discussed in the interviews, especially the issue on high workload. High workload was also reflected in the fact that 91.45% of survey respondents reported that they worked 40 hours or longer per week. Finally, interview findings complemented

  14. The Safety Culture Enactment Questionnaire (SCEQ): Theoretical model and empirical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Borja López; Gracia, Francisco J; Tomás, Inés; Peiró, José M

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the Safety Culture Enactment Questionnaire (SCEQ), designed to assess the degree to which safety is an enacted value in the day-to-day running of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The SCEQ is based on a theoretical safety culture model that is manifested in three fundamental components of the functioning and operation of any organization: strategic decisions, human resources practices, and daily activities and behaviors. The extent to which the importance of safety is enacted in each of these three components provides information about the pervasiveness of the safety culture in the NPP. To validate the SCEQ and the model on which it is based, two separate studies were carried out with data collection in 2008 and 2014, respectively. In Study 1, the SCEQ was administered to the employees of two Spanish NPPs (N=533) belonging to the same company. Participants in Study 2 included 598 employees from the same NPPs, who completed the SCEQ and other questionnaires measuring different safety outcomes (safety climate, safety satisfaction, job satisfaction and risky behaviors). Study 1 comprised item formulation and examination of the factorial structure and reliability of the SCEQ. Study 2 tested internal consistency and provided evidence of factorial validity, validity based on relationships with other variables, and discriminant validity between the SCEQ and safety climate. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) carried out in Study 1 revealed a three-factor solution corresponding to the three components of the theoretical model. Reliability analyses showed strong internal consistency for the three scales of the SCEQ, and each of the 21 items on the questionnaire contributed to the homogeneity of its theoretically developed scale. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) carried out in Study 2 supported the internal structure of the SCEQ; internal consistency of the scales was also supported. Furthermore, the three scales of the SCEQ showed the expected correlation

  15. Perception of colour in French and Russian linguistic cultures: a study based on phraseological units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Жанна Вячеславовна Кургузенкова

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the cultural connotations of different colours in French and Russian linguistic culture. It focuses on phraseological units of the colours “red”, “white”, “black” and “green”.

  16. 安全文化与施工企业安全生产之我见%Views on safety culture and safety production of construction enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新龙

    2014-01-01

    Taking the safety culture as the core-starting from the human orientation,the paper explores the safety culture construction and safety management methods of construction enterprises,describes relationship needing coordinated in safety culture construction,and shows strategies of improving enterprise safety management level,which has significant meaning for realizing safety production of the construction enterprises.%以安全文化的核心---以人为本为切入点,对施工企业安全文化建设与安全管理方法进行了探讨,阐述了安全文化建设应协调的三方面关系,给出了提升企业安全管理水平的策略,指出建设企业安全文化对实现安全生产具有重要的意义。

  17. Quality management and safety culture in medicine – Do standard quality reports provide insights into the human factor of patient safety?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wischet, Werner

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1999 the Institute of Medicine (IOM published the landmark report “To err is human: building a safer healthcare system” highlighting critical deficiencies within the area of patient safety. As a consequence, safety culture evolved as a core component of quality management in medicine. Purpose of the investigation at hand was to find out to what extent this is reflected in standard quality reports issued by German hospitals providing maximum medical care. Reports issued for the year 2006 were analysed with respect to the appearance of indicators for the presence of a safety culture. Results suggest that despite the huge awareness for patient safety caused by the IOM report, the topic of safety culture does not get the anticipated attention within the quality reports. This may indicate that the current requirements for the quality reports do not facilitate transparency when it comes to the human factor of patient safety.

  18. Safety Stock Adjustment in Supply Chain Storage Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Golmakani,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available supply chain is overall system include of suppliers, productive sectors and stock storage, distributers and customers that covers multi-stage structure supplier confidence (delivery with delay production process (unpredicted equipment damage and customer demand (over – expectation orders of customer are three factors at supply chain uncertainly. To react properly, we can use safe storage. In this thesis fuzzy multi-purpose model is provided based on total cost and customer service to control safe storage in storage sectors of supply chain. In this model, fuzzy confidence level of suppliers and contractors have been defined based on experts a fuzzy system and there is no hypothesis about demand distribution. To control and modify estimation deviation we used rolling horizon method and various constrains have been determined (production capacity, size of units of production and transfer, financial limitation to sale primary materials , finally softy stock had been determined to decrease total cost as 20% and increase service level to above expectation. To determine approach efficiency, this is implements in Khorasan axial parts company.

  19. Psychometric properties of the AHRQ Community Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture: a factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboneh, Ephrem A; Look, Kevin A; Stone, Jamie A; Lester, Corey A; Chui, Michelle A

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) developed a hospital patient safety culture survey in 2004 and has adapted this survey to other healthcare settings, such as nursing homes and medical offices, and most recently, community pharmacies. However, it is unknown whether safety culture dimensions developed for hospitals can be transferred to community pharmacies. The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Community Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The survey was administered to 543 community pharmacists in Wisconsin, USA. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the fit of our data with the proposed AHRQ model. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the underlying factor structure. Internal consistency reliabilities were calculated. A total of 433 usable surveys were returned (response rate 80%). Results from the confirmatory factor analysis showed inadequate model fit for the original 36 item, 11-factor structure. Exploratory factor analysis showed that a modified 27-item, four-factor structure better reflected the underlying safety culture dimensions in community pharmacies. The communication openness factor, with three items, dropped in its entirety while six items dropped from multiple factors. The remaining 27 items redistributed to form the four-factor structure: safety-related communication, staff training and work environment, organisational response to safety events, and staffing, work pressure and pace. Cronbach's α of 0.95 suggested good internal consistency. Our findings suggest that validation studies need to be conducted before applying safety dimensions from other healthcare settings into community pharmacies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Republished: Building a culture of safety through team training and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lily; Galla, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Medical errors continue to occur despite multiple strategies devised for their prevention. Although many safety initiatives lead to improvement, they are often short lived and unsustainable. Our goal was to build a culture of patient safety within a structure that optimised teamwork and ongoing engagement of the healthcare team. Teamwork impacts the effectiveness of care, patient safety and clinical outcomes, and team training has been identified as a strategy for enhancing teamwork, reducing medical errors and building a culture of safety in healthcare. Therefore, we implemented Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS), an evidence-based framework which was used for team training to create transformational and/or incremental changes; facilitating transformation of organisational culture, or solving specific problems. To date, TeamSTEPPS (TS) has been implemented in 14 hospitals, two Long Term Care Facilities, and outpatient areas across the North Shore LIJ Health System. 32 150 members of the healthcare team have been trained. TeamSTEPPS was piloted at a community hospital within the framework of the health system's organisational care delivery model, the Collaborative Care Model to facilitate sustainment. AHRQ's Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, (HSOPSC), was administered before and after implementation of TeamSTEPPS, comparing the perception of patient safety by the heathcare team. Pilot hospital results of HSOPSC show significant improvement from 2007 (pre-TeamSTEPPS) to 2010. System-wide results of HSOPSC show similar trends to those seen in the pilot hospital. Valuable lessons for organisational success from the pilot hospital enabled rapid spread of TeamSTEPPS across the rest of the health system.

  1. Impact of the introduction of electronic prescribing on staff perceptions of patient safety and organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James; Pucher, Philip H; Ibrahim, Heba; Stubbs, Ben

    2017-05-15

    Electronic prescribing (EP) systems are online technology platforms by which medicines can be prescribed, administered, and stock controlled. The actual impact of EP on patient safety is not truly understood. This study seeks to assess the impact of the implementation of an EP system on safety culture, as well as assessing differences between clinical respondent groups and considering their implications. Staff completed a modified Safety Attitudes Questionnaire survey, 6 weeks following the introduction of EP across surgical services in a hospital in Dorset, England. Responses were assessed and differences between respondent groups compared. Rates of self-reported adverse events were compared before and after implementation. Overall response rate was 34.5%. There was no significant difference between usage patterns and previous experience with EP between user groups. Overall safety was felt to have been reduced by the introduction of EP. Significant differences between clinician and nonclinicians were seen in ability to discuss errors (3.23 ± 0.5 versus 2.8 ± 0.69, P = 0.004), drug chart access, and ease of medication prescribing. Regression analysis did not identify any confounding factors. Despite a significant reduction in the adverse event rate in other divisions of the hospital that did not implement EP at the same time, this same reduction was not seen in the surgical department. This is the first study to assess the impact of EP on safety culture using a validated assessment tool (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire). Overall safety culture deteriorated following introduction of EP. Problems with system usability/intuitiveness, nonstandardized implementation, and competence assessment strategies may have all contributed to this result. Centers seeking to implement EP in future must consider these factors to ensure a positive impact on patient safety and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  3. Development of Behavioral Indicators of Competences for Safety Culture of Nuclear Power Plants: A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Kwangsu; Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Shin, Youmin; Lee, Yong-Hee; Jang, Tong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The term of safety competency in nuclear field was presented in the OECD/NEA workshop held in 1999. A model of the safety culture competencies in nuclear power plants was developed by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). In general, a competency (competence) is defined as 'cluster of employee's attribute, knowledge, skill, ability or other characteristic that contributes to successful job performance'. We also defined safety culture competency as 'cluster of various internal characteristics (e.g., knowledge, skill, ability, motive, attitude and etc.) of employee that contribute to perform job safely and shape a healthy and strong safety culture.' By this definition, the safety culture competency is the broader construct including job competency. An employee having high level of safety culture competency shows extra discretionary effort to improve safety of peer, team and organization in addition to the individual's successful and safe job accomplishment. The behavioral indicators for each of the competencies are focal points of conversations on progress and are monitored continuously by self-assessment and managers or supervisors' intervention. Deficiencies in any of these indicators can point to coaching, training or other learning opportunities that employees may be required in order to improve. The purpose of this study was to derive a model of safety competencies for improving safety culture of NPPs and develop a set of behavioral indicators of each competency. In addition, the method of measuring behavioral indicators was suggested. For the application of developed safety culture competences and behavioral indicators, the most suitable measuring method for behavioral indicators must be developed. In the case of behavioral observations, behavioral dimensions (frequency, persistence and latency), observation possibility, occurrence basis of behavior (daily job performance, situational dependent) are considered to

  4. Building food safety into the company culture: a look at Maple Leaf Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Jespersen; Huffman, Randy

    2014-07-01

    Maple Leaf Foods learned a hard lesson following its tragic 2008 Listeria outbreak that ended up taking the lives of 23 Canadians. The organization has since 2008 transformed its commitment to food safety with a strong drive and manifest in embedding sustainable food safety behaviours into the existing company culture. Its focus on combining technical risk analysis with behavioural sciences has led to the development and deployment of a food safety strategy deeply rooted in the company values and management commitment. Using five tactics described in this article the organization has been on a journey towards food safety transformation through adoption of best practices for people and systems. The approach to food safety has been one where food safety is treated as a non-competitive issue and Maple Leaf Foods have been open to sharing learning about what happened and how the organization will continue to take a leadership position in food safety to continuously raise the bar for food safety across the industry. Maple Leaf Foods has benefited tremendously by learning about best practice from numerous companies in North America and around the world. The authors believe this brief story will bring value to others as we continue to learn and improve.

  5. [Safety culture of nursing staff. A descriptive study in a Piedmont Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Ines; Dogliotti, Daniele; Poletti, Piera; Gambarini, Lorella

    2012-01-01

    Assessing safety culture is the first step towards a responsible and wary system to the errors and to the quality of the performance. The aim of the study was to assess nurses' safety culture, in order to identify improvement's priorities. A survey of nursing staff, using a questionnaire was carried out in a Piedmont hospital. Of 1056 health care workers, 707 participated (67%). The staff's perception of patient safety was positive: the results of the domains "Information and communication", "Suggestions and development" and "Safety guarantees" tend to be fair, while "Teamwork" was sufficient. The weakest areas were related to involvement (Items: "We are consulted when choosing equipment and devices to be used", 25.9% agreement, "At the end of the year we discuss together activities carried out and results" 31,8%), and "Work organization (shifts, workload) doesn't cause overload and stress", 25.3% agreement, "When an error occurs we know how to communicate with the patient as we have a guideline to lead us" 35.8% agreement. The study shows that, even if the safety culture is overall positive, there are some critical aspects that lead to distress and uncertainty between nursing staff. Improvement strategies may include: staff training to improve teamwork skills and staff involvement, increasing opportunities for discussion, organizing systematic multi-professional audit, to reflect in a structured way on clinical practice.

  6. Perceived Safety, Quality and Cultural Competency of Maternity Care for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Women in Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Sarah; Miller, Yvette D

    2016-03-01

    Various policies, plans and initiatives have been implemented to provide safe, quality and culturally competent care to patients within Queensland's health care system. A series of models of maternity care are available in Queensland that range from standard public care to private midwifery care. The current study aimed to determine whether identifying as culturally or linguistically diverse (CALD) was associated with the perceived safety, quality and cultural competency of maternity care from a consumer perspective, and to identify specific needs and preferences of CALD maternity care consumers. Secondary analysis of data collected in the Having a Baby in Queensland Survey 2012 was used to compare the experiences of 655 CALD women to those of 4049 non-CALD women in Queensland, Australia, across three stages of maternity care: pregnancy, labour and birth, and after birth. After adjustment for model of maternity care received and socio-demographic characteristics, CALD women were significantly more likely than non-CALD women to experience suboptimal staff technical competence in pregnancy, overall perceived safety in pregnancy and labour/birth, and interpersonal sensitivity in pregnancy and labour/birth. Approximately 50 % of CALD women did not have the choice to use a translator or interpreter, or the gender of their care provider, during labour and birth. Thirteen themes of preferences and needs of CALD maternity care consumers based on ethnicity, cultural beliefs, or traditions were identified; however, these were rarely met. Findings imply that CALD women in Queensland experience disadvantageous maternity care with regards to perceived staff technical competence, safety, and interpersonal sensitivity, and receive care that lacks cultural competence. Improved access to support persons, continuity and choice of carer, and staff availability and training is recommended.

  7. Studying patient safety culture from the viewpoint of staffs in educational hospitals in Tehran City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mohebi Far

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: It should be noted that paying more attention to the patient safety culture can lead to improve hospitals condition, as a whole, and to have a patient-friendly environment. Special attention should be paid to dimensions with the lowest mean score in order to strengthen them.

  8. Is Scores Derived from the Most Internationally Applied Patient Safety Culture Assessment Tool Correct?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Moghri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, known as HSOPS, is an internationally well known and widely used tool for measuring patient safety culture in hospitals. It includes 12 dimensions with positive and negative wording questions. The distribution of these questions in different dimensions is uneven and provides the risk of acquiescence bias. The aim of this study was to assess the questionnaire against this bias.Methods: Three hundred nurses were assigned into study and control groups randomly. Short form of HSOPS was distributed in the control group and totally reversed form of it was given to the study group. Percent positive scores and t-test were applied for data analysis. Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS Version 16.Results: Finally a total of 272 nurses completed the questionnaire. All dimensions with positive wording items in both groups had higher scores compared with their negative worded format. The first dimension "organizational learning and continued improvement" which had the only statistically significant difference, got 16.2% less score in the study group comparing the other group. In addition six out of 18 differences in questions were statistically significant.Conclusion: The popular and widely used HSOPS is subject to acquiescence bias. The bias might lead to exaggerate the status of some patient safety culture composites. Balancing the number of positive and negative worded items in each composite could mitigate the mentioned bias and provide a more valid estimation of different elements of patient safety culture.

  9. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Jansma, E.P.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012.

  10. Improving Hospital Quality and Patient Safety an Examination of Organizational Culture and Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John Wallace

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects of safety culture, including operational climate and practices, as well as the adoption and use of information systems for delivering high quality healthcare and improved patient experience. Chapter 2 studies the influence of both general and outcome-specific hospital climate and quality practices on process…

  11. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Jansma, E.P.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012.

  12. Improving Hospital Quality and Patient Safety an Examination of Organizational Culture and Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John Wallace

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects of safety culture, including operational climate and practices, as well as the adoption and use of information systems for delivering high quality healthcare and improved patient experience. Chapter 2 studies the influence of both general and outcome-specific hospital climate and quality practices on process…

  13. 75 FR 20009 - Development of NRC's Safety Culture Policy Statement: Cancellation of Public Workshops Scheduled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... COMMISSION Development of NRC's Safety Culture Policy Statement: Cancellation of Public Workshops Scheduled...: Cancellation of public workshops tentatively scheduled for April 13-15, 2010, and October 27-28, 2010. SUMMARY... into the NRC's draft final policy statement. In addition, the information gathered at the workshop...

  14. Colorectal Cancer Screening at the Nexus of HIV, Minority Statuses, and Cultural Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Diaz, Tressa P.; Park, Soon H.; Bowen, Talita; Patrick, Kevin; Tamang, Suresh; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased significantly among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Screening education is recommended. Purpose: Social learning, minority stress, and cultural safety theories informed this pilot to assess the feasibility of a colorectal cancer screening intervention targeted to PLHIV, with…

  15. Colorectal Cancer Screening at the Nexus of HIV, Minority Statuses, and Cultural Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Diaz, Tressa P.; Park, Soon H.; Bowen, Talita; Patrick, Kevin; Tamang, Suresh; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased significantly among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Screening education is recommended. Purpose: Social learning, minority stress, and cultural safety theories informed this pilot to assess the feasibility of a colorectal cancer screening intervention targeted to PLHIV, with…

  16. Assessment of the culture of safety in public hospitals in Brazil 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima; Arruda, Lidyane Parente; do Nascimento, Nayanne Karen Pinheiro; Sampaio, Renata Lopes; Cavalcante, Maria Lígia Silva Nunes; Costa, Ana Carolina Pinto

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the culture of safety in three public hospitals. Method: transversal study undertaken in three Brazilian public hospitals, with health professionals through applying the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Scores greater than or equal to 75 were considered positive. Results: a total of 573 professionals participated in the study, including nurse technicians and auxiliary nurses 292 (51%), nurses 105 (18.3%), physicians 59 (10.3%), and other professionals 117 (20.4%). The mean of the SAQ varied between 65 and 69 in the three hospitals. Among the domains, however, 'Job satisfaction' presented a higher score, and the opposite was observed for the domain 'Perceptions of management'. The outsourced professionals presented a better perception of the culture of safety than did the statutory professionals. The professionals with higher education presented a better perception of the stressing factors than did the professionals educated to senior high school level. Conclusion: the level of the culture of safety found is below the ideal. The managerial actions are considered the main contributing factor to the culture's weakness; however, the professionals demonstrated themselves to be satisfied with the work. PMID:28301029

  17. Benchmarking safety culture in major hazards industries in the Rotterdam area (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Bezemer, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Main findings: The safety culture scores of the (petro)chemical companies and the refineries were all good or acceptable. In contrast, in the bulk storage and chemical warehousing/logistics sectors several companies scored the acceptable minimum or even below. Strengths and weaknesses of process saf

  18. Measuring the wildland firefighting safety culture change - an analysis of entrapment rates from 1994 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Loveless; Adam Hernandez

    2015-01-01

    The tragic fatality events of the mid-1990s and subsequent studies led to a concentrated effort to increase safety in the US federal wildland firefighter community beginning in 2000. Addressing human factors (HF) as a causal agent in accidents was a major focal point for this cultural change. To examine the effectiveness of this change, we hypothesized a decline in...

  19. Water safety and spatial development: An institutional comparison between the United Kingdom and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, M.; Mastenbroek, E.; Meijerink, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Netherlands and the United Kingdom are known for their different traditions of river flood risk management, which is reflected in their respective institutional frameworks. Whereas the Dutch have focused almost exclusively on reducing the probability of flooding by defining high safety standards

  20. The safety and regulatory process for low calorie sweeteners in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ashley

    2016-10-01

    Low calorie sweeteners are some of the most thoroughly tested and evaluated of all food additives. Products including aspartame and saccharin, have undergone several rounds of risk assessment by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), in relation to a number of potential safety concerns, including carcinogenicity and more recently, effects on body weight gain, glycemic control and effects on the gut microbiome. The majority of the modern day sweeteners; acesulfame K, advantame, aspartame, neotame and sucralose have been approved in the United States through the food additive process, whereas the most recent sweetener approvals for steviol glycosides and lo han guo have occurred through the Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) system, based on scientific procedures. While the regulatory process and review time of these two types of sweetener evaluations by the FDA differ, the same level of scientific evidence is required to support safety, so as to ensure a reasonable certainty of no harm.

  1. Deepening om Safety culture Auto evaluation; Profundizacion en cultura de seguridad. Autoevaluacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Churruca, I.; Buedo Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    The concept of safety culture used in nuclear forums refers to the series of actions aimed at guaranteeing that safety issues in nuclear power plants are adequately addressed. The activities to which this concept refers have been gradually extended over the years so that, today, they encompass the whole organizations structure. In other words, the safety culture implies that all positions in the organizational structure perform their tasks with a level of attention such that all their senses are focused on them. And this performance is what leads us to excellence in plant operation. In addition, the implementation of a self-assessment system in the Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant of its activities and processes has resulted in the identification of expectations on the basis of which we can identify strengths and weaknesses, enabling us to leverage the former and correct the latter. (Author)

  2. The legal framework and initiatives for promoting safety in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivna, Michal; Aw, Tar-Ching; El-Sadig, Mohamed; Loney, Tom; Sharif, Amer Ahmad; Thomsen, Jens; Mauzi, Mariam; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2012-01-01

    Injury is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The UAE is a rapidly developing country with fast economic growth, demographical and environmental changes that are associated with new hazards emerging at a similar pace. The UAE as a federal entity has federal and local systems responsible for safety policy, regulations and enforcement. To set priorities for safety promotion and injury prevention, it is necessary to have data on the most frequent external causes of injury and the main individual, equipment and environmental risk factors that contribute to injury. However good quality data for injury prevention are scarce. The aim of this paper is to describe the scale of injury as a public health problem in the UAE, and the development of safety policies, regulations and promotion efforts with special emphasis on traffic, occupational and child safety.

  3. Nuclear Safety Culture Assessment for a Newcomer Country: Case Study of Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khasawneh, Khalid; Park, Yun Woon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    For countries initiating or considering to start their nuclear power programs; developing a successful safety culture is of a great challenge, owing to lack of experience and the sensitive nature of the nuclear industry in general. The Jordanian case was chosen since Jordan is in the early stages of its nuclear program and the establishment of an effective safety culture is crucial to guarantee the safe operation of its future nuclear facilities. It also should be noted that Fukushima accident has adversely affected the progress of the Jordanian nuclear program driven by the negative public opinion. The government shifts the policies toward enhancing the nuclear safety by enforcing the communication between the engaged parties and openness and transparency with public. In the wake of Fukushima accident the Jordanian government reassured the appropriate siting criteria and siting review, the leadership and the organizations commitment to nuclear safety by adopting advanced reactor technology, the consideration of modern operator accident mitigation strategies and the increased and close cooperation with IAEA and adherence to evolving international safety standards. The progress in the Jordanian nuclear power project in order to satisfy the IAEA requirements was quantified and ranked. A good progress was shown in some aspects, for example in the multicultural and multi-national elements and the establishment of an independent and effective regulatory body. However, some elements, concerning the understanding of the safety culture, management system of the regulatory body and the cultural assessment was not satisfied and an urgent need to focus on and enhance those aspects are required by the Jordanian government. Some elements, for example the leadership, communication and competence, have partial fulfillment of the IAEA requirements. However enhancing those aspects is required in the short and the mid-term in order to guarantee a well-established nuclear power

  4. Students’ Socio-cultural Competence Development, Using English and Russian Phraseological Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit I. Kopzhasarova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of socio-cultural competence development on the basis of using English and Russian phraseological units. The authors specify the essence of the socio-cultural competence, define socio-cultural component of foreign language teaching. The authors justify their viewpoint that phraseological units, being the most valuable source of cultural information, exposing background knowledge and culture specific vocabulary, are the effective means of socio-cultural competence development. The set of exercises on socio-cultural competence development on the material of English and Russian phraseological units, developed by authors, include language and speech tasks; tasks based on project and creative research activity methods, which are the basis of development of the main socio-cultural skills that are necessary in intercultural communication

  5. Preclinical safety studies on autologous cultured human skin fibroblast transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Zhang, Shuying; Liu, Dai; Chai, Mi; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhao, Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Recently, FDA approved the clinical use of autologous fibroblasts (LAVIV™) for the improvement of nasolabial fold wrinkles in adults. The use of autologous fibroblasts for the augmentation of dermal and subcutaneous defects represents a potentially exciting natural alternative to the use of other filler materials for its long-term corrective ability and absence of allergic adverse effects proved by clinical application. However, compared to the clinical evidence, preclinical studies are far from enough. In this study, human skin-derived fibroblasts were cultured and expanded for both in vitro and in vivo observations. In vitro, the subcultured fibroblasts were divided into two groups. One set of cells underwent cell cycle and karyotype analysis at passages 5 and 10. The second group of cells was cocultured in medium with different concentrations of human skin extract D for the measurement of collagen concentration and cell count. In vivo, the subcultured fibroblasts were injected into nude mice subcutaneously. Biopsies were taken for morphology observation and specific collagen staining at 1, 2, and 3 months after injection. The results in vitro showed no significant differences in cell cycle distribution between passages 5 and 10. Cell proliferation and secretion were inhibited as the concentration of extract D increased. In vivo, the fibroblasts were remarkably denser on the experimental side with no dysplastic cells. Mitotic cells were easily observed at the end of the first month but were rare at the end of the third month. Type III collagen was detected at the end of the first month, while collagen type I was positive at the end of the second month. The content of both collagens increased as time passed. The above results indicated that the use of the autologous fibroblasts was safe, providing a basic support for clinical use of fibroblasts.

  6. Safety Culture in activities involving ionising radiation-education project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahyun, A.; Sordi, G. M.; Sanches, M. P.; Levy, P. J.; Levy, D. S.

    2004-07-01

    The Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) requires a Radiological Protection Plan for all installations authorized to work with radioactive material and a qualified Radiological Protection Supervisor. The CNEN requires the certification of practical experience in the area plus a qualification exam, applied by them. ATOMO, has opted to develop on-line courses, using multimedia resources, available at the time this congress takes place. OMICCRON, a multimedia enterprise, is in charge of the program and design. First, the research and brochures have to be adapted for the electronic language, through links, hot words and icons, especially developed for additional information. Besides the images and graphs from the original brochures, Omiccron developed, in graphic computing, specific animation explaining the procedures in more details, illustrating and simplifying the comprehension of the more complex subjects. The CD ROM presentation was enhanced with some slide displays, automatically changing the pictures, as the explanations are given. For practical visualization of these complex and important procedures, the CD also shows some technical videos. At the end of each unit covering a specific subject, the students will be submitted to self-evaluation tests, for more profitable results. This CD is not only an electronic brochure, but mainly an on-line course with weekly Internet support via e-mail or chat site, where the learners will access the instructors and a frequent questions database, useful links and related sites, permanently upgraded. Before going to the following module, the learner has to pass a written test prepared by ATOMO, via Internet. At the end of the course, a certificate will be given. The control will be made through the use of a password, provided for the authorized company and /or users. The instructors will evaluate the learners' advancement by Internet. In the case of companies, this tool will be equally offered, by using

  7. [Is an effort needed in order to replace the punitive culture for the sake of patient safety?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Ubeda, S R

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to introduce a safety culture have flourished in a growing number of health care organisations. However, many of these organisational efforts have been incomplete with respect to the manner on how to address the resistance to change offered by the prevailing punitive culture of healthcare organisations. The present article is intended to increase the awareness on three reasons of why an effort is needed to change the punitive culture before introducing the patient safety culture. The first reason is that the culture needs to be investigated and understood. The second reason is that culture is a complex construct, deeply embedded in organisations and their contexts, and thus difficult to change. The third reason is that punitive culture is not compatible with some components of safety culture, thus without removing it there are great possibilities that it would continue to be active and dominant over safety culture. These reasons suggest that, unless planning and executing effective interventions towards replacing punitive culture with safety culture, there is the risk that punitive culture would still prevail. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of patient safety culture among personnel in the hospitals associated with Islamic Azad University in Tehran in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Moussavi, Fatemeh; MOGHRI, Javad; Gholizadeh, Yavar; Karami, Atiyeh; Najjari, Sedigheh; Mehmandust, Reza; Asghari, Mehdi; Asghari, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is an essential element in the quality of healthcare, and a clear knowledge of its culture in healthcare organizations will lead to both improved healthcare and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess the patient safety culture at Islamic Azad University hospitals in Tehran, Iran, in 2013. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on clinical and diagnostic staff in all Islamic Azad University hospitals in Tehran in June 2013. The international “...

  9. Cultural Mechanisms in Neighborhood Effects Research in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David J.; Hepburn, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the current state of the U.S. literature on cultural mechanisms in neighborhood effects research. We first define what we mean by neighborhood effects and by cultural mechanisms. We then review and critique two theoretical perspectives on the cultural context of disadvantaged neighborhoods that are explicitly integrated into recent neighborhood effects literature in the U.S.: “deviant subculture” and “cultural heterogeneity.” We then draw on other related U.S. literatures from urban studies, cultural sociology, and culture and inequality to suggest some other conceptualizations that may be useful in advancing our understanding of the role of culture in neighborhood effects. We discuss the conceptual and methodological issues that will have to be grappled with in order to move this literature forward and conclude by offering concrete suggestions, both short-term and long-term, for a research agenda. PMID:26504263

  10. Two sides of the safety coin?: How patient engagement and safety climate jointly affect error occurrence in hospital units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffinger, Michael; Latzke, Markus; Steyrer, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Safety climate (SC) and more recently patient engagement (PE) have been identified as potential determinants of patient safety, but conceptual and empirical studies combining both are lacking. On the basis of extant theories and concepts in safety research, this study investigates the effect of PE in conjunction with SC on perceived error occurrence (pEO) in hospitals, controlling for various staff-, patient-, and hospital-related variables as well as the amount of stress and (lack of) organizational support experienced by staff. Besides the main effects of PE and SC on error occurrence, their interaction is examined, too. In 66 hospital units, 4,345 patients assessed the degree of PE, and 811 staff assessed SC and pEO. PE was measured with a new instrument, capturing its core elements according to a recent literature review: Information Provision (both active and passive) and Activation and Collaboration. SC and pEO were measured with validated German-language questionnaires. Besides standard regression and correlational analyses, partial least squares analysis was employed to model the main and interaction effects of PE and SC on pEO, also controlling for stress and (lack of) support perceived by staff, various staff and patient attributes, and potential single-source bias. Both PE and SC are associated with lower pEO, to a similar extent. The joint effect of these predictors suggests a substitution rather than mutually reinforcing interaction. Accounting for control variables and/or potential single-source bias slightly attenuates some effects without altering the results. Ignoring PE potentially amounts to forgoing a potential source of additional safety. On the other hand, despite the abovementioned substitution effect and conjectures of SC being inert, PE should not be considered as a replacement for SC.

  11. 78 FR 47011 - Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants..., ``Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' This... software elements if those systems include software. This RG is one of six RG revisions addressing...

  12. Integrating quality and safety education into clinical nursing education through a dedicated education unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Kelli

    2016-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine and American Association of Colleges of Nursing are calling for curriculum redesign that prepares nursing students with the requisite knowledge and skills to provide safe, high quality care. The purpose of this project was to improve nursing students' knowledge of quality and safety by integrating Quality and Safety Education for Nurses into clinical nursing education through development of a dedicated education unit. This model, which pairs nursing students with front-line nursing staff for clinical experiences, was implemented on a medical floor in an acute care hospital. Prior to implementation, nurses and students were educated about the dedicated education unit and quality and safety competencies. During each clinical rotation, students collaborated with their nurses on projects related to these competencies. Students' knowledge was assessed using questions related to quality and safety. Students who participated in the dedicated education unit had higher scores than those with traditional clinical rotations. Focus groups were held mid-semester to assess nurses' perceptions of the experience. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data including thirsting for knowledge, building teamwork and collaboration, establishing trust and decreasing anxiety, mirroring organization and time management skills, and evolving confidence in the nursing role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and applicability of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Shigeru

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety culture at healthcare organizations plays an important role in guaranteeing, improving and promoting overall patient safety. Although several conceptual frameworks have been proposed in the past, no standard measurement tool has yet been developed for Japan. Methods In order to examine possibilities to introduce the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS in Japan, the authors of this study translated the HSOPS into Japanese, and evaluated its factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity. Healthcare workers (n = 6,395 from 13 acute care general hospitals in Japan participated in this survey. Results Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the Japanese HSOPS' 12-factor model was selected as the most pertinent, and showed a sufficiently high standard partial regression coefficient. The internal reliability of the subscale scores was 0.46-0.88. The construct validity of each safety culture sub-dimension was confirmed by polychoric correlation, and by an ordered probit analysis. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the factor structures of the Japanese and the American HSOPS are almost identical, and that the Japanese HSOPS has acceptable levels of internal reliability and construct validity. This shows that the HSOPS can be introduced in Japan.

  14. Committee Opinion No. 683 Summary: Behavior That Undermines a Culture of Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A key element of an organizational safety culture is maintaining an environment of professionalism that encourages communication and promotes high-quality care. Behavior that undermines a culture of safety, including disruptive or intimidating behavior, has a negative effect on the quality and safety of patient care. Intimidating behavior and disruptive behavior are unprofessional and should not be tolerated. Confronting disruptive individuals is difficult. Co-workers often are reluctant to report disruptive behavior because of fear of retaliation and the stigma associated with "blowing the whistle" on a colleague. Additionally, negative behavior of revenue-generating physicians may be overlooked because of concern about the perceived consequences of confronting them. The Joint Commission requires that hospitals establish a code of conduct that "defines acceptable behavior and behavior that undermines a culture of safety." Clear standards of behavior that acknowledge the consequences of disruptive and intimidating behavior must be established and communicated. Institutions and practices should develop a multifaceted approach to address disruptive behavior. Confidential reporting systems and assistance programs for physicians who exhibit disruptive behavior should be established. A concerted effort should be made within each organization to educate staff (ie, medical, nursing, and ancillary staff) about the potential negative effects of disruptive and inappropriate behavior. A clearly delineated hospital-wide policy and procedure relating to disruptive behavior should be developed and enforced by hospital administration. To preserve professional standing, physicians should understand how to respond to and mitigate the effect of complaints or reports.

  15. Committee Opinion No. 683: Behavior That Undermines a Culture of Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A key element of an organizational safety culture is maintaining an environment of professionalism that encourages communication and promotes high-quality care. Behavior that undermines a culture of safety, including disruptive or intimidating behavior, has a negative effect on the quality and safety of patient care. Intimidating behavior and disruptive behavior are unprofessional and should not be tolerated. Confronting disruptive individuals is difficult. Co-workers often are reluctant to report disruptive behavior because of fear of retaliation and the stigma associated with "blowing the whistle" on a colleague. Additionally, negative behavior of revenue-generating physicians may be overlooked because of concern about the perceived consequences of confronting them. The Joint Commission requires that hospitals establish a code of conduct that "defines acceptable behavior and behavior that undermines a culture of safety." Clear standards of behavior that acknowledge the consequences of disruptive and intimidating behavior must be established and communicated. Institutions and practices should develop a multifaceted approach to address disruptive behavior. Confidential reporting systems and assistance programs for physicians who exhibit disruptive behavior should be established. A concerted effort should be made within each organization to educate staff (ie, medical, nursing, and ancillary staff) about the potential negative effects of disruptive and inappropriate behavior. A clearly delineated hospital-wide policy and procedure relating to disruptive behavior should be developed and enforced by hospital administration. To preserve professional standing, physicians should understand how to respond to and mitigate the effect of complaints or reports.

  16. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AS ONE OF THE MAIN FACTORS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL SAFETY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Živković

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to establish the influence of organizational culture on the system of safety and health at work. The research sample included 556 respondents of various activities in Russia. Based on the results, it can be concluded that there is a statistically significant connection of the Attitude towards occupational safety with 5 out of 7 aspects of organizational culture, as well as with the general factor of Usefulness of the manner of management. In addition, there is a statistically significant connection to age, total years of service and qualifications. Through a comparative analysis of results acquired in the Republic of Serbia and Russia, differences in attitudes towards safety and health activities at work were acquired i.e. there is a difference between the average answers of respondents from Serbia and Russia in the Attitude towards occupational safety which is on average slightly more prominent in respondents from Serbia. In relation to organizational culture aspects, there are differences in Vision, Credibility, Feedback and recognition as well as Responsibility. Respondents from Serbia have higher average values on all these measures, but all the differences are small (all effect sizes are below 0.2.

  17. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Verbeek-van Noord

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012. The Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews was used to assess the risk of bias in the individual studies. Results: In total, 22 manuscripts were included for review. Training settings, study designs, and evaluation methods varied widely. Most studies reporting only a selection of culture dimensions found mainly positive results, whereas studies reporting all safety culture dimensions of the particular survey found mixed results. On average, studies were at moderate risk of bias. Conclusion: Evidence of the effectiveness of Crew Resource Management training in health care on safety culture is scarce and the validity of most studies is limited. The results underline the necessity of more valid study designs, preferably using triangulation methods.

  18. Ergonomic analysis of safety signs: a focus of informational and cultural ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Janaina; Soares, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a research carried out in the states of Pernambuco and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil about differences and similarities in the graphic representation of safety signs at factories of food, steel, shoes and construction/ building industries, together with their workers' opinions on the security signs. The overall results show differences in the sign structure across the states, confirming the influence of cultural differences on the design of safety signs, which must be taken into account during the design process.

  19. Use of Safety Pin on Garments in Pregnancy: A Belief and Cultural Practice with Potential Harmful Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kola M Owonikoko; Aramide M Tijani; Olarewaju G Bajowa; Oluseyi O Atanda

    2017-01-01

    Background: Culture has been known to influence practices and beliefs of people world over. Several cultural practices have been noted among pregnant women who were passed from one generation to the next with its potential harmful and beneficial effect. The use of safety pin in is one of such cultural practices that are widely practiced by many pregnant Nigerian women. Objective: We sought to gain a deeper understanding of the source of knowledge and motivation behind the use of safety pin on...

  20. Assessing Cultural Change in the United States Army Recruiting Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-10

    market research and analysis .27 Given these characteristics there is a clear distinction from the clan culture where NCOs come to their new environment as a recruiter in a market culture. This transition must be difficult. Cameron and Quinn suggest that “if an organization’s culture has gravitated toward the lower quadrants (hierarchy and market) it is very difficult to enact change to move the culture toward the higher quadrants (clan and adhocracy).”28 Conversely, it must be just as difficult to move in the opposite direction,

  1. Changing Safety Culture, One Step at a Time: The Value of the DOE-VPP Program at PNNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Isern, Nancy G.

    2005-02-01

    The primary value of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is the ongoing partnership between management and staff committed to change Laboratory safety culture one step at a time. VPP enables PNNL's safety and health program to transcend a top-down, by-the-book approach to safety, and it also raises grassroots safety consciousness by promoting a commitment to safety and health 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. PNNL VPP is a dynamic, evolving program that fosters innovative approaches to continuous improvement in safety and health performance at the Laboratory.

  2. Efektivitas Pelatihan Patient Safety; Komunikasi S-BAR pada Perawat dalam Menurunkan Kesalahan Pemberian Obat Injeksi di Rumah Sakit PKU Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta Unit II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Siti Fatimah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Health services provided in the hospital are likely to cause patient safety incidents which are adverse patient. The most incidents occurred in Indonesia are errors drug administration. Incidents can be prevented, one of them by training nurses on patient safety with S-BAR approach communications. The study aimed to determine the effectiveness of patient safety training; S-BAR communication in reducing injection drug administration errors in PKU Muhammadiyah Hospital in Yogyakarta Unit II. The type of research pre-experiment with the design of one group pretest-posttest design. Respondents were taken by purposive sampling technique, which total of 32 nurses who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. This study used the observation sheet instruments of 10 true principle of injection drug delivery. Analyzed by Wilcoxon test. After the training of patient safety: the SBAR communication given to nurses, there were signifi cant differences in injection drug administration errors based on the principle really patient, route, medicine, time, assessment, information and evaluation (p<0.05, but no signifi cant differences in principle correct dose, expired and documentation (p> 0.05. Conclusions and suggestions: patient safety training; SBAR communication on nurses wasc reduced injection drug administration errors effectively in PKU Muhammadiyah Hospital Unit II Yogyakarta based on the principle of right of patients, service, medicine, time, assessment, information and evaluation. Suggested Hospital to provide periodic training to all health workers, considering the creation of a patient safety culture is the responsibility of all parties in the Hospital. Thus increase the productivity of health workers as well as the creation of a patient safety culture.

  3. On-board Unit and its Possibilities of Communications on Safety and Security Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vestenicky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The technical solution of on-board unit (OBU for vehicles used for dangerous good transport and design of vehicle sensor network (based on CAN bus for dangerous good monitoring will be discussed. In presentation the conception of GSM/GPRS networking subsystem for real time data transmission into monitoring centre will be described. Next themes of discussion will be focused on the possibilities of solution of safety-related communication channel for safety sensor network in accordance with standard for functional safety of Electrical / Electronic / Programmable Electronic (E/E/PE systems IEC 61508, recommended methods of risk analysis and possibilities of their modelling and proposal of secure communication channel over GSM/GPRS for secure data transmission into control centre on the base of IPsec protocol.

  4. 论煤矿班组安全文化建设%Safety Culture Construction of Coal Team

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊霞

    2014-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the connotation and denotation of the safety culture construction of coal team, this paper discusses the significance of safety culture construction of coal team to the safety management of the enterprise, definitizes the ways of safety culture construction of coal team, and then gradually explores and innovates the efficient paths of safety culture construction of coal team.%基于班组安全文化建设的内涵及外延的分析,探讨班组安全文化建设对企业安全管理的重要意义,明确班组安全文化创建的途径,继而逐步探索和创新班组安全文化建设的有效途径。

  5. Radiation safety control on Ulchin NPP Unit 1 s/g sleeving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. T.; Jang, Y. S. [KEPCO Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Units 1, 2, Kyongsangbukdo (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Ulchin NPP unit 1 has been entered its tenth operation year. As the operation years went by, S/G tubes' defects have been reported, which was analyzed mainly due to PWSCC through ECT and various studies. In the ninth overhaul, technical staffs of Ulchin unit 1 decided to do sleeve installation for defected tubes. This sleeve installation was a second experience on our plant in KEPCO. The sleeving tubes were estimated to 600 pieces, but increased to 987 pieces by ECT results. As the sleeve installation was performed in high radiation level, we have considered various radiation safety, i e. protection of radiation source and internal exposure. The collective radiation exposure dose was recorded to 142.32 man-mSv and no internal exposed person was discovered. But there are some requirements to improve radiation safety for reducing exposure dose to radiation. PWSCC : Primary Water Side Stress Corrosion Crack (author)

  6. Position Paper. Safety for K-12 students: United States policy concerning LGBT student safety must provide inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Sanders

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT are at risk for harassment due to their sexual orientation or gender identification with over 85% of LGBT students in the United States (US reporting such harassment. These statistics demonstrate one aspect of the significance of this issue, but the cost of human life in some instances has revealed another layer of importance related to a need for safety policies for LGBT students. Even though a need exists for such policies, the practice of heteronormativity found in US policymaking regarding bullying does not protect victims or curb the violence. This essay highlights several recent developments in anti-bullying policy in US schools that shows the existence of heteronormativity, which is not helping to pro-tect LGBT students. By understanding the discrimination encouraged by current policy, future policy can be better shaped to protect LGBT students.

  7. The safety assessment of food ingredients derived from plant cell, tissue and organ cultures: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Georgiev, Milen I; Park, So-Young; Dandin, Vijayalaxmi S; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2015-06-01

    Plant cell, tissue and organ cultures (PCTOC) have become an increasingly attractive alternative for the production of various high molecular weight molecules which are used as flavourings, fragrances, colouring agents and food additives. Although PCTOC products are cultivated in vitro in a contamination free environment, the raw material produced from PCTOC may contain many components apart from the target compound. In some cases, PCTOC raw materials may also carry toxins, which may be naturally occurring or accumulated during the culture process. Assessment of the safety of PCTOC products is, therefore, a priority of the biotech industries involved in their production. The safety assessment involves the evaluation of starting material, production process and the end product. Before commercialisation, PCTOC products should be evaluated for their chemical and biological properties, as well as for their toxicity. In this review, measures and general criteria for biosafety evaluation of PCTOC products are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  8. Morbidity and Mortality Conference in Emergency Medicine Residencies and the Culture of Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Aaronson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Morbidity and mortality conferences (M+M are a traditional part of residency training and mandated by the Accreditation Counsel of Graduate Medical Education. This study’s objective was to determine the goals, structure, and the prevalence of practices that foster strong safety cultures in the M+Ms of U.S. emergency medicine (EM residency programs. Methods: The authors conducted a national survey of U.S. EM residency program directors. The survey instrument evaluated five domains of M+M (Organization and Infrastructure; Case Finding; Case Selection; Presentation; and Follow up based on the validated Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality Safety Culture survey. Results: There was an 80% (151/188 response rate. The primary objectives of M+M were discussing adverse outcomes (53/151, 35%, identifying systems errors (47/151, 31% and identifying cognitive errors (26/151, 17%. Fifty-six percent (84/151 of institutions have anonymous case submission, with 10% (15/151 maintaining complete anonymity during the presentation and 21% (31/151 maintaining partial anonymity. Forty-seven percent (71/151 of programs report a formal process to follow up on systems issues identified at M+M. Forty-four percent (67/151 of programs report regular debriefing with residents who have had their cases presented. Conclusion: The structure and goals of M+Ms in EM residencies vary widely. Many programs lack features of M+M that promote a non-punitive response to error, such as anonymity. Other programs lack features that support strong safety cultures, such as following up on systems issues or reporting back to residents on improvements. Further research is warranted to determine if M+M structure is related to patient safety culture in residency programs.

  9. Morbidity and Mortality Conference in Emergency Medicine Residencies and the Culture of Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, Emily L.; Wittels, Kathleen A.; Nadel, Eric S.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Morbidity and mortality conferences (M+M) are a traditional part of residency training and mandated by the Accreditation Counsel of Graduate Medical Education. This study’s objective was to determine the goals, structure, and the prevalence of practices that foster strong safety cultures in the M+Ms of U.S. emergency medicine (EM) residency programs. Methods The authors conducted a national survey of U.S. EM residency program directors. The survey instrument evaluated five domains of M+M (Organization and Infrastructure; Case Finding; Case Selection; Presentation; and Follow up) based on the validated Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality Safety Culture survey. Results There was an 80% (151/188) response rate. The primary objectives of M+M were discussing adverse outcomes (53/151, 35%), identifying systems errors (47/151, 31%) and identifying cognitive errors (26/151, 17%). Fifty-six percent (84/151) of institutions have anonymous case submission, with 10% (15/151) maintaining complete anonymity during the presentation and 21% (31/151) maintaining partial anonymity. Forty-seven percent (71/151) of programs report a formal process to follow up on systems issues identified at M+M. Forty-four percent (67/151) of programs report regular debriefing with residents who have had their cases presented. Conclusion The structure and goals of M+Ms in EM residencies vary widely. Many programs lack features of M+M that promote a non-punitive response to error, such as anonymity. Other programs lack features that support strong safety cultures, such as following up on systems issues or reporting back to residents on improvements. Further research is warranted to determine if M+M structure is related to patient safety culture in residency programs. PMID:26594271

  10. An overview on development of safety culture of regulatory body in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Myunghyun; Choi, Young Sung; Yi, Kyungjoo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Fukushima accident revealed not only licensees but also regulatory bodies' (RBs) establishment of robust safety culture (SC) is crucial to implement effective safety regulation. Result of the IAEA IRRS held in 2011 required regulatory body in Korea to make improvement measure for the enhancement of safety culture of regulatory body (SCRB). Compared to works done to assess SC focused on working organizations of nuclear industry, not enough attention has been paid to assess the RBs. To achieve this goal, long-term comprehensive drive plan has to be made. The IAEA is putting great effort to establish and enhance SC in RBs. OECD/NEA CNRA is planning to produce Green Booklet on SCRB for regulatory guidance. SCRB is an organization's culture, RBs ultimately has to possess in order to assure secure use of nuclear energy. An organization's culture emerges from, and is manifested in, the interplay of its members' emotion, cognition, attitudes, behaviors and interaction patterns. As a result of this mechanism, organizational structures and culture influence individual's attitude and behavior when entered into a situation. Each organization has its strengths and weakness in SC. Safety culture defective components of the Fukushima accident was analyzed by JNES in 2012. According to the casual factors indicated in the investigation report, Nuclear Regulatory Organizations (NROs) of Korea also had weakness of the SCRB in terms of questioning attitude, continuous learning, issue identification and resolution and safety leadership. It doesn't have to be same but necessary for both NSSC and KINS to be consistent in building SC traits to carry out a coherent policy with synergy effect. NROs should communicated and convey consistent message to the stakeholders. Not limited to development of SCRB itself, influence of SCRB on licensee's SC is recommended for further study. Also, what behaviors are expected to make positive effects and whether they can

  11. Applying cultural safety beyond Indigenous contexts: Insights from health research with Amish and Low German Mennonites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet Garneau, Amélie; Farrar, Helen; Fan, HaiYan; Kulig, Judith

    2017-06-01

    People who identify as members of religious communities, such as the Amish and Low German Mennonites, face challenges obtaining quality health care and engagement in research due in part to stereotypes that are conveyed through media and popular discourses. There is also a growing concern that even when these groups are engaged in research, the guiding frameworks of the research fail to consider the sociocultural or historical relations of power, further skewing power imbalances inherent in the research relationship. This paper aims at discussing the uses of cultural safety in the context of health research and knowledge translation with groups of people that are associated with a specific religion. Research with the Amish and Low German Mennonites is provided as examples to illustrate the use of cultural safety in this context. From these examples, we discuss how the use of cultural safety, grounded in critical theoretical perspectives, offers new insight into health research with populations that are traditionally labeled as minority, vulnerable, or marginalized, especially when a dominant characteristic is a unique religious perspective. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Adverse event reporting in Slovenia - the influence of safety culture, supervisors and communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Karin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The provision of safe healthcare is considered a priority in European Union (EU member states. Along with other preventative measures in healthcare, the EU also strives to eliminate the “causes of harm to human health”. The aim of this survey was to determine whether safety culture, supervisors and communication between co-workers influence the number of adverse event reports submitted to the heads of clinical departments and to the management of an institution. Methods. This survey is based on cross-sectional analysis. It was carried out in the largest Slovenian university hospital. We received 235 completed questionnaires. Respondents included professionals in the fields of nursingcare, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and radiological technology. Results. Safety culture influences the number of adverse event reports submitted to the head of a clinical department from the organizational point of view. Supervisors and communication between co-workers do not influence the number of adverse event reports. Conclusion. It can be concluded that neither supervisors nor the level of communication between co-workers influence the frequency of adverse event reporting, while safety culture does influence it from an organizational point of view. The presumed factors only partly influence the number of submitted adverse event reports, thus other causes of under-reporting must be sought elsewhere.

  13. [Adaptation of the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPSC) tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre-Busto, C; Torijano-Casalengua, M L; Olivera-Cañadas, G; Astier-Peña, M P; Maderuelo-Fernández, J A; Rubio-Aguado, E A

    2015-01-01

    To adapt the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPSC) Excel(®) tool for its use by Primary Care Teams of the Spanish National Public Health System. The process of translation and adaptation of MOSPSC from the Agency for Healthcare and Research in Quality (AHRQ) was performed in five steps: Original version translation, Conceptual equivalence evaluation, Acceptability and viability assessment, Content validity and Questionnaire test and response analysis, and psychometric properties assessment. After confirming MOSPSC as a valid, reliable, consistent and useful tool for assessing patient safety culture in our setting, an Excel(®) worksheet was translated and adapted in the same way. It was decided to develop a tool to analyze the "Spanish survey" and to keep it linked to the "Original version" tool. The "Spanish survey" comparison data are those obtained in a 2011 nationwide Spanish survey, while the "Original version" comparison data are those provided by the AHRQ in 2012. The translated and adapted tool and the analysis of the results from a 2011 nationwide Spanish survey are available on the website of the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality. It allows the questions which are decisive in the different dimensions to be determined, and it provides a comparison of the results with graphical representation. Translation and adaptation of this tool enables a patient safety culture in Primary Care in Spain to be more effectively applied. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. [Development and validation of the Korean patient safety culture scale for nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Byungsoo; Kim, Se Young

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate patient safety culture in nursing homes and to test its validity and reliability. A preliminary tool was developed through interviews with focus group, content validity tests, and a pilot study. A nationwide survey was conducted from February to April, 2011, using self-report questionnaires. Participants were 982 employees in nursing homes. Data were analyzed using Cronbach's alpha, item analysis, factor analysis, and multitrait/multi-Item analysis. From the results of the analysis, 27 final items were selected from 49 items on the preliminary tool. Items with low correlation with total scale were excluded. The 4 factors sorted by factor analysis contributed 63.4% of the variance in the total scale. The factors were labeled as leadership, organizational system, working attitude, management practice. Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was .95 and the range for the 4 factors was from .86 to .93. The results of this study indicate that the Korean Patient Safety Culture Scale has reliability and validity and is suitable for evaluation of patient safety culture in Korean nursing homes.

  15. Modeling, dependence, classification, united statistical science, many cultures

    CERN Document Server

    Parzen, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Breiman (2001) proposed to statisticians awareness of two cultures: 1. Parametric modeling culture, pioneered by R.A.Fisher and Jerzy Neyman; 2. Algorithmic predictive culture, pioneered by machine learning research. Parzen (2001), as a part of discussing Breiman (2001), proposed that researchers be aware of many cultures, including the focus of our research: 3. Nonparametric, quantile based, information theoretic modeling. Our research seeks to unify statistical problem solving in terms of comparison density, copula density, measure of dependence, correlation, information, new measures (called LP score comoments) that apply to long tailed distributions with out finite second order moments. A very important goal is to unify methods for discrete and continuous random variables. We are actively developing these ideas, which have a history of many decades, since Parzen (1979, 1983) and Eubank et al. (1987). Our research extends these methods to modern high dimensional data modeling.

  16. You can't improve what you don't measure: Safety climate measures available in the German-speaking countries to support safety culture development in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Tanja; Brösterhaus, Mareen; Hammer, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Safety climate measurement is a key input into safety culture development. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the safety climate measures that have been evaluated for their psychometric properties in a German-speaking country and to make recommendations on how to use them in quality and patient safety improvement. A systematic search strategy was implemented to obtain relevant articles. PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched, and 128 abstracts were identified. After application of limits, 33 full texts were retrieved for subsequent evaluation. Studies were included on the basis of predetermined inclusion criteria and independent assessment by two reviewers. Publications were reviewed concerning healthcare setting, target group, safety culture dimensions covered and results of their psychometric evaluation. This review identified 11 instruments for safety climate assessment in different healthcare settings (i. e. hospitals, nursing homes, primary care, dental care and community pharmacy) for which acceptable to good internal consistency was reported. We observed wide variability concerning the number of dimensions (1 to 14; in some cases including outcome dimensions) and items (9 to 128) that the instruments were comprised of. Nevertheless, consistency with regard to the thematic areas covered was rather high. While there is clear evidence that we can assess safety climate in healthcare, the application of safety climate measures by quality and patient safety practitioners has so far been rather limited. This review bridges this gap between research and improvement practice by highlighting the central role of safety climate assessment in a mixed methods approach to inform safety culture development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. Lost in Translation? Challenges and Opportunities for Raising Health and Safety Awareness among a Multinational Workforce in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Loney

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The United Arab Emirates (UAE has experienced tremendous economic and industrial growth in the petroleum, airline, maritime and construction sectors, especially since the discovery of oil reserves. Mass recruitment of low skilled or unskilled laborers from less-developed countries has been utilized to satisfy the manpower demands of these fast paced industrial developments. Such workforce recruitment has created an unusual populace demographic, with the total UAE population estimated at 8.3 million, composed of 950,000 Emiratis, with the remainder being multinational expatriate workers, with varying educational qualifications, work experience, religious beliefs, cultural practices, and native languages. These unique characteristics pose a challenge for health and safety professionals tasked with ensuring the UAE workforce adheres to specific occupational health and safety procedures. The paper discusses two case studies that employ a novel multimedia approach to raising health and safety awareness among a multinational workforce.

  18. Lost in Translation? Challenges and Opportunities for Raising Health and Safety Awareness among a Multinational Workforce in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loney, Tom; Cooling, Robert Fletcher; Aw, Tar-Ching

    2012-12-01

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has experienced tremendous economic and industrial growth in the petroleum, airline, maritime and construction sectors, especially since the discovery of oil reserves. Mass recruitment of low skilled or unskilled laborers from less-developed countries has been utilized to satisfy the manpower demands of these fast paced industrial developments. Such workforce recruitment has created an unusual populace demographic, with the total UAE population estimated at 8.3 million, composed of 950,000 Emiratis, with the remainder being multinational expatriate workers, with varying educational qualifications, work experience, religious beliefs, cultural practices, and native languages. These unique characteristics pose a challenge for health and safety professionals tasked with ensuring the UAE workforce adheres to specific occupational health and safety procedures. The paper discusses two case studies that employ a novel multimedia approach to raising health and safety awareness among a multinational workforce.

  19. The impact of safety organizing, trusted leadership, and care pathways on reported medication errors in hospital nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogus, Timothy J; Sutcliffe, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has found that safety organizing behaviors of registered nurses (RNs) positively impact patient safety. However, little research exists on the joint benefits of safety organizing and other contextual factors that help foster safety. Although we know that organizational practices often have more powerful effects when combined with other mutually reinforcing practices, little research exists on the joint benefits of safety organizing and other contextual factors believed to foster safety. Specifically, we examined the benefits of bundling safety organizing with leadership (trust in manager) and design (use of care pathways) factors on reported medication errors. A total of 1033 RNs and 78 nurse managers in 78 emergency, internal medicine, intensive care, and surgery nursing units in 10 acute-care hospitals in Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, and Ohio who completed questionnaires between December 2003 and June 2004. Cross-sectional analysis of medication errors reported to the hospital incident reporting system for the 6 months after the administration of the survey linked to survey data on safety organizing, trust in manager, use of care pathways, and RN characteristics and staffing. Multilevel Poisson regression analyses indicated that the benefits of safety organizing on reported medication errors were amplified when paired with high levels of trust in manager or the use of care pathways. Safety organizing plays a key role in improving patient safety on hospital nursing units especially when bundled with other organizational components of a safety supportive system.

  20. A theory-driven, longitudinal evaluation of the impact of team training on safety culture in 24 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katherine J; Skinner, Anne M; High, Robin; Reiter-Palmon, Roni

    2013-05-01

    Effective teamwork facilitates collective learning, which is integral to safety culture. There are no rigorous evaluations of the impact of team training on the four components of safety culture-reporting, just, flexible and learning cultures. We evaluated the impact of a year-long team training programme on safety culture in 24 hospitals using two theoretical frameworks. We used two quasi-experimental designs: a cross-sectional comparison of hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPS) results from an intervention group of 24 hospitals to a static group of 13 hospitals and a pre-post comparison of HSOPS results within intervention hospitals. Dependent variables were HSOPS items representing the four components of safety culture; independent variables were derived from items added to the HSOPS that measured the extent of team training, learning and transfer. We used a generalised linear mixed model approach to account for the correlated nature of the data. 59% of 2137 respondents from the intervention group reported receiving team training. Intervention group HSOPS scores were significantly higher than static group scores in three dimensions assessing the flexible and learning components of safety culture. The distribution of the adoption of team behaviours (transfer) varied in the intervention group from 2.8% to 31.0%. Adoption of team behaviours was significantly associated with odds of an individual reacting more positively at reassessment than baseline to nine items reflecting all four components of safety culture. Team training can result in transformational change in safety culture when the work environment supports the transfer of learning to new behaviour.

  1. Teamwork, communication and safety climate: a systematic review of interventions to improve surgical culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Greg D; Shannon, Evan M; Dawes, Aaron J; Rollo, Johnathon C; Nguyen, David K; Russell, Marcia M; Ko, Clifford Y; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda A

    2015-07-01

    To define the target domains of culture-improvement interventions, to assess the impact of these interventions on surgical culture and to determine whether culture improvements lead to better patient outcomes and improved healthcare efficiency. Healthcare systems are investing considerable resources in improving workplace culture. It remains unclear whether these interventions, when aimed at surgical care, are successful and whether they are associated with changes in patient outcomes. PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched from January 1980 to January 2015. We included studies on interventions that aimed to improve surgical culture, defined as the interpersonal, social and organisational factors that affect the healthcare environment and patient care. The quality of studies was assessed using an adapted tool to focus the review on higher-quality studies. Due to study heterogeneity, findings were narratively reviewed. The 47 studies meeting inclusion criteria (4 randomised trials and 10 moderate-quality observational studies) reported on interventions that targeted three domains of culture: teamwork (n=28), communication (n=26) and safety climate (n=19); several targeted more than one domain. All moderate-quality studies showed improvements in at least one of these domains. Two studies also demonstrated improvements in patient outcomes, such as reduced postoperative complications and even reduced postoperative mortality (absolute risk reduction 1.7%). Two studies reported improvements in healthcare efficiency, including fewer operating room delays. These findings were supported by similar results from low-quality studies. The literature provides promising evidence for various strategies to improve surgical culture, although these approaches differ in terms of the interventions employed as well as the techniques used to measure culture. Nevertheless, culture improvement appears to be associated with other positive effects, including

  2. Investigating patient safety culture across a health system: multilevel modelling of differences associated with service types and staff demographics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallego, Blanca; Westbrook, Mary T; Dunn, Adam G; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    To use multilevel modelling to compare the patient safety cultures of types of services across a health system and to determine whether differences found can be accounted for by staffs' professions...

  3. Effect of a "Lean" intervention to improve safety processes and outcomes on a surgical emergency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Peter; Kreckler, Simon; New, Steve; Sheena, Yezen; Handa, Ashok; Catchpole, Ken

    2010-11-02

    Emergency surgical patients are at high risk for harm because of errors in care. Quality improvement methods that involve process redesign, such as “Lean,” appear to improve service reliability and efficiency in healthcare. Interrupted time series. The emergency general surgery ward of a university hospital in the United Kingdom. Seven safety relevant care processes. A Lean intervention targeting five of the seven care processes relevant to patient safety. 969 patients were admitted during the four month study period before the introduction of the Lean intervention (May to August 2007), and 1114 were admitted during the four month period after completion of the intervention (May to August 2008). Compliance with the five process measures targeted for Lean intervention (but not the two that were not) improved significantly (relative improvement 28% to 149%; PLean can substantially and simultaneously improve compliance with a bundle of safety related processes. Given the interconnected nature of hospital care, this strategy might not translate into improvements in safety outcomes unless a system-wide approach is adopted to remove barriers to change.

  4. Measuring patient safety culture in maternal and child health institutions in China: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Huifeng; Liu, Chaojie; Wang, Yan

    2017-07-12

    Patient safety culture (PSC) plays a critical role in ensuring safe and quality care. Extensive PSC studies have been undertaken in hospitals. However, little is known about PSC in maternal and child health (MCH) institutions in China, which provide both population-based preventive services as well as individual care for patients. This study aimed to develop a theoretical framework for conceptualising PSC in MCH institutions in China. The study was undertaken in six MCH institutions (three in Hebei and three in Beijing). Participants (n=118) were recruited through stratified purposive sampling: 20 managers/administrators, 59 care providers and 39 patients. In-depth interviews were conducted with the participants. The interview data were coded using both inductive (based on the existing PSC theory developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) and deductive (open coding arising from data) approaches. A PSC framework was formulated through axial coding that connected initial codes and selective coding that extracted a small number of themes. The interviewees considered patient safety in relation to six aspects: safety and security in public spaces, safety of medical services, privacy and information security, financial security, psychological safety and gap in services. A 12-dimensional PSC framework was developed, containing 69 items. While the existing PSC theory was confirmed by this study, some new themes emerged from the data. Patients expressed particular concerns about psychological safety and financial security. Defensive medical practices emerged as a PSC dimension that is associated with not only medical safety but also financial security and psychological safety. Patient engagement was also valued by the interviewees, especially the patients, as part of PSC. Although there are some common features in PSC across different healthcare delivery systems, PSC can also be context specific. In MCH settings in China, the meaning of 'patient safety

  5. Cultural Capital and Transnational Parenting: The Case of Ghanaian Migrants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Cati; Shani, Serah

    2015-01-01

    What does cultural capital mean in a transnational context? In this article, Cati Coe and Serah Shani illustrate through the case of Ghanaian immigrants to the United States that the concept of cultural capital offers many insights into immigrants' parenting strategies, but that it also needs to be refined in several ways to account for the…

  6. The Senegal Project: A Cultural Foods Unit for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The Senegal Project is the culminating project in a unit on cultural foods in an 8th grade family and consumer sciences (FCS) course. Initially, students take a quick world tour by studying and cooking foods from Mexico, Italy, China, and India followed by a "more depth and less breadth" study of Senegal, a country with a culture vastly…

  7. Grandparents in the United States and the Republic of China: A Comparison of Generations and Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Robert D.; Strom, Shirley K.; Wang, Chih-Mei; Shen, Yuh-Ling; Griswold, Dianne; Chan, Hou-Sheng; Yang, Chu-Yin

    1999-01-01

    Examines grandparent behaviors in the United States and in the Republic of China to identify curriculum themes for helping them learn to adjust to their changing roles. Results revealed significant differences in perceptions about grandparents across cultures as well as between generations within cultures. Provides specific guidelines and…

  8. Organisational Culture and Values and the Adaptation of Academic Units in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zilwa, Deanna

    2007-01-01

    This study explores connections between the organisational culture and values of academic units in Australian universities and their efforts to adapt to external environmental pressures. It integrates empirical findings from case studies with theories of organisational culture and values and adaptation. It identifies seven dimensions of academic…

  9. Quality management and safety culture in medicine – Do standard quality reports provide insights into the human factor of patient safety?

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In 1999 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published the landmark report "To err is human: building a safer healthcare system" highlighting critical deficiencies within the area of patient safety. As a consequence, safety culture evolved as a core component of quality management in medicine. Purpose of the investigation at hand was to find out to what extent this is reflected in standard quality reports issued by German hospitals providing maximum medical care. Reports issued for the year 2006 w...

  10. The Role of Organizational Culture in the Leadership of United States Air Force Services Squadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to examine the role organizational culture plays in the leadership of United States Air Force (USAF) Services...squadrons. While some might argue that the study of organizational culture is a somewhat vague notion, there is significant theory and findings to show...determine the link between organizational culture and financial performance as indicated by Standard and Poor’s financial ratios. In summarizing his

  11. Perspectives on Safety and Health among Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in the United States and Mexico: A Qualitative Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallones, Lorann; Acosta, Martha S. Vela; Sample, Pat; Bigelow, Philip; Rosales, Monica

    2009-01-01

    Context: A large number of hired farmworkers in the United States come from Mexico. Understanding safety and health concerns among the workers is essential to improving prevention programs. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to obtain detailed information about safety and health concerns of hired farmworkers in Colorado and in Mexico.…

  12. An Actuator Control Unit for Safety-Critical Mechatronic Applications with Embedded Energy Storage Backup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Saponara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an actuator control unit (ACU with a 450-J embedded energy storage backup to face safety critical mechatronic applications. The idea is to ensure full operation of electric actuators, even in the case of battery failure, by using supercapacitors as a local energy tank. Thanks to integrated switching converter circuitry, the supercapacitors provide the required voltage and current levels for the required time to guarantee actuator operation until the system enters into safety mode. Experimental results are presented for a target application related to the control of servomotors for a robotized prosthetic arm. Mechatronic devices for rehabilitation or assisted living of injured and/or elderly people are available today. In most cases, they are battery powered with lithium-based cells, providing high energy density and low weight, but at the expense of a reduced robustness compared to lead-acid- or nickel-based battery cells. The ACU of this work ensures full operation of the wearable robotized arm, controlled through acceleration and electromyography (EMG sensor signals, even in the case of battery failure, thanks to the embedded energy backup unit. To prove the configurability and scalability of the proposed solution, experimental results related to the electric actuation of the car door latch and of a robotized gearbox in vehicles are also shown. The reliability of the energy backup device has been assessed in a wide temperature range, from −40 to 130 °C, and in a durability test campaign of more than 10,000 cycles. Achieved results prove the suitability of the proposed approach for ACUs requiring a burst of power of hundreds of watts for only a few seconds in safety-critical applications. Alternatively, the aging and temperature characterizations of energy backup units is limited to supercapacitors of thousands of farads for high power applications (e.g., electric/hybrid propulsion and with a temperature range limited to

  13. Learning about patient safety: organizational context and culture in the education of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Pauline; Steven, Alison; Howe, Amanda; Sheikh, Aziz; Ashcroft, Darren; Smith, Pam

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the formal and informal ways pre-registration students from medicine, nursing, physiotherapy and pharmacy learn about keeping patients safe. This paper gives an overview of the study and explores findings in relation to organizational context and culture. The study employed a phased design using multiple qualitative methods. The overall approach drew on 'illuminative evaluation'. Ethical approval was obtained. Phase 1 employed a convenience sample of 13 pre-registration courses across the UK. Curriculum documents were gathered, and course directors interviewed. Phase 2 used eight case studies, two for each professional group, to develop an in-depth investigation of learning across university and practice by students and newly-qualified practitioners in relation to patient safety, and to examine the organizational culture that students and newly-qualified staff are exposed to. Analysis was iterative and ongoing throughout the study, using frameworks agreed by all researchers. Patient safety was felt to have become a higher priority for the health care system in recent years. Incident reporting was a key feature of the patient safety agenda within the organizations examined. Staff were often unclear or too busy to report. On the whole, students were not engaged and may not be aware of incident reporting schemes. They may not have access to existing systems in their organization. Most did not access employers' induction programmes. Some training sessions occasionally included students but this did not appear to be routine. Action is needed to develop an efficient interface between employers and education providers to develop up-to-date curricula for patient safety.

  14. The Effect of Individual and Organizational Variables on Patient Safety Culture (PSC: A Case Study on Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khandan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: The purpose of the hospital accreditation program is to improve the patients' safety. Prevention of mistakes in medical procedures, patients' safety risk identification and infection prevention besides the patients' safety culture (PSC are the key factors that must be considered in a successful patients' safety program.This study aimed to assess PSC and its association with demographic factors among nurses of a hospital in Qom, Iran. Materials & Methods: This research as a descriptive-analytical andcross-sectional study on the effect of individual and organizational variables on patients' safety culture among nurses was conducted in 2015. The final sample included 106 employees from one of the hospitals located in Qom province of Iran. The questionnaires consisted demographic questions and a valid questionnaire about patients' safety culture. T-test, ANOVA and Pearson correlation were conducted to analyze the data by SPSS V20. Results:The age of nurses was 35.15±10.33 (Mean±SD years. Results showed that the patients' safety climate scoreamongnurseswas 70.15±7.23. In addition, there are significant differences between groups of work shift and also education levels in the viewpoints of patients' safety (p0.05. Conclusions: Although, based on our finding,considered hospital had a suitable situation of patients' safety culture, but it is important to pay attention to continuous improvement in the scope of health care workers and patient safety to achieve criticalmission and visions of organizing. Job selection on the basis of demographic considerations and implementation of an accreditation plan for health care systems are two examples of how occupational safety and health tools can be used to provide quality improvement information for health care organizations such as hospitals.

  15. Use of Safety Pin on Garments in Pregnancy: A Belief and Cultural Practice with Potential Harmful Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kola M Owonikoko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Culture has been known to influence practices and beliefs of people world over. Several cultural practices have been noted among pregnant women who were passed from one generation to the next with its potential harmful and beneficial effect. The use of safety pin in is one of such cultural practices that are widely practiced by many pregnant Nigerian women. Objective: We sought to gain a deeper understanding of the source of knowledge and motivation behind the use of safety pin on garments during pregnancy as well as explore potential harmful side effects of this cultural practice. Methodology: A total of 419 pregnant women completed questionnaires for a hospital-based cross-sectional study. Safety pin knowledge and motivation for use on garments were assessed using a pre-tested 16 item questionnaire. Consenting women either completed a self-administered structured questionnaire or utilized the help of trained research assistants. Chi-square tests were used to assess relationships between safety pin use on garments and predictor variables. Analysis was done with Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17. Results: Of 419 participants, over half (n = 227 reported safety pin use on garments in pregnancy. About two-thirds (n = 177 of women who use safety pin reported older female relatives as their source of information. The mean age of the participants was 29.1 ± 5.74 (range 16–45 years. Traditional religion worshippers were more likely (81.2% and Christians were least likely to use safety pin (50.7% during pregnancy. Pregnant women with a tertiary education (50.4% were least likely to use safety pin compared with women with no or less than a tertiary level of education. Protection of pregnancy against demons/witchcrafts was the reason given by 129 (56.8% of participants using safety pin in pregnancy. Conclusion: The use of safety pin on garments during pregnancy is a common cultural practice in southwest Nigeria. Our

  16. Indigenous housing and health in the Canadian North: revisiting cultural safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    . I argue that integral components in northern Indigenous conceptualizations of home and, in turn, health are not only unrecognized in housing policy, but actively discouraged. The potential for homemaking to inform health and housing policy speaks to the relevance of cultural safety not only......In this article, I explore the relationship between housing, home and health amongst Indigenous homeless people living in the Canadian North. In particular, I examine the ways in which Indigenous homemaking practices conflict with housing policy, and exacerbate individual pathways to homelessness...

  17. What is safety culture and risk-taking like at a large steel manufacturing company?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlöf, Hasse

    2012-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted at a large steel manufacturing company with 1000 employees, in order to answer the research question: what is the safety culture and risk-taking like at the company, according to employees? Ten focus groups were used for data collection consisting of 6-8 employees each. The participants were operators from production. The interviews lasted 75 min and were digitally recorded and thereafter verbatim transcribed. Descriptive data was also collected from all participants by allowing them to fill out a short questionnaire. The results of this study will be presented at the conference as a poster presentation.

  18. Culture and Healthy Eating: The Role of Independence and Interdependence in the United States and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Cynthia S; Miyamoto, Yuri; Markus, Hazel Rose; Rigotti, Attilio; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Karasawa, Mayumi; Kawakami, Norito; Coe, Christopher L; Love, Gayle D; Ryff, Carol D

    2016-10-01

    Healthy eating is important for physical health. Using large probability samples of middle-aged adults in the United States and Japan, we show that fitting with the culturally normative way of being predicts healthy eating. In the United States, a culture that prioritizes and emphasizes independence, being independent predicts eating a healthy diet (an index of fish, protein, fruit, vegetables, reverse-coded sugared beverages, and reverse-coded high fat meat consumption; Study 1) and not using nonmeat food as a way to cope with stress (Study 2a). In Japan, a culture that prioritizes and emphasizes interdependence, being interdependent predicts eating a healthy diet (Studies 1 and 2b). Furthermore, reflecting the types of agency that are prevalent in each context, these relationships are mediated by autonomy in the United States and positive relations with others in Japan. These findings highlight the importance of understanding cultural differences in shaping healthy behavior and have implications for designing health-promoting interventions.

  19. Quality and safety in adult epilepsy monitoring units: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Khara M; Wiebe, Natalie; Macrodimitris, Sophie; Wiebe, Samuel; Lukmanji, Sara; Jetté, Nathalie

    2016-11-01

    The epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) is a valuable resource for optimizing management of persons with epilepsy, but may place patients at risk for adverse events due to withdrawal of treatment and induction of symptoms. The purpose of this study was to synthesize data on the safety and quality of care in EMUs to inform the development of quality indicators for EMUs. A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting and Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement. The search strategy, which included broad search terms and synonyms pertaining to the EMU, was run in six medical databases and included conference proceedings. Data abstracted included patient and EMU demographics and quality and safety variables. Study quality was evaluated using a modified 15-item Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Descriptive statistics and meta-analyses were used to describe and synthesize the evidence. The search yielded 7,601 references, of which 604 were reviewed in full text. One-hundred thirty-five studies were included. The quality and safety data came from 181,823 patients and reported on 34 different quality and safety variables. Included studies commonly reported the number of patients (108 studies; median number patients, 171.5), age (49 studies; mean age 35.7 years old), and the reason for admission (34 studies). The most common quality and safety data reported were the utility of the EMU admission (38 studies). Thirty-three studies (24.4%) reported on adverse events, and yielded a pooled proportion of adverse events of 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 5-9%). The mean quality score was 73.3% (standard deviation [SD] 17.2). This study demonstrates that there is a great deal of variation in the reporting of quality and safety measures and in the quality and safety in EMUs. Study quality also varied considerably from one study to the next. These findings highlight the need to develop

  20. Compliance of Bhabhatron-II telecobalt unit with IEC standard - Radiation safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, G; Kumar, Munish; Dash Sharma, P K; Sharma, D N; Chhokra, Kanta; Mishra, Bibekananda; Agarwal, S P; Kher, R K

    2009-04-28

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India designed and developed a telecobalt unit, which was named as Bhabhatron-II. In this paper, the results pertaining to radiation safety of indigenously developed Bhabhatron-II telecobalt unit are reported. The various tests were carried out as per requirements of International Electrotechnical Commission standard and acceptance criteria developed nationally. Various devices such as CaSO4:Dy based thermoluminescent dosimeters, farmer type ionization chamber, water phantom and radiographic films were used. All the parameters pertaining to radiation leakage/transmission were within the tolerance limits as per IEC-60601-2-11 standard except the collimator transmission through X collimators (upper jaw), which marginally exceeds the tolerance limit.

  1. Promoting Laboratory Safety Management by Building Safety Culture%打造实验室安全文化促进实验室安全管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆燕; 毛诗焙; 胡晓君

    2015-01-01

    The building and management of the university laboratory safety is not only the important part of laboratory building and management, but also the necessary safeguard of the smooth development of teaching and scientific research. From the safety cultural connotation and the importance of laboratory safety culture building, the laboratory safety culture construction measures of College of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology were further illustrated, and tried to enrich the forms and mechanisms on safety culture education, to pay more attention to the communication of safety culture, so as to establish a long-term working mechanism.%高校实验室的安全建设与管理既是实验室建设和管理的重要组成部分,又是维护学校教学科研等工作正常开展的必要保障。本文从安全文化内涵和实验室安全文化建设重要性入手,阐述了浙江工业大学材料科学与工程学院实验室安全文化建设的具体举措,力图进一步丰富安全文化教育形式和机制,重视安全文化交流,进而建立起一套长效的工作机制。

  2. Risk analysis-based food safety policy: scientific factors versus socio-cultural factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Mauro; van Knapen, Frans; Brom, Frans W A

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate the importance of socio-cultural factors in risk management and the need to incorporate these factors in a standard, internationally recognized (WTO) framework. This was achieved by analysing the relevance of these factors in three cases. It can be concluded that the pre-eminent role of science in food-related regulatory decisions is debatable. At a risk management level, other factors, such as cultural, social, or economic issues, are often more important than scientific advice in determining policy. There is a need for transparency at an international level as trade barriers are gradually being removed and these other factors are becoming more apparent. Therefore it is important that all the factors implicated in the food safety policy-making process are recognized in a standard framework.

  3. Structural equation model to investigate the dimensions influencing safety culture improvement in construction sector: A case in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machfudiyanto, Rossy Armyn; Latief, Yusuf; Yogiswara, Yoko; Setiawan, R. Mahendra Fitra

    2017-06-01

    In facing the ASEAN Economic Community, the level of prevailing working accidents becomes one of the competitiveness factors among the companies. A construction industry is one of the industries prone to high level of accidents. Improving the safety record will not be completely effective unless the occupational safety and healthy culture is enhanced. The aim of this research was to develop a model and to conduct empirical investigation on the relationships among the dimensions of construction occupational safety culture. This research used the structural equation model as a means to examine the hypothesis of positive relationships between dimensions and objectives. The method used in this research was questionnaire survey which was distributed to the respondents from construction companies in a state-owned enterprise in Indonesia. Moreover, there were dimensions of occupational safety culture that was established, such as leadership, behavior, value, strategy, policy, process, employee, safety cost, and contract system. The results of this study indicated that all dimensions were significant and inter-related in forming the safety culture. The result of R2 yielded the safety performance was 54%, which means it was in low category and evaluation of policies on construction companies was required in addressing the issue of working accidents.

  4. Developing a Platform for Learning from Mistakes: changing the culture of patient safety amongst junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwood, Sinead

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors commonly make mistakes which may compromise patient safety. Despite the recent push by the NHS to encourage a "no blame" culture, mistakes are still viewed as shameful, embarrassing and demoralising events. The current model for learning from mistakes means that junior doctors only learn from their own errors. A survey was designed by the author for all the Foundation Year 1 doctors (FY1s) at Yeovil District Hospital to understand better the culture surrounding mistakes, and the types of mistakes that were being made. Using the results of the survey and the support of senior staff, a "Near misses" session has been introduced for FY1s once a month at which mistakes that have been made are discussed, with a consultant present to facilitate the proceedings. The aims of these sessions are to promote a culture of no blame, feedback information to clinical governance, and share learning experiences. 100% of the FY1s had made a mistake that could compromise patient safety. 63% discussed their mistakes with colleagues, 44% with seniors, and only 13% with their educational supervisor. Barriers to discussing mistakes included shame, embarrassment, fear of judgement, and unapproachable seniors. 94% thought a "Near misses" session would be useful. After the third session 100% of the FY1s agreed that the sessions were useful; 53% had changed their practice as a result of something they learned at the sessions. After discussing errors as a group we have worked with the clinical governance department, enacting strategies to avoid repetition of mistakes. Feedback from the junior doctors has been overwhelmingly positive and we have found these sessions to be a simple, inexpensive, and popular solution to cultural change in our organisation.

  5. Building a World-Class Safety Culture: The National Ignition Facility and the Control of Human and Organizational Error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C T; Stalnaker, G

    2002-12-06

    Accidents in complex systems send us signals. They may be harbingers of a catastrophe. Some even argue that a ''normal'' consequence of operations in a complex organization may not only be the goods it produces, but also accidents and--inevitably--catastrophes. We would like to tell you the story of a large, complex organization, whose history questions the argument ''that accidents just happen.'' Starting from a less than enviable safety record, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has accumulated over 2.5 million safe hours. The story of NIF is still unfolding. The facility is still being constructed and commissioned. But the steps NIF has taken in achieving its safety record provide a principled blueprint that may be of value to others. Describing that principled blueprint is the purpose of this paper. The first part of this paper is a case study of NIF and its effort to achieve a world-class safety record. This case study will include a description of (1) NIF's complex systems, (2) NIF's early safety history, (3) factors that may have initiated its safety culture change, and (4) the evolution of its safety blueprint. In the last part of the paper, we will compare NIF's safety culture to what safety industry experts, psychologists, and sociologists say about how to shape a culture and control organizational error.

  6. Culture and health reporting: a comparative content analysis of newspapers in the United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Peng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Health reporting has the potential to educate the public and promote health behaviors. Culture influences the style of such communication. Following the theorization of national cultures by Hofstede and Hofstede (2005) and Wilber (2000), this study compares health reporting in the United States and China through a content analysis of leading newspapers. The authors discover significant differences in health reporting in terms of controllability attribution, temporal orientation, citation of authority sources, and use of statistics. As one of the first comparative content analysis studies of health reporting in Eastern and Western cultures, this study provides a unique cultural lens for health communication scholars to better understand health information in the news media.

  7. Feasibility and safety of in-bed cycling for physical rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Michelle E; Martin, Robert A; Toonstra, Amy L; Zanni, Jennifer M; Mantheiy, Earl C; Nelliot, Archana; Needham, Dale M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of in-bed cycle ergometry as part of routine intensive care unit (ICU) physical therapist (PT) practice. Between July 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011, we prospectively identified all patients admitted to a 16-bed medical ICU receiving cycling by a PT, prospectively collected data on 12 different potential safety events, and retrospectively conducted a chart review to obtain specific details of each cycling session. Six hundred eighty-eight patients received PT interventions, and 181 (26%) received a total of 541 cycling sessions (median [interquartile range {IQR}] cycling sessions per patient, 2 [1-4]). Patients' mean (SD) age was 57 (17) years, and 103 (57%) were male. The median (IQR) time from medical ICU admission to first PT intervention and first cycling session was 2 (1-4) and 4 (2-6) days, respectively, with a median (IQR) cycling session duration of 25 (18-30) minutes. On cycling days, the proportion of patients receiving mechanical ventilation, vasopressor infusions, and continuous renal replacement therapy was 80%, 8%, and 7%, respectively. A single safety event occurred, yielding a 0.2% event rate (95% upper confidence limit, 1.0%). Use of in-bed cycling as part of routine PT interventions in ICU patients is feasible and appears safe. Further study of the potential benefits of early in-bed cycling is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Problem Based Learning as a Cultural Tool for Health and Safety Learning in a Multi-national Company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Henrik; Petersson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    -national company context. Theoretically, the research takes its point of departure in a socio-cultural perspective on the role of cultural tools in learning, and in a complementary interest in the role of communicative framing of learning activities. In the research reported here, the focus is on how employees...... and several organisational changes, has not managed to secure adequate safety culture. Safety implementation processes traditionally involve a large amount of training; which is associated with reduced productivity for the time spent on training. Therefore, the company in question wants to find ways......The general background of this study is an interest in how cultural tools contribute to structuring learning activities. The specific interest is to explore how such tools co-determine employees’ problem solving actions in health, safety and environment (HSE) training activities in a multi...

  9. Do you see what I see? Effects of national culture on employees' safety-related perceptions and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Tristan W; Riseborough, Karli M; Krauss, Autumn D

    2015-05-01

    Growing international trade and globalization are increasing the cultural diversity of the modern workforce, which often results in migrants working under the management of foreign leadership. This change in work arrangements has important implications for occupational health and safety, as migrant workers have been found to be at an increased risk of injuries compared to their domestic counterparts. While some explanations for this discrepancy have been proposed (e.g., job differences, safety knowledge, and communication difficulties), differences in injury involvement have been found to persist even when these contextual factors are controlled for. We argue that employees' national culture may explain further variance in their safety-related perceptions and safety compliance, and investigate this through comparing the survey responses of 562 Anglo and Southern Asian workers at a multinational oil and gas company. Using structural equation modeling, we firstly established partial measurement invariance of our measures across cultural groups. Estimation of the combined sample structural model revealed that supervisor production pressure was negatively related to willingness to report errors and supervisor support, but did not predict safety compliance behavior. Supervisor safety support was positively related to both willingness to report errors and safety compliance. Next, we uncovered evidence of cultural differences in the relationships between supervisor production pressure, supervisor safety support, and willingness to report errors; of note, among Southern Asian employees the negative relationship between supervisor production pressure and willingness to report errors was stronger, and for supervisor safety support, weaker as compared to the model estimated with Anglo employees. Implications of these findings for safety management in multicultural teams within the oil and gas industry are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Strengthening the Safety Culture Construction for Boosting Enterprise's Safety Development%强化安全文化建设助推企业平安发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王杰彬

    2013-01-01

    The safety is the lifeblood of an enterprise, if there is no safty, everything else will be impossible. And the effect quality of safety culture construction directly reflects the enterprise's safety management level. Combined with the present situation of the safety culture construction of Pingmei Shenma Construction Engineering Group Co., Ltd., the author discusses the methods and measures for the safety culture construction of construction enterprises.%安全是一个企业的命脉,没有安全其他一切将无从谈起。而安全文化建设效果的好坏,则直接体现了企业的安全管理水平。笔者结合平煤神马建工集团有限公司安全文化建设现状,共同探讨建筑施工企业安全文化建设的方法和措施。

  11. Associations of patient safety outcomes with models of nursing care organization at unit level in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Carl-Ardy; D'amour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Clarke, Sean; Rivard, Michèle; Blais, Régis

    2013-04-01

    To examine the associations of four distinct nursing care organizational models with patient safety outcomes. Cross-sectional correlational study. Using a standardized protocol, patients' records were screened retrospectively to detect occurrences of patient safety-related events. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations of those events with four nursing care organizational models. Twenty-two medical units in 11 hospitals in Quebec, Canada, were clustered into 4 nursing care organizational models: 2 professional models and 2 functional models. Two thousand six hundred and ninety-nine were patients hospitalized for at least 48 h on the selected units. Composite of six safety-related events widely-considered sensitive to nursing care: medication administration errors, falls, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, unjustified restraints and pressure ulcers. Events were ultimately sorted into two categories: events 'without major' consequences for patients and events 'with' consequences. After controlling for patient characteristics, patient risk of experiencing one or more events (of any severity) and of experiencing an event with consequences was significantly lower, by factors of 25-52%, in both professional models than in the functional models. Event rates for both functional models were statistically indistinguishable from each other. Data suggest that nursing care organizational models characterized by contrasting staffing, work environment and innovation characteristics may be associated with differential risk for hospitalized patients. The two professional models, which draw mainly on registered nurses (RNs) to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support for nurses' professional practice, were associated with lower risks than are the two functional models.

  12. The work-family interface in the United States and Singapore: conflict across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galovan, Adam M; Fackrell, Tamara; Buswell, Lydia; Jones, Blake L; Hill, E Jeffrey; Carroll, Sarah June

    2010-10-01

    This article examines the work-family interface in a cross-cultural comparison between two nationally representative samples from the United States (n = 1,860) and Singapore (n = 1,035) with emphasis on work-family conflict. Family-to-work conflict was negatively related to marital satisfaction in both Singapore and the United States, although the effect was stronger in the United States. Similarly, family-to-work conflict was positively related to job satisfaction in the United States but was negatively related in Singapore. As expected, schedule flexibility was negatively related to depression in the United States, but in Singapore the relationship was positive. These findings suggest that theoretical relationships in the work-family interface developed in the more culturally individualistic West may need to be adapted when studying populations in the more collectivist East.

  13. 根植于航空安全文化的内隐安全态度的预测效应%Predictive Effect of Implicit Safety Attitudes on Safety Performance in Aviation Safety Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    晏碧华; 姬鸣; 赵小军; 屠金路; 游旭群

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental feature of safety culture is represented by safety attitudes. In terms of measuring safety cultures, many researchers have mainly focused on explicit safety attitudes and generally relied on specific survey instruments. It is questionable, however, whether self-report measures can capture all aspects of organizational safety culture. Instead of getting direct answers, it is necessary to introduce implicit measures and the implicit safety attitudes test into safety culture evaluation. The basic hypothesis of this study was that while various enterprises share different safety culture, the structure and intensity of implicit and explicit safety attitudes differ for employees. The present study was aimed at investigating the complete model of aviation safety culture and the importance of implicit safety attitudes by detecting the relationship between explicit and implicit safety attitudes as well as the prediction effect of implicit safety attitudes. The Flight Management Attitudes Questionnaire (FMAQ 2.0, international version) was adopted in this study which was based on the work characteristics of modern airlines pilots. With the purpose of evaluating explicit safety attitudes under the background of aviation safety culture, FMAQ 2.0 is comprised of three subscales, including basic organizational attitudes, cockpit work attitudes, and flight automation attitudes. Moreover, Evaluative Implicit Association Test and Affective Implicit Association Test were developed for aviatic implicit safety attitudes test. 134 pilots were involved in the investigation, 126 valid cases were obtained. Safety performance were obtained from airline company The results showed that (1) IAT of aviation safety attitudes indicated a high effect value, aviation safety led to more positive evaluation and feelings while flight risk and adventure were more connected with negative evaluation and emotion. (2) on four dimensions, including safety regulation, flight style, flight

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity of autochthonous starter cultures as safety parameters for fresh cheese production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Bučan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity, as food safety parameters important for application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB, that previously satisfied technological criteria for functional starter cultures in fresh cheese production were examined. Soluble whole cell protein patterns of autochthonous LAB strains from fresh cheese, obtained by SDS-PAGE, revealed the presence of two predominant strains, which were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum A8 and Enterococcus faecium A7. These strains were not resistant and shown susceptibility to antibiotics: ampicillin, bacitracin, penicillin G, azithromycin, chloramphenicol, clarithromycin, clindamycin, spiramycin, tetracycline, streptomycin, neomycin, gentamicin, erythromycin, rifampicin and novobiocin. Lb. fermentum A8 strain displayed phenotypic resistance to vancomycin, but this resistance is intrinsic, not transferable and it is acceptable from the safety aspect. The capacity of Lb. fermentum A8 and Ec. faecium A7 to inhibit growth of test-microorganisms Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 11911, Escherichia coli 3014, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium FP1 and Staphylococcus aureus 3048, was also analysed. According to obtained results, Lb. fermentum A8 and Ec. faecium A7 are safe from the aspect of spreading antibiotic resistance and could be useful as bioprotective cultures that inhibit common bacterial food contaminants, including L. monocytogenes.

  15. Dynamics of safety performance and culture: a group model building approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yang Miang; Love, Peter E D; Stagbouer, Greg; Annesley, Chris

    2012-09-01

    The management of occupational health and safety (OHS) including safety culture interventions is comprised of complex problems that are often hard to scope and define. Due to the dynamic nature and complexity of OHS management, the concept of system dynamics (SD) is used to analyze accident prevention. In this paper, a system dynamics group model building (GMB) approach is used to create a causal loop diagram of the underlying factors influencing the OHS performance of a major drilling and mining contractor in Australia. While the organization has invested considerable resources into OHS their disabling injury frequency rate (DIFR) has not been decreasing. With this in mind, rich individualistic knowledge about the dynamics influencing the DIFR was acquired from experienced employees with operations, health and safety and training background using a GMB workshop. Findings derived from the workshop were used to develop a series of causal loop diagrams that includes a wide range of dynamics that can assist in better understanding the causal influences OHS performance. The causal loop diagram provides a tool for organizations to hypothesize the dynamics influencing effectiveness of OHS management, particularly the impact on DIFR. In addition the paper demonstrates that the SD GMB approach has significant potential in understanding and improving OHS management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Biological Safety of Condom Material Can Be Determined Using an In Vitro Cell Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Motsoane

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Latex products have long been recognized as a cause of latex protein allergy. The increased usage of latex gloves, with the consequent increased occurrence of latex allergies appears to have escalated with increasing awareness of the transmission of HIV–AIDS and other infections. The use of condoms as a means to prevent the transmission of STD's (sexually transmitted diseases and HIV–AIDS has been widely promoted. Although extensive testing is done to evaluate the physical quality of condoms, no information is available regarding the biological safety of condoms. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of short‐term exposure to physiological levels of condom surface material on cell viability (MTT assay and cell growth (crystal violet assay. A direct contact cell culture testing method (FDA test method F813‐83 used to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of medical materials and devices was used. The modified test method was found to be a sensitive test system for the evaluation of the biological safety of condoms. This study reveals the importance of evaluating the biological safety of all condoms that are commercially available, because of the potential health risk that may be associated with prolonged use of certain types of condoms.

  17. Assessment of the culture of safety in public hospitals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de; Arruda, Lidyane Parente; Nascimento, Nayanne Karen Pinheiro do; Sampaio, Renata Lopes; Cavalcante, Maria Lígia Silva Nunes; Costa, Ana Carolina Pinto

    2017-03-02

    to assess the culture of safety in three public hospitals. transversal study undertaken in three Brazilian public hospitals, with health professionals through applying the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Scores greater than or equal to 75 were considered positive. a total of 573 professionals participated in the study, including nurse technicians and auxiliary nurses 292 (51%), nurses 105 (18.3%), physicians 59 (10.3%), and other professionals 117 (20.4%). The mean of the SAQ varied between 65 and 69 in the three hospitals. Among the domains, however, 'Job satisfaction' presented a higher score, and the opposite was observed for the domain 'Perceptions of management'. The outsourced professionals presented a better perception of the culture of safety than did the statutory professionals. The professionals with higher education presented a better perception of the stressing factors than did the professionals educated to senior high school level. the level of the culture of safety found is below the ideal. The managerial actions are considered the main contributing factor to the culture's weakness; however, the professionals demonstrated themselves to be satisfied with the work. evaluar la cultura de seguridad en tres hospitales públicos. estudio transversal realizado en tres hospitales públicos brasileños, desarrollado con profesionales de la salud aplicando el Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Fueron considerados positivos puntajes mayores o iguales a 75. participaron del estudio 573 profesionales, incluyendo técnicos y auxiliares de enfermería 292 (51%), enfermeros 105 (18,3%), médicos 59 (10,3%), y otros profesionales 117 (20,4%). El promedio del SAQ varió entre 65 a 69 en los tres hospitales. Sin embargo, en los dominios, Satisfacción en el Trabajo presentó mayor puntaje y lo opuesto fue observado en el dominio Percepción de la Administración. Los profesionales tercerizados presentaron mejor percepción de la cultura de seguridad que los

  18. Safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Please note that the safety codes A9, A10 AND A11 (ex annexes of SAPOCO/42) entitled respectively "Safety responsibilities in the divisions" "The safety policy committee (SAPOCO) and safety officers' committees" and "Administrative procedure following a serious accident or incident" are available on the web at the following URLs: Code A9: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337016/LAST_RELEASED Code A10: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337019/LAST_RELEASED Code A11: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337026/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS divisional secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch. TIS Secretariat

  19. Empirical study on influence of safety culture to safety performance of construction enterprises%建筑企业安全文化对安全绩效影响的实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王君玲

    2014-01-01

    基于安全文化在建筑业安全管理中的重要性越来越突出,因此安全文化对于提高安全绩效,减少建筑业事故发生率的作用日益得到重视。文中进行实证研究,探讨建筑企业安全文化对安全绩效的影响。安全文化的维度为安全制度文化、安全物质文化和安全观念文化,研究结果表明,安全制度文化、安全物质文化和安全观念文化均有助于安全绩效提高,研究结果可在一定程度上促使建筑企业重视并自觉改善安全文化,有助于减少建筑业安全事故发生率,提升安全绩效。%The importance of safety culture is more and more prominent in safety management of construction indus -try.The safety culture can reduce the accident frequency to improve the safety performance .An empirical study was conducted on the impact of safety culture on safety performance of construction enterprises .The dimensions of safety culture included safety regulations culture , safety material culture and safety concept culture .It showed that the safety culture helps to improve safety performance .The findings can contribute to improve the safety culture to a certain extent , help to reduce safety accident frequency in construction industry , and improve safety performance .

  20. Risk management for drinking water safety in low and middle income countries - cultural influences on water safety plan (WSP) implementation in urban water utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Yahya Y; Parker, Alison; Smith, Jennifer A; Pollard, Simon J T

    2017-01-15

    We investigated cultural influences on the implementation of water safety plans (WSPs) using case studies from WSP pilots in India, Uganda and Jamaica. A comprehensive thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews (n=150 utility customers, n=32 WSP 'implementers' and n=9 WSP 'promoters'), field observations and related documents revealed 12 cultural themes, offered as 'enabling', 'limiting', or 'neutral', that influence WSP implementation in urban water utilities to varying extents. Aspects such as a 'deliver first, safety later' mind set; supply system knowledge management and storage practices; and non-compliance are deemed influential. Emergent themes of cultural influence (ET1 to ET12) are discussed by reference to the risk management, development studies and institutional culture literatures; by reference to their positive, negative or neutral influence on WSP implementation. The results have implications for the utility endorsement of WSPs, for the impact of organisational cultures on WSP implementation; for the scale-up of pilot studies; and they support repeated calls from practitioner communities for cultural attentiveness during WSP design. Findings on organisational cultures mirror those from utilities in higher income nations implementing WSPs - leadership, advocacy among promoters and customers (not just implementers) and purposeful knowledge management are critical to WSP success.

  1. Research on construction principles of safety culture%安全文化建设原理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秉; 吴超

    2015-01-01

    In order to tamp the theoretical foundation for the construction of safety culture, and enrich the princi-ples of safety culture, two core construction principles of organizational safety culture were put forward and analyzed from the starting point of organizational safety culture construction, including square theory and leverage principle of organizational safety culture, and its wheel structure system was constructed.The results showed that two construc-tion principles of organizational safety culture influence and promote each other.The square theory systematically explains the designing methods and requirements for the construction solution of organizational safety culture, and the leverage principle points out the ideas and specific ways to reduce the hindering effects by the resistance of or-ganizational safety culture construction.They can significantly promote the efficiency and effect of organizational safety culture construction.%为夯实安全文化建设的理论基础,进一步丰富安全文化学原理,以组织安全文化建设为着眼点,提炼并分析组织安全文化建设的2条核心原理,即组织安全文化方格理论和杠杆原理,并构建其“轮形”结构体系。结果表明:2条组织安全文化建设原理之间彼此影响、相互促进,其中,方格理论系统阐明了组织安全文化建设方案的设计方法和要求,杠杆原理指明了减弱组织安全文化建设阻力的阻碍作用的具体思路和途径,它们可显著提升组织安全文化建设的效率和效果。

  2. Patient safety in organizational culture as perceived by leaderships of hospital institutions with different types of administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Dejigov Monteiro da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the perceptions of leaderships toward patient safety culture dimensions in the routine of hospitals with different administrative profiles: government, social and private organizations, and make correlations among participating institutions regarding dimensions of patient safety culture used. METHOD A quantitative cross-sectional study that used the Self Assessment Questionnaire 30 translated into Portuguese. The data were processed by analysis of variance (ANOVA in addition to descriptive statistics, with statistical significance set at p-value ≤ 0.05. RESULTS According to the participants' perceptions, the significant dimensions of patient safety culture were 'patient safety climate' and 'organizational learning', with 81% explanatory power. Mean scores showed that among private organizations, higher values were attributed to statements; however, the correlation between dimensions was stronger among government hospitals. CONCLUSION Different hospital organizations present distinct values for each dimension of patient safety culture and their investigation enables professionals to identify which dimensions need to be introduced or improved to increase patient safety.

  3. A culture gap in the United States: Implications for policy on limiting access to firearms for suicidal persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Elizabeth; Wolsko, Christopher; Keys, Susan G; Pennavaria, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Suicide is a critical public health problem worldwide. In the United States (US), firearm ownership is common, and firearms account for the majority of deaths by suicide. While suicide prevention strategies may include limiting access to firearms, the contentious nature of gun regulations in the US, particularly among members of rural communities, often gives rise to constitutional concerns and political polarization that could inhibit suicidal persons from seeking the help they need. We examine potential outcomes of public health strategies in the US that encourage limiting access to firearms for populations who both value firearm ownership and are vulnerable to suicide. Based on preliminary results from a firearm safety study, we argue that attempts to limit access to firearms among those at risk of suicide will only succeed when the most affected cultural groups are engaged in collaborative discussions.

  4. Cultural framework, anger expression, and health status in Russian immigrant women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdasarov, Zhanna; Edmondson, Christine B

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of anger expression and cultural framework in predicting Russian immigrant women's physical and psychological health status. One hundred Russian immigrant women between the ages of 30 and 65 completed questionnaires assessing anger expression, cultural framework, and health status. All research questions were addressed using hierarchical regression procedures. The results are discussed in terms of implications for understanding immigration experiences of Russian women who migrate from countries that are more collectivistic and less individualistic than the United States.

  5. Criteria of selection of basic linguacultural units within the context of cross-cultural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalupo Olga Ivanovna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problems associated with the analysis and selection of basic linguacultural units that are necessary for a more effective cross-cultural communication. To make the process of dialogue between different cultures and languages more appropriate and productive, it is necessary to possess certain knowledge, skills, which are acquired by man in the process of learning. Important in our opinion in this area are the mastery means which will prepare the person to communicate in a different communicative space. Such means, in our opinion, are the basic linguacultural units, which are considered as carriers of information and expression of cultural identity. They inform choice contributes to a worldview, understanding linguacultural picture of the world community. The basis of selection of linguistic units on the following criteria: the information content, functionality, sufficiency, cultural identity, realism, pivotal importance to the basic sense, social and cultural significance. Application of the proposed criteria allowing more appropriate to make the selection of the material and linguacultural integral components of the scope of cross-cultural interaction, which are characterized by their relevant material necessary for an adequate understanding of the processes occurring in different communicative space.

  6. Evaluation for safety of cultured corneal fibroblasts with cotreatment of alcohol and mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-im; Tchah, Hungwon; Cho, Eun Hee; Kook, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effects of alcohol and mitomycin C (MMC) on cultured corneal fibroblast of the rabbit to determine the safety of this compound for clinical use. Corneal fibroblasts of New Zealand rabbits were cultured. Various concentrations (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 60%) of ethanol were applied for 10, 20, 30, and 40 seconds to estimate dose- and time-dependent responses of cultured corneal fibroblasts. Cell viability was assessed using the MTT assay. Treated cells were additionally stained with Hoechst and annexin V for the identification of apoptosis. To investigate the coeffects of ethanol and MMC, dose and time dependency were evaluated after treatment with various concentrations of ethanol and MMC at different exposure times, and cell viability was established. To determine the latent effects of ethanol and MMC, cultured corneal fibroblasts were cotreated with various concentrations of ethanol and 0.02% MMC for various periods and washed out, and then one group was incubated for 24 hours and another group was not incubated. Cell viability was estimated, and Hoechst and annexin V staining were performed before and after incubation. To establish the pathway of cell death, caspase-3 activities were measured in cultured corneal fibroblasts treated with ethanol or MMC. Cell viability after ethanol treatment was dose and time dependent. After application of ethanol for 10 seconds, cell viability was significantly reduced with 20% ethanol (P = 0.001). At 20, 30, and 40 seconds of treatment with 10% ethanol, cell viability was significantly reduced (P corneal fibroblasts cotreated with 10% ethanol and 0.02% MMC were stained with Hoechst and annexin V. Results were similar to data obtained with ethanol-treated cells. However, after application of 20% alcohol and MMC, a significant number of cells were not viable and were detached from the well walls. Caspase-3 activity significantly increased after treatment with 30% ethanol only and 30% ethanol in conjunction

  7. 以现代文化为引领兼顾新疆文化安全%Safeguarding Safety of Xinjiang Culture under the Guidance of Modern Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申毅

    2011-01-01

    Two tasks were put forward in the Ninth Plenary Session of Seventh Conference of CPC Xinjiang Committee: to promote great-leap-forward development of Xinjiang under the guidance of modern culture;to guarantee the long-term safety in Xinjiang.Accordingly,safeguarding the safety of Xinjiang culture is a measure to respect minorities’ cultures and a strong guarantee to the stability of Xinjiang.The author argues that the measure of safeguarding the safety of Xinjiang culture under the guidance of modern culture will promote Xinjiang culture to develop along a good way.%中共新疆维吾尔自治区党委七届九次全委(扩大)会议提出:以现代文化为引领推动实现新疆跨越式发展和长治久安两大任务。保障新疆文化安全,是尊重民族文化,确保新疆社会稳定的重要举措。以现代文化为引领,兼顾新疆文化安全将科学、全面推动新疆文化良性发展。

  8. Reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cláudia Tartaglia; Laguardia, Josué; Vasconcelos, Ana Glória Godoi; Martins, Mônica

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation of the culture of patient safety in hospitals is nowadays considered as a management too, since it helps to identify problem areas and provide valuable information for planning improvements. This study explored the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, an instrument that evaluates characteristics of patient safety culture among hospital staff. The reliability of the instrument was evaluated by analyzing the internal consistency of each dimension. The validity of the tool was carried out by means of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The sample was made up of 322 questionnaires that were collected in two Brazilian hospitals in 2012. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.52 to 0.91 for the different dimensions, with the exception of two, for which it was much lower. After excluding four items, the exploratory factor analysis presented adjusted indices that were appropriate for a 10 factor model.

  9. Reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Tartaglia Reis

    Full Text Available Abstract: The evaluation of the culture of patient safety in hospitals is nowadays considered as a management too, since it helps to identify problem areas and provide valuable information for planning improvements. This study explored the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, an instrument that evaluates characteristics of patient safety culture among hospital staff. The reliability of the instrument was evaluated by analyzing the internal consistency of each dimension. The validity of the tool was carried out by means of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The sample was made up of 322 questionnaires that were collected in two Brazilian hospitals in 2012. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.52 to 0.91 for the different dimensions, with the exception of two, for which it was much lower. After excluding four items, the exploratory factor analysis presented adjusted indices that were appropriate for a 10 factor model.

  10. Processing techniques for data from the Kuosheng Unit 1 shakedown safety-relief-valve tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCauley, E.W.; Rompel, S.L.; Weaver, H.J.; Altenbach, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    This report describes techniques developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laobratory, Livermore, CA for processing original data from the Taiwan Power Company's Kuosheng MKIII Unit 1 Safety Relief Valve Shakedown Tests conducted in April/May 1981. The computer codes used, TPSORT, TPPLOT, and TPPSD, form a special evaluation system for treating the data from its original packed binary form to ordered, calibrated ASCII transducer files and then to production of time-history plots, numerical output files, and spectral analyses. Using the data processing techniques described, a convenient means of independently examining and analyzing a unique data base for steam condensation phenomena in the MARKIII wetwell is described. The techniques developed for handling these data are applicable to the treatment of similar, but perhaps differently structured, experiment data sets.

  11. The Barselina Project Phase 4 Summary report. Ignalina Unit 2 Probabilistic Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Gunnar [ES-Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Hellstroem, P. [RELCON AB, Solna (Sweden); Zheltobriuch, G.; Bagdonas, A. [Ignalina Power Plant, Visaginas (Lithuania)

    1996-12-01

    The Barselina Project was initiated in the summer of 1991. The project is a multilateral co-operation between Lithuania, Russia and Sweden. The long range objective is to establish common perspectives and unified bases for assessment of severe accident risks and needs for remedial measures for the RBMK reactors. The Swedish BWR Barsebaeck is used as reference plant and the Lithuanian RBMK Ignalina as application plant. During phase 3, from March, 1993 to June, 1994, a full scope Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) model of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant unit 2 (INPP-2) was developed to identify possible safety improvement of risk importance. The probabilistic methodology was applied on a plant specific basis for a channel type reactor of RBMK design. To increase the realism of the risk model a set of deterministic analyses were performed and plant/RBMK-specific data bases were developed and used. A general concept for analysing this type of reactor was developed. During phase 4, July 1994 to September 1996, the PSA was further developed, taking into account plant changes, improved modeling methods and extended plant information concerning dependencies (area events, dynamic effects, electrical and signal dependencies). The updated model is quantified and new results and conclusions are evaluated.

  12. Bangladeshi parental ethnotheories in the United Kingdom: Towards cultural collaborations in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Ruma

    2016-07-01

    Parental meaning systems (ethnotheories) constitute a very important part of the context in which children live and develop. Parental ethnotheories are in turn shaped by implicit cultural ideals that organize parental beliefs and actions and frame child-rearing practices. The article presents a qualitative research into Bangladeshi parental ethnotheories in the United Kingdom, which illustrates both the rich cultural meanings that orientate parental action and also demonstrates how parents generate new meanings following migration and culture change. Professional understandings about children's developmental needs, of child rearing and parenting, are not culture free and an examination of the cultural frames of professional theories is important as parenting is often taught as a universal technique that takes little account of the cultural context and of what parents think. An engagement with other cultural theories about child development can enhance critical reflexivity in clinical practice by provoking reflection on the cultural constructions of professional theories. Creating a context for the expression of parental ethnotheories is necessary for developing cross-cultural collaborations in clinical practice as it empowers families and redresses the power relationship between the therapist and the parent.

  13. Testing the validity of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safety culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Castro, Borja; Gracia, Francisco J; Peiró, José M; Pietrantoni, Luca; Hernández, Ana

    2013-11-01

    This paper takes the first steps to empirically validate the widely used model of safety culture of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), composed of five dimensions, further specified by 37 attributes. To do so, three independent and complementary studies are presented. First, 290 students serve to collect evidence about the face validity of the model. Second, 48 experts in organizational behavior judge its content validity. And third, 468 workers in a Spanish nuclear power plant help to reveal how closely the theoretical five-dimensional model can be replicated. Our findings suggest that several attributes of the model may not be related to their corresponding dimensions. According to our results, a one-dimensional structure fits the data better than the five dimensions proposed by the IAEA. Moreover, the IAEA model, as it stands, seems to have rather moderate content validity and low face validity. Practical implications for researchers and practitioners are included.

  14. A Preliminary Study on the Measures to Assess the Organizational Safety: The Cultural Impact on Human Error Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The Fukushima I nuclear accident following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 occurred after twelve years had passed since the JCO accident which was caused as a result of an error made by JCO employees. These accidents, along with the Chernobyl accident, associated with characteristic problems of various organizations caused severe social and economic disruptions and have had significant environmental and health impact. The cultural problems with human errors occur for various reasons, and different actions are needed to prevent different errors. Unfortunately, much of the research on organization and human error has shown widely various or different results which call for different approaches. In other words, we have to find more practical solutions from various researches for nuclear safety and lead a systematic approach to organizational deficiency causing human error. This paper reviews Hofstede's criteria, IAEA safety culture, safety areas of periodic safety review (PSR), teamwork and performance, and an evaluation of HANARO safety culture to verify the measures used to assess the organizational safety

  15. Diverse cultures at work: ensuring safety and health through leadership and participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starren, A.; Luijters, K.; Drupsteen, L.; Vilkevicius, G.; Stulginskis, A.; Eeckelaert, L.; Elsler, D.

    2013-01-01

    The differences between cultures are helpful in understanding discrepancies when several nationalities are working together. Cross-cultural studies describe characteristics of cultures and differences between different cultures. Therefore, the cross-cultural literature is very helpful in describing

  16. Diverse cultures at work: ensuring safety and health through leadership and participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starren, A.; Luijters, K.; Drupsteen, L.; Vilkevicius, G.; Stulginskis, A.; Eeckelaert, L.; Elsler, D.

    2013-01-01

    The differences between cultures are helpful in understanding discrepancies when several nationalities are working together. Cross-cultural studies describe characteristics of cultures and differences between different cultures. Therefore, the cross-cultural literature is very helpful in describing

  17. Research and Analysis on the System of Coal Mine Enterprise Safety Culture%煤矿企业安全文化体系研究与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭光; 谭威威; 许志

    2012-01-01

    Given the phenomenon of the dissimilarity between the coal mine enterprise safety culture and the common enterprise safety culture,the paper analyzing the features of generalized,precocious,knowledge and intentionality included in the coal mine enterprise safety culture.The constitution of the coal mine enterprise safety culture system is complex.It includes the safety conception culture,the safety behaviors culture,the safety management culture and the safety physical state culture.and Its inscape and implementation approaches are also analyzed.It is a new way to construct the coal mine enterprise safety culture.%针对煤矿企业安全文化不同于一般企业安全文化的现状,分析了煤矿企业安全文化具有广泛性、超前性、知识性和目的性的特点。煤矿企业安全文化体系构成较为复杂,由安全观念文化、安全行为文化、安全管理文化和安全物态文化4部分构成,并对其构成要素和具体实施方法进行了分析。通过研究可为煤矿企业安全文化的建设提供1条新的途径。

  18. The psychometric properties of the 'Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture' in Dutch hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cordula

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many different countries the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS is used to assess the safety culture in hospitals. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Dutch for application in the Netherlands. The aim of this study was to examine the underlying dimensions and psychometric properties of the questionnaire in Dutch hospital settings, and to compare these results with the original questionnaire used in USA hospital settings. Methods The HSOPS was completed by 583 staff members of four general hospitals, three teaching hospitals, and one university hospital in the Netherlands. Confirmatory factor analyses were performed to examine the applicability of the factor structure of the American questionnaire to the Dutch data. Explorative factor analyses were performed to examine whether another composition of items and factors would fit the data better. Supplementary psychometric analyses were performed, including internal consistency and construct validity. Results The confirmatory factor analyses were based on the 12-factor model of the original questionnaire and resulted in a few low reliability scores. 11 Factors were drawn with explorative factor analyses, with acceptable reliability scores and a good construct validity. Two items were removed from the questionnaire. The composition of the factors was very similar to that of the original questionnaire. A few items moved to another factor and two factors turned out to combine into a six-item dimension. All other dimensions consisted of two to five items. Conclusion The Dutch translation of the HSOPS consists of 11 factors with acceptable reliability and good construct validity. and is similar to the original HSOPS factor structure.

  19. Knowledge management as an approach to strengthen safety culture in nuclear organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karseka, T.S.; Yanev, Y.L. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Nuclear Energy Dept.

    2013-04-15

    In the last 10 years knowledge management (KM) in nuclear organizations has emerged as a powerful strategy to deal with important and frequently critical issues of attrition, generation change and knowledge transfer. Applying KM practices in operating organizations, in technical support organizations and regulatory bodies has proven to be efficient and necessary for maintaining competence and skills for achieving high level of safety and operational performance. The IAEA defines KM as an integrated, systematic approach to identifying, acquiring, transforming, developing, disseminating, using, sharing, and preserving knowledge, relevant to achieving specified objectives. KM focuses on people and organizational culture to stimulate and nurture the sharing and use of knowledge; on processes or methods to find, create, capture and share knowledge; and on technology to store and assimilate knowledge and to make it readily accessible in a manner which will allow people to work together even if they are not located together. A main objective of this paper is to describe constructive actions which can sponsor knowledge sharing and solidarity in safety conscious attitude among all employees. All principles and approaches refer primarily to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operating organizations but are also applicable to other institutions involved into nuclear sector. (orig.)

  20. Current issues in developing safety culture while establishing wind energy power plants in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowda, M.C.M.; Repaka, B.; Gowda, P. [MSRIT Research Centre, Bangalore (India); Chandrashekar, R. [SaIT, Bangalore (India)

    2012-07-01

    Safety is important to every one working in the various organizations. They want to be safe when coming to work, at the time of work and going back to home. The ultimate aim of every worker is to work for the needs/money and or satisfaction where these would get prioritized according to the individuals. People don't want accidents to happen. People don't want to get themselves injured nor their colleagues. People would like and love to work in a company which cares for them and keeps them safe. Having said this then what makes them meet with or see an accident in the wind farm? Yes it is the unsafe act and unsafe condition which causes an accident in the wind farm. The present study put forward the factors /issues that influence people behaviors as part of weakening the safety culture to perform an unsafe act or to ignore and work in an unsafe condition. (Author)

  1. Quality of healthcare services and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanian, Akram; Rezaei, Tayyebeh; Abdullahzadeh, Farahnaz; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Dianat, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study investigated quality of healthcare services from patients' perspectives and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 surgery patients and 101 nurses caring them in a public hospital in Tabriz-Iran. Data were collected using the service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL), hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC) and nurse physician professional communication questionnaire. Results: The highest and lowest mean (±SD) scores of the patients' perception on the healthcare services quality belonged to the assurance 13.92 (±3.55) and empathy 6.78 (±1.88) domains,respectively. With regard to the patient safety culture, the mean percentage of positive answers ranged from 45.87% for "non-punitive response to errors" to 68.21% for "organizational continuous learning" domains. The highest and lowest mean (±SD) scores for the nurse physician professional communication were obtained for "cooperation" 3.44 (±0.35) and "non-participative decision-making" 2.84 (±0.34) domains, respectively. The "frequency of reported errors by healthcare professionals" (B=-4.20, 95% CI = -7.14 to -1.27, Pquality of healthcare services. Conclusion: Organizational culture in dealing with medical error should be changed to non-punitive response. Change in safety culture towards reporting of errors, effective communication and teamwork between healthcare professionals are recommended.

  2. 企业安全文化建设可从小处着手%Enterprise Safety Culture Construction Can Start Small

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭智辉

    2012-01-01

    Enterprise safety culture is an important basis for its development. At basic level of safe production and management, how to carry out enterprise safety culture construction, from what reapect to reflect safety culture, how to embody deep culture, middle culture and surface culture in safety culture theory and safety culture of different levels reflected in management is the key to show whether safety culture construction is effective or not. By managing the color and identification of safety helmet, the application of enterprise safety culture theory in practice is discussed.%企业安全文化是企业发展的重要基础,在安全生产、管理一线基层,如何开展企业安全文化建设,从哪些方面体现安全文化,如何在工作实践中体现安全文化理论中的深层文化、中层文化和表层文化,各个层次的安全文化通过具体的管理工作体现是安全文化建设有效与否的关键,本文通过对安全帽的颜色和标识管理,探讨企业安全文化形态体系理论在实践中的运用。

  3. Distance Higher Education Experiences of Arab Gulf Students in the United States: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harthi, Aisha S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a phenomenological research study that was undertaken to provide cultural understanding about the nature of distance education experiences of Arab graduate students pursuing degree programs in the United States. As a theoretical framework, Hofstede's international difference dimensions and Hall's concept of low and high…

  4. Teaching at the University Level: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from the United States and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Dennis G.; Hunt, Gilbert H.; Zhukov, Vassiliy I.; Mardahaev, Lev V.

    2007-01-01

    Interest in what constitutes effective teaching in Pre-K-12 and higher education is nearly universal. This important text explores this interest at the college and university level from a unique, international perspective. "Teaching at the University Level: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from the United States and Russia" brings to one…

  5. Adolescent Girls' Need for Love in Two Cultures--Nigeria and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osa, Osayimwense

    1983-01-01

    Compares a junior novel from the United States with one from Nigeria--Bette Greene's "Summer of My German Soldier" with Buchi Emecheta's "The Bride Price." Suggests that their similarity can inspire children from a variety of backgrounds to an awareness and appreciation of different cultures. (MM)

  6. Addressing Cultural Diversity: Effects of a Problem-Based Intercultural Learning Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Vera; Krause, Ulrike-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores to what extent a problem-based learning unit in combination with cooperative learning and affectively oriented teaching methods facilitates intercultural learning. As part of the study, students reflected on critical incidents, which display misunderstandings or conflicts that arise as a result of cultural differences. In…

  7. Women Vietnamese Refugees in the United States: Maintaining Balance between Two Cultures. Senior Division Winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Katherine

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on how the migration of Vietnamese to the United States affected the women's roles within their families and society. Discusses how Vietnamese women ensured familial stability by maintaining a balance between U.S. and Vietnamese cultures. Provides an annotated bibliography. (CMK)

  8. Addressing Cultural Diversity: Effects of a Problem-Based Intercultural Learning Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Vera; Krause, Ulrike-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores to what extent a problem-based learning unit in combination with cooperative learning and affectively oriented teaching methods facilitates intercultural learning. As part of the study, students reflected on critical incidents, which display misunderstandings or conflicts that arise as a result of cultural differences. In…

  9. New insight and old dilemma: a cross-cultural comparison of Japan and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebra, T S

    2000-01-01

    Conflict in close relationships, or "generative tension," characterizes both the United States and Japan, with differences only in the style and timing of its manifestation. The potentially fruitful strategy of Rothbaum et al.'s article is constrained by their cross-cultural comparative methodology.

  10. "Their Little Wooden Bricks": A History of the Material Culture of Kindergarten in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochner, Larry

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the material culture of kindergarten in the United States in relation to the production and consumption of materials and kindergarten theory and pedagogy. The focus is on Friedrich Froebel's building gifts as they were manufactured and sold by the Milton Bradley Company from 1869 to 1939. A review of trade catalogues over the…

  11. United Sugpiaq Alutiiq (USA) Video Game: Preserving Traditional Knowledge, Culture, and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leslie D.; Sanderville, James Mountain Chief

    2009-01-01

    Video games are explored as a means of reviving dying indigenous languages. The design and production of the place-based United Sugpiaq Alutiiq (USA) video game prototype involved work across generations and across cultures. The video game is one part of a proposed digital environment where Sugcestun speakers in traditional Alaskan villages could…

  12. Unidad: Las influencias culturales en el arte mexicana (Unit: Cultural Influences in Mexican Art). Dos semanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finere, Neal

    This two-week unit, appropriate for bilingual education settings as well as foreign language programs, deals with the three primary cultural influences found in Mexican contemporary art. The multisensory materials, pragmatic focus, and direct creative student involvement are designed to make it a microcosmic, real-life experience. The first part…

  13. Why We Need to Build a Culture of Health in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

    2015-07-01

    The United States spends $2.7 trillion a year on health care, more than any other country by far, and yet the U.S. population is not healthy. In fact, the United States loses $227 billion in productivity each year because of poor health. This is not sustainable-and it is the reason behind the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Culture of Health initiative. Culture of Health means so much more than simply not being sick. It means embracing a definition of health as outlined by the World Health Organization-a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being. And it means shifting the values-and the actions-in the United States so that health becomes a part of everything we do. Health is the bedrock of personal fulfillment. It is the backbone of prosperity and the key to creating a strong and competitive nation. With health, children can grow up making the most of life's opportunities. Businesses can rely on the vitality of workers to stay competitive, and the military can perform at its highest level. But there is no single way to cultivate health. This Commentary explores the principles behind the Culture of Health initiative and examines the role of academic medicine in achieving this vision. Different communities must come up with the approaches that serve them best. Only by working toward a common goal in unique ways will a true Culture of Health be attainable in the United States.

  14. Unidad: Las influencias culturales en el arte mexicana (Unit: Cultural Influences in Mexican Art). Dos semanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finere, Neal

    This two-week unit, appropriate for bilingual education settings as well as foreign language programs, deals with the three primary cultural influences found in Mexican contemporary art. The multisensory materials, pragmatic focus, and direct creative student involvement are designed to make it a microcosmic, real-life experience. The first part…

  15. Traditional ranching heritage and cultural continuity in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Raish; Alice M. McSweeney

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted among ranchers on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests in the Southwestern United States, examines the role of ranching in maintaining traditional heritage and cultural continuity. The mainly Hispanic ranching families of northern New Mexico first came into the region in 1598 with Spanish colonization. Many of the villages received community...

  16. "The State of Chihuahua", Lesson Plan for "Cultural Unit: Focus on Mexico."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Marianne

    This lesson plan was designed for students in Montana schools. The objectives for this culture unit are having: (1) students recognize the similarities between their home stat of Montana and the Mexican state of Chihuahua; (2) students learn about features unique to Chihuahua; and (3) students create an advertising brochure marketing Chihuahua to…

  17. The comparative safety of legal induced abortion and childbirth in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Elizabeth G; Grimes, David A

    2012-02-01

    To assess the safety of abortion compared with childbirth. We estimated mortality rates associated with live births and legal induced abortions in the United States in 1998-2005. We used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Pregnancy Mortality Surveillance System, birth certificates, and Guttmacher Institute surveys. In addition, we searched for population-based data comparing the morbidity of abortion and childbirth. The pregnancy-associated mortality rate among women who delivered live neonates was 8.8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The mortality rate related to induced abortion was 0.6 deaths per 100,000 abortions. In the one recent comparative study of pregnancy morbidity in the United States, pregnancy-related complications were more common with childbirth than with abortion. Legal induced abortion is markedly safer than childbirth. The risk of death associated with childbirth is approximately 14 times higher than that with abortion. Similarly, the overall morbidity associated with childbirth exceeds that with abortion. II.

  18. [Biosafety of working in cold storage units: from the profit margin to the safety margin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Gabriela Chaves; de Souza, Luciana Hugue; Cardoso, Telma Abdalla de Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    The cold storage unit and meat production industry has made Brazil one of the leading suppliers and exporters of products of animal origin. The rapid expansion of the market has led to a rise in competitiveness from a capitalist standpoint, and in this respect corporate profit often leads to the need to adapt human actions to new functions in order to reduce costs and maximize production. These routine activities involve repetitive work, multi-tasking, long hours and operating machines with the use of sharp cutting tools, which is why the work is conducted wearing protective gear. Among the main hazards present, biological risks are the most important due to direct exposure to internal organs, blood, fecal matter, urine and placental or fetal fluids from slaughtered animals that may be infected with pathogens of zoonotic origin. This paper discusses the risks to which slaughterhouse-cold storage unit professionals are exposed, conducting a thorough bibliographical review of the literature that takes into consideration the conceptual framework of Biosafety, which contributes to improve the safety and health conditions of these workers.

  19. Safety culture system of construction enterprise%建筑施工企业安全文化体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余成柱

    2013-01-01

    Construction of safety culture system of construction enterprise is the embodiment of the social culture construction and the need of safety management in economic construction.At present,detailed study on the construction enterprise safety culture system in different developing levels and system contents is deficient.Accordingly,it should be researched in order to analyze status and shortcomings in construction of safety culture system of construction enterprise more accurately.The developing level of construction enterprise is defined according to the type of business and scale.Then,developing level of safety culture system of construction enterprise is introduced according to assessment standard in construction enterprise safety culture.Through investigating status of safety culture system of construction enterprises,the great insufficiency of spiritual culture is excavated in view of system contents,and the greater insufficiency in the system of construction enterprise safety culture system in the lower level enterprise is exposed in terms of developing level.Accordingly,concept should be refined for safe atmosphere and spiritual culture construction in addition to continue strengthening material culture and system culture in terms of the national,industrial and regional standards and specifications.According to different developing level,system construction should be deepened in large and extra large-sized enterprises on the existing sound basis,and a qualified safety culture system should be established in medium and small sized enterprise by building spiritual culture.%建筑施工企业安全文化体系的建设,既是社会文化建设的体现,也是经济建设中施工安全管理的需要.针对不同发展层次与不同体系内容的建筑施工企业安全文化体系细化研究的现状及不足,根据企业类型和规模界定了建筑施工企业的发展层次,根据企业安全文化建设评价标准,引入建筑施工企业安全文化

  20. Impact of telemedicine in hospital culture and its consequences on quality of care and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Milton; Morbeck, Renata Albaladejo; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Abreu Filho, Carlos Alberto Cordeiro; Andrade, Ana Helena Vicente; Terra, Jose Claudio Cyrineu; Teixeira Junior, José Carlos; Kanamura, Alberto Hideki

    2015-01-01

    To describe the impact of the telemedicine application on the clinical process of care and its different effects on hospital culture and healthcare practice. The concept of telemedicine through real time audio-visual coverage was implemented at two different hospitals in São Paulo: a secondary and public hospital, Hospital Municipal Dr. Moysés Deutsch, and a tertiary and private hospital, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. Data were obtained from 257 teleconsultations records over a 12-month period and were compared to a similar period before telemedicine implementation. For 18 patients (7.1%) telemedicine consultation influenced in diagnosis conclusion, and for 239 patients (92.9%), the consultation contributed to clinical management. After telemedicine implementation, stroke thrombolysis protocol was applied in 11% of ischemic stroke patients. Telemedicine approach reduced the need to transfer the patient to another hospital in 25.9% regarding neurological evaluation. Sepsis protocol were adopted and lead to a 30.4% reduction mortality regarding severe sepsis. The application is associated with differences in the use of health services: emergency transfers, mortality, implementation of protocols and patient management decisions, especially regarding thrombolysis. These results highlight the role of telemedicine as a vector for transformation of hospital culture impacting on the safety and quality of care.