WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit researching fuels

  1. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  2. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure - TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program is to provide fresh nuclear reactor fuel to United States universities at no, or low, cost to the university. The title of the fuel remains with the United States government and when universities are finished with the fuel, the fuel is returned to the United States government. The program is funded by the United States Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy division, managed by Department of Energy - Idaho Field Office, and contracted to the Idaho National Laboratory's Management and Operations Contractor - Battelle Energy Alliance. Program has been at Idaho since 1977 and INL subcontracts with 26 United States domestic reactor facilities (13 TRIGA facilities, 9 plate fuel facilities, 2 AGN facilities, 1 Pulstar fuel facility, 1 Critical facility). University has not shipped fuel since 1968 and as such, we have no present procedures for shipping spent fuel. In addition: floor loading rate is unknown, many interferences must be removed to allow direct access to the reactor tank, floor space in the reactor cell is very limited, pavement ends inside our fence; some of the surface is not finished. The whole approach is narrow, curving and downhill. A truck large enough to transport the cask cannot pull into the lot and then back out (nearly impossible / refused by drivers); a large capacity (100 ton), long boom crane would have to be used due to loading dock obstructions. Access to the entrance door is on a sidewalk. The campus uses it as a road for construction equipment, deliveries and security response. Large trees are on both sides of sidewalk. Spent fuel shipments have never been done, no procedures approved or in place, no approved casks, no accident or safety analysis for spent fuel loading. Any cask assembly used in this facility will have to be removed from one crane, moved on the floor and then attached to another crane to get from the staging area to the reactor room. Reactor

  3. Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy's Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006

  4. Progress of the United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, D.G.; Clapper, M.; Thrower, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. To date, the Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program has completed 23 shipments. Almost 5000 spent fuel assemblies from eligible research reactors throughout the world have been accepted into the United States under this program. Over the past year, another cross-country shipment of fuel was accomplished, as well as two additional shipments in the fourth quarter of calendar year 2001. These shipments attracted considerable safeguards oversight since they occurred post September 11. Recent guidance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pertaining to security and safeguards issues deals directly with the transport of nuclear material. Since the Acceptance Program has consistently applied above regulatory safety enhancements in transport of spent nuclear fuel, this guidance did not adversely effect the Program. As the Program draws closer to its termination date, an increased number of requests for program extension are received. Currently, there are no plans to extend the policy beyond its current expiration date; therefore, eligible reactor operators interested in participating in this program are strongly encouraged to evaluate their inventory and plan for future shipments as soon as possible. (author)

  5. A continuing success - The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustin, Tracy P.; Clapper, Maureen; Reilly, Jill E.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy, in consultation with the Department of State, adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. To date, the Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program, established under this policy, has completed 16 spent fuel shipments. 2,651 material test reactor (MTR) assemblies, one Slowpoke core containing less than 1 kilogram of U.S.-origin enriched uranium, 824 Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomic (TRIGA) rods, and 267 TRIGA pins from research reactors around the world have been shipped to the United States so far under this program. As the FRR SNF Acceptance Program progresses into the fifth year of implementation, a second U.S. cross country shipment has been completed, as well as a second overland truck shipment from Canada. Both the cross country shipment and the Canadian shipment were safely and successfully completed, increasing our knowledge and experience in these types of shipments. In addition, two other shipments were completed since last year's RERTR meeting. Other program activities since the last meeting included: taking pre-emptive steps to avoid license amendment pitfalls/showstoppers for spent fuel casks, publication of a revision to the Record of Decision allowing up to 16 casks per ocean going vessel, and the issuance of a cable to 16 of the 41 eligible countries reminding their governments and the reactor operators that the U.S.-origin uranium in their research reactors may be eligible for return to the United States under the Acceptance Program and urging them to begin discussions on shipping schedules. The FRR SNF program has also supported the Department's implementation of the competitive pricing policy for uranium and resumption of shipments of fresh uranium for fabrication into assemblies for research reactors. The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program continues

  6. Moving into the 21st century - The United States' Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David G.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Saris, Elizabeth C.; Reilly, Jill E.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1996, when the United States Department of Energy and the Department of State jointly adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, twelve shipments totaling 2,985 MTR and TRIGA spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research reactors around the world have been accepted into the United States. These shipments have contained approximately 1.7 metric tons of HEU and 0.6 metric tons of LEU. Foreign research reactor operators played a significant role in this success. A new milestone in the acceptance program occurred during the summer of 1999 with the arrival of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from Europe through the Charleston Naval Weapons Station via the Savannah River Site to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This shipment consisted of five casks of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from research reactors in Germany, Italy, Slovenia, and Romania. These casks were transported by truck approximately 2,400 miles across the United States (one cask packaged in an ISO container per truck). Drawing upon lessons learned in previous shipments, significant technical, legal, and political challenges were addressed to complete this cross-country shipment. Other program activities since the last RERTR meeting have included: formulation of a methodology to determine the quantity of spent nuclear fuel in a damaged condition that may be transported in a particular cask (containment analysis for transportation casks); publication of clarification of the fee policy; and continued planning for the outyears of the acceptance policy including review of reactors and eligible material quantities. The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program continues to demonstrate success due to the continuing commitment between the United States and the research reactor community to make this program work. We strongly encourage all eligible research reactors to decide as soon as possible to

  7. The United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program: Proposal to modify the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. The policy was slated to expire in May 2009. However, in October 2003, a petition requesting a program extension was delivered to the United States Secretary of Energy from a group of research reactor operators from foreign countries. In April 2004, the Secretary directed DOE undertake an analysis, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to consider potential extension of the Program. On December 1, 2004, a Federal Register Notice was issued approving the program extension. This paper discusses the findings from the NEPA analysis and the potential changes in the program that may result from implementation of the proposed changes. (author)

  8. Analyses of the transportation of spent research reactor fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, J.W.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Transportation Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories has analyzed the impacts of transportation of research reactor spent fuel from US and foreign reactors for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Defense Programs. This effort represents the first comprehensive analytical evaluation of the risks of transporting high-, medium-, and low-enriched uranium spent research reactor fuel by both sea and land. Two separate shipment programs have been analyzed: the shipment of research reactor spent fuel from Taiwan to the US (Fuel Movement Program), and the return of research reactor spent fuels of US origin from foreign and domestic reactors (Research Reactor Fuel Return Program). In order to perform these analyses, a comprehensive methodology for analyzing the probabilities and consequences of transportation in coastal waters and port facilities, handling at the port, and shipment by truck to reprocessing facilities was developed. The Taiwanese fuel consists of low-burnup aluminum-clad metallic uranium research reactor spent fuel; the other fuels are primarily aluminum-clad oxide fuels. The Fuel Movement Program is ongoing, while the Fuel Return Program addresses future shipments over a ten-year period. The operational aspects of the Taiwanese shipments have been uniform, but several possible shipping configurations are possible for the Fuel Return Program shipments. Comprehensive assessments, which bound the impacts of spent fuel transport, demonstrate that when shipments are made in compliance with applicable regulations, the risks for all such transport are low. For comparison with previously licensed transport activities and to provide continuity with earlier analyses, the results for shipment of 150-day-old commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel are presented as part of this study

  9. International topical meeting on research reactor fuel management (RRFM) - United States foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) acceptance program: 2010 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Taylor, J.L.; Niehus, M.T.; Landers, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, adopted by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS) in May 1996, scheduled to expire May 12, 2016, to return research reactor fuel until May 12, 2019 to the U.S. is in its fourteenth year. This paper provides a brief update on the program, part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and discusses program initiatives and future activities. The goal of the program continues to be recovery of U.S.-origin nuclear materials, which could otherwise be used in weapons, while assisting other countries to enjoy the benefits of nuclear technology. The NNSA is seeking feedback from research reactor operators to help us understand ways to include eligible research reactors who have not yet participated in the program. (author)

  10. Analyses of the transportation of spent research reactor fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, J.W.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed the impacts of transportation of research reactor spent fuel from US and foreign reactors for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Defense Programs. Two separate shipment programs were analyzed. The shipment of research reactor spent fuel from Taiwan to the US (Fuel Movement Program), and the return of research reactor spent fuels of US origin from foreign and domestic reactors (Research Reactor Fuel Return Program). To perform these analyses, a comprehensive methodology for analyzing the probabilities and consequences of transportation in coastal waters and port facilities, handling at the port, and shipment by truck to reprocessing facilities was developed. The Taiwanese fuel consists of low-burnup aluminum-clad metallic uranium research reactor spent fuel; the other fuels are primarily aluminum-clad oxide fuels. The Fuel Movement Program is ongoing, while the Fuel Return Program addresses future shipments over a ten-year period. The operational aspects of the Taiwanese shipments have been uniform, but several possible shipping configurations are possible for the Fuel Return Program shipments. The risks of transporting spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials by all modes have been analyzed extensively. Comprehensive assessments, which bound the impacts of spent fuel transport, demonstrate that when shipments are made in compliance with applicable regulations, the risks for all such transport are low. For comparison with previously licensed transport activities and to provide continuity with earlier analyses, the results for shipment of 150-day-old commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel are presented as part of this study

  11. International topical meeting on research reactor fuel management (RRFM) - United States Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) acceptance program: 2007 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Taylor, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Non-proliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, adopted by The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State in May 1996, has been extended to expire May 12, 2016, providing an additional 10 years to return fuel to the U.S. This paper provides a brief update on the program, now transferred to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and discusses program initiatives and future activities. The goal of the program continues to be recovery of nuclear materials (27 countries have participated so far, returning a total of 7620 spent nuclear fuel elements), which could otherwise be used in weapons, while assisting other countries to enjoy the benefits of nuclear technology. More than ever before, DOE and reactor operators need to work together to schedule shipments as soon as possible, to optimize shipment efficiency over the remaining years of the program. The NNSA is seeking feedback from research reactor operators to help us understand ways to include eligible reactor who have not yet participated in the program

  12. Transport of HIFAR spent fuel from Lucas Heights Research Establishment to the United Kingdom for reprocessing. Public Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-27

    The normal operations of HIFAR produce thirty-eight spent fuel elements annually. Since 1958, when operations began, 1,660 spent fuel elements have been accumulated and are stored in ANSTO`s engineered interim storage facilities at Lucas Heights. In the light of the limited size of these storage facilities and following the Research Reactor Review (1993) and an Inter-Agency Review, the Commonwealth Government announced its decision to reduce the number of spent fuel elements stored at the site. Therefore, ANSTO has been authorised to negotiate the terms for shipment of spent fuel elements of United Kingdom (UK) origin to the Dounreay reprocessing plant in Scotland. This Public Environment Report, prepared under the Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974, describes the potential impacts and risks of a proposed initial shipment of 120 spent fuel elements to the Dounreay reprocessing plant. It describes the intended packaging and transport procedures and considers possible alternative methods of dealing with the continued production of spent fuel rods and the limited storage capacity at LHRL. The exhaustive analysis of every phase of operations involved in the shipping of a cask of spent HIFAR fuel elements from Lucas Heights to Dounreay, for reprocessing, has shown that there are no significant environmental or public health impacts from such a shipment conducted in accordance with standard, internationally established procedures. 18 refs., 12 tabs., 2 figs.

  13. Transport of HIFAR spent fuel from Lucas Heights Research Establishment to the United Kingdom for reprocessing. Public Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The normal operations of HIFAR produce thirty-eight spent fuel elements annually. Since 1958, when operations began, 1,660 spent fuel elements have been accumulated and are stored in ANSTO's engineered interim storage facilities at Lucas Heights. In the light of the limited size of these storage facilities and following the Research Reactor Review (1993) and an Inter-Agency Review, the Commonwealth Government announced its decision to reduce the number of spent fuel elements stored at the site. Therefore, ANSTO has been authorised to negotiate the terms for shipment of spent fuel elements of United Kingdom (UK) origin to the Dounreay reprocessing plant in Scotland. This Public Environment Report, prepared under the Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974, describes the potential impacts and risks of a proposed initial shipment of 120 spent fuel elements to the Dounreay reprocessing plant. It describes the intended packaging and transport procedures and considers possible alternative methods of dealing with the continued production of spent fuel rods and the limited storage capacity at LHRL. The exhaustive analysis of every phase of operations involved in the shipping of a cask of spent HIFAR fuel elements from Lucas Heights to Dounreay, for reprocessing, has shown that there are no significant environmental or public health impacts from such a shipment conducted in accordance with standard, internationally established procedures. 18 refs., 12 tabs., 2 figs

  14. The advanced fuel cycle initiative: the future path for advanced spent fuel treatment and transmutation research in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herczeg, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invested over USD 100 million in transmutation research and development over the past three years. The programme has evolved from an accelerator based transmutation programme to a multi-tier reactor and accelerator based programme. These changes have resulted in a significant re-focus of the research and development programme as well as a name change to reflect the new direction. The Advanced Accelerator Application (AAA) programme is now renamed the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Research completed by the AAA programme in Fiscal Year 2002 points to a multi-phased AFCI Programme consisting of two elements that would be conducted in parallel as part of an integrated research effort: an intermediate-term technology element (AFCI Series One), which emphasises advanced technical enhancements to the current commercial nuclear power infrastructure; and a long term technology element (AFCI Series Two), which will require the introduction of next-generation nuclear energy systems to reduce the toxicity of nuclear waste. (author)

  15. The regulatory process, nuclear safety research and the fuel cycle in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, P.

    1996-01-01

    The main legislation governing the safety of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom is the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HSWA) and the associated relevant statutory provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 (as amended). The HSWA sought to simplify and unify all industrial safety legislation and set in place the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) and its executive arm, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The Health and Safety Executive's Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) regulates the nuclear activities on such sites through HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). Under the Nuclear Installations Act (NIA) no corporate body may use any site for the purpose of installing or operating any reactor, other than such a reactor comprised in a means of transport, or other prescribed installation unless the operator has been granted a nuclear site licence by the Health and Safety Executive. Nuclear fuel cycle facilities are examples of such prescribed installations. (J.P.N.)

  16. Overview of the United States department of energy's used fuel disposition research and development campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutt, Mark [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Swift, Peter; MacKinnon, Robert; McMahon, Kevin; Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boyle, William; Gunter, Timothy; Larson, Ned [U.S. Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) is conducting research and development (R and D) activities within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to support storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. R and D activities are ongoing at nine national laboratories, and are divided into two major topical areas: (1) storage and transportation research, and (2) disposal research. Storage R and D focuses on closing technical gaps related to extended storage of UNF. For example, uncertainties remain regarding high-burnup nuclear fuel cladding performance following possible hydride reorientation and creep deformation, and also regarding long-term canister integrity. Transportation R and D focuses on ensuring transportability of UNF following extended storage, addressing data gaps regarding nuclear fuel integrity, retrievability, and demonstration of subcriticality. Disposal R and D focuses on identifying multiple viable geologic disposal options and addressing technical challenges for generic disposal concepts in various host media (e.g., mined repositories in salt, clay/shale, and granitic rocks, and deep borehole disposal in crystalline rock). R and D will transition to site-specific challenges as national policy advances. R and D goals at this stage are to increase confidence in the robustness of generic disposal concepts, to reduce generic sources of uncertainty that may impact the viability of disposal concepts, and to develop science and engineering tools that will support the selection, characterization, and ultimately licensing of a repository. The US DOE has also initiated activities that can be conducted within the constraints of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to facilitate the development of an interim storage facility and supporting transportation infrastructure. (authors)

  17. Fuel safety research 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-07-01

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a result of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The laboratory was organized by combining three laboratories, the Reactivity Accident Laboratory, the Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of the Sever Accident Research Laboratory. Consequently, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is now in charge of all the fuel safety research in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of five research groups corresponding to each research fields. They are; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 1999 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  18. Fuel safety research 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is in charge of research activity which covers almost research items related to fuel safety of water reactor in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are being conducted by using some unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of JAERI. The research to confirm the safety of high burn-up fuel and MOX fuel under accident conditions is the most important item among them. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). Research group of radionuclides release and transport behavior from irradiated fuel under severe accident conditions (VEGA group). The research conducted in the year 2001 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, the fuel behavior data under BWR power oscillation conditions in the NSRR, the data on failure-bearing capability of hydrided cladding under LOCA conditions and the FP release data at very high temperature in steam which simulate the reactor core condition during severe accidents. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2001 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  19. Fuel safety research 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a part of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The new laboratory was organized by combining three pre-existing laboratories, Reactivity Accident Laboratory, Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of Severe Accident Research Laboratory. The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory becomes to be in charge of all fuel safety research in JAERI. Various experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). The research activities in year 2000 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, failure of high burnup BWR fuel rod under RIA conditions, data on the behavior of hydrided Zircaloy cladding under LOCA conditions and FP release data from VEGA experiments at very high temperature/pressure condition. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2000 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  20. Fuel Chemistry Research | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Chemistry Research Fuel Chemistry Research Photo of a hand holding a beaker containing a clear oils. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's fuel chemistry research explores how biofuels, advanced , emissions control catalysts, and infrastructure materials. Results from NREL's fuel chemistry studies feed

  1. Fuel Cell Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

    2014-03-30

    Executive Summary In conjunction with the Brown Energy Initiative, research Projects selected for the fuel cell research grant were selected on the following criteria: They should be fundamental research that has the potential to significantly impact the nation’s energy infrastructure. They should be scientifically exciting and sound. They should synthesize new materials, lead to greater insights, explore new phenomena, or design new devices or processes that are of relevance to solving the energy problems. They involve top-caliper senior scientists with a record of accomplishment, or junior faculty with outstanding promise of achievement. They should promise to yield at least preliminary results within the given funding period, which would warrant further research development. They should fit into the overall mission of the Brown Energy Initiative, and the investigators should contribute as partners to an intellectually stimulating environment focused on energy science. Based on these criteria, fourteen faculty across three disciplines (Chemistry, Physics and Engineering) and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory were selected to participate in this effort.1 In total, there were 30 people supported, at some level, on these projects. This report highlights the findings and research outcomes of the participating researchers.

  2. Progress of the United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors conference 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapper, Maureen

    2002-01-01

    Foreign Research Reactor Spent nuclear fuel Acceptance Program is actively working with research reactors to accept eligible material before the Acceptance Policy proper expires in 2006. Reactors/governments wishing to participate should contact US immediately if they have not done so already. Program operations are changing to adapt to new challenges. We continue to promote the importance of this Program to senior management in the Department of Energy

  3. Advanced Research Reactor Fuel Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. K.; Park, H. D.; Kim, K. H. (and others)

    2006-04-15

    RERTR program for non-proliferation has propelled to develop high-density U-Mo dispersion fuels, reprocessable and available as nuclear fuel for high performance research reactors in the world. As the centrifugal atomization technology, invented in KAERI, is optimum to fabricate high-density U-Mo fuel powders, it has a great possibility to be applied in commercialization if the atomized fuel shows an acceptable in-reactor performance in irradiation test for qualification. In addition, if rod-type U-Mo dispersion fuel is developed for qualification, it is a great possibility to export the HANARO technology and the U-Mo dispersion fuel to the research reactors supplied in foreign countries in future. In this project, reprocessable rod-type U-Mo test fuel was fabricated, and irradiated in HANARO. New U-Mo fuel to suppress the interaction between U-Mo and Al matrix was designed and evaluated for in-reactor irradiation test. The fabrication process of new U-Mo fuel developed, and the irradiation test fuel was fabricated. In-reactor irradiation data for practical use of U-Mo fuel was collected and evaluated. Application plan of atomized U-Mo powder to the commercialization of U-Mo fuel was investigated.

  4. Fuel tank integrity research : fuel tank analyses and test plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into fuel tank : crashworthiness. Fuel tank research is being performed to : determine strategies for increasing the fuel tank impact : resistance to ...

  5. Caramel fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.

    1979-11-01

    This fuel for research reactors is made of UO 2 pellets in a zircaloy cladding to replace 93% enriched uranium. It is a cold fuel, non contaminating and non proliferating, enrichment is only 7 to 8%. Irradiation tests were performed until burn-up of 50000 MWD/t [fr

  6. Fuel Combustion Laboratory | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion Laboratory Fuel Combustion Laboratory NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the combustion chamber platform for fuel ignition kinetics research, was acquired to expand the lab's

  7. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    | NREL Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development NREL's fuel cell manufacturing R&D focuses on improving quality-inspection practices for high costs. A researcher monitoring web-line equipment in the Manufacturing Laboratory Many fuel cell

  8. Research reactor fuel - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlay, M.R.; Ripley, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    In the two years since the last ANA conference there have been marked changes in the research reactor fuel scene. A new low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, 'monolithic' uranium molybdenum, has shown such promise in initial trials that it may be suitable to meet the objectives of the Joint Declaration signed by Presidents Bush and Putin to commit to converting all US and Russian research reactors to LEU by 2012. Development of more conventional aluminium dispersion UMo LEU fuel has continued in the meantime and is entering the final qualification stage of multiple full sized element irradiations. Despite this progress, the original 2005 timetable for UMo fuel qualification has slipped and research reactors, including the RRR, may not convert from silicide to UMo fuel before 2007. The operators of the Swedish R2 reactor have been forced to pursue the direct route of qualifying a UMo lead test assembly (LTA) in order to meet spent fuel disposal requirements of the Swedish law. The LTA has recently been fabricated and is expected to be loaded shortly into the R2 reactor. We present an update of our previous ANA paper and details of the qualification process for UMo fuel

  9. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  10. Navy Fuel Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs basic and applied research to understand the underlying chemistry that impacts the use, handling, and storage of current and future Navy mobility...

  11. Uranium chemistry research unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The initial field of research of this Unit, established in 1973, was the basic co-ordination chemistry of uranium, thorium, copper, cobalt and nickel. Subsequently the interest of the Unit extended to extractive metallurgy relating to these metals. Under the term 'co-ordination chemistry' is understood the interaction of the central transition metal ion with surrounding atoms in its immediate vicinity (within bonding distance) and the influence they have on each other - for example, structural studies for determining the number and arrangement of co-ordinated atoms and spectrophotometric studies to establish how the f electron energy levels of uranium are influenced by the environment. New types of uranium compounds have been synthesized and studied, and the behaviour of uranium ions in non-aqueous systems has also received attention. This work can be applied to the development and study of extractants and new extractive processes for uranium

  12. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2001-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  13. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  14. Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R.; Johnson, J.D.; Reardon, P.C.; Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W.

    1996-08-01

    Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters

  15. Fuels Performance | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel Performance in Modern Engines NREL is working cooperatively with the National Biodiesel Board on research that assesses several aspects of biodiesel compatibility with engines, vehicles, and fuel-handling infrastructure. Several cooperative studies were recently conducted that examined how biodiesel performs with new

  16. Fuel cells: Trends in research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, A. J.

    Various aspects of fuel cells are discussed. The subjects addressed include: fuel cells for electric power production; phosphoric acid fuel cells; long-term testing of an air-cooled 2.5 kW PAFC stack in Italy; status of fuel cell research and technology in the Netherlands, Bulgaria, PRC, UK, Sweden, India, Japan, and Brazil; fuel cells from the manufacturer's viewpoint; and fuel cells using biomass-derived fuels. Also examined are: solid oxide electrolye fuel cells; aluminum-air batteries with neutral chloride electrolyte; materials research for advanced solid-state fuel cells at the Energy Research Laboratory in Denmark; molten carbonate fuel cells; the impact of the Siemens program; fuel cells at Sorapec; impact of fuel cells on the electric power generation systems in industrial and developing countries; and application of fuel cells to large vehicles.

  17. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  18. Reducing enrichment of fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Keiji; Matsuura, Shojiro.

    1980-01-01

    In research reactors, highly enriched uranium (HEU) is used as fuel for their purposes of operation. However, the United States strongly required in 1977 that these HEU should be replaced by low enrichment uranium (LEU) of 20% or less, or even in unavoidable cases, it should be replaced by medium enrichment uranium (MEU). INFCE (International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation) which started its activity just at that time decided to discuss this problem in the research reactor group of No. 8 sectional committee. Japan has been able to forward the work, taking a leading part in the international opinion because she has taken the countermeasures quickly. INFCE investigated the problem along the lines of policy that the possibility of reducing the degree of enrichment should be limited to the degree in which the core structures and equipments of research reactors will be modified as little as possible, and the change of fuel element geometry will be done within the permissible thermohydrodynamic capacity, and concluded that it might be possible in near future to reduce the degree of enrichment to about 45% MEU, while the reduction to 20% LEU might require considerable research, development and verification. On the other hand, the joint researches by Kyoto University and ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) and by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and ANL are being continued. IAEA has edited the guidebook (IAEA-TECDOC-233) for reducing the degree of enrichment for developing countries. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. Research reactors fuel cycle problems and dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, R.

    2004-01-01

    During last 10 years, some problems appeared in different steps of research reactors fuel cycle. Actually the majority of these reactors have been built in the 60s and these reactors were operated during all this long period in a cycle with steps which were dedicated to this activity. Progressively and for reasons often economical, certain steps of the cycle became more and more difficult to manage due to closing of some specialised workshops in the activities of scraps recycling, irradiated fuel reprocessing, even fuel fabrication. Other steps of the cycle meet or will meet difficulties, in particular supplying of fissile raw material LEU or HEU because this material was mostly produced in enrichment units existing mainly for military reason. Rarefaction of fissile material lead to use more and more enriched uraniums said 'of technical quality', that is to say which come from mixing of varied qualities of enriched material, containing products resulting from reprocessing. Actually, problems of end of fuel cycle are increased, either consisting of intermediary storage on the site of reactor or on specialised sites, or consisting of reprocessing. This brief summary shows most difficulties which are met today by a major part of industrials of the fuel cycle in the exercise of their activities

  20. Research and development of thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Jun.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear properties of thorium are summarized and present status of research and development of the use of thorium as nuclear fuel is reviewed. Thorium may be used for nuclear fuel in forms of metal, oxide, carbide and nitride independently, alloy with uranium or plutonium or mixture of the compound. Their use in reactors is described. The reprocessing of the spent oxide fuel in thorium fuel cycle is called the thorex process and similar to the purex process. A concept of a molten salt fuel reactor and chemical processing of the molten salt fuel are explained. The required future research on thorium fuel cycle is commented briefly. (T.H.)

  1. Composite Solid Fuel: Research of Formation Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabakaev Roman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Involving of local low-grade fuels resources in fuel and energy balance is actual question of research in the present. In this paper the possibility of processing low-grade fuel in the solid fuel composite was considered. The aim of the work is to define the optimal parameters for formation of the solid composite fuel. A result of researches determined that dextrin content in the binder allows to obtain solid composite fuel having the highest strength. The drying temperature for the various fuels was determined: for pellets production was 20-80 °C, for briquettes – 20-40 °C.

  2. Application Technology Research Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To conduct fundamental and developmental research on new and improved application technologies to protect floricultural, nursery, landscape, turf, horticultural, and...

  3. Unified fuel elements development for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A.; Stetsky, Y.; Dobrikova, I.

    1998-01-01

    Square cross-section rod type fuel elements have been developed for russian pool-type research reactors. new fuel elements can replace the large nomenclature of tubular fuel elements with around, square and hexahedral cross-sections and to solve a problem of enrichment reduction. the fuel assembly designs with rod type fuel elements have been developed. The overall dimensions of existing the assemblies are preserved in this one. the experimental-industrial fabricating process of fuel elements, based on a joint extrusion method has been developed. The fabricating process has been tested in laboratory conditions, 150 experimental fuel element samples of the various sizes were produced. (author)

  4. Fuel elements of research reactors in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yongmao; Chen Dianshan; Tan Jiaqiu

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of design, fabrication of fuel elements for research reactors in China, emphasis is placed on the technology of fuel elements for the High Flux Engineering Test Reactor (HFETR). (author)

  5. Proceedings of fuel safety research specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe

    2002-08-01

    Fuel Safety Research Specialists' Meeting, which was organized by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, was held on March 4-5, 2002 at JAERI in Tokai Establishment. Purposes of the Meeting are to exchange information and views on LWR fuel safety topics among the specialist participants from domestic and foreign organizations, and to discuss the recent and future fuel research activities in JAERI. In the Meeting, presentations were given and discussions were made on general report of fuel safety research activities, fuel behaviors in normal operation and accident conditions, FP release behaviors in severe accident conditions, and JAERI's ''Advanced LWR Fuel Performance and Safety Research Program''. A poster exhibition was also carried out. The Meeting significantly contributed to planning future program and cooperation in fuel research. This proceeding integrates all the pictures and papers presented in the Meeting. The 10 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Summary of fuel safety research meeting 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Hidaka, Akihide; Nakamura, Jinichi; Suzuki, Motoe; Nagase, Fumihisa; Sasajima, Hideo; Fujita, Misao; Otomo, Takashi; Kudo, Tamotsu; Amaya, Masaki; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Ikehata, Hisashi; Iwasaki, Ryo; Ozawa, Masaaki; Kida, Mitsuko

    2004-10-01

    Fuel Safety Research Meeting 2004, which was organized by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, was held on March 1-2, 2004 at Toranomon Pastoral, Tokyo. The purposes of the meeting are to present and discuss the results of experiments and analyses on reactor fuel safety and to exchange views and experiences among the participants. The technical topics of the meeting covered the status of fuel safety research activities, fuel behavior under RIA and LOCA conditions, high burnup fuel behavior, and radionuclides release under severe accident conditions. This summary contains all the abstracts and OHP sheets presented in the meeting. (author)

  7. Fuels Performance | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    chemistry, combustion, and emissions to answer two primary questions: How can improved fuel chemistry lead initiative Combustion and engines Fuel chemistry Emissions and fuel economy Find out about related NREL Chemistry. (2014) Saturated Monoglyceride Effects on Low-Temperature Performance of Biodiesel Blends. G.M

  8. Hydrogen and fuel cells in the United States Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacobucci, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past few years, the United States Congress has shown increasing interest in the development of hydrogen fuel and fuel cells for transportation, stationary, and mobile applications The high efficiency of fuel cell systems could address some of the concern over increasing dependence on imported petroleum. Further, lower emissions could help promote air quality goals However, many questions remain, including the affordability, safety, overall fuel-cycle efficiency and emissions. These questions, especially those related to cost, have led Members of Congress to enact legislation to speed the development and commercialization of the technologies. This paper discusses congressional action on hydrogen and fuel cells. It provides an overview of the U.S. Congress, and outlines the role of the appropriations process. It then provides a history of federal hydrogen fuel research and development (R and D), both in terms of legislative and executive initiatives, and it describes pending legislation current as of this writing, including bills on energy policy, transportation policy, tax policy, and appropriations. Finally, the paper presents some of the issues that the pending legislation may raise for industry. (author)

  9. Trends in fuel reprocessing safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujino, Takeshi

    1981-01-01

    With the operation of a fuel reprocessing plant in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and the plan for a second fuel reprocessing plant, the research on fuel reprocessing safety, along with the reprocessing technology itself, has become increasingly important. As compared with the case of LWR power plants, the safety research in this field still lags behind. In the safety of fuel reprocessing, there are the aspects of keeping radiation exposure as low as possible in both personnel and local people, the high reliability of the plant operation and the securing of public safety in accidents. Safety research is then required to establish the safety standards and to raise the rate of plant operation associated with safety. The following matters are described: basic ideas for the safety design, safety features in fuel reprocessing, safety guideline and standards, and safety research for fuel reprocessing. (J.P.N.)

  10. Dispersion fuel for nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushtym, A.V.; Belash, M.M.; Zigunov, V.V.; Slabospitska, O.O.; Zuyok, V.A.

    2017-01-01

    Designs and process flow sheets for production of nuclear fuel rod elements and assemblies TVS-XD with dispersion composition UO_2+Al are presented. The results of fuel rod thermal calculation applied to Kharkiv subcritical assembly and Kyiv research reactor VVR-M, comparative characteristics of these fuel elements, the results of metallographic analyses and corrosion tests of fuel pellets are given in this paper

  11. Agreement among the Government of the Republic of Poland, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for assistance in securing nuclear fuel for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The text of the Project and Supply Agreement among the Government of the Republic of Poland, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for Assistance in Securing Nuclear Fuel for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the above mentioned Project and Supply Agreement on 14 June 2006. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Poland on 8 January 2007, the United States on 12 January 2007 and by the Director General of the IAEA on 16 January 2007. Pursuant to the Article XII of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 16 January 2007, upon signature by the representatives of Poland, the United States and the Director General of the IAEA

  12. The Uranium Chemistry Research Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The article discusses the research work done at the Uranium Chemistry Research Unit of the University of Port Elizabeth. The initial research programme dealt with fundamental aspects of uranium chemistry. New uranium compounds were synthesized and their chemical properties were studied. Research was also done to assist the mining industry, as well as on nuclear medicine. Special mentioning is made of the use of technetium for medical diagnosis and therapy

  13. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Kim, Yeanjin; Yun, Sei-Hun

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants

  14. The Canadian research reactor spent fuel situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present research reactor spent fuel situation in Canada. The research reactors currently operating are listed along with the types of fuel that they utilize. Other shut down research reactors contributing to the storage volume are included for completeness. The spent fuel storage facilities associated with these reactors and the methods used to determine criticality safety are described. Finally the current inventory of spent fuel and where it is stored is presented along with concerns for future storage. (author). 3 figs

  15. Unification of fuel elements for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulyn, A.V.; Stetskyi, Y.A.; Dobrikova, I.V.

    1997-01-01

    To the purpose of fuel elements unification the possibility of rod fuel assembly (FA) using in the cores of research reactors have been considered in this paper. The calculation results of geometric, hydraulic and thermotechnical parameters of rod assembly are submitted. Several designs of finned square fuel element and fuel assembly are proposed on base of analysis of rod FA characteristics in compare of tube ones. The fuel elements specimens and the model assembly are manufactured. The developed designs are the basis for further optimization after neutron-physical calculations of cores. (author)

  16. Status of the breeder fuel cycle in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the status and plans for the fast reactor fuel cycle in the United States. The United States is undertaking a complete reexamination of its entire breeder program strategy, and the direction of the new program is not yet clear. Studies in progress to examine the associated fuel cycle strategies as they relate to the overall emerging breeder strategy are described. The present status of and recent developments in the fuel cycle R and D programs are summarized

  17. Agreement among the Portuguese Republic, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for assistance in securing nuclear fuel for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The text of the Agreement among the Portuguese Republic, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for Assistance in Securing Nuclear Fuel for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the above mentioned Agreement on 14 June 2006. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Portugal on 27 June 2006 and the United States on 13 December 2006, and by the Director General of the IAEA on 14 December 2006. Pursuant to the Article XII.1 of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 19 April 2007, the date on which the Agency received written notification from Portugal that its internal requirements for entry into force had been met

  18. Fuel cell research: Towards efficient energy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rohwer, MB

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available fuel cells by optimising the loading of catalyst (being expensive noble metals) and ionomer; 2) Improving conventional acidic direct alcohol fuel cells by developing more efficient catalysts and by investigating other fuels than methanol; 3... these components add significantly to the overall cost of a PEMFC. 1 We focused our research activities on: 1) The effect of the loading of catalytic ink on cell performance; 2) The effect of the ionomer content in the catalytic ink; 3) Testing...

  19. Research on CDA for advanced fuel FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Go; Hirakawa, Naohiro; Kawada, Ken-ichi; Niwa, Hazime.

    1997-03-01

    For the purpose of evaluating possibility of the re-criticality of a metallic fueled reactor, Tohoku university and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation have made a joint research entitled 'Research on CDA for advanced fuel FBR'. The results of this year are the following. The accident initiator considered is a loss-of-flow accident with ATWS. The LOF analysis was performed for the metallic fueled 600 MWe homogeneous two region reactors, both for a metallic fuel only and for a metallic fuel core with ZrH pin. The SAS3D CDA initiation phase analysis code was used to investigate the re-criticality potential at the severe accident. The change mainly in the constants was necessary to apply the code for the analysis of a metallic fueled reactor. These changes were made by assuming appropriate models. LOF with flow decay half time of t 1/2 =0.5(s) (all blackout case) and 5.5(s) (ordinary LOF case) were analyzed. Independent of the conditions of the analysis, the results show all the cases could avoid to become prompt-critical. Depending on the analysis condition, it becomes necessary to transfer to the transient phase, it is also shown there is a possibility to avoid re-criticality due to the motion of molten fuel both for the metallic fuel and for the metallic fuel with ZrH moderator. However, because of the constants used for the material property the results might overestimate the fuel motion. It is shown that the moderator is effective to terminate the accident at an early stage. The behavior of metallic fueled reactors at CDA was analyzed with SAS3D code by modifying the constants of material properties to be applied to the reactor. It is shown that a metallic fueled reactor has a possibility to avoid re-criticality at CDA. (J.P.N.)

  20. Situation of test and research reactors' spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Junzo; Sato, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. DOE decided a renewal Off-Site Fuel Policy for stopping to spread a highly enriched uranium which was originally enriched at the U.S., the policy declared that to receive all HEU spent fuels from Test and Research reactors in all the world. In Japan, under bilateral agreement of cooperation between the government of the United States and the government of Japan concerning peaceful uses of nuclear energy, the highly enriched uranium of Test and Research Reactors' fuels was purchased from the U.S. and the fuels had been manufactured in Japan, America, Germany and France. On the other hand, a former president of the U.S. J. Carter proposed that to convert the fuels from HEU to LEU concerning a nonproliferation of nuclear materials in 1978, and Japan absolutely supported this policy. Under this condition, the U.S. stopped to receive the spent fuels from the other countries concerning legal action to the Off-Site Fuels Policy. As a result, the spent fuels are increasing, and to cross to each reactor's storage capacity, and if this policy start, a faced crisis of Test and Research Reactors will be avoided. (author)

  1. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-06-28

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

  2. Research reactor spent fuel in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the research reactors in Ukraine, their spent fuel facilities and spent fuel management problems. Nuclear sciences, technology and industry are highly developed in Ukraine. There are 5 NPPs in the country with 14 operating reactors which have total power capacity of 12,800 MW

  3. Advanced fuel in the Budapest research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargitai, T.; Vidovsky, I.

    1997-01-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, the first nuclear facility of Hungary, started to operate in 1959. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research, but applications as neutron radiography, radioisotope production, pressure vessel surveillance test, etc. are important as well. The Budapest Research Reactor is a tank type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water. After a reconstruction and upgrading in 1967 the VVR-SM type fuel elements were used in it. These fuel elements provided a thermal power of 5 MW in the period 1967-1986 and 10 MW after the reconstruction from 1992. In the late eighties the Russian vendor changed the fuel elements slightly, i.e. the main parameters of the fuel remained unchanged, however a higher uranium content was reached. This new fuel is called VVR-M2. The geometry of VVR-SM and VVR-M2 are identical, allowing the use to load old and new fuel assemblies together to the active core. The first new type fuel assemblies were loaded to the Budapest Research Reactor in 1996. The present paper describes the operational experience with the new type of fuel elements in Hungary. (author)

  4. Research reactor de-fueling and fuel shipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, R.D.; Jawdeh, E.; Strydom, J.

    1998-01-01

    Planning for the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor operations during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games began in early 1995. Before any details could be outlined, several preliminary administrative decisions had to be agreed upon by state, city, and university officials. The two major administrative decisions involving the reactor were (1) the security level and requirements and (2) the fuel status of the reactor. The Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) was a heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with high-enriched uranium. The reactor was first licensed in 1964 with an engineered lifetime of thirty years. The reactor was intended for use in research applications and as a teaching facility for nuclear engineering students and reactor operators. Approximately one year prior to the olympics, the Georgia Tech administration decided that the GTRR fuel would be removed. In addition, a heightened, beyond regulatory requirements, security system was to be implemented. This report describes the scheduling, operations, and procedures

  5. Alternative Fuels DISI Engine Research ? Autoignition Metrics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoberg, Carl Magnus Goran [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vuilleumier, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Improved engine efficiency is required to comply with future fuel economy standards. Alternative fuels have the potential to enable more efficient engines while addressing concerns about energy security. This project contributes to the science base needed by industry to develop highly efficient direct injection spark igniton (DISI) engines that also beneficially exploit the different properties of alternative fuels. Here, the emphasis is on quantifying autoignition behavior for a range of spark-ignited engine conditions, including directly injected boosted conditions. The efficiency of stoichiometrically operated spark ignition engines is often limited by fuel-oxidizer end-gas autoignition, which can result in engine knock. A fuel’s knock resistance is assessed empirically by the Research Octane Number (RON) and Motor Octane Number (MON) tests. By clarifying how these two tests relate to the autoignition behavior of conventional and alternative fuel formulations, fuel design guidelines for enhanced engine efficiency can be developed.

  6. Summary of fuel safety research meeting 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Nakamura, Takehiko; Nagase, Fumihisa; Nakamura, Jinichi; Suzuki, Motoe; Sasajima, Hideo; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Amaya, Masaki; Kudo, Tamotsu; Chuto, Toshinori; Tomiyasu, Kunihiko; Udagawa, Yutaka; Ikehata, Hisashi; Kida, Mitsuko; Ikatsu, Nobuhiko; Hosoyamada, Ryuji; Hamanishi, Eizou; Iwasaki, Ryo; Ozawa, Masaaki

    2006-03-01

    Fuel Safety Research Meeting 2005, which was organized by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Establishment of the new organization in Oct. 1, 2005 integrated of JAERI and JNC) was held on March 2-3, 2005 at Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo. The purposes of the meeting are to present and discuss the results of experiments and analyses on reactor fuel safety and to exchange views and experiences among the participants. The technical topics of the meting covered the status of fuel safety research activities, fuel behavior under Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) and Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions, high fuel behavior, and radionuclide release under severe accident conditions. This summary contains all the abstracts and sheets of viewgraph presented in the meeting. (author)

  7. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    For a period of about 10 years AECL had a significant program looking into the possibility of developing U 3 Si as a high density replacement for the UO 2 pellet fuel in use in CANDU power reactors. The element design consisted of a Zircaloy-clad U 3 Si rod containing suitable voidage to accommodate swelling. We found that the binary U 3 Si could not meet the defect criterion for our power reactors, i.e., one month in 300 degree C water with a defect in the sheath and no significant damage to the element. Since U 3 Si could not do the job, a new corrosion resistant ternary U-Si-Al alloy was developed and patented. Fuel elements containing this alloy came close to meeting the defect criterion and showed slightly better irradiation stability than U 3 Si. Shortly after this, the program was terminated for other reasons. We have made much of this experience available to the Low Enrichment Fuel Development Program and will be glad to supply further data to assist this program

  8. Russian research reactor fuel return program starts shipping fuel to Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedik, T.; Bolshinsky, I.; Krass, A.

    2003-01-01

    For almost four years the United States (U.S), the Russian Federation (R.F.), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have been discussing an initiative to return Soviet/Russian-origin research reactor fuel to the Russian Federation. In a series of bilateral and trilateral meetings in Vienna and Moscow, considerable progress has been made toward defining the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program as well as obtaining the necessary technical data to facilitate the return. More than 20 research reactors in 17 countries that have Soviet- or Russian-supplied fuel have identified. Most of these reactors have stocks of both fresh and irradiated HEU fuel that must be carefully stored and managed for many years to come. On September 21, 2003 the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return program shipped 14 kg of fresh Russian-origin HEU fuel from Romania to the nuclear fuel fabrication facility in Russia, which represented the beginning of the practical implementation of the program. (author)

  9. Radionuclide release from research reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtius, H., E-mail: h.curtius@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kaiser, G.; Mueller, E.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Numerous investigations with respect to LWR fuel under non oxidizing repository relevant conditions were performed. The results obtained indicate slow corrosion rates for the UO{sub 2} fuel matrix. Special fuel-types (mostly dispersed fuels, high enriched in {sup 235}U, cladded with aluminium) are used in German research reactors, whereas in German nuclear power plants, UO{sub 2}-fuel (LWR fuel, enrichment in {sup 235}U up to 5%, zircaloy as cladding) is used. Irradiated research reactor fuels contribute less than 1% to the total waste volume. In Germany, the state is responsible for fuel operation and for fuel back-end options. The institute for energy research (IEF-6) at the Research Center Juelich performs investigation with irradiated research reactor spent fuels under repository relevant conditions. In the study, the corrosion of research reactor spent fuel has been investigated in MgCl{sub 2}-rich salt brine and the radionuclide release fractions have been determined. Leaching experiments in brine with two different research reactor fuel-types were performed in a hot cell facility in order to determine the corrosion behaviour and the radionuclide release fractions. The corrosion of two dispersed research reactor fuel-types (UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) was studied in 400 mL MgCl{sub 2}-rich salt brine in the presence of Fe{sup 2+} under static and initially anoxic conditions. Within these experimental parameters, both fuel types corroded in the experimental time period of 3.5 years completely, and secondary alteration phases were formed. After complete corrosion of the used research reactor fuel samples, the inventories of Cs and Sr were quantitatively detected in solution. Solution concentrations of Am and Eu were lower than the solubility of Am(OH){sub 3}(s) and Eu(OH){sub 3}(s) solid phases respectively, and may be controlled by sorption processes. Pu concentrations may be controlled by Pu(IV) polymer species, but the presence of Pu(V) and Pu

  10. Nuclear fuel element recovery using PEDSCO RMI Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.G.; Pedersen, B.V.

    1984-01-01

    In September 1982, a PEDSCO Remote Mobile Investigation Unit was used to recover damaged irradiated fuel elements from a fueling machine and trolley deck at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'. This Canadian-made remote controlled vehicle was originally designed for explosive ordinance disposal by law enforcement agencies. This paper describes its adaptation to nuclear service and its first mission, within a nuclear facility

  11. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells coupled with a biomass gasification unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypkiewicz Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of fuelling a solid oxide fuel cell stack (SOFC with biomass fuels can be realized by coupling a SOFC system with a self-standing gasification unit. Such a solution enables multi-fuel operation, elasticity of the system as well as the increase of the efficiency of small-scale biomass-to-electricity conversion units. A system of this type, consisting of biomass gasification unit, gas purification unit, SOFC stack, anode off-gas afterburner and peripherals was constructed and operated successfully. During the process, biomass fuel (wood chips was gasified with air as gasification agent. The gasifier was capable of converting up to 30 kW of fuel to syngas with efficiencies up to 75%. Syngas leaving the gasification unit is delivered to a medium temperature adsorber for sulphur compounds removal. Steam is added to the purified fuel to maintain steam to carbon ratio higher than 2. The syngas then is passed to a SOFC stack through a fuel preheater. In such a configuration it was possible to operate a commercial 1.3 kW stack within its working regime. Conducted tests confirmed successful operation of a SOFC stack fuelled by biomass-sourced syngas.

  12. The University of Missouri Research Reactor, its fuel and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.; Schlapper, G.A.; Alger, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) and presents a summary of contributions to education, research, and service. These efforts have helped offset the impact on the U.S. economy of research from other countries. Special emphasis is placed on fuel design developments that have allowed MuRR to keep the cost megawatt day (MWD) of fuel essentially constant. Also noted is the fact that the United States has missed some research opportunities because of a hold-the-line attitude. The slipping position of U.S. research reactors is compared with the rest of the world. As will be further outlined in the text, the MURR cannot (with available technology) decrease its U-235 enrichment level and maintain present research capabilities and fuel cycle costs. Data is presented to show how MURR, if permitted to use advanced fuel technology, could reduce fuel fabrication costs and onsite U-235 inventory. In addition it is shown that MURR could increase its capabilities provided that arbitrary institutional limits are removed

  13. The University of Missouri Research Reactor, its fuel and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Robert M.; Schlapper, Gerald A.; Alger, Don M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) and presents a summary of contributions to education, research, and service. These efforts have helped offset the impact on the U. S. economy of research from other countries. Special emphasis is placed on fuel design developments that have allowed MURR to keep the cost megawatt day (MWD) of fuel essentially constant. Also noted is the fact that the United States has missed some research opportunities because of a hold-the-line attitude. The slipping position of U.S. research reactors is compared with the rest of the world. As will be further outlined in the text, the MURR cannot (with available technology) decrease its U-235 enrichment level and maintain present research capabilities and fuel cycle costs. Data is presented to show how MURR if permitted to use advanced fuel technology, could reduce fuel fabrication costs and onsite U-235 inventory. In addition it is shown that MURR could increase its capabilities provided that arbitrary institutional limits are removed

  14. Spent fuel transportation in the United States: commercial spent fuel shipments through December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This report has been prepared to provide updated transportation information on light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel in the United States. Historical data are presented on the quantities of spent fuel shipped from individual reactors on an annual basis and their shipping destinations. Specifically, a tabulation is provided for each present-fuel shipment that lists utility and plant of origin, destination and number of spent-fuel assemblies shipped. For all annual shipping campaigns between 1980 and 1984, the actual numbers of spent-fuel shipments are defined. The shipments are tabulated by year, and the mode of shipment and the casks utilized in shipment are included. The data consist of the current spent-fuel inventories at each of the operating reactors as of December 31, 1984. This report presents historical data on all commercial spent-fuel transportation shipments have occurred in the United States through December 31, 1984

  15. About fuel assemblies optimization in research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malers, Yu.P.

    1992-01-01

    Ealier was considered an algorithm for optimization of fuel assembly arrangement in a research reator. The alggorithm was based on an analytical relation between distributions of energy release and fuel concentration and on the method of succesive linearization and partially integral-number programming. In the paper are solved the problems, appeared as a result of realization of the used approach and required more correct formulation of the algorithm and introduction in it some variations

  16. Climate consequences of low-carbon fuels: The United States Renewable Fuel Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Jason; Tajibaeva, Liaila; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from energy use is to increase the supply of low-carbon alternatives. However, increasing supply tends to lower energy prices, which encourages additional fuel consumption. This “fuel market rebound effect” can undermine climate change mitigation strategies, even to the point where efforts to reduce GHG emissions by increasing the supply of low-carbon fuels may actually result in increased GHG emissions. Here, we explore how policies that encourage the production of low-carbon fuels may result in increased GHG emissions because the resulting increase in energy use overwhelms the benefits of reduced carbon intensity. We describe how climate change mitigation strategies should follow a simple rule: a low-carbon fuel with a carbon intensity of X% that of a fossil fuel must displace at least X% of that fossil fuel to reduce overall GHG emissions. We apply this rule to the United States Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2). We show that absent consideration of the fuel market rebound effect, RFS2 appears to reduce GHG emissions, but once the fuel market rebound effect is factored in, RFS2 actually increases GHG emissions when all fuel GHG intensity targets are met. - Highlights: • Low-carbon fuels partially displace petroleum via fuel market rebound effect. • Synthesis of recent analyses shows incomplete petroleum displacement by biofuels. • Fuel market rebound effect can reduce or reverse climate benefit of low-carbon fuels. • Fossil fuel displacement must exceed relative carbon footprint of a low-carbon fuel. • The Renewable Fuel Standard increases greenhouse gas emissions when mandate is met.

  17. PCR+ In Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdams, H.T.

    2002-04-15

    In past work for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), PCR+ was developed as an alternative methodology for building statistical models. PCR+ is an extension of Principal Components Regression (PCR), in which the eigenvectors resulting from Principal Components Analysis (PCA) are used as predictor variables in regression analysis. The work was motivated by the observation that most heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine research was conducted with test fuels that had been ''concocted'' in the laboratory to vary selected fuel properties in isolation from each other. This approach departs markedly from the real world, where the reformulation of diesel fuels for almost any purpose leads to changes in a number of interrelated properties. In this work, we present new information regarding the problems encountered in the conventional approach to model-building and how the PCR+ method can be used to improve research on the relationship between fuel characteristics and engine emissions. We also discuss how PCR+ can be applied to a variety of other research problems related to diesel fuels.

  18. French experience in research reactor fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, Daniele

    1996-01-01

    Since 1963 Transnucleaire has safely performed a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied suitable packaging for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive material from front-end and back-end products and for power or for research reactors. Transportation of spent fuel from power reactors are made on a regular and industrial basis, but this is not yet the case for the transport of spent fuel coming from research reactors. Each shipment is a permanent challenge and requires a reactive organization dealing with all the transportation issues. This presentation will explain the choices made by Transnucleaire and its associates to provide and optimize the corresponding services while remaining in full compliance with the applicable regulations and customer requirements. (author)

  19. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Suk Ho; Park, Joo Hwan; Jun, Ji Su [and others

    2000-04-01

    Wolsong Unit 1 as the first heavy water reactor in Korea has been in service for 17 years since 1983. It would be about the time to prepare a plan for the solution of problems due to aging of the reactor. The aging of CANDU reactor could lead especially to the steam generator cruding and pressure tube sagging and creep and then decreases the operation margin to make some problems on reactor operations and safety. The counterplan could be made in two ways. One is to repair or modify reactor itself. The other is to develop new advanced fuel to increase of CANDU operation margin effectively, so as to compensate the reduced operation margin. Therefore, the first objectives in the present R and D is to develop the CANFLEX-NU (CANDU Flexible fuelling-Natural Uranium) fuel as a CANDU advanced fuel. The second objectives is to develop CANDU advanced fuel bundle to utilize advanced fuel cycles such as recovered uranium, slightly enriched uranium, etc. and so to raise adaptability for change in situation of uranium market. Also, it is to develop CANDU advanced fuel technology which improve uranium utilization to cope with a world-wide imbalance between uranium supply and demand, without significant modification of nuclear reactor design and refuelling strategies. As the implementations to achieve the above R and D goal, the work contents and scope of technology development of CANDU advanced fuel using natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the nuclear design and fuel management analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the safety analysis, fuel fabrication technologies, the out-pile thermalhydraulic test and in-pile irradiation tests performed. At the next, the work scopes and contents of feasibility study of CANDU advanced fuel using recycled uranium (CANFLEX-RU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the reactor physics analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the basic safety analysis of a CANDU-6 reactor with CANFLEX-RU fuel, the fabrication and

  20. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Suk Ho; Park, Joo Hwan; Jun, Ji Su

    2000-04-01

    Wolsong Unit 1 as the first heavy water reactor in Korea has been in service for 17 years since 1983. It would be about the time to prepare a plan for the solution of problems due to aging of the reactor. The aging of CANDU reactor could lead especially to the steam generator cruding and pressure tube sagging and creep and then decreases the operation margin to make some problems on reactor operations and safety. The counterplan could be made in two ways. One is to repair or modify reactor itself. The other is to develop new advanced fuel to increase of CANDU operation margin effectively, so as to compensate the reduced operation margin. Therefore, the first objectives in the present R and D is to develop the CANFLEX-NU (CANDU Flexible fuelling-Natural Uranium) fuel as a CANDU advanced fuel. The second objectives is to develop CANDU advanced fuel bundle to utilize advanced fuel cycles such as recovered uranium, slightly enriched uranium, etc. and so to raise adaptability for change in situation of uranium market. Also, it is to develop CANDU advanced fuel technology which improve uranium utilization to cope with a world-wide imbalance between uranium supply and demand, without significant modification of nuclear reactor design and refuelling strategies. As the implementations to achieve the above R and D goal, the work contents and scope of technology development of CANDU advanced fuel using natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the nuclear design and fuel management analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the safety analysis, fuel fabrication technologies, the out-pile thermalhydraulic test and in-pile irradiation tests performed. At the next, the work scopes and contents of feasibility study of CANDU advanced fuel using recycled uranium (CANFLEX-RU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the reactor physics analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the basic safety analysis of a CANDU-6 reactor with CANFLEX-RU fuel, the fabrication and

  1. History of research reactor fuel fabrication at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freim, James B.

    1983-01-01

    B and W Research Reactor Fuel Element facility at Lynchburg, Virginia now produces national laboratory and university fuel assemblies. The Company's 201000 square foot facility is devoted entirely to supplying research fuel and related products. B and W re-entered the research reactor fuel market in 1981

  2. Design of fuel loading for Bohunice V-1 Unit 2 reaktor for fuel cycle No.19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majercik, J.

    1998-01-01

    The report contains description of the design of fuel loading for the fuel cycle No. 19 in the V-1 Bohunice Unit 2 reactor. Input data and computer codes used for the development of the design are shown. The fuel loading is characterized by the assortment of the fuel loaded and by the scheme of re shuffling of assemblies in the core. An evaluation of basic neutronic core parameters as relates to the compliance with safety criteria is a part of the report as well

  3. Reuse of discharged fuel in Bohunice-1,2 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrapciak, V.; Majercik, J.; Kacmar, M.

    2003-01-01

    During the reconstruction of Bohunice-1,2 units (1997 - 2001), their cycle lengths dropped to very short values. Because of 4-year limit to fuel residence time, refuelling with fresh 2.4 % enriched assemblies seemed to be a solution of the problem. The paper describes the implementation of a final decision to reuse 3.6 % enriched fuel discharged after 3-year irradiation in previous cycles. This decision led to a large-scale moving of discharged assemblies from spent fuel pools back to reactors (Authors)

  4. US spent fuel research and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machiels, A [EPRI and USDOE (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The structural performance of high-burnup spent fuel cladding during dry storage and transportation has been the subject of research and evaluation at EPRI for several years. The major issues addressed in this research program have included the following: Characterization and development of predictive models for damage mechanisms perceived to be potentially active during dry storage; Modeling and analysis of deformation processes during long-term dry storage; Development of cladding failure models and failure criteria, considering cladding material and physical conditions during dry storage and transportation; Failure analysis, considering end-of-dry-storage conditions, of spent fuel systems subjected to normal and accident conditions of transport, prescribed in Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR71) While issues related to dry storage have largely been resolved, transportation issues have not, at least for spent fuel with discharge burnups greater than 45 GWd/MTU. A research program was launched in late 2002 following two NRC-industry meetings held on September 6, 2002 and October 23, 2002. The aim of the research program was to assess the performance of high-burnup spent fuel cladding under normal and accident conditions of transportation, as prescribed by 10CFR71, considering the physical characteristics and mechanical properties of cladding at the end of dry storage. The objective is to present a synthesis of the information that collectively forms a part of a technical basis intended to facilitate resolution of regulatory issues associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel characterized by discharge burnups greater than 45 GWd/MTU.

  5. Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Photo of a gasoline emissions in advanced engine technologies. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's combustion research and combustion and engine research activities include: Developing experimental and simulation research platforms

  6. Diesel fuel in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaid, B.; Saint-Antonin, V

    2003-07-01

    In the 1970's, Diesel technology had a poor image in the United States owing to the inadequate performance and reliability observed in certain models. The 1990's brought increased awareness of greenhouse effect issues. Greater Diesel penetration of the American automobile market could represent a short-term solution for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions, along with the use of hybrid vehicles, but the impact on American refining plant would be substantial. (author)

  7. Diesel fuel in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaid, B; Saint-Antonin, V

    2003-07-01

    In the 1970's, Diesel technology had a poor image in the United States owing to the inadequate performance and reliability observed in certain models. The 1990's brought increased awareness of greenhouse effect issues. Greater Diesel penetration of the American automobile market could represent a short-term solution for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions, along with the use of hybrid vehicles, but the impact on American refining plant would be substantial. (author)

  8. Diesel fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaid, B.; Saint-Antonin, V.

    2003-01-01

    In the 1970's, Diesel technology had a poor image in the United States owing to the inadequate performance and reliability observed in certain models. The 1990's brought increased awareness of greenhouse effect issues. Greater Diesel penetration of the American automobile market could represent a short-term solution for reducing CO 2 emissions, along with the use of hybrid vehicles, but the impact on American refining plant would be substantial. (author)

  9. Commercial Aspect of Research Reactor Fuel Element Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanto, B.G; Suripto, A

    1998-01-01

    Several aspects affecting the commercialization of the Research Reactor Fuel Element Production Installation (RR FEPI) under a BUMN (state-owned company)have been studied. The break event point (BEP) value based on total production cost used is greatly depending upon the unit selling price of the fuel element. At a selling price of USD 43,500/fuel element, the results of analysis shows that the BEP will be reached at 51% of minimum available capacity. At a selling price of US$ 43.500/fuel element the total income (after tax) for 7 years ahead is US $ 4.620.191,- The net present value in this study has a positive value is equal to US $ 2.827.527,- the internal rate of return will be 18% which is higher than normal the bank interest rare (in US dollar) at this time. It is concluded therefore that the nuclear research reactor fuel element produced by state-owned company BUMN has a good prospect to be sold commercially

  10. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) 2009–2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    At the beginning of 2014, there were 437 nuclear power reactors in operation and 72 reactors under construction. To date, around 370 500 t (HM) (tonnes of heavy metal) of spent fuel have been discharged from reactors, and approximately 253 700 t (HM) are stored at various storage facilities. Although wet storage at reactor sites still dominates, the amount of spent fuel being transferred to dry storage technologies has increased significantly since 2005. For example, around 28% of the total fuel inventory in the United States of America is now in dry storage. Although the licensing for the construction of geological disposal facilities is under way in Finland, France and Sweden, the first facility is not expected to be available until 2025 and for most States with major nuclear programmes not for several decades afterwards. Spent fuel is currently accumulating at around 7000 t (HM) per year worldwide. The net result is that the duration of spent fuel storage has increased beyond what was originally foreseen. In order to demonstrate the safety of both spent fuel and the storage system, a good understanding of the processes that might cause deterioration is required. To address this, the IAEA continued the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) in 2009 to evaluate fuel and materials performance under wet and dry storage and to assess the impact of interim storage on associated spent fuel management activities (such as handling and transport). This has been achieved through: evaluating surveillance and monitoring programmes of spent fuel and storage facilities; collecting and exchanging relevant experience of spent fuel storage and the impact on associated spent fuel management activities; facilitating the transfer of knowledge by documenting the technical basis for spent fuel storage; creating synergy among research projects of the participating Member States; and developing the capability to assess the impact

  11. Fast-reactor fuel reprocessing in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.; Buck, C.; Williams, J.

    1977-01-01

    Enriched uranium metal fuel irradiated in the Dounreay Fast Reactor has been reprocessed and refabricated in plants specifically designed for the purpose in the United Kingdom since 1961. Efficient and reliable fuel recycle is essential to the development of a plutonium-based fast-reactor system, and the importance of establishing at an early stage fast-reactor fuel reprocessing has been reinforced by current world difficulties in reprocessing high-burnup thermal-reactor oxide fuel. The United Kingdom therefore decided to reprocess irradiated fuel from the 250MW(e) Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) as an integral part of the fast reactor development programme. Flowsheet and equipment development work for the small-scale fully active demonstration plant has been carried out since 1972, and the plant will be commissioned and ready for active operation during 1977. In parallel, a comprehensive waste-management system has been developed and installed. Based on this development work and the information which will arise from active operation of the plant, a parallel development programme has been initiated to provide the basis for the design of a large-scale fast-reactor fuel-reprocessing plant to come into operation in the late 1980s to support the projected UK fast-reactor installation programme. The paper identifies the important differences between fast-reactor and thermal-reactor fuel-reprocessing technologies and describes some of the development work carried out in these areas for the small-scale PFR fuel-reprocessing operation. In addition, the development programme in aid of the design of a larger scale fast-reactor fuel-reprocessing plant is outlined and the current design philosophy discussed. (author)

  12. Research reactor spent fuel management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audero, M.A.; Bevilacqua, A.M.; Mehlich, A.M.; Novara, O.

    2002-01-01

    The research reactor spent fuel (RRSF) management strategy will be presented as well as the interim storage experience. Currently, low-enriched uranium RRSF is in wet interim storage either at reactor site or away from reactor site in a centralized storage facility. High-enriched uranium RRSF from the centralized storage facility has been sent to the USA in the framework of the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The strategy for the management of the RRSF could implement the encapsulation for interim dry storage. As an alternative to encapsulation for dry storage some conditioning processes are being studied which include decladding, isotopic dilution, oxidation and immobilization. The immobilized material will be suitable for final disposal. (author)

  13. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. 173.172... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.172 Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tanks containing a mixture of anhydrous hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine (M86 fuel) and designed...

  14. Advanced fuel cell development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Both molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells are being developed in the United States to complement and/or supplant phosphoric acid cells for commercial and utility use. This paper described the two technologies and the programs for their development

  15. Status of spent nuclear fuel management in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The United States produces approximately 20% of its electricity in nuclear power reactors, currently generating, approximately 2,000 metric tons of uranium (tU) of spent nuclear fuel annually. Over the past half century, the country has amassed 33,000 tU of commercial spent nuclear fuel that is being stored at 119 operating and shutdown reactors located on 73 sites around the nation. The cumulative discharge of the spent fuel from reactors is estimated to total approximately 87,000 tU by 2035. Many sites have reracked the spent fuel in their storage pool to maximize pool capacity, and a number of reactor sites have been forced to add dry storage to accommodate the growing inventory of fuel in storage. In addition, research and defense programme reactors have produced spent fuel that is being stored in pools at Federal sites. Much of this fuel will be transferred to dry storage in the coming years. Under current plans, the commercial and federally owned fuel will remain in storage at the existing sites until the United States Department of Energy (DOE) begins receipt at a federal receiving facility. (author)

  16. Characteristics of fuel CRUD from Ringhals Unit 4. A comparison of CRUD samples from ultrasonic fuel cleaning and fuel scrape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jiaxin; Eskhult, Jonas; Marks, Chuck; Dingee, John; Bengtsson, Bernt; Wells, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics and behaviour of PWR fuel CRUD are closely related to plant radiation field build-up and the risks of CRUD-Induced Power Shifts (CIPS, previously AOA) and CRUD-Induced Localized Corrosion (CILC). At Ringhals NPP fuel scrape technology has frequently been used to collect fuel CRUD samples as a part of plant water chemistry monitoring programs. In 2012, high efficiency ultrasonic fuel cleaning (HE-UFC) technology was first used at Ringhals Unit 4 to reduce the risk of CIPS, which was expected to increase due to steam generator replacement and a subsequent power uprate. In the HE-UFC system a “first-of-a-kind” CRUD sampling system was installed for collecting fuel CRUD. It is of interest to compare the fuel CRUD samples collected by the two different CRUD sampling methods and to understand if HE-UFC crud sampling could be used to replace or supplement the fuel scrape method. This paper presents some preliminary results on isotopic compositions, elemental compositions, and phase compositions of fuel CRUD samples collected from similar fuel rods and assemblies by both methods during the 2012 refueling outage, one cycle after steam generator replacement at Ringhals Unit 4. The results show that the characteristics of fuel CRUD sampled by HE-UFC and fuel scrape, although not always identical, were similar or correlated to some extent in terms of weight ratios of Ni to Fe and Cr to Fe as well as specific activities of Co-58, Co-60 and Cr-51. However, due to the limited experience with the HE-UFC sampling method, more consideration is required if the statistical significance of the obtained data and indications are to be verified. (author)

  17. Administrative mechanics of research fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, Diane W.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation contains the discussion on the multitude of administrative mechanics that have to be meshed for the successful completion of a shipment of spent fuel, HEU or LEU in the research reactors fuel cycle. The costs associated with transportation may be the equivalent of 'a black hole', so an overview of cost factors is given. At the end one could find that this black hole factor in the budget is actually a bargain. The first step is the quotation phase. The cost variables in the quotation contain the cost of packaging i.e. containers; the complete routing of the packages and the materials. Factors that are of outmost importance are the routing restrictions and regulations, physical security regulations. All of this effort is just to provide a valid quotation not to accomplish the goal of completing a shipment. Public relations cannot be omitted either

  18. Administrative mechanics of research fuel transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Diane W [Edlow International Company, Washington, DC (United States)

    1983-09-01

    This presentation contains the discussion on the multitude of administrative mechanics that have to be meshed for the successful completion of a shipment of spent fuel, HEU or LEU in the research reactors fuel cycle. The costs associated with transportation may be the equivalent of 'a black hole', so an overview of cost factors is given. At the end one could find that this black hole factor in the budget is actually a bargain. The first step is the quotation phase. The cost variables in the quotation contain the cost of packaging i.e. containers; the complete routing of the packages and the materials. Factors that are of outmost importance are the routing restrictions and regulations, physical security regulations. All of this effort is just to provide a valid quotation not to accomplish the goal of completing a shipment. Public relations cannot be omitted either.

  19. Clinical Epidemiology Unit - overview of research areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical Epidemiology Unit (CEU) conducts etiologic research with potential clinical and public health applications, and leads studies evaluating population-based early detection and cancer prevention strategies

  20. Disassembling and rebuilding 900 MW unit fuel assemblies in Celimene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giquel, G.; Leseur, A.; Pillet, C.; Van Craeynest, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Celimene high activity laboratory, in the Nuclear Research Centre of Saclay, has equipment for and experience of disassembling and rebuilding fuel assemblies from 900 MW light water reactors. These operations have been performed for R and D purposes; they allow removal for investigation of some of the fuel rods and examination of the skeleton. The rebuilt assemblies are sent to the fuel reprocessing plant. Reirradiation of these assemblies has not been considered so far and would require modifications of the procedure and of parts of the new skeleton. Disassembling and rebuilding have already been performed on three assemblies and a fourth one will be rebuilt in the coming months [fr

  1. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  2. Status of spent fuel management in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear generating capacity in the UK is static with no units currently under construction following the completion of the Sizewell B PWR. The Government's reviews of nuclear energy policy and radioactive waste management policy have been published following a public consultation procedure, largely with an endorsement of current policies. Nuclear Electric plc (NE) and Scottish Nuclear Limited's (SNL) AGR and PWR stations are to be privatised as two subsidiaries of a holding company, and it is planned that the Magnox stations and their liabilities will be kept in the public sector, initially in a stand alone company but ultimately integrated with BNFL. Prompt reprocessing of all Magnox fuel will continue. NE and SNL have signed contracts for extensive reprocessing of AGR fuel. In addition, SNL has agreed contractual arrangements with BNFL for long term storage of its remaining overlife arisings of AGR fuel and has therefore on commercial ground opted not to dry store their fuel at the reactor site. NE have not yet made a decision on the fate of their AGR fuel not covered by existing reprocessing contracts. No option selection has taken place for PWR fuel. Following the closure of the Dounreay PFR and the withdrawal from the EFR project, the option of recycle of plutonium in fast reactors has been suspended. (author)

  3. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2014-04-17

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors. Therefore, the overriding motivation behind the FFC R&D program described in this plan is to foster closer integration between fuel design and fabrication to reduce programmatic risk. These motivating factors are all interrelated, and progress addressing one will aid understanding of the others. The FFC R&D needs fall into two principal categories, 1) baseline process optimization, to refine the existing fabrication technologies, and 2) manufacturing process alternatives, to evaluate new fabrication technologies that could provide improvements in quality, repeatability, material utilization, or cost. The FFC R&D Plan examines efforts currently under way in regard to coupon, foil, plate, and fuel element manufacturing, and provides recommendations for a number of R&D topics that are of high priority but not currently funded (i.e., knowledge gaps). The plan ties all FFC R&D efforts into a unified vision that supports the overall Convert Program schedule in general, and the fabrication schedule leading up to the MP-1 and FSP-1 irradiation experiments specifically. The fabrication technology decision gates and down-selection logic and schedules are tied to the schedule for fabricating the MP-1 fuel plates, which will provide the necessary data to make a final fuel fabrication process down-selection. Because of the short turnaround between MP-1 and the follow-on FSP-1 and MP-2 experiments, the suite of specimen types that will be available for MP-1 will be the same as those available for FSP-1 and MP-2. Therefore, the only opportunity to explore parameter space and alternative processing

  4. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle technology in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Arai, Yasuo; Akabori, Mitsuo; Tamaki, Yoshihisa; Itoh, Kunihiro

    2004-01-01

    The research on the nitride fuel was started for an advanced fuel, (U, Pn)N, for fast reactors, and the research activities have been expanded to minor actinide bearing nitride fuels. The fuel fabrication, property measurements, irradiation tests and pyrochemical process experiments have been made. In 2002 a five-year-program named PROMINENT was started for the development of nitride fuel cycle technology within the framework of the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technologies by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. In the research program PROMINENT, property measurements, pyrochemical process and irradiation experiments needed for nitride fuel cycle technology are being made. (author)

  5. Status of research reactor spent fuel world-wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.

    2004-01-01

    Results compiled in the research reactor spent fuel database are used to assess the status of research reactor spent fuel world-wide. Fuel assemblies, their types, enrichment, origin of enrichment and geological distribution among the industrialised and developed countries of the world are discussed. Fuel management practices in wet and dry storage facilities and the concerns of reactor operators about long-term storage of their spent fuel are presented and some of the activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency to address the issues associated with research reactor spent fuel are outlined. (author)

  6. MODELING OF THE FUNCTIONING UNITS OF FUEL SYSTEM OF GAS TURBINE ENGINE AIRCRAFT IN VIEW OF AVIATION FUEL QUALITY CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    I. I. Zavyalik; V. S. Oleshko; V. M. Samoylenko; E. V. Fetisov

    2016-01-01

    The article describes the developed modeling system in MATLAB Simulink which allows to simulate, explore and pre- dict the technical condition of the units of the aircraft gas turbine engine fuel system depending on aviation fuel quality changes.

  7. Performance Evaluation of Metallic Dispersion Fuel for Advanced Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Chae, Hee Taek; Song, Kee Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Uranium alloys with a high uranium density has been developed for high power research reactor fuel using low-enriched uranium (LEU). U-Mo alloys have been developed as candidate fuel material because of excellent irradiation behavior. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been investigated to develop high performance research reactor fuel as RERTR international research program. While plate-type and rod-type dispersion fuel elements are used for research reactors, HANARO uses rod-type dispersion fuel elements. PLATE code is developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the performance evaluation of plate-type dispersion fuel, but there is no counterpart for rod-type dispersion fuel. Especially, thermal conductivity of fuel meat decreases during the irradiation mainly because of interaction layer formation at the interface between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix. The thermal conductivity of the interaction layer is not as high as the Al matrix. The growth of interaction layer is interactively affected by the temperature of fuel because it is associated with a diffusion reaction which is a thermally activated process. It is difficult to estimate the temperature profile during irradiation test due to the interdependency of fuel temperature and thermal conductivity changed by interaction layer growth. In this study, fuel performance of rod-type U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of fuel meat.

  8. Performance Evaluation of Metallic Dispersion Fuel for Advanced Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Chae, Hee Taek; Song, Kee Chan; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2007-01-01

    Uranium alloys with a high uranium density has been developed for high power research reactor fuel using low-enriched uranium (LEU). U-Mo alloys have been developed as candidate fuel material because of excellent irradiation behavior. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been investigated to develop high performance research reactor fuel as RERTR international research program. While plate-type and rod-type dispersion fuel elements are used for research reactors, HANARO uses rod-type dispersion fuel elements. PLATE code is developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the performance evaluation of plate-type dispersion fuel, but there is no counterpart for rod-type dispersion fuel. Especially, thermal conductivity of fuel meat decreases during the irradiation mainly because of interaction layer formation at the interface between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix. The thermal conductivity of the interaction layer is not as high as the Al matrix. The growth of interaction layer is interactively affected by the temperature of fuel because it is associated with a diffusion reaction which is a thermally activated process. It is difficult to estimate the temperature profile during irradiation test due to the interdependency of fuel temperature and thermal conductivity changed by interaction layer growth. In this study, fuel performance of rod-type U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of fuel meat

  9. Handling of TRIGA spent fuel at the Medical University of Hanover and its return to the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Harke, Heinrich; Kelm, Wieland; Klaus, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The Medical University of Hannover (MHH) was taking part in the US Department of Energy's (DOE) 'Research Reactor Spent Fuel Acceptance Program' to return its 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements to the United States in the middle of 1999. The fuel elements have been moved to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho. This paper describes the technical facilities for handling the fuel elements at the MHH and the various steps in removing the fuel elements from the reactor, transferring them to the transport cask and shipping them to the INEEL. (authors)

  10. Shifting to non-explosive fuels for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilinsky, Victor

    1984-01-01

    The RERTR program is not just an American program, it is an international program and it can succeed only with wide support and participation. Excellent work underway at research laboratories in several countries is making a vital contribution. The cooperative spirit shown by all participants is particularly gratifying. Some practical difficulties may be encountered with the safety regulatory agencies in different countries when modifying the reactors. The US NRC intends to demonstrate that conversion to low enriched fuel is not a difficult process by taking steps to enable domestic reactors operating in the United States to convert to low enriched fuels. A proposed regulation is being prepared limiting the use of highly enriched uranium in domestic reactors. In this connection, The US NRC will be prepared tp cooperate with reactor operators from other countries in the safety area as it relates to the conversion process

  11. Development of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) automotive auxiliary power unit (APU) fueled by gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMinco, C.; Mukerjee, S.; Grieve, J.; Faville, M.; Noetzel, J.; Perry, M.; Horvath, A.; Prediger, D.; Pastula, M.; Boersma, R.; Ghosh, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the development progress of a 3 to 5 auxiliary power unit (APU) based on a gasoline fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This fuel cell was supplied reformate gas (reactant) by a partial oxidation (POx) catalytic reformer utilizing liquid gasoline and designed by Delphi Automotive Systems. This reformate gas consists mainly of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and nitrogen and was fed directly in to the SOFC stack without any additional fuel reformer processing. The SOFC stack was developed by Global Thermoelectric and operates around 700 o C. This automotive APU produces power to support future 42 volt vehicle electrical architectures and loads. The balance of the APU, designed by Delphi Automotive Systems, employs a packaging and insulation design to facilitate installation and operation on-board automobiles. (author)

  12. Fuels and Combustion | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuels and Combustion Fuels and Combustion This is the March 2015 issue of the Transportation and , combustion strategy, and engine design hold the potential to maximize vehicle energy efficiency and performance of low-carbon fuels in internal combustion engines with a whole-systems approach to fuel chemistry

  13. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell mini power unit for portable application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbani, F.; Squadrito, G.; Barbera, O.; Giacoppo, G.; Passalacqua, E. [CNR-ITAE, via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse n. 5, 98126 S. Lucia, Messina (Italy); Zerbinati, O. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Dip. di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita, via Bellini 25/g, 15100 Alessandria (Italy)

    2007-06-20

    This paper describes the design, realisation and test of a power unit based on a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, operating at room temperature, for portable application. The device is composed of an home made air breathing fuel cell stack, a metal hydride tank for H{sub 2} supply, a dc-dc converter for power output control and a fan for stack cooling. The stack is composed by 10 cells with an active surface of 25 cm{sup 2} and produces a rated power of 15 W at 6 V and 2 A. The stack successfully runs with end-off fed hydrogen without appreciable performance degradation during the time. The final assembled system is able to generate 12 W at 9.5 V, and power a portable DVD player for 3 h in continuous. The power unit has collected about 100 h of operation without maintenance. (author)

  14. Experience on wet storage spent fuel sipping at IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    The IEA-R1 research reactor of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) is a pool type reactor of B and W design, that has been operating since 1957 at a power of 2 MW. Irradiated (spent) fuels have been stored at the facility during the various years of operation. At present there are 40 spent fuel assemblies at dry storage, 79 spent fuel assemblies at wet storage and 30 fuel assemblies in the core. The oldest fuels are of United States origin, made with U-Al alloy, both of LEU and HEU MTR fuel type. Many of these fuel assemblies have corrosion pits along their lateral fuel plates. These pits originate by galvanic corrosion between the fuel plate and the stainless steel storage racks. As a consequence of the possibility of sending the irradiated old fuels back the U.S.A., sipping tests were performed with the spent fuel assemblies. The reason for this was to evaluate their 137 Cs leaking rate, if any. This work describes the procedure and methodology used to perform the sipping tests with the fuel assemblies at the storage pool, and presents the results obtained for the 137 Cs sipping water activity for each fuel assembly. A correlation is made between the corrosion pits and the activity values measured. A 137 Cs leaking rate is determined and compared to the criteria established for canning spent fuel assemblies before shipment

  15. Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K.; Braff, William

    2009-01-01

    In a substantial improvement over present alkaline systems, an advanced hybrid bipolar plate for a unitized fuel cell/electrolyzer has been developed. This design, which operates on pure feed streams (H2/O2 and water, respectively) consists of a porous metallic foil filled with a polymer that has very high water transport properties. Combined with a second metallic plate, the pore-filled metallic plates form a bipolar plate with an empty cavity in the center.

  16. Overview of remote technologies applied to research reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerdoegh, M.; Takats, F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of the remote technologies applied to research reactor fuels. Due to many reasons, the remote technology utilization to research reactor fuel is not so widespread as it is for power reactor fuels, however, the advantages of the application of such techniques are obvious. (author)

  17. Spent fuel pool cooling system upgrade for Kori Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Park, Jong; In Shin, Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Following Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, the needs for reliable performance of its own safety functions of Spent Fuel Pool Cooling System (SFPCS) has risen significantly to maintain the plant in a safe condition. Regulatory Guide 1.13 of United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the SFPCS shall be designed safety related as Quality Group C and Seismic Category 1. However, the existing Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) of KORI Unit 1 was not designed as a safety system. In order to comply with the above licensing requirement for the extended operational life of KORI Unit 1, it has been decided to add a safety related Seismic Category 1 Makeup System to KORI Unit 1 and the existing SFPCS to be modified in dedicated channels with safety related equipment to enhance system's reliability as a means of providing diversity. This paper focuses on describing the relevant design requirements, applications, and supplemental facilities to the SFPCS of KORI Unit 1. (authors)

  18. The United Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, D.

    1978-01-01

    The UNRI, the only common institute of the socialist countries was founded in 1956 in Dubna. The scientists of small countries have the opportunity to take part in fundamental research with very expensive devices which are usually not available for them. There are six research laboratories and one department in the UNRI namely: the theoretical physical laboratory; the laboratory of high energies - there is a synchrophasotron of 1a GeV there; the laboratory of nuclear problems - there is a synchrocyclotron of 680 MeV there; the laboratory of nuclear reactions with the cyclotron U-300 which can accelerate heavy ions; the neutronphysical laboratory with the impulse reactor IBM-30; the laboratory of computation and automatization with two big computers; the department of new acceleration methods. The main results obtained by Hungarian scientist in Dubna are described. (V.N.)

  19. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on aesthetics and fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Ryan

    2005-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on research addressing aesthetic considerations of fuels management. A general finding is that fuels management activities can contribute to the visual quality of a landscape. Topics covered in the synthesis include research findings on...

  20. Management and storage of spent fuel from CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, F.

    1996-01-01

    CEA research reactors and their interim spent fuel storage facilities are described. Long-term solutions for spent fuel storage problems, involving wet storage at PEGASE or dry storage at CASCAD, are outlined in some detail. (author)

  1. Status of reactor shielding research in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartine, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Shielding research in the United States continues to place emphasis on: (1) the development and refinement of shielding design calculational methods and nuclear data; and (2) the performance of confirmation experiments, both to evaluate specific design concepts and to verify specific calculational techniques and input data. The successful prediction of the radiation levels observed within the now-operating Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has demonstrated the validity of this two-pronged approach, which has since been applied to US fast breeder reactor programs and is now being used to determine radiation levels and possible further shielding needs at operating light water reactors, especially under accident conditions. A similar approach is being applied to the back end of the fission fuel cycle to verify that radiation doses at fuel element storage and transportation facilities and within fuel reprocessing plants are kept at acceptable levels without undue economic penalties

  2. A computerised automatic pellet inspection unit for FBTR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, M.S.; Mahule, K.N.; Ghosh, J.K.; Venkatesh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Physical inspection and certification of nuclear reactor fuel element components is an activity demanding utmost imagination and skill in devising accurate measuring systems. There is also need for remote handling, automation, rapid processing and inspection data print out when dealing with reactor fuel material. This report deals with an automatic computerised fuel pellet inspection system that has been developed in Radiometallurgy Division, B.A.R.C. to carry out dimensional and weight measurements on fuel pellets for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam near Madras. The system consists of several subsystems each developed especially for a specific purpose and as such items are not available off the shelf from manufacturers in India. If a general approach is adopted towards the report, there are many innovations and ideas that can be used in the automatic inspection of a variety of products in industry. As the system is fairly involved the report does not attempt to deal with detailed description of the equipment. The function of the system is to accept a certain quantity of fuel pellets in a bowl feeder, separate the pellets rejected owing to their exceeding dimensional and weight limits and form columns of accepted pellets. Dimensional and weight limits can be set as required and all inspection data are presented in a printed format. The system processes pellets at the rate of 15 per minute. The entire system can be run by operators with no special skills. The unit is currently in use for the inspection of mixed carbide fuel pellets for FBTR. (author)

  3. The use of medium enriched uranium fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation described in the present paper concerns the use of medium enriched uranium fuel for our research reactors. The underlying assumptions set up for the evaluation are as follows: (1) At first, the use of alternative fuel should not affect, even to a small extent, research and development programs in nuclear energy utilization, which were described in the previous paper. Hence the use of lower enrichment fuel should not cause any reduction in reactor performances. (2) The fuel cycle cost for operating research reactors with alternative fuel, excepting R and D cost for such fuel, should not increase beyond an acceptable limit. (3) The use of alternative fuel should be satisfactory with respect to non-proliferation purposes, to the almost same degree as the use of 20% enriched uranium fuel

  4. MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

  5. High Burnup Fuel Performance and Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Je Keun; Lee, Chan Bok; Kim, Dae Ho (and others)

    2007-03-15

    The worldwide trend of nuclear fuel development is to develop a high burnup and high performance nuclear fuel with high economies and safety. Because the fuel performance evaluation code, INFRA, has a patent, and the superiority for prediction of fuel performance was proven through the IAEA CRP FUMEX-II program, the INFRA code can be utilized with commercial purpose in the industry. The INFRA code was provided and utilized usefully in the universities and relevant institutes domesticallly and it has been used as a reference code in the industry for the development of the intrinsic fuel rod design code.

  6. Uncertainty analysis of light water reactor unit fuel pin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamerow, S.; Ivanov, K., E-mail: sln107@PSU.EDU, E-mail: kni1@PSU.EDU [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States); Moreno, C. Arenas, E-mail: cristina.arenas@UPC.EDU [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    The study explored the calculation of uncertainty based on available covariance data and computational tools. Uncertainty due to temperature changes and different fuel compositions are the main focus of this analysis. Selected unit fuel pin cells were analyzed according to the OECD LWR UAM benchmark specifications. Criticality and uncertainty analyses were performed using TSUNAMI-1D sequence in SCALE 6.0. It was found that uncertainties increase with increasing temperature while k{sub eff} decreases. This increase in the uncertainty is due to the increase in sensitivity of the largest contributor of uncertainty, namely nuclide reaction {sup 238}U (n, gamma). The sensitivity grew larger as the capture cross-section of {sup 238}U expanded due to Doppler broadening. In addition, three different compositions (UOx, MOx, and UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) of fuel cells were analyzed. It showed a remarkable increase in uncertainty in k{sub eff} for the case of the MOx fuel cell and UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuel cell. The increase in the uncertainty of k{sub eff} in UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuel was nearly twice of that in MOx fuel and almost four times the amount in UOx fuel. The components of the uncertainties in k{sub eff} in each case were examined and it was found that the neutron-nuclide reaction of {sup 238}U, mainly (n,n'), contributed the most to the uncertainties in the cases of MOx and UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At higher energy, the covariance coefficient matrix of {sup 238}U (n,n') to {sup 238}U (n,n') and {sup 238}U (n,n') cross-section showed very large values. Further, examination of the UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} case found that the {sup 238}U (n,n') became the dominant contributor to the uncertainty because most of the thermal neutrons in the cell were absorbed by Gadolinium in UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} case and thus shifting the neutron spectrum to higher energy. For the MOx case on other hand, {sup 239}Pu has a very strong absorption cross-section at low energy

  7. The risks of the Taiwan research reactor spent fuel project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The proposed action is to transport up to 118 spent fuel rods, to include canned spent fuel rod particulates immobilized on filters, from a research reactor in Taiwan by sea to Hampton Roads, Virginia, and then overland by truck to the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels at the Savannah River Site (SRS). At SRS, the spent fuel will be reprocessed to recover uranium and plutonium. 55 refs., 8 tabs

  8. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM UNITED STATES COAST GUARD AIR STATION CAPE COD BOURNE, MASSACHUSETTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John K. Steckel Jr

    2004-06-30

    This report covers the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant, installed by PPL Spectrum, Inc. (PPL) under contract with the United States Coast Guard (USCG), Research and Development Center (RDC). The fuel cell was installed at Air Station Cape Cod in Bourne, MA. The project had the support of the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative (MTC), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Keyspan Energy. PPL selected FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) and its fuel cell model DFC{reg_sign}300 for the contract. Grant contributions were finalized and a contract between PPL and the USCG for the manufacture, installation, and first year's maintenance of the fuel cell was executed on September 24, 2001. As the prime contractor, PPL was responsible for all facets of the project. All the work was completed by PPL through various subcontracts, including the primary subcontract with FCE for the manufacture, delivery, and installation of the fuel cell. The manufacturing and design phases proceeded in a relatively timely manner for the first half of the project. However, during latter stages of manufacture and fuel cell testing, a variety of issues were encountered that ultimately resulted in several delivery delays, and a number of contract modifications. Final installation and field testing was completed in April and May 2003. Final acceptance of the fuel cell was completed on May 16, 2003. The fuel cell has operated successfully for more than one year. The unit achieved an availability rate of 96%, which exceeded expectations. The capacity factor was limited because the unit was set at 155 kW (versus a nameplate of 250 kW) due to the interconnection with the electric utility. There were 18 shutdowns during the first year and most were brief. The ability of this plant to operate in the island mode improved availability by 3 to 4%. Events that would normally be shutdowns were simply island mode events. The mean time between failure was calculated at 239 hours, or slightly

  9. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. A report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide members of the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells with information regarding collaborative opportunities in the United States. The report is designed to provide an overview of key issues and activities and to provide guidance on strategies for finding U.S. research and commercial partners and gaining access to the U.S. market. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the key drivers of policy at the federal and state government levels regarding hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and provides a perspective of the U.S. industry and key players. It also suggests three general pathways for accessing U.S. opportunities: enhancing visibility; developing vendor relationships; and establishing a formal presence in the U.S. The next sections summarize focus areas for commercial and research activity that currently are of the greatest interest in the U.S. Section 2 describes major programs within the federal government and national laboratories, and discusses various methods for identifying R and D funding opportunities, with an overview of federal acquisition regulations. Section 3 reviews the efforts of several state governments engaging the fuel cell industry as an economic driver and presents an overview of acquisition at the state level. Section 4 discusses university research and development (R and D) and university-industry partnerships. There are 12 appendices attached to the report. These appendices provide more detailed information regarding the key federal government agencies involved in fuel cells and hydrogen, state-specific policies and activities, national laboratories and universities, and other information regarding the fuel cell and hydrogen industry in the U.S. (Author)

  10. Status of the DOE's foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacey, K.; Saris, E.C.

    1997-01-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the U.S. Department of State (DOS), adopted a policy to accept and manage in the United States ∼20 tonnes of spent nuclear fuel from research reactors in up to 41 countries. This spent fuel is being accepted under the nuclear weapons non-proliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Only spent fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States is covered under this policy. Implementing this policy is a top priority of the DOE. The purpose of this paper is to provide the current status of the foreign research reactor acceptance program, including achievements to date and future challenges

  11. Research on bioorganic fuels as power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, Markku J.; Spets, Jukka-Pekka [Aalto University, Department of Energy Technology-TKK, Applied Thermodynamics, PO Box 4400, FI-02201 TKK (Finland); Kiros, Yohannes [Royal Institute of Technology-KTH, Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, S100-44 Stockholm (Sweden); Anttila, Tomi [Oy Hydrocell Ltd, Minkkikatu 1-3, 04430 Jaervenpaeae (Finland)

    2010-11-15

    This paper deals with the kind of the bioorganic fuel cells that are equipped with or without ion exchange membranes. The bioorganic materials of interest are alcohols (methanol, ethanol) and glucose, which are obtained from renewable energy sources such as biomass. The operation temperatures of the direct fuel cells cover from room temperature up to 150 C. The direct bioorganic fuel cells belong to the subject area of 'Advanced fuel cells' of the Working group 4 in the EU COST Action 543 among the collaborating Universities and Institutes. Bioorganic fuel cells are suitable for application in small portable power sources, such as backups, battery chargers and in electronic devices. A number of current and earlier works are summarised and advances are highlighted in this area with special emphasis on glucose as a fuel. (author)

  12. Research at the Dairy and Functional Foods Research Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Peggy Tomasula is Research Leader of the Dairy and Functional Foods Research Unit (DFFRU), ARS, USDA, Wyndmoor, PA, a group that includes 11 Research Scientists, 4 of whom are Lead Scientists (LS), 13 support scientists, and 3 Retired Collaborators. The mission of the DFFRU is to solve critical ...

  13. Complete Flow Blockage of a Fuel Channel for Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Park, Suki

    2015-01-01

    The CHF correlation suitable for narrow rectangular channels are implemented in RELAP5/MOD3.3 code for the analyses, and the behavior of fuel temperatures and MCHFR(minimum critical heat flux ratio) are compared between the original and modified codes. The complete flow blockage of fuel channel for research reactor is analyzed using original and modified RELAP5/MOD3.3 and the results are compared each other. The Sudo-Kaminaga CHF correlation is implemented into RELAP5/MOD3.3 for analyzing the behavior of fuel adjacent to the blocked channel. A flow blockage of fuel channels can be postulated by a foreign object blocking cooling channels of fuels. Since a research reactor with plate type fuel has isolated fuel channels, a complete flow blockage of one fuel channel can cause a failure of adjacent fuel plates by the loss of cooling capability. Although research reactor systems are designed to prevent foreign materials from entering into the core, partial flow blockage accidents and following fuel failures are reported in some old research reactors. In this report, an analysis of complete flow blockage accident is presented for a 15MW pool-type research reactor with plate type fuels. The fuel surface experience different heat transfer regime in the results from original and modified RELAP5/MOD3.3. By the discrepancy in heat transfer mode of two cases, a fuel melting is expected by the modified RELAP5/MOD3.3, whereas the fuel integrity is ensured by the original code

  14. Management and storage of spent research reactor fuel within the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krull, W.

    1996-01-01

    Research reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany and their needs for the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel are described. Existing long-term interim storage facilities are described. Special licensing and legal restrictions imposed by the German Atomic Energy Act are outlined. Possible final solutions for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle for research reactors, including reprocessing in the United Kingdom or France, return of US-origin fuel and a home-grown German solution are discussed. (author). 2 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  15. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, D.

    1982-12-01

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO 2 rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H 3 Si-Al dispersion and UO 2 caramel plate fuels

  16. Back-end of the research reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, Gehard J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper outlines the status of topics and issues related to: (1) Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Return to the U.S., including policy, shipments and ports of entry, management sites, fees, storage technologies, contracts, actual shipment, and legal process, (2) UKAEA: MTR Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing, (3) COGEMA: MTR Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing, and (4) Intermediate Storage + Direct Disposal for Research Reactors. (author)

  17. New fuels for proliferation-safe research reactors. SCK-CEN a kingpin in international research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berghe, S.

    2011-01-01

    A number of research reactors in the world, including BR2, are still working on highly enriched proliferation sensitive nuclear fuel. Extremely high-density fuel is required to make possible the switch to low-enriched fuel without loss of effectiveness. In the past few years, SCK-CEN has developed into the global test station for new, low-enriched fuels.

  18. Automated assembling of single fuel cell units for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Muminovic, A.; Barz, C.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    The manufacturing of PEMFC stacks (POLYMER ELEKTROLYT MEMBRAN Fuel Cell) is nowadays still done by hand. Over hundreds of identical single components have to be placed accurate together for the construction of a fuel cell stack. Beside logistic problems, higher total costs and disadvantages in weight the high number of components produce a higher statistic interference because of faulty erection or material defects and summation of manufacturing tolerances. The saving of costs is about 20 - 25 %. Furthermore, the total weight of the fuel cells will be reduced because of a new sealing technology. Overall a one minute cycle time has to be aimed per cell at the manufacturing of these single components. The change of the existing sealing concept to a bonded sealing is one of the important requisites to get an automated manufacturing of single cell units. One of the important steps for an automated gluing process is the checking of the glue application by using of an image processing system. After bonding the single fuel cell the sealing and electrical function can be checked, so that only functional and high qualitative cells can get into further manufacturing processes.

  19. Etude Climat no. 41 'Combating fuel poverty: policies in France and the United Kingdom'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyszler, Johan; Bordier, Cecile; Leseur, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Climate Reports' offer in-depth analyses on a given subject. This issue addresses the following points: The National Debate on Energy Transition in France highlighted issues relating to the social acceptability of the measures in question, and especially the inclusion of fuel poverty. However, the wide range of determining factors for fuel poverty (high energy prices, poor living conditions, and limited financial resources) make it hard to characterise the households involved. Several indicators are available although the defining criterion that is currently used, even though it is disputed, is the allocation of at least 10% of a household's income to expenditure on fuel: in this case, 3.8 million households would be concerned in France, and 4.7 million in the United Kingdom

  20. Storage experience in Hungary with fuel from research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, J.; Hargitai, T.

    1996-01-01

    In Hungary several critical assemblies, a training reactor and a research reactor have been in operation. The fuel used in the research and training reactors are of Soviet origin. Though spent fuel storage experience is fairly good, medium and long term storage solutions are needed. (author)

  1. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program 2015 Research Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Charles W. McHugh; Colin C. Hardy

    2016-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support...

  2. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Program: 2014 Research Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Robin J. Innes; Colin C. Hardy; Kristine M. Lee

    2015-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support staff in FFS...

  3. Status of biomass fuels technologies research in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, R.P.; Parker, S.; Glenn, B.

    1984-07-01

    Biomass is a tremendous potential source of fuel and chemical feedstocks. The US Department of Energy has sponsored a broad spectrum of research on biomass at various US government laboratories, private installations, and universities. The status of biomass fuels technologies research in the US is discussed.

  4. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program: 2013 Research accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Robin J. Innes; Colin C. Hardy; Kristine M. Lee

    2014-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support staff in...

  5. Kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The effects of using different low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density, on the kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Simulations were carried out to calculate prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed-neutron fraction, core excess reactivity and neutron flux spectrum. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were used to carry out these calculations. It was observed that both the silicide fuels had the same prompt neutron generation time 0.02% more than that of the original aluminide fuel, while the oxide fuel had a prompt neutron generation time 0.05% less than that of the original aluminide fuel. The effective delayed-neutron fraction decreased for all the fuels; the decrease was maximum at 0.06% for U 3 Si 2 -Al followed by 0.03% for U 3 Si-Al, and 0.01% for U 3 O 8 -Al fuel. The U 3 O 8 -Al fueled reactor gave the maximum ρ excess at BOL which was 21.67% more than the original fuel followed by U 3 Si-Al which was 2.55% more, while that of U 3 Si 2 -Al was 2.50% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The neutron flux of all the fuels was more thermalized, than in the original fuel, in the active fuel region of the core. The thermalization was maximum for U 3 O 8 -Al followed by U 3 Si-Al and then U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel.

  6. Researches of WWER fuel rods behaviour under RIA accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechaeva, O.; Medvedev, A.; Novikov, V.; Salatov, A.

    2003-01-01

    Unirradiated fuel rod and refabricated fuel rod tests in the BIGR as well as acceptance criteria proving absence of fragmentation and the settlement modeling of refabricated fuel rods thermomechanical behavior in the BIGR-tests using RAPTA-5 code are discussed in this paper. The behaviour of WWER type simulators with E110 and E635 cladding was researched at the BIGR reactor under power pulse conditions simulating reactivity initiated accident. The results of the tests in four variants of experimental conditions are submitted. The behaviour of 12 WWER type refabricated fuel rods was researched in the BIGR reactor under power pulse conditions simulating reactivity initiated accident: burnup 48 and 60 MWd/kgU, pulse width 3 ms, peak fuel enthalpy 115-190 cal/g. The program of future tests in the research reactor MIR with high burnup fuel rod (up to 70 MWd/kgU) under conditions simulating design RIA in WWER-1000 is presented

  7. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Fuel Cell Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Fuel cell research focused on proton exchange membranes (PEM), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Specific technologies included aircraft fuel cell reformers, new and improved electrodes, electrolytes, interconnect, and seals, modeling of fuel cells including CFD coupled with impedance spectroscopy. Research was conducted on new materials and designs for fuel cells, along with using embedded sensors with power management electronics to improve the power density delivered by fuel cells. Fuel cell applications considered were in-space operations, aviation, and ground-based fuel cells such as; powering auxiliary power units (APUs) in aircraft; high power density, long duration power supplies for interplanetary missions (space science probes and planetary rovers); regenerative capabilities for high altitude aircraft; and power supplies for reusable launch vehicles.

  8. FTA fuel cell bus program : research accomplishments through 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Prepared by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Office of Research, Demonstration, and Innovation (TRI), this report summarizes the accomplishments of fuel-cell-transit-bus-related research and demonstrations projects supported by FTA through 20...

  9. Electrocatalysis research for fuel cells and hydrogen production

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, MK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR undertakes research in the Electrocatalysis of fuel cells and for hydrogen production. The Hydrogen South Africa (HySA) strategy supports research on electrocatalysts due to their importance to the national beneficiation strategy. The work...

  10. Research and Test Reactor Fuel Elements (RTRFE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, Brett W.; Marinak, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    BWX Technologies Inc. (BWXT) has experienced several production improvements over the past year. The homogeneity yields in 4.8 gU/cc U 3 Si 2 plates have increased over last year's already high yields. Through teamwork and innovative manufacturing techniques, maintaining high quality surface finishes on plates and elements is becoming easier and less expensive. Currently, BWXT is designing a fabrication development plan to reach a fuel loading of 9 gU/cc within 2 - 4 years. This development will involve a step approach requested by ANL to produce plates using U-8Mo at a loading of 6 gU/cc first and qualify the fuel at those levels. In achieving the goal of a very high-density fuel loading of 9 gU/cc, BWXT is considering employing several new, state of the art, ultrasonic testing techniques for fuel core evaluation. (author)

  11. Experimental research of fuel element reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cech, B.; Novak, J.; Chamrad, B.

    1980-01-01

    The rate and extent of the damage of the can integrity for fission products is the basic criterion of reliability. The extent of damage is measurable by the fission product leakage into the reactor coolant circuit. An analysis is made of the causes of the fuel element can damage and a model is proposed for testing fuel element reliability. Special experiments should be carried out to assess partial processes, such as heat transfer and fuel element surface temperature, fission gas liberation and pressure changes inside the element, corrosion weakening of the can wall, can deformation as a result of mechanical interactions. The irradiation probe for reliability testing of fuel elements is described. (M.S.)

  12. BNFL's experience in the sea transport of irradiated research reactor fuel to the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, I.A.; Porter, I.

    2000-01-01

    BNFL provides worldwide transport for a wide range of nuclear materials. BNFL Transport manages an unique fleet of vessels, designed, built, and operated to the highest safety standards, including the highest rating within the INF Code recommended by the International Maritime Organisation. The company has some 20 years of experience of transporting irradiated research reactor fuel in support of the United States' programme for returning US obligated fuel from around the world. Between 1977 and 1988 BNFL performed 11 shipments of irradiated research reactor fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the US. Since 1997, a further 3 shipments have been performed as part of an ongoing programme for Japanese research reactor operators. Where possible, shipments of fuel from European countries such as Sweden and Spain have been combined with those from Japan for delivery to the US. (author)

  13. Logistics of the research reactor fuel cycle: AREVA solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohayon, David; Halle, Laurent; Naigeon, Philippe; Falgoux, Jean-Louis; Franck Obadia, Franck; Auziere, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The AREVA Group Companies offer comprehensive solutions for the entire fuel cycle of Research Reactors comply with IAEA standards. CERCA and Cogema Logistics have developed a full partnership in the front end cycle. In the field of uranium CERCA and Cogema Logistics have the long term experience of the shipment from Russia, USA to the CERCA plant.. Since 1960, CERCA has manufactured over 300,000 fuel plates and 15,000 fuel elements of more than 70 designs. These fuel elements have been delivered to 40 research reactors in 20 countries. For the Back-End stage, Cogema and Cogema Logistics propose customised solutions and services for international shipments. Cogema Logistics has developed a new generation of packaging to meet the various needs and requirements of the Laboratories and Research Reactors all over the world, and complex regulatory framework. Comprehensive assistance dedicated, services, technical studies, packaging and transport systems are provided by AREVA for every step of research reactor fuel cycle. (author)

  14. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Steven Van; Koonen, Edgar; Berghe, Sven van den [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  15. Fuel assembly leakage, unit 4, cycle 22, Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szecsenyi, C.; Burjan, T.; Torma, B.; Bona, G.

    2009-01-01

    At the beginning of Cycle 22, Unit 4, Paks NPP the Iodine isotopes activity concentrations raised irregularly in the water of the primary circuit. Analysis supposed that from 1 to 10 fuel rods in one or more newly loaded follower assemblies had lost their integrity. Due to the fact it was not necessary to shut down the reactor, but at the end of the cycle sipping tests were performed for the entire core to find out the facts using a telescope sipping device supplied by H and B Co., Germany. This paper describes the circumstances of the emergence of the problem, the operational inspection and limitation rules in Paks NPP, the theoretical analysis to estimate the scope and kind of the problem, the sipping device and the measurement/evaluation methods applied for the practical tests, fulfilment the tests, the results and their evaluation and the conclusions regarding the event. (Authors)

  16. Fuel assembly leakage, Unit 4, Cycle 22, Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szecsenyi, Z.; Burjan, T.; Torma, B.; Bona, G.

    2009-01-01

    At the beginning of Cycle 22, Unit 4, Paks NPP the Iodine isotopes activity concentrations raised irregularly in the water of the primary circuit. Analysis supposed that from 1 to 10 fuel rods in one or more newly loaded follower assemblies had lost their integrity. Due to the fact it was not necessary to shut down the reactor, but at the end of the cycle sipping tests were performed for the entire core to find out the facts using a telescope sipping device supplied by H and B Co., Germany. This paper describes the circumstances of the emergence of the problem, the operational inspection and limitation rules in the Paks NPP, the theoretical analysis to estimate the scope and kind of the problem, the sipping device and the measurement/evaluation methods applied for the practical tests, fulfilment the tests, the results and their evaluation and the conclusions regarding the event. (authors)

  17. Validation concerns for dry storage of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trumble, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Department of Energy have accelerated the need for storage options to support the return of foreign research reactor (FRR) fuel to the United States. Many of these returns consist of fuel types which contain highly enriched uranium and are aluminum clad. These attributes present many challenges not experienced in the fuel storage designs for commercial nuclear fuels where the fuels have lower enrichment and the cladding is more robust. Historically, returned FRR fuel has been stored for short periods in basins where it is cooled and then sent to be reprocessed. However, a severe lack of basin space and questionable availability of reprocessing facilities necessitates the development of other proposals. One proposed option is to store the FRR fuel in a dry state, thus reducing the corrosion problems associated with aluminum cladding. A drawback to this type of storage, however, is the lack of experimental data for this type of fuel under dry storage conditions. This lack of data has led to recent discussions over the accuracy of some of the current multigroup cross section libraries when applied to dry, fast systems of uranium and aluminum. This concern is evaluated for the specific case of Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel (MTR is >60% of FRR fuel), a review of applicable experiments is presented and a new experiment is proposed

  18. Cost aspects of the research reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Research reactors have made valuable contributions to the development of nuclear power, basic science, materials development, radioisotope production for medicine and industry, and education and training. In doing so, they have provided an invaluable service to humanity. Research reactors are expected to make important contributions in the coming decades to further development of the peaceful uses of nuclear technology, in particular for advanced nuclear fission reactors and fuel cycles, fusion, high energy physics, basic research, materials science, nuclear medicine, and biological sciences. However, in the context of decreased public sector support, research reactors are increasingly faced with financial constraints. It is therefore of great importance that their operations are based on a sound understanding of the costs of the complete research reactor fuel cycle, and that they are managed according to sound financial and economic principles. This publication is targeted at individuals and organizations involved with research reactor operations, with the aim of providing both information and an analytical framework for assessing and determining the cost structure of fuel cycle related activities. Efficient management of fuel cycle expenditures is an important component in developing strategies for sustainable future operation of a research reactor. The elements of the fuel cycle are presented with a description of how they can affect the cost efficient operation of a research reactor. A systematic review of fuel cycle choices is particularly important when a new reactor is being planned or when an existing reactor is facing major changes in its fuel cycle structure, for example because of conversion of the core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, or the changes in spent fuel management provision. Review and optimization of fuel cycle issues is also recommended for existing research reactors, even in cases where research reactor

  19. Research on burning of biomass fuels, KTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagstroem, U.; Zoukatas, N.; Kutscher, E.; Megas, L.

    1983-05-01

    The three main principles of combustion, namely burning over the fuel bed, under the bed, and the inverted flame have been investigated. Combustion under the fuel bed rendered the lowest emission of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, benzopyrene, particulates and tar. Emission is also reduced by preheating the primary incoming air. Burning of pine gives variable emissions whereas birch tree and lying log gives satisfactory combustion. High flame intensity and Reynolds number of the flame zone in the interval 5 to 8 x 10/sup 3/ also give low emission. A conventional wood burner with its flame over the fuel bed and with a water cooled combustion chamber produces 100 times more carbon monoxide than an advanced construction.

  20. Growing dimensions. Spent fuel management at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.

    1998-01-01

    More than 550 nuclear research reactors are operating or shout down around the world. At many of these reactors, spent fuel from their operations is stored, pending decisions on its final disposition. In recent years, problems associated with this spent fuel storage have loomed larger in the international nuclear community. In efforts to determine the overall scope of problems and to develop a database on the subject, the IAEA has surveyed research reactor operators in its Member States. Information for the Research Reactor Spent Fuel Database (RRSFDB) so far has been obtained from a limited but representative number of research reactors. It supplements data already on hand in the Agency's more established Research Reactor Database (RRDB). Drawing upon these database resources, this article presents an overall picture of spent fuel management and storage at the world's research reactors, in the context of associated national and international programmes in the field

  1. Results of fuel elements fabrication on the basis of increased concentration dioxide fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, A.B.; Afanasiev, V.L.; Enin, A.A.; Suprun, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    According to the Russian Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, that were constructed under the Russian projects, at the Novosibirsk Chemical Concentrates Plant the pilot series of different configuration (WR-M2, MR, IRT-4M) fuel elements, based on increased concentration uranium dioxide fuel, have been fabricated for reactor tests. Comprehensive fabricated fuel elements quality estimation has been carried out. (author)

  2. An integrated approach for investigation of failed nuclear fuel used at NPP Cernavoda Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuturici, I.L.; Parvan, M.; Popov, M.; Dobrin, R.; Staicu, C.

    1996-01-01

    At NPP Cernavoda-Unit 1 the fuel surveillance and the defect detection system in operation are based on monitoring the coolant activity concentration and on measuring the flux of delayed neutrons emitted by some short-lived fission products. In order to identify the failed fuel underwater non-destructive examination has to be performed. The major interest for the availability of underwater examination consists in the necessity of a speedy acquisition of the data on failed fuel in operation and of appropriate follow-up actions to be taken. Often the identification operation will be followed by more detailed examinations on selected fuel rods in the hot cells of the Post-irradiation Examination Laboratory of the Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti. Transfer of selected fuel rods will be done by the use of a type B(U) road transportation cask. Such an integrated approach will help to keep the level of activity concentration of the primary circuit well below the authorized limits. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs

  3. MODELING OF THE FUNCTIONING UNITS OF FUEL SYSTEM OF GAS TURBINE ENGINE AIRCRAFT IN VIEW OF AVIATION FUEL QUALITY CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Zavyalik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the developed modeling system in MATLAB Simulink which allows to simulate, explore and pre- dict the technical condition of the units of the aircraft gas turbine engine fuel system depending on aviation fuel quality changes.

  4. Research and development of FBR fuel reprocessing in PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, T.

    1976-05-01

    The research program of the PNC for FBR fuel reprocessing in Japan is discussed. The general characteristics of FBR fuel reprocessing are pointed out and a comparison with LWR fuel is made. The R and D program is based on reprocessing using the aqueous Purex process. So far, some preliminary steps of the research program have been carried out, these include solvent extraction test, off-gas treatment test, voloxidation process study, solidification test of high-level liquid waste, and study of the dissolution behaviour of irradiated mixed oxide fuel. By the end of the 1980s, a pilot plant for FBR fuel reprocessing will be completed. For the design of the pilot plant, further research will be carried out in the following fields: head-end techniques; voloxidation process; dissolution and extraction techniques; waste treatment techniques. A time schedule for the different steps of the program is included

  5. Conversion of research reactors to low-enrichment uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    There are at present approximately 350 research reactors in 52 countries ranging in power from less than 1 watt to 100 Megawatt and over. In the 1970's, many people became concerned about the possibility that some fuels and fuel cycles could provide an easy route to the acquisition of nuclear weapons. Since enrichment to less than 20% is internationally recognized as a fully adequate barrier to weapons usability, certain Member States have moved to minimize the international trade in highly enriched uranium and have established programmes to develop the technical means to help convert research reactors to the use of low-enrichment fuels with minimum penalties. This could involve modifications in the design of the reactor and development of new fuels. As a result of these programmes, it is expected that most research reactors can be converted to the use of low-enriched fuel

  6. Analysis of long-time operation of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsch Marek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-cogeneration is cogeneration with small performance, with maximal electric power up to 50 kWe. On the present, there are available small micro-cogeneration units with small electric performance, about 1 kWe, which are usable also in single family houses or flats. These micro-cogeneration units operate on principle of conventional combustion engine, Stirling engine, steam engine or fuel cell. Micro-cogeneration units with fuel cells are new progressive developing type of units for single family houses. Fuel cell is electrochemical device which by oxidation-reduction reaction turn directly chemical energy of fuel to electric power, secondary products are pure water and thermal energy. The aim of paper is measuring and evaluation of operation parameters of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell which uses natural gas as a fuel.

  7. Results of a diesel multiple unit fuel tank blunt impact test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research and Development is conducting research into passenger locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness. A series of impact tests is being conducted to measure fuel tank deformation under two types of dyn...

  8. Management and storage of nuclear fuel from Belgian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    1996-01-01

    Experiences and problems with the storage of irradiated fuel at research reactors in Belgium are described. In particular, interim storage problems exist for spent fuel elements at the BR2 and the shut down BR3 reactors in Mol. (author). 1 ref

  9. Research reactor fuel transport in the U.K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panter, R [U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1983-09-01

    This paper describes the containers currently used for transport of fresh or spent fuel elements for Research and Materials Test Reactors in the U.K., their status, operating procedures and some of the practical difficulties. In the U.K., MTR fuel cycle work is almost entirely the responsibility of the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority.

  10. CNG INJECTOR RESEARCH FOR DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Majczak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the tests results of the prototype design of hydraulically assisted injector, that is designed for gas supply into diesel engines. The construction of the injector allows for it positioning in the glow plug socket, so that the gas is injected directly into the combustion chamber. The cycle analysis of the four-cylinder Andoria ADCR engine with a capacity of 2.6 dm3 for different crankshaft rotational speeds allowed to determine the necessary time for fuel injection. Because of that, it was possible to determine the required mass flow rate of the injector, for replacing as much of the original fuel by gaseous fuel. To ensure a high value of flow inside the injector, supply pressure equal to 1 MPa was applied. High gas supply pressure requires high value of valve opening forces. For this purpose a injector with hydraulic control system, using a liquid under pressure for the opening process was designed. On the basis of air pressure measurements in the flow line after the injector, the analysis of opening and closing of the valve was made. Measurements of outflow mass of the injector were also carried out. The results showed that the designed injector meets the requirements necessary to supply ADCR engine by the CNG fuel.

  11. Biorefinery and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Das; Thomas T. Adams; Mark A. Eiteman; John Stickney; Joy Doran Peterson; James R. Kastner; Sudhagar Mani; Ryan Adolphson

    2012-06-12

    In this project we focused on several aspects of technology development that advances the formation of an integrated biorefinery. These focus areas include: [1] establishment of pyrolysis processing systems and characterization of the product oils for fuel applications, including engine testing of a preferred product and its pro forma economic analysis; [2] extraction of sugars through a novel hotwater extaction process, and the development of levoglucosan (a pyrolysis BioOil intermediate); [3] identification and testing of the use of biochar, the coproduct from pyrolysis, for soil applications; [4] developments in methods of atomic layer epitaxy (for efficient development of coatings as in fuel cells); [5] advancement in fermentation of lignocellulosics, [6] development of algal biomass as a potential substrate for the biorefinery, and [7] development of catalysts from coproducts. These advancements are intended to provide a diverse set of product choices within the biorefinery, thus improving the cost effectiveness of the system. Technical effectiveness was demonstrated in the pyrolysis biooil based diesel fuel supplement, sugar extraction from lignocelluose, use of biochar, production of algal biomass in wastewaters, and the development of catalysts. Economic feasibility of algal biomass production systems seems attractive, relative to the other options. However, further optimization in all paths, and testing/demonstration at larger scales are required to fully understand the economic viabilities. The various coproducts provide a clear picture that multiple streams of value can be generated within an integrated biorefinery, and these include fuels and products.

  12. Fuel Cells: Power System Option for Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneeth, M.; Mohanty, Surajeet

    2012-07-01

    Fuel Cells are direct energy conversion devices and, thereby, they deliver electrical energy at very high efficiency levels. Hydrogen and Oxygen gases are electrochemically processed, producing clean electric power with water as the only by product. A typical, Fuel Cell based power system involve a Electrochemical power converter, gas storage and management systems, thermal management systems and relevant control units. While there exists different types of Fuel cells, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells are considered as the most suitable one for portable applications. Generally, Fuel Cells are considered as the primary power system option in space missions requiring high power ( > 5kW) and long durations and also where water is a consumable, such as manned missions. This is primarily due to the advantage that fuel cell based power systems offer, in terms of specific energy. Fuel cells have the potential to attain specific energy > 500Wh/kg, specific power >500W/kg, energy density > 400Whr/L and also power density > 200 W/L. This apart, a fuel cell system operate totally independent of sun light, whereas as battery based system is fully dependent on the same. This uniqueness provides added flexibility and capabilities to the missions and modularity for power system. High power requiring missions involving reusable launch vehicles, manned missions etc are expected to be richly benefited from this. Another potential application of Fuel Cell would be interplanetary exploration. Unpredictable and dusty atmospheres of heavenly bodies limits sun light significantly and there fuel cells of different types, eg, Bio-Fuel Cells, PEMFC, DMFCs would be able to work effectively. Manned or unmanned lunar out post would require continuous power even during extra long lunar nights and high power levels are expected. Regenerative Fuel Cells, a combination of Fuel Cells and Electrolysers, are identified as strong candidate. While application of Fuel Cells in high power

  13. U.S. Department of Energy operational experience with shipments of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Massey, Charles D.; Mustin, Tracy P.

    1998-01-01

    On May 13, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Record of Decision on a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. The goal of the long-term policy is to recover enriched uranium exported from the United States, while giving foreign research reactor operators sufficient time to develop their own long-term solutions for storage and disposal of spent fuel. The spent fuel accepted by the U.S. DOE under the policy must be out of the research reactors by May 12, 2006 and returned to the United States by May 12, 2009. (author)

  14. Application of ac impedance in fuel cell research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selman, J R; Lin, Y P [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-10-01

    In applying ac impedance to fuel cells and their porous (gas diffusion) electrodes the emphasis lies on different fuel cell components, and their properties, according to the fuel cell type. The focus has been directed at the electrode/electrolyte interface in MCFC and PAFC, whereas in SOFC and PEMFC the ionic/electronic conductivity of the electrolyte or the characteristics of its composite with the electrocatalyst is of primary interest. The limitations of ac impedance in fuel cell application are in part due to difficulties of interpretation and in part due to experimental difficulties because of the generally fast electrode reaction kinetics. Further research directions are indicated. (author)

  15. Thermal fuel research and development facilities in BNFL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, V.A.; Vickers, J.

    1996-01-01

    BNFL is committed to providing high quality, cost effective nuclear fuel cycle services to customers on a National and International level. BNFL's services, products and expertise span the complete fuel cycle; from fuel manufacture through to fuel reprocessing, transport, waste management and decommissioning and the Company maintains its technical and commercial lead by investment in continued research and development (R and D). This paper discusses BNFL's involvement in R and D and gives an account of the current facilities available together with a description of the advanced R and D facilities constructed or planned at Springfields and Sellafield. It outlines the work being carried out to support the company fuel technology business, to (1) develop more cost effective routes to existing fuel products; (2) maximize the use of recycled uranium, plutonium and tails uranium and (3) support a successful MOX business

  16. Toxic Hazards Research Unit Annual Report: 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    mediated hemolysis by mercapto compounds. Journal of Applied Toxicology, Volume 6, Number 5, pages 336-370, 1986. Hydrophobic tributyltin ( TBT ...7 ~OF~ AAMRL-TR-87-020 NMRI-87-2 ’~LRES 4 Iq 1986 TOXIC HAZARDS RESEARCH UNIT ANNUAL REPORT WILLIAM E. HOUSTON, Ph.D. RAYMOND S. KUTZMAN, Ph.D...and is approved for publication. FOR THE COMMANDElRi BRUCE 0. STUART, Ph.D. Director, Toxic Hazards Division Harry G. Armstrong Aerospace Medical

  17. INVENTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF COMMERCIAL REACTOR FUELS WITHIN THE UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2011-03-31

    There are currently 104 nuclear reactors in 31 states, operated by 51 different utilities. Operation of these reactors generates used fuel assemblies that require storage prior to final disposition. The regulatory framework within the United States (U.S.) allows for the licensing of used nuclear fuel storage facilities for an initial licensing period of up to 40 years with potential for license extensions in 40 years increments. Extended storage, for periods of up to 300 years, is being considered within the U.S. Therefore, there is an emerging need to develop the technical bases to support the licensing for long-term storage. In support of the Research and Development (R&D) activities required to support the technical bases, a comprehensive assessment of the current inventory of used nuclear fuel based upon publicly available resources has been completed that includes the most current projections of used fuel discharges from operating reactors. Negotiations with the nuclear power industry are ongoing concerning the willingness of individual utilities to provide information and material needed to complete the R&D activities required to develop the technical bases for used fuel storage for up to 300 years. This report includes a status of negotiations between DOE and industry in these regards. These negotiations are expected to result in a framework for cooperation between the Department and industry in which industry will provide and specific information on used fuel inventory and the Department will compensate industry for the material required for Research and Development and Testing and Evaluation Facility activities.

  18. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  19. Reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor using various low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density were calculated. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity feedback, moderator temperature reactivity feedback, moderator density reactivity feedback and moderator void reactivity feedback. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that the magnitudes all the respective reactivity feedbacks from 38 deg. C to 50 deg. C and 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, of all the fuels were very close to each other. The fuel temperature reactivity feedback of the U 3 O 8 -Al was about 2% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The magnitudes of the moderator temperature, moderator density and moderator void reactivity feedbacks of all the fuels, showed very minor variations from the original aluminide fuel.

  20. [Research and workshop on alternative fuels for aviation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University was granted U. S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funds for research and development to improve the efficiency in ethanol powered aircraft, measure performance and compare emissions of ethanol, Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) and 100 LL aviation gasoline. The premise of the initial proposal was to use a test stand owned by Engine Components Inc. (ECI) based in San Antonio, Texas. After the grant was awarded, ECI decided to close down its test stand facility. Since there were no other test stands available at that time, RAFDC was forced to find additional support to build its own test stand. Baylor University provided initial funds for the test stand building. Other obstacles had to be overcome in order to initiate the program. The price of the emission testing equipment had increased substantially beyond the initial quote. Rosemount Analytical Inc. gave RAFDC an estimate of $120,000.00 for a basic emission testing package. RAFDC had to find additional funding to purchase this equipment. The electronic ignition unit also presented a series of time consuming problems. Since at that time there were no off-the-shelf units of this type available, one had to be specially ordered and developed. FAA funds were used to purchase a Super Flow dynamometer. Due to the many unforeseen obstacles, much more time and effort than originally anticipated had to be dedicated to the project, with much of the work done on a volunteer basis. Many people contributed their time to the program. One person, mainly responsible for the initial design of the test stand, was a retired engineer from Allison with extensive aircraft engine test stand experience. Also, many Baylor students volunteered to assemble the. test stand and continue to be involved in the current test program. Although the program presented many challenges, which resulted in delays, the RAFDC's test

  1. Research reactor fuel development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    2000-09-01

    This paper reviews recent U 3 Si 2 and U-Mo dispersion fuel development activities at AECL. The scope of work includes fabrication development, irradiation testing, post-irradiation examination and performance qualification. U-Mo alloys with a variety of compositions, ranging from 6 to 10 wt % Mo, have been fabricated with high purity and homogeneity in the product. The alloys and powders were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction analysis. U-Mo powder samples have been supplied to the Argonne National Laboratory for irradiation testing in the ATR reactor. Low-enriched uranium fuel elements containing U-7 wt % Mo and U-10 wt % Mo with loadings up to 4.5 gU/cm 3 have been fabricated at CRL for irradiation testing in the NRU reactor. The U-Mo fuel elements will be tested in NRU at linear powers up to 145 kW/m, and to 85 atom % 235 U burnup. (author)

  2. Research reactor fuel development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews recent U 3 Si 2 and U-Mo dispersion fuel development activities at AECL. The scope of work includes fabrication development, irradiation testing, postirradiation examination and performance qualification. U-Mo alloys with a variety of compositions, ranging from 6 to 10 wt % Mo, have been fabricated with high purity and homogeneity in the product. The alloys and powders were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction analysis. U-Mo powder samples have been supplied to the Argonne National Laboratory for irradiation testing in the ATR reactor. Low-enriched uranium fuel elements containing U-7 wt % Mo and U-10 wt % Mo with loadings up to 4.5 gU/cm 3 have been fabricated at CRL for irradiation testing in the NRU reactor. The U-Mo fuel elements will be tested in NRU at linear powers up to 145 kW/m, and to 85 atom % 235 U burnup. (author)

  3. Research Establishment progress report 1978 - uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    A report of research programs continuing in the following areas is presented: mining and treatment of uranium ores, uranium enrichment, waste treatment, reprocessing and the uranium fuel cycle. Staff responsible for each project are indicated

  4. Bioenergy Research Programme. Yearbook 1994. Production of wood fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alakangas, E.

    1995-01-01

    BIOENERGIA Research Programme is one of energy technology programmes of the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry (in 1995 TEKES, Technology Development Center). The aim of Bioenergy Research Programme is to increase the use of economically profitable and environmentally sound bioenergy by improving the competitiveness of present peat and wood fuels. Research and development projects will also develop new economically competitive biofuels and new equipment and methods for production, handling and using of biofuels. The funding for 1994 was nearly 50 million FIM and projects numbered 60. The main goal of the production of wood fuels research area is to develop new production methods in order to decrease the production costs to the level of imported fuels. The total potential of the wood fuel use should be at least 1.0 million toe/a (5.5 million m 3 ). There were 27 projects in 1994 for research on wood fuel production. This part of the yearbook 1994 presents the main results of these projects. The wood reserves do not limit the obtainability of the target. Research and development work has, however, directed to development of equipment and research on wood fuels production chains. Many devices, designed for both separate and integrated production of wood fuels became ready or were becoming ready for prototyping, to be used for production tests. Results of the biomass harvesting and properties research were obtained for utilization in 1994. According to the results it is possible to obtain the desired targets both in integrated and separated production of wood fuels. (author)

  5. Engine Tune-Up Service. Unit 5: Fuel and Carburetion Systems. Student Guide. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ludy

    This student guide is for Unit 5, Fuel and Carburetion Systems, in the Engine Tune-Up Service portion of the Automotive Mechanics Curriculum. It deals with inspecting and servicing the fuel and carburetion systems. A companion review exercise book and posttests are available separately as CE 031 218-219. An introduction tells how this unit fits…

  6. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance as Telecommunications Backup Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and industry project partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) acts as the central data repository for the data collected from real-world operation of fuel cell backup power systems. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) co-funding awarded through DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, more than 1,300 fuel cell units were deployed over a three-plus-year period in stationary, material handling equipment, auxiliary power, and backup power applications. This surpassed a Fuel Cell Technologies Office ARRA objective to spur commercialization of an early market technology by installing 1,000 fuel cell units across several different applications, including backup power. By December 2013, 852 backup power units out of 1,330 fuel cell units deployed were providing backup service, mainly for telecommunications towers. For 136 of the fuel cell backup units, project participants provided detailed operational data to the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center for analysis by NREL's technology validation team. NREL analyzed operational data collected from these government co-funded demonstration projects to characterize key fuel cell backup power performance metrics, including reliability and operation trends, and to highlight the business case for using fuel cells in these early market applications. NREL's analyses include these critical metrics, along with deployment, U.S. grid outage statistics, and infrastructure operation.

  7. The United States spent fuel acceptance policy - A year in review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David G.

    1997-01-01

    Through the combined efforts of the United States and many other nations participating in the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, much progress has been made toward reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. A little more than a year ago, the U.S. Department of Energy adopted a new 1 0-year policy to accept research reactor spent nuclear fuel into the United States from other nations. The policy supports U.S. nuclear weapons nonproliferation objectives and demonstrates the continued commitment of the U.S. to the RERTR program. This paper is a review of the past year's activities and addresses the progress made since the policy was implemented

  8. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo; Ritchie, Iain G.

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programs have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU), and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. (author)

  9. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country of origin where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programmes have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium, and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. It is hoped that an announcement of the extension of the U.S. Acceptance Programme, which is expected in the very near future, will facilitate the life extensions of many productive TRIGA reactors around the world. (author)

  10. Operation experience of the advanced fuel assemblies at Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP within four fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Kobelev, S.; Kushmanov, S.

    2006-01-01

    The first commissioning of Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 with standard reactor WWER-1000 (project V-320) was in 2001. The reactor core, starting from the first fuel charge, was arranged completely with Advanced Fuel Assemblies (AFAs). In this way, it is possible to obtain the experience in startup and operation of the core, completely arranged with AFAs, and also to get a possibility of performing the comprehensive check for justification of newly commissioned units and justification of design solutions accepted in the design of reactor core for Taiwan NPP, Bushehr NPP and Kudankulam NPP. The first fuel charge of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 is a reference and unified for Tiawan NPP (V-428), Bushehr NPP (V-446), Kudankulam NPP(V-412) with small differences caused by design features of RP V-320. The first core charge of Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP was arranged of 163 AFAs, comprising 61 CPS ARs and 42 BAR bundles. The subsequent fuel charges were arranged of AFAs with gadolinium oxide integrated into fuel instead of BAR. By 2005 the results of operation of the core at Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP during four fuel cycles showed that AFA is sufficiently reliable and serviceable. The activity of the primary coolant of the Volgodonsk NPP is at stable low level. During the whole time of the core operation of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 no leaky AFAs were revealed. The modifications of the internals, made during pre-operational work, are reasonable and effective to provide for fuel mechanical stability in the course of operation. The modifications, made in AFA structure during operation of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1, are aimed at improving the service and operational reliability of its components. Correctness of the solutions taken is confirmed by AFAs operation experience both at the Volgodonsk NPP, and at other operating Russian NPPs

  11. Decommissioning the Dresden Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.L.; Bargelt, R.J.; Panozzo, J.B.; Christensen, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    The Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) (Exelon Generation Co.) was decommissioned using a new underwater coating strategy developed in cooperation with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This was the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating approach. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and in safer, more cost effective deactivation. The process was pioneered at the INL and used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. The INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by the INL and Exelon on the pathway for this activity. The rationale used to select the underwater coating option and the advantages and disadvantages are shown. Special circumstances, such as the use of a remotely operated underwater vehicle to map (visually and radiologically) the pool areas that were not readily accessible, are discussed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are given and a lessons learned evaluation is included. (authors)

  12. Assessment of Research Needs for Advanced Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1985-11-01

    The DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Working Group (AFCWG) was formed and asked to perform a scientific evaluation of the current status of fuel cells, with emphasis on identification of long-range research that may have a significant impact on the practical utilization of fuel cells in a variety of applications. The AFCWG held six meetings at locations throughout the country where fuel cell research and development are in progress, for presentations by experts on the status of fuel cell research and development efforts, as well as for inputs on research needs. Subsequent discussions by the AFCWG have resulted in the identification of priority research areas that should be explored over the long term in order to advance the design and performance of fuel cells of all types. Surveys describing the salient features of individual fuel cell types are presented in Chapters 2 to 6 and include elaborations of long-term research needs relating to the expeditious introduction of improved fuel cells. The Introduction and the Summary (Chapter 1) were prepared by AFCWG. They were repeatedly revised in response to comments and criticism. The present version represents the closest approach to a consensus that we were able to reach, which should not be interpreted to mean that each member of AFCWG endorses every statement and every unexpressed deletion. The Introduction and Summary always represent a majority view and, occasionally, a unanimous judgment. Chapters 2 to 6 provide background information and carry the names of identified authors. The identified authors of Chapters 2 to 6, rather than AFCWG as a whole, bear full responsibility for the scientific and technical contents of these chapters.

  13. Basic research on cermet nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Hiroshi; Sto, Seichi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Takano, Masahide; Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kosaku

    1998-01-01

    Production of cermet nuclear fuel having fine uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) particles dispersed in matrix metal requires basic property data on the compatibility of matrix metal with fission product compounds. It is thermodynamically suggested that, as burnup increases, cesium in oxide fuel reacts with the fuel, other fission products or cladding pipe and produces cesium uranates, cesium molybdate, or cesium chromate in stainless steel cladding pipe. Attempt was made to measure the thermal expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity of cesium uranates (Cs{sub 2}UO{sub 4} and Cs{sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7}), cesium molybdate (Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) and cesium chromate (Cs{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}). Thermal expansion was measured by X-ray diffraction and determined by Cohen`s method. Thermal conductivity was obtained by measuring thermal diffusion by laser flash method. The thermal expansion of Cs{sub 2}UO{sub 4} and Cs{sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7} is as low as 1.2% for the former and 1.0% for the latter, up to 1000K. The thermal expansion of Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} is as high as that of Cs{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}, 2.1% for the former and 2.5% for the latter at temperatures from room temperature to 873K. Average thermal expansion in this temperature range is 4.4 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} for Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} and 4.2 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}. The thermal expansion of Cs{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} is four times higher than that of UO{sub 2} and five times higher than that of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The thermal conductivity of Cs{sub 2}UO{sub 4} is nearly equal to that of Cs{sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7} in absolute value and temperature dependency. Cs{sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7}, having different thermal conductivity between {alpha} and {beta} phases, shows higher conductivity with {beta} than with {alpha}, about 1/4 of that of UO{sub 2} at 1000K. The thermal conductivity of Cs{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} is nearly equal to that of Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} in absolute value and temperature dependency. (N.H.)

  14. Handling of spent fuel from research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, K.

    1997-01-01

    In Japan eleven research reactors are in operation. After the 19th International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research Reactors and Test Reactors (RERTR) on October 6-10, 1996, Seoul, Korea, the Five Agency Committee on Highly Enriched Uranium, which consists of Science and Technology Agency, the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) met on November 7,1996, to discuss the handling of spent fuel from research reactors in Japan. Advantages and disadvantages to return spent fuel to the USA in comparison to Europe were discussed. So far, a number of spent fuel elements in JAERI and KURRI are to be returned to the US. The first shipment to the US is planned for 60 HEU elements from JMTR in 1997. The shipment from KURRI is planned to start in 1999. (author)

  15. Calculation of fuel burn-up and fuel reloading for the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Nguyen Phuoc; Huy, Ngo Quang [Centre for Nuclear Technique Application, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Thong, Ha Van; Binh, Do Quang [Nuclear Research Inst., Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    1994-10-01

    Calculation of fuel burnup and fuel reloading for the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor was carried out by using a new programme named HEXA-BURNUP, realized in a PC. The programme is used to calculate the following parameters of the Dalat reactor: a/Critical configurations of the core loaded with 69, 72, 74, 86, 88, 89 and 92 fuel elements. The effective multiplication coefficients equal 1 within the error ranges of less than 0.38%. b/ The thermal neutron flux distribution in the reactor. The calculated results agree with the experimental data measured at 11 typical positions. c/The average fuel burn-up for the period from Feb. 1984 to Sep. 1992. The difference between calculation and experiment is only about 1.9%. 10 fuel reloading versions are calculated, from which an optimal version is proposed. (author). 9 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Fuel defect detection, localization and removal in Bruce Power units 3 through 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, R.; Armstrong, J.; Iglesias, F.; Oduntan, R.; Lewis, B.

    2005-01-01

    Fuel element defects are occurring in Bruce 'A' and Bruce 'B' Units. A root-cause investigation is ongoing, however, a solution is not yet in-hand. Fuel defect management efforts have been undertaken, therefore, in the interim. Fuel defect management tools are in-place for all Bruce Units. These tools can be categorized as analysis-based or operations-based. Analysis-based tools include computer codes used primarily for fuel defect characterization, while operations-based tools include Unit-specific delayed-neutron ('DN') monitoring systems and gaseous fission product ('GFP') monitoring systems. Operations-based tools are used for fuel defect detection, localization and removal activities. Fuel and Physics staff use defect detection, localization and removal methodologies and guidelines to disposition fuel defects. Methodologies are 'standardized' or 'routine' procedures for implementing analysis-based and operations-based tools to disposition fuel defects during Unit start-up operation and during operation at high steady-state power levels. Guidelines at present serve to supplement fuel defect management methodologies during Unit power raise. (author)

  17. Report of 5th new nuclear fuel research meeting, Yayoi Research Group. Trend of advanced basic research in nuclear fuel technical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    Theme of this meeting is 'Trend of advanced basic research in nuclear fuel technical development', and it was attempted to balance both sides of the basic research and the development. At the meeting, lectures were given on the chemical form of FPs in oxide fuel pins, the absorption of hydrogen of fuel cladding tubes, the application of hydride fuel to thorium cycle, the thermal properties of fuel cladding tubes, the preparation of NpN and heat conductivity, the high temperature chemical reprocessing of nitride fuel, the research on the annihilation treatment of minor actinide in fast reactors, the separation of TRU by dry process and the annihilation using a metallic fuel FBR. In this report, the summaries of the lectures are collected, and also the program of the meeting and the list of attendants are shown. (K.I.)

  18. Radioactivity and United Kingdom estuaries: an overview identifying research priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, E.I.; Clifton, R.J.; Stevens, H.E.

    1985-05-01

    The report consists of the results of an evaluation of research priorities for the environmental radioactivity of estuaries, (and near shore waters) of the United Kingdom. The format of this report is:(i) general conclusions for the future requirements for research in the field of environmental radioactivity; (ii) an overview of some specific recommendations for research; and (iii) an appendix in which a comprehensive evaluation of the research priorities for specific areas of research are given. On the basis that man is the prime target for concern and protection, special attention has been given to the environment in the vicinity of the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield, Cumbria, which is the source of major releases of a variety of radionuclides into the natural environment. Subjects covered in the Appendix are: site factors; pathways to man; source term; hot particles; terrestrial inputs; surveys and monitoring; analysis; organics; field versus laboratory data; biology; bioaccumulation factors; some bioaccumulators of radioactivity; bioturbation; bacteria; genetics; natural change; sediment; resuspension; surfaces; Ksub(d) factors; pore liquids; diagenesis and the ageing processes; airborne transport of radionuclides; models; natural radioactivity; public opinion; recreation; the ICRP; the ALARA principle; decommissioning of nuclear power stations; identification of research requirements; environmental radioactivity - the national effort. (U.K.)

  19. Control system design specification of advanced spent fuel management process units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. H.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. S

    2003-06-01

    In this study, the design specifications of instrumentation and control system for advanced spent fuel management process units are presented. The advanced spent fuel management process consists of several process units such as slitting device, dry pulverizing/mixing device, metallizer, etc. In this study, the control and operation characteristics of the advanced spent fuel management mockup process devices and the process devices developed in 2001 and 2002 are analysed. Also, a integral processing system of the unit process control signals is proposed, which the operation efficiency is improved. And a redundant PLC control system is constructed which the reliability is improved. A control scheme is proposed for the time delayed systems compensating the control performance degradation caused by time delay. The control system design specification is presented for the advanced spent fuel management process units. This design specifications can be effectively used for the detail design of the advanced spent fuel management process.

  20. Fuel flexibility in power generation onboard offshore floating units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keep, Jeroen van [Waertsilae Corporation, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-07-01

    Power Plants for offshore oil and gas installations utilizing dual fuel (DF) reciprocating engines are by many owners seen as an interesting alternative to conventional solutions due to the apparent advantages in fuel flexibility, fuel efficiency and lower emission. The paper summarizes the dual fuel technology, typical solutions for FPSO's and operational. Items that are discussed: DF operation and how it works; fuel flexibility, including transfer between fuel modes; fuel efficiency, also in production an important cost saver; emissions of the different fuel modes; size and weights, constraints; experiences of the P-63 project. With the above it is safe to conclude that the DF-technology is mature with important benefits for the offshore production market in certain specific applications, most notably the FPSO's for fields in low gas to oil ratios, bringing important fuel cost savings and also for new-built F-LNG/FSO/FPSO's where the power plant can be accommodated below decks, freeing up valuable deck space for the process plant. (author)

  1. Status of USNRC research on fuel behavior under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, W.V.

    1976-01-01

    The program of the Fuel Behaviour Research is directed at providing a detailed understanding of the response of nuclear fuel assemblies to off-normal or accident conditions. This understanding is expressed in physical and analytical correlations which are incorporated into computer codes. The results of these experiments and the resulting codes are available to the licensing authorities for use in evaluating utility submissions. (orig.) [de

  2. Hydrogen and fuel cell research networking in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppley, B.A. [Queen' s-RMC Fuel Cell Research Centre, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reviewed the activities of the Ontario Fuel Cell Research and Innovation Network since its launch in 2006. Funded by the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation, the project involves 17 academic researchers from 8 universities and is supported by 8 industrial partners. The group of researchers has made progress in supporting the developing fuel cell industry in Ontario and in Canada. Their work has the potential to help deploy the province's automotive-oriented manufacturing sector in directions that address the issues of clean air and climate change. New initiatives in the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies are instrumental in expanding this network to leverage new business activities in the post financial crisis period. These activities are expected to result in economic benefits for job and economic growth.

  3. Criticality safety research on nuclear fuel cycle facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2004-07-01

    This paper present d s current status and future program of the criticality safety research on nuclear fuel cycle made by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Experimental research on solution fuel treated in reprocessing plant has been performed using two critical facilities, STACY and TRACY. Fundamental data of static and transient characteristics are accumulated for validation of criticality safety codes. Subcritical measurements are also made for developing a monitoring system for criticality safety. Criticality safety codes system for solution and power system, and evaluation method related to burnup credit are developed. (author)

  4. Destructive examination of 3-cycle LWR fuel rods from Turkey Point Unit 3 for the Climax-Spent Fuel Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkin, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    The destructive examination results of five light water reactor rods from the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor are presented. The examinations included fission gas collection and analyses, burnup and hydrogen analyses, and a metallographic evaluation of the fuel, cladding, oxide, and hydrides. The rods exhibited a low fission gas release with all other results appearing representative for pressurized water reactor fuel rods with similar burnups (28 GWd/MTU) and operating histories

  5. Fuel enrichment reduction for heavy water moderated research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve heavy-water-moderated research reactors of significant power level (5 MW to 125 MW) currently operate in a number of countries, and use highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. Most of these reactors could in principle be converted to use uranium of lower enrichment, subject in some cases to the successful development and demonstration of new fuel materials and/or fuel element designs. It is, however, generally accepted as desirable that existing fuel element geometry be retained unaltered to minimise the capital costs and licensing difficulties associated with enrichment conversion. The high flux Australian reactor, HIFAR, at Lucas Heights, Sydney is one of 5 Dido-class reactors in the above group. It operates at 10 MW using 80% 235 U HEU fuel. Theoretical studies of neutronic, thermohydraulic and operational aspects of converting HIFAR to use fuels of reduced enrichment have been made over a period. It is concluded that with no change of fuel element geometry and no penalty in the present HEU fuel cycle burn-up performance, conversion to MEU (nominally 45% 235 U) would be feasible within the limits of current fully qualified U-Al fuel materials technology. There would be no significant, adverse effects on safety-related parameters (e.g. reactivity coefficients) and only small penalties in reactor flux. Conversion to LEU (nominally 20% 235 U) a similar basis would require that fuel materials of about 2.3 g U cm -3 be fully qualified, and would depress the in-core thermal neutron flux by about 15 per cent relative to HEU fuelling. In qualitative terms, similar conclusions would be expected to hold for a majority of the above heavy water moderated reactors. (author)

  6. Status of the US foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacey, K.A.; Zeitoun, A.; Saris, E.C.

    1997-01-01

    A significant step was made in 1996 with the establishment of a new nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Specifically the United States will accept over a 13-year period up to 20 tonnes of spent nuclear fuel from 41 countries. Only spent fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States is covered under this policy. Since the acceptance policy took effect on 13 May 1996, the Department of Energy has undertaken a number of steps to effectively implement the policy. An implementation strategy plan, mitigation action plan, and detailed transportation plans have been developed. Other activities include foreign research reactor assessments, and the determination of shipment priorities and schedules. The first shipment under the acceptance policy was received into the United States in September 1996. A second shipment was received from Canada in December 1996. The next shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel is expected from Europe in early March 1997. The primary challenge for DOE is to continue to transport this material in a consistent, cost-effective manner over the 13-year duration of the program. This article covers the following topics: background; acceptance policy; implementation of the acceptance policy; next steps/closing. 6 figs

  7. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Sagert, N.H.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Taylor, P.

    1984-04-01

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  8. Safety research in nuclear fuel cycle at PNC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This report collects the results of safety research in nuclear fuel cycle at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, in order to answer to the Questionnaire of OECD/NEA. The Questionnaire request to include information concerning to research topic, description, main results (if available), reference documents, research institutes involved, sponsoring organization and other pertinent information about followings: a) Recently completed research projects. b) Ongoing (current) research projects. Achievements on following items are omitted by the request of OECD/NEA, uranium mining and milling, uranium refining and conversion to UF{sub 6}, uranium enrichment, fuel manufacturers, spent fuel storage, radioactive waste management, transport of radioactive materials, decommissioning. We select topics from the fields of a) nuclear installation, b) seismic, and c) PSA, in projects from frame of annual safety research plan for nuclear installations established by Nuclear Safety Commission. We apply for the above a) and b) projects as follows: a) Achievements in Safety Research, fiscal 1991-1995, b) fiscal 1996 Safety Research Achievements: Progress. (author)

  9. Safety research in nuclear fuel cycle at PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This report collects the results of safety research in nuclear fuel cycle at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, in order to answer to the Questionnaire of OECD/NEA. The Questionnaire request to include information concerning to research topic, description, main results (if available), reference documents, research institutes involved, sponsoring organization and other pertinent information about followings: a) Recently completed research projects. b) Ongoing (current) research projects. Achievements on following items are omitted by the request of OECD/NEA, uranium mining and milling, uranium refining and conversion to UF 6 , uranium enrichment, fuel manufacturers, spent fuel storage, radioactive waste management, transport of radioactive materials, decommissioning. We select topics from the fields of a) nuclear installation, b) seismic, and c) PSA, in projects from frame of annual safety research plan for nuclear installations established by Nuclear Safety Commission. We apply for the above a) and b) projects as follows: a) Achievements in Safety Research, fiscal 1991-1995, b) fiscal 1996 Safety Research Achievements: Progress. (author)

  10. The united kingdom's changing requirements for spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, Z.; Hambley, D.I.; Gregg, R.; Ross, D.N.

    2013-01-01

    The UK is adopting an open fuel cycle, and is necessarily moving to a regime of long term storage of spent fuel, followed by geological disposal once a geological disposal facility (GDF) is available. The earliest GDF receipt date for legacy spent fuel is assumed to be 2075. The UK is set to embark on a programme of new nuclear build to maintain a nuclear energy contribution of 16 GW. Additionally, the UK are considering a significant expansion of nuclear energy in order to meet carbon reduction targets and it is plausible to foresee a scenario where up to 75 GW from nuclear power production could be deployed in the UK by the mid 21. century. Such an expansion, could lead to spent fuel storage and its disposal being a dominant issue for the UK Government, the utilities and the public. If the UK were to transition a closed fuel cycle, then spent fuel storage should become less onerous depending on the timescales. The UK has demonstrated a preference for wet storage of spent fuel on an interim basis. The UK has adopted an approach of centralised storage, but a 16 GW new build programme and any significant expansion of this may push the UK towards distributed spent fuel storage at a number of reactors station sites across the UK

  11. Research on assurance system of nuclear fuel supply (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Naoi, Yosuke; Wakabayashi, Shuji; Tazaki, Makiko; Senzaki, Masao

    2010-03-01

    Assurance of supply (AOS) of nuclear fuel is a special arrangement in case of nuclear fuel supply disruption caused by political reasons other than nonproliferation. It aims to support a stable supply of nuclear fuel while avoiding unnecessary spread of sensitive enrichment technology. Current discussions on AOS have been initiated by the IAEA Director-General's article published in The Economist entitled 'Towards a Safer World' Oct. 2003. Since then, various proposals on AOS have been presented. In order to facilitate international discussions on AOS, authors have conducted studies of AOS system based on Japanese Government's proposal 'IAEA Standby Arrangement System (INFCIRC/683)'. In this paper, we gave an overview of discussions on AOS since World War II, and elaborated on some of current proposals. We have been able to discuss feasibility of AOS system more specifically by including additional costs and period required for AOS, and to present a system which could work as a practical system. Issues we have tried to tackle here include definitions of AOS, and roles of consumer states, supplier states, IAEA and nuclear industries. We present some solutions including broadening coverage of AOS, declaration by supplier states on AOS, establishing advisory committee in the IAEA on the actual application of AOS, and setting up an IAEA fund for AOS. (author)

  12. Research on assurance system of nuclear fuel supply (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Naoi, Yosuke; Wakabayashi, Shuji; Tazaki, Makiko; Senzaki, Masao

    2010-08-01

    Assurance of supply (AOS) of nuclear fuel is a special arrangement in case of nuclear fuel supply disruption caused by political reasons other than nonproliferation. It aims to support a stable supply of nuclear fuel while avoiding spread of sensitive enrichment technology. Current discussions on AOS have been initiated by the IAEA Director-General's article published in The Economist entitled 'Towards a Safer World' Oct. 2003. Since then, various proposals on AOS have been presented. In order to facilitate international discussions on AOS, authors have conducted studies of AOS system based on Japanese Government's proposal 'IAEA Standby Arrangement System (INFCIRC/683)'. In this paper, we have been able to discuss feasibility of AOS system more specifically by including additional costs and period required for AOS, and to present a system which could work as a practical system. Issues we have tried to tackle here include definitions of AOS, and roles of consumer States, supplier States, IAEA and nuclear industries. We present some solutions including broadening coverage of AOS, declaration by supplier States on AOS, establishing advisory committee in the IAEA on the actual application of AOS, and setting up an IAEA fund for AOS. (author)

  13. Proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy and United States Department of State are jointly proposing to adopt a policy to manage spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors. Only spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States would be covered by the proposed policy. The purpose of the proposed policy is to promote U.S. nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy objectives, specifically by seeking to reduce highly-enriched uranium from civilian commerce. This is a summary of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Environmental effects and policy considerations of three Management Alternative approaches for implementation of the proposed policy are assessed. The three Management Alternatives analyzed are: (1) acceptance and management of the spent nuclear fuel by the Department of Energy in the United States, (2) management of the spent nuclear fuel at one or more foreign facilities (under conditions that satisfy United States nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy objectives), and (3) a combination of components of Management Alternatives 1 and 2 (Hybrid Alternative). A No Action Alternative is also analyzed. For each Management Alternative, there are a number of alternatives for its implementation. For Management Alternative 1, this document addresses the environmental effects of various implementation alternatives such as varied policy durations, management of various quantities of spent nuclear fuel, and differing financing arrangements. Environmental impacts at various potential ports of entry, along truck and rail transportation routes, at candidate management sites, and for alternate storage technologies are also examined. For Management Alternative 2, this document addresses two subalternatives: (1) assisting foreign nations with storage; and (2) assisting foreign nations with reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel

  14. Development of core technology for research reactors using plate type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jae Joo; Lee, Doo Jeong; Park, Cheol

    2009-12-01

    Around 250 research reactors are under operation over the world. However, about 2/3 have been operated more than 30 years and demands for replacements are expected in the near future. The number of expected units is around 110, and around 55 units from 40 countries will be expected to be bid in the world market. In 2007, Netherlands started international bidding process to construct a new 80MW RR (named PALLAS) with the target of commercial operation in 2016, which will replace the existing HFR(45MW). KAERI consortium has been participated in that bid. Most of RRs use plate type fuels as a fuel assembly, Be and Graphite as a reflector. On the other hand, in Korea, the KAERI is operating the HANARO, which uses a rod type fuel assembly and heavy water as a reflector. Hence, core technologies for RRs using plate type fuels are in short. Therefore, core technologies should be secured for exporting a RR. In chapter 2, the conceptual design of PALLAS which use plate type fuels are described including core, cooling system and connected systems, layout of general components. Experimental verification tests for the plate type fuel and second shutdown system and the code verification for nuclear design are explained in Chapter 3 and 4, respectively

  15. HANARO Neutron Radiography Facility and Fuel Cell Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taejoo

    2013-01-01

    Fuel cell which generates electric energy from hydrogen and oxygen is one of noticed renewable energy system because this has high efficiency and free from CO 2 . Especially, PEMFC (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell) is focused by automotive companies because PEMFC, which has high power rate per volume and low operating temperature (60∼80), is suited due to the compact design and short start-up time. The water management is one of the most critical issues for fuel cell commercialization. In order to make a proper scheme for water management, thein formation of water distribution and behavior is very important. Neutron imaging is the best method to visualize the water at fuel cell and has been applied worldwide with qualitative and quantitative results. Because the NRF has large beam size (350Χ450mm 2 ) and relatively high neutron flux (2Χ107 n/cm 2 sec), it is suitable for large scale fuel cell research. Neutron imaging technique was used to investigate the water distribution and behavior in PEMFC under different operating conditions. The NRF has contributed the improvement of fuel cell performance and is one of the best choices for fuel cell study

  16. Fuel consumption models for pine flatwoods fuel types in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton S. Wright

    2013-01-01

    Modeling fire effects, including terrestrial and atmospheric carbon fluxes and pollutant emissions during wildland fires, requires accurate predictions of fuel consumption. Empirical models were developed for predicting fuel consumption from fuel and environmental measurements on a series of operational prescribed fires in pine flatwoods ecosystems in the southeastern...

  17. Research on a Scania 11 liter ethanol fueled bus engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egebaeck, K E; Pettersson, E

    1996-05-01

    This report presents research carried out on an alcohol fueled bus engine. The engine used was a six cylinder 11 liter compression ignition turbo-charged engine with an inter cooler. The research program included studies of the impact on the emissions when changing different engine components and different settings of the engine. A study of the impact on the engine performance and emissions when using different fuel compositions was also carried out. During the course of the work, the engine was equipped with oxidation catalysts of two different types, one of which was more efficient than the other concerning the oxidation of unburnt fuel related components. One of the main purposes of the research was to improve the emission characteristics of the engine by an optimization of the engine and its setting. The exhaust emissions were thoroughly characterized with respect to both regulated and unregulated emissions. 13 refs, figs, tabs

  18. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle technology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, Janne

    2004-01-01

    Research and development on nitride fuels for minor actinide burning in accelerator driven systems is performed in Europe in context of the CONFIRM project. Dry and wet methods for fabrication of uranium free nitride fuels have been developed with the assistance of thermo-chemical modelling. Four (Pu, Zr) pins have been fabricated by PSI and will be irradiated in Studsvik at a rating of 40-50 kW/m. The thermal conductivity of (Pu, Zr)N has been measured and was found to be in agreement with earlier theoretical assessments. Safety modeling indicates that americium bearing nitride fuels, in spite of their relatively poor high temperature stability under atmospheric pressure, can survive power transients as long as the fuel cladding remains intact. (author)

  19. Nuclear criticality assessment of Oak Ridge research fuel element storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1978-06-01

    Spent and partially spent Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) fuel elements are retained in the storage section of the ORR pool facility. Determination of a maximum expected neutron multiplication factor for the storage area is accomplished by a validated calculational method. The KENO Monte Carlo code and the Hansen-Roach 16-group neutron cross section sets were validated by calculations of critical experiments performed with early ORR fuel elements and with SPERT-D fuel elements. Calculations of various fuel element arrangements are presented which confirm the subcriticality previously inferred from critical experiments and indicate the k/sub eff/ would not exceed 0.85, were the storage area to be filled to capacity with storage racks containing elements with the fissionable material loading increased to 350 g of 235 U

  20. Annual report 1984. Nuclear fuel research department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebel, D.

    1985-12-01

    Research activities have been reviewed in the field of powder metallurgy and the production of new ceramic materials in particular silicon nitrides. Communications on the chemistry of solutions and the analytical chemistry have been compiled specially under the aspect of technical solutions and the development of new devices, equipments and methods. In a final chapter publications and lectures are assorted

  1. Research of Houjiayao Unit in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y.

    2012-12-01

    "Houjiayao Group" is the standard stratigraphic unit of late Pleistocene in northern China, which was created by Jia Lanpo and Wei Qi during their research on Houjiayao site. Based on the mammal, ancient human fossils and Paleolithic features, "Houjiayao Group" was thought as late Pleistocene sediments. "Houjiayao Group" was defined as late Pleistocene stratigraphic units. However, the problems of the age of "Houjiayao Group", stratigraphic division and other issues, have not yet been well resolved. These issues include: the differences of age-dating results, the unclear comparison between stratigraphic units and regional contrast, the uncertain relationship between "Houjiayao Group" and "Nihewan Layer ", and so on. Houjiayao site which located in the southeast of Houjiayao village in Dongjingji town Yangyuan County, Hebei province of China, is a very important paleolithic site. But some researches show that Houjiayao site is located at the 3th terrace of Liyigou valley and there are many opinions about the age of Houjiayao site, which varies from 20-500 thousand years. Combined with former research results and many research methods, our study was mainly focused on the key problems existing in the study of "Houjiayao Group". Through the use of sequence stratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and other theoretical methods, stratigraphic section was studied in the late Pleistocene stratigraphy and sedimentary environment. Through environmental indicators and the age-dating tests, the evolution of ancient geography and environment were identified elementarily. After analyzing informations of this area, geomorphologic investigation and stratum comparation in and around Houjiayao site were done. Houjiayao site is located on the west bank of Liyigou river, which has a tributary named Black Stone River. Two or three layers of volcanic materials were found in this area, those sediments are from a buried paleovolcano in upstream of Black Stone River. The volcanic

  2. ENS RRFM 2005: 9th international topical meeting on research reactor fuel management. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The ENS topical meeting on research reactor fuel management is an annual conference launched successfully in 1997. It has since then grown into well established international forum for the exchange and expertise on all significant aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle of research reactors. Oral presentations at this meeting were divided in the following four sessions: International Topics; Fuel Development, Qualification, Fabrication and Licensing; Reactor Operation, Fuel Safety and Core Conversion; Spent Fuel Management, Back-end Options, Transportation. The three poster sessions were devoted to fuel development, qualification, fabrication and licensing; reactor operation, fuel safety, core conversion, spent fuel; spent fuel management, fuel cycle back-end options, transportation

  3. Research reactor spent nuclear fuel shipment from the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, K.; Broz, V.; Novosad, P.; Podlaha, J.; Svitak, F.

    2009-01-01

    In May 2004, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative agreement was signed by the governments of the United States and the Russian Federation. The goal of this initiative is to minimize, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, the existing threat of misuse of nuclear and radioactive materials for terrorist purposes, particularly highly enriched uranium (HEU), fresh and spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and plutonium, which have been stored in a number of countries. Within the framework of the initiative, HEU materials and SNF from research reactors of Russian origin will be transported back to the Russian Federation for reprocessing/liquidation. The program is designated as the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program and is similar to the U.S. Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program, which is underway for nuclear materials of United States origin. These RRRFR activities are carried out under the responsibilities of the respective ministries (i.e., U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Russian Federation Rosatom). The Czech Republic and the Nuclear Research Institute Rez, plc (NRI) joined Global Threat Reduction Initiative in 2004. During NRI's more than 50 years of existence, radioactive and nuclear materials had accumulated and had been safely stored on its grounds. In 1995, the Czech regulatory body , State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS), instructed NRI that all ecological burdens from its past activities must be addressed and that the SNF from the research reactor LVR -15 had to be transported for reprocessing. At the end of November 2007, all these activities culminated with the unique shipment to the Russian Federation of 527 fuel assemblies of SNF type EK-10 (enrichment 10% U-235) and IRT-M (enrichment 36% and 80% U-235) and 657 irradiated fuel rods of EK-10 fuel, which were used in LVR-15 reactor. (authors)

  4. Fuel isolation research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This document is intended to give a broad outline of the Fuel Isolatikn program and to indicate how this program fits into the overall framework of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Similar activities in other countries are described, and the differences in philosophy behind these and the Canadian program are highlighted. A program plan is presented that outlines the development of research programs that contribute to the safety assessment of the disposal concept and the development of technology required for selection and optimization of a feasible fuel isolation system. Some indication of the work that might take place beyond concept assessment, at the end of the decade, is also given. The current program is described in some detail, with emphasis on what the prkgram has achieved to date and hopes to achieve in the future for the concept assessment phase of the waste management program. Finally, some major capital facilities associated with the fuel isolation program are described

  5. Spent fuel performance assessment and research. Final report of a co-ordinated research project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR) 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The report provides an overview of technical issues related to spent fuel wet and dry storage and summarizes the objectives and major findings of research, carried out within the framework of the Coordinated Research Program. Included are the fuel integrity aspects, fuel degradation mechanisms in dry and wet storage, behaviour of storage facility components (metallic components, reinforced concrete). Also included are issues related to long-term storage and monitoring technologies and techniques. Country reports on research projects within the SPAR Coordinated Research Program is presented. A brief history is given on the history of the BEFAST and SPAR Coordinated Research Projects

  6. Spent fuel performance assessment and research. Final report of a co-ordinated research project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR) 1997-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The report provides an overview of technical issues related to spent fuel wet and dry storage and summarizes the objectives and major findings of research, carried out within the framework of the Coordinated Research Program. Included are the fuel integrity aspects, fuel degradation mechanisms in dry and wet storage, behaviour of storage facility components (metallic components, reinforced concrete). Also included are issues related to long-term storage and monitoring technologies and techniques. Country reports on research projects within the SPAR Coordinated Research Program is presented. A brief history is given on the history of the BEFAST and SPAR Coordinated Research Projects.

  7. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  8. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  9. Testing a CANDU-fueling machine at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocaru, Virgil

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, as a national and European premiere, the Fueling Machine Head no. 4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda Unit 2 (NPP) was successfully tested at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR). In 2005, the second Fueling Machine (no. 5) has tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate the CANDU technology in Romania. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig has built being available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing activity. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any CANDU Reactor owner

  10. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. Follow up report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Fuel cell technology continues to grow in the United States, with strong sales in stationary applications and early markets such as data centers, materials handling equipment, and telecommunications sites. New fuel cell customers include Fortune 500 companies Apple, eBay, Coca-Cola, and Walmart, who will use fuel cells to provide reliable power to data centers, stores, and facilities. Some are purchasing multi-megawatt (MW) systems, including three of the largest non-utility purchases of stationary fuel cells in the world by AT and T, Apple and eBay - 17 MW, 10 MW and 6 MW respectively. Others are replacing fleets of battery forklifts with fuel cells. Sysco, the food distributor, has more than 700 fuel cell-powered forklifts operating at seven facilities, with more on order. Mega-retailer Walmart now operates more than 500 fuel cell forklifts at three warehouses, including a freezer facility. Although federal government budget reduction efforts are impacting a wide range of departments and programs, fuel cell and hydrogen technology continues to be funded, albeit at a lower level than in past years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding fuel cell and hydrogen R and D and has nearly 300 ongoing projects at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes universities. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and DOE's Market Transformation efforts have acted as a government ''catalyst'' for market success of emerging technologies. Early market deployments of about 1,400 fuel cells under the ARRA have led to more than 5,000 additional fuel cell purchases by industry with no DOE funding. In addition, interest in Congress remains high. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Coons (D-DE), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and John Hoeven (R-ND) re-launched the bipartisan Senate Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Caucus in August 2012 to promote the continued development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

  11. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site

  12. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  13. Water chemistry regimes for VVER-440 units: water chemistry influence on fuel cladding behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmitko, M.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture next problems of water chemistry influence on fuel cladding behaviour for VVER-440 units are presented: primary coolant technologies; water chemistry specification and control; fuel integrity considerations; zirconium alloys cladding corrosion (corrosion versus burn-up; water chemistry effect; crud deposition; hydrogen absorption; axial offset anomaly); alternatives for the primary coolant regimes

  14. Engine Tune-Up Service. Unit 5: Fuel and Carburetion Systems. Posttests. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, David T.

    This book of posttests is designed to accompany the Engine Tune-Up Service Student Guide for Unit 5, Fuel and Carburetion Systems; available separately as CE 031 217. Focus of the posttests is the inspecting and servicing of the fuel and carburetion systems. One multiple choice posttest is provided that covers the 10 performance objectives…

  15. Catalytic Reforming of Higher Hydrocarbon Fuels to Hydrogen: Process Investigations with Regard to Auxiliary Power Units

    OpenAIRE

    Kaltschmitt, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    This thesis discusses the investigation of the catalytic partial oxidation on rhodium-coated honeycomb catalysts with respect to the conversion of a model surrogate fuel and commercial diesel fuel into hydrogen for the use in auxiliary power units. Furthermore, the influence of simulated tail-gas recycling was investigated.

  16. Two CANDU fueling machines tested at the Institute For Nuclear Research - Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, Cezar; Cojocaru, Virgil

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, as a national and European premiere, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), the Fueling Machine Head no.4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 was successfully tested. In 2005, a second Fueling Machine (no.5) was tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate in Romania the CANDU technology. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig was built and is available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing operation. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any other CANDU Reactor owner. This experience will support the next steps concerning F/M commissioning in the NPP Cernavoda - Unit 2 and also give the confidence to the end-users that the Institute's team can provide technical assistance during the operation. Also, the obtained results demonstrate that the overall refurbishment of the F/M control system in Unit 1 and Unit 2 will be possible. The paper presents: - a short description of the F/M head;- a short description of the F/M test rig; - the computer control system; - the F/M testing activities; -results and expectations. (authors)

  17. Two CANDU fueling machines tested at the Institute For Nuclear Research - Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, C.; Cojocaru, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In 2003, as a national and European premiere, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), the Fueling Machine Head no.4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 was successfully tested. In 2005, a second Fueling Machine (no.5) was tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate in Romania the CANDU technology. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig was built and is available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing operation. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any other CANDU Reactor owner. This experience will support the next steps concerning F/M commissioning in the NPP Cernavoda - Unit 2 and also give the confidence to the end-users that the Institute's team can provide technical assistance during the operation. Also, the obtained results demonstrate that the overall refurbishment of the F/M control system in Unit 1 and Unit 2 will be possible. The paper presents: - a short description of the F/M head;- a short description of the F/M test rig; - the computer control system; - the F/M testing activities; -results and expectations. (authors)

  18. Building on success. The foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David G.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Saris, Elizabeth C.; Massey, Charles D.

    1998-01-01

    The second year of implementation of the research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program was marked by significant challenges and achievements. In July 1998, the Department of Energy completed by significant challenges and achievements. In July 1998, the Department of Energy completed its first shipment of spent fuel from Asia via the Concord Naval Weapons Station in California to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental (INEEL). This shipment, which consisted of three casks of spent nuclear fuel from two research reactors in the Republic of Korea, presented significant technical, legal, and political challenges in the United States and abroad. Lessons learned will be used in the planning and execution of our next significant milestone, a shipment of TRIGA spent fuel from research reactors in Europe to INEEL, scheduled for the summer of 1999. This shipment will include transit across the United States for over 2,000 miles. Other challenges and advances include: clarification of the fee policy to address changes in the economic status of countries during the life of the program; resolution of issues associated with cask certification and the specific types and conditions of spent fuel proposed for transport; revisions to standard contract language in order to more clearly address unique shipping situations; and priorization and scheduling of shipments to most effectively implement the program. As of this meeting, eight shipments, consisting of nearly 2,000 spent fuel assemblies from fifteen countries, have been successfully completed. With the continued cooperation of the international research reactor community, we are committed to building on this success in the remaining years of the program. (author)

  19. Testing of a transport cask for research reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Silva, Luiz Leite da; Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O.; Novara, Oscar E.

    2011-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries which operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a tri-national team and a half-scale model for MTR fuel constructed in Argentina and tested in Brazil. Two test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. Although the specimen has not successfully performed the tests, its overall performance was considered very satisfactory, and improvements are being introduced to the design. A third test sequence is planned for 2011. (author)

  20. Fuel element gamma scanning at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986, a demonstration program was begun at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) to convert operations from high-enrichment uranium fuel to the newly developed U 3 Si 2 low-enrichment fuel. A primary program objective is to validate neutronics calculations conducted by the Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactors Program at Argonne National Laboratory. Accordingly, a new method for determining core-power distribution has been developed. The method is based on gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements to determine the relative levels of 140 La in the fuel elements after each operating cycle. The measurement and data analyses are described and a comparison of measured and diffusion theory calculated values of the core-power distribution is presented in this paper

  1. Research on nondestructive examination methods for CANDU fuel channel inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, M.; Petriu, F.; Toma, V.; Revenco, V.; Calinescu, A.; Ciocan, R.; Iordache, C.; Popescu, L.; Mihalache, M.; Murgescu, C.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of the 1994 edition of CAN/CSA-N285.4 Periodic Inspection Standard, which address all known and postulated degradation mechanisms and introduce material surveillance demands, involve a growing need for improved nondestructive examination (NDE) methods and technologies. In order to have a proper technical support in its decisions concerning fuel channel inspections at Cernavoda NPP, the Romanian Power Authority (RENEL) initiated a Research Program regarding the nondestructive characterization of the fuel channels structural integrity. The paper presents the most significant results obtained on this Research Program: the ENDUS experimental system for Laboratory simulation of the fuel channel inspection, ultrasonic Rayleigh-Lamb waves technique for pressure tubes examination, phase analysis technique for near-surface flaws, influence of the metallurgical state of the pressure tube material on the eddy current defectoscopic signals, characterization of plastic deformation and fracture of zirconium alloys by acoustic emission. (author)

  2. Dry Storage of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel - 13321

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, T.M.; Dunsmuir, M.D.; Leduc, D.R.; Severynse, T.F.; Sindelar, R.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Moore, E.N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Spent fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors is received and stored at the Savannah River Site's L Area Material Storage (L Basin) Facility. This DOE-owned fuel consists primarily of highly enriched uranium in metal, oxide or silicide form with aluminum cladding. Upon receipt, the fuel is unloaded and transferred to basin storage awaiting final disposition. Disposition alternatives include processing via the site's H Canyon facility for uranium recovery, or packaging and shipment of the spent fuel to a waste repository. A program has been developed to provide a phased approach for dry storage of the L Basin fuel. The initial phase of the dry storage program will demonstrate loading, drying, and storage of fuel in twelve instrumented canisters to assess fuel performance. After closure, the loaded canisters are transferred to pad-mounted concrete overpacks, similar to those used for dry storage of commercial fuel. Unlike commercial spent fuel, however, the DOE fuel has high enrichment, very low to high burnup, and low decay heat. The aluminum cladding presents unique challenges due to the presence of an oxide layer that forms on the cladding surface, and corrosion degradation resulting from prolonged wet storage. The removal of free and bound water is essential to the prevention of fuel corrosion and radiolytic generation of hydrogen. The demonstration will validate models predicting pressure, temperature, gas generation, and corrosion performance, provide an engineering scale demonstration of fuel handling, drying, leak testing, and canister backfill operations, and establish 'road-ready' storage of fuel that is suitable for offsite repository shipment or retrievable for onsite processing. Implementation of the Phase I demonstration can be completed within three years. Phases II and III, leading to the de-inventory of L Basin, would require an additional 750 canisters and 6-12 years to complete. Transfer of the fuel from basin storage

  3. Conjugate heat transfer simulations of advanced research reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piro, M.H.A., E-mail: pirom@aecl.ca; Leitch, B.W.

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Temperature predictions are enhanced by coupling heat transfer in solid and fluid zones. • Seven different cases are considered to observe trends in predicted temperature and pressure. • The seven cases consider high/medium/low power, flow, burnup, fuel material and geometry. • Simulations provide temperature predictions for performance/safety. Boiling is unlikely. • Simulations demonstrate that a candidate geometry can enhance performance/safety. - Abstract: The current work presents numerical simulations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer of advanced U–Mo/Al and U–Mo/Mg research reactor fuels in support of performance and safety analyses. The objective of this study is to enhance predictions of the flow regime and fuel temperatures through high fidelity simulations that better capture various heat transfer pathways and with a more realistic geometric representation of the fuel assembly in comparison to previous efforts. Specifically, thermal conduction, convection and radiation mechanisms are conjugated between the solid and fluid regions. Also, a complete fuel element assembly is represented in three dimensional space, permitting fluid flow and heat transfer to be simulated across the entire domain. Seven case studies are examined that vary the coolant inlet conditions, specific power, and burnup to investigate the predicted changes in the pressure drop in the coolant and the fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. In addition, an alternate fuel geometry is considered with helical fins (replacing straight fins in the existing design) to investigate the relative changes in predicted fluid and solid temperatures. Numerical simulations predict that the clad temperature is sensitive to changes in the thermal boundary layer in the coolant, particularly in simultaneously developing flow regions, while the temperature in the fuel is anticipated to be unaffected. Finally, heat transfer between fluid and solid regions is enhanced with

  4. Stereo photo series for quantifying natural fuels. Volume XII: Post-hurricane fuels in forests of the Southeast United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Vihnanek; Cameron S. Balog; Clinton S. Wright; Roger D. Ottmar; Jeffrey W. Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Two series of single and stereo photographs display a range of natural conditions and fuel loadings in post-hurricane forests in the southeastern United States. Each group of photos includes inventory information summarizing vegetation composition, structure and loading, woody material loading and density by size class, forest floor loading, and various site...

  5. Fuel Management at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, V.L.; Nguyen, N.D.; Luong, B.V.; Le, V.V.; Huynh, T.N.; Nguyen, K.C. [Nuclear Research Institute, 01 Nguyen Tu Luc Street, Dalat City (Viet Nam)

    2011-07-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type research reactor which was reconstructed in 1982 from the old 250 kW TRIGA-MARK II reactor. The spent fuel storage was newly designed and installed in the place of the old thermalizing column for biological irradiation. The core was loaded by Russian WWR-M2 fuel assemblies (FAs) with 36% enrichment. The reconstructed reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983 and attained it nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. The first fuel reloading was executed in April 1994 after more than 10 years of operation with 89 highly enriched uranium (HEU) FAs. The third fuel reloading by shuffling of HEU FAs was executed in June 2004. After the shuffling the working configuration of reactor core kept unchanged of 104 HEU FAs. The fourth fuel reloading was executed in November 2006. The 2 new HEU FAs were loaded in the core periphery, at previous locations of wet irradiation channel and dry irradiation channel. After reloading the working configuration of reactor core consisted of 106 HEU FAs. Contracts for reactor core conversion between USA, Russia, Vietnam and the International Atomic Energy Agency for Nuclear fuel manufacture and supply for DNRR and Return of Russian-origin non-irradiated highly enriched uranium fuel to the Russian Federation have been realized in 2007. According to the results of design and safety analyses performed by the joint study between RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory and Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute the mixed core configurations of irradiated HEU and new low enriched uranium (LEU) FAs has been created on 12 September, 2007 and on 20 July, 2009. After reloading in 2009, the 14 HEU FAs with highest burnup were removed from the core and put in the interim storage in reactor pool. The works on full core conversion for the DNRR are being realized in cooperation with the organizations, DOE and IAEA. Contract for Nuclear fuel manufacture and supply of 66 LEU FAs for DNRR

  6. Fossil fuel power generation within the European Research Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-10

    The report is the first in a series of three produced by the PowerClean Thematic Network that looks at and defines future requirements for research and development of fossil fuel power generation in the European Union. It makes the case for fossil fuel R & D with emphasis on the need for clean coal technologies (to increased efficiency and other CO{sub 2} capture and storage) For satisfying future energy demands of the enlarged European Union between now and 2030. The report concludes that affirmative R, D and D action is needed to support the EU power industry, working together on a Europe-wide basis, to establish the use of coal and other fossil fuels in near-zero emissions power plant. The role model would be the European Research Area, as in the Sixth Framework Programme (FP6), but with a more comprehensive range of technical objectives recognising the importance of fossil fuels. Section headings are: introduction; current energy use; future needs and requirements; the future for clean fossil fuel energy in Europe; comparison with approaches adopted elsewhere (USA Vision 21 and FutureGen programmes, Japan); and responsibilities for EU coal R, D & D. 14 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. History of Research Reactor Fuel Fabrication at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freim, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    1982 was a year of tremendous growth for Babcock and Wilcox and its Research Reactor Fuel Facility. The Division has progressed from essentially being a non-competitor to a position where we are growing in strength. This paper describes some of the general aspects of past history and where B and W is now

  8. Fuel Cell Demonstration Project - 200 kW - Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Power Plant Located at the National Transportation Research Center: FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, JB

    2005-05-06

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researches and develops distributed generation technology for the Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Distributed Energy Program. This report describes installation and operation of one such distributed generation system, a United Technology Corporation fuel cell located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee. Data collected from June 2003 to June of 2004, provides valuable insight regarding fuel cell-grid compatibility and the cost-benefit of the fuel cell operation. The NTRC fuel cell included a high-heat recovery option so that use of thermal energy improves project economics and improves system efficiency to 59% year round. During the year the fuel cell supplied a total of 834MWh to the NTRC and provided 300MBtu of hot water. Installation of the NTRC fuel cell was funded by the Distributed Energy Program with partial funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy Down Program, administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. On-going operational expenses are funded by ORNL's utility budget and are paid from operational cost savings. Technical information and the benefit-cost of the fuel cell are both evaluated in this report and sister reports.

  9. Electric utility fuel choice behavior in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joskow, P.L.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1977-10-01

    Electric utility fuel choice behavior is analyzed by a conditional logit model to determine the effects of changing oil prices of five plants. Three of the plants faced favorable expected coal prices and, like many areas of the country, were insensitive to changing oil prices. This was not the case at the New England plant, however, where relatively small price increases would decrease the likelihood of choosing oil as an alternative fuel for new plants. The modeling of utility behavior in fuel decisions is felt to be applicable to other industries where a continuum of decision possibilities does not reasonably characterize choice alternatives. New behavior models are urged in order to obtain better predictions of the effects of a changing economic environment. 10 references.

  10. Research efforts on fuels, fuel models, and fire behavior in eastern hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. Waldrop; Lucy Brudnak; Ross J. Phillips; Patrick H. Brose

    2006-01-01

    Although fire was historically important to most eastern hardwood systems, its reintroduction by prescribed burning programs has been slow. As a result, less information is available on these systems to fire managers. Recent research and nationwide programs are beginning to produce usable products to predict fuel accumulation and fire behavior. We introduce some of...

  11. Basic research on high-uranium density fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugajin, M.; Itoh, A.; Akabori, M.

    1992-01-01

    High-uranium density fuels, uranium silicides (U 3 Si 2 , U 3 Si) and U 6 Me-type uranium alloys (Me = Fe, Mn, Ni), were prepared and examined metallurgically as low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels for research and test reactors. Miniature aluminum-dispersion plate-type fuel (miniplate) and aluminum-clad disk-type fuel specimens were fabricated and subjected to the neutron irradiation in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). Fuel-aluminum compatibility tests were conducted to elucidate the extent of reaction and to identify reaction products. The relative stability of the fuels in an aluminum matrix was established at 350degC or above. Experiments were also performed to predict the chemical form of the solid fission-products in the uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) simulating a high burnup anticipated for reactor service. (author)

  12. Research on Elemental Technology of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Performance Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Dong Uk; Jean, Sang Hwan; Koo, Min

    2003-04-01

    Most of current properties models and fuel performance models used in the performance evaluation codes are based on the in-pile data up to 33,000 MWd/MtU. Therefore, international experts are investigating the properties changes and developing advanced prediction models for high burn-up application. Current research is to develop high burn-up fission gas release model for the code and to support the code development activities by collecting data and models, reviewing/assessing the data and models together, and benchmarking the selected models against the appropriate in-pile data. For high burn-up applications, two stage two step fission gas release model is developed based on the real two diffusion process in the grain lattice and grain boundaries of the fission gases and the observation of accelerated release rate in the high burn-up. It is found that the prediction of this model is in excellent agreement with the in-pile measurement results, not only in the low burn-up but also in the high burn-up. This research is found that the importance of thermal conductivity of oxide fuel, especially in the high burn-up, is focused again. It is found that even the temperature dependent models differ from one to another and most of them overestimate the conductivity in the high burn-up. An in-pile data benchmarking of high LHGR fuel rod shows that the difference can reach 30%∼40%, which predicts 400 .deg. C lower than the real fuel centerline temperature. Recent models on the thermal expansion and heat capacity of oxide fuel are found to be well-defined. Irradiation swelling of the oxide fuel are now well-understood that in most cases in LWRs solid fission product swelling is dominant. Thus, the accumulation of in-pile data can enhance the accuracy of the model prediction, rather than theoretical modeling works. Thermo-physical properties of Zircaloy cladding are also well-defined and well-understood except the thermal expansion. However, it turns out that even the

  13. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  14. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M.; Quist, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author)

  15. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author)

  16. Design and research of fuel element for pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Sheng

    1994-05-01

    The fuel element is the key component for pulsed reactor and its design is one of kernel techniques for pulsed reactor. Following the GA Company of US the NPIC (Nuclear Power Institute of China) has mastered this technique. Up to now, the first pulsed reactor in China (PRC-1) has been safely operated for about 3 years. The design and research of fuel element undertaken by NPIC is summarized. The verification and evaluation of this design has been carried out by using the results of measured parameters during operation and test of PRC-1 as well as comparing the design parameters published by others

  17. Some tooling for manufacturing research reactor fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will discuss some of the tooling necessary to manufacture aluminum-based research reactor fuel plates. Most of this tooling is intended for use in a high-production facility. Some of the tools shown have manufactured more than 150,000 pieces. The only maintenance has been sharpening. With careful design, tools can be made to accommodate the manufacture of several different fuel elements, thus, reducing tooling costs and maintaining tools that the operators are trained to use. An important feature is to design the tools using materials with good lasting quality. Good tools can increase return on investment. (author)

  18. Some Tooling for Manufacturing Research Reactor Fuel Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will discuss some of the tooling necessary to manufacture aluminum-based research reactor fuel plates. Most of this tooling is intended for use in a high-production facility. Some of the tools shown have manufactured more than 150,000 pieces. The only maintenance has been sharpening. With careful design, tools can be made to accommodate the manufacture of several different fuel elements, thus, reducing tooling costs and maintaining tools that the operators are trained to use. An important feature is to design the tools using materials with good lasting quality. Good tools can increase return on investment

  19. Final Technical Report for the MIT Annular Fuel Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-01-01

    MIT-NFC-PR-082 (January 2006) Abstract This summary provides an overview of the results of the U.S. DOE funded NERI (Nuclear Research Energy Initiative) program on development of the internally and externally cooled annular fuel for high power density PWRs. This new fuel was proposed by MIT to allow a substantial increase in power density (on the order of 30% or higher) while maintaining or improving safety margins. A comprehensive study was performed by a team consisting of MIT (lead organization), Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Gamma Engineering Corporation, Framatome ANP(formerly Duke Engineering) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

  20. Pulverulent deposits on fuel assemblies in primary circuit on 2 units at EDF (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatla, A.; Piana, O.

    2015-01-01

    In march 2013, during the moving of some fuel assemblies in the fuel deactivation pool of two units nuclear power plants (Blayais 4 and Chinon B2 units), some fine and powdery deposits in suspension have been observed. In the two cases, the fuel has stayed in the deactivation pool during a long time (12 and 3 months), the units have started for the first time to inject Zinc in the primary circuit in the beginning of the precedent fuel cycle, and the units have operated an extended fuel cycle. EDF has performed analysis to evaluate the harmfulness of the particles and to investigate the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon. 3 conclusions can be drawn. First, the deposits are made up of usual corrosion products issued from the primary circuit components. Secondly, the chemical composition and the powdery characteristics of the deposits exclude nuclear safety risks. Thirdly, the atypical behaviour of the deposits could probably be linked with a modification of their structure due to a zinc effect. Because of the lack of new understanding elements, the extension of zinc injection to other NPP units has been broken off currently in France. EDF is studying the international experience feedback to identify the operating parameters of the nuclear power plant which might influent the phenomenon, and to evaluate if the deposits could enhance fuel cladding corrosion

  1. Atomization of U3Si2 for research reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.K.; Kim, K.H.; Lee, C.T.; Kuk, I.H.

    1995-01-01

    Rotating disk atomization technique is applied to KMRR (Korea Multi-purpose Research Reactor) fuel fabrication. A rotating disk atomizer is designed and manufactured locally and U-4.0 wt. % Si alloy powders are produced. The atomized powders are heat-treated to transform into U 3 Si and the mixture of U 3 Si and Al are extruded to fuel meat. Most of the atomized powders are spherical in shape. The microstructure of the powder is fine due to the rapid solidification. The time required for peritectoid reaction is reduced due to the fine microstructures and the resultant U 3 Si grain size is finer than ever obtained from ingot process. The mechanical properties of the fuel meat are improved: yield strength about 30 %, tensile strength 10% and elongation 250 % increased. (author)

  2. Increasing the flexibility of base-load generating units in operation on fossil fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girshfel' d, V Ya; Khanaev, V A; Volkova, E D; Gorelov, V A; Gershenkroi, M L

    1979-01-01

    Increasing the flexibility of base-load generating units operating on fossil fuel by modifying them is a necessary measure. The highest economic effect is attained with modification of gas- and oil-fired generating units in the Western United Power Systems of the European part of the SPSS. On the basis of available experience, 150- and 200-MW units can be extensively used to regulate the power in the European part of the SPSS through putting them into reserve for the hours of the load dip at night. The change under favorable conditions of 150- and 200-MW units operating on coal to a district-heating operating mode does not reduce the possibilities for flexible operation of these units because it is possible greatly to unload the turbines while the minimum load level of the pulverized fuel fired boiler is retained through transferring a part of the heat load to the desuperheater. It is necessary to accumulate and analyze experience with operation of generating units (especially of supercritical units) with regular shutdowns and starts of groups of units and to solve the problems of modification of generating units, with differentiation with respect to types of fuel and to the united power supply system.

  3. Convective parameters in fuel elements for research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Martinez, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of a prototype for the simulation of fuel elements for research nuclear reactors by natural convection in water is presented in this paper. This project is carry out in the thermofluids laboratory of National Institute of Nuclear Research. The fuel prototype has already been test for natural convection in air, and the first results in water are presented in this work. In chapter I, a general description of Triga Mark III is made, paying special atention to fuel-moderator components. In chapter II and III an approach to convection subject in its global aspects is made, since the intention is to give a general idea of the events occuring around fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. In chapter II, where an emphasis on forced convection is made, some basic concepts for forced convection as well as for natural convection are included. The subject of flow through cylinders is annotated only as a comparative reference with natural convection in vertical cylinders, noting the difference between used correlations and the involved variables. In chapter III a compilation of correlation found in the bibliography about natural convection in vertical cylinders is presented, since its geometry is the more suitable in the analysis of a fuel rod. Finally, in chapter IV performed experiments in the test bench are detailed, and the results are presented in form of tables and graphs, showing the used equations for the calculations and the restrictions used in each case. For the analysis of the prototypes used in the test bench, a constant and uniform flow of heat in the whole length of the fuel rod is considered. At the end of this chapter, the work conclusions and a brief explanation of the results are presented (Author)

  4. Fuel Cells in Distributed Power Market Applications in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastler, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews results from EPRI market analysis, which examined the technical and economic market potential of fuel cells in distributed power markets in the United States. A methodology and approach for developing realistic quantitative estimates of market potential in competitive electricity markets is presented. Market size estimates for phosphoric acid, polymer exchange membrane, high temperature fuel cells (carbonate and solid oxide systems) and ultra-high efficient fuel cell hybrids are estimated. Market potentials are reviewed for fuel cells systems ranging in size from 3 kW up to 20-30 MW in scale and underlying assumptions are provided. The results and implications are discussed in relation to the changing U.S. electric utility market structures. Results will be of value to energy companies and to fuel cell developers seeking to understand revenue sales estimates, market size, and most profitable segments for fuel cells in the competitive US electric markets. (author)

  5. Advanced spent fuel processing technologies for the United States GNEP programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laidler, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Spent fuel processing technologies for future advanced nuclear fuel cycles are being developed under the scope of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). This effort seeks to make available for future deployment a fissile material recycling system that does not involve the separation of pure plutonium from spent fuel. In the nuclear system proposed by the United States under the GNEP initiative, light water reactor spent fuel is treated by means of a solvent extraction process that involves a group extraction of transuranic elements. The recovered transuranics are recycled as fuel material for advanced burner reactors, which can lead in the long term to fast reactors with conversion ratios greater than unity, helping to assure the sustainability of nuclear power systems. Both aqueous and pyrochemical methods are being considered for fast reactor spent fuel processing in the current US development programme. (author)

  6. Geoscience research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of deep disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock. As part of that assessment, a broad program of geoscience and geotechnical work has been undertaken to develop methods for characterizing sites, incorporating geotechnical data into disposal facility design, and incorporating geotechnical data into environmental and safety assessment of the disposal system. General field investigations are conducted throughout the Precambrian Shield, subsurface investigations are conducted at designated field research areas, and in situ rock mass experiments are being conducted in an Underground Research Laboratory. Samples from the field research areas and elsewhere are subjected to a wide range of tests and experiments in the laboratory to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in ground-water-rock-waste interactions. Mathematical models to simulate these processes are developed, verified and validated. 114 refs.; 13 figs

  7. 48 CFR 252.229-7009 - Relief from customs duty and value added tax on fuel (passenger vehicles) (United Kingdom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and value added tax on fuel (passenger vehicles) (United Kingdom). 252.229-7009 Section 252.229-7009... Relief from customs duty and value added tax on fuel (passenger vehicles) (United Kingdom). As prescribed in 229.402-70(i), use the following clause: Relief from Customs Duty and Value Added Tax on Fuel...

  8. Proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel: Appendix B, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel characteristics and transportation casks. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This is Appendix B of a draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. It discusses relevant characterization and other information of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel that could be managed under the proposed action. It also discusses regulations for the transport of radioactive materials and the design of spent fuel casks

  9. Redundant filtration system of the fuel buildings,units 1 and 2 Almaraz NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Tanco, J.

    2011-01-01

    The project redundant filtering fuel buildings in units 1 and 2 of Almaraz NPP, will compliance to the requirements established in the complementary technical instructions to the authorization of exploitation of Almaraz NPP, established by the CSN and will consist of the installation of a new filtration unit.

  10. Fuel cycle industrialization program prepared by N-Fuel Research Committee, ANRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    To meet the new situation resulting from the scaling down of nuclear power development plan in Japan, and the changes due to the new U.S. nuclear non-proliferation policy, the Nuclear Fuel Research Committee of the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy of MITI has prepared the ''Interim Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle''. It sets out in precise terms the methods that should be followed for establishing the nuclear fuel cycle in Japan. Major items treated in this report are; uranium ore development, promotion of uranium stockpiling, construction of domestic uranium enrichment plant, promotion of the construction of a nuclear fuel park, Pu utilization and cooperation in international movement for nuclear non-proliferation, and the establishment of measures for radioactive waste management. Discussions are made from technological, economical, and political view points. Also attached are a table of the comprehensive industrialization plan up to the year 2000 and a table of estimated nuclear fuel demand and supply in Japan.

  11. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on assessing social acceptability of fuels treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry C. Daniel; Michael Valdiserri; Carrie R. Daniel; Pamela Jakes; Pamela Jakes; Susan Barro

    2005-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on research for assessing the social acceptability of fuels treatments. The synthesis is structured around six important considerations for any social acceptability assessment: defining the fuels treatments being assessed; representing...

  12. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  13. Research and development into power reactor fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.

    1983-07-01

    The nuclear fuel in a power reactor must perform reliably during normal operation, and the consequences of abnormal events must be researched and assessed. The present highly reliable operation of the natural UO 2 in the CANDU power reactors has reduced the need for further work in this area; however a core of expertise must be retained for purposes such as training of new staff, retaining the capability of reacting to unforeseen circumstances, and participating in the commercial development of new ideas. The assessment of fuel performance during accidents requires research into many aspects of materials, fuel and fission product behaviour, and the consolidation of that knowledge into computer codes used to evaluate the consequences of any particular accident. This work is growing in scope, much is known from out-reactor work at temperatures up to about 1500 degreesC, but the need for in-reactor verification and investigation of higher-temperature accidents has necessitated the construction of a major new in-reactor test loop and the initiation of the associated out-reactor support programs. Since many of the programs on normal and accident-related performance are generic in nature, they will be applicable to advanced fuel cycles. Work will therefore be gradually transferred from the present, committed power reactor system to support the next generation of thorium-based reactor cycles

  14. Effect of reduced enrichment on the fuel cycle for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1982-01-01

    The new fuels developed by the RERTR Program and by other international programs for application in research reactors with reduced uranium enrichment (<20% EU) are discussed. It is shown that these fuels, combined with proper fuel-element design and fuel-management strategies, can provide at least the same core residence time as high-enrichment fuels in current use, and can frequently significantly extend it. The effect of enrichment reduction on other components of the research reactor fuel cycle, such as uranium and enrichment requirements, fuel fabrication, fuel shipment, and reprocessing are also briefly discussed with their economic implications. From a systematic comparison of HEU and LEU cores for the same reference research reactor, it is concluded that the new fuels have a potential for reducing the research reactor fuel cycle costs while reducing, at the same time, the uranium enrichment of the fuel

  15. Fuel performance of rod-type research reactor fuel using a centrifugally atomized U-Mo powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Yoon Sang; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2009-01-01

    A low enriched uranium nuclear fuel for research reactors has been developed in order to replace a highly enriched uranium fuel according to the non-proliferation policy under the reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) program. In KAERI, a rod-type U 3 Si dispersion fuel has been developed for a localization of the HANARO fuel and a U 3 Si/Al dispersion fuel of 3.15 gU/cc has been used at HANARO as a driver fuel since 2005. Although uranium silicide dispersion fuels such as U 3 Si 2 /Al and U 3 Si/Al are being used widely, high uranium density dispersion fuels (8-9 g/cm 3 ) are required for some high performance research reactors. U-Mo alloys have been considered as one of the most promising uranium alloys for a dispersion fuel due to their good irradiation performance. An international qualification program on U-Mo fuel to replace a uranium silicide dispersion fuel with a U-Mo dispersion fuel has been carried out

  16. Spent fuel management options for research reactors in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    Research reactors (RRs) have been operated in Latin America since the late 1950s, and a total of 23 RRs have been built in the region. At the time of writing (November 2005), 18 RRs are in operation, 4 have been shut down and 1 has been decommissioned. The number of operating RRs in Latin America represents around 6% of the existing operational RRs worldwide and around 21% of the RRs operating in developing countries. Common to all RRs in the region is a consistent record of safe and successful operation. With the purpose of carrying out a collaborative study of different aspects of the management of spent fuel from RRs, some countries from the region proposed to the IAEA in 2000 the organization of a Regional Project. The project (IAEA TC Regional Project RLA/4/018) that was approved for the biennium 2001-2002 and extended for 2003-2004 included the participation of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Peru. The main objectives of this project were: (a) to define the basic conditions for a regional strategy for managing spent fuel that will provide solutions compatible with the economic and technological realities of the countries involved; and (b) to determine what is needed for the temporary wet and dry storage of spent fuel from the research reactors in the countries of the Latin American region that participated in the project. This TECDOC is based on the results of TC Regional Project RLA/4/018. This project was successful in identifying and assessing a number of viable alternatives for RRSF management in the Latin American region. Options for operational and interim storage, spent fuel conditioning and final disposal have been carefully considered. This report presents the views of Latin American experts on RR spent fuel management and will be useful as reference material for the Latin American RR community, decision making authorities in the region and the public in general

  17. Experimental research on safety assurance of advanced WWER fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krainov, Ju.; Kukushkin, Ju.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental investigations on substantiation of implementation of a modernized butt joint for the WWER-440 reactor, carried out in the critical test facility 'P' in the RRC 'Kurchatov Institute'. The comparison results of the calculation and experimental data obtained in the physical startup of Volgodonsk NPP-1 with the WWER-1000 are also given. In the implementation of four-year fuel cycle in the WWER-440 with the average enrichment of fuel makeup 3.82% it was solved to conduct experimental research of power distribution in the vicinity of control rod butt junction. Moreover, it was assumed that adequate actions should be applied to eliminate inadmissible power jumps, if necessary. It is not available to measure their values in NPP conditions. Therefore, the power distribution near the butt joint was studied in a 19-rod bank installed in the critical test facility 'P' first for the normal design of the joint when surrounding fuel assemblies enrichment goes up. Then a set of calculation and tests was fulfilled to optimize a butt junction design. On the base of this research the composition of a butt junction was advanced by placing Hf plates into the junction. The effectiveness of modernized butt joint design was experimentally confirmed. In Volgodonsk NPP-1 with WWER-1000 the four-year fuel cycle is being implemented. During the physical startup of the reactor the measurements of the reactivity effects and coefficients were measured at the minimum controlled flux level, and the parameters of a number of critical states were recorded. The data obtained were compared with the calculation. The validity of the certified code package for forecasting the neutronic characteristics of WWER-1000 cores in the implementation of a four year fuel cycle has been supported (Authors)

  18. Recommended reactor coolant water chemistry requirements for WWER-1000 units with 235U higher enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade worldwide experience of PWRs and WWERs confirms the trends for the improvement of the nuclear power industry electricity production through the implementation of high burn-up or high fuel duty, which are usually accompanied with the usage of UO 2 fuel with higher content of 235 U - 4.0% - 4.5% (5.0%). It was concluded that the onset of sub-cooled nucleate boiling (SNB) on the fuel cladding surfaces and the initial excess reactivity of the core are the primary and basic factors accompanying the implementation of uranium fuel with higher 235 U content, aiming extended fuel cycles and higher burn-up of the fuel in Pressurized Water Reactors. As main consequences of the presence of these factors the modifications of chemical / electrochemical environments of nuclear fuel cladding- and reactor coolant system- surfaces are evaluated. These conclusions are the reason for: 1) The determination of the choices of the type of fuel cladding materials in respect with their enough corrosion resistance to the specific fuel cladding environment, created by the presence of SNB; 2) The development and implementation of primary circuit water chemistry guidelines ensuring the necessary low corrosion rates of primary circuit materials and limitation of cladding deposition and out-of-core radioactivity buildup; 3) Implementation of additional neutron absorbers which allow enough decrease of the initial concentration of H 3 BO 3 in coolant, so that its neutralization will be possible with the permitted alkalising agent concentrations. In this paper the specific features of WWER-1000 units in Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant; use of 235 U higher enriched fuel in the WWER-1000 reactors in the Kozloduy NPP; coolant water chemistry and radiochemistry plant data during the power operation period of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 5, 15 th fuel cycle; evaluation of the approaches and results by the conversion of the WWER-1000 Units at the Kozloduy NPP to the uranium fuel with 4.3% 235 U as

  19. Fuel burnup analysis for the Moroccan TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bakkari, B.; El Bardouni, T.; Nacir, B.; El Younoussi, C.; Boulaich, Y.; Boukhal, H.; Zoubair, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A fuel burnup analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II Moroccan research reactor was established. ► Burnup calculations were done by means of the in-house developed burnup code BUCAL1. ► BUCAL1 uses the MCNP tallies directly in the calculation of the isotopic inventories. ► The reactor life time was found to be 3360 MW h considering full power operating conditions. ► Power factors and fluxes of the in-core irradiation positions are strongly affected by burnup. -- Abstract: The fundamental advantage and main reason to use Monte Carlo methods for burnup calculations is the possibility to generate extremely accurate burnup dependent one group cross-sections and neutron fluxes for arbitrary core and fuel geometries. Yet, a set of values determined for a material at a given position and time remains accurate only in a local region, in which neutron spectrum and flux vary weakly — and only for a limited period of time, during which changes of the local isotopic composition are minor. This paper presents the approach of fuel burnup evaluation used at the Moroccan TRIGA MARK II research reactor. The approach is essentially based upon the utilization of BUCAL1, an in-house developed burnup code. BUCAL1 is a FORTRAN computer code designed to aid in analysis, prediction, and optimization of fuel burnup performance in nuclear reactors. The code was developed to incorporate the neutron absorption reaction tally information generated directly by MCNP5 code in the calculation of fissioned or neutron-transmuted isotopes for multi-fueled regions. The fuel cycle length and changes in several core parameters such as: core excess reactivity, control rods position, fluxes at the irradiation positions, axial and radial power factors and other parameters are estimated. Besides, this study gives valuable insight into the behavior of the reactor and will ensure better utilization and operation of the reactor during its life-time and it will allow the establishment of

  20. Fuels from microalgae: Technology status, potential, and research requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neenan, B.; Feinberg, D.; Hill, A.; McIntosh, R.; Terry, K.

    1986-08-01

    Although numerous options for the production of fuels from microalgae have been proposed, our analysis indicates that only two qualify for extensive development - gasoline and ester fuel. In developing the comparisons that support this conclusion, we have identified the major areas of microalgae production and processing that require extensive development. Technology success requires developing and testing processes that fully utilize the polar and nonpolar lipids produced by microalgae. Process designs used in these analyses were derived from fragmented, preliminary laboratory data. These results must be substantiated and integrated processes proposed, tested, and refined to be able to evaluate the commercial feasibility from microalgae. The production of algal feedstocks for processing to gasoline or ester fuel requires algae of high productivity and high lipid content that efficiently utilize saline waters. Species screening and development suggest that algae can achieve required standards taken individually, but algae that can meet the integrated requirements still elude researchers. Effective development of fuels from microalgae technology requires that R and D be directed toward meeting the integrated standards set out in the analysis. As technology analysts, it is inappropriate for us to dictate how the R and D effort should proceed to meet these standards. We end our role by noting that alternative approaches to meeting the feasibility targets have been identified, and it is now the task of program managers and scientists to choose the appropriate approach to assure the greatest likelihood of realizing a commercially viable technology. 70 refs., 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  1. Current researches on safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Hiroshi; Kiyose, Ryohei

    1980-01-01

    Recently, the problem of safe disposal of radioactive waste generated from nuclear fuel cycle becomes more important in Japan. On the other hand, many researches on shallow land burial of low-level wastes and geologic isolation of high-level wastes have been carried out in the United States of America. In this report, the researches on the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal in the United States of America were briefly introduced with emphasis on the studies on behavior and migration of radionuclide from disposed waste in geosphere. (author)

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE INFLUENCE OF PARAMETERS OF CONTROL OF HEATING POWER GENERATING UNITS ON FUEL CONSUMPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shchinnikov P.A.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is presented analysis of the influence of parameters of state of the process of control on the increase of the fuel consumption of heat power generating units. There are presented results of calculations of the increase of the fuel consumption at the deviation of the working steam temperature and pressure from rated values. Result of calculus is compared with the experiment.

  3. Return of TRIGA fuel from the Medical University of Hanover (MHH) to the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Klaus, Uwe; Schmidt, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The Medical University of Hanover (MHH) returned its TRIGA fuel to the United States in the summer of 1999. This paper deals with the procedure for handling the fuel elements within and outside the reactor facility. It describes the dry loading technology, taking into account the special conditions relevant to the MHH. It also includes the time scale for both the various steps of the procedure and the entire process, as well as the main results of the radiological surveys. (author)

  4. The modeling experience of fuel element units operation under MSC.MARC and MENTAT 2008R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, G.; Kashirin, B.; Kosaurov, A.; Konovalov, Y.; Kuznetsov, A.; Medvedev, A.; Novikov, V.; Vatulin, A.

    2009-01-01

    MSC Software is leading developer of CAE-software in the world, so behaviour of fuel elements modeling with MSC.MARC use is of great practical importance. Behaviour of fuel elements usually is modeled in the elastic-viscous-plastic statement with account on fuel swelling during irradiation. For container type fuel elements contact interaction between fuel pellets and cladding or other parts of fuel element in top and bottom plugs must be in account. Results of simulated behaviour of various type fuel elements - container type fuel elements for PWR and RBMK reactors, dispersion type fuel elements for research reactors are presented. (authors)

  5. Research and development activities on Three Mile Island Unit Two. Annual report for 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The year 1985 was significant in the cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). Major milestones in the project included lifting the plenum assembly from the reactor vessel and the start of operations to remove the damaged fuel from the reactor. This report summarizes these milestones and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include the following: waste immobilization and management; fuel shipping cask delivery and testing; sample acquisition and evaluation; and decontamination and dose reduction. 26 figs.

  6. Development of expert system for fuel monitoring and analysis in WWER-1000 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Evdokimov, I.; Sorokin, A.; Kanukova, V.; Zborovskii, V.; Aliev, T.; Sokolov, N.; Shishkin, A.

    2011-01-01

    At present, an expert system (software package) for fuel monitoring in WWER units is under development in Russia. It comprises several modules which cover analysis of coolant activity, detection of failures and estimation of failure parameters, predictions of activity level and some aspects of PCI analysis. This paper outlines the current version of the fuel monitoring system, its basic features and user interface. Advances in development of computer modules for PCI analysis are reported. At present two levels of PCI analysis are used. The first is estimation of probability for pellets to get in contact with cladding in fuel rods. Estimations are made with taking into account specifications and tolerances for fuel fabrication as well as fuel operation conditions. The second level of PCI analysis implies a simplified approach for on-line calculations of stresses in cladding depending on power ramping rates. The model for PCI calculations and its application within the computer system is demonstrated. (authors)

  7. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  8. Look at potential options for the fast reactor fuel cycle in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the status and plans for the fast reactor fuel cycle in the United States, presents some options that are under consideration, and describes how these options are being evaluated at the present time. The United States will undertake some far-reaching examinations of the entire breeder program strategy in the coming year, and the outcome of these reviews cannot be predicted today. In other papers at this conference you have heard various perspectives from both government and industry representatives. The proposed studies to examine the associated fuel cycle strategies as they relate to the overall emerging breeder strategy are described. The present status of and recent developments in the fuel cycle R and D programs will also be summarized and updated in order to present an overall picture of the United States situation

  9. An analysis of fuel performance cycle 20 of BWR unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Prasad, P.N.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), an industrial unit of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Government of India manufactures and supplies fuel assemblies to the two Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) at Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS 1 and 2) in India which were commissioned on turnkey collaboration with GE, USA. Each fuel assembly has 36 fuel elements arranged in 6x6 square configuration. Each fuel assembly contains UO 2 pellets of different enrichments. Several improvements have been carried out over the years in the manufacture of fuel assemblies. These changes have helped in improving the fuel performance considerably. During cycle 20, the unit 2 was operating at 506/153 MWth/MWe (95.47% of rated thermal power of 530MWth) prior to shut down for refueling outage. In core sipping was completed within two days. Five leakers were identified during in core sipping. The average leaky assembly's exposure was 16,098.4 MWD/T. The minimum value of a leaky assembly's exposure was 8,591 MWD/T. Out of five assemblies, four assemblies had seen two cycles of exposure and were due for discharge. One assembly had seen single cycle. Trend of chemistry parameters for the last four cycles were within tech spec limits. Similarly trend of physics parameters for the fuel assemblies for the last cycles were also within design/tech spec limits. There were no fuel failures in the previous cycles 18 and 19. The manufacturing and QA details of the five assemblies show no deviations from the procedures and the trends are normal and within specified limits. This paper discusses the analysis of fuel failures in detail

  10. A report on the transport of MTR-type spent fuel assemblies of the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshisaki, Magno B.; Leopando, Leonardo S.

    1999-03-01

    Fifty one (51) fuel assemblies of mixed enrichment from the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1), consisting of 50 spent and 1 fresh, were shipped to the United States last 14 March 1999 under the U.S. Return of Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) fuel policy. The shipment was in line with the U.S. initiative to implement its Record of Decision (ROD) which took effect on 13 May 1996 to accept and manage all FRR uranium fuel of U.S. origin and enriched in the United States. The shipment program would last10 years, ending midnight of 13 May 2006. The ROD provided a 3 year extension period within which to accept FRR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) withdrawn from reactors after 2006. The U.S. policy gave priority to the NPT significance of high enriched U, as the prime target of the return of FRR policy. Classified as a developing country, the Philippines, through the PNRI, signed a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy for the cost-free shipment of PRR-1 spent fuel to the United States. Spent fuel loading and transport operations to the port area lasted seven (7) days, from 8 to 14 March 1999. (Author)

  11. Reprocessing of research reactor fuel the Dounreay option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartwright, P.

    1997-08-01

    Reprocessing is a proven process for the treatment of spent U/Al Research Reactor fuel. At Dounreay 12679 elements have been reprocessed during the past 30 years. For reactors converting to LEU fuel the uranium recovered in reprocessing can be blended down to less than 20% U{sub 235}, enrichment and be fabricated into new elements. For reactors already converted to LEU it is technically possible to reprocess spent silicide fuel to reduce the U{sub 235} burden and present to a repository only stable conditioned waste. The main waste stream from reprocessing which contains the Fission products is collected in underground storage tanks where it is kept for a period of at least five years before being converted to a stable solid form for return to the country of origin for subsequent storage/disposal. Discharges to the environment from reprocessing are low and are limited to the radioactive gases contained in the spent fuel and a low level liquid waste steam. Both of these discharges are independently monitored, and controlled within strict discharge limits set by the UK Government`s Scottish Office. Transportation of spent fuel to Dounreay has been undertaken using many routes from mainland Europe and has utilised over the past few years both chartered and scheduled vessel services. Several different transport containers have been handled and are currently licensed in the UK. This paper provides a short history of MTR reprocessing at Dounreay, and provides information to show reprocessing can satisfy the needs of MTR operators, showing that reprocessing is a valuable asset in non-proliferation terms, offers a complete solution and is environmentally acceptable.

  12. Irradiated fuel by-product separation research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burston, M.

    1984-01-01

    Although no decision has been made to reprocess irradiated CANDU fuel, by-product separation research has recently been initiated in Canada because of its potential importance to Canadian research programs in advanced fuel cycles (especially U/Pu cycle development in the near term) and nuclear waste management. In addition, separated by-products could have a significant commercial potential. Demonstrated applications include: heat sources, gamma radiation sources, light sources, new materials for productions of other useful isotopes, etc. For illustrative purposes the calculated market value of by-products currently stored in irradiated CANDU fuel is approximately $210/kgU. Ontario Hydro has initiated a program to study the application of new separation technolgies, such as laser-based techniques and the plasma ion cyclotron resonance separation technique, to either augment and/or supplant the chemical extraction methods. The main goal is to develop new, more economical extraction methods in order to increase the magnitude of the advantages resulting from this approach to reprocessing. (author)

  13. Irradiation experience of IPEN fuel at IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, Jose A.; Neto, Adolfo; Durazzo, Michelangelo; Souza, Jose A.B. de; Frajndlich, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    IPEN/CNEN-SP produces, for its IEA-R1 Research Reactor, MTR fuel assemblies based on U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel type. Since 1985 a qualification program on these fuel assemblies has been performed. Average 235 U burnup of 30% and peak burnup of 50% was already achieved by these fuel assemblies. This paper presents some results acquire, by these fuel assemblies, under irradiation at IEA-R1 Research Reactor. (author)

  14. Research in JAERI on the backend of nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Mitsuru; Takeshita, Isao

    1999-01-01

    Japan's policy of the backend of nuclear fuel cycle is to reprocess spent fuels and recycle recovered plutonium and uranium, under the principle of no surplus plutonium. High-level radioactive waste separated during reprocessing will be disposed of after solidification in vitrified form, followed by the storage for 30 to 50 years and finally by ultimate disposal in a deep geological formation. The role of JAERI and the effective utilization of NUCEF would become more important. The current status of JAERI's research on backend cycle is reviewed together with the future research direction with emphases on NUCEF utilization. (1) Major objectives of safety research is to develop safety criteria and establish technical bases for licensing, to improve the safety of current or near future technology and to clarify the safety margin of licensed technology. (2) The present goal of fundamental research is to show or clarify the chemical or scientific feasibility of advanced system such as for recycling minor actinides or for incinerating long-lived nuclides. (3) Supporting research for nuclear material control is also conducted mainly for international contribution to strengthened safeguards by IAEA and to frame working of international monitoring system for CTBT. (J.P.N.)

  15. Advance reactor and fuel-cycle systems--potentials and limitations for United States utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.; Williams, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential benefits and limitations of advance reactor and fuel-cycle systems for United States utilities. The results of the review of advanced technologies show that for the near and midterm, the only advance reactor and fuel-cycle system with significant potential for United States utilities is the current LWR, and evolutionary, not revolutionary, enhancements. For the long term, the liquid-metal breeder reactor continues to be the most promising advance nuclear option. The major factors leading to this conclusion are summarized

  16. Implementation plan of the environmental impact statement on a proposed policy for acceptance of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of selected portions of the United States Department of Energy's ''Implementation Plan for the Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Policy for Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel'', DOE/EIS-0218, October 1994

  17. Basic Research in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Philip

    1979-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the development of basic research in the U.S. since World War II. Topics include the creation of the federal agencies, physics and astronomy, chemistry, earth science, life science, the environment, and social science. (BB)

  18. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Janice

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta. Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education, environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work, and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit

  19. Hydrogen and fuel cell research: Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, L.

    2006-01-01

    Vision: IESVic's mission is to chart feasible paths to sustainable energy. Current research areas of investigation: 1. Energy system analysis 2. Computational fuel cell engineering; Fuel cell parameter measurement; Microscale fuel cells 3. Hydrogen dispersion studies for safety codes 4. Active magnetic refrigeration for hydrogen liquifaction and heat transfer in metal hydrides 5. Hydrogen and fuel cell system integration (author)

  20. Scientific research on the back-end of the fuel cycle for the 21. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the Atalante-2000 conference is to present the major research axis concerning the nuclear fuel cycle back-end. The different topics are: - Present options concerning fuel cycle back-end; - Reprocessing of spent fuel; - Advanced separation for transmutation; - Processing and packaging of radioactive wastes; - Design and fabrication of targets for transmutation; and - Conversion of military plutonium into MOX fuels

  1. Elucidating the consumption and CO_2 emissions of fossil fuels and low-carbon energy in the United States using Lotka–Volterra models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Bi-Huei; Chang, Chih-Jen; Chang, Chun-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    By using the Lotka–Volterra model, this work examines for the first time the feasibility of using low-carbon energy to reduce fossil fuel consumption in the United States and, ultimately, to decrease CO_2 emissions. The research sample in this work consists of data on energy consumption and CO_2 emissions in the United States. Parameter estimation results reveal that although the consumption of low-carbon energy increases the consumption of fossil fuels, the latter does not affect the former. Low-carbon energy usage, including nuclear energy and solar photovoltaic power, increases fossil fuel consumption because the entire lifetime of a nuclear or solar energy facility, from the construction of electricity plants to decommissioning, consumes tremendous amounts of fossil fuels. This result verifies the infeasibility of low-carbon energy to replace fossil fuels under the current mining technology, electricity generation skills and governmental policy in the United States and explains why the United States refused to become a signatory of the Kyoto Protocol. Equilibrium analysis results indicate that the annual consumption of fossil fuels will ultimately exceed that of low-carbon energy by 461%. Since our proposed Lotka–Volterra model accurately predicts the consumption and CO_2 emission of different energy sources, this work contributes to the energy policies. - Highlights: • Our Lotka–Volterra model accurately predicts consumption of different energy sources. • We find the current infeasibility of using low-carbon energy to reduce fossil fuels. • The set-up of nuclear and solar plants increases fossil fuel usage in the U.S. • The consumption of fossil fuels will exceed that of low-carbon energy by 435%. • United States government prefers economic development over environmental protection.

  2. Status of research reactor spent fuel world-wide: Database summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    Results complied in the research reactor spent fuel database are used to assess the status of research reactor spent fuel world-wide. Fuel assemblies, their types, enrichment, origin of enrichment and geological distribution among the industrialized and developed countries of the world are discussed. Fuel management practices in wet and dry storage facilities and the concerns of reactor operators about long-term storage of their spent fuel are presented and some of the activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency to address the issues associated with research reactor spent fuel are outlined. (author). 4 refs, 17 figs, 4 tabs

  3. The development of mobile melt-dilute technology for the treatment of former Soviet Union research reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, D.A.; Howden, E.A.; Allen, K.J.; Marsden, K.; Westphal, B.R.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.; Fisher, D.L.; Adams, T.M.; Sindelar, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    United States Government funded national security nuclear non-proliferation projects have historically focused on power reactor spent fuel assemblies that contain weapons usable materials. More recently concern and emphasis have been focused on the spent fuel located at the many research reactor facilities spread throughout the Former Soviet Union. The need exists for a mobile system that can be deployed at these research reactors for the purpose of ensuring that the nuclear materials cannot be used for weapons development. On-site application of the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) process offers an economical method for converting weapons usable Former Soviet Union high enriched uranium research reactor fuel to a safe and secure low enriched uranium ingot. The process will generate little waste and will be performed in a sealed canister that will contain all off-gas products generated during the melting process, eliminating the need for an off-gas treatment system. The process is modular, reusable, and readily portable to a desired reactor site or storage location. The storage canisters containing the melted ingot can be configured for compatibility with the fuel storage technologies currently available or returned to Russia for reprocessing under the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program. The objective of the MMD Project is to develop the mobile melt and dilute technology in preparation for active deployment at Russian built and fueled research reactors. The project has just completed conceptual design and is beginning proof of principle experiments and integrated prototype design of the furnace and canister. (authors)

  4. Shipping cask demand associated with United States Government storage of commercial spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daling, P.M.; Engel, R.L.

    1983-05-01

    There were primarily two objectives of this study. The first was to develop estimates of the shipping cask fleet size that will be needed in the United States in the near future. These estimates were compared with current US spent fuel cask fleet size to determine its adequacy to provide the transportation services. The second objective was to develop estimates of the transportation costs associated with future movements of spent fuel. The results of this study were based on assumptions that were made prior to passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 which authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide Federal Interim Storage of spent fuel from commercial reactors. The Act requires that the DOE is responsible for transportation of the fuel, although private industry is to provide these services. This paper examined the impacts of various spent fuel management strategies on spent fuel transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs. Conclusions related to optimization of the spent fuel transportation system can be drawn from the results of this study. The conclusions can be affected by changing the given set of assumptions used in this analysis. 3 tables

  5. Bubble Chamber Research Group Microcomputer Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.; Barlow, J.; Mace, P.R.; Seller, P.; Waters, M.; Watson, J.G.

    1982-05-01

    A distributed data acquisition system has been developed by the Bubble Chamber Research Group at the Rutherford Appleton laboratory for use with their film measuring machines. The system is based upon a set of microcomputers linked together with a VAX 11/780 computer, in a local area computer network. This network is of the star type and uses a packet switching technique. Each film measuring machine is equipped with a microcomputer which controls the function of the table, buffers data and enhances the interface between operators and machines. This paper provides a detailed description of each microcomputer and can be used as a reference manual for these computers. (author)

  6. Commercial spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States, 1964--1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This report provides an overview of US commercial light-water reactor spent-fuel shipments that have occurred from January, 1964 through December, 1987. A summary analysis was performed on these historical shipments, showing the amount of fuel that has been shipped to research facilities, reprocessing plants, away-from-reactor (AFR) storage sites, and other reactors. Also presented in this report is a listing of potential spent-fuel shipments to and/or from commercial nuclear plants. Table 1 provides the detailed listing of historical spent-fuel shipments. Table 2 is a summary of these shipments grouped by destination. Section IV discusses utility plans for future spent-fuel shipments. 2 tabs

  7. NREL Fuels and Engines Research: Maximizing Vehicle Efficiency and

    Science.gov (United States)

    chemistry, conversion, and combustion to the evaluation of advanced fuels in actual engines and vehicles . With fuel chemistry, our scientific discoveries start out small. We use quantum mechanical modeling to explore how fuels with varying chemistry interact with engine and vehicle design. At our Fuel Combustion

  8. Life-cycle cost analysis for Foreign Research Reactor, Spent Nuclear Fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, P.B.; Geddes, R.L.; Jackson, W.N.; McDonell, W.R.; Dupont, M.E.; McWhorter, D.L.; Liutkus, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    DOE-EM-37 requested a life-cycle cost analysis for disposal of the Foreign Research Reactor-Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR-SNF). The analysis was to address life-cycle and unit costs for a range of FRR-SNF elements from those currently available (6,000 elements) to the (then) bounding case (15,000 elements). Five alternative disposition strategies were devised for the FRR-SNF elements. Life-cycle costs were computed for each strategy. In addition, the five strategies were evaluated in terms of six societal and technical goals. This report summarizes the study that was originally documented to DOE-EM

  9. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This report describes research performed in ten laboratories within the framework of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water. The project consisted of exposure of standard racks of corrosion coupons in the spent fuel pools of the participating research reactor laboratories and the evaluation of the coupons after predetermined exposure times, along with periodic monitoring of the storage water. A group of experts in the field contributed a state of the art review and provided technical supervision of the project. Localized corrosion mechanisms are notoriously difficult to understand, and it was clear from the outset that obtaining consistency in the results and their interpretation from laboratory to laboratory would depend on the development of an excellent set of experimental protocols. These experimental protocols are described in the report together with guidelines for the maintenance of optimum water chemistry to minimize the corrosion of aluminium clad research reactor fuel in wet storage. A large database on corrosion of aluminium clad materials has been generated from the CRP and the SRS corrosion surveillance programme. An evaluation of these data indicates that the most important factors contributing to the corrosion of the aluminium are: (1) High water conductivity (100-200 μS/cm); (2) Aggressive impurity ion concentrations (Cl - ); (3) Deposition of cathodic particles on aluminium (Fe, etc.); (4) Sludge (containing Fe, Cl - and other ions in concentrations greater than ten times the concentrations in the water); (5) Galvanic couples between dissimilar metals (stainless steel-aluminium, aluminium-uranium, etc); (6) Scratches and imperfections (in protective oxide coating on cladding); (7) Poor water circulation. These factors operating both independently and synergistically may cause corrosion of the aluminium. The single most important key to preventing corrosion is maintaining good

  10. Inspection of fuel elements in the cooling pond of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S.V.; Mestnikov, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    Nondestructive testing methods for fuel bundles and fuel elements in the cooling ponds of atomic power plants, using special inspection stands, have come into widespread use during the past decade. This paper describes a methodological stand that was built for the laboratory development of methods and individual units of inspection stands for fuel bundles of RBMK and VVER-1000 reactors. A complex of equipment was developed for the study of irradiated fuel elements, thus creating a methodological base for developing techniques for nondestructive testing of irradiated fuel elements and equipment to obtain information about the state of the fuel elements in a reactor expeditiously. The time required to inspect a fuel element can be shortened using some techniques simultaneously. The length of a fuel element can be measured simultaneously with visual inspection, eddy-current flaw detection can be preformed at the same time as the tranverse size of the fuel element is being determined. 6 refs., 5 figs

  11. Japanese perspectives and research on packaging, transport and storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, T.; Ito, C.; Yamakawa, H.; Shirai, K.

    2004-01-01

    The Japanese policy on spent fuel is reprocessing. Until, reprocessed, spent fuel shall be stored properly. This paper overviews current status of transport and storage of spent fuel with related research in Japan. The research was partly carried out under a contract of Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of the Japanese government

  12. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES OF THERMO-PHYSICAL AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL INTERNALS OF BIO-DIESEL FUEL

    OpenAIRE

    V. N. Goryachkin; A. V. Ivaschenko

    2010-01-01

    The conducted researches are related to transfer of diesel engines to biodiesel fuel. The technique and results of an experimental research of thermo-physical and physical-and-chemical properties of biodiesel fuel as well as mixes of biodiesel fuel with the petroleum one are presented.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES OF THERMO-PHYSICAL AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL INTERNALS OF BIO-DIESEL FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Goryachkin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The conducted researches are related to transfer of diesel engines to biodiesel fuel. The technique and results of an experimental research of thermo-physical and physical-and-chemical properties of biodiesel fuel as well as mixes of biodiesel fuel with the petroleum one are presented.

  14. The use of radiochemical techniques in fuel cell research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, H.

    1975-01-01

    The utilization of metal chelates as catalysts in fuel cell research gives rise to special problems which cannot be solved by the usual methods, but may be well clarified by isotope technical methods. The electrocatalytic efficiency of polymer iron phthalocyanine (on carbon carriers) can be proved by the plotting of potential-current density curves. Two questions, however, remain unanswered: a) What is the solubility behaviour of the catalyst, and b) is there an additional stabilizing interaction between the metal chelate catalyst and the carbon electrode. To answer the first question, the iron phthalocyanine was labelled with Fe-59 and the dissolving time of the complexed Fe ions measured; the results were compared with the potential time behaviour of the oxygen cathodes. To check the interactions between phthalocyamine catalysts and carbon carrier, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used. The evidence obtained suggest the application of isotope technical methods to an ever greater extent than up to now in fuel cell and battery research. (RB/LH) [de

  15. Used fuel disposition research and development roadmap - FY10 status.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-10-01

    Since 1987 the U.S. has focused research and development activities relevant to the disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel and high level waste on the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. At the same time, the U.S. successfully deployed a deep geologic disposal facility for defense-related transuranic waste in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 2009 the DOE established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Office of Nuclear Energy. The Mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. national laboratories have participated on these programs and has conducted research and development related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive research and development (R&D) program investigating a variety of geologic media has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R&D program is being developed in the UFDC with a goal of meeting the UFDC Grand Challenge to provide a sound technical basis for absolute confidence in the safety and security of long-term storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes from the nuclear energy enterprise. The DOE has decided to no longer pursue the development of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since a repository site will ultimately have to be selected, sited, characterized, designed, and licensed, other disposal options must now be considered. In addition to the unsaturated volcanic tuff evaluated at Yucca Mountain, several different geologic media are under investigation internationally and preliminary assessments indicate that disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level waste in these media is feasible. Considerable progress has been made in

  16. Used fuel disposition research and development roadmap - FY10 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1987 the U.S. has focused research and development activities relevant to the disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel and high level waste on the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. At the same time, the U.S. successfully deployed a deep geologic disposal facility for defense-related transuranic waste in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 2009 the DOE established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Office of Nuclear Energy. The Mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. national laboratories have participated on these programs and has conducted research and development related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive research and development (R and D) program investigating a variety of geologic media has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R and D program is being developed in the UFDC with a goal of meeting the UFDC Grand Challenge to provide a sound technical basis for absolute confidence in the safety and security of long-term storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes from the nuclear energy enterprise. The DOE has decided to no longer pursue the development of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since a repository site will ultimately have to be selected, sited, characterized, designed, and licensed, other disposal options must now be considered. In addition to the unsaturated volcanic tuff evaluated at Yucca Mountain, several different geologic media are under investigation internationally and preliminary assessments indicate that disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level waste in these media is feasible. Considerable progress has been

  17. Selection of fuel design for conversion and upgradation of Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) is being converted from the use of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel and its power is also being upgraded. In order to select new fuel for the converted and upgraded core ten different fuel element designs were analyzed and their relative performance was compared. Results of this study were later used to select appropriate design of the new fuel for PARR-1. This paper describes the computational methodology utilized for the analysis of various fuel element designs. Criteria for selecting the new fuel element are discussed and guidelines forming the selection basis of the new fuel design are given. (author)

  18. Reactivity feedback coefficients of a material test research reactor fueled with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Farhan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)], E-mail: farhan73@hotmail.com; Majid, Asad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2008-10-15

    The reactivity feedback coefficients of a material test research reactor fueled with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuels were calculated. For this purpose, the low-density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, moderator temperature reactivity coefficient and moderator density reactivity coefficient. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the average values of fuel temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, moderator temperature reactivity coefficient and moderator density reactivity coefficient from 20 deg. C to 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, followed the relationships (in units of {delta}k/k x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}) -2.116 - 0.118 {rho}{sub U}, 0.713 - 37.309/{rho}{sub U} and -12.765 - 34.309/{rho}{sub U}, respectively for 4.0 {<=} {rho}{sub U} (g/cm{sup 3}) {<=} 6.0.

  19. Chemistry research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikis, A.C.; Garisto, F.; Lemire, R.J.; Paquette, J.; Sagert, N.H.; Saluja, P.P.S.; Sunder, S.; Taylor, P.

    1988-01-01

    This publication reviews chemical research in support of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The overall objective of this research is to develop the fundamental understanding required to demonstrate the suitability of waste immobilization media and processes, and to develop the chemical information required to predict the long-term behaviour of radionuclides in the geosphere after the waste form and the various engineered barriers containing it have failed. Key studies towards the above objective include experimental and theoretical studies of uranium dioxide oxidation/dissolution; compilation of thermodynamic databases and an experimental program to determine unavailable thermodynamic data; studies of hydrothermal alteration of minerals and radionuclide interactions with such minerals; and a study examining actinide colloid formation, as well as sorption of actinides on groundwater colloids

  20. Fuel cell programs in the United States for stationary power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, M.

    1996-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, is participating with the private sector in sponsoring the development of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technologies for application in the utility, commercial and industrial sectors. Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) development was sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy in previous years and is now being commercialized by the private sector. Private sector participants with the Department of Energy include the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research institute (GRI), electric and gas utilities, universities, manufacturing companies and their suppliers. through continued government and private sector support, fuel cell systems are emerging power generation technologies which are expected to have significant worldwide impacts. An industry with annual sales of over a billion dollars is envisioned early in the 21st century. PAFC power plants have begun to enter the marketplace and MCFC and SOFC power plants are expected to be ready to enter the marketplace in the late 1990s. In support of the efficient and effective use of our natural resources, the fuel cell program seeks to increase energy efficiency and economic effectiveness of power generation. This is to be accomplished through effectiveness of power generation. This is accomplished through the development and commercialization of cost-effective, efficient and environmentally desirable fuel cell systems which will operate on fossil fuels in multiple and end use sectors.

  1. The FMEA Analysis for Fuel Handling System at Cernavoda Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Woon; Rhee, Bo Wook; Yoon, Chul; Kim, Hyeong Tae; Cho, In Gil; Kim, Seong Ho

    2006-01-01

    A Nuclear Safety Evaluation was performed by an independent assessor at the request of the regulatory authority CNCAN (Comisia Nationala pentru Controlul Activitatilor Nucleare. National Committee for Nuclear Activities Control in Romania) to provide an independent overview of all the nuclear safety aspects of Cernavoda Unit 2 under construction and an expert opinion whether the completed Cernavoda Unit-2 Nuclear Power Plant would satisfy current Western European nuclear safety objectives and practices. A report was produced (Cernavoda 2 Nuclear Safety Expert Project, 'Task 10 . Safety Evaluation Report', A.F.Parsons, NNC Limited, December 2001) and contains recommendations either mandatory or advisory. The FMEA study, one of the mandatory recommendations, is performing now for fuel handling system and radioactive waste handling system for Cernavoda unit 2 in Romania sponsored by KHNP. In this paper, only the FMEA study for fuel handling system is presented

  2. Radiological safety experience in nuclear fuel cycle operations at Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushparaja; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Subramaniam, G.

    2000-01-01

    Activities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, cover nuclear fuel cycle operations based on natural uranium as the fuel. The facilities include: plant for purification and production of nuclear grade uranium metal, fuel fabrication, research reactor operation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management in each stage. Comprehensive radiation protection programmes for assessment and monitoring of radiological impact of these operations, both in occupational and public environment, have been operating in BARC since beginning. These programmes, based on the 1990 ICRP Recommendations as prescribed by national regulatory body, the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), are being successfully implemented by the Health, Safety and Environment Group, BARC. Radiation Hazards Control Units attached to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities provide radiation safety surveillance to the various operations. The radiation monitoring programme consists of measurement and control of external exposures by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), hand-held and installed instruments, and internal exposures by bioassay and direct whole body counting using shadow shield counter for beta gamma emitters and phoswich detector based system for plutonium. In addition, an environmental monitoring programme is in place to assess public exposures resulting from the operation of these facilities. The programme involves analysis of various matrices in the environment such as bay water, salt, fish, sediment and computation of resulting public exposures. Based on the operating experience in these plants, improved educating and training programmes for plant operators, have been designed. This, together with the application of new technologies have brought down individual as well as average doses of occupational workers. The environmental releases remain a small fraction of the authorised limits. The operating health physics experience in some of these facilities is discussed in this paper

  3. Management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors and residues from post-irradiation examination of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    The safe and economic management of spent fuel is important for all countries which have nuclear research or power reactors. It involves all aspects of the handling, transportation, storage, conditioning and reprocessing or final disposal of the spent fuel. In the case of spent fuel management from power reactors the shortage of available reprocessing capacity and the rising economic interest in the direct disposal of spent fuel have led to an increasing interest in the long term storage and management of spent fuel. The IAEA has played a major role in coordinating the national activities of the Member States in this area. It was against this background that the Technical Committee Meeting on ''Safe Management of Spent Fuel From Research Reactors, Prototype Power Reactors and Fuel From Commercial Power Reactors That Has Been Subjected to PIE (Post Irradiated Examination)'' (28th November - 1st December 1988) was organised. The aims of the current meeting have been to: 1. Review the state-of-the-art in the field of management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors, as well as the residues from post irradiation examination of commercial power reactor fuel. The emphasis was to be on the safe handling, conditioning, transportation, storage and/or disposal of the spent fuel during operation and final decommissioning of the reactors. Information was sought on design details, including shielding, criticality and radionuclide release prevention, heat removal, automation and remote control, planning and staff training; licensing and operational practices during each of the phases of spent fuel management. 2. Identify areas where additional research and development are needed. 3. Recommend areas for future international cooperation in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Three-peat NREL Intern Pushes Boundaries of Early-Stage Fuels Research on

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Stage Fuels Research on Way to Master's Degree January 4, 2018 Woman preparing a fuel evaluation in a . Mission & Programs Awards History Leadership Community Education Center Economic Impact Environment

  5. Basic Research Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIlroy, A.; McRae, G.; Sick, V.; Siebers, D. L.; Westbrook, C. K.; Smith, P. J.; Taatjes, C.; Trouve, A.; Wagner, A. F.; Rohlfing, E.; Manley, D.; Tully, F.; Hilderbrandt, R.; Green, W.; Marceau, D.; O' Neal, J.; Lyday, M.; Cebulski, F.; Garcia, T. R.; Strong, D.

    2006-11-01

    To identify basic research needs and opportunities underlying utilization of evolving transportation fuels, with a focus on new or emerging science challenges that have the potential for significant long-term impact on fuel efficiency and emissions.

  6. Reprocessing ability of high density fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, A.; Belieres, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of a new high density fuel is becoming a key issue for Research Reactors operators. Such a new fuel should be a Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) fuel with a high density, to improve present in core performances. It must be compatible with the reprocessing in an industrial plant to provide a steady back-end solution. Within the framework of a work group CEA/CERCA/COGEMA on new fuel development for Research Reactors, COGEMA has performed an evaluation of the reprocessing ability of some fuel dispersants selected as good candidates. The results will allow US to classify these fuel dispersants from a reprocessing ability point of view. (author)

  7. Fuel policy of the United Kingdom in the 21-st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    The main aspects of the United Kingdom fuel policy are analyzed. The possibility of using the new energy sources such as wind power, energy of waves, tide solar geothermal and thermonuclear energy is discussed. It is noted that in the large-scale power engineering for the purpose of fuel economy it is necessary to use schemes with combined production of heat and electric power. Construction of NPPs with thermal reactors having the total power of 40 GW by 2000 is projected as maximum program. Large commissioning of fast reactors is planned at the end of this century and at the beginning of next one. The exact date is determined by economic reasons, in particular, by the ratio of specific costs for thermal and fast reactors and relative cost of fuel cycle depending on the natural uranium cost. Favourable financial position of foreign partners and optimization of specifications of the NPP with a gas-cooled fast reactor (the use of helium or carbon dioxide is possible) make it possible to realize this reactor concept at the present stage approximately in two years. It is concluded that the development of methods for converting coal into liquid and gas fuels and transition to electric power production at NPPs are the main directions in fuel policy. In the future the use of wind and solar energy for district heating is the most favourable for the United Kingdom while the geothermal energy is the least perspective. In the far future the using the thermonuclear fusion is also perspective [ru

  8. Fuel Cell Backup Power Unit Configuration and Electricity Market Participation: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhiwen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eichman, Josh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-13

    This National Renewable Energy Laboratory industry-inspired Laboratory Directed Research and Development project evaluates the feasibility and economics of using fuel cell backup power systems in cell towers to provide grid services (e.g., balancing, ancillary services, demand response). The work is intended to evaluate the integration of thousands of under-utilized, clean, efficient, and reliable fuel cell systems that are already installed in cell towers for potential grid and ancillary services.

  9. History of Significant Vehicle and Fuel Introductions in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirk, Matthew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alleman, Teresa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thomas, John F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Brian H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines (Co-Optima) project, a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to accelerate the introduction of affordable, scalable, and sustainable biofuels and high-efficiency, low-emission vehicle engines. The simultaneous fuels and vehicles research and development is designed to deliver maximum energy savings, emissions reduction, and on-road performance.

  10. Archaeomagnetic research in the United States midcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Stacey Nicole

    This dissertation combines archaeomagnetic and independent chronometric data from 240 archaeological features to develop a regional secular variation curve for the U.S. midcontinent. These data were obtained from features located between 31.5--40.5° N latitude and 82.5--93.5° W longitude that have been dated to between 60 and 10,700 cal BP. The archaeomagnetic samples were collected from 41 sites within this region over the past 35 years under the direction of four different researchers: Robert DuBois (University of Oklahoma), Daniel Wolfman (University of Arkansas and New Mexico State Museum), Wulf Gose (University of Texas at Austin), and myself. In this project, the data are initially smoothed through the moving windows method to form the first approximation of the curve. Outlier analyses and pairwise statistical comparisons are utilized to refine the smoothed curve, and the results are compared to other Holocene-aged secular variation records from North America. These analyses indicate that the final curve should be treated as three distinct segments with different precision and use recommendations. First, the 850--75 cal BP segment can be used to date archaeomagnetic sample from the project area with expected temporal precision of 100--200 years. Second, the 2528--850 cal BP segment can be used cautiously to date archaeomagnetic samples with an expected temporal precision of 200--300 years. Third, the 9755--4650 cal BP segment should be used for contextual dating purposes only, in that an undated sample can be put into a regional context through comparison with the segment's constituent samples. Finally, three archaeological problems are addressed through the archaeomagnetic data. First, archaeomagnetic data are used to resolve the temporal conflict between an eastern Tennessee structure's morphology and a much earlier radiocarbon date obtained for the structure. Then, archaeomagnetic data are used to address a number of internal chronology questions

  11. A comprehensive guide to fuel management practices for dry mixed conifer forests in the northwestern United States: Mechanical, chemical, and biological fuel treatment methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa B. Jain; Mike A. Battaglia; Han-Sup Han; Russell T. Graham; Christopher R. Keyes; Jeremy S. Fried; Jonathan E. Sandquist

    2014-01-01

    Several mechanical approaches to managing vegetation fuels hold promise when applied to the dry mixed conifer forests in the western United States. These are most useful to treat surface, ladder, and crown fuels. There are a variety of techniques to remove or alter all kinds of plant biomass (live, dead, or decomposed) that affect forest resilience. It is important for...

  12. Conditioning spent fuels from research nuclear reactor in ceramic dies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, D.O; Rodriguez, D.S; Mateos, P; Heredia, A; Sangilippo, M; Sterba, M

    2002-01-01

    The problem of immobilizing nuclear wastes is a complex one and is vitally important in the nuclear fuels cycle. In the case of spent elements from research reactors, the presence of large amounts of aluminum makes the procedure more complex and, therefore, onerous. There are various alternatives proposed for processing these materials. Two methods were studied in the Nuclear Materials Division for obtaining, as a final product, a vitreous block that could be place definitively in a geological repository. The processes are briefly, as follows: 1.By mechanical and chemical processes eliminating all the exterior aluminum from the fuel plates and then placing the product which we will call 'meat' (with some additional treatment and mixing with the amount needed to produce a natural uranium compound or weakened by decreasing the isotope enrichment in U-235) in a vitreous matrix. 2.Mechanically eliminate the aluminum from the exterior frame (as shown below) by shearing and cutting off the sectors containing only the Al, but leaving the rest of the aluminum, a big part of which is still present (4511.03), then doing the same procedure as in the case above: mixing with a natural uranium compound or weakening and vitrifying this mixture. In both cases, the vitrification can be carried out by fusion as well as by sintering. Given that these methods imply a big increase in volume together with a big mass of uranium and an even bigger amount of glass we decided to study an alternative. The proposed process involves synthesizing the mixtures obtained from the pre-treatment of the fuel plates (as described later) with natural isotope uranium oxide in order to obtain a block with the appropriate properties for its final disposal in a deep geological repository (CW)

  13. Ongoing and planned fuel safety research in NEA member states - Compiled from SEGFSM Members' Contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    This report is in response to an action placed on SEGFSM members to compile ongoing and planned fuel safety research in NEA member states with the aim of providing CSNI an overview on related R and D international programmes and projects, along with the identification of current and future needs and priorities. A questionnaire was distributed to SEGFSM members on 18 October 2000, requesting them to identify fuel safety research programmes and to provide information on achievements and future plans. The questionnaire required respondents to provide information on the ongoing R and D programmes under the following headings: Title; Research Laboratory/Sponsor(s); Objectives/Goals; Status of Work; Brief description/presentation of the main results achieved; Future plans; References. Replies were received from organizations in the following countries: Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Korea, Norway (Halden Reactor Project), Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA. The report is based on the information provided in the replies received, as a consequence it cannot be viewed as comprehensive; programmes may well be in progress in addition to those detailed here. It is also possible that the detailed results of some programmes may remain proprietary and therefore not available in the short term. The report is organized in topic sections relating to: fuel and clad studies, integral fuel rod tests and PIE, LOCA and RIA studies including whole rods and bundles as well as single effects studies of fuel and cladding, code development for both steady state and transient fuel behaviour, thermal hydraulics, reactor physics codes and finally severe accident studies. The main issues for the current generation of reactors are those of high burn-up performance in normal operations, LOCA and RIA conditions and the main goal for the industry is to consolidate the safety issues to bring all countries up to a licensed discharge burn-up of ∼60 MWd/kg in

  14. Main results and status of the development of LEU fuel for Russian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A.; Morozov, A.; Suprun, V.; Dobrikova, I.

    2005-01-01

    VNIINM develops low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel on base U-Mo alloys and a novel design of pin-type fuel elements. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. The work is carried on the following main directions: - irradiate LEU U-Mo dispersion fuel (the uranium density up to 6,0 g/cm 3 ) in two Russian research reactors: MIR (RIAR, Dimitrovgrad) as pin type fuel mini-elements and in WWR-M (PINP, Gatchina) within full-scaled fuel assembly (FA) with pin type fuel elements; - finalize development of design and fabrication process of IRT type FA with pin type fuel elements; - develop methods of reducing of U-Mo fuel --Al matrix interaction under irradiation; - develop fabricating methods of fuel elements on base of monolithic U-Mo fuel. The paper generally reviews the results of calculation, design and technology investigations accomplished by now. (author)

  15. Status and current spent fuel storage practices in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Brief discussions are presented on the history and state of spent fuel generation by utilities that comprise the United States commercial nuclear power industry, the current situation regarding the Federal government's nuclear waste policy, and evolving spent fuel storage practices. These evolving spent fuel storage practices are the result of private sector initiatives, but appear to be influenced by various external factors. The paper is not intended to provide a comprehensive appraisal of the storage initiatives being conducted by the private sector. The focus, instead, is on the Federal government's role and activities related to spent fuel management. Although the Federal government has adopted a policy calling for deep geological disposal of spent fuel, the US Congress has recently begun to consider expanding that policy to include a centralized interim storage facility. In the absence of such an expanded policy, the Department of Energy has performed some preliminary activities that would expedite development of a centralized interim storage facility, if Congress were to enact such a policy. The Department's current activities with regard to developing a centralized interim storage facility, which are consistent with the current policy, are described in the paper. The paper also describes two important technical development activities that have been conducted by the Department of Energy to support improved efficiency in spent fuel management. The Department's activities regarding development of a burnup credit methodology, and a dry transfer system are summarized. (author)

  16. Status of research reactor fuel development in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang-Kyu; Ryu, Woo-Seok; Park, Jong-Man; Lee, Don-Bae; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kuk, Il-Hyun

    1996-01-01

    The development of uranium silicide dispersion fuel fabrication technology has been carried out in KAERI. LEU fuel bundle was prepared for irradiation test. In order to compare the performance of atomized and comminuted U 3 Si dispersed fuels, the bundle of two kinds of fuel elements were prepared. Irradiation test will be performed in the OR-hole of HANARO in the near future. U 3 Si 2 atomization technology has been improved by using ceramic crucible and nozzle. Irradiation test for atomized U 3 Si 2 plate type fuel will be carried out in cooperation with ANL by using HANARO in connection with RERTR advanced fuel development. (author)

  17. Research program and uses of the solution fueled reactor SILENE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbry, F.; Ratel, R.

    1985-09-01

    Designed and operated by the Nuclear Protection and Safety Institute of the CEA, SILENE is an original small sized reactor fueled with an uranyl nitrate solution. The reactor is capable to operate in three modes: ''Pulse'' operation (high power levels up to 1000 Megawatts during several millisecond), ''Free evolution'' operation (simulation of criticality accident excursions), ''Steady state'' operation in a power range of 0.01 W to 1 kW. The core can be surrounded by appropriate shields (lead, polyethylene) to vary the leakage radiations and the gamma to neutron dose ratio. It's possible to insert in the central cavity of the annular core vessel some capsules, devices or samples to be submitted to very high radiations levels. The research activities are mainly devoted towards nuclear safety studies: the criticality accident studies, and the behavior of oxide fuels under transient conditions. Some examples of tests are presented. As to other applications of the SILENE facility, the main studies now in progress deal with: designing and calibration of Health physics intrumentation, neutron and gamma dosimetry, and, radiobiology. Once the characteristics of radiation field are qualified by calculations and experimental techniques, SILENE will be proposed as a reference source [fr

  18. Studies on fuel failure detection in Rikkyo Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, T.; Hayashi, S.H.; Harasawa, S.; Tomura, K.

    1992-01-01

    Studies on fuel failure detection have been made since 1986 in Rikkyo Research Reactor. One of the methods is the monitoring of the trace concentration of fission products appearing in the air on the surface of the water tank of the reactor. The interested radionuclides here are 89 Rb and 138 Cs, which are the daughter nuclides of the FP rare gas nuclides, 89 Kr and 138 Xe, respectively and have the half lives of 15.2 min and 32.2 min respectively. They are detected on a filter paper attached on a conventional dust sampler, by sucking the air of the surface of the water for 15 ∼ 30 min during reactor operation (100 kW). In this presentation are reported the results of an attempt to increase the sensitivity of detecting these nuclides by introducing nitrogen gas bubbles into the water. The bubbling of the gas increased the sensitivity as much as several times compared with the case without bubbling. These measurements are giving us the 'background' concentration, the order of which is almost unchanged for these several years, --in 10 -6 Bq/cm 3 . The origin of these nuclides is considered to be not from the fuel but from the uranium contained as an impurity in the reactor material in the core. (author)

  19. Alternative Fuel Research in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has recently constructed an Alternative Fuels Laboratory which is solely being used to perform Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reactor studies, novel catalyst development and thermal stability experiments. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst screening experiments while focusing on reducing energy inputs, reducing CO2 emissions and increasing product yields within the F-T process. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which reacts syn-gas (a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), over the surface of a catalyst material which is then converted into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions1. These hydrocarbons can then be further processed into higher quality liquid fuels such as gasoline and diesel. The experiments performed in this laboratory will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics to focus on newly formulated catalysts, improved process conditions and enhanced catalyst activation methods. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor used solely for cobalt catalyst activation.

  20. Standalone BISON Fuel Performance Results for Watts Bar Unit 1, Cycles 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pawlowski, Roger [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is moving forward with more complex multiphysics simulations and increased focus on incorporating fuel performance analysis methods. The coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics capabilities within the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS) have become relatively stable, and major advances have been made in analysis efforts, including the simulation of twelve cycles of Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) operation. While this is a major achievement, the VERA-CS approaches for treating fuel pin heat transfer have well-known limitations that could be eliminated through better integration with the BISON fuel performance code. Several approaches are being implemented to consider fuel performance, including a more direct multiway coupling with Tiamat, as well as a more loosely coupled one-way approach with standalone BISON cases. Fuel performance typically undergoes an independent analysis using a standalone fuel performance code with manually specified input defined from an independent core simulator solution or set of assumptions. This report summarizes the improvements made since the initial milestone to execute BISON from VERA-CS output. Many of these improvements were prompted through tighter collaboration with the BISON development team at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A brief description of WBN1 and some of the VERA-CS data used to simulate it are presented. Data from a small mesh sensitivity study are shown, which helps justify the mesh parameters used in this work. The multi-cycle results are presented, followed by the results for the first three cycles of WBN1 operation, particularly the parameters of interest to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) screening (fuel-clad gap closure, maximum centerline fuel temperature, maximum/minimum clad hoop stress, and cumulative damage index). Once the mechanics of this capability are functioning, future work will target cycles with

  1. Application of energy management coupled with fuel switching on a hydrotreater unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Gabr

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, saving energy and protecting environment became the most important topics for search and survey. The energy engineer for any chemical process is obliged by restrictions of “Kyoto Protocol” for limitation of carbon dioxide emissions from fuel combustion, so he does his best to reduce utility consumption and thus reduce gas emission. Proper designing of the heat exchanger network (HEN for any process is an effective and successful method to minimize utility consumption and therefore minimize gas emission (mainly carbon gases (CO2 and sulfur gases (SOx. Fuel switching coupled with energy targeting achieved the least gas emission. In this work we choose a hydrotreater unit of a petroleum refinery as a case study due to its effective role and its obvious consumption of utility. We applied the methodology of energy targeting through HEN design (using pinch technology at several values of mean temperature difference (ΔTmin; where the maximum percentage of energy saving was 37% for hot and cold utility which directly leads to percentage reduction of gas emission by 29% for CO2 and 17% for SOx. Switching fuel oil to other types of fuel realized gas emission reduction percentage where the maximum reduction established was through natural gas fuel type and reached 54% for CO2 and 90% for SOx. Comparison between existing design and the optimum ΔTmin HEN led to few modifications with the least added capital cost for the hydrotreater existing design to revamp it through four scenarios; the first one depended on fuel switching to natural gas while the second one switched fuel to diesel oil, in the third scenario we applied heat integration only and the fourth one used both of heat integration and fuel switching in a parallel way.

  2. State of the art: Multi-fuel reformers for automotive fuel cell applications. Problem identification and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerholm, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry; Pettersson, L.J. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1999-12-01

    On an assignment from the Transport and Communications Research Board (KFB) a literature study and a study trip to the USA and Great Britain have been performed. The literature study and the study trip was made during late spring and autumn 1999.The purpose of the project was to collect available information about the chemical composition of the product gas from a multi-fuel reformer for a fuel cell vehicle. It was furthermore to identify problems and research needs. The report recommends directions for future major research efforts. The results of the literature study and the study trip led to the following general conclusions: With the technology available today it does not seem feasible to develop a highly efficient and reliable multi-fuel reformer for automotive applications, i. e. for applications where all types of fuels ranging from natural gas to heavy diesel fuels can be used. The potential for developing a durable and reliable system is considerably higher if dedicated fuel reformers are used.The authors propose that petroleum-derived fuels should be designed for potential use in mobile fuel cell applications. In the present literature survey and the site visit discussions we found that there are relatively low emissions from fuel cell engines compared to internal combustion engines. However, the major research work on reformers/fuel cells have been performed during steady-state operation. Emissions during start-up, shutdown and transient operation are basically unknown and must be investigated in more detail. The conclusions and findings in this report are based on open/available information, such as discussions at site visits, reports, scientific publications and symposium proceedings.

  3. Overview of current research and development programmes for fuel in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Research and Development (R and D) programmes for HTGR fuel have been performed since 1969 by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) as a leading organization in Japan. The R and D covers all fields necessary for the construction of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is the first HTGR in Japan. This R and D includes fuel fabrication, fuel property data, irradiation performance under normal operating conditions, safety-related research and fuel inspection technology. The R and D for the HTTR has been completed from a licensing point of view. Some R and D including future advanced fuel development continue. 2 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Studies and research concerning BNFP: LWR spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallo, F.A.

    1978-08-01

    This report describes potential spent fuel storage expansion programs using the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant--Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BNFP-FRSS) as a model. Three basic storage arrangements are evaluated with cost and schedule estimates being provided for each configuration. A general description of the existing facility is included with emphasis on the technical and equipment requirements which would be necessary to achieve increased spent fuel storage capacity at BNFP-FRSS

  5. Draft Environmental Impact Statement on a proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy and United States Department of State are jointly proposing to adopt a policy to manage spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors. Only spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States would be covered by the proposed policy. The purpose of the proposed policy is to promote U.S. nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy objectives, specifically by seeking to reduce highly-enriched uranium from civilian commerce. Environmental effects and policy considerations of three Management Alternative approaches for implementation of the proposed policy are assessed. The three Management Alternatives analyzed are: (1) acceptance and management of the spent nuclear fuel by the Department of Energy in the United States, (2) management of the spent nuclear fuel at one or more foreign facilities (under conditions that satisfy United States nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy objectives), and (3) a combination of components of Management Alternatives 1 and 2 (Hybrid Alternative). A No Action Alternative is also analyzed. For each Management Alternative, there are a number of alternatives for its implementation. For Management Alternative 1, this document addresses the environmental effects of various implementation alternatives such as varied policy durations, management of various quantities of spent nuclear fuel, and differing financing arrangements. Environmental impacts at various potential ports of entry, along truck and rail transportation routes, at candidate management sites, and for alternate storage technologies are also examined. For Management Alternative 2, this document addresses two subalternatives: (1) assisting foreign nations with storage; and (2) assisting foreign nations with reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel. Management Alternative 3 analyzes a hybrid alternative. This document is Vol. 1 of 2 plus summary volume

  6. International guidelines for fire protection at nuclear installations including nuclear fuel plants, nuclear fuel stores, teaching reactors, research establishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guidelines are recommended to designers, constructors, operators and insurers of nuclear fuel plants and other facilities using significant quantities of radioactive materials including research and teaching reactor installations where the reactors generally operate at less than approximately 10 MW(th). Recommendations for elementary precautions against fire risk at nuclear installations are followed by appendices on more specific topics. These cover: fire protection management and organization; precautions against loss during construction alterations and maintenance; basic fire protection for nuclear fuel plants; storage and nuclear fuel; and basic fire protection for research and training establishments. There are numerous illustrations of facilities referred to in the text. (U.K.)

  7. Recent emissions research in southwestern shrub and grassland fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Weise; Wayne Miller; David R. Cocker; Heejung Jung; Seyedehsan Hosseini; Marko Princevac; Robert J. Yokelson; Ian Burling; Sheryl Akagi; Shawn Urbanski; WeiMin Hao

    2015-01-01

    While it is currently challenging to use prescribed burning in chaparral and other southwestern shrub fuel types due to many constraints, any such activities require smoke management planning. Information on fuels and emissions from chaparral were limited and based on older sampling systems. The DoD SERDP program funded a project to measure fuels and smoke emissions in...

  8. International topical meeting. Research Reactor Fuel Management (RRFM) and meeting of the International Group on Reactor Research (IGORR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear research and test reactors have been in operation for over 60 years, over 270 research reactors are currently operating in more than 50 countries. This meeting is dedicated to different aspects of research reactor fuels: new fuels for new reactors, the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels, spent fuel management and computational tools for core simulation. About 80 contributions are reported in this document, they are organized into 7 sessions: 1) international topics and overview on new projects and fuel, 2) new projects and upgrades, 3) fuel development, 4) optimisation and research reactor utilisation, 5) innovative methods in research reactors physics, 6) safety, operation and research reactor conversion, 7) fuel back-end management, and a poster session. Experience from Australian, Romanian, Libyan, Syrian, Vietnamese, South-African and Ghana research reactors are reported among other things. The Russian program for research reactor spent fuel management is described and the status of the American-driven program for the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels is presented. (A.C.)

  9. Historical overview of domestic spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Wankerl, M.W.; Hamberger, C.R.; Schmid, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The information in this paper summarizes historical data on spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States (US) from the period from 1964 to 1991. Information on shipments has been developed to establish a basis for developing a transportation system in the US for initiating shipments of spent nuclear fuel beginning in 1998. The paper shows that approximately 2700 power reactor spent nuclear fuel rail and truck casks have been shipped within the US during the past 28 years. In total, approximately 2000 metric tonnes of uranium (MTU) have been shipped to date, which compares with projected shipping rates of from 3000 to greater than 6000 MM per year when the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System is in full operation

  10. Historical overview of domestic spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Wankerl, M.W.; Hamberger, C.R.; Schmid, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    The information in this paper summarized historical data on spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States (U.S.) from the period from 1964 to 1991. Information on shipments has been developed to establish a basis for developing a transportation system in the U.S. for initiating shipments of spent nuclear fuel beginning in 1988. The paper shows that approximately 2700 power spent nuclear fuel rail and truck casks have been shipped within the U.S. during the past 28 years. In total, approximately 2000 metric tonnes of uranium (MTU) have been shipped to date, which compares with projected shipping rates of from 3000 to greater than 6000 MTU per year when the U.S. Civilian Radiation Waste Management System is in full operation. (author)

  11. Power cycling and ramp test in R-2 and Mihama Unit 2 for MHI PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, T.; Takahashi, T.; Kubo, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kondo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Up to the present time, Mitsubishi has manufactured approximately 3000 fuel assemblies for Japanese PWRs, of which performance in reactors is satisfactory under base load operation. For the forthcoming load following age in Japan, expected in mid eighties, Mitsubishi is performing various R and D programs, so that load following operation can be smoothly introduced with current good performance maintained. R and D programs consist of two phases. One is the verification and demonstration of power ramping and cycling capability of the current design fuels, and the other is the development of remedy fuels with more operational margin. This paper describes the recent results obtained for the former phase, especially for the following two programs: (1) Power cycling and ramp test in R-2; (2) Power ramp demonstration (PRD) in Mihama Unit 2 (PRD-1). PIE works for power cycling and ramp test rods have been almost completed. The second PRD will be performed early in 1983

  12. Highlight: Research Chair unites four West African universities in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Local and regional experts including researchers, consultants, and academics convened in Cotonou, Benin, on February 26, 2015 to launch a Research Chair on EcoHealth. The Chair unites four West African universities that have pledged to reduce air pollution and non-communicable respiratory ...

  13. Future Directions for Urban Forestry Research in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; David J. Nowak; Gary W. Watson

    2002-01-01

    Urban forestry research promises to continue to be an integral part of the growth and development of forestry in urban and urbanizing areas of the United States. The future is expected to bring increased emphasis on research in support of the care of trees and other plants, ecological restoration, and comprehensive and adaptive management across the landscape....

  14. Infusing Active Learning into the Research Methods Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    The research methods unit of survey psychology classes introduces important concepts of scientific reasoning and fluency, making it an ideal course in which to deliver enhanced curricula. To increase interest and engagement, the author developed an expanded research methods and statistics module to give students the opportunity to explore…

  15. Fundamental principles of failed fuel detection concepts on nuclear power units of WWER type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusanova, L.; Miglo, V.; Slavyagin, P.

    2001-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the Russian failed fuel detection concept in both operating and shut down reactors. The philosophy for detection of fission products released from defective fuel during operation and sipping tests and using of these results for regulation of the radiological situation at the NPP during the next cycle is widely spread. In presented work such philosophy is applied to the shut down rectors. An option for sipping test performed in a mast of Refueling Machine (RM) using a wet-gas version of sipping test is briefly described. The use of the FFD method in RM mast allows combining the procedure of Fuel Assemblies (FA) tightness test with transport operation during reloading of the fuel from the core into the cooling pool. This reduces the time for reloading and transport operation with FA and increases the safety of reactor operation. The FFD method in RM mast has passed successful tests on Unit 4 at Balakovskaja NPP and it is expected to apply in other NPP unit with WWER-1000 reactors

  16. Race for a Better Fuel Begins with NREL Researchers | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    produced at NREL registers an estimated octane rating of 107. NREL's fuel is better suited for race cars by Dennis Schroeder Look! Up in the Sky! In addition to race cars, the 85% triptane could find a use Race for a Better Fuel Begins with NREL Researchers Race for a Better Fuel Begins with NREL

  17. Development of nuclear fuel materials for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Park, H. D.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, J. T.; Ryu, W. S.; Hwang, W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, H. I.; Kwon, H. I.; Park, C.; Lee, B. C.; Park, J. M.; Lee, C. S.; Chae, H. T.; Im, N. J.; Cho, M. S.; Im, I. C.; Nam, C.; Lee, D. B.; Goh, Y. M.; Kim, J. D.; Ahn, H. S.; Woo, Y. M.; Chang, S. J.; Cho, H. D.

    1997-09-01

    This project has aimed at the development of U 3 Si dispersion fuel for the localization of HANARO fuel and the application of atomization process to advanced RERTR fuel development. The design criteria were established through the modified computer codes. Design documents were prepared and issued. The acceptable co-extrusion cladding was achieved. The electron beam welding technology has been developed and the sealing of the end plug and cladding was accomplished without defects. The atomization fuel meats have about 200% higher elongation and about 20% higher than comminution fuel meats. The thermal compatibility test showed that atomization fuel have about 30% higher stability that the comminution fuel. The pressure drops of 18 rods fuel assembly and 36 rods fuel assembly were measured to have 213 kPa and 205 kPa respectively. Apparent wear was not found in endurance test. The irradiation fuel was designed and fabricated by using low enriched uranium metal following the developed Q/A system. The safety analysis of irradiation fuel assembly was performed through linear power calculation by using MCNP4A code and centerline temperature calculation by using DIFAIR code. The quality assurance system has been established. The quality inspection technologies were developed. By acquiring the license, low enriched uranium of 100 kg as well as depleted uranium can be used. U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel swelled less than comminution fuel irrespective of temperature and fuel fraction in a compatibility test. The atomized U-10wt.%Mo powder were found to have gamma phase of isotropic structure. Gamma structure remained with a little swelling without any structure change at 400 deg C for 100 hours. Irradiation miniplate and test rig were designed preliminary manufactured. Thermal hydraulic and linear power calculations were performed by using PLTEMP and MCNP4A computer codes respectively. The hydraulic test showed that the pressure drop met the HANARO requirement. The vibration

  18. Nondestructive techniques for assaying fuel debris in piping at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.; McIsaac, C.V.; Beller, L.S.; Isaacson, L.; Mandler, J.W.; Hobbins, R.R. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Four major categories of nondestructive techniques - ultrasonic, passive gamma ray, infrared detection, and remote video examination - have been determined to be feasible for assaying fuel debris in the primary coolant system of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Reactor. Passive gamma ray detection is the most suitable technique for the TMI-2 piping; however, further development of this technique is needed for specific application to TMI-2

  19. Economical analysis to utilize MTR fuel elements using silicides in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergallo, Juan E.; Novara, Oscar E.; Adelfang, Pablo

    2000-01-01

    According to international programs on reducing enrichment in research reactors and the necessity to maintain their operation, new fuel elements have been developed in order to meet both objectives. Thus, U-Si alloy fuel elements for research reactors are becoming of greater interest for the international markets. It became necessary to make an economic study about the convenience of introducing this type of fuel elements in the RA-3 reactor and to know the potentiality of this fuel. The economical behavior of the reactor operation has been evaluated comparing the actual U 3 O 8 nuclear fuel cycle with U 3 Si 2 nuclear fuels. Results obtained show that the main economical factor to determine the change of fuels is the cost of fabrication, and the change is advisable up to an 80% difference. The other factors related to the cost of nuclear fuel cycle are not relevant or have real minor impacts. (author)

  20. Achieving the timely receipt of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizes, C.M.; Clark, W.D; Thomas, J.; Andes, T.

    1998-01-01

    The May 1996 Record of Decision on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel states that the United States will accept spent nuclear fuel containing uranium of U.S.-origin from foreign research reactors through the year 2009. The best information available indicates that approximately 13,000 assemblies of Material Test Reactor (MTR) spent nuclear fuel from 29 countries are expected to be shipped to the Savannah River Site during the 13 years of the program. As of July 1998, 1,371 spent nuclear fuel assemblies from 12 foreign research reactors have been received at the SRS. That is, after more than two years of the FRR program (approximately 15 percent of the program time), 11 percent of the total assemblies have been received at SRS. Current projections show that most of the assemblies can be received by 2009, however if some of the eligible, non-participating countries decide to rejoin the program, a bottleneck would occur at the end of the program. Also adding to the potential for the bottleneck is a trend of shipments being moved out in the timeline. The Savannah River Site is working to be proactive in avoiding a bottleneck at the end of the program, but cooperation is required from all program participants to be successful. Activities currently in progress include inventory/information questionnaires, verifying fuel against cask(s) certificate of compliance (C. of C.), and collecting Appendix A information well in advance of shipping the SNF. The inventory/information sheets have been distributed to a select number of reactor facilities in the past, but work is in progress to refine the process. Information requested in the questionnaire includes inventory numbers, preferred shipping dates, and cask preferences. This information allows for improved shipment planning and helps to ensure that we are working to meet the needs of the reactor facilities. Current plans are to send the questionnaires to

  1. The Microcomputer in the Clinical Nursing Research Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwirian, Patricia M.; Byers, Sandra R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses the microcomputer in clinical nursing research. There are six general areas in which computers have been useful to nurses: nursing notes and charting; patient care plans; automated monitoring of high-tech nursing units; HIS and MIS systems; personnel distribution systems; and education. Three alternative models for the conduct of clinical nursing research in a hospital are described. The first is a centralized model relying on the bureaucratic structure of the hospital. Second is a decentralized network of professional nurses and research support personnel woven together by a Clinical Nurse Researcher, and third is a dedicated clinical nursing research unit. Microcomputers have five characteristics which make them vital tools for nurse researchers: user-friendliness; environment friendliness; low cost; ease of interface with other information systems; and range and quality of software.

  2. Subcritical Measurements Research Program for Fresh and Spent Materials Test Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    'A series of subcritical noise measurements were performed on fresh and spent University of Missouri Research Reactor fuel assemblies. These experimental measurements were performed for the purposes of providing benchmark quality data for validating transport theory computer codes and nuclear cross-section data used to perform criticality safety analyses for highly enriched, uranium-aluminum Material Test Reactor fuel assemblies. A mechanical test rig was designed and built to hold up to four fuel assemblies and neutron detectors in a subcritical array. The rig provided researchers with the ability to evaluate the reactivity effects of variable fuel/detector spacing, fuel rotation, and insertion of metal reflector plates into the lattice.'

  3. Thermal-Hydraulic Research Review and Cooperation Outcome for Light Water Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Lee, Chan; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chi Young [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The fuel assembly for pressurized water reactor (PWR) consists of fuel rod bundle, spacer grid and bottom/top end fittings. The cooling water in high pressure and temperature is introduced in lower plenum of reactor core and directed to upper plenum through the subchannel which is formed between the fuel rods. The main thermalhydraulic performance parameters for the PWR fuel are pressure drop and critical heat flux in normal operating condition, and quenching time in accident condition. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an advanced PWR fuel, dual-cooled annular fuel and accident tolerant fuel for the enhancement of fuel performance and the localization. For the key thermal-hydraulic technology development of PWR fuel, the KAERI LWR fuel team has conducted the experiments for pressure drop, turbulent flow mixing and heat transfer, critical heat flux(CHF) and quenching. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was also performed to predict flow and heat transfer in fuel assembly including the spent fuel assembly in dry cask for interim repository. In addition, the research cooperation with university and nuclear fuel company was also carried out to develop a basic thermalhydraulic technology and the commercialization.

  4. IAEA activities in support of the international programmes to return fresh and spent research reactor nuclear fuel to the conuntry of origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelgang, P.; Tozser, S.; Marshall, F.; Borio di Tigliole, A.

    2017-01-01

    The IAEA has been involved for more than thirty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), whose enrichment is ≥ 20% in 235U, in international commerce. In particular, IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the two main international efforts to return fresh and spent HEU research reactor fuel to the country where it was originally enriched: the United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRRSNF) Acceptance Programme and the United States-IAEA-Russian Federation tripartite initiative known as the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Programme. This report gives an account of IAEA efforts in support of both programmes including a historical overview of fuel return shipments and a brief description of associated cooperation activities carried out by the IAEA. [es

  5. Nuclear liability and research reactor fuel. A plant supplier's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Hetzmann, A.

    2000-01-01

    Contracts on Research Reactors are normally entered into by the owner and - very often - later user and the supplier of such plants. They are not concluded by the fuel supplier, except fuel supplier and plant supplier are identical. Thus, the fuel supplier mostly has no direct influence into the contract negotiations and the clauses which are eventually agreed upon between the parties. So has any other subcontractor for any other system or component. Any such subsupplier can and will negotiate a subsidiary supply contract (subcontract) with the supplier of the plant. The supplier drafts the related clauses so as to pass on to the subsupplier as many risks out of his contracts as possible. The subsupplier, on the other hand, tries to protect himself, tries to limit the risks he takes over, e.g. to the worth of his subcontract maximum. A critical issue in such negotiations is those concerning the risks the supplier had to accept and the subsupplier, although he may be responsible later for the risk changing to reality; i.e. the occurrence of a loss, cannot be hold liable for in full because the subcontract limits his liability, e.g. to the subcontract value or a certain delay penalty. A typical example for this conflict are delays of the entire project caused by one subsupplier. A very specific case in this context is the so-called nuclear liability. Nuclear liability means being hold responsible for the consequences or damages originating from a nuclear event in the plant. Those consequences or damages may be suffered by third parties, which are neither the owner/operator nor the supplier and result in a liability to such party (third party liability). Several of the aspects below may be related to the nuclear liability issue: The supplier often has its registered office not in the country where the plant is; The supplier may have far bigger assets than the owner/operator. The legal system of the supplier's country may be more favourable for enforcing claims of

  6. Water reactor fuel research at the Joint Research Centre of the Commission of the European Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markgraf, J [HFR Unit, Inst. for Advanced Materials, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-01

    The JRC programmes 1995-1998 are in progress within 8 JRC Institutes located within different research centres situated in five member states of the European Union. Except for the area of reactor safety and waste management, there are no JRC research programmes related to water reactor fuel directly. However, the JRC is providing support on basis of contracts and cooperations to bilateral and international R and D programmes through access to its large test facilities like the High Flux Reactor at the JRC Petten and the hot cell facilities of the Transuranium Institute at the JRC Karlsruhe. Access is available to customers from all over the world. 3 tabs.

  7. Novelly formed products of the interaction of fuel with construction materials of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovoj, A.A.; Galkin, B.Ya.; Drapchinskij, L.V.; Krinitsyn, A.P.; Pazukhin, Eh.M.; Petrov, B.F.; Pleskachevskij, L.A.; Checherov, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation environment and position of fuel-containing masses in the bubbler pond of the 4th unit of the Chernobyl NPP are described. Classification of the products of fuel interaction with structural materials is given. Amounts of fuel on the 1st and 2nd floor of the bubbler pond are estimated. Postaccident pictures of the premises of the bubbler pond are presented for the first time

  8. Detection of fission products release in the research reactor 'RA' spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.; Vukadin, Z.; Pavlovic, S.; Maksin, T.; Idakovic, Z.; Marinkovic, N.

    1997-05-01

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating the 6.5/10 MW thermal heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor RA at the VINCA Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool in the basement of the reactor building. In 1984, the reactor was shut down for refurbishment, which for a number of reasons has not yet been completed. Recent investigations show that independent of the future status of the research reactor, safe disposal of the so far irradiated fuel must be the subject of primary concern. The present status of the research reactor RA spent fuel storage pool at the VINCA Institute presents a serious safety problem. Action is therefore initiated in two directions. First, safety of the existing spent fuel storage should be improved. Second, transferring spent fuel into another, presumably dry storage space should be considered. By storing the previously irradiated fuel of the research reactor RA in a newly built storage space, sufficient free space will be provided in the existing spent fuel storage pool for the newly irradiated fuel when the reactor starts operation again. In the case that it would be decided to decommission the research reactor RA, the newly built storage space would provide safe disposal for the fuel irradiated so far

  9. The neutron beam intensity increase by in-core fuel management enhancement in multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Vukadin, Z.; Konstantinovic, J.

    1986-01-01

    The exploitation characteristics of an existing multipurpose research reactor can be increased not only by great reconstruction, but also, to the considerable extent, by the in-core fuel management sophistication. The optimisation of the in-core fuel management procedure in such reactors is governed (among others) by the identified reactor utilisation goals, i.e. by weighting factors dedicated to different utilisation goals, which are often (regarding the in-core fuel management procedure) highly controversial. In this work the best solution for in-core fuel management is sought, with the highest weighting factor dedicated to the neutron beam usage, rather than sample irradiation in the reactor core. The term in-core fuel management includes: the core configuration, the locations of the fresh fuel inflow zone and spent fuel excite zone, and the fuel transfers between these two zones (author)

  10. Code structure for U-Mo fuel performance analysis in high performance research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Cho, Tae Won; Lee, Chul Min; Sohn, Dong Seong [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A performance analysis modeling applicable to research reactor fuel is being developed with available models describing fuel performance phenomena observed from in-pile tests. We established the calculation algorithm and scheme to best predict fuel performance using radio-thermo-mechanically coupled system to consider fuel swelling, interaction layer growth, pore formation in the fuel meat, and creep fuel deformation and mass relocation, etc. In this paper, we present a general structure of the performance analysis code for typical research reactor fuel and advanced features such as a model to predict fuel failure induced by combination of breakaway swelling and pore growth in the fuel meat. Thermo-mechanical code dedicated to the modeling of U-Mo dispersion fuel plates is being under development in Korea to satisfy a demand for advanced performance analysis and safe assessment of the plates. The major physical phenomena during irradiation are considered in the code such that interaction layer formation by fuel-matrix interdiffusion, fission induced swelling of fuel particle, mass relocation by fission induced stress, and pore formation at the interface between the reaction product and Al matrix.

  11. Assessment of fuel damage of pool type research reactor in the case of fuel plates blockage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, Jafari; Samad, Khakshournia [AEOI, Karegar Ave. School of R and D of Nuclear Reactors and Accelerators, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); D' Auria, F. [Pisa Univ., DIMNP (Italy)

    2007-07-01

    Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) is a pool type 5 MW research reactor. It is assumed that external objects or debris that may fall down to reactor core cause obstruction of coolant flow through one of the fuel assemblies. Thermal hydraulic analysis of this event, using the RELAP5 system code has been studied. The reported transient is related to the partial and total obstruction of a single Fuel Element (FE) cooling channel of 27 FE equilibrium core of TRR. Such event constitutes a severe accident for this type of reactor since it may lead to local dryout and eventually to loss of the FE integrity. Two scenarios are analysed to emphasize the severity of the accident. The first one is a partial blockage of an average FE considering four different obstruction levels: 25%, 50%, 75% and 97% of nominal flow area. The second one is an extreme scenario consisting of total blockage of the same FE. This study constitutes the first step of a larger work which consists of performing a 3-dimensional simulation using the Best Estimate coupled code technique. However, as a first approach the instantaneous reactor power is derived through the point kinetic calculation included in the RELAP5 code. Main results obtained from the RELAP5 calculations are as following. First, in the case of flow blockage under 97% of the nominal flow area of an average FE, only an increase of the coolant and clad temperatures is observed without any consequences for the integrity of the FE. The mass flow rate remains sufficient to cool the clad safely. Secondly, in the case of total obstruction of the nominal flow area, it is seen that transient turns out to be a severe accident due to the dryout conditions are reached shortly and melting of the cladding occurs. Thirdly, the use of the point kinetic approach leads to conservative results. A best estimate simulation of such kind of transients requires the use of 3-dimensional kinetic calculations, which could be done using the current Coupled Codes

  12. Engine Tune-Up Service. Unit 5: Fuel and Carburetion Systems. Review Exercise Book. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ludy

    This book of pretests and review exercises is designed to accompany the Engine Tune-Up Service Student Guide for Unit 5, Fuel and Carburetion Systems, available separately as CE 031 217. Focus of the exercises and pretests is inspecting and servicing the fuel and carburetion systems. Pretests and performance checklists are provided for each of the…

  13. Evaluation of the CONSUME and FOFEM fuel consumption models in pine and mixed hardwood forests of the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Prichard; Eva C. Karau; Roger D. Ottmar; Maureen C. Kennedy; James B. Cronan; Clinton S. Wright; Robert E. Keane

    2014-01-01

    Reliable predictions of fuel consumption are critical in the eastern United States (US), where prescribed burning is frequently applied to forests and air quality is of increasing concern. CONSUME and the First Order Fire Effects Model (FOFEM), predictive models developed to estimate fuel consumption and emissions from wildland fires, have not been systematically...

  14. Proceedings of the international meeting on development, fabrication and application of reduced enrichment fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the papers presented in the following areas: (1) Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program Status; (2) Fuel Development; (3) Fuel Demonstrations; (4) General Topics; and (5) Specific Reactor Applications

  15. Progress in researches on MOX fuel pellet producing technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaodan

    2010-01-01

    Being the key section of nuclear-fuel cycle, the producing technology of MOX(UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuel had driven to maturity in France, England, Russia, Belgium, etc. MOX fuel had been applied in FBR and LWR successfully in those countries. With the rapidly developing of nuclear-generated power, the MOX fuel for FBR and LWR was active demanded in China. However, the producing technology of MOX fuel developed slowly. During the period of 'the seventh five year's project', MOX fuel pellet was produced by mechanically mixed method and oxalate deposited method, respectively. Parts of cool performance of MOX fuel pellet produced by oxalate deposited method reached the qualification of fuel for FBR. During the period of 'the ninth five year's project' and 'the tenth five year's project', the technical route of producing MOX fuel was determined, and the test line of producing MOX fuel was built preliminarily. In the same time, the producing technology and analyzing technology of MOX fuel pellet by mechanically mixed was studied roundly, and the representative analogue pellet(UO 2 -CeO 2 ) was produced. That settled the supporting technology for the commercial process and research of MOX fuel rod and MOX fuel module. (authors)

  16. Qualification of high-density fuel manufacturing for research reactors at CNEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; De La Fuente, M.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H. [CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    CNEA, the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina, is at the present a qualified supplier of uranium oxide fuel for research reactors. A new objective in this field is to develop and qualify the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuel for this type of reactors. According with the international trend Silicide fuel and U-xMo fuel are included in our program as the most suitable options. The facilities to complete the qualification of high-density MTR fuels, like the manufacturing plant installations, the reactor, the pool side fuel examination station and the hot cells are fully operational and equipped to perform all the activities required within the program. The programs for both type of fuels include similar activities: development and set up of the fuel material manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of miniplates, fabrication and irradiation of full scale fuel elements, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. For silicide fuels most of these steps have already been completed. For U-xMo fuel the activities also include the development of alternative ways to obtain U-xMo powder, feasibility studies for large-scale manufacturing and the economical assessment. Set up of U-xMo fuel plate manufacturing is also well advanced and the fabrication of the first full scale prototype is foreseen during this year. (author)

  17. Application of powder metallurgy in production of nuclear fuels for research and power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kosaku

    2000-01-01

    Powder metallurgy has been applied in many of the processes of nuclear fuel fabrication, which has contributed, to a great progress of the nuclear technology to date. Evolution of nuclear fuels still continues to meet various emerging demands in terms of enhanced safety, economical effectiveness, non-proliferation and environmental mitigation. This paper reviews recent progress of nuclear fuels of research and power reactors, in particular, focusing on the powder metallurgy application. First, the review is made on plate type fuels for research reactors, inter alia, silicide fuel which is prevailing worldwide from the viewpoint of non-proliferation. The relation between fabrication and irradiation behavior is also discussed. Next, oxide fuels including MOX are reviewed. Recent interests of UO 2 are directed toward large grain pellets and burnable absorber pellets, both of which arise from requirement of extended burnup. Finally, the MOX fuel for thermal reactors is reviewed. (author)

  18. Recent activities of the nuclear fuel technology department of Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S.; Aybers, T.; Kopuz, B.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Technology Department (NFTD) in CNRTC is a unique unit in Turkey in charge of performing all activities in nuclear fuel field. It has a pilot plant on uranium refining and conversion to UO 2 since 1986. Presently, its R and D activities are focused on pellet manufacturing and characterization: UO 2 , ThO 2 and (Th,U)O 2 . The studies on thorium dioxide fuel include to obtain ThO 2 pellets from thorium nitrate and mixed (Th,U)O 2 pellets. A study on evaluation of different fuel cycle options in accordance with nuclear energy planning in Turkey is also going on. (author)

  19. International collaboration, the route to fuel cycle research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinsley, T.; Mathers, D.; Rayment, F.

    2013-01-01

    In hindsight, involvement with European Framework projects such as GoFastR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactors) and ACSEPT (Actinide Recycling by Separation and Transmutation) was a crucial and, at the time, an innovative step in maintaining the UK skills base during a period of major changes in the UK nuclear industry. It has undoubtedly delivered the objectives intended in terms of maintenance of the key skills, developing and training new staff, regenerating facilities and building strong links with the European nuclear research community. Over the last 2-3 years NNL's participation in European projects has moved forward such that NNL (National Nuclear Laboratory) is an integral partner of several major projects, fully engaged with delivering the core objectives of the projects and intent on forging deep collaborations with key organisations across Europe. With the renewed interest in nuclear energy and future fuel cycle options in the UK, NNL is now well positioned to contribute at an even deeper level in European level programmes

  20. International collaboration, the route to fuel cycle research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinsley, T.; Mathers, D.; Rayment, F. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    In hindsight, involvement with European Framework projects such as GoFastR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactors) and ACSEPT (Actinide Recycling by Separation and Transmutation) was a crucial and, at the time, an innovative step in maintaining the UK skills base during a period of major changes in the UK nuclear industry. It has undoubtedly delivered the objectives intended in terms of maintenance of the key skills, developing and training new staff, regenerating facilities and building strong links with the European nuclear research community. Over the last 2-3 years NNL's participation in European projects has moved forward such that NNL (National Nuclear Laboratory) is an integral partner of several major projects, fully engaged with delivering the core objectives of the projects and intent on forging deep collaborations with key organisations across Europe. With the renewed interest in nuclear energy and future fuel cycle options in the UK, NNL is now well positioned to contribute at an even deeper level in European level programmes.

  1. Research of fuel temperature control in fuel pipeline of diesel engine using positive temperature coefficient material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As fuel temperature increases, both its viscosity and surface tension decrease, and this is helpful to improve fuel atomization and then better combustion and emission performances of engine. Based on the self-regulated temperature property of positive temperature coefficient material, this article used a positive temperature coefficient material as electric heating element to heat diesel fuel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine. A kind of BaTiO3-based positive temperature coefficient material, with the Curie temperature of 230°C and rated voltage of 24 V, was developed, and its micrograph and element compositions were also analyzed. By the fuel pipeline wrapped in six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, its resistivity–temperature and heating characteristics were tested on a fuel pump bench. The experiments showed that in this installation, the surface temperature of six positive temperature coefficient ceramics rose to the equilibrium temperature only for 100 s at rated voltage. In rated power supply for six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, the temperature of injection fuel improved for 21°C–27°C within 100 s, and then could keep constant. Using positive temperature coefficient material to heat diesel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine, the injection mass per cycle had little change, approximately 0.3%/°C. This study provides a beneficial reference for improving atomization of high-viscosity liquids by employing positive temperature coefficient material without any control methods.

  2. Economics of conservation systems research in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of conservation systems in crop production is not a new concept in the southeastern United States. In 1978, researchers from across the Southeast met in Griffin, Georgia for the first annual Southern Conservation Agricultural Systems Conference. Four of the ten presentations specifically men...

  3. Conducting qualitative research within Clinical Trials Units: avoiding potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cindy; O'Cathain, Alicia; Hind, Danny; Adamson, Joy; Lawton, Julia; Baird, Wendy

    2014-07-01

    The value of using qualitative research within or alongside randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is becoming more widely accepted. Qualitative research may be conducted concurrently with pilot or full RCTs to understand the feasibility and acceptability of the interventions being tested, or to improve trial conduct. Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) in the United Kingdom (UK) manage large numbers of RCTs and, increasingly, manage the qualitative research or collaborate with qualitative researchers external to the CTU. CTUs are beginning to explicitly manage the process, for example, through the use of standard operating procedures for designing and implementing qualitative research with trials. We reviewed the experiences of two UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) registered CTUs of conducting qualitative research concurrently with RCTs. Drawing on experiences gained from 15 studies, we identify the potential for the qualitative research to undermine the successful completion or scientific integrity of RCTs. We show that potential problems can arise from feedback of interim or final qualitative findings to members of the trial team or beyond, in particular reporting qualitative findings whilst the trial is on-going. The problems include: We make recommendations for improving the management of qualitative research within CTUs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Progress of the Russian RERTR program: Development of new-type fuel elements for Russian-built research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A. V.; Stetskiy, Y.A.; Mishunin, V.A.; Suprun, V.B.; Dobrikova, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The new design of pin-type fuel elements and fuel assembly on their basis for Russian research reactors has been developed. The number of following activities has been performed: computational and experimental substantiation of fuel element design; development of fabrication process of fuel elements; manufacturing of experimental assembly for lifetime in-pile tests. The relevant fuel assemblies are considered to be perspective for usage as low-enriched fuel for Russian research reactors. (author)

  5. Studies and research concerning BNFP: spent fuel dry storage studies at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, K.J.

    1980-09-01

    Conceptual designs are presented utilizing the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant for the dry interim storage of spent light water reactor fuel. Studies were conducted to determine feasible approaches to storing spent fuel by methods other than wet pool storage. Fuel that has had an opportunity to cool for several years, or more, after discharge from a reactor is especially adaptable to dry storage since its thermal load is greatly reduced compared to the thermal load immediately following discharge. A thermal analysis was performed to help in determining the feasibility of various spent fuel dry storage concepts. Methods to reject the heat from dry storage are briefly discussed, which include both active and passive cooling systems. The storage modes reviewed include above and below ground caisson-type storage facilities and numerous variations of vault, or hot cell-type, storage facilities

  6. Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors' spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE's Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE's efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE's activities in taking back spent fuel

  7. Research reactors. Problems of fuel element enrichment reduction. Deliberations and comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    This paper summarises the main data from the major research reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany utilising highly enriched uranium (HEU) and presently available fuel technology for their fuel elements. The required modification for an adaption of the fabrication to lower enriched fuel are considered as well as the consequences on reactor performance operation and licensing. On the basis of past experience with reactor modifications a rough estimate of 82 months is given for the conversion of a reactor to a modified type of fuel and of 70 months for a fuel test program. The conclusions reflect the own calculations and data from other papers submitted to INFCE-WG 8C

  8. World wide IFC phosphoric acid fuel cell implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    International Fuel Cells, a subsidary of United technologies Corporation, is engaged in research and development of all types of fuel cell technologies and currently manufactures alkaline fuel cell power plants for the U.S. manned space flight program and natural gas fueled stationary power plants using phosphoric acid fuel cells. This paper describes the phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants.

  9. Fuel Cycle Research and Development. Technical Monthly - March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    meeting. Kenneth Dayman, the graduate student from University of Texas, completed an initial draft of his master's thesis. His research will contribute to the multivariate classifier currently under development. Sarah Bender, the graduate student from Pennsylvania State University, presented her work on a poster and in a conference paper at the MARC IX meeting. A mass balance flowsheet for the fast reactor fuel was completed and a model simulation is scheduled to begin construction next month. The development of a mass balance flowsheet for light water reactor fuel will predict the behavior of the separation process using mathematical functions. The completed flowsheet will be utilized as the basis for constructing the model simulation for the electrochemical separations. Comments and review of the model from the MPACT Working Group meeting have been used to evaluate updates to the EChem model. A preliminary physical security layout has been developed in ATLAS. Thermal stability tests for high temperature microfluidic interconnections were completed on all compounds tested for bonding strength. An interconnection strategy was determined based on these results that we expect will allow for operation at 400C in the first generation of sampling systems. Design of the sampling system using the chosen interconnections was initiated, with handoff to an external foundry for fabrication based on ANL specified process conditions expected by the middle of the month. Monte Carlo simulations of the sampling system were conducted under conditions of realistic sampling size distributions, electrorefiner inhomogeneity distributions, and detector efficiencies. These simulations were used to establish a baseline limit of detection for system operation, assuming an on-line separation step is conducted before detection. Sensor for measuring density and depth of molten electrolyte - The procurement effort continued. 80% of the components ordered to assemble the double bubbler have arrived at

  10. Development status of metallic, dispersion and non-oxide advanced and alternative fuels for power and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The current thermal power reactors use less than 1% of the energy contained in uranium. Long term perspectives aiming at a better economical extraction of the potential supplied by uranium motivated the development of new reactor types and, of course, new fuel concepts. Most of them dated from the sixties including liquid metal cooled fast (FR) and high temperature gas cooled (HTGR) reactors. Unfortunately, these impulses slowed down during the last twenty years; nuclear energy had to face political and consensus problems, in particular in the United States of America and in Europe, resulting from the consequences of the TMI and Chernobyl accidents. Good economical results obtained by the thermal power reactors also contributed to this process. During the last twenty years mainly France, India, Japan and the Russian Federation have maintained a relatively high level of technological development with appropriate financial items, in particular, in fuel research for the above mentioned reactor types. China and South Africa are now progressing in development of FR/HTGR and HTGR technologies, respectively. The purpose of this report is not only to summarise knowledge accumulated in the fuel research since the beginning of the sixties. This subject has been well covered in literature up to the end of the eighties. This report rather concentrates on the 'advanced fuels 'for the current different types of reactors including metallic, carbide and nitride fuels for fast reactors, so-called 'cold' fuels and fuels to burn excessive ex-weapons plutonium in thermal power reactors, alternative fuels for small size and research reactors. Emphasis has been put on the aspects of fabrication and irradiation behaviour of these fuels; available basic data concerning essential properties that help to understand the phenomena have been mentioned as well. This report brings complementary information to the earlier published monographs and concerns developments carried out after the early

  11. The development of lower enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feraday, M A; Belanger, L; Grolway, C M [AECL, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Foo, M T [CRNL, Combustion Engineering Superheater Ltd., Moncton, NB (Canada)

    1983-08-01

    As part of the world wide move to proliferation resistant fuels, new fuels which use reduced enrichment uranium are being developed for use in the NRX and NRU reactors. A fuel consisting of particles of a USiAl alloy dispersed in an Al matrix has been selected for development along with Al-37 wt% U alloy and Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cermet as backup fuels. This report outlines the progress made in the development of the Al-USiAl and Al-37 wt% U. Results show that good quality extruded rods containing either fuel can be made with techniques similar to those used to fabricate the current NRX and NRU fuels. However, the new fuels will be more expensive to make. Although the oxidation behaviour of the Al-USiAl is not as good as that of the Al-U alloys, its corrosion behaviour in high temperature water does not seem much worse. The oxidation and aqueous corrosion of A-37 wt% U are not much different from those of the Al-U alloys currently used. (author)

  12. Studies and research concerning BNFP. Nuclear spent fuel transportation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.T.; Maier, J.B.

    1979-11-01

    Currently, there are a number of institutional problems associated with the shipment of spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear power plants: new and conflicting regulations, embargoing of certain routes, imposition of transport safeguards, physical security in-transit, and a lack of definition of when and where the fuel will be moved. This report presents a summary of these types and kinds of problems. It represents the results of evaluations performed relative to fuel receipt at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Case studies were made which address existing reactor sites with near-term spent fuel transportation needs. Shipment by either highway, rail, water, or intermodal water-rail was considered. The report identifies the impact of new regulations and uncertainty caused by indeterminate regulatory policy and lack of action on spent fuel acceptance and storage. This stagnant situation has made it impossible for industry to determine realistic transportation scenarios for business planning and financial risk analysis. A current lack of private investment in nuclear transportation equipment is expected to further prolong the problems associated with nuclear spent fuel and waste disposition. These problems are expected to intensify in the 1980's and in certain cases will make continuing reactor plant operation difficult or impossible

  13. Examinations of fuel debris samples from Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumihisa

    2012-01-01

    In the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plants, fuels were molten due to loss of coolant and heat-up of the reactor core. Information on properties of molten fuels (debris) is important to analyze progress of the accident, estimate the status inside the damaged reactors and work on a plan for debris removal. Extensive examinations for properties of debris have been conducted after the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 in 1979. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted a part of the examinations in the frame of the OECD/NEA Three Mile Island Vessel Investigation Program. This issue report outline and main results of the TMI-2 debris examination programs. (author)

  14. Summary of entire research achievements of creative engineering research program on nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Shingo; Ikegami, Tetsuo

    2008-03-01

    Creative Engineering Research Program on Nuclear Fuel Cycle (former In-house Innovative Research Encouraging Program) was implemented from FY 2001 to FY 2007 in order to support such in-house researches that create innovative new concepts and aim technical break-through. Totally 37 applications have been received and 14 research themes have been accepted and been performed in this program. As for the research achievements of the 14 research themes, first author papers accepted by scientific journals and by science councils were 47 and 32, respectively, and oral presentations at scientific societies were 99. Furthermore, interpretive articles for scientific journals, requested lectures, patents, and prize winnings were 13, 30, 8, and 3, respectively. Consequently, it can be evaluated that the research achievements resulted from this program are generally in high level and that the expectations, at the starting point of this program, to activate the innovative research activities have been accomplished. In this report, the final reports of the 14 research themes together with the outline of this program are included. (author)

  15. Research program on conditions to failure of high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Regarding the power ramp test to verify the out-of-pile test results on hydrogen-induced cladding failure, situation of the shipping port restoration after the earthquake disaster was investigated for the overseas transportation of test fuel rods which had been interrupted. Its reopening schedule was still currently uncertain and the power ramp test plan also remained suspended. The information about the fuel irradiation performance obtained from JNES projects and international projects, etc. is prepared as database, and based on the recent findings, the fuel irradiation performance models and analysis codes are developed and/or improved. (author)

  16. 2011 RENEWABLE ENERGY: SOLAR FUELS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Hupp

    2011-01-21

    The conference will present and discuss current science that underlies solar fuels production, and will focus on direct production pathways for production. Thus, recent advances in design and understanding of molecular systems and materials for light capture and conversion of relevance for solar fuels will be discussed. An important set of topics will be homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological catalysts for the multi-electron processes of water oxidation, hydrogen production and carbon dioxide reduction to useful fuels. Also, progress towards integrated and scalable systems will be presented. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program.

  17. Report by the AERES on the unit: Fuel Study Department (DEC) under the supervision of the establishments and bodies: Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory, the DEC (Departement d'Etudes des Combustibles, Fuel Study Department) which comprises four departments: a department of analysis and characterization of fuel behaviour (SA3C) which comprises four laboratories, a Plutonium, Uranium and Minor Actinides department (SPUA) which comprises four laboratories, a department for the investigation and simulation of fuel behaviour (four laboratories) and the Leca-Star department (3 laboratories and a project group). The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved, risks and recommendations, productions and publications on different themes (fundamental research on fuels, fuel design, fabrications, characterizations and property measurements, experimental irradiations, characterization of irradiated fuels and chemical and radio-chemical analysis, modelling and simulation). A more detailed assessment is presented for each theme in terms of scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project

  18. Numerical Research on Hybrid Fuel Locking Device for Upward Flow Core-Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Hyung; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Yoo, Yeon-Sik; Ryu, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The assembly must be held firmly against these forces, but cannot be permanently attached to the support stand because periodic refueling of the reactor requires removal or relocation of each assembly. There are so many kinds of fuel locking device, but they are operated manually. As a part of a new project, we have investigated a hybrid fuel locking device (HFLD) for research reactor which is operated automatically. Prior method of holding down the fuel assembly includes a hybrid zero electromagnet consisting of an electromagnet and a permanent magnet. The role of an electromagnet is converged to zero power for overcoming the lifting power of a permanent magnet by controlling the coil current. At this time, a HFLD is an unlocking state. On the contrary, it is locking state that only a permanent magnet works when the power of an electromagnet is off. The results of a FEM in this work lead to the following conclusions: (1) It is possible that an electromagnet is converged to zero power for overcoming the lifting power of a permanent magnet by remote controlling the coil current. (2) At this time, it is able to detect remotely using proximity sensor whether a HFLD is latched or not

  19. Advances and highlights of the CNEA qualification program as high density fuel manufacturer for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H. [Unidad de Actividad Combustibles Nucleares Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNE4), Avda. del Libertador, 8250 C1429BNO Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    One of the main objectives of CNEA regarding the fuel for research reactors is the development and qualification of the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuels. The qualification programs for both types of fuels, Silicide fuel and U- x Mo fuel, are similar. They include the following activities: development and set up of the fissile compound manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of mini plates and plates, design and fabrication of fuel assembly prototypes for irradiation, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. This paper describes the different activities performed within each program during the last year and the main advances and achievements of the programs within this period. The main achievements may be summarized in the following activities: Continuation of the irradiation of the first silicide fuel element in the R A3. Completion of the manufacturing of the second silicide fuel element, licensing and beginning of its irradiation in the R A3. Development of the HMD Process to manufacture U-Mo powder (pUMA project). Set up of fuel plates manufacturing at industrial level using U-Mo powder. Preliminary studies and the design for the irradiation of mini plates, plates and full scale fuel elements with U-Mo and 7 g U/cm{sup 3}. PIE destructive studies for the P-04 silicide fuel prototype (accurate burnup determination through chemical analysis, metallography and SEM of samples from the irradiated fuel plates). Improvement and development of new characterization techniques for high density fuel plates quality control including US testing and densitometric analysis of X-ray examinations. The results obtained in this period are encouraging and also allow to foresee a wider participation of CNEA in the international effort to qualify U-Mo as a new material for the manufacturing of research reactor fuels. (author)

  20. Advances and highlights of the CNEA qualification program as high density fuel manufacturer for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main objectives of CNEA regarding the fuel for research reactors is the development and qualification of the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuels. The qualification programs for both types of fuels, Silicide fuel and U- x Mo fuel, are similar. They include the following activities: development and set up of the fissile compound manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of mini plates and plates, design and fabrication of fuel assembly prototypes for irradiation, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. This paper describes the different activities performed within each program during the last year and the main advances and achievements of the programs within this period. The main achievements may be summarized in the following activities: Continuation of the irradiation of the first silicide fuel element in the R A3. Completion of the manufacturing of the second silicide fuel element, licensing and beginning of its irradiation in the R A3. Development of the HMD Process to manufacture U-Mo powder (pUMA project). Set up of fuel plates manufacturing at industrial level using U-Mo powder. Preliminary studies and the design for the irradiation of mini plates, plates and full scale fuel elements with U-Mo and 7 g U/cm 3 . PIE destructive studies for the P-04 silicide fuel prototype (accurate burnup determination through chemical analysis, metallography and SEM of samples from the irradiated fuel plates). Improvement and development of new characterization techniques for high density fuel plates quality control including US testing and densitometric analysis of X-ray examinations. The results obtained in this period are encouraging and also allow to foresee a wider participation of CNEA in the international effort to qualify U-Mo as a new material for the manufacturing of research reactor fuels. (author)

  1. A study of UO2 wafer fuel for very high-power research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, T.C.; Jankus, V.Z.; Rest, J.; Billone, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program is aimed at reducing fuel enrichment to 2 caramel fuel is one of the most promising new types of reduced-enrichment fuel for use in research reactors with very high power density. Parametric studies have been carried out to determine the maximum specific power attainable without significant fission-gas release for UO 2 wafers ranging from 0.75 to 1.50 mm in thickness. The results indicate that (1) all the fuel designs considered in this study are predicted not to fail under full power operation up to a burnup, of 1.9x10 21 fis/cm 3 ; (2) for all fuel designs, failure is predicted at approximately the same fuel centerline temperature for a given burnup; (3) the thinner the wafer, the wider the margin for fuel specific power between normal operation and increased-power operation leading to fuel failure; (4) increasing the coolant pressure in the reactor core could improve fuel performance by maintaining the fuel at a higher power level without failure for a given burnup; and (5) for a given power level, fuel failure will occur earlier at a higher cladding surface temperature and/or under power-cycling conditions. (author)

  2. The importance of independent research and evaluation in assessing nuclear fuel cycle and waste management facility safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, Walter D.; Patrick, Wesley C.; Sagar, Budhi

    2009-01-01

    In 1987, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) a federally funded research and development center. Known as the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), its overall mission is to provide NRC with an independent assessment capability on technical and regulatory issues related to a potential geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, as well as interim storage and other nuclear fuel-cycle facilities. For more than 20 years, the CNWRA has supported NRC through an extensive pre-licensing period of establishing the framework of regulations and guidance documents, developing computer codes and other review tools, and conducting independent laboratory, field, and numerical analyses. In June 2008, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a license application and final environmental impact statement to NRC seeking authorization to construct the nation's first geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The CNWRA will assist NRC in conducting a detailed technical review to critically evaluate the DOE license application to assess whether the potential repository has been designed and can be constructed and operated to safely dispose spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. NRC access to independent, unbiased, technical advice from the CNWRA is an important aspect of the evaluation process. This paper discusses why an independent perspective is important when dealing with nuclear fuel cycle and waste management issues. It addresses practical considerations such as avoiding conflicts of interest while at the same time maintaining a world-class research program in technical areas related to the nuclear fuel cycle. It also describes an innovative approach for providing CNWRA scientists and engineers a creative outlet for professional development through an internally funded research program that is focused on future nuclear waste

  3. Manufacturing and Construction of Fresh Fuel Storage Rack for a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jinho; Lee, Sangjin; Lee, Jongmin; Ryu, Jeong-Soo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of this study is to provide the manufacturing and construction information regarding the Fresh Fuel Storage Rack (FFSR). The main function of a FFSR is to store and protect the 2 core new fuel assemblies for the operation of the research reactor. The fresh fuel assemblies are stored in a rack made of stainless steel and the storage rack is installed in the fresh fuel storage room. The fresh fuel facility provides fresh fuel assemblies with dry storage space. General design requirements of the fresh fuel storage facilities are given in the ANSI-57.3. Design, manufacturing, and construction of the fresh fuel storage rack are introduced. The analysis is performed to confirm the structural intensity of the fresh fuel storage rack under the seismic loads. The fresh fuel storage rack designed for storage of fresh fuel assemblies should be manufactured and installed with consideration of predicted number of fresh fuel assemblies, structural integrity, resistivity to corrosion and radiation, cleaning, and workability.

  4. Manufacturing and Construction of Fresh Fuel Storage Rack for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jinho; Lee, Sangjin; Lee, Jongmin; Ryu, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide the manufacturing and construction information regarding the Fresh Fuel Storage Rack (FFSR). The main function of a FFSR is to store and protect the 2 core new fuel assemblies for the operation of the research reactor. The fresh fuel assemblies are stored in a rack made of stainless steel and the storage rack is installed in the fresh fuel storage room. The fresh fuel facility provides fresh fuel assemblies with dry storage space. General design requirements of the fresh fuel storage facilities are given in the ANSI-57.3. Design, manufacturing, and construction of the fresh fuel storage rack are introduced. The analysis is performed to confirm the structural intensity of the fresh fuel storage rack under the seismic loads. The fresh fuel storage rack designed for storage of fresh fuel assemblies should be manufactured and installed with consideration of predicted number of fresh fuel assemblies, structural integrity, resistivity to corrosion and radiation, cleaning, and workability

  5. Improved oxidative stability of biodiesel fuels : antioxidant research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel is a domestic, renewable fuel that is gaining wide acceptance, especially in Europe. : When blended with conventional petroleum diesel, biodiesel reduces hydrocarbon, particulate : and carbon monoxide emissions, while having minimal to no e...

  6. Research on plant of metal fuel fabrication using casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Yasuhide; Mori, Yukihide

    2003-12-01

    This document presents the plant concept of metal fuel fabrication system (38tHM/y) using casting process in electrolytic recycle, which based on recent studies of its equipment design and quality control system. And we estimate the cost of its construction and operation, including costs of maintenance, consumed hardware and management of waste. The content of this work is as follows. (1) Designing of fuel fabrication equipment: We make material flow diagrams of the fuel fabrication plant and rough designs of the injection casting furnace, demolder and inspection equipment. (2) Designing of resolution system of liquid waste, which comes from analytical process facility. Increased analytical items, we rearrange analytical process facility, estimate its chemicals and amount of waste. (3) Arrangement of equipments: We made a arrangement diagram of the metal fuel fabrication equipments in cells. (4) Estimation of cost data: We estimated cost to construct the facility and to operate it. (author)

  7. Static analytical and experimental research of shock absorber to safeguard the nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundulis, Gintautas [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos Street 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania)], E-mail: gintas@mail.lei.lt; Grybenas, Albertas [Laboratory of Materials Research and Testing, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos Street 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Karalevicius, Renatas [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos Street 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Makarevicius, Vidas [Laboratory of Materials Research and Testing, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos Street 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Rimkevicius, Sigitas; Uspuras, Eugenijus [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos Street 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2009-01-15

    The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) has two RBMK-1500 graphite-moderated boiling water multi-channel reactors. The Ignalina NPP Unit 1 was shutdown at the end of 2004, while Unit 2 is foreseen to be shutdown at the end of 2009. At the Ignalina NPP Unit 1 remains approximately 1000 spent fuel assemblies with low burn-up depth. A special set of equipment was developed to reuse these assemblies in the reactor of Unit 2. One of most important items of this set is a container, which is used for the transportation of spent fuel assemblies between the reactors of Unit 1 and Unit 2. A special shock absorber was designed to avoid failure of fuel assemblies in case of hypothetical spent fuel assemblies drop accident during uploading/unloading of spent fuel assemblies to/from container. This shock absorber was examined by using scaled experiments. The objective of this article is the estimation whether the proposed design of shock absorber fulfils the function of the absorber and the optimization of its geometrical parameters using the results of the performed investigations. Static analytical and experimental investigations are presented in the article. The finite element code BRIGADE/Plus was used for the analytical analysis. The calculation model was verified by comparing the experimental investigation and simulation results for further employment of this finite element model in the development of an optimum design of shock absorber. Static simulation was used to perform primary optimization of design and dimension of the shock absorber.

  8. Investigation of research and development subjects for the Very High Burnup Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Amano, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yasufumi; Furuta, Teruo; Nagase, Fumihisa; Suzuki, Masahide

    1993-06-01

    A concept of the Very High Burnup Fuel aiming at a maximum fuel assembly burnup of 100 GWd/t has been proposed in terms of burnup extension, utilization of Pu and transmutation of transuranium elements (TRU: Np, Am and Cm). The authors have investigated research and development (R and D) subjects of the fuel pellet and the cladding material of the Fuel. The present report describes the results on the fuel pellet. First, the chemical state of the Fuel and fission products (FP) was inferred through an FP-inventory and an equilibrium-thermodynamics calculations. Besides, knowledge obtained from post-irradiation examinations was surveyed. Next, an investigation was made on irradiation behavior of U/Pu mixed oxide (MOX) fuel with high enrichment of Pu, as well as on fission-gas release and swelling behavior of high burnup fuels. Reprocessibility of the Fuel, particularly solubility of the spent fuel, was also examined. As for the TRU-added fuel, material property data on TRU oxides were surveyed and summarized as a database. And the subjects on the production and the irradiation behavior were examined on the basis of experiences of MOX fuel production and TRU-added fuel irradiation. As a whole, the present study revealed the necessity of accumulating fundamental data and knowledge required for design and assessment of the fuel pellet, including the information on properties and irradiation performance of the TRU-added fuel. Finally, the R and D subjects were summarized, and a proposal was made on the way of development of the fuel pellet and cladding materials. (author)

  9. Research and photovoltaic industry at the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, Ch.; Herino, R.; Delville, R.; Allegre, R.

    2006-06-01

    For a big country as the United States, the solar energy can be a solution for the air quality improvement, the greenhouse gases fight and the reduction of the dependence to the imported petroleum and also for the economic growth by the increase of the employment in the solar industry sector. This document takes stock on the photovoltaic in the United States in the industrial and research domains. The american photovoltaic industry is the third behind the Japan and the Germany. (A.L.B.)

  10. Health physics aspects of a research reactor fuel shipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.; Johnson, A.G.; Anderson, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    In June 1982, 92 irradiated fuel elements were shipped from the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor to Westinghouse Hanford Corporation to be used in the Fuel Materials Examination Facility, This paper describes some of the health physics aspects of the planning, preparation and procedures associated with that shipment. In particular, the lessons learned are described in order that the benefits of the experience gained may be readily available to other small institutions. (author)

  11. Research in Supercritical Fuel Properties and Combustion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    identified reactions needing further study and C-2 and C-3 species to add to the mechanism . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supercritical fluids , Brillouin scattering...kinetics mechanism for combustion of hydrocarbon fuels containing up to 2 carbon atoms, including uncertainties. • We identified key reactions and...safety. The chemical mechanisms for combustion of all of these fuels share the same set of elementary reactions of smaller-fragment hydrocarbons , and

  12. Hydrogen Fuel Cell: Research Progress and Near-Term Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-27

    effort brings together automobile and ener- gy companies , as well as their suppliers and other stakeholders, to evaluate light-duty fuel cell vehicles...emissions compared to conventional power technologies. Grocers, banks, tire and hardware companies , logistics providers, and others in the private sector...Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Markets, April 2007. 2. Assumptions: Operate 7 hours/shift, 3 shifts/day, 7 days/week

  13. Four years Re-Use of low burned fuel assemblies from units 1 and 2 in core loadings of units 3 and 4 WWER-440 at Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanova, I.; Antov, A.; Spasova, V.

    2006-01-01

    At the end of 2002 units 1 and 2 of Kozloduy NPP were shutdown before their design life time which left a large number of assemblies yet with a significant energy resources. A decision to load these assemblies into the cores of Units 3 and 4 during the next 4 cycles has been taken. In 2003, 43 assemblies from Unit 1 cycle 23 rd and 55 assemblies from Unit 2 cycle 24 th are loaded in the cores of units 3 and 4 respectively. In 2004, new 49 assemblies from Unit 1 cycle 23rd and new 55 assemblies from Unit 2 cycle 24th are loaded in the cores of units 3 and 4 respectively. In 2005, the next new 25 assemblies from Unit 1 cycle 23 rd and 66 assemblies from Unit 2 cycle 24th are loaded in the cores of units 3 and 4 respectively. In 2006, the next new 54 assemblies from Unit 1 cycle 23 rd and 52 assemblies from Unit 2 cycle 24 th + 2 assemblies from Unit 3 cycle 19th are loaded in the cores of Units 3 and 4 respectively. The SPPSHB computer code system is used for development and safety assessment of the fuel loading patterns of Units 3 and 4 at Kozloduy NPP with low burned assemblies from units 1 and 2 (Authors)

  14. Status and prospects of safety research of fuel cycle facilities in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchere, H.; Mercier, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The following themes of research are discussed: prolonged loss of cooling in concentrated fission product solution storage tanks; dewatering of a spent fuel storage pond; explosion risks in nuclear fuel cycle laboratories and plants; dissemination of radioactive materials in case of fire in fuel manufacturing plants and in spent fuel analysis laboratories; contamination transfer; phenomenology of liquid uranium hexafluoride vaporization into the atmosphere; ways and means of intervention in the event of liquid ClF 3 leakage; offsite explosion; seismic research. (K.A.)

  15. Research of power fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in industrial boiler based on numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova K.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the presented research is to perform numerical modelling of fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in once-through industrial steam boiler. Full size and scaled-down furnace model created with FIRE 3D software and was used for the research. All geometrical features were observed. The baseline information for the low-temperature vortex furnace process are velocity and temperature of low, upper and burner blast, air-fuel ratio, fuel consumption, coal dust size range. The obtained results are: temperature and velocity three dimensional fields, furnace gases and solid fuel ash particles concentration.

  16. Radiation exposures associated with shipments of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, C.D.; Messick, C.E.; Mustin, T.

    1999-01-01

    In accordance with the Record of Decision on a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (ROD) (DOE, 1996a), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a 13-year program under which DOE accepts foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States. The ROD required that DOE take several steps to ensure low environmental and health impacts resulting from the implementation of the program. These efforts mainly focus on transportation related activities that the analysis of potential environmental impacts in the Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (EIS) (DOE, 1996b) identified as having the potential for exceeding current radiation protection guidelines. Consequently, DOE issued a Mitigation Action Plan to reduce the likelihood of potential adverse environmental impacts associated with the policy established in the ROD. As shown in the EIS, incident-free radiation exposures to members of the ship's crew, port workers, and ground transportation personnel due to shipments of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors are expected to be below the radiation exposure limit of 100 mrem (1 mSv) per year established to protect the general public. However, the analysis in the EIS demonstrated that port and transportation workers could conceivably receive a cumulative radiation dose above the limit established for the general public if, for example, they are involved in multiple shipments within one year or if the radiation levels outside the casks are at the maximum allowable regulatory limit (10 mrem/hr [0.1 mSv/h] at 2 meters from the surface of the cask). With the program successfully underway, DOE has collected information from the shipments in accordance with the Mitigation Action Plan. The information to date has demonstrated that the analysis in

  17. Application of United Nations Framework Classification – 2009 (UNFC-2009) to nuclear fuel resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulsidas, Harikrishnan; Li Shengxiang; Van Gosen, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    United Nations Framework Classification for Fossil Fuel and Mineral Reserves and Resources 2009: • Generic, principles-based system: – Applicable to both solid minerals and fluids; • Applications in: – International energy studies; – National resource reporting; – Company project management; – Financial reporting; • 3-D classification of resources on the basis of: – Socio-economic criteria (E); – Project maturity (technical feasibility) (F); – Geological knowledge (G); • A key goal of UNFC-2009 is to provide a tool to facilitate global communications: – Uses a numerical coding system; – Language independent reporting

  18. Bioenergy Research Programme, Yearbook 1995. Production of wood fuels; Bioenergian tutkimusohjelma, vuosikirja 1995. Puupolttoaineen tuotantotekniikka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alakangas, E. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    Bioenergy Research Programme is one of the energy technology research programmes of the Technology Development Center TEKES. The aim of the Bioenergy Research Programme is to increase, by using technical research and development, the economically profitable and environmentally sound utilisation of bioenergy, to improve the competitiveness of present peat and wood fuels, and to develop new competitive fuels and equipment related to bioenergy. The funding for 1995 was nearly 52 million FIM and the number of projects 66. The main goal of the wood fuels research area is to develop new production methods in order to decrease the production costs to the level of imported fuels. The total potential of the wood fuel use should be at least 1.0 million toe/a (5.5 million m{sup 3}). During the year 1995 There were over 30 projects concerning the production of wood derived fuels going on. Nearly half of them focused on integrated production of pulp wood and wood fuel. About ten projects was carried out to promote the wood fuel production from logging residues. Other topics were firewood production, production logistics and wood fuel resources. For production of fuel chips from logging residues, a new chipper truck, MOHA-SISU, was introduced. The new machine gives a new logistic solution resulting in high productivity and reasonable operating costs. In Mikkeli region three years of active work promoted the usage of wood fuel in a district power plant to the level of over 110 000 m{sup 3} of fuel chips. The production costs tend to be a little high in average, and the production chain still needs to be improved

  19. Bioenergy Research Programme, Yearbook 1995. Production of wood fuels; Bioenergian tutkimusohjelma, vuosikirja 1995. Puupolttoaineen tuotantotekniikka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alakangas, E [ed.

    1997-12-31

    Bioenergy Research Programme is one of the energy technology research programmes of the Technology Development Center TEKES. The aim of the Bioenergy Research Programme is to increase, by using technical research and development, the economically profitable and environmentally sound utilisation of bioenergy, to improve the competitiveness of present peat and wood fuels, and to develop new competitive fuels and equipment related to bioenergy. The funding for 1995 was nearly 52 million FIM and the number of projects 66. The main goal of the wood fuels research area is to develop new production methods in order to decrease the production costs to the level of imported fuels. The total potential of the wood fuel use should be at least 1.0 million toe/a (5.5 million m{sup 3}). During the year 1995 There were over 30 projects concerning the production of wood derived fuels going on. Nearly half of them focused on integrated production of pulp wood and wood fuel. About ten projects was carried out to promote the wood fuel production from logging residues. Other topics were firewood production, production logistics and wood fuel resources. For production of fuel chips from logging residues, a new chipper truck, MOHA-SISU, was introduced. The new machine gives a new logistic solution resulting in high productivity and reasonable operating costs. In Mikkeli region three years of active work promoted the usage of wood fuel in a district power plant to the level of over 110 000 m{sup 3} of fuel chips. The production costs tend to be a little high in average, and the production chain still needs to be improved

  20. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Massey, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Since initiating the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel causing a degradation of the fuel assembly exposing fuel meat and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues and implementation challenges associated with the transport of MTR type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, implementation status, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be of interest to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors in evaluating the condition of their fuel to ensure it can be transported in accordance with appropriate cask certificate requirements. (author)

  1. Transmutation research and fuel cycle (report on discussion at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamana, Hajimu

    1999-01-01

    A symposium was held on a topic of 'Transmutation Research' on Dec. 21 and 22, 1999 at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. This meeting was held as a joint-meeting of KUR's specialist meeting and Tokyo University's activity supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research of Ministry of Education, Sport and Culture of Japan. This paper describes the overview of the discussions of this joint-meeting, and interprets their significance. Major themes discussed are, needed discussions on the transmutation research, policy and concepts of the organizations doing transmutation researches, a view from university side, transmutation researches in the oversea countries, opinions from various standpoints of the nuclear fuel cycle, conclusive discussions. 'the meanings of the transmutation research should be discussed together with the geological disposal and fast reactor system', 'transmutation may be a cooperative option for the disposal, thus, they should not be in a independent relation', and Balance evaluation will be needed' are the examples of the conclusive remarks of this meeting. (author)

  2. Science Policy Research Unit annual report 1984/1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The report covers the principal research programmes of the Unit, and also describes its graduate and undergraduate teaching, (listing subjects of postgraduate research) and library services. A list of 1984 published papers and staff is presented. The principle research programmes include: the setting up of the Designated Research Centre on Science, Technology and Energy Policy in British Economic Development; policy for technology and industrial innovation in industrialised countries; energy economics, technology and policy (with a sub-section on coal); European science and industrial policy; science policy and research evaluation; technical change and employment opportunities in the UK economy; new technology, manpower and skills; technology and social change; science and technology policy in developing countries; military technology and arms limitation. Short-term projects and consultancy are also covered.

  3. UK MOD research on H{sub 2} storage and generation methods for soldier-portable fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, D.J. [Defence Evaluation Research Agency, Hampshire (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    The research which the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA) has conducted on hydrogen storage and production methods was presented and their applicability to soldier portable applications was discussed. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered to be the future power source for solider-portable equipment such as army radios. Advances in fuel cell technology has resulted in improvements in specific power and power density as well as reductions in Pt loading and cost. However, a viable in-service power source is still required. This fuel source is likely to be hydrogen because it has a high energy per unit weight and has a simple reaction with oxygen to produce water as the only by-product. In the future, methanol may be used as the fuel source but currently methanol fuel cells demonstrate poorer performance than those running on hydrogen. A vital part of a fuel cell system, therefore, is hydrogen storage, of which there are two basic types; physical and chemical storage. In addition to weight, other important factors to be considered in a storage system are cost, reliability and safety. This paper described each physical storage method including hydrogen stored as a compressed gas, as a cryogenic liquid, reversibly absorbed in intermetallic alloys and reversibly adsorbed onto carbon materials such as nonofibres. Liquid hydrogen storage is only feasible for larger scale applications such as electric vehicles and is not practical for portable applications. A man-portable fuel cell is likely to be either pressure cylinders or reversible metal hydrides. 6 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  4. Power ramp testing method for PWR fuel rod at research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yidong; Zhang Peisheng; Zhang Aimin; Gao Yongguang; Wang Huarong

    2003-01-01

    A tentative power ramp test for short PWR fuel rod has been conducted at the Heavy Water Research Reactor (HWRR) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The test fuel rod was cooled by the circulating water in the test loop. The power ramp was realized by moving solid neutron-absorbing screen around the fuel rod. The linear power of the fuel rod increased from 220 W/cm to 340 W/cm with a power ramp rate of 20 W/cm/min. The power of the fuel rod was monitored by both in-core thermal and nuclear measurement sensors in the test rig. This test provides experiences for further developing the power ramp test methods for PWR fuel rods at research reactor. (author)

  5. Outline of results of safety research (in nuclear fuel cycle field in fiscal year 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The safety research in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation in fiscal year 1996 has been carried out based on the basic plan of safety research (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000) which was decided in March, 1996. In this report, on nuclear fuel cycle field, namely all the subjects in the fields of nuclear fuel facilities, environmental radioactivity and waste disposal, and the subjects related to nuclear fuel facilities among the fields of aseismatic and probabilistic safety assessments, the results of research in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5-year project, are summarized together with the outline of the basic plan of safety research. The basic policy, objective and system for promotion of the safety research are described. The objectives of the safety research are the advancement of safety technology, the safety of facilities, stable operation techniques, the safety design and the evaluation techniques of next generation facilities, and the support of transferring nuclear fuel cycle to private businesses. The objects of the research are uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication and reprocessing, and waste treatment and storage. 52 investigation papers of the results of the safety research in nuclear fuel cycle field in fiscal year 1996 are collected in this report. (K.I.)

  6. Novelly formed products of the interaction of fuel with construction materials of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovoj, A.A.; Galkin, B.Ya.; Krinitsyn, A.P.; Pazukhin, Eh.M.; Kheruvimov, A.N.; Chechcherov, K.P.; Anderson, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation environment and map of sampling route in the steam distributing collector of the 4th unit of the Chernobyl NPP are described. The results of gamma- and alpha radiometric analyses as well as chemical analysis are presented. Samples of core materials taken from the depth of fuel-containing masses by drilling through reactor vault wall of the damaged power unit are described

  7. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT XXII, I--MAINTAINING THE FUEL SYSTEM (PART I)--CUMMINS DIESEL ENGINE, II--UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENTIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FUNCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE FUEL SYSTEM AND DIFFERENTIAL DRIVE UNITS USED IN DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE (1) FUEL SYSTEM COMPARISONS, (2) FUEL SYSTEM SUPPLY COMPONENTS, (3) FUEL SUPPLY SECTION MAINTENANCE, (4) FUNCTION OF THE DIFFERENTIAL,…

  8. [General practice research units in Denmark: multidisciplinary research in support of practical work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reventlow, Susanne; Broholm, Katalin Alexa Király; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark the general practice research units operating in connection with universities provide a home base, training and methodology support for researchers in the field from medical students to general practitioners carrying out practical work. Research issues frequently require a multidisciplinary approach and use of different kinds of materials. Problems arising from the practical work of general practitioners take priority in the wide selection of topics. The units have networked efficiently with organizations of general practitioners and medical education. The combination of research environments has created synergy benefiting everybody and increased the scientific productivity and visibility of the field.

  9. Research reactors spent fuel management in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rychecky, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Czech Republic 3 research and testing nuclear reactors are operated at present time, with the biggest one being the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) reactor LVR-15, operated with maximum power 10 MW. This reactor serves as a radiation source for material testing, producing of ionizing radiation sources, theoretical studies, and, most recently, for boron neutron capture therapy. Another NRI reactor LR-0 is a reactor of zero power used mainly for the studies of WWER 1000 spent fuel criticality. For training of students the reactor called VRABEC (VR-1), operated also with very low power, serves since 1990 at the Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, of Czech Technical University. The similar testing type reactor (SR-0), already decommissioned, was also used since 1974 to 1989 in Skoda, Nuclear Machinery, Plzen. This contribution summarizes the present state of the spent fuel (SF) management of these nuclear reactors. As the SF management is different for very low or zero power reactors and power reactors, the first type will be only briefly discussed, and then the main attention will be devoted to SF management of the NRI experimental reactor LVR-15

  10. Research reactors spent fuel management in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychecky, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    In Czech Republic 3 research and testing nuclear reactors are operated at present time, with the biggest one being the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) reactor LVR-15, operated with maximum power 10 MW. This reactor serves as a radiation source for material testing, producing of ionizing radiation sources, theoretical studies, and, most recently, for boron neutron capture therapy. Another NRI reactor LR-0 is a reactor of zero power used mainly for the studies of WWER 1000 spent fuel criticality. For training of students the reactor called VRABEC (VR-1), operated also with very low power, serves since 1990 at the Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, of Czech Technical University. The similar testing type reactor (SR-0), already decommissioned, was also used since 1974 to 1989 in Skoda, Nuclear Machinery, Plzen. This contribution summarizes the present state of the spent fuel (SF) management of these nuclear reactors. As the SF management is different for very low or zero power reactors and power reactors, the first type will be only briefly discussed, and then the main attention will be devoted to SF management of the NRI experimental reactor LVR-15.

  11. The Use of Hydrogen as a Fuel for Inland Waterway Units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Morsy El Gohary; Yousri M.A.Welaya; Amr Abdelwahab Saad

    2014-01-01

    Escalating apprehension about the harmful effects of widespread use of conventional fossil fuels in the marine field and in internal combustion engines in general, has led to a vast amount of efforts and the directing of large capital investment towards research and development of sustainable alternative energy sources. One of the most promising and abundant of these sources is hydrogen. Firstly, the use of current fossil fuels is discussed focusing on the emissions and economic sides to emphasize the need for a new, cleaner and renewable fuel with particular reference to hydrogen as a suitable possible alternative. Hydrogen properties, production and storage methods are then reviewed along with its suitability from the economical point of view. Finally, a cost analysis for the use of hydrogen in internal combustion engines is carried out to illustrate the benefits of its use as a replacement for diesel. The outcome of this cost analysis shows that 98% of the capital expenditure is consumed by the equipment, and 68.3% of the total cost of the equipment is spent on the solar photovoltaic cells. The hydrogen plant is classified as a large investment project because of its high initial cost which is about 1 billion US$;but this is justified because hydrogen is produced in a totally green way. When hydrogen is used as a fuel, no harmful emissions are obtained.

  12. The use of hydrogen as a fuel for inland waterway units

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gohary, M. Morsy; Welaya, Yousri M. A.; Saad, Amr Abdelwahab

    2014-06-01

    Escalating apprehension about the harmful effects of widespread use of conventional fossil fuels in the marine field and in internal combustion engines in general, has led to a vast amount of efforts and the directing of large capital investment towards research and development of sustainable alternative energy sources. One of the most promising and abundant of these sources is hydrogen. Firstly, the use of current fossil fuels is discussed focusing on the emissions and economic sides to emphasize the need for a new, cleaner and renewable fuel with particular reference to hydrogen as a suitable possible alternative. Hydrogen properties, production and storage methods are then reviewed along with its suitability from the economical point of view. Finally, a cost analysis for the use of hydrogen in internal combustion engines is carried out to illustrate the benefits of its use as a replacement for diesel. The outcome of this cost analysis shows that 98% of the capital expenditure is consumed by the equipment, and 68.3% of the total cost of the equipment is spent on the solar photovoltaic cells. The hydrogen plant is classified as a large investment project because of its high initial cost which is about 1 billion US; but this is justified because hydrogen is produced in a totally green way. When hydrogen is used as a fuel, no harmful emissions are obtained.

  13. U.S. progress in the development of very high density low enrichment research reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M. K.; Wachs, D. M.; Jue, J.-F.; Keiser, D. D.; Gan, J.; Rice, F.; Robinson, A.; Woolstenhulme, N. E.; Medvedev, P.; Hofman, G. L.; Kim, Y.-S.

    2012-01-01

    The effort to develop low-enriched fuels for high power research reactors began world-wide in 1996. Since that time, hundreds of fuel specimens have been tested to investigate the operational limits of many variations of U-Mo alloy dispersion and monolithic fuels. In the U.S., the fuel development program has focused on the development of monolithic fuel, and is currently transitioning from conducting research experiments to the demonstration of large scale, prototypic element assemblies. These larger scale, integral fuel performance demonstrations include the AFIP-7 test of full-sized, curved plates configured as an element, the RERTR-FE irradiation of hybrid fuel elements in the Advanced Test Reactor, reactor specific Design Demonstration Experiments, and a multi-element Base Fuel Demonstration. These tests are conducted alongside mini-plate tests designed to prove fuel stability over a wide range of operating conditions. Along with irradiation testing, work on collecting data on fuel plate mechanical integrity, thermal conductivity, fission product release, and microstructural stability is underway. (authors)

  14. Criticality safety of storage barrels for enriched uranium fresh fuel at the RB research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    Study on criticality safety of fresh low and high enriched uranium (LEU and HEU) fuel elements in the storage/transport barrels at the RB research reactor is carried out by using the well-known MCNP computer code. It is shown that studied arrays of tightly closed fuel barrels, each entirely loaded with 100 fresh (HEU or LEU) fuel slugs, are far away from criticality, even in cases of an unexpected flooding by light water.(author)

  15. Experience with the transport and storage casks CASTOR (registered) MTR 2 for spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack, Allen; Rettenbacher, Katharina; Skrzyppek, Juergen [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The CASTOR (registered) MTR 2 cask was designed and manufactured by the company GNS during the 1990's for the transport and interim storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from various types of research reactors. Casks of this type have been used at the VKTA Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, Germany as well as at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre at Petten and at the HOR reactor at Delft in the Netherlands. A total of 24 units have been used for the functions of transport and storage with various spent fuel types (VVER, HFR-HEU, and HOR-HEU) for more than ten years now. This type of packaging for radioactive material is a member of the CASTOR (registered) family of spent nuclear fuel casks used worldwide. Over 1000 units are loaded and in storage in Europe, Asia, Africa and North America. This paper presents the experience from the use of the casks for transport and storage in the past, as well as the prospects for the future. (author)

  16. UKAEA fast reactor project research and development programme on fuel element cladding and sub-assembly wrapper materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Research and development work on fuel element component (cladding, subassembly wrappers, etc.) materials for the U.K. sodium cooled fast reactor programme has been conducted at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) establishments at Dounreay, Harwell, Risley, and Springfields during the past fifteen years or so. This work has formed an integral part of, and has been co-ordinated by, the UKAEA Fast Reactor Project and has involved close liaison with the Nuclear Power Company (NPC) and the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). The research and development were initially related to the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) but the scope has now been extended to cover the first Civil Fast Reactor (CFR1), which has recently been re-designated the Civil Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR). The paper outlines the present status of the development of sodium cooled fast reactors in the U.K. and proceeds to summarize the principal PFR and CDFR core and fuel element parameters which have determined the planning and direction of the fuel element materials programme. The current position on the fuel element cladding and wrapper research and development programme is reviewed, and the facilities and future irradiation programme to be carried out in PFR are described

  17. The main conditions ensured problemless implementation of 235U high enriched fuel in Kozloduy NPP (Bulgaria) - WWER-1000 Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.; Minkova, K.; Michaylov, G.; Penev, P.; Gerchev, N.

    2009-01-01

    The collected water chemistry and radiochemistry data during the operation of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 for the period 2006-2009 (12-th, 13-th 14-th and 15-th fuel cycles) undoubtedly indicate for WWER-1000 Units (whose specific features are: Steam generators with austenitic stainless steel 08Cr18N10T tubing; Steam generators are with horizontal straight tubing and Fuel elements cladding material is Zr-1%Nb (Zr1Nb) alloy), that one realistic way for problemless implementation of 235 U high enriched fuel have been found. The main feature characteristics of this way are: Implementation of solid neutron burnable absorbers together with the dissolved in coolant neutron absorber - natural boric acid; Application of fuel cladding materials with enough corrosion resistance by the specific fuel cladding environment created by presence of SNB; Keeping of suitable coolant water chemistry which ensures low corrosion rates of core- and out-of-core- materials and limits in core (cladding) depositions and restricts out-of-core radioactivity buildup. The realization of this way in WWER-1000 Units in Kozloduy NPP was practically carried out through: 1) Implementation of Russian fuel assemblies TVSA which have as fuel cladding material E-110 alloy (Zr1Nb) with enough high corrosion resistance by presence of sub-cooled nucleate boiling (SNB) and use burnable absorber (Gd) integrated in the uranium-gadolinium (U-Gd 2 O 3 ) fuel (fuel rod with 5.0% Gd 2 O 3 ); 2) Development and implementation of water chemistry primary circuit guidelines, which require the relation between boric acid concentration and total alkalising agent concentrations to ensure coolant pH 300 = 7.0 - 7.2 values during the whole operation period. The above mentioned conditions by the passing of WWER-1000 Units in NPP Kozloduy to uranium fuel with 4.4% 235 U (TVSA fuel assemblies) practically ensured avoidance of the creation of the necessary conditions for AOA onset. The operational experience (2006-2009) of the

  18. Treatment of spent fuels from research reactors and reactor development programs in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closs, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    Quite a great number of different types of spent fuel from research reactors and development programs exists in Germany. The general policy is to send back to the USA as long as possible fuel from MTRs and TRIGAs of USA origin. An option is reprocessing in Great Britain or France. This option is pursued as long as reprocessing and reuse of the recovered material is economically justifiable. For those fuels which cannot be returned to the USA or which will not be reprocessed, a domestic back-up solution of spent fuel management has been developed in Germany, compatible with the management of spent fuel from power reactors. It consists in dry storage in special casks and, later on, direct disposal. Preliminary results from experimental R and D investigations with research reactor fuel and experience from LWR fuel lead to the conclusion that the direct disposal option even for research reactor fuel or exotic fuel does not impose major technical difficulties for the German waste management and disposal concept. (author)

  19. Research on using depleted uranium as nuclear fuel for HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiahua; Chen Zhicheng; Bao Borong

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of our work is to find a way for application of depleted uranium in CANDU reactor by using MOX nuclear fuel of depleted U and Pu instead of natural uranium. From preliminary evaluation and calculation, it was shown that MOX nuclear fuel consisting of depleted uranium enrichment tailings (0.25% 235 U) and plutonium (their ratio 99.5%:0.5%) could replace natural uranium in CANDU reactor to sustain chain reaction. The prospects of application of depleted uranium in nuclear energy field are also discussed

  20. Combustion and Heat Transfer Studies Utilizing Advanced Diagnostics: Fuels Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    competing reactions (Reactions (6) and (7)) and their respective rate equations (Eqs. 8 and 9). Reaction (6) has the advantage of no activation energy and...cartridges were J&W (diol, cyano and C-18) J.T. Baker (silica gel) and Alltech (IC/Ag). All were conditioned and used according to the vendors...hot fuel through the test section. At the same time the water supply to the fuel cooler is turned on. The main advantage of this procedure is that it

  1. Fast reactor fuel reprocessing development in the United States: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenier, W.S.; Burch, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of the reduced nuclear power demand and the growing concerns over the potential proliferation of sensitive nuclear materials, there has not been a necessity to make immediate decisions regarding near-term reprocessing and breeder reactor commercialization. Programs which formed the basic thrust of nuclear development in the early 1970's have already been adjusted: increased emphasis on problems of radioactive waste management; increased attention to nonproliferation objectives and subsequent reorientation of the overall fuel cycle and breeder programs; increased emphasis on a once-through light-water reactor technology; increased concern for a more detailed knowledge of the uranium resource base; reorientation of the uranium enrichment programs; and exploration of alternative fuel cycles (such as thorium) to minimize the use of plutonium. Nevertheless, major strategic decisions still loom over breeder commercialization, the breeder's requisite demand for reprocessing, and the future role of more proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. The current program in the United States is organized to provide the necessary technology for the reprocessing of breeder fuels on a timetable that is consistent with the reactor development and demonstration program. Also addressed in this paper are the present day concerns of environmental protection, safety, nuclear material safeguards, and proliferation resistance. It is structured on the well-known Purex processing method but includes new efforts aimed at advanced and alternative fuels. At the present time, the program consists mainly of a generic effort that is planned to progress through an integrated equipment engineering demonstration to an eventual pilot-plant operation. Each of these facilities is viewed as a test bed for advanced and alternative processing steps to address the many significant technical and political issues. 16 figures

  2. Nuclear fuel cycle cost estimation and sensitivity analysis of unit costs on the basis of an equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. K.; Ko, W. I.; You, S. R.; Gao, R. X.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the difference in the value of the nuclear fuel cycle cost calculated by the deterministic and probabilistic methods on the basis of an equilibrium model. Calculating using the deterministic method, the direct disposal cost and Pyro-SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor) nuclear fuel cycle cost, including the reactor cost, were found to be 66.41 mills/kWh and 77.82 mills/kWh, respectively (1 mill = one thousand of a dollar, i.e., 10-3 $). This is because the cost of SFR is considerably expensive. Calculating again using the probabilistic method, however, the direct disposal cost and Pyro-SFR nuclear fuel cycle cost, excluding the reactor cost, were found be 7.47 mills/kWh and 6.40 mills/kWh, respectively, on the basis of the most likely value. This is because the nuclear fuel cycle cost is significantly affected by the standard deviation and the mean of the unit cost that includes uncertainty. Thus, it is judged that not only the deterministic method, but also the probabilistic method, would also be necessary to evaluate the nuclear fuel cycle cost. By analyzing the sensitivity of the unit cost in each phase of the nuclear fuel cycle, it was found that the uranium unit price is the most influential factor in determining nuclear fuel cycle costs.

  3. Report by the AERES on the unit: Research Unit on Reactor Safety under the supervision of the establishments and bodies: Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory whose activity is organized according to the following themes: behaviour of nuclear fuel under accidental conditions, core fusion accidents, fire in confined environment, and civil engineering and structure behaviour. The authors discuss an assessment of the unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved and recommendations, productions and publications. A more detailed assessment is presented in terms of scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. Each research theme is analyzed in the same way

  4. Perspectives on research and development of microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Martinez, A.; Vazquez Larios, A.L.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Poggi Varaldo, H.M. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: hectorpoggi2001@gmail.com; rareli@hotmail.com

    2009-09-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC), is an anoxic electrochemical bioreactor where bacteria grow in the absence of oxygen in a chamber containing an anode which it may be covered by a biofilm. Microorganisms anoxically oxidize the organic substrate and electrons generated are released to the anode. Released protons are transferred to the cathode. Natural or forced aeration of the cathode supplies the oxygen for the final reaction 2H{sup +} + 2e{sup -} + (1/2) O{sub 2} = H{sub 2}O. In this work, we present a critical review on MFC focused on subjects that are receiving a growing interest from the research and technological communities: (i) types of MFC, their relative advantages and disadvantages and ranges of application; (ii) development of biocathodes; (iii) enrichment procedures of microbial communities in MFC. Recent research shows that one-chamber fitted with cathode aerated by natural aeration, and other special types of high performance MFC, have displaced the historical two-chamber MFC. Recent studies showed that electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) can be successfully enriched in MFC. The cost and eventual poisoning of the platinum catalyst used at the cathode is a major limitation to MFC application and economic viability. Researchers have started working on the concept of biocathodes that would use bacteria instead of platinum as a biocatalyst. Microbial enrichment of inocula seeded to MFC may provide a way to enrich the consortium with EAB, thus substantially increasing the transfer of electrons to the anode. Bioaugmentation of consortia in MFC with strains EAB, could contribute to the same goal. [Spanish] Las celdas de combustible microbianas (CCM) son un biorrector anoxico donde las bacterias crecen en ausencia de oxigeno en una camara que contiene un anodo que puede cubrirse con una biopelicula. Los microorganismos oxidan onoxicamente el sustrato organico y los electrones generados se liberan al anodo. Los protones liberados se transfieren al catodo. La

  5. Progress in the development of very high density research and test reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2528, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    New nuclear fuels are being developed to enable many of the most important research and test reactors worldwide to convert from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuels to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels without significant loss in performance. The last decade of work has focused on the development of uranium-molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) based fuels and is an international effort that includes the active participation of more than ten national programs. The US RERTR program, under the NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is in the process of developing both dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel designs. While the U-Mo fuel alloy has behaved extremely well under irradiation, initial testing (circa 2003) revealed that the U-Mo fuels dispersed in aluminum had an unexpected tendency toward unstable swelling (pillowing) under high-power conditions. Technical investigations were initiated worldwide at this time by the partner programs to understand this behavior as well as to develop and test remedies. The behavior was corrected by modifying the chemistry of the U-Mo/Al interfaces in both fuel designs. In the dispersion fuel design, this was accomplished by the addition of small amounts of silicon to the aluminum matrix material. Two methods are under development for the monolithic fuel design, which include the application of a thin layer of silicon or a thin zirconium based diffusion barrier at the fuel/clad interface. This paper gives an overview of the current status of U-Mo fuel development, including basic research results, manufacturing aspects, results of the latest irradiations and post irradiation examinations, the approach to fuel performance qualification, and the scale-up and commercialization of fabrication technology. (authors)

  6. Corrosion surveillance programme for Latin American research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Haddad, R.; Ritchie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the IAEA sponsored Regional Technical Co-operation Project for Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru) are to provide the basic conditions to define a regional strategy for managing spent fuel and to provide solutions, taking into consideration the economic and technological realities of the countries involved. In particular, to determine the basic conditions for managing research reactor spent fuel during operation and interim storage as well as final disposal, and to establish forms of regional cooperation in the four main areas: spent fuel characterization, safety, regulation and public communication. This paper reports the corrosion surveillance activities of the Regional Project and these are based on the IAEA sponsored co-ordinated research project (CRP) on 'Corrosion of research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water'. The overall test consists of exposing corrosion coupon racks at different spent fuel basins followed by evaluation. (author)

  7. The aging of biomedical research in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin R W Matthews

    Full Text Available In the past 30 years, the average age of biomedical researchers has steadily increased. The average age of an investigator at the National Institutes of Health (NIH rose from 39 to 51 between 1980 and 2008. The aging of the biomedical workforce was even more apparent when looking at first-time NIH grantees. The average age of a new investigator was 42 in 2008, compared to 36 in 1980. To determine if the rising barriers at NIH for entry in biomedical research might impact innovative ideas and research, we analyzed the research and publications of Nobel Prize winners from 1980 to 2010 to assess the age at which their pioneering research occurred. We established that in the 30-year period, 96 scientists won the Nobel Prize in medicine or chemistry for work related to biomedicine, and that their groundbreaking research was conducted at an average age of 41-one year younger than the average age of a new investigator at NIH. Furthermore, 78% of the Nobel Prize winners conducted their research before the age of 51, the average age of an NIH principal investigator. This suggested that limited access to NIH might inhibit research potential and novel projects, and could impact biomedicine and the next generation scientists in the United States.

  8. An example of a United States Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    Under the likely scenario in which public support for nuclear energy remains low and fossil fuels continue to be abundant and cheap, government supported nuclear research centers must adapt their missions to ensure that they tackle problems of current significance. It will be critical to be multidisciplinary, to generate economic value, and to apply nuclear competencies to current problems. Addressing problems in nuclear safety, D and D, nuclear waste management, nonproliferation, isotope production are a few examples of current needs in the nuclear arena. Argonne's original mission, to develop nuclear reactor technology, was a critical need for the U.S. in 1946. It would be wise to recognize that this mission was a special instance of a more general one--to apply unique human and physical capital to long term, high risk technology development in response to society's needs. International collaboration will enhance the collective chances for success as the world moves into the 21st century

  9. Proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel: Appendix A, environmental justice analysis. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This is Appendix A to a draft Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. This appendix addresses environmental justice for the acceptance of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. Analyses of environmental justice concerns are provided in three areas: (1) potential ports of entry, (2) potential transportation routes from candidate ports of entry to interim management sites, and (3) areas surrounding potential interim management sites. These analyses lead to the conclusion that the alternatives analyzed in this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) would result in no disproportionate adverse effects on minority populations or low-income communities surrounding the candidate ports, transport routes, or interim management sites

  10. Application of room temperature ionic liquids in advanced fuel cycles RIAR research concept program users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Alexander V.; Kormilitsyn, Michael V.; Savochkin, Yuri P.; Osipenko, Alexander G.; Smolensky, Valeri V.; Shadrin, Alexander Yu.; Babain, Vladimir A.

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews briefly the research program on application of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids (RTILs) in some processes of the nuclear fuel reprocessing, particularly in the uranium-aluminum fuel reprocessing and separation of TPEs and REEs from the PUREX process liquid waste, and approaches to implementation of this program. (author)

  11. Researches of real observation geometry in monitoring fuel-containing materials' subcriticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysotskij, E.D.; Shevchenko, V.G.; Shevchenko, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of fuel-containing materials monitoring is discussed in the part related to the feasibilities of researches and realization of optimal geometry (detectors - source) of survey of neutron activity dynamics in nuclearly hazardous areas with clusters of fuel-containing materials concentrated in the premises 305/2

  12. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria Sturtevant; Margaret Ann Moote; Pamela Jakes; Anthony S. Cheng

    2005-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on collaboration research, and offers knowledge and tools to improve collaboration in the planning and implementation of wildland fire and fuels management projects. It covers a variety of topics including benefits of collaboration,...

  13. Conversion and start up of Tehran Research Reactor with LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaker, M.

    2004-01-01

    The MW Tehran Research Reactor, Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel has been converted to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using U 3 0 8 -Al with less than 20% enriched uranium. Measured value of excess reactivity, control rod worth and other parameters indicate good agreement with computational predictions. (author)

  14. Program for fundamental and applied research of fuel cells in VNIIEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisin, A.V.; Borisseonock, V.A.; Novitskii, Y.Z.; Potyomckin, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    According to VNIIEF the integral part of development of fuel cell power plants is fundamental and applied research. This paper describes areas of research on molten carbonate fuel cells. Topics include the development of mathematical models for porous electrodes, thin film electrolytes, the possibility of solid nickel anodes, model of activation polarization of anode, electrolyte with high solubility of oxygen. Other areas include research on a stationary mode of stack operation, anticorrosion coatings, impedance diagnostic methods, ultrasound diagnostics, radiation treatments, an air aluminium cell, and alternative catalysts for low temperature fuel cells.

  15. Nuclear fuel cycle: research and development and push technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Wagner dos Santos

    2002-01-01

    The scope of this work is to show the importance of 'push technologies in the development of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle more specifically the so called 'Projeto Conversao' PROCON. This R and D activities lead to the design of special equipment, new metallic and polymer materials. (author)

  16. Research and development issues for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumpelt, M.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes issues pertaining to the development of molten carbonate fuel cells. In particular, the corrosion resistance and service life of nickel oxide cathodes is described. The resistivity of lithium oxide/iron oxides and improvement with doping is addressed.

  17. Alternative Fuel Fleet Vehicle Evaluations | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    delivery, transit, and freight vehicles. Although biodiesel is the most commonly used alternative fuel in Diesel and Biodiesel Renewable diesel is a conventional petroleum diesel substitute produced from alternative to conventional diesel and does not require any vehicle modifications. Biodiesel is an oxygenated

  18. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (C) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1999 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc. 'below'), which means that the fiscal year 2002 was the fourth year of the scheme. This scheme is to invite foresighted and original themes of basic and fundamental research, to be performed using JNC's facilities and equipment, in principle, for the research and development of JNC in the field of the nuclear fuel cycle, from researchers at universities, etc. Those researchers who propose research themes in response to the invitation are expected to lead the research. The purpose of the scheme is to promote the efficiency of basic and fundamental research and development by enhancing the research environment of JNC through collaboration between JNC's own researchers and other researchers, and exchange of information and publication of achievements, etc. Research themes proposed by researchers at universities, etc. are screened by a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2002 on twenty selected themes related to the JNC's collaborative research for fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; eight of which ended in 2002. Of these, three were related to fast breeder reactors, two to the nuclear fuel cycle and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  19. Overall intelligent hybrid control system for a fossil-fuel power unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garduno-Ramirez, Raul

    2000-08-01

    This research present a methodology to design a generalized overall unit control system for a fossil fuel power unit (FFPU), and develops a minimum prototype to demonstrate its feasibility. Toward the above goal, the associated research project was undertaken as a technology innovation process with its two ends identified as follows. First, it is recognized that the coordinated control strategies constitute the uppermost control level in current FFPUs, and so, are responsible for driving the boiler-turbine-generator set as a single entity. Second, a FFPU is envisioned as a complex process, subject to multiple changing operating conditions, that should perform as an intelligent system, for which an advanced integral control concept is needed. Therefore, as an outcome of the innovation process, a generalized unit control concept that extends the capabilities of current coordinated control schemes is proposed. This concept is presented as the Intelligent Coordinated Control System (ICCS) paradigm, which establishes an open reference framework for the development of overall unit control schemes. The ICCS's system goals are identified using power plant process engineering concepts, and intelligent control systems engineering concepts are used to identify main tasks and to achieve system functional decomposition. A software engineering agency concept is used to identify and group agents according to their knowledge and purpose interactions. The resultant ICCS structure is an open set of functionally grouped agent clusters in a two-level hierarchical system. The upper level, mainly characterized for knowledge-driven processes, performs the supervisory functions needed to provide self governing operation characteristics, while the lower level, mainly characterized for data-driven processes, performs the fast reactive behavior functions necessary for hybrid real-time control and protection. Developed through several stages, the ICCS-MP finally implements a two

  20. A battery-fuel cell hybrid auxiliary power unit for trucks: Analysis of direct and indirect hybrid configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsun, Remzi Can; Krupp, Carsten; Baltzer, Sidney; Gnörich, Bruno; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A battery-fuel cell hybrid auxiliary power unit for heavy duty vehicles is reported. • Comparison of direct and indirect hybrids using representative load profiles. • Evaluation based on validated fuel cell system and battery models. • Indirect hybrid with constant fuel cell load yields 29.3% hybrid system efficiency. • Fuel cell should be pre-heated using waste heat from the diesel engine during drive. - Abstract: The idling operation of engines in heavy duty vehicles to cover electricity demand during layovers entails significant fuel consumption and corresponding emissions. Indeed, this mode of operation is highly inefficient and a noteworthy contributor to the transportation sector’s aggregate carbon dioxide emissions. Here, a potential solution to this wasteful practice is outlined in the form of a hybrid battery-fuel cell system for application as an auxiliary power unit for trucks. Drawing on experimentally-validated fuel cell and battery models, several possible hybrid concepts are evaluated and direct and indirect hybrid configurations analyzed using a representative load profile. The results indicate that a direct hybrid configuration is only applicable if the load demand profile does not deviate strongly from the assumed profile. Operation of an indirect hybrid with a constant fuel cell load yields the greatest hybrid system efficiency, at 29.3%, while battery size could be reduced by 87% if the fuel cell is operated at the highest dynamics. Maximum efficiency in truck applications can be achieved by pre-heating the system prior to operation using exhaust heat from the motor, which increased system efficiency from 25.3% to 28.1%, including start-up. These findings confirm that hybrid systems could offer enormous fuel savings and constitute a sizeable step on the path toward energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly heavy duty vehicles that does not necessitate a fuel switch.

  1. Conversion of research and test reactors to low enriched uranium fuel: technical overview and program status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roglans-Ribas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the nuclear research and test reactors worldwide operate with high enriched uranium fuel. In response to worries over the potential use of HEU from research reactors in nuclear weapons, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of HEU fuel by converting research reactors to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The Reactor Conversion program is currently under the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). 55 of the 129 reactors included in the scope have been already converted to LEU fuel or have shutdown prior to conversion. The major technical activities of the Conversion Program include: (1) the development of advanced LEU fuels; (2) conversion analysis and conversion support; and (3) technology development for the production of Molybdenum-99 (Mo 99 ) with LEU targets. The paper provides an overview of the status of the program, the technical challenges and accomplishments, and the role of international collaborations in the accomplishment of the Conversion Program objectives. Nuclear research and test reactors worldwide have been in operation for over 60 years. Many of these facilities operate with high enriched uranium fuel. In response to increased worries over the potential use of HEU from research reactors in the manufacturing of nuclear weapons, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of HEU fuel in research reactors by converting them to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor conversion program was initially focused on U.S.-supplied reactors, but in the early 1990s it expanded and began to collaborate with Russian institutes with the objective of converting Russian supplied reactors to the use of LEU fuel.

  2. DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Bensch, D.; Ambos, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003

  3. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT III, MAINTAINING THE FUEL SYSTEM--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE FUEL SYSTEM. TOPICS ARE (1) PURPOSE OF THE FUEL SYSTEM, (2) TRACING THE FUEL FLOW, (3) MINOR COMPONENTS OF THE FUEL SYSTEM, (4) MAINTENANCE TIPS, (5) CONSTRUCTION AND FUNCTION OF THE FUEL INJECTORS, AND (6)…

  4. Note on current position regarding the development by the UKAEA of Reduced Enrichment fuels for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, B.

    1983-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority have an MTR fuel fabrication plant located at Dounreay on the north coast of Scotland. The prime function of the plant is to manufacture fuel elements for the UKAEA's own DIDO and PLUTO heavy water reactors located at their research establishment at Harwell. The plant, which has a capacity of about 1000 fuel elements per annum, also manufactures fuel elements, on a commercial basis, for university reactors in the United Kingdom and for a number of customers in overseas countries. The UKAEA have been manufacturing MTR fuel elements of a wide range of designs for over twenty-five years. Following the initiative of the US Government's RERTR programme, the UKAEA have embarked on a modest programme of MTR fuel manufacturing development., irradiation and post-irradiation examination to establish the techniques required to manufacture fuel elements containing uranium of a significantly lower enrichment than that in the fuel elements they currently manufacture. In the first instance this work is being directed towards the production of fuel elements containing uranium of 45% enrichment. After an initial analysis it was recognised that although a satisfactory 45% enriched version of certain of the designs of fuel elements currently manufactured could probably be produced using established U/Al alloy technology, it would be necessary to utilise powder technology for other elements in order to achieve the higher uranium density required. Studies of published information and consideration of the technology and facilities already available at Dounreay prompted the decision to concentrate on the development Of U 3 O 8 /Al cermet type fuel elements of similar geometry to those currently manufactured. Some of the fuel element designs currently manufactured by the UKAEA are listed: Concentric (Extruded) 74% enriched; Concentric Plates 80% enriched with densities 0.60 and 0.53 g U/ cm 3 ; Flat Plate (Swaged) 80% enriched and Flat Plate

  5. Nuclear fuels technologies fiscal year 1996 research and research development test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, C.A.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    During fiscal year 1996, the Department of Energy's Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) funded Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to investigate issues associated with the fabrication of plutonium from dismantled weapons into mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel for disposition in nuclear power reactors. These issues can be divided into two main categories: issues associated with the fact that the plutonium from dismantled weapons contains gallium, and issues associated with the unique characteristics of the PuO 2 produced by the dry conversion process that OFMD is proposing to convert the weapons material. Initial descriptions of the experimental work performed in fiscal year 1996 to address these issues can be found in Nuclear Fuels Technologies Fiscal Year 1996 Research and Development Test Matrices'. However, in some instances the change in programmatic emphasis towards the Parallex program either altered the manner in which some of these experiments were performed (i.e., the work was done as part of the Parallex fabrication development and not as individual separate-effects tests as originally envisioned) or delayed the experiments into Fiscal Year 1997. This report reviews the experiments that were conducted and presents the results. 7 figs., 14 tabs

  6. Dynamic analytical and experimental research of shock absorber to safeguard the nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundulis, Gintautas, E-mail: gintas@mail.lei.lt [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Grybenas, Albertas [Laboratory of Materials Research and Testing, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Karalevicius, Renatas [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Makarevicius, Vidas [Laboratory of Materials Research and Testing, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Rimkevicius, Sigitas; Uspuras, Eugenijus [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Plastical deformation of the shock absorber. • Dynamic testing of the scaled shock absorber. • Dynamic simulation of the shock absorber using finite element method. • Strain-rate evaluation in dynamic analysis. • Variation of displacement, acceleration and velocity during dynamic impact. -- Abstract: The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) has two RBMK-1500 graphite moderated boiling water multi-channel reactors. The Ignalina NPP Unit 1 was shut down at the end of 2004 while Unit 2 has been in operation for over 5 years. After shutdown at the Unit 1 remained spent fuel assemblies with low burn-up depth. In order to reuse these assemblies in the reactor of Unit 2 a special set of equipment was developed. One of the most important items of this set is a container, which is used for the transportation of spent fuel assemblies between the reactors of Unit 1 and Unit 2. A special shock absorber was designed to avoid failure of fuel assemblies in case of hypothetical spent fuel assemblies drop accident during uploading/unloading of spent fuel assemblies to/from container. This shock absorber was examined using scaled experiments and finite element analysis. Static and dynamic investigations of the shock absorber were performed for the estimation and optimization of its geometrical parameters. The objective of this work is the estimation whether the proposed design of shock absorber can fulfil the stopping function of the spent fuel assemblies and is capable to withstand the dynamics load. Experimental testing of scaled shock absorber models and dynamic analytical investigations using the finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit were performed. The simulation model was verified by comparing the experimental and simulation results and it was concluded that the shock absorber is capable to withstand the dynamic load, i.e. successful force suppression function in case of accident.

  7. Swelling Estimation of Multi-wire U-Mo Monolithic Fuel for HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon-Sang; Ryu, Ho-Jin; Park, Jong-Man; Oh, Jong-Myeong; Kim, Chang-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In order to use low-enriched uranium (LEU) instead of highly enriched uranium (HEU) for high performance research reactors, the reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) program is developing high uranium density fuel such as U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. U-Mo alloys have an excellent irradiation performance when compared to other uranium alloys or compounds. But the results from the post-irradiation examination of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels indicate that an interaction between the U-Mo alloy fuel and the Al matrix phases occurs readily during an irradiation and it is sensitively dependent on the temperature. In order to lessen these severe interactions, a concept of a multi-wire type fuel was proposed. The fuel configuration is that three to six U-Mo fuel wires (1.5 mm - 2 mm in diameter) are symmetrically arranged at the periphery side in the Al matrix. In this study temperature calculations and a swelling estimation of a multi-wire monolithic fuel were carried out. Also the results of a post irradiation analysis of this fuel will be introduced.

  8. Subcritical Noise Analysis Measurements with Fresh and Spent Research Reactor Fuels Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Kryter, R.C.; Miller, V.C.

    1999-01-01

    The verification of the subcriticality is of utmost importance for the safe transportation and storage of nuclear reactor fuels. Transportation containers and storage facilities are designed such that nuclear fuels remain in a subcritical state. Such designs often involve excess conservatism because of the lack of relevant experimental data to verify the accuracy of Monte Carlo codes used in nuclear criticality safety analyses. A joint experimental research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., and the University of Missouri was initiated to obtain measured quantities that could be directly related to the subcriticality of simple arrays of Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) fuel elements. A series of measurement were performed to assess the reactivity of materials such as BORAL, stainless steel, aluminum, and lead that are typically used in the construction of shipping casks. These materials were positioned between the fuel elements. In addition, a limited number of measurements were performed with configurations of fresh and spent (irradiated) fuel elements to ascertain the reactivity of the spent fuel elements. In these experiments, fresh fuel elements were replaced by spent fuel elements such that the subcritical reactivity change could be measured. The results of these measurements were used by Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions to determine the subcriticality of MURR fuel elements isolated by absorbing materials. The measurements were interpreted using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code to obtain the subcritical neutron multiplication factor k(sub eff), and the bias in K(sub eff) that are used in criticality safety analyses

  9. Status report on conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor to low enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. The US Department of Energy is funding a program to compare reactor performance with high and low enrichment fuels. The goals of the program are: (1) to amend the SAR and the technical specifications of the GTRR so that LEU U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel plates can replace the current HEU U-Al alloy fuel, and (2) to optimize the LEU core such that maximum value neutron beams can be extracted for possible neutron capture therapy application. This paper presents a status report on the LEU conversion effort. (author)

  10. Status report on conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor to low enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. The US Department of Energy is funding a program to compare reactor performance with high and low enrichment fuels. The goals of the program are: (1) to amend the SAR and the Technical Specifications of the GTRR so that LEU U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel plates can replace the current HEU U-Al alloy fuel, and (2) to optimize the LEU core such that maximum value neutron beams can be extracted for possible neutron capture therapy application. This paper presents a status report on the LEU conversion effort

  11. Behaviour of power and research reactor fuel in wet and dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire-Canosa, J [Nuclear Waste Management Organization (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Canada has developed extensive experience in both wet and dry storage of CANDU fuel. Fuel has been stored in water pools at CANDU reactor sites for approximately 45 years, and in dry storage facilities for a large part of the past decade. Currently, Canada has 38 450 t U of spent fuel in storage, of which 8850 t U are in dry storage. In June 2007, the Government of Canada selected the Adaptive Phased Management (APM) approach, recommended by the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), for the long-term management of Canada's nuclear-fuel waste. The Canadian utilities and AECL are conducting development work in extended storage systems as well as research on fuel behaviour under storage conditions. Both activities have as ultimate objective to establish a technical basis for assuring the safety of long-term fuel storage.

  12. Modeling the performance of hydrogen-oxygen unitized regenerative proton exchange membrane fuel cells for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Massimo; Alotto, Piergiorgio; Moro, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Thanks to the independent sizing of power and energy, hydrogen-based energy storage is one of the very few technologies capable of providing long operational times in addition to the other advantages offered by electrochemical energy storage, for example scalability, site versatility, and mobile service. The typical design consists of an electrolyzer in charge mode and a separate fuel cell in discharge mode. Instead, a unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) is a single device performing both energy conversions, achieving a higher compactness and power-to-weight ratio. This paper presents a performance model of a URFC based on a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyte and working on hydrogen and oxygen, which can provide high energy and power densities (>0.7 W cm-2). It provides voltage, power, and efficiency at varying load conditions as functions of the controlling physical quantities: temperature, pressure, concentration, and humidification. The model constitutes a tool for designing the interface and control sub-system as well as for exploring optimized cell/stack designs and operational conditions. To date, only a few of such analyses have been carried out and more research is needed in order to explore the true potential of URFCs.

  13. Closing Symposium of the DFG Research Unit FOR 1066

    CERN Document Server

    Niehuis, Reinhard; Kroll, Norbert; Behrends, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    The book reports on advanced solutions to the problem of simulating wing and nacelle stall, as presented and discussed by internationally recognized researchers at the Closing Symposium of the DFG Research Unit FOR 1066. Reliable simulations of flow separation on airfoils, wings and powered engine nacelles at high Reynolds numbers represent great challenges in defining suitable mathematical models, computing numerically accurate solutions and providing comprehensive experimental data for the validation of numerical simulations. Additional problems arise from the need to consider airframe-engine interactions and inhomogeneous onset flow conditions, as real aircraft operate in atmospheric environments with often-large distortions. The findings of fundamental and applied research into these and other related issues are reported in detail in this book, which targets all readers, academics and professionals alike, interested in the development of advanced computational fluid dynamics modeling for the simulation of...

  14. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  15. Status of Research on Pebble Bed HTR Fuel Fabrication Technology in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachmawati, M.; Sarjono; Ridwan; Langenati, R.

    2014-01-01

    Research on pebble bed HTR fuel fabrication is conducted in Indonesia. One of the aims is to build a knowledge base on pebble bed HTR fuel element fabrication technology for fuel procurement. The steps of research strategies are firstly to understand the basic design research of TRISO fuel, properties, and requirements, and secondly to understand the TRISO fuel manufacturing technology, which comprises fabrication and quality control, including its facility. Both steps are adopted from research and experiences of the countries with HTR fuel element fabrication technology. From the knowledge gained in the research, an experimental design of the process and a set of prototype process equipment for fabrication are developed, namely kernels production using external gelation process, TRISO coating of the kernel, and pebble compacting. Experiments using the prototypes have been conducted. Characterization of the kernel product, i.e. diameter, sphericity, density and O/U ratio, shows that the kernel product is still not in compliance with the specification requirements. These are deemed to be caused mainly by the selected vibrating system and the viscosity adjustment. Another major cause is the selected NH3 and air feeding method for both NH3 and air layer in the preparation for spherical droplets of liquid. The FB-CVD TRISO coating of the kernel has been experimented but unsuccessful by using an FB-CVD once‐through continuous coating process. For the pebble compacting, the process is still in the early stage of setting-up compaction equipment. This paper summarizes the current status of research on HTR fuel fabrication technology in Indonesia, the proposed process and its equipment setting-up for improvement of the kernel production. The knowledge and lessons learned gained from the research is useful and can be an assistance in planning for fuel development laboratory facilities procurement, formulating User Requirement Document and Bid Invitation Specification for

  16. Caramel fuel for research reactors: experience acquired in the fabrication, monitoring and irradiation of Osiris core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contenson, Ghislain de; Foulquier, Henri; Trotabas, Maria; Vignesoult, Nicole; Cerles, J.-M.; Delafosse, Jacques.

    1981-06-01

    A plate type nuclear fuel (Caramel fuel) has been developed in France in the framework of the various activities pursued in the design, fabrication and development of nuclear fuels by the CEA. This fuel can be adapted to various different categories of water cooled reactor (power reactors, marine propulsion reactors, urbain heating reactors, research reactors). The successful work conducted in this field led the realization of a complete core and reloads for the high performance research reactor, Osiris, at Saclay. The existing highly enriched U-Al alloy fuel was replaced by a non-proliferating low enrichment (7%) caramel fuel. This new core has been operating successfully since january 1980. A brief description of Caramel and its main advantages is given. The way in which it is fabricated is described together with the quality controls to which it is subjected. The qualification program and the main results deduced from it are also presented. The program used to monitor its in-pile behavior is described. The essential purpose of this program is to ensure the high performance of the fuel under irradiation. The successful operation of Osiris, which terminated 11 irradiation cycles on the 21st of April 1981 confirmed the correctness of the decisions made and the excellent performance that could be achieved with these fuel elements under the severe conditions encountered in a high performance research reactor [fr

  17. Shipment of Taiwanese research reactor spent nuclear fuel (Phase 2): Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The proposed action is to transport approximately 1100 spent fuel rods from a foreign research reactor in Taiwan by sea to Hampton Roads, Virginia, and then overland by truck to the receiving basin for offsite fuels at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) for reprocessing to recover uranium and plutonium. The analysis of the impacts of the proposed action have been evaluated and shown to have negligible impact on the local environments. The calculations have been completed using the RADTRAN III code. PWR spent fuel was analyzed as a benchmark to link the calculations in this analysis to those in earlier environmental documentation. Cumulative total, maximum annual, and per shipment risks were calculated. The results indicate that the PWR spent fuel shipment risks are somewhat lower than those previously estimated. The cumulative and maximum annual normal, or incident-free, risks associated with the shipment of Taiwanese research reactor spent fuel is a factor of 10 lower than that for PWR fuel, and the cumulative and maximum annual accident radiological risks are a factor of about 2.2 lower than that for PWR spent fuel. As a result, the port risks are about a factor of 10 larger than the risk of overland transport. All of the risks calculated are small. The PWR risk values are similar to those judged by the NRC to be small enough not to warrant increased stringency in regulations. The Taiwanese research reactor spent fuel shipment risk values are smaller yet. 51 refs., 22 tabs

  18. Replacement of the Pumps for Fuel Channel Cooling Circuit of the Maria Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krzysztoszek, G.; Mieleszczenko, W.; Moldysz, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock–Świerk (Poland)

    2014-08-15

    The high flux Maria research reactor is operated by the National Centre for Nuclear Research in Świerk. It is a pool type reactor with pressurized fuel channels located in the beryllium matrix. According to the Global Threat Reduction Initiative programme our goal is to convert the Maria reactor from HEU to LEU fuel. Hydraulic losses in the new LEU fuel produced by CERCA are about 30% higher than the existing HEU fuel of type MR-6. For the MR-6 fuel were installed four two speed pumps. These pumps performed the function of the main circulations pumps during reactor operation with residual pumping power provided by emergency pumps. In the new system four main pumps will be used for circulating coolant while the reactor is operation with three auxiliary pumps for decay heat removal after reactor shutdown, meaning that the conversion of Maria research reactor will be possible after increasing flow in the primary cooling circuit of the fuel channels. The technical design of replacement of the pumps in the primary fuel channel cooling circuit was finished in April 2011 and accepted by the Safety Committee. After delivery of the new pumps we are planning to upgrade the primary fuel channel cooling circuit during October–November 2012. (author)

  19. Fuel cycle safety research. Role and development in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shiro

    2005-01-01

    The report stresses important roles played by risk informed methodology in chemical process safety problems as encountered in fuel cycle facility such as a reprocessing plant. Abnormal situation management is a safety issue - The lesson learned from the pesticide manufacturing facility in Bhopal, India. Little attention has been given to understanding the issues regarding performance during normal versus abnormal situation. The first step is in abnormal situation management is to define what really is abnormal. The second step is to ensure that everyone understands the difference between normal and abnormal, and the root causes of abnormal events. The third step is to be aware of current practices that support abnormal situation management, and the procedures, practices, and techniques used to respond to abnormal conditions. Dynamic simulation will become to useful techniques for abnormal situation management as well as probabilistic safety assessment for process facilities including nuclear fuel cycle. (S. Ohno)

  20. Fossil fuel power plant combustion control: Research in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasini, S.; Trebbi, G.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand forecasts for Italy to the year 2000 indicate an increase of about 50% which, due to the current moratorium on nuclear energy, should be met entirely by fossil fuel power plants. Now, there is growing public concern about possible negative health impacts due to the air pollution produced through the combustion of fossil fuels. In response to these concerns, ENEL (Italian National Electricity Board) is investing heavily in air pollution abatement technology R ampersand D. The first phase involves the investigation of pollution mechanisms in order to develop suitable mathematical models and diagnostic techniques. The validity of the models is being tested through through measurements made by sophisticated instrumentation placed directly inside the combustion chambers of steam generator systems. These are allowing engineers to develop improved combustion control methods designed to reduce air pollution at source

  1. Plans and status for accepting spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitoun, Abe; Williams, John; Brown, Keith; Chacey, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    In May 1996, the Department of Energy, acting with the cooperation of the Department of State, announced adoption of a policy that will have a significant influence on international efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. This policy is concerned with the management of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors. Spent nuclear fuel, unirradiated fuel, and target material accepted under the policy must contain uranium enriched in the U.S. Although such spent fuel will comprise a relatively small part of the Department of Energy's (the Department's) overall inventory of spent nuclear fuel, the policy invokes actions that provide a cornerstone of U.S. nonproliferation activities. Implementation of this policy is now underway. This paper describes the Department's implementation strategy with the emphasis on those actions that will affect foreign research reactor operators. (author)

  2. Planar Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    electrodes and the electrolyte. The effect of the reduction in concentrations can be seen from the well-known Nernst potential equation , given by...reactions is modeled as a jump in the electric potential, which is determined using Nernst potential ( equation (18)) and activation polarization ( equation ...derivatives of structural cost functions. 2. Solution Methodology 2.1 Governing Equations (Fuel Cell) The three-dimensional SOFC model [30,31] utilized in

  3. A high arctic experience of uniting research and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Niels Martin; Christensen, Torben R.; Roslin, Tomas

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring is science keeping our thumb on the pulse of the environment to detect any changes of concern for societies. Basic science is the question-driven search for fundamental processes and mechanisms. Given the firm root of monitoring in human interests and needs, basic sciences have often been regarded as scientifically "purer"—particularly within university-based research communities. We argue that the dichotomy between "research" and "monitoring" is an artificial one, and that this artificial split clouds the definition of scientific goals and leads to suboptimal use of resources. We claim that the synergy between the two scientific approaches is well distilled by science conducted under extreme logistic constraints, when scientists are forced to take full advantage of both the data and the infrastructure available. In evidence of this view, we present our experiences from two decades of uniting research and monitoring at the remote research facility Zackenberg in High Arctic Greenland. For this site, we show how the combination of insights from monitoring with the mechanistic understanding obtained from basic research has yielded the most complete understanding of the system—to the benefit of all, and as an example to follow. We therefore urge scientists from across the continuum from monitoring to research to come together, to disregard old division lines, and to work together to expose a comprehensive picture of ecosystem change and its consequences.

  4. Development of a transport cask for spent fuel elements of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, F.; Saliba, R.O.; Furnari, J.C.; Mourao, R.P; Leite da Silva, L.; Novara, O.; Alexandre Miranda, C.; Mattar Neto, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development of a research reactor spent fuel transport cask. Through a project funded by the IAEA, Argentina, Brazil and Chile have collaborated to enhance regional capacity in the management of spent fuel elements from research reactors operated in the region. A packaging for the transport of research reactors spent fuel was developed. It was designed by a team of researchers from the countries mentioned and a 1:2 scale model for MTR type fuel was constructed in Argentina and subsequently tested in CDTN facilities in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. There were three test sequences to test the cask for normal transport and hypothetical accident conditions. It has successfully passed the tests and the overall performance was considered satisfactory. As part of the licensing process, a test sequence with the presence of regulatory authorities is scheduled for December, 2012 (author)

  5. Research on nuclear energy in the fields of fuel cycle, PWR reactors and LMFBR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Camarcat, N.

    1995-01-01

    In this article we present the CEA research programs to improve the safety of the next generation of reactors, to manage the Plutonium and the wastes of the fuel cycle end and to ameliorate the competitiveness. 6 refs

  6. Experimental determination of fuel surface temperature in the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khang, Ngo Phu; Huy, Ngo Quang; An, Tran Khac; Lam, Pham Van [Nuclear Research Inst., Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    1994-10-01

    Measured fuel surface temperatures, obtained at various locations of the core of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor under normal operating conditions, are presented, and some thermal characteristics of the reactor are discussed. (author). 2 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The United States of America and scientific research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Hather

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To gauge the current commitment to scientific research in the United States of America (US, we compared federal research funding (FRF with the US gross domestic product (GDP and industry research spending during the past six decades. In order to address the recent globalization of scientific research, we also focused on four key indicators of research activities: research and development (R&D funding, total science and engineering doctoral degrees, patents, and scientific publications. We compared these indicators across three major population and economic regions: the US, the European Union (EU and the People's Republic of China (China over the past decade. We discovered a number of interesting trends with direct relevance for science policy. The level of US FRF has varied between 0.2% and 0.6% of the GDP during the last six decades. Since the 1960s, the US FRF contribution has fallen from twice that of industrial research funding to roughly equal. Also, in the last two decades, the portion of the US government R&D spending devoted to research has increased. Although well below the US and the EU in overall funding, the current growth rate for R&D funding in China greatly exceeds that of both. Finally, the EU currently produces more science and engineering doctoral graduates and scientific publications than the US in absolute terms, but not per capita. This study's aim is to facilitate a serious discussion of key questions by the research community and federal policy makers. In particular, our results raise two questions with respect to: a the increasing globalization of science: "What role is the US playing now, and what role will it play in the future of international science?"; and b the ability to produce beneficial innovations for society: "How will the US continue to foster its strengths?"

  8. The United States of America and scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hather, Gregory J; Haynes, Winston; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Stewart, Elizabeth A; Arzberger, Peter; Chain, Patrick; Field, Dawn; Franza, B Robert; Lin, Biaoyang; Meyer, Folker; Ozdemir, Vural; Smith, Charles V; van Belle, Gerald; Wooley, John; Kolker, Eugene

    2010-08-16

    To gauge the current commitment to scientific research in the United States of America (US), we compared federal research funding (FRF) with the US gross domestic product (GDP) and industry research spending during the past six decades. In order to address the recent globalization of scientific research, we also focused on four key indicators of research activities: research and development (R&D) funding, total science and engineering doctoral degrees, patents, and scientific publications. We compared these indicators across three major population and economic regions: the US, the European Union (EU) and the People's Republic of China (China) over the past decade. We discovered a number of interesting trends with direct relevance for science policy. The level of US FRF has varied between 0.2% and 0.6% of the GDP during the last six decades. Since the 1960s, the US FRF contribution has fallen from twice that of industrial research funding to roughly equal. Also, in the last two decades, the portion of the US government R&D spending devoted to research has increased. Although well below the US and the EU in overall funding, the current growth rate for R&D funding in China greatly exceeds that of both. Finally, the EU currently produces more science and engineering doctoral graduates and scientific publications than the US in absolute terms, but not per capita. This study's aim is to facilitate a serious discussion of key questions by the research community and federal policy makers. In particular, our results raise two questions with respect to: a) the increasing globalization of science: "What role is the US playing now, and what role will it play in the future of international science?"; and b) the ability to produce beneficial innovations for society: "How will the US continue to foster its strengths?"

  9. Conceptual aspects of the safety evaluation of a project of complementary spent nuclear fuel dry storage unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Rafaela da S. A.; Fontes, Gladson S., E-mail: rafaaelaandrade@hotmail.com, E-mail: gsfontes@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Saldanha, Pedro L. C., E-mail: saldanha@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Based on the number of cycles and the amount of new fuel elements exchanged in the reactor cores at each cycle, the forecast for the exhaustion of the spent nuclear fuel pools of the Brazil plants has provision until 2021. As are still in the studies the availability of a long-term storage facility for spent fuel, the short-term solution will be the construction of the Complementary Storage Spent Nuclear Fuel Unit, it will build inside the site in Angra Plants. The dry cask is a method of storage in which the fuel elements of high-level radioactive waste are stored, such as spent nuclear fuel, which already cooled in the fuel pool for at least one year and up to ten years. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss a conceptual study of the safety analysis of a project of licensing of a Dry Storage Unit (DSU) with the objective of verifying the application of national and international criteria, requirements and standards. The safety analysis will make on the principles adopted by the US Nuclear USNRC and the standards adopted at CNEN for dry storage. The concept of installation, seismic, geological and other analysis will be approached for approval of the site to be installed at DSU, the approved permit for the construction and finally the external and internal events that may occur being incidents and / or accidents and which are The necessary mitigations if something occurs within a period of time. (author)

  10. Conceptual aspects of the safety evaluation of a project of complementary spent nuclear fuel dry storage unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Rafaela da S. A.; Fontes, Gladson S.; Saldanha, Pedro L. C.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the number of cycles and the amount of new fuel elements exchanged in the reactor cores at each cycle, the forecast for the exhaustion of the spent nuclear fuel pools of the Brazil plants has provision until 2021. As are still in the studies the availability of a long-term storage facility for spent fuel, the short-term solution will be the construction of the Complementary Storage Spent Nuclear Fuel Unit, it will build inside the site in Angra Plants. The dry cask is a method of storage in which the fuel elements of high-level radioactive waste are stored, such as spent nuclear fuel, which already cooled in the fuel pool for at least one year and up to ten years. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss a conceptual study of the safety analysis of a project of licensing of a Dry Storage Unit (DSU) with the objective of verifying the application of national and international criteria, requirements and standards. The safety analysis will make on the principles adopted by the US Nuclear USNRC and the standards adopted at CNEN for dry storage. The concept of installation, seismic, geological and other analysis will be approached for approval of the site to be installed at DSU, the approved permit for the construction and finally the external and internal events that may occur being incidents and / or accidents and which are The necessary mitigations if something occurs within a period of time. (author)

  11. Exploring the SCOAP3 Research Contributions of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsteller, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics (SCOAP3) is a successful global partnership of libraries, funding agencies and research centers. This presentation will inform the audience about SCOAP3 and also delve into descriptive statistics of the United States' intellectual contribution to particle physics via these open access journals. Exploration of the SCOAP3 particle physics literature using a variety of metrics tools such as Web of Science™, InCites™, Scopus® and SciVal will be shared. ORA or Sci2 will be used to visualize author collaboration networks.

  12. Reduction of fuel enrichment for research reactors built-up in accordance with Russian (Soviet) projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.B.; Enin, A.A.; Tkachyov, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the Russian program of reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) built-up in accordance with Russian (Soviet) projects, AO 'NCCP' performs works on FA fabrication with reduced enrichment fuel. The main trends and results of performed works on research reactors FEs and FAs based on UO 2 and U-9%Mo fuel with U 235 19.7% enrichment are described. (author)

  13. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Mustin, T.P.; Massey, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    Since resuming the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy (DOE) and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues associated with the transport of Materials Testing Reactor (MTR)-type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be important to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors, so that appropriate amendments to the Certificate of Compliance for spent fuel casks can be submitted in a timely manner to facilitate the safe and scheduled transport of FRR SNF

  14. Research report on development of spacer grid strap for AFA 3G fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Yuandong

    2004-11-01

    The current development and tendency for fuel assemblies being of low leakage, high burn-up and long cycle fuel reload in the world are presented, and the necessity and feasibility to develop the spacer grid for high burn-up fuel assembly are elaborated. Considering all the activities in implementing of spacer grid and the technical difficulties in machining of tools, the major technological processes are introduced; the research program and the approaches to develop the spacer grid while research targets and overall schedule are defined and some key technical points and applicable practices are discussed. Finally the requirements and the conditions necessary for developing of spacer grid are proposed. (authors)

  15. Analysis of fuel handling system for fuel bundle safety during station blackout in 500 MWe PHWR unit of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhuresh, R; Nagarajan, R; Jit, I; Sanatkumar, A [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Mumbai (India)

    1997-12-31

    Situations of Station Blackout (SBO) i.e. postulated concurrent unavailability of Class Ill and Class IV power, could arise for a long period, while on-power refuelling or other fuel handling operations are in progress with the hot irradiated fuel bundles being anywhere in the system from the Reactor Building to the Spent Fuel Storage Bay. The cooling provisions for these fuel bundles are diverse and specific to the various stages of fuel handling operations and are either on Class Ill or on Class II power with particular requirements of instrument air. Therefore, during SBO, due to the limited availability of Class II power and instrument air, it becomes difficult to maintain cooling to these fuel bundles. However, some minimal cooling is essential, to ensure the safety of the bundles. As discussed in the paper, safety of these fuel bundles in the system and/or for those lying in the liner tube region of the reactor end fitting is ensured, during SBO, by resorting to passive means like `stay-put`, `gravity- fill`, `D{sub 2}0- steaming` etc. for cooling the bundles. The paper also describes various consequences emanating from these cooling schemes. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  16. Analysis of fuel handling system for fuel bundle safety during station blackout in 500 MWe PHWR unit of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhuresh, R.; Nagarajan, R.; Jit, I.; Sanatkumar, A.

    1996-01-01

    Situations of Station Blackout (SBO) i.e. postulated concurrent unavailability of Class Ill and Class IV power, could arise for a long period, while on-power refuelling or other fuel handling operations are in progress with the hot irradiated fuel bundles being anywhere in the system from the Reactor Building to the Spent Fuel Storage Bay. The cooling provisions for these fuel bundles are diverse and specific to the various stages of fuel handling operations and are either on Class Ill or on Class II power with particular requirements of instrument air. Therefore, during SBO, due to the limited availability of Class II power and instrument air, it becomes difficult to maintain cooling to these fuel bundles. However, some minimal cooling is essential, to ensure the safety of the bundles. As discussed in the paper, safety of these fuel bundles in the system and/or for those lying in the liner tube region of the reactor end fitting is ensured, during SBO, by resorting to passive means like 'stay-put', 'gravity- fill', 'D 2 0- steaming' etc. for cooling the bundles. The paper also describes various consequences emanating from these cooling schemes. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  17. United States Department of Energy commercial reactor spent fuel programs being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piscitella, R.R.; Rasmussen, T.L.; Uhl, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory participation in OCRWM programs includes the Spent Fuel Storage Cask Testing Program, Dry Rod Consolidation Technology Program, Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Program, the Nuclear Fuel Services Project, and the Cask Systems Acquisition Program. The DOE has entered into a cooperative agreement with Virginia Power and the Electric Power Research Institute to demonstrate storage of commercial spent fuel in steel storage casks. The Program conducted heat transfer and shielding tests with three storage casks with intact spent fuel assemblies and two casks with consolidated spent fuel rods, one of which was previously tested with intact fuel, and provides test information in support of Virginia Power's at-reactor dry storage licensing effort. 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Mass Transfer in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells under Operation Mode Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional, single-phase, isothermal, multicomponent, transient model is built to investigate the transport phenomena in unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs under the condition of switching from the fuel cell (FC mode to the water electrolysis (WE mode. The model is coupled with an electrochemical reaction. The proton exchange membrane (PEM is selected as the solid electrolyte of the URFC. The work is motivated by the need to elucidate the complex mass transfer and electrochemical process under operation mode switching in order to improve the performance of PEM URFC. A set of governing equations, including conservation of mass, momentum, species, and charge, are considered. These equations are solved by the finite element method. The simulation results indicate the distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, water mass fraction, and electrolyte potential response to the transient phenomena via saltation under operation mode switching. The hydrogen mass fraction gradients are smaller than the oxygen mass fraction gradients. The average mass fractions of the reactants (oxygen and hydrogen and product (water exhibit evident differences between each layer in the steady state of the FC mode. By contrast, the average mass fractions of the reactant (water and products (oxygen and hydrogen exhibit only slight differences between each layer in the steady state of the WE mode. Under either the FC mode or the WE mode, the duration of the transient state is only approximately 0.2 s.

  19. Scenarios for multi-unit inertial fusion energy plants producing hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1993-12-01

    This work describes: (a) the motivation for considering fusion in general, and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) in particular, to produce hydrogen fuel powering low-emission vehicles; (b) the general requirements for any fusion electric plant to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis at costs competitive with present consumer gasoline fuel costs per passenger mile, for advanced car architectures meeting President Clinton's 80 mpg advanced car goal, and (c) a comparative economic analysis for the potential cost of electricity (CoE) and corresponding cost of hydrogen (CoH) from a variety of multi-unit IFE plants with one to eight target chambers sharing a common driver and target fab facility. Cases with either heavy-ion or diode-pumped, solid-state laser drivers are considered, with ''conventional'' indirect drive target gains versus ''advanced, e.g. Fast Ignitor'' direct drive gain assumptions, and with conventional steam balance-of-plant (BoP) versus advanced MHD plus steam combined cycle BoP, to contrast the potential economics under ''conventional'' and ''advanced'' IFE assumptions, respectively

  20. Ultimate disposition of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Clark, W.D.; Clapper, M.; Mustin, T.P.

    2001-01-01

    Treatment and disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the United States has changed significantly over the last decade due to change in world climate associated with nuclear material. Chemical processing of aluminum based SNF is ending and alternate disposition paths are being developed that will allow for the ultimate disposition of the enriched uranium in this SNF. Existing inventories of aluminum based SNF are currently being stored primarily in water-filled basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) while these alternate disposition paths are being developed and implemented. Nuclear nonproliferation continues to be a worldwide concern and it is causing a significant influence on the development of management alternatives for SNF. SRS recently completed an environmental impact statement for the management of aluminum clad SNF that selects alternatives for all of the fuels in inventory. The U.S. Department of Energy and SRS are now implementing a dual strategy of processing small quantities of 'problematic' SNF while developing an alternative technology to dispose of the remaining aluminum clad SNF in the proposed monitored geologic repository. (author)