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Sample records for unit reduce physical

  1. Fundamental units: physics and metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Okun, Lev Borisovich

    2003-01-01

    The problem of fundamental units is discussed in the context of achievements of both theoretical physics and modern metrology. On one hand, due to fascinating accuracy of atomic clocks, the traditional macroscopic standards of metrology (second, metre, kilogram) are giving way to standards based on fundamental units of nature: velocity of light $c$ and quantum of action $h$. On the other hand, the poor precision of gravitational constant $G$, which is widely believed to define the ``cube of theories'' and the units of the future ``theory of everything'', does not allow to use $G$ as a fundamental dimensional constant in metrology. The electromagnetic units in SI are actually based on concepts of prerelativistic classical electrodynamics such as ether, electric permitivity and magnetic permeability of vacuum. Concluding remarks are devoted to terminological confusion which accompanies the progress in basic physics and metrology.

  2. Frequent physical activity may not reduce vascular disease risk as much as moderate activity: large prospective study of women in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Miranda E G; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie; Cairns, Benjamin J

    2015-02-24

    Although physical activity has generally been associated with reduced risk of vascular disease, there is limited evidence about the effects of the frequency and duration of various activities on the incidence of particular types of vascular disease. In 1998, on average, 1.1 million women without prior vascular disease reported their frequency of physical activity and many other personal characteristics. Three years later, they were asked about hours spent walking, cycling, gardening, and housework each week. Women were followed by record linkage to National Health Service cause-specific hospital admissions and death records. Cox regression was used to calculate adjusted relative risks for first vascular events in relation to physical activity. During an average of 9 years follow-up, 49,113 women had a first coronary heart disease event, 17,822 had a first cerebrovascular event, and 14,550 had a first venous thromboembolic event. In comparison with inactive women, those reporting moderate activity had significantly lower risks of all 3 conditions (Pheart disease (P=0.002), cerebrovascular disease (Pheart disease, venous thromboembolic event, and cerebrovascular disease than inactivity. However, among active women, there is little to suggest progressive reductions in risk of vascular diseases with increasing frequency of activity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Does physical training reduce fatigue in sarcoidosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcellis, R. G. J.; van der Veeke, M.A.F.; Mesters, I.; Drent, M.; Bie, R.A.; de Vries, Jolanda; Lenssen, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sarcoidosis patients frequently experience fatigue, exercise intolerance and muscle weakness, resulting in reduced quality of life (QOL). Scientific studies on the benefits of physical training in sarcoidosis have been scarce, so the aim of this pilot study was to examine the impact of a

  4. Teaching Physics from a Reduced Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benge, Raymond D.; Young, C.; Davis, S.; Worley, A.; Smith, L.; Gell, A.

    2010-01-01

    This poster reports on an educational experiment flown in January 2009 as part of NASA's Microgravity University program. The experiment flown was an investigation into the properties of harmonic oscillators in reduced gravity. Harmonic oscillators are studied in every introductory physics class. The equation for the period of a harmonic oscillator does not include the acceleration due to gravity, so the period should be independent of gravity. However, the equation for the period of a pendulum does include the acceleration due to gravity, so the period of a pendulum should appear longer under reduced gravity (such as lunar or Martian gravity) and shorter under hyper-gravity. Typical homework problems for introductory physics classes ask questions such as "What would be the period of oscillation if this experiment were performed on the Moon or Mars?” This gives students a chance to actually see the effects predicted by the equations. These environments can be simulated aboard an aircraft. Video of the experiments being performed aboard the aircraft is to be used in introductory physics classes. Students will be able to record information from watching the experiment performed aboard the aircraft in a similar manner to how they collect data in the laboratory. They can then determine if the experiment matches theory. Video and an experimental procedure are being prepared based upon this flight, and these materials will be available for download by faculty anywhere with access to the internet who wish to use the experiment in their own classrooms in both college and high school physics classes.

  5. Physical health functioning among United Methodist clergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proeschold-Bell, Rae Jean; LeGrand, Sara

    2012-09-01

    United Methodist clergy have been found to have higher than average self-reported rates of obesity, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, and high blood pressure. However, health diagnoses differ from physical health functioning, which indicates how much health problems interfere with activities of daily living. Ninety-five percent (n = 1726) of all actively serving United Methodist clergy in North Carolina completed the SF-12, a measure of physical health functioning that has US norms based on self-administered survey data. Sixty-two percent (n = 1074) of our sample completed the SF-12 by self-administered formats. We used mean difference tests among self-administered clergy surveys to compare the clergy SF-12 Physical Composite Scores to US-normed scores. Clergy reported significantly better physical health composite scores than their gender- and age-matched peers, despite above average disease burden in the same sample. Although health interventions tailored to clergy that address chronic disease are urgently needed, it may be difficult to elicit participation given pastors' optimistic view of their physical health functioning.

  6. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on Physical Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, David

    1994-01-01

    The concept of the physical unit is key to the understanding of physics, for it is the link between the theoretical relationships which describe physical quantities and the measurements which confirm or confound their predictions. No topic can be more suitable for treatment in a special issue of Metrologia, for the journal's field is measurement: fine measurements, measurements of fundamental quantities, the relationships between measurements, the processes and conventions which allow measurements to be exchanged, duplicated and confirmed. And if physical quantities are to be measured, reference must be made to the units in which they are expressed. Units, in turn, serve no function in isolation. Used individually, units can convey only the simplest of ideas. When organized, however, so that they are part of a system which is logically coherent, which permits the transfer of measurements from one place to another or from one area of science to another and is recognized universally by those whose work depends on unambiguous statements of quantity, they represent a tool of remarkable power with which to express quantities in a concise and consistent way. This issue describes the units of the Système International d'Unités (SI). It does this in a series of essays, each of which treats the SI in a way which reflects the personal interests and viewpoint of the author. Individual articles deal with the definition and description of units, their historical development and their application in scientific, legal, business, regional and international affairs. There is no pretence that this is a textbook on the SI, for the topic is not covered exhaustively, completely or even uniformly: the purpose of these essays is to show that the SI is ubiquitous, touching many aspects of human endeavour; that it is useful, serving the interests of science, technology and commerce; and that it is not closed, the underlying principles of how to describe, select, define and disseminate

  7. Manual for Reducing Educational Unit Costs in Latin American Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centro Multinacional de Investigacion Educativa, San Jose (Costa Rica).

    Designed for educational administrators, this manual provides suggestions for reducing educational unit costs in Latin America without reducing the quality of the education. Chapter one defines unit cost concepts and compares the costs of the Latin American countries. Chapter two deals with the different policies which could affect the principal…

  8. Manual for Reducing Educational Unit Costs in Latin American Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centro Multinacional de Investigacion Educativa, San Jose (Costa Rica).

    Designed for educational administrators, this manual provides suggestions for reducing educational unit costs in Latin America without reducing the quality of the education. Chapter one defines unit cost concepts and compares the costs of the Latin American countries. Chapter two deals with the different policies which could affect the principal…

  9. Complexity reduced coding of binary pattern units in image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmyshev, E. V.; Guillen-Bonilla, J. T.

    2011-06-01

    The ability to simulate and control complex physical situations in real time is an important element of many engineering and robotics applications, including pattern recognition and image classification. One of the ways to meet specific requirements of a process is a reduction of computational complexity of algorithms. In this work we propose a new coding of binary pattern units (BPU) that reduces the time and spatial complexity of algorithms of image classification significantly. We apply this coding to a particular but important case of the coordinated clusters representation (CCR) of images. This algorithm reduces the dimension of the CCR feature space and, as a consequence, the time and space complexity of the CCR based methods of image classification, exponentially. In addition, the new coding preserves all the fundamental properties of the CCR that are successfully used in the recognition, classification and segmentation of texture images. The same approach to the coding of BPUs can be used in the Local Binary Pattern (LBP) method. In order to evaluate the reduction of time and space complexity, we did an experiment on multiclass classification of images using the "traditional" and the new coding of the CCR. This test showed very effective reduction of the computing time and required computer memory with the use of the new coding of BPUs of the CCR, retaining 100% or a little less efficiency of classification at the time.

  10. Quarterly report -- Physics unit: October--December, 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, D.E.; Faulkner, J.E.; Ozeroff, J.

    1954-01-11

    This report is intended to be a description of current work being done by the Physics Unit at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation. The work is concerned mainly with the study of graphite-moderated natural uranium reactors for the production of plutonium on a large scale. In addition, varied physics problems associated with the operation of an industrial atomic plant are occasionally dealt with. The report is divided into four sections; lattice physics; nuclear physics; irradiation physics; and plant physics.

  11. Edexcel AS Physics Student Unit Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Student Unit Guides are perfect for revision. Each guide is written by an examiner and explains the unit requirements, summarises the relevant unit content and includes a series of specimen questions and answers. There are three sections to each guide:. Introduction - includes advice on how to use the guide, an explanation of the skills being tested by the assessment objectives, an outline of the unit or module and, depending on the unit, suggestions for how to revise effectively and prepare for the examination questions. Content Guidance - provides an examiner's overview of the module's key t

  12. Edexcel A2 Physics Student Unit Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Student Unit Guides are perfect for revision. Each guide is written by an examiner and explains the unit requirements, summarises the relevant unit content and includes a series of specimen questions and answers. There are three sections to each guide:. Introduction - includes advice on how to use the guide, an explanation of the skills being tested by the assessment objectives, an outline of the unit or module and, depending on the unit, suggestions for how to revise effectively and prepare for the examination questions. Content Guidance - provides an examiner's overview of the module's key t

  13. High energy physics in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  14. Uniting forces in physics and medicine

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Following the very successful ‘Physics for Health’ workshop held at CERN on 2-4 February this year, a strategy document has recently been issued. It outlines the main issues discussed at the workshop and indicates the most promising avenues in the field of medical applications derived from physics. Rolf Heuer, CERN Director General talks to the participants in the “Physics for Health in Europe” workshop. The response to the first “Physics for Health in Europe” workshop was enthusiastic: more than 400 scientists from 32 countries signed up, submitting 200 abstracts within a few weeks. Between fifty and a hundred people were connected to the live webcast at all times. “We had to close the registration before the planned deadline since the capacity of CERN’s main auditorium had been reached”, says Manjit Dosanjh from the organizing committee. Participants included physicists, medical doctors, experts in radio...

  15. Unit Invariance as a Unifying Principle of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shaukat, Abrar

    2010-01-01

    A basic principle of physics is the freedom to locally choose any unit system when describing physical quantities. Its implementation amounts to treating Weyl invariance as a fundamental symmetry of all physical theories. In this thesis, we study the consequences of this "unit invariance" principle and find that it is a unifying one. Unit invariance is achieved by introducing a gauge field called the scale, designed to measure how unit systems vary from point to point. In fact, by a uniform and simple Weyl invariant coupling of scale and matter fields, we unify massless, massive, and partially massless excitations. As a consequence, masses now dictate the response of physical quantities to changes of scale. This response is calibrated by certain "tractor Weyl weights". Reality of these weights yield Breitenlohner-Freedman stability bounds in anti de Sitter spaces. Another valuable outcome of our approach is a general mechanism for constructing conformally invariant theories. In particular, we provide direct d...

  16. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  17. Strategic Priorities for Physical Activity Surveillance in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Janet E; Carlson, Susan A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Berrigan, David; Carlson, Cynthia; Dorn, Joan M; Heath, Gregory W; Kohl, Harold W; Lee, I-Min; Lee, Sarah M; Másse, Louise C; Morrow, James R; Gabriel, Kelley Pettee; Pivarnik, James M; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Rodgers, Anne B; Saelens, Brian E; Sallis, James F; Troiano, Richard P; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Wendel, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Develop strategic priorities to guide future physical activity surveillance in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine convened a scientific roundtable of physical activity and measurement experts. Participants summarized the current state of aerobic physical activity surveillance for adults, focusing on practice and research needs in three areas: 1) behavior, 2) human movement, and 3) community supports. Needs and challenges for each area were identified. At the conclusion of the meeting, experts identified one overarching strategy and five strategic priorities to guide future surveillance. The identified overarching strategy was to develop a national plan for physical activity surveillance similar to the U.S. National Physical Activity Plan for promotion. The purpose of the plan would be to enhance coordination and collaboration within and between sectors, such as transportation and public health, and to address specific strategic priorities identified at the roundtable. These strategic priorities were used 1) to identify and prioritize physical activity constructs; 2) to assess the psychometric properties of instruments for physical activity surveillance; 3) to provide training and technical assistance for those collecting, analyzing, or interpreting surveillance data; 4) to explore accessing data from alternative sources; and 5) to improve communication, translation, and dissemination about estimates of physical activity from surveillance systems. This roundtable provided strategic priorities for physical activity surveillance in the United States. A first step is to develop a national plan for physical activity surveillance that would provide an operating framework from which to execute these priorities.

  18. Women in physics in the United States: Recruitment and retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramzon, Nina; Benson, Patrice; Bertschinger, Edmund; Blessing, Susan; Cochran, Geraldine L.; Cox, Anne; Cunningham, Beth; Galbraith-Frew, Jessica; Johnson, Jolene; Kerby, Leslie; Lalanne, Elaine; O'Donnell, Christine; Petty, Sara; Sampath, Sujatha; Seestrom, Susan; Singh, Chandralekha; Spencer, Cherrill; Woodle, Kathryne Sparks; Yennello, Sherry

    2015-12-01

    Initiatives to increase the number, persistence, and success of women in physics in the United States reach preteen girls through senior women. Programs exist at both the local and national levels. In addition, researchers have investigated issues related to gender equity in physics and physics education. Anecdotal evidence suggests increased media coverage of the underrepresentation of women in science. All of these efforts are motivated and made more effective by the continued collection and presentation of data on the presence, persistence, and promise of women in physics.

  19. Influence of sulfur physical properties in Claus unit operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larraz Mora, R.; Arvelo Alvarez, R. [Chemical Engineering Dept., Univ. of la Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    The Claus process is an efficient way of removing H{sub 2}S from acid gas streams and it has been widely practiced in industries such as natural gas processing, oil refining and metal smelting. Increasingly strict pollution control regulations require maximum sulfur recovery and high stream factor from the Claus units in order to minimize sulfur-containing effluents. As has been widely reported Claus unit's damages mainly occur during start up and shutdown. These operations involve scheduled warm-up and cool-down of the unit, usually burning refinery fuel-gas, which if not properly made can produce severe pipe and equipment plugging as well as catalyst deactivation. Sulfur products remaining in the unit during a shutdown period can produce dramatic unit corrosion episodes diminishing sulfur recovery unit stream factor. In the present paper some guidelines are given based on sulfur physical properties singularities which help to improve start-up/shut-down procedures. (orig.)

  20. A participatory ergonomics approach to reduce mental and physical workload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Peeters, M.; Grundemann, R.W.M.; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Dul, J.

    1995-01-01

    A step-by-step approach to better work, aimed at reducing mental and physical workload in office work, is evaluated. This approach is based on a strong commitment of the management in the enterprise, and on as much direct worker participation as possible. After every step the workers proposed how to

  1. Training programs in medical physics in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzl, L H

    1977-01-01

    The history of the field of medical physics in the United States is reviewed; the importance of the development of the nuclear reactor and particle accelerators to medical physics is pointed out. Conclusions and recommendations of an IAEA/WHO seminar on the training of medical physicists (in 1972) are given and compared with existing programs in the US. It is concluded that the recommendations of the IAEA are, for the most part, followed. 1 table. (RWR)

  2. Physical exercise at the workplace reduces perceived physical exertion during healthcare work: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-11-01

    High physical exertion during work is a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain and long-term sickness absence. Physical exertion (RPE) reflects the balance between physical work demands and physical capacity of the individual. Thus, increasing the physical capacity through physical exercise may decrease physical exertion during work. This study investigates the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on physical exertion during work (WRPE) among healthcare workers. 200 female healthcare workers (age: 42.0, body mass index: 24.1, average pain intensity: 3.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, average WRPE: 3.6 on a scale of 0 to 10) from 18 departments at three participating hospitals. Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level to 10 weeks of: (1) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed in groups during working hours for 5×10 minutes per week and up to five group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or (2) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed during leisure time for 5×10 minutes per week. Physical exertion was assessed at baseline and at 10-week follow-up. 2.2 (SD: 1.1) and 1.0 (SD: 1.2) training sessions were performed per week in WORK and HOME, respectively. Physical exertion was reduced more in WORK than HOME (pworkplace appears more effective than home-based exercise in reducing physical exertion during daily work tasks in healthcare workers. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  3. Reduced physics models in SOLPS for reactor scoping studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coster, D.P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Heat exhaust is a challenge for ITER and becomes even more of an issue for devices beyond ITER. The main reason for this is that the power produced in the core scales as R{sup 3} while relying on standard exhaust physics results in the heat exhaust scaling as R{sup 1} (R is the major radius). ITER has used SOLPS (B2-EIRENE) to design the ITER divertor, as well as to provide a database that supports the calculations of the ITER operational parameter space. The typical run time for such SOLPS runs is of the order 3 months (for D+C+He using EIRENE to treat the neutrals kinetically with an extensive choice of atomic and molecular physics). Future devices will be expected to radiate much of the power before it crosses the separatrix, and this requires treating extrinsic impurities such as Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe - the large number of charge states puts additional pressure on SOLPS, further slowing down the code. For design work of future machines, fast models have been implemented in system codes but these are usually unavoidably restricted in the included physics. As a bridge between system studies and detailed SOLPS runs, SOLPS offers a number of possibilities to speed up the code considerably at the cost of reducing the fidelity of the physics. By employing a fluid neutral model, aggressive bundling of the charge state of impurities, and reducing the size of the grids used, the run time for one second of physics time (which is often enough for the divertor to come to a steady state) can be reduced to approximately one day. This work looks at the impact of these trade-offs in the physics by comparing key parameters for different simulation assumptions. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Developing an Appropriate Goalball Unit for Secondary Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Michael K.; Happel, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Goalball, a sport designed for those with visual impairments, is a competitive and recreational sport enjoyed by athletes around the world. Students with and without visual impairments can experience positive outcomes when teachers appropriately include a goalball unit as part of their inclusive secondary physical education curriculum. This…

  5. Reflector antenna analysis using physical optics on Graphics Processing Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borries, Oscar Peter; Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Dammann, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The Physical Optics approximation is a widely used asymptotic method for calculating the scattering from electrically large bodies. It requires significant computational work and little memory, and is thus well suited for application on a Graphics Processing Unit. Here, we investigate...... the performance of an implementation and demonstrate that while there are some implementational pitfalls, a careful implementation can result in impressive improvements....

  6. Perceptions of a disability sport unit in general physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Michelle; Collins, Karen; Wright, Steven; Kearns, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess the effectiveness of a disability sport unit in shaping perceptions of disability. Data from interviews, observations, and documents were collected on 87 elementary-aged students, one physical education teacher, and one teaching intern. Comparisons were drawn between fifth graders engaged in a five-week disability sport unit to fourth graders participating in their standard physical education curriculum. Findings revealed differences in the way fourth and fifth graders came to view individuals with disabilities. The results support an analysis of curriculum development that underscores the significance of the social model in positively impacting constructions of disability. Recommendations include the use of disability sports in physical education as an effective strategy for educating students in game play, knowledge of the Paralympics, and the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in a variety of sporting venues.

  7. Reducing the failure rate in introductory physics classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Jeff; Coulombe, Patrick; Lindell, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Calculus-based introductory physics courses are often among the most difficult at many colleges and universities. With the national movement to increase STEM majors, the introductory calculus-based courses need to be less of a weed-out course and more of a course that propels students forward into successful majors. This talk discusses two approaches to reduce DFW rates and improve student retention: studio courses and parachute courses. Studio courses integrate lecture/laboratory into one course where the primary mode of instruction is small group activities. Typically, any students enrolled in the college or university can enroll in a studio version of the course. Parachute courses on the other hand, focus on the poor performing students. Designed so that students not doing well in an introductory physics course can switch into the parachute class mid-semester without harm to their GPA. In addition, the parachute course focuses on helping students build the knowledge and skills necessary for success when retaking the calculus-based Physics course. The studio course format has been found to reduce DFW rates at several universities by 40-60% compared with separate lecture and laboratory format versions of the same courses, while parachutes courses were less successful. At one university, the parachute course succeeded in helping 80% of students maintain their GPA, but only helped 20% successfully pass the calculus-based physics course.

  8. Early Rehabilitation in the Intensive Care Unit: Preventing Physical and Mental Health Impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Ann; Sricharoenchai, Thiti; Needham, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Survivors of critical illness often experience new or worsening impairments in physical, cognitive and/or mental health, referred to as post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). Such impairments can be long-lasting and negatively impact survivors’ quality of life. Early rehabilitation in the intensive care unit (ICU), while patients remain on life-support therapies, may reduce the complications associated with PICS. This article addresses evidence-based rehabilitation interventions to reduce the p...

  9. Early Rehabilitation in the Intensive Care Unit: Preventing Physical and Mental Health Impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Ann; Sricharoenchai, Thiti; Needham, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Survivors of critical illness often experience new or worsening impairments in physical, cognitive and/or mental health, referred to as post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). Such impairments can be long-lasting and negatively impact survivors’ quality of life. Early rehabilitation in the intensive care unit (ICU), while patients remain on life-support therapies, may reduce the complications associated with PICS. This article addresses evidence-based rehabilitation interventions to reduce the p...

  10. Musical agency reduces perceived exertion during strenuous physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Thomas Hans; Hardikar, Samyogita; Demoucron, Matthias; Niessen, Margot; Demey, Michiel; Giot, Olivier; Li, Yongming; Haynes, John-Dylan; Villringer, Arno; Leman, Marc

    2013-10-29

    Music is known to be capable of reducing perceived exertion during strenuous physical activity. The current interpretation of this modulating effect of music is that music may be perceived as a diversion from unpleasant proprioceptive sensations that go along with exhaustion. Here we investigated the effects of music on perceived exertion during a physically strenuous task, varying musical agency, a task that relies on the experience of body proprioception, rather than simply diverting from it. For this we measured psychologically indicated exertion during physical workout with and without musical agency while simultaneously acquiring metabolic values with spirometry. Results showed that musical agency significantly decreased perceived exertion during workout, indicating that musical agency may actually facilitate physically strenuous activities. This indicates that the positive effect of music on perceived exertion cannot always be explained by an effect of diversion from proprioceptive feedback. Furthermore, this finding suggests that the down-modulating effect of musical agency on perceived exertion may be a previously unacknowledged driving force for the development of music in humans: making music makes strenuous physical activities less exhausting.

  11. The economic benefits of reducing physical inactivity: an Australian example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cumming Toby B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity has major impacts on health and productivity. Our aim was to estimate the health and economic benefits of reducing the prevalence of physical inactivity in the 2008 Australian adult population. The economic benefits were estimated as 'opportunity cost savings', which represent resources utilized in the treatment of preventable disease that are potentially available for re-direction to another purpose from fewer incident cases of disease occurring in communities. Methods Simulation models were developed to show the effect of a 10% feasible, reduction target for physical inactivity from current Australian levels (70%. Lifetime cohort health benefits were estimated as fewer incident cases of inactivity-related diseases; deaths; and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs by age and sex. Opportunity costs were estimated as health sector cost impacts, as well as paid and unpaid production gains and leisure impacts from fewer disease events associated with reduced physical inactivity. Workforce production gains were estimated by comparing surveyed participation and absenteeism rates of physically active and inactive adults, and valued using the friction cost approach. The impact of an improvement in health status on unpaid household production and leisure time were modeled from time use survey data, as applied to the exposed and non-exposed population subgroups and valued by suitable proxy. Potential costs associated with interventions to increase physical activity were not included. Multivariable uncertainty analyses and univariate sensitivity analyses were undertaken to provide information on the strength of the conclusions. Results A 10% reduction in physical inactivity would result in 6,000 fewer incident cases of disease, 2,000 fewer deaths, 25,000 fewer DALYs and provide gains in working days (114,000, days of home-based production (180,000 while conferring a AUD96 million reduction in health sector costs

  12. Left atrial enlargement and reduced physical function during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Andrew A; Myers, Leann; Welsch, Michael; Jazwinski, S Michal; Welsh, David A

    2013-10-01

    Diastolic dysfunction, often seen with increasing age, is associated with reduced exercise capacity and increased mortality. Mortality rates in older individuals are linked to the development of disability, which may be preceded by functional limitations. The goal of this study was to identify which echocardiographic measures of diastolic function correlate with physical function in older subjects. A total of 36 men and women from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study, age 62-101 yr, received a complete echocardiographic exam and performed the 10-item continuous-scale physical-functional performance test (CS-PFP-10). After adjustment for age and gender, left atrial volume index (ρ = -0.59; p = .0005) correlated with the total CS-PFP-10 score. Increased left atrial volume index may be a marker of impaired performance of activities of daily living in older individuals.

  13. Physical Separation of Straw Stem Components to Reduce Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, John Richard; Thompson, David Neal; Hoskinson, Reed Louis; Shaw, Peter Gordon; Grant, D.R.

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we describe ongoing efforts to solve challenges to using straw for bioenergy and bioproducts. Among these, silica in straw forms a low-melting eutectic with potassium, causing slag deposits, and chlorides cause corrosion beneath the deposits. Straw consists principally of stems, leaves, sheaths, nodes, awns, and chaff. Leaves and sheaths are higher in silica, while chaff, leaves and nodes are the primary source of fines. Our approach to reducing silica is to selectively harvest the straw stems using an in-field physical separation, leaving the remaining components in the field to build soil organic matter and contribute soil nutrients.

  14. Communication between professionals from physical rehabilitation unit and deaf clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiliam César Alves Machado

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify how professionals from the local public physical rehabilitation unit communicate with deaf peopleseeking specialized care. Methods: exploratory descriptive study with qualitative approach conducted with 32 professionalsworking in physical rehabilitation through self-reporting instrument. Results: two thematic categories emerged from dataanalysis: Using the Brazilian Sign Language, and Improvising communication strategies to interact with deaf patients. Whenprofessionals improvise strategies to communicate with the deaf, it might create barriers that negatively affect the qualityof services provided to this population. Conclusion: communication is inefficient, and effective initiatives focused on thequalification of professionals working in rehabilitation can contribute for them to master the Brazilian Sign Language,ensuring adequate care to deaf clients/patients, in the same way as those provided to people without hearing impairment.

  15. Dog Walking and Physical Activity in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A. Ham, MS

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dog walking is a purposeful physical activity that may have health benefits for humans and canines. A descriptive epidemiology of the contribution of dog walking to physically active lifestyles among dog walkers in the United States has not been previously reported. Methods Data on youth and adults who reported walking for pet care trips (N = 1282 on the National Household Travel Survey 2001 were analyzed for number of trips, proportion walking a dog for at least 10 minutes on one trip, and accumulation of 30 minutes or more in 1 day of walks lasting at least 10 minutes. Results In 1 day, 58.9% of dog walkers took two or more walks, 80.2% took at least one walk of 10 minutes or more, and 42.3% accumulated 30 minutes or more from walks lasting at least 10 minutes each. There were no significant differences by sex, family income, or categories of urbanization. Conclusion Walking a dog may contribute to a physically active lifestyle and should be promoted as a strategy that fits within the framework set forth by the Task Force on Community Preventive Services for Physical Activity.

  16. Strategies to reduce sodium intake in the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henney, Jane E; Taylor, Christine Lewis; Boon, Caitlin S

    2010-01-01

    "Reducing the intake of sodium is an important public health goal for Americans. Since the 1970s, an array of public health interventions and national dietary guidelines has sought to reduce sodium intake. However, the U.S...

  17. Reducing costs by clustering maintenance activities for multiple critical units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Bram; Klingenberg, Warse; Teunter, Ruud; Tinga, Tiedo

    Advances in sensor technology have enabled companies to make significant progress towards achieving condition-based maintenance (CBM). CBM provides the opportunity to perform maintenance actions more effectively. However, scheduling maintenance at the unit level may imply a high maintenance

  18. Steps Ahead: Adaptation of physical activity and dietary guidelines for reducing unhealthy weight gain in the Lower Misissippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of our study was to test the effectiveness of adapting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) (DG), with and without a physical activity (PA) component, in reducing weight gain in the Lower Mississippi Delta region (LMD) of the United States. A sample of 121 White and African-Americ...

  19. Physical Unclonable Function with Multiplexing Units and its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masaya; Asai, Toshiya; Shiozaki, Mitsuru; Fujino, Takeshi

    Recently, semiconductor counterfeiting has become an increasingly serious problem. Therefore, techniques to prevent the counterfeit by using random characteristic patterns that are difficult to control artificially have attracted attention. The physical unclonable function (PUF) is one of the techniques. It is a method to derive ID information peculiar to a device by detecting random physical features that cannot be controlled during the device's manufacture. Because information such as the ID information is difficult to replicate, PUF is used as a technique to prevent counterfeiting. Several studies have been reported on PUF. Arbiter PUF, which utilizes the difference in signal propagation delay between selectors, is the typical method of composing PUF using delay characteristics. This paper proposed a new PUF which is based on the arbiter PUF. The proposed PUF introduces new multiplexing selector units. It attempts to generate an effective response using the orders of three signal arrivals. Experiments using FPGAs verify the validity of the proposed PUF. Although Uniqueness is deteriorated, Correctness, Steadiness, Randomness and Resistance against the machine learning attacks are improved in comparison with conventional one.

  20. Significantly reducing registration time in IGRT using graphics processing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Purpose/Objective For online IGRT, rapid image processing is needed. Fast parallel computations using graphics processing units (GPUs) have recently been made more accessible through general purpose programming interfaces. We present a GPU implementation of the Horn and Schunck method...... respiration phases in a free breathing volunteer and 41 anatomical landmark points in each image series. The registration method used is a multi-resolution GPU implementation of the 3D Horn and Schunck algorithm. It is based on the CUDA framework from Nvidia. Results On an Intel Core 2 CPU at 2.4GHz each...... registration took 30 minutes. On an Nvidia Geforce 8800GTX GPU in the same machine this registration took 37 seconds, making the GPU version 48.7 times faster. The nine image series of different respiration phases were registered to the same reference image (full inhale). Accuracy was evaluated on landmark...

  1. The introduction of individual treatment by resident physical therapists in primary care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra da Silveira Langoni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the effect on clinical indicators of the introduction of individual weekly physical therapy sessions in five Primary Health Care units in Porto Alegre, RS. Methods: The medical records from 59 patients were analyzed. They were treated between April 2010 and May 2011 by two physical therapists from the Multidisciplinary Residency Program in Family and Community Health at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul. Data was collected for the determination of the sociodemographic (gender, age, marital status and occupation and clinical profiles (medical diagnosis, medication intake, number of medications and the presence of pain, dyspnea, or urinary loss. Data was analyzed using Student’s t test, Mann Whitney, Chi-square and Fisher’s exact test; the odds ratio was used when a significant association has been identified. Results: Most participants were female (81.4%, adult (62%, who did not cohabitated (62.7%, domestic workers (35.6% with musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders (86.4%. Thirty-two participants took medicine at the beginning of the intervention and, at the end, only five did so. After treatment, the amount of administered medications was also significantly reduced. The score of the Visual Analogue Scale (pain or dyspnea was significantly reduced at the end of an average of 7.7 ± 3.2 sessions. Those users who reported having followed the domiciliary advice had an 8.3 times greater chance of being discharged. Conclusions: The weekly physical therapy sessions carried out at Primary Care units reduced symptoms, the use and amount of medication taken by the users treated and achieved greater success among those who followed the domiciliary advice given by the resident physical therapists.

  2. Physical and Visual Accessibilities in Intensive Care Units: A Comparative Study of Open-Plan and Racetrack Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mahbub; Khan, Nayma; Jones, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    This study compared physical and visual accessibilities and their associations with staff perception and interaction behaviors in 2 intensive care units (ICUs) with open-plan and racetrack layouts. For the study, physical and visual accessibilities were measured using the spatial analysis techniques of Space Syntax. Data on staff perception were collected from 81 clinicians using a questionnaire survey. The locations of 2233 interactions, and the location and length of another 339 interactions in these units were collected using systematic field observation techniques. According to the study, physical and visual accessibilities were different in the 2 ICUs, and clinicians' primary workspaces were physically and visually more accessible in the open-plan ICU. Physical and visual accessibilities affected how well clinicians' knew their peers and where their peers were located in these units. Physical and visual accessibilities also affected clinicians' perception of interaction and communication and of teamwork and collaboration in these units. Additionally, physical and visual accessibilities showed significant positive associations with interaction behaviors in these units, with the open-plan ICU showing stronger associations. However, physical accessibilities were less important than visual accessibilities in relation to interaction behaviors in these ICUs. The implications of these findings for ICU design are discussed.

  3. Measurement Units and Physical Dimensions of Fractance-Part II: Fractional-Order Measurement Units and Physical Dimensions of Fractance and Rules for Fractors in Series and Parallel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pu, Yi-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Here and in the companion paper (Part I), a novel conceptual framework on the measurement units and physical dimensions of fractance and rules for fractors in series and parallel is mainly discussed...

  4. Physical exercise at the workplace reduces perceived physical exertion during healthcare work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High physical exertion during work is a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain and long-term sickness absence. Physical exertion (RPE) reflects the balance between physical work demands and physical capacity of the individual. Thus, increasing the physical capacity through physical...... exercise may decrease physical exertion during work. This study investigates the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on physical exertion during work (WRPE) among healthcare workers. METHODS: 200 female healthcare workers (age: 42.0, body mass index: 24.1, average pain intensity......: 3.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, average WRPE: 3.6 on a scale of 0 to 10) from 18 departments at three participating hospitals. Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level to 10 weeks of: (1) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed in groups during working hours for 5×10 minutes per...

  5. Prevalence of fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity by race/ethnicity--United States, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-06

    Diets high in fruits and vegetables and participation in regular physical activity are associated with a lower risk for several chronic diseases and conditions. The National Cholesterol Education Program and the American Cancer Society both emphasize lifestyle modifications that include diet and physical activity to reduce disease risk. These are also two of the strategies implemented by states participating in CDC's Nutrition and Physical Activity Program to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases. To examine the combined prevalence of 1) consumption of fruits and vegetables five or more times per day and 2) regular physical activity among U.S. adults by race/ethnicity, CDC analyzed self-reported data from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that the combined prevalence of these two behavioral strategies was higher among men of multiple/other races (16.5%) compared with non-Hispanic white men (12.6%). In addition, only 12.6% of non-Hispanic black women and 14.8% of Hispanic women, compared with 17.4% of non-Hispanic white women, engaged in these two behavioral strategies. These results underscore the need to promote diets high in fruits and vegetables and regular physical activity among all populations in the United States and among racial and ethnic minority communities in particular.

  6. Does parental physical violence reduce children's standardized test score performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Maxwell, Leah; Stromquist, Ann; Whitten, Paul; Limbos, Mary Ann; Merchant, James

    2007-11-01

    Many negative cognitive and behavioral outcomes have been identified among children living in households with parental violence, but few studies have examined academic performance. In a rural population-based cohort, we examine the role of parental violence on standardized test score performance. The cohort included 306 children ages 6 through 17. Parents responded to a health interview that included questions about physical violence. Children's standardized test scores were collected prospectively for 5 years after the parent interview. Hierarchical multivariate models clustering on school, household, and repeated individual test scores and controlling for children's and parent's characteristics were run to predict test score performance. One in five children lived in a household in which parents reported at least one act of physical violence. Children whose parents reported intimate partner violence (IPV) performed an average of 12.2 percentile points lower than children whose parents reported no IPV (95% CI, -19.2--5.2; p Parent-reported IPV led to larger test score reductions for girls than for boys and for children less than 12 years old than for older children. Parental physical violence was common, and children in homes with violence had significantly poorer performance on standardized test scores.

  7. Predictors of physical restraint use in Canadian intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Elena; Sneyers, Barbara; Rose, Louise; Perreault, Marc M; Williamson, David R; Mehta, Sangeeta; Cook, Deborah J; Lapinsky, Stephanie C; Burry, Lisa

    2014-03-24

    Physical restraint (PR) use in the intensive care unit (ICU) has been associated with higher rates of self-extubation and prolonged ICU length of stay. Our objectives were to describe patterns and predictors of PR use. We conducted a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of analgosedation, antipsychotic, neuromuscular blocker, and PR practices in 51 Canadian ICUs. Data were collected prospectively for all mechanically ventilated adults admitted during a two-week period. We tested for patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics that were associated with PR use and number of days of use, using logistic and Poisson regression respectively. PR was used on 374 out of 711 (53%) patients, for a mean number of 4.1 (standard deviation (SD) 4.0) days. Treatment characteristics associated with PR were higher daily benzodiazepine dose (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00 to 1.11), higher daily opioid dose (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.06), antipsychotic drugs (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.74 to 5.48), agitation (Sedation-Agitation Scale (SAS) >4) (OR 3.73, 95% CI 1.50 to 9.29), and sedation administration method (continuous and bolus versus bolus only) (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.74 to 5.48). Hospital characteristics associated with PR indicated patients were less likely to be restrained in ICUs from university-affiliated hospitals (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.61). Mainly treatment characteristics were associated with more days of PR, including: higher daily benzodiazepine dose (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.07, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.13), daily sedation interruption (IRR 3.44, 95% CI 1.48 to 8.10), antipsychotic drugs (IRR 15.67, 95% CI 6.62 to 37.12), SAS <3 (IRR 2.62, 95% CI 1.08 to 6.35), and any adverse event including accidental device removal (IRR 8.27, 95% CI 2.07 to 33.08). Patient characteristics (age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, admission category, prior substance abuse, prior psychotropic medication, pre

  8. Women in physics in the United States: recruitment and retention

    CERN Document Server

    Abramzon, Nina; Bertschinger, Edmund; Blessing, Susan; Cochran, Geraldine L; Cox, Anne; Cunningham, Beth A; Galbraith-Frew, Jessica; Johnson, Jolene; Kerby, Leslie; Lalanne, Elaine; ODonnell, Christine; Petty, Sara; Sampath, Sujatha; Singh, Chandralekha; Spencer, Cherrill; Woodle, Kathryne Sparks; Yenello, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    Initiatives to increase the number, persistence, and success of women in physics in the US reach pre-teen girls through senior women. Programs exist at both the local and national levels. In addition, researchers have investigated issues related to gender equity in physics and physics education. Anecdotal evidence suggests increased media coverage of the underrepresentation of women in science. All of these efforts are both motivated and made more effective by the collection and presentation of data on the presence, persistence, and promise of women in physics.

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Army Physical Readiness Test Results of AMEDD Units Without Formal Physical Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    on active duty. Another reason is that physical fitness is an integral part of many units’ daily training regimen. With the emphasis now on Total...departure from previous physical fitness programs. Individual programs account for differences in age and sex , and enable soldiers to establish personal...for the Army.6 Within the U.S. Army, the component of physical fitness is governed by AR 350-15. This regulation directs that all Active Army personnel

  10. Early pharmacological treatment of delirium may reduce physical restraint use: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Christopher J; Thomas, Wendy L; McAllen, Karen J

    2014-03-01

    Evidence surrounding pharmacological treatment of delirium is limited. The negative impact of physical restraints on patient outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU), however, is well published. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether initiating pharmacologic delirium treatment within 24 hours of a positive screen reduces the number of days in physical restraints and improves patient outcomes compared with delayed or no treatment. Patients from a mixed ICU with a documented positive delirium score using the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist were retrospectively grouped based on having received pharmacologic treatment within 24 hours of the first positive screen or not. Primary end points were number of days spent in physical restraints and time to extubation after delirium onset. Secondary end points included hospital and ICU length of stay (LOS) and survival to discharge. Two hundred intubated patients were either pharmacologically treated (n = 98) or not treated (n = 102) within 24 hours of the first positive delirium score. Patients receiving treatment spent a shorter median time in restraints compared with patients who were not treated (3 vs 6 days; P < .001), and had a shorter median time to extubation (3 vs 6.5 days; P < .001). The treatment group also experienced a shorter ICU LOS (9.5 vs 16 days; P < .001) and hospital LOS (14.5 vs 22 days; P < .001) compared with the no-treatment group. Delirious patients who received pharmacological treatment within 24 hours of the first positive screen spent fewer days in physical restraints and less time receiving mechanical ventilation compared with those who did not. Although delirium management is multifactorial, early pharmacological therapy may benefit patients diagnosed with delirium.

  11. Does Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Reduce Future Physical Abuse? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephanie C.; Kim, Johnny S.; Tripodi, Stephen J.; Brown, Samantha M.; Gowdy, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use meta-analytic techniques to evaluating the effectiveness of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) at reducing future physical abuse among physically abusive families. Methods: A systematic search identified six eligible studies. Outcomes of interest were physical abuse recurrence, child abuse potential, and parenting stress.…

  12. Does Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Reduce Future Physical Abuse? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephanie C.; Kim, Johnny S.; Tripodi, Stephen J.; Brown, Samantha M.; Gowdy, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use meta-analytic techniques to evaluating the effectiveness of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) at reducing future physical abuse among physically abusive families. Methods: A systematic search identified six eligible studies. Outcomes of interest were physical abuse recurrence, child abuse potential, and parenting stress.…

  13. Women in physics: Reducing the gender gap at the college level

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Christine; Cunningham, Beth

    2015-12-01

    In the United States, too few women in college obtain physics degrees. This policy analysis examines different strategies for addressing the gap through improving physics courses and providing additional support to students. It re-commends that, although several options could be effective, stakeholders should prioritize implementing psychological interventions, and they should collaborate with groups from other STEM fields, humanities, and other interests.

  14. Mildly negative social encounters reduce physical pain sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsook, Terry K; MacDonald, Geoff

    2010-11-01

    While previous research has demonstrated a reduction in physical pain sensitivity in response to social exclusion, the manipulations employed have arguably been far removed from typical daily experience. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of relatively ordinary social encounters on the perception of pain. Healthy participants rated the intensity and unpleasantness of painful stimuli before and after engaging in a structured interaction with a confederate who was instructed to either be warm and friendly or indifferent. A control group was asked to perform a similar structured activity, but alone. Consistent with predictions, participants who experienced the mildly negative social exchange reported lower pain intensity and unpleasantness after the encounter relative to baseline, whereas those exposed to the positive social exchange did not evidence any change in pain ratings. These results were not mediated by changes in mood or perceived connectedness. If mildly negative social encounters can provoke an analgesic effect, it is possible that social hypoalgesia may be considerably more commonplace than previously realized. Discussion focuses on the role of stress-induced hypoalgesia, and the implications of the results for clinical assessments of pain.

  15. Barriers associated with reduced physical activity in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Batista Amorim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of COPD patients to perform activities of daily living (ADL; to identify barriers that prevent these individuals from performing ADL; and to correlate those barriers with dyspnea severity, six-minute walk test (6MWT, and an ADL limitation score. METHODS: In COPD patients and healthy, age-matched controls, the number of steps, the distance walked, and walking time were recorded with a triaxial accelerometer, for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire regarding perceived barriers and the London Chest Activity of Daily Living (LCADL scale were used in order to identify the factors that prevent the performance of ADL. The severity of dyspnea was assessed with two scales, whereas submaximal exercise capacity was determined on the basis of the 6MWT. RESULTS: We evaluated 40 COPD patients and 40 controls. In comparison with the control values, the mean walk time was significantly shorter for COPD patients (68.5 ± 25.8 min/day vs. 105.2 ± 49.4 min/day; p < 0.001, as was the distance walked (3.9 ± 1.9 km/day vs. 6.4 ± 3.2 km/day; p < 0.001. The COPD patients also walked fewer steps/day. The most common self-reported barriers to performing ADL were lack of infrastructure, social influences, and lack of willpower. The 6MWT distance correlated with the results obtained with the accelerometer but not with the LCADL scale results. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD are less active than are healthy adults of a comparable age. Physical inactivity and the barriers to performing ADL have immediate implications for clinical practice, calling for early intervention measures.

  16. Use of Physical Restraints in Dutch Intensive Care Units: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, A.W. van der; Peelen, L.M.; Raijmakers, R.J.; Vroegop, R.L.; Bakker, D.F.; Tekatli, H.; Boogaard, M.H.W.A. van den; Slooter, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence indicates that harmful effects are associated with the use of physical restraint. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the use of physical restraint in intensive care units. Prevalence, adherence to protocols, and correlates of the use of physical restraint were determined.

  17. Physical Improvements in Exciter/Igniter Units Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project consists of developing a prototype exciter/igniter unit that can operate to a subset of expected flight performance requirements. The main focus...

  18. Benefits of Implementing a Dance Unit in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajek, Mary; Richards, K. Andrew R.; Ressler, James

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of participating in a dance curriculum, as well as how dance relates to the National Standards. It also provides insight into how physical educators can overcome the barriers to teaching dance in their programs.

  19. Physical Improvements in Exciter/Igniter Units Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 2 project consists of the physical integration of our Phase 1 small, compact exciter with a "flight like" igniter or spark plug capable of...

  20. Benefits of Implementing a Dance Unit in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajek, Mary; Richards, K. Andrew R.; Ressler, James

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of participating in a dance curriculum, as well as how dance relates to the National Standards. It also provides insight into how physical educators can overcome the barriers to teaching dance in their programs.

  1. Changing Times: The Use of Reduced Work Time Options in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Barney

    1983-01-01

    This article addresses the increase in voluntary reduced work time arrangements that have developed in the United States in response to growing interest in alternatives to the standardized approach to scheduling. Permanent part-time employment, job sharing, and voluntary reduced work time plans are defined, described and, to a limited extent,…

  2. CCEA as physics student unit guide unit 1 : forces, energy and electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Cosgrove, Ferguson

    2014-01-01

    Perfect for revision, these guides explain the unit requirements, summarise the content and include specimen questions with graded answers. Each full-colour New Edition Student Unit Guide provides ideal preparation for your unit exam:. - Feel confident you understand the unit: each guide comprehensively covers the unit content and includes topic summaries, knowledge check questions and a reference index. - Get to grips with the exam requirements: the specific skills on which you will be tested are explored and explained. - Analyse exam-style questions: graded student responses will help you fo

  3. Failures of foreseeability: Risk management considerations in reducing allegations of sexual violence in psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banja, John D

    2017-01-01

    This article begins with a brief discussion of findings on causal factors leading to allegations of sexual violence in health care facilities and then offers the author's account of 4 such cases that he reviewed, 3 of which occurred in psychiatric units. These cases show remarkably similar variables, especially involving decisions to allow male and female patients to commingle, the inadequate physical layout of the units, poor or absent video surveillance, and staff unacquainted with institutional policies on patient safety or refusing to enforce relevant rules. These variables arguably amount to "failures of foreseeability" that reasonably cautious health care personnel should recognize as facilitating or enabling sexual violence. As such, the proactive message of this article for health care risk management urges critical and robust attention paid to a unit's environmental/physical design as well as to performance factors among personnel so as to prevent sexual attacks and diminish the probability of malpractice actions.

  4. National Curriculum for Physical Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Junghwan; Graber, Kim C.

    2017-01-01

    Since the publication of "A Nation at Risk," some scholars have argued that a national curriculum and national testing are necessary to hold school personnel accountable for student achievement and, ultimately, to raise educational standards. The idea of developing a nationwide curriculum has been widely debated in the United States,…

  5. Future particle-physics projects in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, D. S. [Fermilab

    2015-08-25

    Basic proposals of experiments aimed at precision measurements of Standard Model parameters and at searches for new particles, including dark-matter particles, are described along with future experimental projects considered by American Physical Society at the meeting in the summer of 2013 and intended for implementation within the next ten to twenty years.

  6. Edexcel A2 physics student unit 5 : physics from creation to collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Perfect for revision, these guides explain the unit requirements, summarise the content and include specimen questions with graded answers. Each full-colour New Edition Student Unit Guide provides ideal preparation for your unit exam:.; Feel confident you understand the unit: each guide comprehensively covers the unit content and includes topic summaries, knowledge check questions and a reference index.; Get to grips with the exam requirements: the specific skills on which you will be tested are explored and explained.; Analyse exam-style questions: graded student responses will help you focus

  7. Fundamentals of Physics for Engineering I (Unit guides). Academic year 2013-2014

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Guides to the units of course "Fundamentals of Physics for Engineering I". Degree in Sound and Image in Telecommunication Engineering. Polytechnic School of the University of Alicante. Academic year 2013-2014.

  8. Fundamentals of Engineering Physics I (Unit guides). Academic year 2015-2016

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Guides to the units of course "Fundamentals of Engineering Physics I". Degree in Sound and Image in Telecommunication Engineering. Polytechnic School of the University of Alicante. Academic year 2015-2016.

  9. Fundamentals of Engineering Physics I (Summaries of the units). Academic year 2015-2016

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Summaries of the units of course "Fundamentals of Engineering Physics I". Degree in Sound and Image in Telecommunication Engineering. Polytechnic School of the University of Alicante. Academic year 2015-2016.

  10. Fundamentals of Physics for Engineering I (Unit guides). Academic year 2014-2015

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Guides to the units of course "Fundamentals of Physics for Engineering I". Degree in Sound and Image in Telecommunication Engineering. Polytechnic School of the University of Alicante. Academic year 2014-2015.

  11. Assessment of physical work load at visual display unit workstations : Ergonomic applications and gender aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Karlqvist, Lena

    1997-01-01

    From the department of Occupational Health, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Department of Ergonomics, National Institute for Working Life, Solna, and the Department of Surgical Sciences K3, Section for Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm. Assessment of physical work load at visual display unit workstations Ergonomic applications and gender aspects Lena Karlqvist Arbete och Hälsa I997:9 .Local physical workload at visual display unit(VDU) wor...

  12. Reducing physical restraint use in alcohol withdrawal patients: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainier, Nicole C

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol withdrawal patients experience symptoms ranging from mild anxiety and disorientation to severe agitation and hallucinations. The most critical of these patients are treated in intensive care units. Physical restraints are often required to maintain patient safety until symptoms resolve. The use of physical restraints is contradictory to nursing values and is unsupported by evidenced-based literature. A literature review was conducted to see what, if any, alternatives have been tested to improve patient care for this complicated patient population.

  13. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  14. Electromagnetism Unit of an Introductory University Physics Course: The Influence of a Reform-Based Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sarah Elizabeth; Hazari, Zahra; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Harrison, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Many students enrolled in university physics have little interest in the subject matter, a trend more pronounced in females. This study assesses students' conceptual understanding and interest during the electrochemistry unit of a physics course for nonphysics majors that was revised in light of consistently low ratings from its students. The…

  15. Expression of results in quantum chemistry physical chemistry division commission on physicochemical symbols, terminology and units

    CERN Document Server

    Whiffen, D H

    2013-01-01

    Expression of Results in Quantum Chemistry recommends the appropriate insertion of physical constants in the output information of a theoretical paper in order to make the numerical end results of theoretical work easily transformed to SI units by the reader. The acceptance of this recommendation would circumvent the need for a set of atomic units each with its own symbol and name. It is the traditional use of the phrase """"atomic units"""" in this area which has obscured the real problem. The four SI dimensions of length, mass, time, and current require four physical constants to be permitte

  16. Clinical decision making on the use of physical restraint in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqian Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical restraint is a common nursing intervention in intensive care units and nurses often use it to ensure patients' safety and to prevent unexpected accidents. However, existing literature indicated that the use of physical restraint is a complex one because of inadequate rationales, the negative physical and emotional effects on patients, but the lack of perceived alternatives. This paper is aimed to interpret the clinical decision-making theories related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units in order to facilitate our understanding on the use of physical restraint and to evaluate the quality of decisions made by nurses. By reviewing the literature, intuition and heuristics are the main decision-making strategies related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units because the rapid and reflexive nature of intuition and heuristics allow nurses to have a rapid response to urgent and emergent cases. However, it is problematic if nurses simply count their decision-making on experience rather than incorporate research evidence into clinical practice because of inadequate evidence to support the use of physical restraint. Besides that, such a rapid response may lead nurses to make decisions without adequate assessment and thinking and therefore biases and errors may be generated. Therefore, despite the importance of intuition and heuristics in decision-making in acute settings on the use of physical restraint, it is recommended that nurses should incorporate research evidence with their experience to make decisions and adequate assessment before implementing physical restraint is also necessary.

  17. Age, sex, and racial differences in harsh physical punishment: results from a nationally representative United States sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillieu, Tamara L; Afifi, Tracie O; Mota, Natalie; Keyes, Katherine M; Sareen, Jitender

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine age, sex, and racial differences in the prevalence of harsh physical punishment in childhood in a nationally representative sample of the United States. Data were from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) collected in 2004 and 2005 (n=34,653). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine age, sex, and racial differences in the prevalence of harsh physical punishment. Results suggest that the prevalence of harsh physical punishment has been decreasing among more recently born age groups; however, there appear to be sex and racial differences in this trend over time. The magnitude of the decrease appears to be stronger for males than for females. By race, the decrease in harsh physical punishment over time is only apparent among Whites; Black participants demonstrate little change over time, and harsh physical punishment seems to be increasing over time among Hispanics. Prevention and intervention efforts that educate about the links of physical punishment to negative outcomes and alternative non-physical discipline strategies may be particularly useful in reducing the prevalence of harsh physical punishment over time.

  18. Physical Activity Patterns of Acute Stroke Patients Managed in a Rehabilitation Focused Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya West

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive stroke unit care, incorporating acute care and rehabilitation, may promote early physical activity after stroke. However, previous information regarding physical activity specific to the acute phase of stroke and the comprehensive stroke unit setting is limited to one stroke unit. This study describes the physical activity undertaken by patients within 14 days after stroke admitted to a comprehensive stroke unit. Methods. This study was a prospective observational study. Behavioural mapping was used to determine the proportion of the day spent in different activities. Therapist reports were used to determine the amount of formal therapy received on the day of observation. The timing of commencement of activity out of bed was obtained from the medical records. Results. On average, patients spent 45% (SD 25 of the day in some form of physical activity and received 58 (SD 34 minutes per day of physiotherapy and occupational therapy combined. Mean time to first mobilisation out of bed was 46 (SD 32 hours post-stroke. Conclusions. This study suggests that commencement of physical activity occurs earlier and physical activity is at a higher level early after stroke in this comprehensive stroke unit, when compared to studies of other acute stroke models of care.

  19. Tuning physical properties by assembling subnanometer inorganic and organic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Parilla, P. A.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Mascarenhas, A.; Islam, Z.; Ren, Y.; Lee, P. L.; McNevin, M. J.; Naumov, I.; Fu, H. X.; Huang, X. Y.; Li, J.

    2008-03-01

    Designing inorganic-organic hybrid materials in a nanoscopic scale allows taking the full advantage of the two worlds, which has recently been demonstrated in a new family of hybrid crystalline materials that are the fully ordered assemblies of sub-nanometer scale inorganic units (e.g., few monolayer-thick slab, single atomic chain) and organic molecules[1].They have been shown to exhibit a number of unique properties that are not readily available in either of the components or their nanostructures: for instance, strongly enhanced exciton-polariton absorption and exciton binding energy[2], a massive bandgap blue shift (˜ 2 eV) from that of the bulk inorganic semiconductor[3], and fine-tuning of thermal expansion and achieving zero-thermal expansio[4]. They have great potential for applications in areas including transparent conducting materials, thermoelectric materials, UV optoelectronic devices, because of their unusual electronic, vibrational and optical properties and the flexibility in tailoring the material properties adapting to the specific application requirements. .[1] X. H. Huang et al., JACS 125, 7049 (03). [2] Y. Zhang et al., PRL 96, 26405 (06). [3] B. Fluegel et al., PRB 70, 205308 (04). [4] Y. Zhang et al., PRL 99, 215901 (07).

  20. Transfer Function Bounds for Partial-unit-memory Convolutional Codes Based on Reduced State Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of a coding system consisting of a convolutional encoder and a Viterbi decoder is analytically found by the well-known transfer function bounding technique. For the partial-unit-memory byte-oriented convolutional encoder with m sub 0 binary memory cells and (k sub 0 m sub 0) inputs, a state diagram of 2(K) (sub 0) was for the transfer function bound. A reduced state diagram of (2 (m sub 0) +1) is used for easy evaluation of transfer function bounds for partial-unit-memory codes.

  1. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    sensorimotor cortex. Specifically for each unit decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (in mM), there was a predicted -10.86 (95% confidence intervals -16.786 to -4.482) decrease in grip strength (kg force) (P < 0.001) and -8.74 (95% confidence intervals -13.943 to -3.015) decrease in muscle strength (P < 0.006). This study suggests that reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid levels reflect pathological abnormalities that may play a role in determining physical disability. These abnormalities may include decreases in the pre- and postsynaptic components of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission and in the density of inhibitory neurons. Additionally, the reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration may contribute to the neurodegenerative process, resulting in increased firing of axons, with consequent increased energy demands, which may lead to neuroaxonal degeneration and loss of the compensatory mechanisms that maintain motor function. This study supports the idea that modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission may be an important target for neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis.See De Stefano and Giorgio (doi:10.1093/brain/awv213) for a scientific commentary on this article.

  2. An Optimization System with Parallel Processing for Reducing Common-Mode Current on Electronic Control Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Yuji; Uno, Takanori; Asai, Hideki

    In this paper, we propose an optimization system with parallel processing for reducing electromagnetic interference (EMI) on electronic control unit (ECU). We adopt simulated annealing (SA), genetic algorithm (GA) and taboo search (TS) to seek optimal solutions, and a Spice-like circuit simulator to analyze common-mode current. Therefore, the proposed system can determine the adequate combinations of the parasitic inductance and capacitance values on printed circuit board (PCB) efficiently and practically, to reduce EMI caused by the common-mode current. Finally, we apply the proposed system to an example circuit to verify the validity and efficiency of the system.

  3. Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in a neuro-spine intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Kimberly; Palamone, Janet; Thomas, Kathryn; Naidech, Andrew; Silkaitis, Christina; Henry, Jennifer; Bolon, Maureen; Zembower, Teresa R

    2015-08-01

    A collaborative effort reduced catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the neuro-spine intensive care unit where the majority of infections occurred at our institution. Our stepwise approach included retrospective data review, daily rounding with clinicians, developing and implementing an action plan, conducting practice audits, and sharing of real-time data outcomes. The catheter-associated urinary tract infection rate was reduced from 8.18 to 0.93 per 1,000 catheter-days and standardized infection ratio decreased from 2.16 to 0.37.

  4. Strength training, but not endurance training, reduces motor unit discharge rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Chã, Carolina; Falla, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effects of strength and endurance training on motor unit discharge rate variability and force steadiness of knee extensor muscles. Thirty sedentary healthy men (age, 26.0±3.8yrs) were randomly assigned to strength training, endurance training or a control group. Conventional endurance and strength training was performed 3days per week, over a period of 6weeks. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), time to task failure (at 30% MVC), coefficient of variation (CoV) of force and of the discharges rates of motor units from the vastus medialis obliquus and vastus lateralis were determined as subjects performed 20% and 30% MVC knee extension contractions before and after training. CoV of motor unit discharges rates was significantly reduced for both muscles following strength training (Pstrength training intervention only (PStrength training, but not endurance training, reduces motor unit discharge rate variability and enhances force steadiness of the knee extensors. These results provide new insights into the neuromuscular adaptations that occur with different training methods.

  5. Retrofitting Inefficient Rooftop Air-Conditioning Units Reduces U.S. Navy Energy Use (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-04-01

    As part of the U.S. Navy's overall energy strategy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) to demonstrate market-ready energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration. One such technology - retrofitting rooftop air-conditioning units with an advanced rooftop control system - was identified as a promising source for reducing energy use and costs, and can contribute to increasing energy security.

  6. Reducing Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death in the Rural United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Macarena C; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Bauer, Ursula E; Iademarco, Michael F

    2017-01-13

    In 2014, the all-cause age-adjusted death rate in the United States reached a historic low of 724.6 per 100,000 population (1). However, mortality in rural (nonmetropolitan) areas of the United States has decreased at a much slower pace, resulting in a widening gap between rural mortality rates (830.5) and urban mortality rates (704.3) (1). During 1999–2014, annual age-adjusted death rates for the five leading causes of death in the United States (heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD), and stroke) were higher in rural areas than in urban (metropolitan) areas (Figure 1). In most public health regions (Figure 2), the proportion of deaths among persons aged leading causes that were potentially excess deaths was higher in rural areas compared with urban areas (Figure 3). Several factors probably influence the rural-urban gap in potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes, many of which are associated with sociodemographic differences between rural and urban areas. Residents of rural areas in the United States tend to be older, poorer, and sicker than their urban counterparts (3). A higher proportion of the rural U.S. population reports limited physical activity because of chronic conditions than urban populations (4). Moreover, social circumstances and behaviors have an impact on mortality and potentially contribute to approximately half of the determining causes of potentially excess deaths (5).

  7. Natural units in physics, and the curious case of the radian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincey, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Sets of natural units, like ‘atomic units’, are sometimes used to simplify the equations of physics. This choice of units can be seen as a way of showing the relationships between quantities in their simplest form, in specialised situations, while still being correct. The unit system used for teaching, the SI, is instead designed primarily to be a set of units that can be applied consistently across all areas of science, commerce and industry. The SI also gives priority to emphasising the distinction between different quantities, by (most of the time) giving different units to different quantities, rather than producing the simplest possible equations. It is not widely appreciated that the SI treats the radian as the natural unit for angle, the only unit to be treated this way, with consequent issues for clear distinctions between quantities involving angles. The system that the SI would become if this anomaly were removed is presented. Rather than advocating this major change to the SI itself, it is proposed to highlight the existence of the underlying system to clarify how angles are handled physics, to make it easier to include angles in software calculations, and as an example of how the choice of unit system affects the equations we use.

  8. KARAKTERISASI CANGKANG KERANG MENGGUNAKAN XRD DAN X RAY PHYSICS BASIC UNIT

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cangkang kerang jenis Anadara Granosa merupakan bahan keramik yang  termasuk ke dalam jenis zat padat kristal. Sebagai langkah awal dilakukan penelitian dengan sampel cangkang kerang (CaCO3)  yaitu melakukan karakterisasi menggunakan dua  alat yang berbeda yaitu X Ray Diffraction (XRD) dan X Ray Physics Basic Unit, ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui perbedaan antara kedua alat tersebut. Dalam karakterisasi cangkang kerang (CaCO3) menggunakan X–Ray Diffraction dan X – Ray Physics Basic  Unit  taha...

  9. 40 CFR 270.165 - When may I begin physical construction of new units permitted under the RAP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of new units permitted under the RAP? 270.165 Section 270.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PERMIT PROGRAM Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) Getting A Rap Approved § 270.165 When may I begin physical construction of new units permitted under the RAP? You must not begin physical construction of new units...

  10. Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-09

    Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and

  11. Poorer physical fitness is associated with reduced structural brain integrity in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosco, Michael L; Brickman, Adam M; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Griffith, Erica Y; Narkhede, Atul; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H; Colbert, Lisa H; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-05-15

    Physical fitness is an important correlate of structural and functional integrity of the brain in healthy adults. In heart failure (HF) patients, poor physical fitness may contribute to cognitive dysfunction and we examined the unique contribution of physical fitness to brain structural integrity among patients with HF. Sixty-nine HF patients performed the Modified Mini Mental State examination (3MS) and underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging. All participants completed the 2-minute step test (2MST), a brief measure of physical fitness. We examined the associations between cognitive performance, physical fitness, and three indices of global brain integrity: total cortical gray matter volume, total white matter volume, and whole brain cortical thickness. Regression analyses adjusting for demographic characteristics, medical variables (e.g., left ventricular ejection fraction), and intracranial volume revealed reduced performance on the 2MST were associated with decreased gray matter volume and thinner cortex (pphysical fitness is common in HF and associated with reduced structural brain integrity. Prospective studies are needed to elucidate underlying mechanisms for the influence of physical fitness on brain health in HF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of Olefin-Reducing Catalyst in FCC Unit at Daqing Petrochemical Company

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinfeng; Yang Daoxue; Zhang Guojing; Yao Hua

    2003-01-01

    This article refers to the application of DOCO olefin-reducing catalyst developed by RIPP and manufactured by the Catalyst Factory of Changling Refining and Chemical Company in the 1.4 Mt/a RFCCU at Daqing Petrochemical Company. Results of operation over two months had revealed that this catalyst had good olefin-reducing ability and heavy oil converting ability adapted to paraffinic feedstock. The gasoline olefin yield had been reduced to 36.1 v% from 54.2 v% with gasoline RON rating decreased by 1.4 units. The induction period of gasoline had significantly increased to 952 mm, while the coke yield was increased by 0.05 percentage point with light oil yield dropping by only 0.02 percentage point. The FCC product distribution is favorable.

  13. Reducing physical risk factors in construction work through a participatory intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Jeppe; Brandt, Mikkel; Møller, Jeppe Lykke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that reducing physical workload among workers in the construction industry is complicated. In order to address this issue, we developed a process evaluation in a formative mixed-methods design, drawing on existing knowledge of the potential barriers...

  14. Reduced Pseudoneglect for Physical Space, but Not Mental Representations of Space, for Adults with Autistic Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Michael C.; Maybery, Murray T.; Visser, Troy A.

    2017-01-01

    Neurotypical individuals display a leftward attentional bias, called pseudoneglect, for physical space (e.g. landmark task) and mental representations of space (e.g. mental number line bisection). However, leftward bias is reduced in autistic individuals viewing faces, and neurotypical individuals with autistic traits viewing "greyscale"…

  15. Towards successful physical stress reducing products: An evaluation of seven cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looze, M.P. de; Urlings, I.J.M.; Vink, P.; Rhijn, J.W. van; Miedema, M.C.; Bronkhorst, R.E.; Grinten, M.P. van der

    2001-01-01

    Lifting, carrying, pushing and pulling at work are assumed to be related to increased risks of musculoskeletal injury, mainly in the low back and shoulder region. The implementation of products to reduce the physical load in heavy work is a well-known strategy to attack this problem. The success of

  16. Dietary fiber stabilizes blood glucose and insulin levels and reduces physical activity in sows (Sus scrofa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, de J.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether a diet with a high level of fermentable dietary fiber can stabilize interprandial blood glucose and insulin levels, prevent declines below basal levels, and reduce physical activity in limited-fed breeding sows. Stable levels of glucose and insulin may preve

  17. Dietary fiber stabilizes blood glucose and insulin levels and reduces physical activity in sows (Sus scrofa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, de J.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether a diet with a high level of fermentable dietary fiber can stabilize interprandial blood glucose and insulin levels, prevent declines below basal levels, and reduce physical activity in limited-fed breeding sows. Stable levels of glucose and insulin may preve

  18. Does Writing about Past Childhood Abuse Reduce Psychological and Physical Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Holly M.; Range, Lillian M.

    2009-01-01

    To see if writing about former abuse reduced depression, somatic, and sleep complaints, 664 undergraduates were screened for past physical or sexual abuse. Of those abused, 88 consenting students were randomly assigned to no-writing control or writing (20 minutes on 4 different days) about abuse or trivial topics. All completed pre-, post-, and…

  19. Structural change of the physical economy. Decomposition analysis of physical and hybrid-unit input-output tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, R.

    2003-10-01

    Economic processes generate a variety of material flows, which cause resource problems through the depletion of natural resources and environmental issues due to the emission of pollutants. This thesis presents an analytical method to study the relationship between the monetary economy and the 'physical economy'. In particular, this method can assess the impact of structural change in the economy on physical throughput. The starting point for the approach is the development of an elaborate version of the physical input-output table (PIOT), which acts as an economic-environmental accounting framework for the physical economy. In the empirical application, hybrid-unit input-output (I/O) tables, which combine physical and monetary information, are constructed for iron and steel, and plastic products for the Netherlands for the years 1990 and 1997. The impact of structural change on material flows is analyzed using Structural Decomposition Analysis (SDA), whic specifies effects such as sectoral shifts, technological change, and alterations in consumer spending and international trade patterns. The study thoroughly reviews the application of SDA to environmental issues, compares the method with other decomposition methods, and develops new mathematical specifications. An SDA is performed using the hybrid-unit input-output tables for the Netherlands. The results are subsequently used in novel forecasting and backcasting scenario analyses for the period 1997-2030. The results show that dematerialization of iron and steel, and plastics, has generally not occurred in the recent past (1990-1997), and will not occur, under a wide variety of scenario assumptions, in the future (1997-2030)

  20. Stochastic and Historical Resonances of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William P., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Humphry's article, "The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics," offers fundamental clarifications of measurement concepts that Fisher hopes will find a wide audience. In particular, parameterizing discrimination while preserving statistical sufficiency will indeed provide greater flexibility in accounting "for the effects of empirical…

  1. The "Earth Physics" Workshops Offered by the Earth Science Education Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Earth science has a part to play in broadening students' learning experience in physics. The Earth Science Education Unit presents a range of (free) workshops to teachers and trainee teachers, suggesting how Earth-based science activities, which show how we understand and use the planet we live on, can easily be slotted into normal science…

  2. The "Earth Physics" Workshops Offered by the Earth Science Education Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Earth science has a part to play in broadening students' learning experience in physics. The Earth Science Education Unit presents a range of (free) workshops to teachers and trainee teachers, suggesting how Earth-based science activities, which show how we understand and use the planet we live on, can easily be slotted into normal science…

  3. Natural Environments, Obesity, and Physical Activity in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michimi, Akihiko; Wimberly, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the associations of the natural environment with obesity and physical activity in nonmetropolitan areas of the United States among representative samples by using 2 indices of outdoor activity potential (OAP) at the county level. Methods: We used the data from 457,820 and 473,296 noninstitutionalized adults aged over 18 years…

  4. Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-09

    Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and

  5. Exercise and limitations in physical activity levels among new dialysis patients in the United States: an epidemiologic study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2008-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies of physical activity among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are lacking. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of physical activity among new dialysis patients in the United States.

  6. Soil washing physical separations test procedure - 300-FF-1 operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belden, R.D.

    1993-10-08

    This procedure provides the operations approach, a field sampling plan, and laboratory procedures for a soil washing test to be conducted by Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) in the 300-FF-1 area at the Hanford site. The {open_quotes}Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Soil Washing Physical Separations Test, 300-FF-1 Operable Unit,{close_quotes} Hanford, Washington, Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc., February 1994 (QAPP) is provided in a separate document that presents the procedural and organizational guidelines for this test. This document describes specifications, responsibilities, and general procedures to be followed to conduct physical separation soil treatability tests in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. These procedures are based on the {open_quotes}300-FF-1 Physical Separations CERCLA Treatability Test Plan, DOE/RL 92-2l,{close_quotes} (DOE-RL 1993).

  7. Physical restraint: experiences, attitudes and opinions of adult intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Samantha; Hallett, Christine; McHugh, Gretl

    2016-03-01

    Patients within the adult intensive care unit have the potential to develop delirium and agitation. This can result in the patient displaying unwanted behaviours such as attempting to remove the medical devices to which they are attached. Some adult intensive care units within the UK are starting to adopt physical restraint as a method of managing unwanted behaviours. To determine the experiences, attitudes and opinions of adult intensive care nurses in relation to the application of physical restraint. Questionnaire survey. A postal questionnaire was distributed to all nurses (n = 192) within two purposefully selected large adult intensive care units in the UK. Data were collected between November 2012 and February 2013. The questionnaire was completed by 38·9% (n = 75) of the nurses contacted. All believed that physical restraint had a place, with the majority of the view that the reason for its application was to maintain patient safety. Some expressed discomfort about the use of physical restraint. Nurses were happy to discuss the use of restraint with families. There was a perceived need for training and support for nursing staff as well as the need for medical staff to support the decision-making process. Nurses require more support and evidence to base their decision-making upon. They require guidance from professional bodies as well as support from medical colleagues. The findings have limited generalizability as they can only be applied to the units accessed and the response rate was poor. Alternative approaches such as pain management, sleep promotion and the involvement of relatives need to be explored before physical restraint policy can be written. Further research is required into the safety of physical restraint, alternative methods of managing the risk of agitation and identifying predisposing factors to accidental device removal. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  8. [Physical activity programmes to reduce overweight and obesity in children and adolescents; a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Cordero, M J; Ortegón Piñero, A; Mur Vilar, N; Sánchez García, J C; García Verazaluce, J J; García García, I; Sánchez López, A M

    2014-10-01

    Obesity treatment has been the subject of much controversy; various authors have recommended the application of a comprehensive treatment programme, and in the light of this previous research, we consider the question of what is the most effective programme of physical activity to reduce overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. To analyse major studies on the effectiveness of physical activity in reducing overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Systematic review of the results of physical activity programmes, published in scientific articles, to reduce overweight and obesity. Using an automated database search in PubMed and Google Scholar, conducted from October 2013 to March 2014, we identified 85 valid items. In selecting the items, the criteria applied included the usefulness and relevance of the subject matter and the credibility or experience of the research study authors. The internal and external validity of each of the articles reviewed was taken into account. This review confirmed the effectiveness of physical activity in reducing overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The most effective programmes were those combining aerobic and anaerobic exercises. It is generally accepted that at least 180 minutes per week should be dedicated to exercise, in the form of three 60-minute sessions of moderate intensity. Such programmes could be sufficient for persons with overweight or obesity. Researchers in this field agree that when a diet based on an appropriate distribution of meals is combined with regular physical activity, they reinforce each other, and thus optimum results are obtained. Weight reduction programmes that take account of family involvement are more effective than nutrition education itself or other routine interventions that fail to consider family involvement. The role of pa rents and of the persons around the child or adolescent is essential to reinforce positive behaviour toward lifestyle change. Copyright AULA

  9. Physical rehabilitation of patients in the intensive care unit requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a small case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Rod A; Skrzat, Julie; Reddy, Dereddi Raja S; Zanni, Jennifer M; Fan, Eddy; Stephens, R Scott; Needham, Dale M

    2013-02-01

    Neuromuscular weakness and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting complications experienced by intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. There is growing evidence that implementing rehabilitation therapy shortly after ICU admission improves physical function and reduces health care utilization. Recently, there is increasing interest and utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to support patients with severe respiratory failure. Patients receiving ECMO are at great risk for significant physical impairments and pose unique challenges for delivering rehabilitation therapy. Consequently, there is a need for innovative examples of safely and feasibly delivering active rehabilitation to these patients. This case report describes 3 patients with respiratory failure requiring ECMO who received physical rehabilitation to illustrate and discuss relevant feasibility and safety issues. In case 1, sedation and femoral cannulation limited rehabilitation therapy while on ECMO. In the 2 subsequent cases, minimizing sedation and utilizing a single bicaval dual lumen ECMO cannula placed in the internal jugular vein allowed patients to be alert and participate in active physical therapy while on ECMO, illustrating feasible rehabilitation techniques for these patients. Although greater experience is needed to more fully evaluate the safety of rehabilitation on ECMO, these initial cases are encouraging. We recommend systematically and prospectively tracking safety events and patient outcomes during rehabilitation on ECMO to provide greater evidence in this area.

  10. [Reducing patient pressure sore incidence in the surgical intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hui-Ting; Shu, Ling-Hui; Pan, Chao-Chun; Yang, Shu-Yen; Chen, Wan-I

    2011-06-01

    Pressure ulcers were an increasingly significant problem among patients in the authors' ward. The eight patients diagnosed with pressure ulcers (0.42% of all inpatients) during the first half of 2009 represented a 140% increase over the first half of 2008 (0.28% of all inpatients). This project was designed to reduce pressure ulcer incidence in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU) to 0.05%. Intervention measures included: 1) holding professional training on preventing pressure ulcers; 2) specifying appropriate patient turnover tools; 3) creating and distributing to nurses a proper turnover technique and positioning manual; 4) creating and distributing to nurses a comprehensive patient skin inspection checklist; and 5) organizing a permanent pressure ulcer care quality and audit committee. Pressure ulcer incidence fell from 0.42% to 0.04% following implementation of the methods. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the proposed methods to reduce pressure ulcer incidence and enhance nursing care quality.

  11. [Reducing patient pressure sore incidence density in the pediatric surgical intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chen; Chang, Shiow-Ru; Tang, Chi-Min

    2014-04-01

    Our unit recorded 21 cases of pressure sores from January 2011 to June 2011. The resulting pressure-sore incidence density of 0.74% exceeded the Taiwan Clinical Performance Indicator (TCPI) for medical centers (0.62%) as well as the mean incidence density for our unit (0.55%) during the same period in 2010. We developed this project to decrease the incidence density of pressure sores at our pediatric-surgical-intensive-care unit from 0.74% to 0.31%. Strategies implemented included: 1. providing on-the-job education; 2. providing bedside teaching; 3. developing a series of pictures to illustrate proper sitting, lying, and changing positions and the proper fixation of catheters; 4. implementing a reminder mechanism; 5. introducing pressure-preventing devices; 6. and establishing an audit team. Incidence density decreased from 0.74% (Jan. to Jun. 2011) to 0.18% (Mar. to Jul. 2012). We demonstrated that the developed improvement program effectively reduced the incidence density of pressure sores and increased the quality of nursing care.

  12. Fuel Efficient Strategies for Reducing Contrail Formations in United States Air Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil Y.; Ng, Hok K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a class of strategies for reducing persistent contrail formation in the United States airspace. The primary objective is to minimize potential contrail formation regions by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude in a fuel-efficient way. The results show that the contrail formations can be reduced significantly without extra fuel consumption and without adversely affecting congestion in the airspace. The contrail formations can be further reduced by using extra fuel. For the day tested, the maximal reduction strategy has a 53% contrail reduction rate. The most fuel-efficient strategy has an 8% reduction rate with 2.86% less fuel-burnt compared to the maximal reduction strategy. Using a cost function which penalizes extra fuel consumed while maximizing the amount of contrail reduction provides a flexible way to trade off between contrail reduction and fuel consumption. It can achieve a 35% contrail reduction rate with only 0.23% extra fuel consumption. The proposed fuel-efficient contrail reduction strategy provides a solution to reduce aviation-induced environmental impact on a daily basis.

  13. Increasing importance of deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Schichtel, Bret A; Walker, John T; Schwede, Donna B; Chen, Xi; Lehmann, Christopher M B; Puchalski, Melissa A; Gay, David A; Collett, Jeffrey L

    2016-05-24

    Rapid development of agriculture and fossil fuel combustion greatly increased US reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere in the second half of the 20th century, resulting in excess nitrogen deposition to natural ecosystems. Recent efforts to lower nitrogen oxides emissions have substantially decreased nitrate wet deposition. Levels of wet ammonium deposition, by contrast, have increased in many regions. Together these changes have altered the balance between oxidized and reduced nitrogen deposition. Across most of the United States, wet deposition has transitioned from being nitrate-dominated in the 1980s to ammonium-dominated in recent years. Ammonia has historically not been routinely measured because there are no specific regulatory requirements for its measurement. Recent expansion in ammonia observations, however, along with ongoing measurements of nitric acid and fine particle ammonium and nitrate, permit new insight into the balance of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the total (wet + dry) US nitrogen deposition budget. Observations from 37 sites reveal that reduced nitrogen contributes, on average, ∼65% of the total inorganic nitrogen deposition budget. Dry deposition of ammonia plays an especially key role in nitrogen deposition, contributing from 19% to 65% in different regions. Future progress toward reducing US nitrogen deposition will be increasingly difficult without a reduction in ammonia emissions.

  14. Coupled Physical/Chemical and Biofiltration Technologies to Reduce Air Emissions from Forest Products Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. McGinnis

    2001-12-31

    The research is a laboratory and bench-scale investigation of a system to concentrate and destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including hazardous air pollutants, formed from the drying of wood and the manufacture of wood board products (e.g., particle board and oriented strandboard). The approach that was investigated involved concentrating the dilute VOCs (<500 ppmv) with a physical/chemical adsorption unit, followed by the treatment of the concentrated voc stream (2,000 to 2,500 ppmv) with a biofiltration unit. The research program lasted three years, and involved three research organizations. Michigan Technological University was the primary recipient of the financial assistance, the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and Mississippi State University (MSU) were subcontractors to MTU. The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a pilot-scale demonstration of the technology with sufficient data to provide for the design of an industrial system. No commercialization activities were included in this project.

  15. Examination of ethical dilemmas experienced by adult intensive care unit nurses in physical restraint practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yönt, Gülendam Hakverdioğlu; Korhan, Esra Akin; Dizer, Berna; Gümüş, Fatma; Koyuncu, Rukiye

    2014-01-01

    Nurses are more likely to face the dilemma of whether to resort to physical restraints or not and have a hard time making that decision. This is a descriptive study. A total of 55 nurses participated in the research. For data collection, a question form developed by researchers to determine perceptions of ethical dilemmas by nurses in the application of physical restraint was used. A descriptive analysis was made by calculating the mean, standard deviation, and maximum and minimum values. The nurses expressed (36.4%) having difficulty in deciding to use physical restraint. Nurses reported that they experience ethical dilemmas mainly in relation to the ethic principles of nonmaleficence, beneficence, and convenience. We have concluded that majority of nurses working in critical care units apply physical restraint to patients, although they are facing ethical dilemmas concerning harm and benefit principles during the application.

  16. Impact of a hybrid TGfU-Sport Education unit on student motivation in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Arias, Alexander; Harvey, Stephen; Cárceles, Adrián; Práxedes, Alba; Del Villar, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) and Sport Education (SE) pedagogical models share several objectives and pedagogical processes. Despite this seemingly uncanny relationship, few studies have examined the efficacy of a hybrid TGfU/SE pedagogical model, particularly how a teacher's utilization of such a model impacts on student motivation. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect a hybrid TGfU/SE unit, in comparison to direct instruction, on students' perceptions of various aspects of their motivation to engage in physical education (autonomous motivation, basic psychological needs, enjoyment and intention to be physically active). A crossover design was utilized, using the technique of counterbalancing. One group experienced a hybrid SE/TGfU unit first, followed by a unit of direct instruction. A second group experienced the units in the opposite order. Participants were 55 students. The intervention was conducted over a total of 16 lessons. The hybrid unit was designed according to the characteristics of SE by using seasons, roles, persistent teams, etc. Learning tasks set by the teacher during individual lessons, however, were designed according to the pedagogical principles of TGfU. Student motivation data was generated using validated questionnaires. Results showed that regardless of the order of intervention, the two groups showed significant improvements in autonomy, competence and enjoyment when they were taught using the hybrid model. Instead, in the variables autonomous motivation, relatedness and intention to be physically active there were no significant improvements in one group. These results demonstrate that it is possible to design varied learning situations in which affiliation, leadership and trust are fostered, while tasks are adapted to the characteristics of the students. All this can cause greater autonomous motivation, and consequently, perceived competence in the student, a positive image of the sport to

  17. EDUCATION PACKAGE REDUCE PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL COMPLAINT IN CERVICAL CANCER PATIENT WITH CHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Triharini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Patient with cervix cancer who receives chemotherapy experience problems in physical or psychological. Physical complaints such as nausea, vomiting and fatigue. Psychological responses such as anxiety and depression can be reduced by providing education about the care package for themselves at home. The education package at the gynecology ward RSU Dr. Soetomo Surabaya has been developed which contains about nutrition, activity, psychological aspects and progressive muscle relaxation exercise. The objective of this study explore the relationship of the educational package with physical and psychological complaints of cervical cancer patients with chemotherapy. Method :  This research use cross-sectional design. The sampling technique used total population. The sample was taken from those suitable with  inclusion criteria, with the total sample 25 patients. Data were collected by using a questionnaire. Data analysis using the T test and chi-squere. Result : Results showed that there are differences level of nausea, vomiting, fatigue and the entry psychological response to the respondents before and after intervention (p<0.05. The results showed that there is relationship between age with anxiety (p=0,032, relationship between the status of work with fatigue (p=0,003 and relationship between the frequency of chemotherapy with fatigue (p=0,015. Analysis : It can be concluded that education package can reduce physical and psychological complaint in serviks cancer patient with chemoteraphy. Discussion : Implications the results of this research is the educational package can be developed as part of the nursing care of cervical cancer patients with chemotherapy to reduce physical and psychological complaints.

  18. Efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity' on reducing sickness absence among health care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Nygaard; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2015-01-01

    capacity measures. RESULTS: A TPA intervention was not significantly more effective than REF in reducing sickness absence caused by musculoskeletal troubles. However, there were significant improvements for TPA participants compared to REF in reducing pain intensity from 47.9 mm to 21.8 mm (p ... intervention is a promising initiative for health care workers since participants achieved a substantial effect on their experience of pain, on their work ability and on their fear of physical movement relating to pain. Moreover, a difference in aerobic capacity was apparent between the sample groups. TPA...

  19. A Reduced Basis Framework: Application to large scale non-linear multi-physics problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daversin C.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present applications of the reduced basis method (RBM to large-scale non-linear multi-physics problems. We first describe the mathematical framework in place and in particular the Empirical Interpolation Method (EIM to recover an affine decomposition and then we propose an implementation using the open-source library Feel++ which provides both the reduced basis and finite element layers. Large scale numerical examples are shown and are connected to real industrial applications arising from the High Field Resistive Magnets development at the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses.

  20. Lactobacilli require physical contact to reduce staphylococcal TSST-1 secretion and vaginal epithelial inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-06-01

    ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureusbiofilms can be found on vaginal epithelia, secreting toxins and causing inflammation. The co-vaginal species ITALIC! Lactobacilluscan alter staphylococcal-induced epithelial secretion of inflammatory cytokines and quench staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion. It is hypothesized that these effects of lactobacilli require direct physical contact between lactobacilli, staphylococci and the epithelium. Indeed, lactobacilli only reduced ITALIC! S. aureus-induced inflammatory cytokine expression when allowed physical contact with vaginal epithelial cells. Furthermore, a reduction in toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion only occurred when a probiotic ITALIC! Lactobacillusstrain was allowed contact, but not when being physically separated from ITALIC! S. aureus Bacterial-probe atomic force microscopy demonstrated that lactobacilli and staphylococci strongly adhere to epithelial cells, while lactobacilli adhere stronger to staphylococci than staphylococci to each other, giving lactobacilli opportunity to penetrate and reside in staphylococcal biofilms, as visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy with fluorescence ITALIC! in situhybridization probes. These results identify that physical contact and biochemical signaling by lactobacilli are intrinsically linked mechanisms that reduce virulence of ITALIC! S. aureusbiofilm.

  1. Utilizing Mushrooms to Reduce Overall Sodium in Taco Filling Using Physical and Sensory Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kristin M; Decker, Eric A; Autio, Wesley R; Toong, Ken; DiStefano, Garett; Kinchla, Amanda J

    2017-08-30

    This project investigated the use of integrating mushrooms into beef taco filling as a means to reduce overall sodium for food service applications. Initial product development used physical characterization analysis (moisture, yield, color, and texture) to determine initial threshold of mushroom inclusion with minimal differences against an all-meat control. Increasing mushroom inclusion increased moisture and yield before draining but decreased yield after draining, lightness, redness, and texture. Results showed that inclusion under 50% by weight minimized physical attribute deviation from an all-meat control. Additional physical analysis investigated a variety of other factors (mushroom type, blanching, and particle size) to determine if other attributing mushroom characteristics would yield statistical similarity to the all-meat control. Results showed that a formulation containing up to 45% mushrooms can be integrated into beef fillings using un-blanched, white button mushrooms with small grind (1 to 5 mm), which maximized mushroom usage while minimizing differences from the all-meat control. Additional sodium analysis showed that varying salt level in formulations did not affect physical characteristics and mushroom inclusion could not significantly reduce overall sodium level. Optimized mushroom samples were then fielded in a hedonic sensory study to untrained consumers to evaluate product liking attributes (overall liking, aroma, color, flavor, juiciness, saltiness, and texture). Samples with overall liking scores that closely matched the control were then fielded in a paired-preference test to determine acceptance. Consumers preferred a 45% mushroom with reduced sodium taco filling compared to its full sodium counterpart in a food service fielded paired-preference sensory test. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. A Physical Unit for Value - Econophysics as Arbiter between Finance and Economics

    CERN Document Server

    Defilla, S

    2006-01-01

    Finance and accounting often ignore money illusion, whereas economics treats it by using consumer baskets for making multilateral purchasing power comparisons between currencies. Such baskets are variable socio-economic phenomena and their use as numeraire (= value or real price unit) creates inconsistency as it confuses a measurement unit with a measurement result. Econophysics could do better and define a physical value unit in the Standard International (SI = metric) format based upon the exergetic (= objective) value of Planck Energy (1956.1 MJ). Planck units form a natural system of units that is independent of culture or civilization. We define a new value unit named walras (Wal) in h. of the economist L. Walras. By chance, one Wal is equal to the annual real cost of physiological energy consumption of the Sleeping Beauty, i.e. of a reference person at minimal activity. This corresponds to the annual minimum real cost of life. This pilot research uses official disaggregated Swiss Producer and Consumer P...

  3. Comments on redefinition of SI units based on fundamental physical constants with fixed values

    CERN Document Server

    Khruschov, V V

    2011-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of fixation of fundamental physical constants' values for definition of SI units are considered. The case with a new definition of the mass unit on the base of a fixed value of the Avogadro constant is studied in detail. Criteria on choosing of a optimum FPC set with fixed values for the redefinition of the SI units are suggested. The minimal optimum FPC set that is consistent with the criteria is presented. The set comprises the speed of light, the constant of the ground state hyperfine transition of the caesium-133 atom, the Avogadro constant, the mass of the carbon-12 atom and the absolute magnitude of the electron charge. Comment on the redefinition of the kelvin is also made.

  4. Reducing gender differences in performance in introductory college physics through values affirmation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost-Smith, Lauren

    2011-04-01

    Despite males and females being equally represented at the college level in several STEM disciplines (including biology, chemistry and mathematics), females continue to be under-represented in physics. Our research documents and addresses this participation gender gap in the introductory, calculus-based physics courses at the University of Colorado. We characterize gender differences in performance, psychological factors (including attitudes and beliefs) and retention that exist in Physics 1 and 2 [L. E. Kost, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 5, 010101 (2009); L. E. Kost-Smith, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 6, 020112 (2010)]. We find that the gender differences in performance can largely be accounted for by measurable differences in the physics and mathematics backgrounds and incoming attitudes and beliefs of males and females. But these background factors do not completely account for the gender gaps. We hypothesize, based on gender differences in responses to survey questions about students' sense of physics identity and confidence levels, that identity threat (the fear of confirming a negative characterization about one's identity) is playing a role in our courses. Working with researchers in psychology, we implemented an intervention where students either wrote about their most important values or not, twice at the beginning of the course [A. Miyake, et al., Science, 330, 1234 (2010)]. This ``values affirmation'' activity reduced the male-female performance difference substantially and elevated women's modal grades from the C to B range. Benefits were strongest for women who tended to endorse the stereotype that men do better than women in physics. This brief psychological intervention may be a promising way to address the gender gap in science performance.

  5. Do school-based physical activity interventions increase or reduce inequalities in health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ploeg, Kerry A; Maximova, Katerina; McGavock, Jonathan; Davis, Wendy; Veugelers, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of school-based health promotion on physical activity inequalities among children from low-income areas. This study compared the two-year change in physical activity among 10-11 year-old children attending schools with and without health promotion programs by activity level, body weight status, and socioeconomic backgrounds to assess whether health promotion programs reduce or exacerbate health inequalities. This was a quasi-experimental trial of a Comprehensive School Health (CSH) program implemented in schools located in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. In the spring of 2009 and 2011, pedometer (7 full days) and demographic data were collected from cross-sectional samples of grade five children from 10 intervention and 20 comparison schools. Socioeconomic status was determined from parent self-report. Low-active, active, and high-active children were defined according to step-count tertiles. Multilevel linear regression methods adjusted for potential confounders were used to assess the relative inequity in physical activity and were compared between groups and over-time. In 2009, a greater proportion of students in the intervention schools were overweight (38% vs. 31% p = 0.03) and were less active (10,827 vs. 12,265 steps/day p active students, from -13.4% to 0% among active students, and from -15.1% to -2.7% among high-active students. The relative difference between intervention and comparison schools reduced from -11.1% to -1.6% among normal weight students, from -16.8% to -1.4% among overweight students, and was balanced across socioeconomic subgroups. These findings demonstrate that CSH programs implemented in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods reduced inequalities in physical activity. Investments in school-based health promotion are a viable, promising, and important approach to improve physical activity and prevent childhood obesity, and may also

  6. Methods for reducing sepsis mortality in emergency departments and inpatient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Martin E; D'Angelo, John; Jacobsen, Diane; Jarrett, Mark P; Kabcenell, Andrea I; Masick, Kevin D; Parmentier, Darlene; Nelson, Karen L; Stier, Lori

    2015-05-01

    As part of a zero-tolerance approach to preventable deaths, North Shore-LIJ Health System (North Shore-LIJ) leadership prioritized a major patient safety initiative to reduce sepsis mortality in 2009 across 10 acute care hospitals (an 11th joined later). At baseline (2008), approximately 3,500 patients were discharged with a diagnosis of sepsis, which ranked as the top All Patient Refined Diagnosis-Related Group by number of deaths (N = 883). Initially, the focus was sepsis recognition and treatment in the emergency departments (EDs). North Shore-LIJ, the 14th largest health care system in the United States, cares for individuals at every stage of life at 19 acute care and specialty hospitals and more than 400 outpatient physician practice sites throughout New York City and the greater New York metropolitan area. The health system launched a strategic partnership with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) in August 2011 to accelerate the pace of sepsis improvement. Throughout the course of the initiative, North Shore-LIJ collaborated with many local, state, national, and international organizations to test innovative ideas, share evidence-based best practices, and, more recently, to raise public awareness. North Shore-LIJ reduced overall sepsis mortality by approximately 50% in a six-year period (2008-2013; sustained through 2014) and increased compliance with sepsis resuscitation bundle elements in the EDs and inpatient units in the 11 acute care hospitals. Improvements were achieved by engaging leadership; fostering interprofessional collaboration, collaborating with other leading health care organizations; and developing meaningful, real-time metrics for all levels of staff.

  7. Identifying, highlighting and reducing polypharmacy in a UK hospice inpatient unit using improvement Science methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phippen, Alison; Pickard, Jennie; Steinke, Douglas; Cope, Matt; Roberts, Dai

    2017-01-01

    Polypharmacy, the concurrent use of multiple medications by one individual is a growing global issue driven by an ageing population and increasing prevalence of multi-morbidity[1]. Polypharmacy can be problematic: interactions between medications, reduced adherence to medication, burden of medication to patients, administration time, increased risk of errors and increased cost. Quality improvement methods were applied to identify and highlight polypharmacy patients with the aim of reducing their average number of regular tablets/capsules per day by 25%. The project was delivered within a UK based 27 bedded hospice inpatient unit. A series of PDSA cycles studied interventions focusing on the identification of patients with polypharmacy, the highlighting of these patients to prescribers for review and the views of patients about their medication. For the purposes of the study, polypharmacy was defined as greater than ten regular medicines and/or greater than twenty regular tablets/capsules each day. The interventions tested included patients on regular paracetamol and strong opioids being offered a trial without regular paracetamol, a constipation guide promoting the use of combination laxatives, education of prescribers around dose strengths, checklist of recommendations was placed in case notes and a sticker was used on the medicine chart to highlight patients in need of polypharmacy review. The introduction of a trial without paracetamol and a laxative guide led to reductions in polypharmacy. The sticker and checklist were successful interventions for highlighting patients with polypharmacy. Quality improvement methods were used to plan, try, test and implement simple interventions for patients on the hospice inpatient unit. This has led to a 25% reduction in the average regular tablet/capsules burden , a 16% reduction in the average number of regular medications and a 30% reduction in the average volume of liquid medication per patient without an increase in the

  8. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases...

  9. [Physical restraint use in critical care units. Perceptions of patients and their families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Ciriza Amatriain, A I; Nicolás Olmedo, A; Goñi Viguria, R; Regaira Martínez, E; Margall Coscojuela, M A; Asiain Erro, M C

    2012-01-01

    The use of physical restraints in Intensive Care Units (ICU) is common although little is known about patients' and relatives' perceptions of this use. 1) To analyze the prevalence and use of physical restraints in a general adult ICU; 2) to know the perceptions of patients who experienced use of physical restraints and; 3) to know the perceptions of relatives of patients who used physical restraints. This descriptive study, which used both quantitative and qualitative methods, was carried out in an adult ICU. For the first objective, all the patients (101) who had used any kind of physical restraint were analysed. For the second and third objectives, 30 patients and 30 relatives were interviewed using the guidelines of Strumpf & Evans as modified by Hardin (1993). All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and then submitted to a language content analysis using the method of Hsieh & Shannon. The only physical restraint used was the wrist restraint with a prevalence of 43.47%. Seventy-two percent of patients wore the restraint ≤12h and 28%>12h. Analysis of the patient interviews revealed 4 main themes: acceptance of the restraint conditioned by beliefs and information provided; feelings and sensations caused by the use of the restraint; alternatives proposed and future repercussions. Three themes emerged from the interviews with relatives: impressions caused by the use of the restrictions; reasons for accepting or rejecting them; alternatives to the use of restraints. Most patients used physical restraints for a short period of time and only the wrist restraint was used. Patients using physical restraints and their relatives expressed a wide range of feelings and sensations, with no negative future repercussions. In general, they agreed with the use of restraints although more precise information would lead to greater acceptance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Human touch effectively and safely reduces pain in the newborn intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Carolyn J; Chiodo, Lisa M

    2014-03-01

    This was a feasibility pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of the nonpharmacologic pain management technique of gentle human touch (GHT) in reducing pain response to heel stick in premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Eleven premature infants ranging from 27 to 34 weeks' gestational age, in a level III NICU in a teaching hospital, were recruited and randomized to order of treatment in this repeated-measures crossover-design experiment. Containment with GHT during heel stick was compared with traditional nursery care (side lying and "nested" in an incubator). Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and cry were measured continuously beginning at baseline and continuing through heel warming, heel stick, and recovery following the heel stick. Infants who did not receive GHT had decreased respiration, increased heart rate, and increased cry time during the heel stick. In contrast, infants who received GHT did not have decreased respirations, elevated heart rates, or increased cry time during the heel stick. No significant differences were noted in oxygen saturation in either group. GHT is a simple nonpharmacologic therapy that can be used by nurses and families to reduce pain of heel stick in premature infants in the NICU.

  11. Reducing the decline in physical activity during pregnancy: a systematic review of behaviour change interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead Currie

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Physical activity (PA typically declines throughout pregnancy. Low levels of PA are associated with excessive weight gain and subsequently increase risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, hypertension disorders, delivery by caesarean section and stillbirth. Systematic reviews on PA during pregnancy have not explored the efficacy of behaviour change techniques or related theory in altering PA behaviour. This systematic review evaluated the content of PA interventions to reduce the decline of PA in pregnant women with a specific emphasis on the behaviour change techniques employed to elicit this change. SEARCH AND REVIEW METHODOLOGY: Literature searches were conducted in eight databases. Strict inclusion and exclusion criteria were employed. Two reviewers independently evaluated each intervention using the behaviour change techniques (BCT taxonomy to identify the specific behaviour change techniques employed. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias using the guidelines from the Cochrane Collaboration. Overall quality was determined using the GRADE approach. FINDINGS: A total of 1140 potentially eligible papers were identified from which 14 studies were selected for inclusion. Interventions included counselling (n = 6, structured exercise (n = 6 and education (n = 2. Common behaviour change techniques employed in these studies were goal setting and planning, feedback, repetition and substitution, shaping knowledge and comparison of behaviours. Regular face-to-face meetings were also commonly employed. PA change over time in intervention groups ranged from increases of 28% to decreases of 25%. In 8 out of 10 studies, which provided adequate data, participants in the intervention group were more physically active post intervention than controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Physical activity interventions incorporating behaviour change techniques help reduce the decline in PA throughout pregnancy

  12. A physical function test for use in the intensive care unit: validity, responsiveness, and predictive utility of the physical function ICU test (scored).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Linda; de Morton, Natalie A; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Edbrooke, Lara; Haines, Kimberley; Warrillow, Stephen; Berney, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Several tests have recently been developed to measure changes in patient strength and functional outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU). The original Physical Function ICU Test (PFIT) demonstrates reliability and sensitivity. The aims of this study were to further develop the original PFIT, to derive an interval score (the PFIT-s), and to test the clinimetric properties of the PFIT-s. A nested cohort study was conducted. One hundred forty-four and 116 participants performed the PFIT at ICU admission and discharge, respectively. Original test components were modified using principal component analysis. Rasch analysis examined the unidimensionality of the PFIT, and an interval score was derived. Correlations tested validity, and multiple regression analyses investigated predictive ability. Responsiveness was assessed using the effect size index (ESI), and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was calculated. The shoulder lift component was removed. Unidimensionality of combined admission and discharge PFIT-s scores was confirmed. The PFIT-s displayed moderate convergent validity with the Timed "Up & Go" Test (r=-.60), the Six-Minute Walk Test (r=.41), and the Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score (rho=.49). The ESI of the PFIT-s was 0.82, and the MCID was 1.5 points (interval scale range=0-10). A higher admission PFIT-s score was predictive of: an MRC score of ≥48, increased likelihood of discharge home, reduced likelihood of discharge to inpatient rehabilitation, and reduced acute care hospital length of stay. Scoring of sit-to-stand assistance required is subjective, and cadence cutpoints used may not be generalizable. The PFIT-s is a safe and inexpensive test of physical function with high clinical utility. It is valid, responsive to change, and predictive of key outcomes. It is recommended that the PFIT-s be adopted to test physical function in the ICU.

  13. Using real time process measurements to reduce catheter related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, R; Ely, E; Elasy, T; Dittus, R; Foss, J; Wilkerson, K; Speroff, T

    2005-01-01

    

Problem: Measuring a process of care in real time is essential for continuous quality improvement (CQI). Our inability to measure the process of central venous catheter (CVC) care in real time prevented CQI efforts aimed at reducing catheter related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) from these devices. Design: A system was developed for measuring the process of CVC care in real time. We used these new process measurements to continuously monitor the system, guide CQI activities, and deliver performance feedback to providers. Setting: Adult medical intensive care unit (MICU). Key measures for improvement: Measured process of CVC care in real time; CR-BSI rate and time between CR-BSI events; and performance feedback to staff. Strategies for change: An interdisciplinary team developed a standardized, user friendly nursing checklist for CVC insertion. Infection control practitioners scanned the completed checklists into a computerized database, thereby generating real time measurements for the process of CVC insertion. Armed with these new process measurements, the team optimized the impact of a multifaceted intervention aimed at reducing CR-BSIs. Effects of change: The new checklist immediately provided real time measurements for the process of CVC insertion. These process measures allowed the team to directly monitor adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Through continuous process measurement, the team successfully overcame barriers to change, reduced the CR-BSI rate, and improved patient safety. Two years after the introduction of the checklist the CR-BSI rate remained at a historic low. Lessons learnt: Measuring the process of CVC care in real time is feasible in the ICU. When trying to improve care, real time process measurements are an excellent tool for overcoming barriers to change and enhancing the sustainability of efforts. To continually improve patient safety, healthcare organizations should continually measure their key clinical processes in real

  14. Pompe disease is a differential diagnosis in case of reduced physical capacity and abnormal muscular fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Julie Schjødtz; Ellingsen, Anne R; Andreasen, Caroline M

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Pompe disease is an inherited metabolic myopathy with low activity of alpha glucosidase and variable clinical symptoms. In this case report we describe a woman with long standing muscular fatigue and malaise with the diagnosis initially established by pathologic findings in the muscle...... biopsy. Enzyme replacement therapy is now a treatment option, and a prompt diagnosis is therefore relevant. This disease should be considered in patients with unexplained fatigue and reduced physical capacity, especially in case of concurrent elevated levels of creatine kinase and liver enzymes....

  15. United States Physical Therapists' Knowledge About Joint Hypermobility Syndrome Compared with Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russek, Leslie N; LaShomb, Emily A; Ware, Amy M; Wesner, Sarah M; Westcott, Vanessa

    2016-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is one of the most common inherited connective tissue disorders. It causes significant pain and disability for all age groups, ranging from developmental delay among children to widespread chronic pain in adults. Experts in JHS assert that the condition is under-recognized and poorly managed. The aim of this study was to assess US physical therapists' knowledge about JHS compared with other causes of widespread pain and activity limitations: fibromyalgia, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and adult rheumatoid arthritis. Cross-sectional, Internet-based survey of randomly selected members of the American Physical Therapy Association and descriptive statistics were used to explore physical therapists' knowledge about JHS, fibromyalgia, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and adult rheumatoid arthritis, and chi square was used to compare knowledge about the different conditions. The response rate was 15.5% (496). Although 36% recognized the Beighton Scale for assessing joint hypermobility, only 26.8% of respondents were familiar with the Brighton Criteria for diagnosing JHS. Few respondents (11-19%) realized that JHS has extra-articular features such as anxiety disorder, fatigue, headache, delayed motor development, easy bruising and sleep disturbance. Physical therapists working in environments most likely to see patients with JHS underestimated the likely prevalence in their patient population. The results suggest that many physical therapists in the United States are not familiar with the diagnostic criteria, prevalence or common clinical presentation of JHS. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Contemporary Issues of Social Justice: A Focus on Race and Physical Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Louis; Clark, Langston

    2016-09-01

    Ongoing events in the United States show the continual need to address issues of social justice in every social context. Of particular note in this article, the contemporary national focus on race has thrust social justice issues into the forefront of the country's conscious. Although legal segregation has ran its course, schools and many neighborhoods remain, to a large degree, culturally, ethnically, linguistically, economically, and racially segregated and unequal (Orfield & Lee, 2005). Even though an African American president presently occupies the White House, the idea of a postracial America remains an unrealized ideal. Though social justice and racial discussions are firmly entrenched in educational research, investigations that focus on race are scant in physical education literature. Here, we attempt to develop an understanding of social justice in physical education with a focus on racial concerns. We purposely confine the examination to the U.S. context to avoid the dilution of the importance of these issues, while recognizing other international landscapes may differ significantly. To accomplish this goal, we hope to explicate the undergirding theoretical tenants of critical race theory and culturally relevant pedagogy in relation to social justice in physical education. Finally, we make observations of social justice in the physical education and physical education teacher education realms to address and illuminate areas of concern.

  17. A ten-year experience of physical Intimate partner violence (IPV) in a French forensic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall, Frédéric; Lechevalier, Agathe; Hérin, Fabrice; Vergnault, Marion; Telmon, Norbert; Bartoli, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    Forensic units have a central role to play in healthy public policy, by the collection and management of violence. This study aims to describe the characteristics of physical Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) against men reported over 10 years in the forensic unit of Toulouse (France) and to compare them with the characteristics of physical IPV against women over the same period. All the medico-legal reports of male victims over 18 years of age between 2005 and 2014 were analyzed. Female victims over 18 years of age in the same period were randomized by year in order to study a similar number of individuals. We analyzed 712 forensic reports of male victims and 865 forensic reports of female victims. Repeated consultation concerned 20.5% of women and 7.5% of men (p origin of the process of violence are difficult to apprehend in such a dyadic context. The findings should be interpreted with caution, but they provide original and substantial material, which can be useful in recognizing victims and in developing preventive strategies. With this aim, forensic units have a central role to play in the collection of violence and in individualized management. In France, this subject has not been extensively studied and future research is needed to emphasize the characteristics of IPV in order to better understand the phenomenon and to create and assess public policies in order to prevent it.

  18. Physical fitness and nutritional status of polish ground force unit recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, A; Bertrandt, J; Kłos, A

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the work was to conduct an examination of the physical fitness and nutritional status of recruits (221 men beginning military service in the infantry unit). Soldiers' physical efficiency was estimated using 4 tests: standing long jump, pull-ups on bar, 30-second sit-ups and 1000-metre run. The nutritional status assessment was done based on anthropometric measurements including measurements of body height, body mass and selected skin fold thickness. The study group of soldiers were the best at sit-ups (46.33 points). They got over 40 points for the 1000-metre run (43.68 points) and for pull-ups on bar (41.69 points). They obtained the lowest scores for standing long jumps (30.77 points). About 14% of recruits were overweight and 4.1% underweight. Recruits enrolling in the infantry unit present a low physical fitness level. Overweight and obesity occurrence, and particularly underweight, in recruits testify to improper nutrition before beginning military service.

  19. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA, using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA’s influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence—influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being.

  20. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-08-17

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA's influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence-influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being.

  1. New Study Shows Flu Vaccine Reduced Children's Risk of Intensive Care Unit Flu Admission by Three-Fourths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Image Library (PHIL) New Study Shows Flu Vaccine Reduced Children’s Risk of Intensive Care Unit Flu Admission by ... Media Relations (404) 639-3286 Getting a flu vaccine reduces a child's risk of flu-related intensive care hospitalization by ...

  2. Enhancing physical activity and reducing obesity through smartcare and financial incentives: A pilot randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Shin, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Hyuktae; Min, Hye Yeon; Joh, Hee-Kyung; Chung, Won Joo; Park, Jin Ho; Jung, Kee-Taig; Cho, BeLong

    2017-02-01

    A pilot randomized trial assessed the feasibility and effectiveness of an intervention combining Smartcare (activity tracker with a smartphone application) and financial incentives. A three-arm, open-label randomized controlled trial design involving traditional education, Smartcare, and Smartcare with financial incentives was involved in this study. The latter group received financial incentives depending on the achievement of daily physical activity goals (process incentive) and weight loss targets (outcome incentive). Male university students (N = 105) with body mass index of ≥27 were enrolled. The average weight loss in the traditional education, Smartcare, and Smartcare with financial incentives groups was -0.4, -1.1, and -3.1 kg, respectively, with significantly greater weight loss in the third group (both Ps incentives groups (odds ratio for the Smartcare with financial incentive vs. Smartcare = 7.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.45-36.47). Levels of physical activity were significantly higher in this group. The addition of financial incentives to Smartcare was effective in increasing physical activity and reducing obesity. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  3. Reduced cerebellar gray matter is a neural signature of physical frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Liu, Li-Kuo; Lee, Pei-Lin; Lee, Wei-Ju; Chen, Liang-Kung; Wang, Pei-Ning; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-09-01

    Physical frailty has been recognized as a clinical syndrome resulting from declines in various physiological systems; however, the role of the central nervous system in the pathophysiology of frailty remains unclear. The I-Lan Longitudinal Aging Study randomly sampled community-dwelling people aged 50 or older for a brain magnetic resonance imaging study. All participants were assessed for frailty status (robust, prefrail, and frail) based on the presence of five frailty components: slow walking speed, muscle weakness, low physical activity, exhaustion and weight loss (Fried criteria). Gray matter volume (GMV) changes associated with frailty status and individual frailty components were examined. Overall, 456 participants (64.0 ± 8.5 years, 47.6% women) were included in this study. The prefrail (n = 178, 39.0%) and frail (n = 19, 4.2%) subjects were grouped for analysis. The prefrail-frail group showed reduced GMV, compared to the robust group (n = 259, 56.8%), in the cerebellum, hippocampi, middle frontal gyri, and several other cerebral regions (corrected P physical frailty is associated with a decreased reserve in specific brain regions, especially cerebellum. Further longitudinal studies are needed to explore if the cerebellum- and noncerebellum-based frailty components reflect a distinctive future risk for developing frailty. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Physical Plant Design and Engineering Controls to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Conly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the environment as a reservoir for microorganisms implicated in disease transmission in the hospital setting has been increasingly recognized, especially with respect to dialysis units, ventilation in specialized areas, and the proper use of disinfectants (1. Inherent within the environmental setting is the importance of physical plant design. Several studies have underscored the importance of optimizing design standards to maximize patient and health care worker (HCW safety, including the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in patients (2-6. Ulrich et al (7 recently completed an evidence-based review, entitled 'The role of the physical environment in the hospital of the 21st century: A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity', for the Center for Health Design in California (USA, which was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Ulrich and colleagues identified over 600 studies that examined the hospital environment and its effects on staff effectiveness, patient safety, patient and family stress, quality and costs. They suggested that one of the important elements in improving patient safety is the reduction of the risk of hospital-acquired infections through improved facility design.

  5. [Nursing interventions on the physical environment of Neonatal Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel Capó Rn, I

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyse nursing interventions regarding noise and lighting that influence neurodevelopment of the preterm infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A review of the literature was performed using the databases: Cuiden Plus, PubMed, IBECS and Cochrane Library Plus. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were established in accordance with the objectives and limits used in each database. Of the 35 articles used, most were descriptive quantitative studies based on the measurement of sound pressure levels and lighting in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The countries included in this study are Brazil and the United States, and the variables analysed were the recording the times of light and noise. Based on the high levels of light and noise recorded in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units, nursing interventions that should be carried out to reduce them are described. The evidence indicates that after the implementation of these interventions, the high levels of both environmental stimuli are reduced significantly. Despite the extensive literature published on this problem, the levels of light and noise continue to exceed the recommended limits. Therefore, nurses need to increase and enhance their efforts in this environment, in order to positively influence neurodevelopment of premature newborn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of physical exercise to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in youths: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesa, Claudia Ciceri; Barbiero, Sandra Mari; Petkowicz, Rosemary de Oliveira; Martins, Carla Correa; Marques, Renata das Virgens; Andreolla, Allana Abreu Martins; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to test the effectiveness of a physical activity and exercise-based program in a clinical context to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents. A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a pediatric preventive outpatient clinic. Intervention was 14 weeks of exercise for the intervention group or general health advice for the control group. The primary and the secondary outcomes were reduction of cardiovascular risk factors and the feasibility and the effectiveness of clinical advice plan to practice physical exercises at home. A total of 134 children were screened; 26 met eligibility criteria. Of these, 10 were allocated in the exercise intervention group and nine were included in the control group until the end of the intervention. Those patients who discontinued the intervention had the lowest scores of z-BMI (P = 0.033) and subscapular skin fold (P = 0.048). After 14 weeks of intervention, no statistical differences were found between the groups. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was higher in the exercise group, with a mild tendency to be significant (P = 0.066). Patients who adhere to treatment had diastolic blood pressure decreased from baseline to the end of the follow-up period in the control group (P = 0.013). Regardless of this result, the other comparisons within the group were not statistically different between T0 and T14. A low-cost physical activity advice intervention presented many barriers for implementation in routine clinical care, limiting its feasibility and evaluation of effectiveness to reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  7. Quantifying and Reducing Uncertainties in Estimating OMI Tropospheric Column NO2 Trend over The United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, C. D.; Wang, Y.; Boersma, F.; Celarier, E. A.; Bucsela, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the effects of retrieval radiation schemes and parameters on trend analysis using tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column density (VCD) measurements over the United States. Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observations from 2005 through 2012 are used in this analysis. We investigated two radiation schemes, provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA TOMRAD) and Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut (KNMI DAK). In addition, we analyzed trend dependence on radiation parameters, including surface albedo and viewing geometry. The cross-track mean VCD average difference is 10-15% between the two radiation schemes in 2005. As the OMI anomaly developed and progressively worsens, the difference between the two schemes becomes larger. Furthermore, applying surface albedo measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) leads to increases of estimated NO2 VCD trends over high-emission regions. We find that the uncertainties of OMI-derived NO2 VCD trends can be reduced by up to a factor of 3 by selecting OMI cross-track rows on the basis of their performance over the ocean [see abstract figure]. Comparison of OMI tropospheric VCD trends to those estimated based on the EPA surface NO2 observations indicate using MODIS surface albedo data and a more narrow selection of OMI cross-track rows greatly improves the agreement of estimated trends between satellite and surface data. This figure shows the reduction of uncertainty in OMI NO2 trend by selecting OMI cross-track rows based on the performance over the ocean. With this technique, uncertainties within the seasonal trend may be reduced by a factor of 3 or more (blue) compared with only removing the anomalous rows: considering OMI cross-track rows 4-24 (red).

  8. Using Graphics Processing Units to solve the classical N-body problem in physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Spera, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) can speed up the numerical solution of various problems in astrophysics including the dynamical evolution of stellar systems; the performance gain can be more than a factor 100 compared to using a Central Processing Unit only. In this work I describe some strategies to speed up the classical N-body problem using GPUs. I show some features of the N-body code HiGPUs as template code. In this context, I also give some hints on the parallel implementation of a regularization method and I introduce the code HiGPUs-R. Although the main application of this work concerns astrophysics, some of the presented techniques are of general validity and can be applied to other branches of physics such as electrodynamics and QCD.

  9. Physical fitness and anthropometric characteristics in professional soccer players of the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Magalhães Sales

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The anthropometric profile of soccer players that act in the United Arab Emirates is similar to others around the world. However, regarding the physical fitness, results are still inconclusive, since findings from other studies suggest that the anaerobic power of our sample is alike or lower than other elite players throughout the world. Likewise indirect VO2max, especially given the acknowledged limitations of obtaining indirectly this variable. In addition, making an analysis by playing position, the results of this study are similar to previous research.

  10. A novel algorithm for reducing false arrhythmia alarms in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Chandan; Sharma, Sonal; Jalali, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Alarm fatigue in intensive care units (ICU) is one of the top healthcare issues in the US. False alarms in ICU will decrease the quality of care and staff response time over the alarms. Normally, false alarm will cause desensitization of the clinical staff which leads to warnings and misleading, if the triggered alarm is true. In this study, we have proposed a multi-model ensemble approach to reduce the false alarm rate in monitoring systems. We have used 750 patient records from PhysioNet database. At First arrhythmia based features from electrocardiogram (ECG), arterial blood pressure (ABP) and photoplethysmogram (PPG) features were extracted from the records. Next, the dataset has been separated into two subsets on the basis of available features information. The first dataset (DS1) is the combination of ECG physiological, ABP and PPG features. Their correlation coefficient and p-values criteria have been applied for relevant alarm-wise feature-set selection, and random forest classifier was used for model development and validation. The threshold based approach was used on second dataset (DS2) which is the combination of arrhythmia, ABP and PPG features. The developed ensemble model is able to achieve sensitivity 83.33-100 % (average 95.56 %) being true alarms and suppress false alarms rate 66.67-89% (average 77.25%). The predictability of classifier shows the advantage to deal with unbalanced set of information, therefore overall model performance has reached to 83.96% accuracy.

  11. BESIII Physics Data Storing and Processing on HBase and MapReduce

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEI, Xiaofeng; Li, Qiang; Kan, Bowen; Sun, Gongxing; Sun, Zhenyu

    2015-12-01

    In the past years, we have successfully applied Hadoop to high-energy physics analysis. Although, it has not only improved the efficiency of data analysis, but also reduced the cost of cluster building so far, there are still some spaces to be optimized, like inflexible pre-selection, low-efficient random data reading and I/O bottleneck caused by Fuse that is used to access HDFS. In order to change this situation, this paper presents a new analysis platform for high-energy physics data storing and analysing. The data structure is changed from DST tree-like files to HBase according to the features of the data itself and analysis processes, since HBase is more suitable for processing random data reading than DST files and enable HDFS to be accessed directly. A few of optimization measures are taken for the purpose of getting a good performance. A customized protocol is defined for data serializing and desterilizing for the sake of decreasing the storage space in HBase. In order to make full use of locality of data storing in HBase, utilizing a new MapReduce model and a new split policy for HBase regions are proposed in the paper. In addition, a dynamic pluggable easy-to-use TAG (event metadata) based pre-selection subsystem is established. It can assist physicists even to filter out 999%o uninterested data, if the conditions are set properly. This means that a lot of I/O resources can be saved, the CPU usage can be improved and consuming time for data analysis can be reduced. Finally, several use cases are designed, the test results show that the new platform has an excellent performance with 3.4 times faster with pre-selection and 20% faster without preselection, and the new platform is stable and scalable as well.

  12. Physical Aggression and Mindfulness among College Students: Evidence from China and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The link between trait mindfulness and several dimensions of aggression (verbal, anger and hostility has been documented, while the link between physical aggression and trait mindfulness remains less clear. Method: We used two datasets: one United States sample from 300 freshmen males from Clemson University, South Carolina and a Chinese sample of 1516 freshmen students from Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. Multiple regressions were conducted to examine the association between mindfulness (measured by Mindful Attention and Awareness Scale (MAAS and each of the four subscales of aggression. Results: Among the Clemson sample (N = 286, the mindfulness scale had a significant negative association with each of the four subscales of aggression: Hostility: β = −0.62, p < 0.001; Verbal: β = −0.37, p < 0.001; Physical: β = −0.29, p < 0.001; Anger: β = −0.44, p < 0.001. Among the Shanghai male subsample, the mindfulness scale had a significant negative association with each of the four subscales of aggression: Hostility: β = −0.57, p < 0.001; Verbal: β = −0.37, p < 0.001; Physical: β = −0.35, p < 0.001; Anger: β = −0.58, p < 0.001. Among the Shanghai female subsample (N = 512, the mindfulness scale had a significant negative association with each of the four subscales of aggression: Hostility: β = −0.62, p < 0.001; Verbal: β = −0.41, p < 0.001; Physical: β = −0.52, p < 0.001; and Anger: β = −0.64, p < 0.001. Discussion: Our study documents the negative association between mindfulness and physical aggression in two non-clinical samples. Future studies could explore whether mindfulness training lowers physical aggression among younger adults.

  13. Improving reducibility of iron ore pellets by optimization of physical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal J.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reducibility of iron bearing material is an important property which represents its suitability of reduction in iron making furnaces. It has direct influence on improving productivity and lowering energy consumption in iron making process. The reducibility of iron ore pellets of a specific chemistry can be improved by the optimization of physical parameters such as induration temperature, improving size distribution of fines, improving apparent porosity etc. In this study, the reference pellet is prepared in a typical plant condition and the properties of the reference pellet are considered as base value to improve reducibility index (RI maintaining other properties at the acceptable limit without altering pellet chemistry. Optimization of induration temperature at the 1250-1275ºC shows around 74 % RI, which is 5 points more than the base value of 69.5 %. Furthermore, on optimizing additives size, such as limestone fines and anthracite coal fines at -350 mesh and induration temperature of 1250-1275ºC, RI is improved to 77 %, i.e., 8 points improvement is achieved with respect to the base value.

  14. Physical properties by geologic unit in the southern San Luis Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauch, V. J.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Physical properties of geologic units are important for geophysical interpretation because they provide the tie between lithology and geophysical fields. For gravity data, the applicable physical property is bulk density, which is the overall mass per unit volume of rocks, sediments, and their pore spaces. Bulk dry density is the mass per unit volume measured when the sample is dry. Saturated density is the mass per unit volume measured when the sample is saturated with fresh water, which has a density of 1,000 kg/m^3. The two values are commonly compared in order to determine the porosity of a sample, that is, the percentage of the volume that is composed of open space. Density is commonly reported in kilograms per cubic meter in the International System of Units (SI). For magnetic data, the applicable physical property is total magnetization, which is determined by the quantity of naturally occurring magnetic minerals in rocks and sediments, and the nature of their permanent magnetizations. Total magnetization is the vector sum of two components: remanent and induced (Blakely, 1995; Hansen and others, 2005). The induced component is a function of the quantity of magnetic minerals (commonly magnetite) and is a vector that is always oriented parallel to the present-day Earth’s magnetic field. The quantity of magnetic minerals is proportional to magnetic susceptibility, a property that can be measured from hand samples or outcrops. Measurements using these instruments provide values of volume magnetic susceptibility as opposed to mass magnetic susceptibility, which is commonly obtained in the laboratory. Values of magnetic susceptibility represent a ratio, and so are unitless, but the system of units must be specified for the values to be useful. Data reported here are in International System of Units (SI). The remanent component represents the vector sum of all permanent magnetizations held by the magnetic minerals, which have fixed directions irrespective of the

  15. Knowledge, attitude and practice of intensive care unit nurses about physical restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Mohammad; Aloush, Sami; Al-Awamreh, Khitam

    2017-09-01

    Physical restraint is mainly used in intensive care units (ICUs) to prevent delirious or agitated patients from removing tubes and lines connected to them. However, inappropriate use of physical restraint could have many detrimental physical effects on the patient, such as nerve damage, asphyxiation or even death. The aim of the study is to investigate nurses' knowledge, attitude and practice of physical restraint in ICUs in Jordanian hospitals, about which little is known. A descriptive and cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 400 nurses working in three public hospitals and one university-affiliated hospital from different geographical regions in Jordan was selected. An Arabic version of the Physical Restraint Questionnaire (PRQ) was used to collect the data. A total of 300 completed questionnaires were returned, with a response rate of 75%. Of the total sample, 51% were males, 65.7% were from public hospitals and 80.3% held a bachelor's degree. The mean score in the knowledge section was 9.7 (SD =1.7) out of 15; in the attitude section, it was 24.7 (SD = 4.8) out of 33; and in the practice section, it was 30.9 (SD = 3.5) out of 42. Nurses who reported previous related education scored higher on the knowledge section (mean = 10.7; SD = 1.4) than nurses who reported no previous related education (mean = 9.1; SD = 1.6; p < .001). However, no significant differences between these categories were found in relation to attitude and practice. The study demonstrated some lack of knowledge and unsafe practices regarding physical restraint in ICUs in Jordan. It suggests improving nurses' knowledge, attitude and practices through in-service education on best practice for physical restraint, developing policies/guidelines and providing adequate staff and equipment to maintain patient safety and prevent complications. Conducting education programmes on physical restraint for ICU nurses and providing other preventive strategies

  16. Physically-Based Reduced Order Modelling of a Uni-Axial Polysilicon MEMS Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zerbini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mechanical response of a commercial off-the-shelf, uni-axial polysilicon MEMS accelerometer subject to drops is numerically investigated. To speed up the calculations, a simplified physically-based (beams and plate, two degrees of freedom model of the movable parts of the sensor is adopted. The capability and the accuracy of the model are assessed against three-dimensional finite element simulations, and against outcomes of experiments on instrumented samples. It is shown that the reduced order model provides accurate outcomes as for the system dynamics. To also get rather accurate results in terms of stress fields within regions that are prone to fail upon high-g shocks, a correction factor is proposed by accounting for the local stress amplification induced by re-entrant corners.

  17. Physically-based reduced order modelling of a uni-axial polysilicon MEMS accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisi, Aldo; Mariani, Stefano; Corigliano, Alberto; Zerbini, Sarah

    2012-10-17

    In this paper, the mechanical response of a commercial off-the-shelf, uni-axial polysilicon MEMS accelerometer subject to drops is numerically investigated. To speed up the calculations, a simplified physically-based (beams and plate), two degrees of freedom model of the movable parts of the sensor is adopted. The capability and the accuracy of the model are assessed against three-dimensional finite element simulations, and against outcomes of experiments on instrumented samples. It is shown that the reduced order model provides accurate outcomes as for the system dynamics. To also get rather accurate results in terms of stress fields within regions that are prone to fail upon high-g shocks, a correction factor is proposed by accounting for the local stress amplification induced by re-entrant corners.

  18. Physical activity reduces risk for colon polyps in a multiethnic colorectal cancer screening population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Nelson F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying modifiable factors that influence the epidemiology of colorectal cancer incidence among multiethnic groups might be informative for the development of public health strategies targeting the disease. Minimal data exists describing the impact of physical activity on colorectal polyp risk in United States minority populations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship of exercise on the prevalence of polyps in a multiethnic colorectal cancer screening population. Results We enrolled 982 patients: 558 Hispanic, 202 Asian,149 Black, and 69 White. Patients who reported exercising one or more hours weekly had a lower prevalence of any polyps (25.3% vs 33.2%, P = 0.008 as well as adenomas (13.8 vs. 18.9%, P = 0.03 compared to those who did not exercise. Black and Hispanic patients and those who were overweight or obese also had lower prevalence of polyps if they led an active lifestyle. Multivariate analysis revealed that age >55, male sex, and Black race/ethnicity were positively associated with the presence of adenomas, while a history of exercising one hour or more weekly was an independent negative predictor for the presence of adenomas anywhere in the colon (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.4 - 0.9, P = 0.03. Conclusions Exercising one hour per week was associated with a lower prevalence of polyps and adenomas when compared to those who exercised less or not at all. An active lifestyle provides benefits to groups who are at risk for colorectal cancer, such as Blacks. It also provides significant protection to overweight and obese individuals. Public health initiatives should promote physical activity as a cancer prevention tool in multiethnic populations. Trial registration none

  19. SU-E-T-31: Alternative VMAT Technique Reduces Total Monitor Units for Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happersett, L; Mechalakos, J; Kuo, L; Zhang, P; Rimner, A [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate an alternative approach to VMAT optimization for hypofractionation lung treatment which increases average aperture opening and results in lower total Monitor Units (MU) without significantly sacrificing plan quality. Methods: Benchmark Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (bVMAT) plans were generated for 10 lung Stereotactic Body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases using Eclipse Version 11.0.42 (Varian Medical Systems) without a maximum MU constraint. Prescriptions ranged from 40 to 54Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. AAA dose calculation and PRO fluence based optimization was utilized. Two comparison VMAT plans were generated for each case, one that forced an initial “open” mlc aperture conformal to the tumor as a starting condition (oVMAT) with similar optimization parameters and arc geometries, and one that repeated the bVMAT optimization but added a maximum MU constraint (muVMAT). All plans used two arcs with lengths between 168 to 230 degrees. PTV D 95% and Dmean, lung V20 Gy, chest wall V30 Gy, average aperture opening and MU's were compared. Statistical significance was evaluated using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Average PTV D(95), PTV mean and lung V20Gy over all plans was 99.2 ± 1.7%, 103.3 ± 0.6% and 7.8 ± 2.4% respectively. The average chest wall V30Gy was 61 ± 61 cc and ranged between 0 to 166 cc. There were no significant differences between the three techniques for the dosimetric quantities. MUs were reduced by 11 ±11% (p<0.01) and 25 ± 5% (p<0.01) and the average aperture size was increased by 13.7 ± 14% (p=0.02) and 35.8 ± 10% (p<0.01) with muVMAT and oVMAT, respectively, compared to bVMAT. Conclusion: oVMAT and muVMAT techniques were both able to increase average aperture size and reduce total MU compared to the benchmark VMAT plan, but the magnitude of the changes observed for oVMAT was larger.

  20. Reduced functional measure of cardiovascular reserve predicts admission to critical care unit following kidney transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M S Ting

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is currently no effective preoperative assessment for patients undergoing kidney transplantation that is able to identify those at high perioperative risk requiring admission to critical care unit (CCU. We sought to determine if functional measures of cardiovascular reserve, in particular the anaerobic threshold (VO₂AT could identify these patients. METHODS: Adult patients were assessed within 4 weeks prior to kidney transplantation in a University hospital with a 37-bed CCU, between April 2010 and June 2012. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET, echocardiography and arterial applanation tonometry were performed. RESULTS: There were 70 participants (age 41.7±14.5 years, 60% male, 91.4% living donor kidney recipients, 23.4% were desensitized. 14 patients (20% required escalation of care from the ward to CCU following transplantation. Reduced anaerobic threshold (VO₂AT was the most significant predictor, independently (OR = 0.43; 95% CI 0.27-0.68; p<0.001 and in the multivariate logistic regression analysis (adjusted OR = 0.26; 95% CI 0.12-0.59; p = 0.001. The area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve was 0.93, based on a risk prediction model that incorporated VO₂AT, body mass index and desensitization status. Neither echocardiographic nor measures of aortic compliance were significantly associated with CCU admission. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first prospective observational study to demonstrate the usefulness of CPET as a preoperative risk stratification tool for patients undergoing kidney transplantation. The study suggests that VO₂AT has the potential to predict perioperative morbidity in kidney transplant recipients.

  1. Creating healing intensive care unit environments: physical and psychological considerations in designing critical care areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazuin, Doug; Cardon, Kerrie

    2011-01-01

    A number of elements contribute to a healing ICU environment. The layout of a critical care unit helps create an environment that supports caregiving, which helps alleviate a host of work-related stresses. A quieter environment, one that includes family and friends, dotted with windows and natural light, creates a space that makes people feel balanced and reassured. A healing environment responds to the needs of all the people within a critical care unit-those who receive or give care and those who support patients and staff. Critical care units should be designed to focus on healing the body, the mind, and the senses. The design and policies of that department can be created in such a way to provide a sense of calm and balance. The physical environment has an impact on patient outcomes; the psychological environment can, too. A healing ICU environment will balance both. The authors discuss the ways in which architecture, interior design, and behavior contribute to a healing ICU environment.

  2. Self-Efficacy and Participation in Physical and Social Activity among Older Adults in Spain and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jessica M.; Multhaup, Kristi S.; Perkins, H. Wesley; Barton, Cole

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We explored Bandura's self-efficacy theory as applied to older adult (aged 63-92) participation in physical and social activity in a cross-cultural study. Design and Methods: Older adults in Spain (n = 53) and the United States (n = 55) completed questions regarding self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and participation in physical and…

  3. The association of ambient air pollution and physical inactivity in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Roberts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity, ambient air pollution and obesity are modifiable risk factors for non-communicable diseases, with the first accounting for 10% of premature deaths worldwide. Although community level interventions may target each simultaneously, research on the relationship between these risk factors is lacking. OBJECTIVES: After comparing spatial interpolation methods to determine the best predictor for particulate matter (PM2.5; PM10 and ozone (O3 exposures throughout the U.S., we evaluated the cross-sectional association of ambient air pollution with leisure-time physical inactivity among adults. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we assessed leisure-time physical inactivity using individual self-reported survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. These data were combined with county-level U.S. Environmental Protection Agency air pollution exposure estimates using two interpolation methods (Inverse Distance Weighting and Empirical Bayesian Kriging. Finally, we evaluated whether those exposed to higher levels of air pollution were less active by performing logistic regression, adjusting for demographic and behavioral risk factors, and after stratifying by body weight category. RESULTS: With Empirical Bayesian Kriging air pollution values, we estimated a statistically significant 16-35% relative increase in the odds of leisure-time physical inactivity per exposure class increase of PM2.5 in the fully adjusted model across the normal weight respondents (p-value<0.0001. Evidence suggested a relationship between the increasing dose of PM2.5 exposure and the increasing odds of physical inactivity. CONCLUSIONS: In a nationally representative, cross-sectional sample, increased community level air pollution is associated with reduced leisure-time physical activity particularly among the normal weight. Although our design precludes a causal inference, these

  4. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 2: Mechanics II, Momentum, Energy, Rotational and Harmonic Motion, and Chaos (Units 8 - 15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Physics Group. The Physics Suite contains a broad array of curricular materials that are based on physics education research, including: Understanding Physics, by Cummings, Laws, Redish and Cooney (an introductory textbook based on the best-selling text by Halliday/Resnick/Walker) RealTime Physics Laboratory Modules Physics by Inquiry (intended for use in a workshop setting) Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tutorials in Introductory Physics Activity Based Tutorials (designed primarily for use in recitations)

  5. The Soul, as an Uninhibited Mental Activity, is Reduced into Consciousness by Rules of Quantum Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Dönmez, Aslıhan; Ünsalver, Barış Önen; Evrensel, Alper; Kaya Yertutanol, Fatma Duygu

    2017-06-09

    This paper is an effort to describe, in neuroscientific terms, one of the most ambiguous concepts of the universe-the soul. Previous efforts to understand what the soul is and where it may exist have accepted the soul as a subjective and individual entity. We will make two additions to this view: (1) The soul is a result of uninhibited mental activity and lacks spatial and temporal information; (2) The soul is an undivided whole and, to become divided, the soul has to be reduced into unconscious and conscious mental events. This reduction process parallels the maturation of the frontal cortex and GABA becoming the main inhibitory neurotransmitter. As examples of uninhibited mental activity, we will discuss the perceptual differences of a newborn, individuals undergoing dissociation, and individuals induced by psychedelic drugs. Then, we will explain the similarities between the structure of the universe and the structure of the brain, and we propose that consideration of the rules of quantum physics is necessary to understand how the soul is reduced into consciousness.

  6. Clinical and Economic Burden of Mental Disorders Among Children With Chronic Physical Conditions, United States, 2008–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Suryavanshi, Manasi S.; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of chronic physical and mental disorders is increasing among children and adolescents in the United States. In this study, we investigated the association between mental health disorders and chronic physical conditions among children, and we assessed whether having mental disorders is associated with increased health care costs for children with chronic physical conditions, using Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2008 through 2013. Methods Children aged 5 ...

  7. Stop Staring! Proposed Strategies to Reduce Students' Body-Related Concerns in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, Patricia-Ann; Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    Although physical activity may provide a means for adolescents to improve their physical appearance and subsequently lessen body-related concerns, the fear of being negatively evaluated by others can act as a barrier to physical activity. Moreover, environments where people are constantly looked at and evaluated--such as physical education…

  8. Base units of the SI, fundamental constants and modern quantum physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordé, Christian J

    2005-09-15

    Over the past 40 years, a number of discoveries in quantum physics have completely transformed our vision of fundamental metrology. This revolution starts with the frequency stabilization of lasers using saturation spectroscopy and the redefinition of the metre by fixing the velocity of light c. Today, the trend is to redefine all SI base units from fundamental constants and we discuss strategies to achieve this goal. We first consider a kinematical frame, in which fundamental constants with a dimension, such as the speed of light c, the Planck constant h, the Boltzmann constant k(B) or the electron mass m(e) can be used to connect and redefine base units. The various interaction forces of nature are then introduced in a dynamical frame, where they are completely characterized by dimensionless coupling constants such as the fine structure constant alpha or its gravitational analogue alpha(G). This point is discussed by rewriting the Maxwell and Dirac equations with new force fields and these coupling constants. We describe and stress the importance of various quantum effects leading to the advent of this new quantum metrology. In the second part of the paper, we present the status of the seven base units and the prospects of their possible redefinitions from fundamental constants in an experimental perspective. The two parts can be read independently and they point to these same conclusions concerning the redefinitions of base units. The concept of rest mass is directly related to the Compton frequency of a body, which is precisely what is measured by the watt balance. The conversion factor between mass and frequency is the Planck constant, which could therefore be fixed in a realistic and consistent new definition of the kilogram based on its Compton frequency. We discuss also how the Boltzmann constant could be better determined and fixed to replace the present definition of the kelvin.

  9. Reducing treatment by means of physical rehabilitation after lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Dugina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the main approaches to the assignment of physical rehabilitation restorative treatment after lower limb amputations. Material and Methods: theoretical analysis and synthesis of modern scientific and methodological literature data on methods of comprehensive rehabilitation after lower limb amputations. Results: the features of the application of physical rehabilitation after lower limb amputations, tasks and presents the main approaches to the appointment of medical physical training, therapeutic massage and physical therapy in preparation for prosthetics. Conclusions: demonstrated that therapeutic physical training, therapeutic massage and physical therapy are effective means of physical rehabilitation of patients after lower limb amputations.

  10. Patterns in Nature Forming Patterns in Minds: An Evaluation of an Introductory Physics Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaffer, Christopher Ryan

    Educators are increasingly focused on the process over the content. In science especially, teachers want students to understand the nature of science and investigation. The emergence of scientific inquiry and engineering design teaching methods have led to the development of new teaching and evaluation methods that concentrate on steps in a process rather than facts in a topic. Research supports the notion that an explicit focus on the scientific process can lead to student science knowledge gains. In response to new research and standards many teachers have been developing teaching methods that seem to work well in their classrooms, but lack the time and resources to test them in other classroom environments. A high school Physics teacher (Bradford Hill) has developed a unit called Patterns in Nature (PIN) with objectives relating mathematical modeling to the scientific process. Designed for use in his large public school classroom, the unit was taken and used in a charter school with small classes. This study looks at specifically whether or not the PIN unit effectively teaches students how to graph the data they gather and fit an appropriate mathematical pattern, using that model to predict future measurements. Additionally, the study looks at the students' knowledge and views about the nature of science and the process of scientific investigation as it is affected by the PIN unit. Findings show that students are able to identify and apply patterns to data, but have difficulties explaining the meaning of the math. Students' show increases in their knowledge of the process of science, and the majority develop positive views about science in general. A major goal of this study is to place this unit in the cyclical process of Design-Based Research and allow for Pattern in Nature's continuous improvement, development and evaluation. Design-Based Research (DBR) is an approach that can be applied to the implementation and evaluation of classroom materials. This method

  11. The current state of physical therapy pain curricula in the United States: a faculty survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeger Bement, Marie K; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-02-01

    Insufficient pain education is problematic across the health care spectrum. Recent educational advancements have been made to combat the deficits in pain education to ensure that health care professionals are proficient in assessing and managing pain. The purpose of this survey was to determine the extent of pain education in current Doctorate of Physical Therapy schools in the United States, including how pain is incorporated into the curriculum, the amount of time spent teaching about pain, and the resources used to teach about pain. The survey consisted of 10 questions in the following subject areas: basic science mechanisms and concepts about pain, pain assessment, pain management, and adequacy of pain curriculum. The overall response was 77% (167/216) for the first series of responses of the survey (Question 1), whereas 62% completed the entire survey (Questions 2-10). The average contact hours teaching about pain was 31 ± 1.8 (mean ± standard error of the mean) with a range of 5 to 115 hours. The majority of schools that responded covered the science of pain, assessment, and management. Less than 50% of respondents were aware of the Institute of Medicine report on pain or the International Association for the Study of Pain guidelines for physical therapy pain education. Only 61% of respondents believed that their students received adequate education in pain management. Thus, this survey demonstrated how pain education is incorporated into physical therapy schools and highlighted areas for improvement such as awareness of recent educational advancements. This article demonstrates how pain education is incorporated into physical therapy curricula within accredited programs. Understanding the current structure of pain education in health professional curriculum can serve as a basis to determine if recent publications of guidelines and competencies impact education. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. THE IMPACT OF REDUCED AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL USE ON FOOD: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE FOR THE UNITED STATES

    OpenAIRE

    Senauer, Benjamin

    1993-01-01

    Concerns about food safety and environmental quality have increased in recent years. Consumers are particularly concerned about the health risks posed by pesticide residues in food and the environmental impact of agricultural chemicals. These concerns have stimulated a considerable amount of recent research to assess the effects of reduced agricultural chemical use. This paper focuses on the research in the United States which has examined the impact of reduced agricultural chemical use on fo...

  13. Do walking strategies to increase physical activity reduce reported sitting in workplaces: a randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Nicola W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions designed to increase workplace physical activity may not automatically reduce high volumes of sitting, a behaviour independently linked to chronic diseases such as obesity and type II diabetes. This study compared the impact two different walking strategies had on step counts and reported sitting times. Methods Participants were white-collar university employees (n = 179; age 41.3 ± 10.1 years; 141 women, who volunteered and undertook a standardised ten-week intervention at three sites. Pre-intervention step counts (Yamax SW-200 and self-reported sitting times were measured over five consecutive workdays. Using pre-intervention step counts, employees at each site were randomly allocated to a control group (n = 60; maintain normal behaviour, a route-based walking group (n = 60; at least 10 minutes sustained walking each workday or an incidental walking group (n = 59; walking in workday tasks. Workday step counts and reported sitting times were re-assessed at the beginning, mid- and endpoint of intervention and group mean± SD steps/day and reported sitting times for pre-intervention and intervention measurement points compared using a mixed factorial ANOVA; paired sample-t-tests were used for follow-up, simple effect analyses. Results A significant interactive effect (F = 3.5; p t = 3.9, p t = 2.5, p Conclusion Compared to controls, both route and incidental walking increased physical activity in white-collar employees. Our data suggests that workplace walking, particularly through incidental movement, also has the potential to decrease employee sitting times, but there is a need for on-going research using concurrent and objective measures of sitting, standing and walking.

  14. Influence of Adult Knee Height, Age at First Birth, Migration, and Current Age on Adult Physical Function of Bangladeshi Mothers and Daughters in the United Kingdom and Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Bogin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United Kingdom, Bangladeshi women have the lowest self-reported levels of physical activity and some of the highest levels of metabolic disease of all ethnic groups. To better understand these risks for poor health we employed life course and intergenerational hypotheses to predict lower body physical function in a sample of 121 Bangladeshi mothers (40–70 years old and one of their adult daughters (17–36 years old living in Bangladesh or in the UK. For the mothers, older age and shorter knee height predicted reduced lower body physical function. Knee height is a biomarker of nutrition and health status between birth and puberty. Age at first birth did not have a significant effect. For daughters, older age and migration to the UK predicted reduced lower body physical function. We controlled for total stature and fatness in all analyses. UK-born daughters were taller than BD-born daughters living in the UK, mostly due to differences in knee height. These new findings support previous research indicating that early life health and adequate nutritional status, along with appropriate adult physical activity and diet, may decrease risks for poor physical function, morbidity, and premature mortality.

  15. A revolution without tooth and claw-redefining the physical base units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    A case study is presented of a recent proposal by the major metrology institutes to redefine four of the physical base units, namely kilogram, ampere, mole, and kelvin. The episode shows a number of features that are unusual for progress in an objective science: for example, the progress is not triggered by experimental discoveries or theoretical innovations; also, the new definitions are eventually implemented by means of a voting process. In the philosophical analysis, I will first argue that the episode provides considerable evidence for confirmation holism, i.e. the claim that central statements in fundamental science cannot be tested in isolation; second, that the episode satisfies many of the criteria which Kuhn requires for scientific revolutions even though one would naturally classify it as normal science. These two observations are interrelated since holism can provide within normal science a possible source of future revolutionary periods.

  16. Effectiveness of physical activity in reducing pain in patients with fibromyalgia: a blinded randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayo, Andrea Harumi; Peccin, Maria Stella; Sanches, Carla Munhoz; Trevisani, Virgínia Fernandes Moça

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of muscle-strengthening exercises (MS) and a walking program (WA) in reducing pain in patients with fibromyalgia. Ninety women, 30-55 years of age, diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria, were randomized into 3 groups: WA Group, MS Group, and control group. Pain (visual analog scale) was evaluated as the primary outcome. Physical functioning (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, FIQ), health-related quality of life (Short-Form 36 Health Survey, SF-36), and use of medication were evaluated as secondary outcomes. Assessments were performed at baseline, 8, 16, and 28 weeks. Intention-to-treat and efficacy analyses were conducted. Sixty-eight patients completed the treatment protocol. All 3 groups showed improvement after the 16-week treatment compared to baseline. At the 28-week follow-up, pain reduction was similar for the WA and MS groups (P = 0.39), but different from the control group (P = 0.01). At the end of the treatment, 80% of subjects in the control group took pain medication, but only 46.7% in the WA and 41.4% in the MS groups. Mean FIQ total scores were lower for the WA and MS groups (P = 0.96) compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Patients in the WA and MS groups reported higher scores (better health status) than controls in almost all SF-36 subscales. MS was as effective as WA in reducing pain regarding all study variables; however, symptoms management during the follow-up period was more efficient in the WA group.

  17. Physical and mental health status of Iraqi refugees resettled in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Eboni M; Yanni, Emad A; Pezzi, Clelia; Guterbock, Michael; Rothney, Erin; Harton, Elizabeth; Montour, Jessica; Elias, Collin; Burke, Heather

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a survey among Iraqi refugees resettled in the United States to assess their physical and mental health status and healthcare access and utilization following the initial 8-month, post-arrival period. We randomly selected Iraqi refugees: ≥18 years of age; living in the United States for 8–36 months; and residents of Michigan, California, Texas and Idaho. Participants completed a household questionnaire and mental health assessment. We distributed 366 surveys. Seventy-five percent of participants had health insurance at the time of the survey; 43 % reported delaying or not seeking care for a medical problem in the past year. Sixty percent of participants reported one chronic condition; 37 % reported ≥2 conditions. The prevalence of emotional distress, anxiety, and depression was approximately 50 % of participants; 31 % were at risk for post-traumatic stress disorder. Iraqi refugees in this evaluation reported a high prevalence of chronic conditions and mental health symptoms despite relatively high access to healthcare. It is important for resettlement partners to be aware of the distinctive health concerns of this population to best address needs within this community.

  18. Physical activity in young children is reduced with increasing bronchial responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasholt, Martin; Baty, Florent; Bisgaard, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is essential for young children to develop adequately and for quality of life. It can be lower in children with subclinical asthma, and therefore methods to reveal subclinical reduction in physical activity in young children are warranted....

  19. Theoretical approaches to the steady-state statistical physics of interacting dissipative units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Eric

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a concise overview of some of the generic approaches that have been developed to deal with the statistical description of large systems of interacting dissipative ‘units’. The latter notion includes, e.g. inelastic grains, active or self-propelled particles, bubbles in a foam, low-dimensional dynamical systems like driven oscillators, or even spatially extended modes like Fourier modes of the velocity field in a fluid. We first review methods based on the statistical properties of a single unit, starting with elementary mean-field approximations, either static or dynamic, that describe a unit embedded in a ‘self-consistent’ environment. We then discuss how this basic mean-field approach can be extended to account for spatial dependences, in the form of space-dependent mean-field Fokker-Planck equations, for example. We also briefly review the use of kinetic theory in the framework of the Boltzmann equation, which is an appropriate description for dilute systems. We then turn to descriptions in terms of the full N-body distribution, starting from exact solutions of one-dimensional models, using a matrix-product ansatz method when correlations are present. Since exactly solvable models are scarce, we also present some approximation methods which can be used to determine the N-body distribution in a large system of dissipative units. These methods include the Edwards approach for dense granular matter and the approximate treatment of multiparticle Langevin equations with colored noise, which models systems of self-propelled particles. Throughout this review, emphasis is put on methodological aspects of the statistical modeling and on formal similarities between different physical problems, rather than on the specific behavior of a given system.

  20. Safety and feasibility of femoral catheters during physical rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damluji, Abdulla; Zanni, Jennifer M; Mantheiy, Earl; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Kho, Michelle E; Needham, Dale M

    2013-08-01

    Femoral catheters pose a potential barrier to early rehabilitation in the intensive care unit (ICU) due to concerns, such as catheter removal, local trauma, bleeding, and infection. We prospectively evaluated the feasibility and safety of physical therapy (PT) in ICU patients with femoral catheters. We evaluated consecutive medical ICU patients who received PT with a femoral venous, arterial, or hemodialysis catheter(s) in situ. Of 1074 consecutive patients, 239 (22%) received a femoral catheter (81% venous, 29% arterial, 6% hemodialysis; some patients had >1 catheter). Of those, 101 (42%) received PT interventions, while the catheter was in situ, for a total of 253 sessions over 210 medical ICU (MICU) days. On these 210 MICU days, the highest daily activity level achieved was 49 (23%) standing or walking, 57 (27%) sitting, 25 (12%) supine cycle ergometry, and 79 (38%) in-bed exercises. During 253 PT sessions, there were no catheter-related adverse events giving a 0% event rate (95% upper confidence limit of 2.1% for venous catheters). Physical therapy interventions in MICU patients with in situ femoral catheters appear to be feasible and safe. The presence of a femoral catheter should not automatically restrict ICU patients to bed rest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduced firing rates of high threshold motor units in response to eccentric overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balshaw, Tom G; Pahar, Madhu; Chesham, Ross; Macgregor, Lewis J; Hunter, Angus M

    2017-01-01

    Acute responses of motor units were investigated during submaximal voluntary isometric tasks following eccentric overload (EO) and constant load (CL) knee extension resistance exercise. Ten healthy resistance-trained participants performed four experimental test sessions separated by 5 days over a 20 day period. Two sessions involved constant load and the other two used eccentric overload. EO and CL used both sessions for different target knee eccentric extension phases; one at 2 sec and the other at 4 sec. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) and isometric trapezoid efforts for 10 sec at 70% MVC were completed before and after each intervention and decomposed electromyography was used to measure motor unit firing rate. The firing rate of later recruited, high-threshold motor units declined following the 2-sec EO but was maintained following 2sec CL (P units were maintained for both loading types following 4-sec extension phases. MVC and rate of force development where maintained following both EO and CL and 2 and 4 sec phases. This study demonstrates a slower firing rate of high-threshold motor units following fast eccentric overload while MVC was maintained. This suggests that there was a neuromuscular stimulus without cost to the force-generating capacity of the knee extensors. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  2. Physical origins of ruled surfaces on the reduced density matrices geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Yao; Ji, Zhengfeng; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Qi, Xiaofei; Yu, Nengkun; Zeng, Bei; Zhou, Duanlu

    2017-02-01

    The reduced density matrices (RDMs) of many-body quantum states form a convex set. The boundary of low dimensional projections of this convex set may exhibit nontrivial geometry such as ruled surfaces. In this paper, we study the physical origins of these ruled surfaces for bosonic systems. The emergence of ruled surfaces was recently proposed as signatures of symmetry-breaking phase. We show that, apart from being signatures of symmetry-breaking, ruled surfaces can also be the consequence of gapless quantum systems by demonstrating an explicit example in terms of a two-mode Ising model. Our analysis was largely simplified by the quantum de Finetti's theorem—in the limit of large system size, these RDMs are the convex set of all the symmetric separable states. To distinguish ruled surfaces originated from gapless systems from those caused by symmetry-breaking, we propose to use the finite size scaling method for the corresponding geometry. This method is then applied to the two-mode XY model, successfully identifying a ruled surface as the consequence of gapless systems.

  3. Physical Aging of Thin and Ultrathin Free-Standing Polymer Films: Effect of Stress and Reduced Glass Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Justin; Roth, Connie

    2014-03-01

    While great effort has been made in elucidating the effect of confinement on the glass transition (Tg) in polymers, considerably less work has been done on physical aging. Starting with supported films, we have previously shown that the reduced physical aging rates in ultrathin polystyrene (PS) films can be linked to the reduced Tg near the free surface [Macromolecules 2010, 43, 8296]. We then showed that high molecular weight (MW) free-standing PS films have two reduced Tgs suggesting that two separate mechanisms are acting simultaneously to propagate enhanced mobility at the free surface deeper into the film [PRL 2011, 107, 235701]. To help determine the mechanisms of these two reduced Tgs, we performed physical aging measurements on these high MW free-standing PS films. For thick films (220-1800 nm) in which there are no Tg reductions, we find that the physical aging rate depends strongly on stress caused by thermal expansion mismatch between film and support. This stress, applied to the films as they are quenched into the glassy state, can nearly double the physical aging rate when changing the frame material from polycarbonate to silicon [Macromolecules 2013, DOI:10.1021/ma401872u]. Finally, ultrathin high MW PS films held at a temperature between the two Tgs do exhibit physical aging, indicating that at least some of the film is glassy between these two transitions.

  4. Genetic distance as an alternative to physical distance for definition of gene units in association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Calaza, Manuel; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2014-05-28

    Some association studies, as the implemented in VEGAS, ALIGATOR, i-GSEA4GWAS, GSA-SNP and other software tools, use genes as the unit of analysis. These genes include the coding sequence plus flanking sequences. Polymorphisms in the flanking sequences are of interest because they involve cis-regulatory elements or they inform on untyped genetic variants trough linkage disequilibrium. Gene extensions have customarily been defined as ±50 Kb. This approach is not fully satisfactory because genetic relationships between neighbouring sequences are a function of genetic distances, which are only poorly replaced by physical distances. Standardized recombination rates (SRR) from the deCODE recombination map were used as units of genetic distances. We searched for a SRR producing flanking sequences near the ±50 Kb offset that has been common in previous studies. A SRR≥2 was selected because it led to gene extensions with median length=45.3 Kb and the simplicity of an integer value. As expected, boundaries of the genes defined with the ±50 Kb and with the SRR≥2 rules were rarely concordant. The impact of these differences was illustrated with the interpretation of top association signals from two large studies including many hits and their detailed analysis based in different criteria. The definition based in genetic distance was more concordant with the results of these studies than the based in physical distance. In the analysis of 18 top disease associated loci form the first study, the SRR≥2 genes led to a fully concordant interpretation in 17 loci; the ±50 Kb genes only in 6. Interpretation of the 43 putative functional genes of the second study based in the SRR≥2 definition only missed 4 of the genes, whereas the based in the ±50 Kb definition missed 10 genes. A gene definition based on genetic distance led to results more concordant with expert detailed analyses than the commonly used based in physical distance. The genome coordinates for each

  5. Reducing Youth Incarceration in the United States. KIDS COUNT Data Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    A sea change is underway in the nation's approach to dealing with young people who get in trouble with the law. Although the country still leads the industrialized world in the rate at which it locks up young people, the youth confinement rate in the United States is rapidly declining. In 2010 this rate reached a new 35-year low, with almost every…

  6. Characterising physical habitats and fluvial hydromorphology: A new system for the survey and classification of river geomorphic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belletti, Barbara; Rinaldi, Massimo; Bussettini, Martina; Comiti, Francesco; Gurnell, Angela M.; Mao, Luca; Nardi, Laura; Vezza, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Geomorphic units are the elementary spatial physical features of the river mosaic at the reach scale that are nested within the overall hydromorphological structure of a river and its catchment. Geomorphic units also constitute the template of physical habitats for the biota. The assessment of river hydromorphological conditions is required by the European Water Framework Directive 2000/60 (WFD) for the classification and monitoring of water bodies and is useful for establishing links between their physical and biological conditions. The spatial scale of geomorphic units, incorporating their component elements and hydraulic patches, is the most appropriate to assess these links. Given the weakness of existing methods for the characterisation and assessment of geomorphic units and physical habitats (e.g., lack of a well-defined spatiotemporal framework, terminology issues, etc.), a new system for the survey and characterisation of river geomorphic units is needed that fits within a geomorphologically meaningful framework. This paper presents a system for the survey and classification of geomorphic units (GUS, geomorphic units survey and classification system) aimed at characterising physical habitats and stream morphology. The method is embedded into a multiscale, hierarchical framework for the analysis of river hydromorphological conditions. Three scales of geomorphic units are considered (i.e., macro-units, units, sub-units), organised within two spatial domains (i.e., bankfull channel and floodplain). Different levels of characterisation can be applied, depending on the aims of the survey: broad, basic, and detailed level. At each level, different, complementary information is collected. The method is applied by combining remote sensing analysis and field survey, according to the spatial scale and the level of description required. The method is applicable to most of fluvial conditions, and has been designed to be flexible and adaptable according to the

  7. Depression symptoms reduce physical activity in COPD patients: a prospective multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueñas-Espín I

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Iván Dueñas-Espín,1–5 Heleen Demeyer,6 Elena Gimeno-Santos,1–3 Michael I Polkey,7 Nicholas S Hopkinson,7 Roberto A Rabinovich,8 Fabienne Dobbels,9 Niklas Karlsson,10 Thierry Troosters,6,11 Judith Garcia-Aymerich1–3 On behalf of the PROactive Consortium 1ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL, 2Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF, 3CIBEREpidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain; 4Secretaría Nacional de Educación Superior, Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación del Ecuador (SENESCYT, Quito, Ecuador; 5Institut d’investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain; 6Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 7NIHR Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust and Imperial College, London, UK; 8ELEGI Colt Laboratory, Centre for Inflammation Research, The Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 9Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Academic Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 10Health Economics and Outcomes Research, AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden; 11Department of Respiratory Diseases, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Background: The role of anxiety and depression in the physical activity (PA of patients with COPD is controversial. We prospectively assessed the effect of symptoms of anxiety and depression on PA in COPD patients.Methods: We evaluated anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS], PA (Dynaport® accelerometer, and other relevant characteristics in 220 COPD patients from five European countries at baseline and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. HADS score was categorized as: no symptoms (score 0–7, suggested (8–10, and probable (>11 anxiety or depression. We estimated the association between anxiety and depression at t (baseline and 6 months and PA at t+1 (6 and 12 months using

  8. Study of regeneration system of 300 MW power unit based on nondeaerating heat balance diagram at reduced load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, S. B.; Trifonov, N. N.; Sukhorukov, Yu. G.; Yurchenko, A. Yu.; Grigor'eva, E. B.; Snegin, I. P.; Zhivykh, D. A.; Medvedkin, A. V.; Ryabich, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    More than 30 power units of thermal power stations, based on the nondeaerating heat balance diagram, successfully operate in the former Soviet Union. Most of them are power units with a power of 300 MW, equipped with HTGZ and LMZ turbines. They operate according to a variable electric load curve characterized by deep reductions when undergoing night minimums. Additional extension of the range of power unit adjustment makes it possible to maintain the dispatch load curve and obtain profit for the electric power plant. The objective of this research is to carry out estimated and experimental processing of the operating regimes of the regeneration system of steam-turbine plants within the extended adjustment range and under the conditions when the constraints on the regeneration system and its equipment are removed. Constraints concerning the heat balance diagram that reduce the power unit efficiency when extending the adjustment range have been considered. Test results are presented for the nondeaerating heat balance diagram with the HTGZ turbine. Turbine pump and feed electric pump operation was studied at a power unit load of 120-300 MW. The reliability of feed pump operation is confirmed by a stable vibratory condition and the absence of cavitation noise and vibration at a frequency that characterizes the cavitation condition, as well as by oil temperature maintenance after bearings within normal limits. Cavitation performance of pumps in the studied range of their operation has been determined. Technical solutions are proposed on providing a profitable and stable operation of regeneration systems when extending the range of adjustment of power unit load. A nondeaerating diagram of high-pressure preheater (HPP) condensate discharge to the mixer. A regeneration system has been developed and studied on the operating power unit fitted with a deaeratorless thermal circuit of the system for removing the high-pressure preheater heating steam condensate to the mixer

  9. Thermo-physical performance prediction of the KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit for liquid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, J. H.; Notardonato, W. U.; Karng, S. W.; Oh, I.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) researchers have been working on enhanced and modernized cryogenic liquid propellant handling techniques to reduce life cycle costs of propellant management system for the unique KSC application. The KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit (GODU) for liquid hydrogen (LH2) plans to demonstrate integrated refrigeration, zero-loss flexible term storage of LH2, and densified hydrogen handling techniques. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has partnered with the KSC researchers to develop thermal performance prediction model of the GODU for LH2. The model includes integrated refrigeration cooling performance, thermal losses in the tank and distribution lines, transient system characteristics during chilling and loading, and long term steady-state propellant storage. This paper will discuss recent experimental data of the GODU for LH2 system and modeling results.

  10. Physical activity reduces hippocampal atrophy in elders at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Carson eSmith

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined the impact of physical activity (PA on longitudinal change in hippocampal volume in cognitively intact older adults at varying genetic risk for the sporadic form of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Hippocampal volume was measured from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans administered at baseline and at an 18-month follow-up in 97 healthy, cognitively intact older adults. Participants were classified as High or Low PA based on a self-report questionnaire of frequency and intensity of exercise. Risk status was defined by the presence or absence of the apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4 allele. Four subgroups were studied: Low Risk/High PA (n = 24, Low Risk/Low PA (n = 34, High Risk/High PA (n = 22, and High Risk/Low PA (n = 17. Over the 18 month follow-up interval, hippocampal volume decreased by 3% in the High Risk/Low PA group, but remained stable in the three remaining groups. No main effects or interactions between genetic risk and PA were observed in control brain regions, including the caudate, amygdala, thalamus, precentral gyrus, caudal middle frontal gyrus, cortical white matter, and total grey matter. These findings suggest that PA may help to preserve hippocampal volume in individuals at increased genetic risk for AD. The protective effects of PA on hippocampal atrophy were not observed in individuals at low risk for AD. These data suggest that individuals at genetic risk for AD should be targeted for increased levels of PA as a means of reducing atrophy in a brain region critical for the formation of episodic memories.

  11. Capsaicin Supplementation Reduces Physical Fatigue and Improves Exercise Performance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chiu, Chien-Chao; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Chiu, Chun-Hui; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Chili pepper is used as a food, seasoning and has been revered for its medicinal and health claims. It is very popular and is the most common spice worldwide. Capsaicin (CAP) is a major pungent and bioactive phytochemical in chili peppers. CAP has been shown to improve mitochondrial biogenesis and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. However, there is limited evidence around the effects of CAP on physical fatigue and exercise performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CAP on anti-fatigue and ergogenic functions following physiological challenge. Female Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice from four groups (n = 8 per group) were orally administered CAP for 4 weeks at 0, 205, 410, and 1025 mg/kg/day, which were respectively designated the vehicle, CAP-1X, CAP-2X, and CAP-5X groups. The anti-fatigue activity and exercise performance was evaluated using forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, BUN (blood urea nitrogen) and creatine kinase (CK) after a 15-min swimming exercise. The grip strength and exhaustive swimming time of the CAP-5X group were significantly higher than other groups. CAP supplementation dose-dependently reduced serum lactate, ammonia, BUN and CK levels, and increased glucose concentration after the 15-min swimming test. In addition, CAP also increased hepatic glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise. The possible mechanism was relevant to energy homeostasis and the physiological modulations by CAP supplementation. Therefore, our results suggest that CAP supplementation may have a wide spectrum of bioactivities for promoting health, performance improvement and fatigue amelioration. PMID:27775591

  12. Capsaicin Supplementation Reduces Physical Fatigue and Improves Exercise Performance in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chiu, Chien-Chao; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Chiu, Chun-Hui; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2016-10-20

    Chili pepper is used as a food, seasoning and has been revered for its medicinal and health claims. It is very popular and is the most common spice worldwide. Capsaicin (CAP) is a major pungent and bioactive phytochemical in chili peppers. CAP has been shown to improve mitochondrial biogenesis and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. However, there is limited evidence around the effects of CAP on physical fatigue and exercise performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CAP on anti-fatigue and ergogenic functions following physiological challenge. Female Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice from four groups (n = 8 per group) were orally administered CAP for 4 weeks at 0, 205, 410, and 1025 mg/kg/day, which were respectively designated the vehicle, CAP-1X, CAP-2X, and CAP-5X groups. The anti-fatigue activity and exercise performance was evaluated using forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, BUN (blood urea nitrogen) and creatine kinase (CK) after a 15-min swimming exercise. The grip strength and exhaustive swimming time of the CAP-5X group were significantly higher than other groups. CAP supplementation dose-dependently reduced serum lactate, ammonia, BUN and CK levels, and increased glucose concentration after the 15-min swimming test. In addition, CAP also increased hepatic glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise. The possible mechanism was relevant to energy homeostasis and the physiological modulations by CAP supplementation. Therefore, our results suggest that CAP supplementation may have a wide spectrum of bioactivities for promoting health, performance improvement and fatigue amelioration.

  13. Capsaicin Supplementation Reduces Physical Fatigue and Improves Exercise Performance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Hsu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chili pepper is used as a food, seasoning and has been revered for its medicinal and health claims. It is very popular and is the most common spice worldwide. Capsaicin (CAP is a major pungent and bioactive phytochemical in chili peppers. CAP has been shown to improve mitochondrial biogenesis and adenosine triphosphate (ATP production. However, there is limited evidence around the effects of CAP on physical fatigue and exercise performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CAP on anti-fatigue and ergogenic functions following physiological challenge. Female Institute of Cancer Research (ICR mice from four groups (n = 8 per group were orally administered CAP for 4 weeks at 0, 205, 410, and 1025 mg/kg/day, which were respectively designated the vehicle, CAP-1X, CAP-2X, and CAP-5X groups. The anti-fatigue activity and exercise performance was evaluated using forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, BUN (blood urea nitrogen and creatine kinase (CK after a 15-min swimming exercise. The grip strength and exhaustive swimming time of the CAP-5X group were significantly higher than other groups. CAP supplementation dose-dependently reduced serum lactate, ammonia, BUN and CK levels, and increased glucose concentration after the 15-min swimming test. In addition, CAP also increased hepatic glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise. The possible mechanism was relevant to energy homeostasis and the physiological modulations by CAP supplementation. Therefore, our results suggest that CAP supplementation may have a wide spectrum of bioactivities for promoting health, performance improvement and fatigue amelioration.

  14. Total atmospheric deposition of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet and dry deposition of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the...

  15. Total atmospheric deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet and dry deposition of reduced nitrogen in the Pacific Northwest...

  16. Dry deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of dry deposition of reduced nitrogen in the Pacific Northwest region...

  17. 300-FF-1 Operable Unit physical separation of soils pilot plant study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-01-15

    Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) was selected in a competitive selection process to conduct a pilot study for the physical separation of soils in the North Process Pond of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. In January 1994, ART mobilized its 15 tons-per-hour pilot plant to the site. The plant was initially staged in a commercial area to allow for pretest inspections and minor modifications. The plant was specifically designed for use as a physical separations unit and consisted of a feed hopper, wet screens, hydrocyclones, as well as settling and dewatering equipment. The plant was supported in the field with prescreening equipment, mobile generators, air compressors, and water storage tanks. The plant was moved into the surface contamination area on March 24, 1994. The testing was conducted during the period March 23, 1994 through April 13, 1994. Two soil types were treated during the testing: a natural soil contaminated with low levels of uranium, cesium, cobalt, and heavy metals, and a natural soil contaminated with a uranium carbonate material that was visually recognizable by the presence of a green sludge material in the soil matrix. The ``green`` material contained significantly higher levels of the same contaminants. Both source materials were treated by the plant in a manner that fed the material, produced clean gravel and sand fractions, and concentrated the contaminants in a sludge cake. Process water was recycled during the operations. The testing was extremely successful in that for both source waste streams, it was demonstrated that volume reductions of greater than 90% could be achieved while also meeting the test performance criteria. The volume reduction for the natural soils averaged a 93.8%, while the ``green`` soils showed a 91.4% volume reduction.

  18. A Web of Drones: A 2040 Strategy to Reduce the United States Dependance on Space Based Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    2040. On the Design of the Aircraft The drone is required to keep a payload airborne for 24 hours unrefueled and 5 days with refueling but without... Design of the Web The altitude of the drones and the distance between them are not set in stone. A denser web (more nodes, shorter distances between...AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY A WEB OF DRONES : A 2040 STRATEGY TO REDUCE THE UNITED STATES DEPENDANCE ON SPACE BASED CAPABILITIES by

  19. Computerized Dose Range Checking Using Hard and Soft Stop Alerts Reduces Prescribing Errors in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Lilanthi; Vyles, David; Bakerman, Paul; Holton, Vanessa; Vaidya, Vinay; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Westdorp, Joan; Sanchez, Christine; Kurz, Rhonda

    2017-09-01

    An enhanced dose range checking (DRC) system was developed to evaluate prescription error rates in the pediatric intensive care unit and the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. An enhanced DRC system incorporating "soft" and "hard" alerts was designed and implemented. Practitioner responses to alerts for patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit and the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit were retrospectively reviewed. Alert rates increased from 0.3% to 3.4% after "go-live" (P < 0.001). Before go-live, all alerts were soft alerts. In the period after go-live, 68% of alerts were soft alerts and 32% were hard alerts. Before go-live, providers reduced doses only 1 time for every 10 dose alerts. After implementation of the enhanced computerized physician order entry system, the practitioners responded to soft alerts by reducing doses to more appropriate levels in 24.7% of orders (70/283), compared with 10% (3/30) before go-live (P = 0.0701). The practitioners deleted orders in 9.5% of cases (27/283) after implementation of the enhanced DRC system, as compared with no cancelled orders before go-live (P = 0.0774). Medication orders that triggered a soft alert were submitted unmodified in 65.7% (186/283) as compared with 90% (27/30) of orders before go-live (P = 0.0067). After go-live, 28.7% of hard alerts resulted in a reduced dose, 64% resulted in a cancelled order, and 7.4% were submitted as written. Before go-live, alerts were often clinically irrelevant. After go-live, there was a statistically significant decrease in orders that were submitted unmodified and an increase in the number of orders that were reduced or cancelled.

  20. Student Modeling of Physical Phenomena as They Derive Integral Formulae: One Way To Reduce Proof Phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancis, Jerome

    2001-01-01

    Students in a freshmen calculus course should become fluent in modeling physical phenomena represented by integrals, in particular geometric formulas for volumes and arc length and physical formulas for work. Describes how to train students to became fluent in such modeling and derivation of standard integral formulas. Indicates that these lessons…

  1. Efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity' in reducing sickness absence among health care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard Andersen, Lotte; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2013-01-01

    Health care workers have high physical work demands, involving patient handling and manual work tasks. A strategy for prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders can enhance the physical capacity of the health care worker. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of 'Tailored...

  2. As the Last Resort: Reducing the Use of Restrictive Physical Interventions Using Organisational Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Roy; McDonnell, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The development of restrictive physical interventions (RPI) to manage challenging behaviours based upon control and restraint during the 1980s and 1990s led to widespread professional disquiet and campaigning to improve the policies, training and application of physical techniques. This included the promotion of a value base within which physical…

  3. Workforce Projections 2010-2020: Annual Supply and Demand Forecasting Models for Physical Therapists Across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michel D; Hack, Laurita M; Coulson, Elizabeth; Freburger, Janet; Johnson, Michael P; Katz, Richard; Kerwin, Joanne; Smith, Megan H; Wessman, Henry C Bud; Venskus, Diana G; Sinnott, Patricia L; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Health human resources continue to emerge as a critical health policy issue across the United States. The purpose of this study was to develop a strategy for modeling future workforce projections to serve as a basis for analyzing annual supply of and demand for physical therapists across the United States into 2020. A traditional stock-and-flow methodology or model was developed and populated with publicly available data to produce estimates of supply and demand for physical therapists by 2020. Supply was determined by adding the estimated number of physical therapists and the approximation of new graduates to the number of physical therapists who immigrated, minus US graduates who never passed the licensure examination, and an estimated attrition rate in any given year. Demand was determined by using projected US population with health care insurance multiplied by a demand ratio in any given year. The difference between projected supply and demand represented a shortage or surplus of physical therapists. Three separate projection models were developed based on best available data in the years 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. Based on these projections, demand for physical therapists in the United States outstrips supply under most assumptions. Workforce projection methodology research is based on assumptions using imperfect data; therefore, the results must be interpreted in terms of overall trends rather than as precise actuarial data-generated absolute numbers from specified forecasting. Outcomes of this projection study provide a foundation for discussion and debate regarding the most effective and efficient ways to influence supply-side variables so as to position physical therapists to meet current and future population demand. Attrition rates or permanent exits out of the profession can have important supply-side effects and appear to have an effect on predicting future shortage or surplus of physical therapists. © 2016 American Physical Therapy

  4. A new clinical unit for digital radiography based on a thick amorphous Selenium plate: Physical and psychophysical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivetti, Stefano; Lanconelli, Nico; Bertolini, Marco; Acchiappati, Domenico [Alma Mater Studiorum, Physics Department, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy and S.C. di Fisica Sanitaria ' ' Azienda USL di Modena' ' 41100 Modena (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum, Physics Department, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, 42123 Reggio Emilia (Italy); S.C. di Fisica Sanitaria ' ' Azienda USL di Modena' ' 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Here, we present a physical and psychophysical characterization of a new clinical unit (named AcSelerate) for digital radiography based on a thick a-Se layer. We also compared images acquired with and without a software filter (named CRF) developed for reducing sharpness and noise of the images and making them similar to images coming from traditional computed radiography systems. Methods: The characterization was achieved in terms of physical figures of merit [modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE)], and psychophysical parameters (contrast-detail analysis with an automatic reading of CDRAD images). We accomplished measurements with four standard beam conditions: RAQ3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9. Results: The system shows an excellent MTF (about 50% at the Nyquist frequency). The DQE is about 55% at 0.5 lp/mm and above 20% at the Nyquist frequency and is almost independent from exposure. The contrast-detail curves are comparable to some of the best published data for other systems devoted to imaging in general radiography. The CRF filter influences both the MTF and NPS, but it does lead to very small changes on DQE. Also the visibility of CDRAD details is basically unaltered, when the filter is activated. Conclusions: As normally happens with detector based on direct conversion, the system presents an excellent MTF. The improved efficiency caused by the thick layer allows getting good noise characteristics and DQE results better (about 10% on average) than many of the computed radiography (CR) systems and comparable to those obtained by the best systems for digital radiography available on the market.

  5. Feasibility and safety of in-bed cycling for physical rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Michelle E; Martin, Robert A; Toonstra, Amy L; Zanni, Jennifer M; Mantheiy, Earl C; Nelliot, Archana; Needham, Dale M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of in-bed cycle ergometry as part of routine intensive care unit (ICU) physical therapist (PT) practice. Between July 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011, we prospectively identified all patients admitted to a 16-bed medical ICU receiving cycling by a PT, prospectively collected data on 12 different potential safety events, and retrospectively conducted a chart review to obtain specific details of each cycling session. Six hundred eighty-eight patients received PT interventions, and 181 (26%) received a total of 541 cycling sessions (median [interquartile range {IQR}] cycling sessions per patient, 2 [1-4]). Patients' mean (SD) age was 57 (17) years, and 103 (57%) were male. The median (IQR) time from medical ICU admission to first PT intervention and first cycling session was 2 (1-4) and 4 (2-6) days, respectively, with a median (IQR) cycling session duration of 25 (18-30) minutes. On cycling days, the proportion of patients receiving mechanical ventilation, vasopressor infusions, and continuous renal replacement therapy was 80%, 8%, and 7%, respectively. A single safety event occurred, yielding a 0.2% event rate (95% upper confidence limit, 1.0%). Use of in-bed cycling as part of routine PT interventions in ICU patients is feasible and appears safe. Further study of the potential benefits of early in-bed cycling is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Positive experiences in physical education through teacher intervention in the teaching unit futsal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Abós Catalán

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The interpersonal style used by the teacher of Physical Education (PE in their classes can trigger consequences for students inside and outside the classroom. Grounded in self-determination theory and achievement goal theory, the aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between motivational climate and support of the basic psychological needs (BPN generated by the PE teacher in the teaching unit (TU of futsal, with consequences of enjoyment and boredom, as well as the predisposition toward EF experienced by students. The sample was composed of 70 students (32 men and 38 women year 4th of compulsory Secondary Education, aged 15 to 17 years (M age = 15.31, SD = 0.49. The variables measured at the end of the TU were: motivational climate (EPCM, support of the BPN (CANPB and affective consequences (SSI the content of futsal and the predisposition towards PE (PEPS. The results of correlation analysis showed that the task climate and support of the BPN in the TU futsal, correlated positively and significantly with enjoyment and some predisposing factors toward PE, while doing it in reverse with boredom. Therefore, given the relationship between what happens in the classroom and outside it, seems necessary that teachers of PE generates a task climate and support of the BPN in each of curricular content, to students adopt life-styles more active and healthy. 

  7. Unit physics performance of a mix model in Eulerian fluid computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, Erik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Douglass, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-25

    In this report, we evaluate the performance of a K-L drag-buoyancy mix model, described in a reference study by Dimonte-Tipton [1] hereafter denoted as [D-T]. The model was implemented in an Eulerian multi-material AMR code, and the results are discussed here for a series of unit physics tests. The tests were chosen to calibrate the model coefficients against empirical data, principally from RT (Rayleigh-Taylor) and RM (Richtmyer-Meshkov) experiments, and the present results are compared to experiments and to results reported in [D-T]. Results show the Eulerian implementation of the mix model agrees well with expectations for test problems in which there is no convective flow of the mass averaged fluid, i.e., in RT mix or in the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT). In RM shock-driven mix, the mix layer moves through the Eulerian computational grid, and there are differences with the previous results computed in a Lagrange frame [D-T]. The differences are attributed to the mass averaged fluid motion and examined in detail. Shock and re-shock mix are not well matched simultaneously. Results are also presented and discussed regarding model sensitivity to coefficient values and to initial conditions (IC), grid convergence, and the generation of atomically mixed volume fractions.

  8. Psychological distress leads to reduced physical activity and fitness in children: the Australian longitudinal LOOK study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, L S; Telford, R M; Byrne, D G; Abhayaratna, W P; Telford, R D

    2016-08-01

    Stress and depression can affect an individual's level of physical activity and fitness, which may place them at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This study investigates the longitudinal effects of stress and depression on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness among youth. Six hundred and seventy-six children, initially aged 8 years, from the LOOK study completed a modified version of the Children's Depression Inventory, the Children's Stress Questionnaire, and objective physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness assessments on three occasions, every 4 years. Depressive symptoms had a direct effect (longitudinal) on the cardiorespiratory fitness of girls, with a similar trend for boys. In cross-sectional analyses, a child who identified with more symptoms of depression and stress was likely to be less fit and less physically active, which in girls extended to less moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Our findings, that both physical activity and fitness are impacted by depression and stress may contribute to strategies directed towards achieving enhanced physical activity and reductions in obesity.

  9. Using real time process measurements to reduce catheter related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, R; Ely, E; Elasy, T; Dittus, R; Foss, J.; Wilkerson, K; Speroff, T

    2005-01-01

    

Problem: Measuring a process of care in real time is essential for continuous quality improvement (CQI). Our inability to measure the process of central venous catheter (CVC) care in real time prevented CQI efforts aimed at reducing catheter related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) from these devices.

  10. Reduced cognitive function in children with toxocariasis in a nationally representative sample of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael G; Haseeb, M A

    2012-12-01

    Toxocariasis has recently been recognised as a potentially important neglected infection in developed countries, particularly those that experience substantive health disparities such as the United States. Given a relatively high prevalence of infection, an association between Toxocara infection and cognitive function may elucidate an important mechanism by which toxocariasis could contribute significantly to morbidity while still remaining hidden and, thus, neglected. To assess the potential relationship between toxocariasis and cognitive function, this investigation measured differences in components of both the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised (WRAT-R) in children seropositive and in children seronegative for Toxocara antibodies in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a large, nationally-representative survey of the United States population. Seropositive children scored significantly lower on the WISC-R and WRAT-R compared with the seronegative children. Moreover, this relationship was independent of socioeconomic status, ethnicity, gender, rural residence, cytomegalovirus infection and blood lead levels. These results identify an important association that may reflect morbidity attributable to a genuine neglected infection. Nevertheless, longitudinal data are required to confirm an etiological connection between toxocariasis and cognitive function, as well as the true population attributable risk for toxocariasis and its chronic sequelae.

  11. Role of physical activity in reducing cognitive decline in older Mexican-American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenbacher, Allison J; Snih, Soham Al; Bindawas, Saad M; Markides, Kyriakos S; Graham, James E; Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Raji, Mukaila; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2014-09-01

    The effect of physical activity on cognitive function in older adults from minority and disadvantaged populations is not well understood. This study examined the longitudinal association between physical activity and cognition in older Mexican Americans. The study methodology included a prospective cohort with longitudinal analysis of data from the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly. General linear mixed models were used to assess the associations and interactions between physical activity and cognitive function over 14 years. Community-based assessments were performed in participants' homes. Physical activity was recorded for 1,669 older Mexican Americans using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly. Cognition was measured using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and separated into memory and nonmemory components. A statistically significant positive association was observed between levels of physical activity and cognitive function after adjusting for age, sex, marital status, education, and comorbid health conditions. There was a statistically significant difference in MMSE scores over time between participants in the third (β = 0.11, standard error (SE) = 0.05) and fourth (β = 0.10, SE = 0.2) quartiles of physical activity and those in the first. The protective effect of physical activity on cognitive decline was evident for the memory component of the MMSE but not the nonmemory component after adjusting for covariates. Greater physical activity at baseline was associated with less cognitive decline over 14 years in older Mexican Americans. The reduction in cognitive decline appeared to be related to the memory components of cognitive function.

  12. The introduction of individual treatment by resident physical therapists in primary care units - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p261

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra da Silveira Langoni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the effect on clinical indicators of the introduction of individual weekly physical therapy sessions in five Primary Health Care units in Porto Alegre, RS. Methods: The medical records from 59 patients were analyzed. They were treated between April 2010 and May 2011 by two physical therapists from the Multidisciplinary Residency Program in Family and Community Health at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul. Data was collected for the determination of the sociodemographic (gender, age, marital status and occupation and clinical profiles (medical diagnosis, medication intake, number of medications and the presence of pain, dyspnea, or urinary loss. Data was analyzed using Student’s t test, Mann Whitney, Chi-square and Fisher’s exact test; the odds ratio was used when a significant association has been identified. Results: Most participants were female (81.4%, adult (62%, who did not cohabitated (62.7%, domestic workers (35.6% with musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders (86.4%. Thirty-two participants took medicine at the beginning of the intervention and, at the end, only five did so. After treatment, the amount of administered medications was also significantly reduced. The score of the Visual Analogue Scale (pain or dyspnea was significantly reduced at the end of an average of 7.7 ± 3.2 sessions. Those users who reported having followed the domiciliary advice had an 8.3 times greater chance of being discharged. Conclusions: The weekly physical therapy sessions carried out at Primary Care units reduced symptoms, the use and amount of medication taken by the users treated and achieved greater success among those who followed the domiciliary advice given by the resident physical therapists.

  13. Impaired popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation caused by reduced daily physical activity is prevented by increased shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, André L; Padilla, Jaume; Vianna, Lauro C

    2017-07-01

    We recently showed that 5 days of reduced daily physical activity impair popliteal artery, but not brachial artery, flow-mediated dilation (FMD). However, the mechanisms by which physical inactivity causes leg vascular dysfunction are unclear. We reason that a reduction in leg blood flow-induced shear stress is a primary underlying mechanism by which reduced daily physical activity impairs popliteal artery FMD. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine whether increased leg blood flow and shear stress during inactivity prevent the reduction in popliteal artery FMD. Bilateral popliteal artery FMD measures were performed at baseline and after 5 days of a transition from high (>10,000 steps/day) to low levels (physical activity in 13 healthy and physically active men [20 ± 2 (SD) yr]. During the inactive period, one foot was submerged in ~42°C water (i.e., heated leg) three times a day for 30 min each period, to increase blood flow and thus shear stress, whereas the contralateral leg remained dry and served as internal control (i.e., nonheated leg). During heating, popliteal artery mean shear rate was increased in the heated leg (change of 119.3 ± 26.4%, P physical activity in the control nonheated leg (P results support the hypothesis that reduced leg blood flow-induced shear stress during physical inactivity is a key underlying mechanism mediating leg vascular dysfunction.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We found that the impairment in popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation caused by physical inactivity can be prevented by increased shear stress. These findings indicate that reduced leg blood flow-induced shear stress during physical inactivity may be a key underlying mechanism mediating the detrimental leg vascular effects of physical inactivity. Heating the foot area may be used as a nonpharmacological therapy to combat inactivity-induced leg vascular dysfunction, especially in people who are unable or unwilling to be active. Copyright © 2017 the American

  14. Olanzapine reduces physical activity in rats exposed to activity-based anorexia : possible implications for treatment of anorexia nervosa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Kas, Martien J H; van Engeland, Herman; Adan, Roger A H

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa (AN) patients often show extreme hypophagia and excessive physical activity. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model of AN and mimics food restriction and hyperactivity in rats. This study investigated whether treatment with olanzapine (Zyprexa) reduc

  15. Impact of Interactive Engagement on Reducing the Gender Gap in Quantum Physics Learning Outcomes among Senior Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Benson Adesina

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the author examines the extent to which an interactive engagement approach can reduce the gender gap in senior secondary school (SSS) (age 16-18 years) students' learning outcomes in quantum physics. One hundred and twenty one (male = 65; female = 56) SSS 3 students participated in this study. They were randomly selected from two…

  16. Decreased physical activity, reduced QoL and presence of debilitating fatigue in patients with Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Eline S.; Smans, Lisanne C C J; Hofstetter, Hedwig; Stubbe, Janine H.; de Vries, Marieke; Backx, Frank J G; Hermus, Ad R M M; Zelissen, Pierre M J

    BACKGROUND: Health related quality of life in patients with Addison's disease has been assessed in various European countries, indicating a reduced quality of life. However, no studies have addressed the impact of Addison's disease on physical activity. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to

  17. Decreased physical activity, reduced QoL and presence of debilitating fatigue in patients with Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, E.S. Van der; Smans, L.C.C.J.; Hofstetter, H.; Stubbe, J.H.; Vries, M de; Backx, F.J.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Zelissen, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life in patients with Addison's disease has been assessed in various European countries, indicating a reduced quality of life. However, no studies have addressed the impact of Addison's disease on physical activity. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to

  18. Decreased physical activity, reduced QoL and presence of debilitating fatigue in patients with Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, E.S. van der; Smans, L.C.C.J.; Hofstetter, H.; Stubbe, J.H.; Vries, M. de; Backx, F.J.G.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Zelissen, P.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health-related quality of life in patients with Addison's disease has been assessed in various European countries, indicating a reduced quality of life. However, no studies have addressed the impact of Addison's disease on physical activity. Objective: The aim of this study was to

  19. Effectiveness of measures and implementation strategies in reducing physical work demands due to manual handling at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, H.F. van der; Sluiter, J.; Hulshof, C.T.J.; Vink, P.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.

    2005-01-01

    This is a study of the effectiveness of interventions to reduce the physical work demands associated with manual (materials) handling in the work situation and musculoskeletal symptoms in the longer term. A systematic electronic literature search between 1990 and February 2003 was performed in 5 dat

  20. Impact of Interactive Engagement on Reducing the Gender Gap in Quantum Physics Learning Outcomes among Senior Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Benson Adesina

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the author examines the extent to which an interactive engagement approach can reduce the gender gap in senior secondary school (SSS) (age 16-18 years) students' learning outcomes in quantum physics. One hundred and twenty one (male = 65; female = 56) SSS 3 students participated in this study. They were randomly selected from two…

  1. Olanzapine reduces physical activity in rats exposed to activity-based anorexia : possible implications for treatment of anorexia nervosa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Kas, Martien J H; van Engeland, Herman; Adan, Roger A H

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa (AN) patients often show extreme hypophagia and excessive physical activity. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model of AN and mimics food restriction and hyperactivity in rats. This study investigated whether treatment with olanzapine (Zyprexa) reduc

  2. Static and dynamic loads on the bottom row of armour units: A theoretical and physical model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Koppel, M.A.; Muilwijk, M.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    A physical model study on the row averaged static and dynamic load on the bottom row of single layer armour units in order to investigate the influence of various parameters such as the number of rows on the slope of a breakwater and the initial relative packing density.

  3. Static and dynamic loads on the bottom row of armour units: A theoretical and physical model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Koppel, M.A.; Muilwijk, M.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    A physical model study on the row averaged static and dynamic load on the bottom row of single layer armour units in order to investigate the influence of various parameters such as the number of rows on the slope of a breakwater and the initial relative packing density.

  4. 78 FR 79017 - Zion Solutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Physical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Zion Solutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Physical... shut down facility and responsibility for its decommissioning was transferred to ZionSolutions (ZS), a subsidiary of EnergySolutions. ZS was established solely for the purpose of acquiring and decommissioning...

  5. Education reduces the effects of genetic susceptibilities to poor physical health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Wendy; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Mortensen, Erik L

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Greater education is associated with better physical health. This has been of great concern to public health officials. Most demonstrations show that education influences mean levels of health. Little is known about the influence of education on variance in health status, or about how...... this influence may impact the underlying genetic and environmental sources of health problems. This study explored these influences. METHODS: In a 2002 postal questionnaire, 21 522 members of same-sex pairs in the Danish Twin Registry born between 1931 and 1982 reported physical health in the 12-item Short Form...... Health Survey. We used quantitative genetic models to examine how genetic and environmental variance in physical health differed with level of education, adjusting for birth-year effects. RESULTS: and Conclusions As expected, greater education was associated with better physical health. Greater education...

  6. Substance Use, Mental Disorders and Physical Health of Caribbeans at-Home Compared to Those Residing in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krim K. Lacey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the health conditions of domestic Caribbeans with those living in the United States to explore how national context and migration experiences might influence substance use (i.e., alcohol or drug and other mental and physical health conditions. The study is based upon probability samples of non-institutionalized Caribbeans living in the United States (1621, Jamaica (1216 and Guyana (2068 18 years of age and over. Employing descriptive statistics and multivariate analytic procedures, the results revealed that substance use and other physical health conditions and major depressive disorder and mania vary by national context, with higher rates among Caribbeans living in the United States. Context and generation status influenced health outcomes. Among first generation black Caribbeans, residing in the United States for a longer length of time is linked to poorer health outcomes. There were different socio-demographic correlates of health among at-home and abroad Caribbeans. The results of this study support the need for additional research to explain how national context, migratory experiences and generation status contribute to understanding substance use and mental disorders and physical health outcomes among Caribbean first generation and descendants within the United States, compared to those remaining in the Caribbean region.

  7. Leisure time physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of preterm delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegaard, Hanne Kristine; Hedegaard, Morten; Damm, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This study was undertaken to study the association between the times spent on sports activities and leisure time physical activity in the first and early second trimester of pregnancy and the risk of preterm delivery.......This study was undertaken to study the association between the times spent on sports activities and leisure time physical activity in the first and early second trimester of pregnancy and the risk of preterm delivery....

  8. Reducing inappropriate antibiotics prescribing: The role of online commentary on physical examination findings

    OpenAIRE

    Heritage, J; Elliott, M; Stivers, T.; Richardson, A.; Mangione-Smith, R

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the relationship of ‘online commentary’(contemporaneous physician comments about physical examination [PE] findings) with (i) parent questioning of the treatment recommendation and (ii) inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Methods: A nested cross-sectional study of 522 encounters motivated by upper respiratory symptoms in 27 California pediatric practices (38 pediatricians). Physicians completed a post-visit survey regarding physical examination findings, d...

  9. Unit operations for gas-liquid mass transfer in reduced gravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Allen, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Basic scaling rules are derived for converting Earth-based designs of mass transfer equipment into designs for a reduced gravity environment. Three types of gas-liquid mass transfer operations are considered: bubble columns, spray towers, and packed columns. Application of the scaling rules reveals that the height of a bubble column in lunar- and Mars-based operations would be lower than terrestrial designs by factors of 0.64 and 0.79 respectively. The reduced gravity columns would have greater cross-sectional areas, however, by factors of 2.4 and 1.6 for lunar and Martian settings. Similar results were obtained for spray towers. In contract, packed column height was found to be nearly independent of gravity.

  10. Association of proximity and density of parks and objectively measured physical activity in the United States: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Carolyn; Joshi, Spruha; Rundle, Andrew; Hutson, Malo; Chong, Catherine; Weiss, Christopher C; Genkinger, Jeanine; Neckerman, Kathryn; Lovasi, Gina

    2015-08-01

    One strategy for increasing physical activity is to create and enhance access to park space. We assessed the literature on the relationship of parks and objectively measured physical activity in population-based studies in the United States (US) and identified limitations in current built environment and physical activity measurement and reporting. Five English-language scholarly databases were queried using standardized search terms. Abstracts were screened for the following inclusion criteria: 1) published between January 1990 and June 2013; 2) US-based with a sample size greater than 100 individuals; 3) included built environment measures related to parks or trails; and 4) included objectively measured physical activity as an outcome. Following initial screening for inclusion by two independent raters, articles were abstracted into a database. Of 10,949 abstracts screened, 20 articles met the inclusion criteria. Five articles reported a significant positive association between parks and physical activity. Nine studies found no association, and six studies had mixed findings. Our review found that even among studies with objectively measured physical activity, the association between access to parks and physical activity varied between studies, possibly due to heterogeneity of exposure measurement. Self-reported (vs. independently-measured) neighborhood park environment characteristics and smaller (vs. larger) buffer sizes were more predictive of physical activity. We recommend strategies for further research, employing standardized reporting and innovative study designs to better understand the relationship of parks and physical activity.

  11. Perspective on the energy future of the Northeast United States. [Reduce demand and develop diversified supplies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, J.; Davitian, H.; Goettle, R. IV; Palmedo, P.F.

    1976-06-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the implications of alternative energy futures for the northeastern U.S. First, the past and present energy supply and demand patterns for the U.S. and the northeast region are reviewed. Then, on the basis of detailed analyses of present and possible future supply and demand activities, scenarios for the years 1985 and 2000 are constructed and compared to examine the implications of various policies that will affect future supply and demand activities. Economic and environmental consequences are also discussed. The principal findings of the study are these: (1) conservation measures can reduce fuel and resource requirements in the northeast by over 30 percent; (2) oil imports are likely to continue to be a major energy resource for the northeast since only if strong conservation measures are combined with large increases in U.S. energy supplies is there apt to be a substantial decline in oil imports to the region; (3) a shift to coal and other alternate energy supplies, coupled with increased conservation, could compensate for a curtailment in the use of nuclear power in the region; (4) new resource technologies are capable of supplying up to 20 percent of the region's energy requirements in 2000; (5) no single supply technology or single conservation strategy taken alone can reduce the region's increasing dependence on foreign oil. Rather, the creation of an acceptable energy system for the region will require efforts in many directions in terms both of reducing demand and developing reliable, diversified supplies.

  12. Domesticating Physics: Introductory Physics Textbooks for Women in Home Economics in the United States, 1914-1955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrman, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Technologies such as electrical appliances entered American households on a large scale only after many decades of promotion to the public. The genre of "household physics" textbooks was one such form of promotion that was directed towards assumed white, female and largely middle-class home economics students. Published from the 1910s to…

  13. Domesticating Physics: Introductory Physics Textbooks for Women in Home Economics in the United States, 1914-1955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrman, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Technologies such as electrical appliances entered American households on a large scale only after many decades of promotion to the public. The genre of "household physics" textbooks was one such form of promotion that was directed towards assumed white, female and largely middle-class home economics students. Published from the 1910s to…

  14. Reduced physical activity in adults at risk for type 2 diabetes who curtail their sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, John N; Bromley, Lindsay E; Darukhanavala, Amy P; Whitmore, Harry R; Imperial, Jacqueline G; Penev, Pamen D

    2012-02-01

    Adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes have high metabolic morbidity, which is exacerbated by physical inactivity. Self-reported sleep diabetes, which may be mediated in part by sleep-loss-related reduction in physical activity. We examined the relationship between habitual sleep curtailment and physical activity in adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes. Forty-eight young urban adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes (27 F/21 M; mean (s.d.) age 26 (4) years; BMI 23.8 (2.5) kg/m(2)) each completed 13 (2) days of sleep and physical activity monitoring by wrist actigraphy and waist accelerometry while following their usual lifestyle at home. Laboratory polysomnography was used to screen for sleep disorders. The primary outcome of the study was the comparison of total daily activity counts between participants with habitual sleep diabetes who habitually curtail their sleep have less daily physical activity and more sedentary living, which may enhance their metabolic risk.

  15. Physical activity reduces the risk of subsequent depression for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, William J; Deleger, Stéphane; Roberts, Robert E; Kaplan, George A

    2002-08-15

    Previous studies assessing protective effects of physical activity on depression have had conflicting results; one recent study argued that excluding disabled subjects attenuated any observed effects. The authors' objective was to compare the effects of higher levels of physical activity on prevalent and incident depression with and without exclusion of disabled subjects. Participants were 1,947 community-dwelling adults from the Alameda County Study aged 50-94 years at baseline in 1994 with 5 years of follow-up. Depression was measured using criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Physical activity was measured with an eight-point scale; odds ratios are based upon a one-point increase on the scale. Even with adjustments for age, sex, ethnicity, financial strain, chronic conditions, disability, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking, and social relations, greater physical activity was protective for both prevalent depression (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79, 1.01) and incident depression (adjusted OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.73, 0.96) over 5 years. Exclusion of disabled subjects did not attenuate the incidence results (adjusted OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.92). Findings support the protective effects of physical activity on depression for older adults and argue against excluding disabled subjects from similar studies.

  16. American Cancer Society Guidelines on nutrition and physical activity for cancer prevention: reducing the risk of cancer with healthy food choices and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushi, Lawrence H; Doyle, Colleen; McCullough, Marji; Rock, Cheryl L; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Bandera, Elisa V; Gapstur, Susan; Patel, Alpa V; Andrews, Kimberly; Gansler, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines to serve as a foundation for its communication, policy, and community strategies and, ultimately, to affect dietary and physical activity patterns among Americans. These Guidelines, published approximately every 5 years, are developed by a national panel of experts in cancer research, prevention, epidemiology, public health, and policy, and they reflect the most current scientific evidence related to dietary and activity patterns and cancer risk. The ACS Guidelines focus on recommendations for individual choices regarding diet and physical activity patterns, but those choices occur within a community context that either facilitates or creates barriers to healthy behaviors. Therefore, this committee presents recommendations for community action to accompany the 4 recommendations for individual choices to reduce cancer risk. These recommendations for community action recognize that a supportive social and physical environment is indispensable if individuals at all levels of society are to have genuine opportunities to choose healthy behaviors. The ACS Guidelines are consistent with guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association for the prevention of coronary heart disease and diabetes, as well as for general health promotion, as defined by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.

  17. In-hospital fellow coverage reduces communication errors in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mallory; Alban, Rodrigo F; Hardy, James P; Oxman, David A; Garcia, Edward R; Hevelone, Nathanael; Frendl, Gyorgy; Rogers, Selwyn O

    2014-06-01

    Staff coverage strategies of intensive care units (ICUs) impact clinical outcomes. High-intensity staff coverage strategies are associated with lower morbidity and mortality. Accessible clinical expertise, team work, and effective communication have all been attributed to the success of this coverage strategy. We evaluate the impact of in-hospital fellow coverage (IHFC) on improving communication of cardiorespiratory events. A prospective observational study performed in an academic tertiary care center with high-intensity staff coverage. The main outcome measure was resident to fellow communication of cardiorespiratory events during IHFC vs home coverage (HC) periods. Three hundred twelve cardiorespiratory events were collected in 114 surgical ICU patients in 134 study days. Complete data were available for 306 events. One hundred three communication errors occurred. IHFC was associated with significantly better communication of events compared to HC (Pcommunicated 89% of events during IHFC vs 51% of events during HC (PCommunication patterns of junior and midlevel residents were similar. Midlevel residents communicated 68% of all on-call events (87% IHFC vs 50% HC, Pcommunicated 66% of events (94% IHFC vs 52% HC, PCommunication errors were lower in all ICUs during IHFC (Pcommunication errors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reliability of Wearable Inertial Measurement Units to Measure Physical Activity in Team Handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luteberget, Live S; Holme, Benjamin R; Spencer, Matt

    2017-09-05

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and sensitivity of commercially available inertial measurement units (IMU) to measure physical activity in team handball. Twenty-two handball players were instrumented with two IMUs (OptimEye S5, Catapult Sports, Australia) taped together. They participated in either a laboratory assessment (n=10), consisting of seven team handball specific tasks, or field assessment (n=12) conducted in twelve training sessions. Variables, including PlayerLoad™ and inertial movement analysis (IMA) magnitude and counts, were extracted from the manufactures software. IMA count was divided into intensity bands of low (1.5-2.5m·s(-1)), medium (2.5-3.5m·s(-1)), high (>3.5m·s(-1)), medium/high (>2.5m·s(-1)), and total (>1.5m·s(-1)). Reliability between devices and sensitivity was established using coefficient of variation (CV) and smallest worthwhile difference (SWD). Laboratory assessment : IMA magnitude showed a good reliability (CV: 3.1%) in well-controlled tasks. CV increased (4.4-6.7%) in more complex tasks. Field assessment : Total IMA count (CV: 1.8%, SWD: 2.5%), PlayerLoad™ (CV: 0.9 % SWD: 2.1%), and its associated variables (CV: 0.4-1.7%) showed a good reliability, well below the SWD. However, the CV of IMA increased when categorized into intensity bands (2.9-5.6%). The reliability of IMA count were good, when data was displayed as total, high or medium/high counts. A good reliability for PlayerLoad™ and associated variables was evident. The CV of the aforementioned variables was well below the SWD, suggesting that OptimEye IMU and its software are sensitive for use in team handball.

  19. Effect of aquatic physical therapy on pain and state of sleep and wakefulness among stable preterm newborns in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignochi, Carine Moraes; Teixeira, Patrícia P; Nader, Silvana S

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of aquatic physical therapy on pain and on the cycle of sleep and wakefulness among stable hospitalized premature infants. This study was characterized as an uncontrolled clinical trial on a time series and included 12 clinically stable newborns of gestational age less than 36 weeks who were hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). After selection, the newborns were placed in a liquid medium for aquatic physical therapy lasting 10 minutes. Movements to stimulate flexor posture and postural organization were performed. The sleep-wakefulness cycle was assessed using the adapted Brazelton (1973)* scale and pain was assessed by the occurrence of signs of pain according to the Neonatal Facial Coding System (NFCS) scale; and physiological parameters. In relation to states of sleep and wakefulness, before the physical therapy, the newborns' behavior varied from fully awake with vigorous body movements to crying. After the physical therapy, the states of sleep ranged from light sleep with closed eyes to some body movement. These values presented statistically significant differences (paquatic physical therapy can be a simple and effective method for reducing pain and improving sleep quality among preterm infants in NICUs. Controlled studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed in order to generalize the results. Article registered of the Clinical Trials under the NCT00785837.

  20. Decreased physical activity, reduced QoL and presence of debilitating fatigue in patients with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, Eline S; Smans, Lisanne C C J; Hofstetter, Hedwig; Stubbe, Janine H; de Vries, Marieke; Backx, Frank J G; Hermus, Ad R M M; Zelissen, Pierre M J

    2016-09-01

    Health-related quality of life in patients with Addison's disease has been assessed in various European countries, indicating a reduced quality of life. However, no studies have addressed the impact of Addison's disease on physical activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of life in Dutch patients with Addison's disease particularly regarding the presence of fatigue and the ability to be physically active. In this cross-sectional study, a postal survey was performed among Dutch patients with Addison's disease on stable glucocorticoid replacement therapy with hydrocortisone or cortisone acetate. For quality of life and physical activity assessment, patients completed general and health-related quality of life and physical activity questionnaires, and scores were compared to Dutch controls. A total of 328 patients with Addison's disease were studied. In patients with Addison's disease, only 45·7% met the standard of physical activity (Combinorm) compared to 67·8% of Dutch controls (P Addison's disease, combined with a reduced subjective health-related QoL and increased fatigue. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Early transfer of mated females into the maternity unit reduces stress and increases maternal care in farm mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    sized groups (n = 60): (i) ‘EARLY’, transfer to maternity unit immediately after the end of the mating period, March 23; (ii) ‘INTERMEDIATE’, transfer in the middle of the period, April 10; (iii) ‘LATE’, transfer late in the pregnancy period, April 25. Data collection included weekly determination...... to an environment with free access to nest building material. During the weeks before delivery, INTERMEDIATE females had 50% higher FCM concentrations than the other two groups (P = 0.002), indicative of stress. After delivery, late moved females had, in average, 2.7 °C colder nests compared to early moved females...... vitality from early moved females. In conclusion, transfer into the maternity unit early after mating, rather than later during the pregnancy period, reduces stress and increases maternal care in farm mink....

  2. Quantitative seismic interpretation: Applying rock physics tools to reduce interpretation risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Chen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Seismic data analysis is one of the key technologies for characterizing reservoirs and monitoring subsurface pore fluids. While there have been great advances in 3D seismic data processing, the quantitative interpretation of the seismic data for rock properties still poses many challenges. This book demonstrates how rock physics can be applied to predict reservoir parameters, such as lithologies and pore fluids, from seismically derived attributes, as well as how the multidisciplinary combination of rock physics models with seismic data, sedimentological information, and stochastic techniques can lead to more powerful results than can be obtained from a single technique.

  3. Reduced physical activity in children and adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis despite satisfactory control of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Nielsen, Susan; Muller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    minute, cpm) (475.6 vs. 522.7, p = 0.0000018) and in minutes per day spent with cpm >1500 (67.9 vs. 76.4, p = 0.0000014), with cpm >2000 (moderate physical activity) (48.4 vs. 52.8, p = 0.0001, and with cpm >3000 (high physical activity) (24.7 vs. 26.5, p = 0.00015). A negative association (β = -0.213, p...

  4. Lean Six Sigma to Reduce Intensive Care Unit Length of Stay and Costs in Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Stephen; Mercincavage, Michael; Angelini, Cory; Cogliano, William; Damuth, Emily; Roberts, Brian W; Zanotti, Sergio; Mazzarelli, Anthony J

    2016-11-29

    Patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) represent important "outliers" of hospital length of stay (LOS) and costs (∼$26 billion annually in the United States). We tested the hypothesis that a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) approach for process improvement could reduce hospital LOS and the associated costs of care for patients with PMV. Before-and-after cohort study. Multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) in an academic medical center. Adult patients admitted to the ICU and treated with PMV, as defined by diagnosis-related group (DRG). We implemented a clinical redesign intervention based on LSS principles. We identified eight distinct processes in preparing patients with PMV for post-acute care. Our clinical redesign included reengineering daily patient care rounds ("Lean ICU rounds") to reduce variation and waste in these processes. We compared hospital LOS and direct cost per case in patients with PMV before (2013) and after (2014) our LSS intervention. Among 259 patients with PMV (131 preintervention; 128 postintervention), median hospital LOS decreased by 24% during the intervention period (29 vs. 22 days, p < .001). Accordingly, median hospital direct cost per case decreased by 27% ($66,335 vs. $48,370, p < .001). We found that a LSS-based clinical redesign reduced hospital LOS and the costs of care for patients with PMV.

  5. Efficiency of light-emitting diode and halogen units in reducing residual monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Ribeiro Carvalho, Felipe; Almeida, Rhita C.; Almeida, Marco Antonio; Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Leite, Marcia C. Amorim M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this in-vitro study, we aimed to compare the residual monomers in composites beneath brackets bonded to enamel, using a light-emitting diode (LED) or a halogen unit, and to compare the residual monomers in the central to the peripheral areas of the composite. Methods Twenty bovine teeth preserved in 0.1% thymol were used in this study. Ten teeth were used to standardize the thickness of the composite film, since different thicknesses would cause different absorbance of light. Brackets were bonded to 10 bovine incisors, with the halogen light (n = 5) and the LED (n = 5). The brackets were debonded, and the remaining composite on the enamel surface was sectioned in 2 regions: peripheral (0.8 mm) and central, resulting in 2 subgroups per group: central halogen (n = 5), peripheral halogen (n = 5), central LED (n = 5), and peripheral LED (n = 5). The spectrometric analysis in the infrared region was used to measure the free monomers with the attenuated total reflectance method. Results Normal distribution was tested by using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Data were compared by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at P <0.05. The LED group showed fewer residual monomers than did the halogen group (P = 0.014). No differences were found among the regions (P = 0.354), and there were no interactions between light type and region (P = 0.368). Conclusions LED leaves less residual monomer than does the halogen light, even with half of the irradiation time; there were no differences between the central and peripheral regions, and no interaction between light type and region. PMID:21055603

  6. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (Pnosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries.

  7. Social Environments and Physical Aggression among 21,107 Students in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, William; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Simons-Morton, Bruce; Dostaler, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Background: Physical aggression is an important issue in North American populations. The importance of students' social environments in the occurrence of physical aggression requires focused study. In this study, reports of physical aggression were examined in relation to social environment factors among national samples of students from Canada…

  8. Stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with observation unit care reduces cost for patients with emergent chest pain: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chadwick D; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B; Hamilton, Craig A; Harper, Erin N; Hundley, W Gregory

    2010-09-01

    We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Older persons afraid of falling reduce physical activity to prevent outdoor falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Jong, R. de; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective.: The aim of this study was to test the assumption that the level of outdoor physical activity mediates the relationship between fear of falling and actual outdoor falls according to the Task Difficulty Homeostasis Theory. Method.: A prospective follow-up study of 10 months conducted in th

  10. The effect of a cognitive and a physical stress-reducing programme on psychological complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhenen, W. van; Blonk, R.W.B.; Klink, J.J. van der; Dijk, F.J. van; Schaufeli, W.B.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the short-term and long-term effectiveness of two, brief, preventive, work stress management programmes. One programme was a cognition-focused programme, the other was a newly developed intervention in which physical exercise and relaxation were combined. It was

  11. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  12. Promoting physical activity and reducing climate change : Opportunities to replace short car trips with active transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maibach, E.; Steg, L.; Anable, J.

    2009-01-01

    Automobile use is a significant contributor to climate change, local air pollution, pedestrian injuries and deaths, declines in physical activity and obesity. A significant proportion of car use is for short trips that can relatively easily be taken with active transportation options - walking or

  13. The effect of a cognitive and a physical stress-reducing programme on psychological complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhenen, W. van; Blonk, R.W.B.; Klink, J.J. van der; Dijk, F.J. van; Schaufeli, W.B.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the short-term and long-term effectiveness of two, brief, preventive, work stress management programmes. One programme was a cognition-focused programme, the other was a newly developed intervention in which physical exercise and relaxation were combined. It was hypothesis

  14. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  15. Reducing psychological distress and obesity in Australian farmers by promoting physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCoombe Scott

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have confirmed that the rate of mental illness is no higher in rural Australians than that of urban Australians. However, the rate of poor mental health outcomes, and in particular suicide, is significantly raised in rural populations. This is thought to be due to lack of early diagnosis, health service access, the distance-decay effect, poor physical health determinants and access to firearms. Research conducted by the National Centre for Farmer Health between 2004 and 2009 reveals that there is a correlation between obesity and psychological distress among the farming community where suicide rates are recognised as high. Chronic stress overstimulates the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis that is associated with abdominal obesity. Increasing physical activity may block negative thoughts, increase social contact, positively influence brain chemistry and improve both physical and mental health. This paper describes the design of the Farming Fit study that aims to identify the effect of physical activity on psychological distress, obesity and health behaviours such as diet patterns and smoking in farm men and women. Methods/Design For this quasi-experimental (convenience sample control-intervention study, overweight (Body Mass Index ≥25 kg/m2 farm men and women will be recruited from Sustainable Farm Families™ (SFF programs held across Victoria, Australia. Baseline demographic data, health data, depression anxiety stress scale (DASS scores, dietary information, physical activity data, anthropometric data, blood pressure and biochemical analysis of plasma and salivary cortisol levels will be collected. The intervention group will receive an exercise program and regular phone coaching in order to increase their physical activity. Analysis will evaluate the impact of the intervention by longitudinal data (baseline and post intervention comparison of intervention and control groups. Discussion

  16. The practice of active rest by workplace units improves personal relationships, mental health, and physical activity among workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Jiang, Ying; Ariyoshi, Daisuke; Yoshida, Marie; Moriyama, Hideko; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2017-03-28

    This study was designed to clarify the effects of active rest, with a focus on the practice of short-time group exercise by workplace units, on personal relationships, mental health, physical activity, and work ability among workers. Fifty-nine white-collar workers (40 males and 19 females) performed our active rest (short-time exercise) program, which consists of warm-up, cognitive functional training, aerobic exercise, resistance training and cool-down for 10 minutes per day, 3 times per week during their lunch breaks for 10 weeks. Participants from a workplace unit were randomly allocated to the intervention (five workplaces, n=29) or control groups (six workplaces, n=30). The participants' anthropometric measurements, and their Profile of Mood States (POMS) 2, Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ), physical activity levels and Work Ability Index were examined at the baseline and after the 10-week intervention. After 10 weeks, physical activity levels, especially the time spent in moderate and vigorous intensity, increased in the intervention group (pchange in "vigor-activity" in POMS 2 (r=0.467, p=0.011). These results suggest that the practice of active rest by workplace units is important for improving personal relationships, mental health, and physical activity among workers.

  17. Analytically reduced form of multicenter integrals from Gaussian transforms. [in atomic and molecular physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straton, Jack C.

    1989-01-01

    The four-dimensional Fourier-Feynman transformations previously used in analytically reducing the general class of integrals containing multicenter products of 1s hydrogenic orbitals, Coulomb or Yukawa potentials, and plane waves, are replaced by the one-dimensional Gaussian transformation. This reduces the previously required double-diagonalization of the quadratic form of the multicenter integrals to only one diagonalization, yielding a simpler reduced form of the integral. The present work also extends the result to include all s states and pairs of states with l not equal to zero summed over the m quantum number.

  18. Washing older blood units before transfusion reduces plasma iron and improves outcomes in experimental canine pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Puch, Irene; Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Solomon, Steven B; Remy, Kenneth E; Fernandez, Melinda; Feng, Jing; Kanias, Tamir; Bellavia, Landon; Sinchar, Derek; Perlegas, Andreas; Solomon, Michael A; Kelley, Walter E; Popovsky, Mark A; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Klein, Harvey G; Natanson, Charles

    2014-02-27

    In a randomized controlled blinded trial, 2-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24), with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, were exchanged-transfused with either 7- or 42-day-old washed or unwashed canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Washing red cells (RBC) before transfusion had a significantly different effect on canine survival, multiple organ injury, plasma iron, and cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) levels depending on the age of stored blood (all, P blood improved survival rates, shock score, lung injury, cardiac performance and liver function, and reduced levels of non-transferrin bound iron and plasma labile iron. In contrast, washing fresh blood worsened all these same clinical parameters and increased CFH levels. Our data indicate that transfusion of fresh blood, which results in less hemolysis, CFH, and iron release, is less toxic than transfusion of older blood in critically ill infected subjects. However, washing older blood prevented elevations in plasma circulating iron and improved survival and multiple organ injury in animals with an established pulmonary infection. Our data suggest that fresh blood should not be washed routinely because, in a setting of established infection, washed RBC are prone to release CFH and result in worsened clinical outcomes.

  19. Skipping breakfast reduces energy intake and physical activity in healthy women who are habitual breakfast eaters: A randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Eiichi; Hatamoto, Yoichi; Yonekura, Satomi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2017-03-09

    Many epidemiological studies indicate a positive relationship between skipping breakfast (SB) and obesity. However, it is unclear whether SB affects energy intake and physical activity during the day. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of SB on energy intake and physical activity under free-living conditions. The present study used a randomized, crossover trial design comparing eating breakfast (EB) and SB days. Twenty lean, healthy women 21-25years old who were habitual breakfast eaters (≥5daysperweek) took part in this study. On EB days, participants were provided a standard breakfast (542kcal). The meals and physical activity after breakfast were under free-living conditions. The meals consisted of foods available at supermarkets, restaurants, and convenience stores. Dietary intake was evaluated by adding values from food labels. Physical activity was assessed using a tri-axial accelerometer. Energy intake at lunch was significantly increased after SB compared with EB (+131±188kcal; p=0.0057). Total energy intake per day was significantly lower after SB compared with EB (-262±428kcal, p=0.013). Physical activity energy expenditure was slightly lower after SB compared with EB (-41±75kcal in the morning, p=0.024; -56±129kcalperday, p=0.064). Step counts and time spent physically active over the whole day were not significantly different between conditions. Skipping breakfast reduced energy intake during the day and morning physical activity in healthy women who were habitual breakfast eaters. The decreased energy expenditure related to physical activity after SB did not exceed the decreased energy intake.

  20. Strategies used by adults to reduce their prescription drug costs: United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robin A; Villarroel, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Among U.S. adults aged 18-64, strategies for reducing prescription drug costs were more commonly practiced by those who were uninsured than those who had public or private coverage. Lack of health insurance coverage and poverty are recognized risk factors for not taking medication as prescribed due to cost. This cost-saving strategy may result in poorer health status and increased emergency room use and hospitalizations, compared with adults who follow their recommended pharmacotherapy. It is unknown whether adverse health outcomes and higher health care costs are also associated with the cost-reduction strategies of alternative therapy use or obtaining prescription drugs from abroad. Among adults aged 65 and over, those covered by both Medicare and Medicaid were more likely to have not taken their medication as prescribed to save money, but were less likely to have asked their doctor for a lower-cost prescription, than those who had private insurance coverage. Differences in cost-saving strategies by insurance coverage may be interrelated with socioeconomic and other patient characteristics. Belief that the recommended pharmacotherapy is needed, and an understanding of the recommended treatment, have been found to be lower among older adults who are economically vulnerable, compared with those with higher income. Income was also associated with the use of cost-reduction strategies. Among adults aged 65 and over, those living with incomes at 139%-400% FPL were more likely than adults living in lower or higher income thresholds to have asked their provider for a lower-cost prescription to save money. These patterns in the estimates by insurance status and poverty level are similar to those previously reported using the 2011 NHIS data.

  1. [Measurement units used in treatments to reduce weight and obesity. Systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Hervás, Ana Isabel; Reig García-Galbis, Manuel; Rizo Baeza, M Mercedes; Cortés Castell, Ernesto; Mur Villar, Norma; Aguilar Cordero, M J

    2014-09-01

    There are different parameters to express the loss of weight in the treatment of overweight and obesity: absolute loss, percentage of loss, decrease in BMI, etc. To determine the magnitudes more used in the bibliography in order to establish criteria for uniformity in the expression of those results. a systematic review of the last five years has made at Proquest, CINHAL, Scopus, with descriptors "body fat distribution" and "diet" and "diet, reducing" and "weight loss". Articles published in English, French and Spanish were selected. Inclusion criteria were used: articles only dietary treatment of overweight in humans, and exclusion criteria: not dietary treatments, metabolic diseases, less than 50 patients and less than 8 weeks of treatment. Title, summary, methodology, results and discussion have been analysed by two researchers independently. 854 items found, only 61 met the criteria. These were grouped into 5 subgroups, as they expressed the weight loss (weight or fat loss in kg; weight and fat loss in kg; weight or fat loss in %; weight loss in % and fat loss in kg or vice versa; weight and far loss in%). The results show a lack of homogeneity in the loss, being the percentage the most used expression. There is great heterogeneity in the expression of results of the treatments for weight loss; the diet is one of the least used tools; the analysis of clinical trials of intervention reflects a high quality in subjects older than 18 years, highlighting the lack of this type of research lines in children under 18 years. Therefore, it should standardize the magnitudes of expression of the success of these treatments and increase the lines of research on this topic. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) members, United Kingdom, visiting the ATLAS semiconductor tracker (SCT) module tests.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Mr Peter Warry, PPARC Chairman, Victrex Plc, United Kingdom visiting the ATLAS SCT module tests with Dr Joleen Pater, SCT (Manchester). Photo 02: PPARC Council Members, United Kingdom, visiting the ATLAS SCT module tests. L.t to r.: Mrs Judith Scott, Chief Executive, British Computer Society, Prof. George Efstathiou, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Mr Peter Warry, PPARC Chairman, Victrex Plc, Prof. Martin Ward, Director X-Ray Astronomy, of Leicester, Prof. James Stirling, Director, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham and Prof. Brian Foster, University of Bristol.

  3. Freedom from restraint: consequences of reducing physical restraints in the management of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C; Mitchell-Pedersen, L; Fingerote, E; Edmund, L

    1989-01-01

    Physical restraint is commonly used in the management of elderly people in North American hospitals and nursing homes. Between December 1981 and March 1982 the Department of Geriatric Medicine, St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg, changed its practice regarding the use of such restraints. In the fiscal year 1980-81 the rate of application of physical restraints was 52 per 1000 patient-days and the frequency of falls 7 per 1000 patient-days. By 1986-87 the figures were 0.3 and 8.7 per 1000 patient-days respectively; the increase in falls was not clinically significant. During the study period there was a 40% reduction in the use of chemical restraints (psychotropic drugs other than hypnotic and antidepressant agents). Here we record how this change in practice occurred and persisted. PMID:2776096

  4. Regular physical activity and reduced occurrence of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle-Pascual, A L; Martin-Alvarez, P J; Reyes, C; Calle, J R

    1993-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of regular non-strenuous physical exercise on the appearance of microalbuminuria in Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients, we have studied a cohort of 372 Type 2 diabetic patients (152 males and 220 females, mean age: 63.59 +/- 0.70 years, evolution time: 10.31 +/- 0.4 years, M +/- SEM). One hundred and ninety seven (52.9%) presented normo-albuminuria, 124 (33.3%) microalbuminuria and 51 (13.7%) proteinuria. These three groups were different with regard to evolution time, weight, BMI, waist-hip ratio, Hb1Ac value, prevalence of hypertension and physical activity level. 132 (35.4%) patients had a regular exercise-induced caloric expenditure under 500 kcal/wk whereas 122 (32.7%) were between 500 and 1.000 kcal/wk and 118 (31.7%) over 1.000 kcal/wk. Prevalence of normo-albuminuric patients was 40.1%, 52.4% and 67.7% respectively (p physical activity level when adjusted to systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, evolution time and HbA1c value. Our results stress the fact that regular non-strenuous physical activity may have a protective effect on the appearance of microalbuminuria in Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Whether the cardiovascular protective influence of exercise in these patients depends on such an effect remains unknown. On the basis of this cross-sectional evidence, a longitudinal study is now under way.

  5. Regular physical activity reduces the effects of Achilles tendon vibration on postural control for older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitre, J; Serres, I; Lhuisset, L; Bois, J; Gasnier, Y; Paillard, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to determine in what extent physical activity influences postural control when visual, vestibular, and/or proprioceptive systems are disrupted. Two groups of healthy older women: an active group (74.0 ± 3.8 years) who practiced physical activities and a sedentary group (74.7 ± 6.3 years) who did not, underwent 12 postural conditions consisted in altering information emanating from sensory systems by means of sensory manipulations (i.e., eyes closed, cervical collar, tendon vibration, electromyostimulation, galvanic vestibular stimulation, foam surface). The center of foot pressure velocity was recorded on a force platform. Results indicate that the sensory manipulations altered postural control. The sedentary group was more disturbed than the active group by the use of tendon vibration. There was no clear difference between the two groups in the other conditions. This study suggests that the practice of physical activities is beneficial as a means of limiting the effects of tendon vibration on postural control through a better use of the not manipulated sensory systems and/or a more efficient reweighting to proprioceptive information from regions unaffected by the tendon vibration.

  6. Study of the effectiveness of a participatory ergonomics intervention in reducing worker pain severity through physical exposure pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Andrew C; Frazer, Mardon B; Cole, Donald C; Kerr, Mickey S; Wells, Richard P; Norman, Robert W

    2005-02-01

    A participatory ergonomics programme was implemented in an automotive parts manufacturing factory. An ergonomics change team was formed composed of members from management and the organized labour union. It was hypothesized that the physical change projects implemented as part of this process would result in decreased worker exposures to peak and cumulative physical demands and reduced worker perceptions of physical effort and pain severity. A quasi-experimental design was employed, utilizing a sister plant in the corporation as a referent group. A longitudinal questionnaire approach was used to document pre-post changes in worker perceptions. In general, the physical change projects were rated as improvements by workers and were successful at reducing peak and/or cumulative mechanical exposures. However, there were few systematic changes in perceived effort or pain severity levels. Explanations include the confounding effects of differential production rate and staffing changes at the intervention and referent plants and/or insufficient overall intervention intensity due to a relatively short intervention period, plant and team ambivalence towards the process and the low overall impact on exposure of the particular changes implemented.

  7. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their

  8. Musculoskeletal disorders in hemodialysis patients and its impact on physical function (Zagazig University Nephrology Unit, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany R El-Najjar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion Musculoskeletal system involvement remains a common problem that limits the physical function of patients with renal failure, in particular, those treated with long-term maintenance dialysis.

  9. Proposal for inclusion of topics of particle physics integrated electric charge through a potentially meaningful teaching units

    OpenAIRE

    Lisiane Barcellos Calheiro; Isabel Krey Garcia

    2014-01-01

    In this article the results of the analysis of free and concept maps produced are presented from the application and evaluation of a Potentially Meaningful Teaching Units – PMTU, which is a teaching sequence based on various learning theories and seeks to promote meaningful student learning. Presents, in this work, part of a research Masters in Science Education which deals with the inclusion of topics of particle physics integrated with traditional content of the third year of hi...

  10. The practice of active rest by workplace units improves personal relationships, mental health, and physical activity among workers

    OpenAIRE

    Michishita, Ryoma; Jiang, Ying; Ariyoshi, Daisuke; Yoshida, Marie; Moriyama, Hideko; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to clarify the effects of active rest, with a focus on the practice of short-time group exercise by workplace units, on personal relationships, mental health, physical activity, and work ability among workers. Methods: Fifty-nine white-collar workers (40 males and 19 females) performed our active rest (short-time exercise) program, which consists of warm-up, cognitive functional training, aerobic exercise, resistance training and cool-down for 10 minutes per day, ...

  11. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AGAINST DEVIANT BEHAVIOR: IS IT POSSIBLE TO PREVENT AND REDUCE DEVIANCES WITH SPORT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatka Al. Dimitrova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses physical activity and sport as a good way to overcome deviant behavior in children. A number of characteristics of sporting activity are identified, which define it as useful not only for the physical but also for the psychological, emotional and overall development of the personality. Organized extracurricular sports activities are mentioned as a good means of organizing the leisure time of the students. Of course, sport is not a universal remedy for the problems of society and the deviant behavior of children. But it is one of the working options for prevention and overcoming deviant behavior, especially if it is a result mainly of the child's personal characteristics such as aggression, temperamental behavior or adrenal dependence. Affiliation to the team gives the child certainty that they area member of a community where they give and receive permanent support. The pursuit of personal achievement reflects the development of the child and directs his or her energy in a positive direction. Achieved success boosts self-confidence and self-esteem that are so necessary to young people especially in teen years. Driving into discipline in sport will lead to compliance with social norms and public laws.

  12. Physics Education Research in the United States: A Summary of Its Rationale and Main Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Espada, Wilson J.

    2003-01-01

    Recognizes how difficult it is for secondary and post-secondary students to make connections between physics and everyday phenomena, rationalize the use of a particular formula for a given problem, and go beyond algebraic substitutions to really make sense of physics in a meaningful way. Provides a rationale for physicists to become involved in…

  13. Fun and Creative Unit Assessment Ideas for All Students in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional methods of assessment--such as rubrics, checklists, skill tests, and quizzes--have long been viable methods of evaluation in physical education, they may at times seem boring or overwhelming. Yet, assessment can be as fun and interesting as the activities that are taught in physical education, and can help to increase…

  14. The Current Experiences of Physical Education Teachers at Schools for Blind Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A.; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It has been well established that children with visual impairments tend to be less physically active and more delayed in motor skills than their sighted peers. As a result, there has been some research focusing on inclusive physical education for these children. However, there is a clear lack of research on the current status of…

  15. Content Analysis of Conceptually Based Physical Education in Southeastern United States Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Suzanne Ellen; Greene, Leon; Satinsky, Sonya; Neuberger, John

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to explore PE in higher education through the offering of traditional activity- and skills-based physical education (ASPE) and conceptually-based physical education (CPE) courses, and to conduct an exploratory content analysis on the CPE available to students in randomized colleges and universities in the…

  16. Physics Education Research in the United States: A Summary of Its Rationale and Main Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Espada, Wilson J.

    2003-01-01

    Recognizes how difficult it is for secondary and post-secondary students to make connections between physics and everyday phenomena, rationalize the use of a particular formula for a given problem, and go beyond algebraic substitutions to really make sense of physics in a meaningful way. Provides a rationale for physicists to become involved in…

  17. Proposal for inclusion of topics of particle physics integrated electric charge through a potentially meaningful teaching units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiane Barcellos Calheiro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article the results of the analysis of free and concept maps produced are presented from the application and evaluation of a Potentially Meaningful Teaching Units – PMTU, which is a teaching sequence based on various learning theories and seeks to promote meaningful student learning. Presents, in this work, part of a research Masters in Science Education which deals with the inclusion of topics of particle physics integrated with traditional content of the third year of high school. It was implemented in a third grade high school class of a State School in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, and Brazil. The PMTU aimed to address in an integrated manner threads for Particle Physics and Electronics. A didactic sequence that integrated the topics of electric charge, atomic models, elementary particles, quantization and process electrification was applied. Such integration aimed at stimulating the interest on topics related to Modern and Contemporary Physics. It was developed using PMTU activities that aimed at promoting meaningful learning and knowledge construction in the classroom, Since the topics involved were quite complex, this made their integration a real challenge to the high school teachers, and resulted in changes in their teaching practices. Research showed that the inclusion of topics on physics of elementary particles the and electricity, through Potentially Meaningful Teaching Units, show satisfactory results in the students’ learning.

  18. Morphology and the physical and thermal properties of thermoplastic polyurethane reinforced with thermally reduced graphene oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Strankowski Michał; Piszczyk Łukasz; Kosmela Paulina; Korzeniewski Piotr

    2015-01-01

    In this study, thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRG)-containing polyurethane nanocomposites were obtained by the extrusion method. The content of TRG incorporated into polyurethane elastomer systems equaled 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 wt%. The morphology, static and dynamic mechanical properties, and thermal stability of the modified materials were investigated. The application of TRG resulted in a visible increase in material stiffness as confirmed by the measurements of complex compression modul...

  19. Protein corona mitigates the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide by reducing its physical interaction with cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guangxin; Kang, Seung-gu; Tian, Xin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhao, Lin; Ge, Cuicui; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-10-07

    Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called "protein corona" formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical to understand how absorbed proteins on the surfaces of nanoparticles alter their biological effects. In this work, we have demonstrated with both experimental and theoretical approaches that protein BSA coating can mitigate the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by reducing its cell membrane penetration. Our cell viability and cellular uptake experiments showed that protein corona decreased cellular uptake of GO, thus significantly mitigating the potential cytotoxicity of GO. The electron microscopy images also confirmed that protein corona reduced the cellular morphological damage by limiting GO penetration into the cell membrane. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulations validated the experimental results and revealed that the adsorbed BSA in effect weakened the interaction between the phospholipids and graphene surface due to a reduction of the available surface area plus an unfavorable steric effect, thus significantly reducing the graphene penetration and lipid bilayer damaging. These findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of this important graphene protein corona interaction with cell membranes, and should have implications in future development of graphene-based biomedical applications.

  20. Process evaluation of workplace interventions with physical exercise to reduce musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L.; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2014-01-01

    were too much, and 29% would rather have trained a completely different kind of exercise. In conclusion, resistance training at the workplace is generally well received among office workers with neck-shoulder pain, but a one-size-fits-all approach is not feasible for all employees......Process evaluation is important to explain success or failure of workplace interventions. This study performs a summative process evaluation of workplace interventions with physical exercise. As part of a randomized controlled trial 132 office workers with neck and shoulder pain were to participate...... in 10 weeks of elastic resistance training five times a week at the workplace; the 2 min group performed a single set of lateral raise to failure, and the 12 min group performed 5-6 sets with 8–12 repetitions. Participants received a single instructional session together with a training diary and manual...

  1. Physical exercise reduces cardiac defects in type 2 spinal muscular atrophy-like mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Olivier; Lopes, Philippe; Desseille, Céline; Branchu, Julien; Chali, Farah; Ben Salah, Amina; Pariset, Claude; Chanoine, Christophe; Charbonnier, Frédéric

    2012-11-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading genetic cause of death in infants worldwide, is due to the misexpression of the survival of motor neuron protein, causing death of motor neurons. Several clinical symptoms suggested that, in addition to motor neurons, the autonomic nervous systems could be implicated in the cardiac function alterations observed in patienst with SMA. These alterations were also found in a severe SMA mouse model, including bradycardia and a reduction of sympathetic innervation, both associated with autonomic imbalance. In the present study, we investigate the extent of autonomic dysfunction and the effects of a running-based exercise on the altered cardiorespiratory function in type 2 SMA-like mice. We observed that the SMA induced: (1) a dramatic alteration of intrinsic cardiac conduction associated with bradycardia; (2) a severe cardiomyopathy associated with extensive ventricular fibrosis; and (3) a delay in cardiac muscle maturation associated with contractile protein expression defects. Furthermore, our data indicate that the sympathetic system is not only functioning, but also likely contributes to alleviate the bradycardia and the arrhythmia in SMA-like mice. Moreover, physical exercise provides many benefits, including the reduction of cardiac protein expression defect, the reduction of fibrosis, the increase in cardiac electrical conduction velocity, and the drastic reduction in bradycardia and arrhythmias resulting in the partial restoration of the cardiac function in these mice. Thus, modulating the cardiorespiratory function in SMA could represent a new target for improving supportive care and for developing new pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions that would most certainly include physical exercise.

  2. Leisure-time physical activity among older adults. United States, 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, H R; Croft, J B; Giles, W H; Anda, R F; Casper, M L; Caspersen, C J; Jones, D A

    1996-06-24

    To investigate the prevalence and selected correlates of leisure-time physical activity in a nationally representative sample of persons aged 65 years or older. Data from 2783 older male and 5018 older female respondents to the 1990 National Health Interview Survey were used. Regular physical activity was defined as participation in leisure-time physical activities 3 times or more per week for 30 minutes or more during the previous 2 weeks. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from multivariate logistic regression analysis. Prevalence of regular physical activity was 37% among older men and 24% among older women. Correlates of regular physical activity included the perception of excellent to good health (men: OR, 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.9; women: OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-1.9), correct exercise knowledge (men: OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.9-3.1; women: OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 2.2-3.4), no activity limitations (men: OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.6; women: OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.4-2.0) and not perceiving "a lot" of stress during the previous 2 weeks (men: OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4; women: OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.6). Among those who had been told at least twice that they had high blood pressure, physician's advice to exercise was associated with regular physical activity (men: OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3; women: OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9). The 2 major activities among active older adults were walking (men, 69%; women, 75%) and gardening (men, 45%; women, 35%). Prevalence of regular physical activity is low among older Americans. Identifying the correlates of physical activity will help to formulate strategies to increase physical activity in this age group.

  3. A National Workshop in the United States to Prepare New Faculty in Physics and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Kenneth S.

    2010-07-01

    Starting in 1996, newly hired college and university faculty in physics and astronomy from throughout the U.S. have been invited to attend a workshop to help them improve their teaching skills. More than 1000 faculty have participated, representing more than 25% of the new hires at all U. S. institutions that award a baccalaureate in physics or astronomy, from 4-year colleges through research universities. The workshops seek to improve physics teaching by introducing new faculty to instructional strategies and innovations that have been shown to be effective in a variety of contexts. Such a national mentoring workshop can effectively address a commonality of physics and astronomy teaching challenges that transcend institutional characters and types. Based on surveys of the participants (and their department chairs), we have found that a large fraction of the participants have become adopters of innovative teaching techniques and that they rate the workshops as the most significant cause of the improvements in their teaching.

  4. An eight week school-based intervention with circuit training improves physical fitness and reduces body fat in male adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Christoforos D; Aphamis, George; Tsouloupas, Costas N; Ioannou, Yiannakis; Hadjicharalambous, Marios

    2016-01-01

    School-based intervention programs have been found to effectively improve various fitness and health parameters. However, only few studies so far examined the effect of circuit training in school environment during physical education (PE) classes. The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of an eight-week circuit training on physical fitness and body fat in male adolescents. Thirty nine, 16-year old male high-school students participated in the current study. The students were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The intervention period lasted eight weeks and consisted of two circuit training sessions per week performed during regular PE classes. Total body fat was calculated by using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Physical fitness parameters such as cardiorespiratory fitness, flexibility, jumping ability and isometric arm strength were assessed through a battery of field tests. Finally, resting heart rate and blood pressure levels were assessed with an automatic monitor. By the end of the intervention period, total body fat and resting systolic blood pressure were significantly lower while cardiorespiratory fitness was significantly improved in the circuit training group only (Ptraining during PE classes appeared to be effective in improving various physical fitness parameters and reducing fatness in male adolescents.

  5. Physical exercise reduces the expression of RANTES and its CCR5 receptor in the adipose tissue of obese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturcam, Engin; Abubaker, Jehad; Tiss, Ali; Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Al-Ghimlas, Fahad; Al-Khairi, Irina; Cherian, Preethi; Elkum, Naser; Hammad, Maha; John, Jeena; Kavalakatt, Sina; Lehe, Cynthia; Warsame, Samia; Behbehani, Kazem; Dermime, Said; Dehbi, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    RANTES and its CCR5 receptor trigger inflammation and its progression to insulin resistance in obese. In the present study, we investigated for the first time the effect of physical exercise on the expression of RANTES and CCR5 in obese humans. Fifty-seven adult nondiabetic subjects (17 lean and 40 obese) were enrolled in a 3-month supervised physical exercise. RANTES and CCR5 expressions were measured in PBMCs and subcutaneous adipose tissue before and after exercise. Circulating plasma levels of RANTES were also investigated. There was a significant increase in RANTES and CCR5 expression in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese compared to lean. In PBMCs, however, while the levels of RANTES mRNA and protein were comparable between both groups, CCR5 mRNA was downregulated in obese subjects (P < 0.05). Physical exercise significantly reduced the expression of both RANTES and CCR5 (P < 0.05) in the adipose tissue of obese individuals with a concomitant decrease in the levels of the inflammatory markers TNF- α , IL-6, and P-JNK. Circulating RANTES correlated negatively with anti-inflammatory IL-1 ra (P = 0.001) and positively with proinflammatory IP-10 and TBARS levels (P < 0.05). Therefore, physical exercise may provide an effective approach for combating the deleterious effects associated with obesity through RANTES signaling in the adipose tissue.

  6. Physical Exercise Reduces the Expression of RANTES and Its CCR5 Receptor in the Adipose Tissue of Obese Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Baturcam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RANTES and its CCR5 receptor trigger inflammation and its progression to insulin resistance in obese. In the present study, we investigated for the first time the effect of physical exercise on the expression of RANTES and CCR5 in obese humans. Fifty-seven adult nondiabetic subjects (17 lean and 40 obese were enrolled in a 3-month supervised physical exercise. RANTES and CCR5 expressions were measured in PBMCs and subcutaneous adipose tissue before and after exercise. Circulating plasma levels of RANTES were also investigated. There was a significant increase in RANTES and CCR5 expression in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese compared to lean. In PBMCs, however, while the levels of RANTES mRNA and protein were comparable between both groups, CCR5 mRNA was downregulated in obese subjects (P<0.05. Physical exercise significantly reduced the expression of both RANTES and CCR5 (P<0.05 in the adipose tissue of obese individuals with a concomitant decrease in the levels of the inflammatory markers TNF-α, IL-6, and P-JNK. Circulating RANTES correlated negatively with anti-inflammatory IL-1ra (P=0.001 and positively with proinflammatory IP-10 and TBARS levels (P<0.05. Therefore, physical exercise may provide an effective approach for combating the deleterious effects associated with obesity through RANTES signaling in the adipose tissue.

  7. Physical and electrical characterization of reduced graphene oxide synthesized adopting green route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TAPAS K GHOSH; SHIRSHENDU GOPE; DIPAK RANA; INDRANIL ROY; GUNJAN SARKAR; SOURAV SADHUKHAN; AMARTYA BHATTACHARYA; KRISHNENDU PRAMANIK; SANATAN CHATTOPADHYAY; MUKUT CHAKRABORTY; DIPANKAR CHATTOPADHYAY

    2016-04-01

    Graphene and its related materials are important areas of research in recent years owing to their unique properties. The wide-range industrial application of graphene-related compounds has led to the development of novel and simple methods for the synthesis of graphene. In this paper, an environmentally friendly green synthesis for the partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to reduced GO (RGO) in a cost-effective single-step mechanism was reported. The method completely avoids the use of toxic and environmentally harmful reducing agents commonly used in the chemical reduction of GO to obtain RGO. The reduction of GO was carried out using aqueous leaf extracts of Paederia foetide L. The prepared GO and green RGO were characterized by ultraviolet–visible, Ramanand Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopic analysis which showed a clear indication of the partial removal of oxygen-containing groups from the GO and the formation of RGO. The morphology of the green RGO was characterizedby transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic light scattering was used for zeta potential measurement and correlated with the morphology of the sheets. Electrical conductivity was also measuredto check the extent of reduction of GO to RGO.

  8. Morphology and the physical and thermal properties of thermoplastic polyurethane reinforced with thermally reduced graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strankowski Michał

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRG-containing polyurethane nanocomposites were obtained by the extrusion method. The content of TRG incorporated into polyurethane elastomer systems equaled 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 wt%. The morphology, static and dynamic mechanical properties, and thermal stability of the modified materials were investigated. The application of TRG resulted in a visible increase in material stiffness as confirmed by the measurements of complex compression modulus (E′ and glass transition temperature (Tg. The Tg increased with increasing content of nanofiller in the thermoplastic system. The addition of thermally reduced graphene oxide had a slight effect on thermal stability of the obtained materials. The incorporation of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 wt% of TRG into a system resulted in increased char residues compared to unmodified PU elastomer. Also, this study demonstrated that after exceeding a specific amount of TRG, the physicomechanical properties of modified materials start to deteriorate.

  9. Physical investigation of electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politano, Grazia Giuseppina; Versace, Carlo; Vena, Carlo; Castriota, Marco; Ciuchi, Federica; Fasanella, Angela; Desiderio, Giovanni; Cazzanelli, Enzo

    2016-11-01

    Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide thin films are very promising materials because they can be used in optoelectronic devices and in a growing range of applications such as touch screens and flexible displays. In this work, graphene oxide (GO) and thermally reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin films, deposited on Ti/glass substrates, have been obtained by electrophoretic deposition. The morphological and the structural properties of the samples have been investigated by micro-Raman technique, X-ray reflectometry, and SEM analysis. In order to study the optical and electrical properties, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and impedance analysis have been performed. The thermal annealing changes strongly the structural, electrical, and optical properties, because during the thermal processes some amount of sp3 bonds originally present in GO were removed. In particular, the annealing enhances the Ohmic behavior of the rGO film increasing its conductivity and the estimated optical density. Moreover, using electrophoretic deposition, we have found a higher value of optical density for GO thin films, not observed in GO films obtained with other deposition methods.

  10. Evaluating the effectiveness of ultraviolet-C lamps for reducing keyboard contamination in the intensive care unit: A longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostine, Andrew; Gostine, David; Donohue, Cristina; Carlstrom, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) spectrum light for decontamination of patient care areas is an effective way to reduce transmission of infectious pathogens. Our purpose was to investigate the efficacy of an automated UV-C device to eliminate bioburden on hospital computer keyboards. The study took place at an academic hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Baseline cultures were obtained from keyboards in intensive care units. Automated UV-C lamps were installed over keyboards and mice of those computers. The lamps were tested at varying cycle lengths to determine shortest effective cycles. Delay after use and prior to cycle initiation was varied to minimize cycle interruptions. Finally, 218 postinstallation samples were analyzed. Of 203 baseline samples, 193 (95.1%) were positive for bacteria, with a median of 120 colony forming units (CFU) per keyboard. There were numerous bacteria linked to health care-associated infections (HAIs), including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas, Pasteurella, Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, and Enterobacter. Of the 193 keyboards, 25 (12.3%) had gram-negative species. Of 218 postinstallation samples, 205 (94%) were sterile. Of the 13 that showed bacterial growth, 6 produced a single CFU. Comparison of pre- and post-UV decontamination median CFU values (120 and 0, respectively) revealed a >99% reduction in bacteria. The UV lamp effectively decontaminates keyboards with minimal interruption and low UV exposure. Further studies are required to determine reduction of HAI transmission with use of these devices. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Early transfer of mated females into the maternity unit reduces stress and increases maternal care in farm mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Mated mammals on farms are typically transferred to another housing environment prior to delivery. We investigated whether the timing of this transfer – EARLY (Day −36), INTERMEDIATE (Day −18), or LATE (Day −3) relative to the expected day of birth (Day 0) – affects maternal stress, maternal care...... vitality from early moved females. In conclusion, transfer into the maternity unit early after mating, rather than later during the pregnancy period, reduces stress and increases maternal care in farm mink.......Mated mammals on farms are typically transferred to another housing environment prior to delivery. We investigated whether the timing of this transfer – EARLY (Day −36), INTERMEDIATE (Day −18), or LATE (Day −3) relative to the expected day of birth (Day 0) – affects maternal stress, maternal care...... sized groups (n = 60): (i) ‘EARLY’, transfer to maternity unit immediately after the end of the mating period, March 23; (ii) ‘INTERMEDIATE’, transfer in the middle of the period, April 10; (iii) ‘LATE’, transfer late in the pregnancy period, April 25. Data collection included weekly determination...

  12. How to reduce avoidable admissions due to acute diabetes complications?: Interrelation between primary and specialized attention in a diabetes unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. García-Talavera Espín

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a serious health problem. In the year 2030 it will affect 366 million people around the world. Objective: Evaluate the effectiveness of a mixed intervention and reducing the amount and seriousness of acute complications in diabetics from our Health Area. Materials and method: Protocols of action as well as information documents were produced. Diabetes Unit coordinated educational activities in the different support levels of the Area VII of Murcia. Information talks were provided for the people in charge of the Diabetes Unit in every Care Center and Service of the Health Area. Personalized training was provided for patients treated in the differet Care levels. The study comprised three stages. Information leaflets were spread and talks offered to the patient regarding in house handling of hypo and hyper glycemia. Results: A reduction of 39% of the emergencies due to acute non complicated diabetes was achieved, as well as a reduction of 47.6% of hospital admissions. There was a reduction of 67.8% of the amount of total hospital stays for the group of patients under 35 years who were admitted into the hospital due to type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus that didn't show any complications (GRD295. Conclusions: There was a reduction of more than thirty percent in the emergencies due to acute decompensations in the disease and a significant reduction in the avoidable hospital stays in the young adult, thus improving the patients' life quality and reducing the social cost of the diabetic patient.

  13. A multifactorial injury prevention intervention reduces injury incidence in Physical Education Teacher Education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, L; Cardon, G; Witvrouw, E; Steyaert, A; De Clercq, D

    2016-01-01

    Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) students are at considerable risk for non-contact sports injuries of the lower extremities. Multifactorial injury prevention interventions including exercises have been successful in sports populations, but no such study has ever been performed in PETE students. This study investigated the efficacy of a multifactorial injury prevention intervention on injury incidence reduction in PETE students. PETE students in the intervention group (n = 154) and in the control group (n = 189) registered sports injuries prospectively. The intervention lasted one academic year and consisted of an injury awareness programme and preventive strategies, implemented by the PETE sports lecturers. Differences in injury incidence between the intervention and control group were tested by Poisson regression Wald tests. There was a trend towards significantly lower incidence rate (2.18 vs. 2.73; p = 0.061) in the intervention group compared with the control group. Students in the intervention group had significantly less acute, first-time and extracurricular injuries. The largest reduction was observed for injuries during unsupervised practice sessions. A multifactorial injury prevention intervention embedded into a regular PETE programme is a promising and feasible strategy to prevent injuries in PETE students. Further research is needed to investigate whether the results may be generalised to other PETE programmes.

  14. Intelligent Derivation Algorithm for Physical Units and Its Application%物理量单位的智能导出算法及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鲤江; 郑云巧; 孙晓梦

    2013-01-01

    Derivation of units of physical quantities are important and indispensable part of the physics homework.An intelligent derivation algorithm for physical quantities units is proposed,that computer automatically derived units of unknown physical quantities from the arithmetic expression of known physical quantities.Convert division expressions to multiplication expressions by unit index symbol transform,uniform units of the same dimension through unit conversion,evaluate index algebraic sum for the same unit to get final derived units of unknown physical quantities.Performing unit conversion to the rest units toward the units with the largest number or SI units in the same dimension is auto-matically finished by database call technology.Experimental results on arithmetic expressions with numbers and units show that the operation results of the algorithm are correct with correct rate of 100%.%推导物理量的单位是物理作业中不可缺少的重要环节。提出一种物理量单位的智能导出算法,即计算机根据物理量的运算式自动推导出待求物理量的单位。实验结果表明,物理量单位导出及换算算法的结果正确,对算术运算式中的物理量单位导出及换算的正确率为100%,且物理量数值的运算正确。

  15. Physical Properties Investigation of Reduced Graphene Oxide Thin Films Prepared by Material Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Schmiedova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the study of the optical properties of inkjet-printed graphene oxide (GO layers by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Due to its unique optical and electrical properties, GO can be used as, for example, a transparent and flexible electrode material in organic and printed electronics. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize the optical response of the GO layer and its reduced form (rGO, obtainable, for example, by reduction of prepared layers by either annealing, UV radiation, or chemical reduction in the visible range. The thicknesses of the layers were determined by a mechanical profilometer and used as an input parameter for optical modeling. Ellipsometric spectra were analyzed according to the dispersion model and the influence of the reduction of GO on optical constants is discussed. Thus, detailed analysis of the ellipsometric data provides a unique tool for qualitative and also quantitative description of the optical properties of GO thin films for electronic applications.

  16. Physical and chemical evolution of reduced organic matter in the ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Blake, David F.

    1995-01-01

    Icy mantles on interstellar grains have been a topic of study in airborne astronomy. Recent laboratory analog studies of the yield of organic residue from UV photolyzed ices have shown that this mechanism can be the most significant source of complex reduced organic matter in the interstellar medium. However, the total yield is a function of the occurrence of heating events that evaporate the ice, i.e. T is greater than 130 K, and the mechanism for such events is debated. Recently, we proposed that the recombination of radicals in the ice does not need high temperature excursions and, instead, occurs during a structural transformation of water ice at temperatures in the range 38 - 68 K.

  17. Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena in a Simulated Reduced Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipa, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a ground-based apparatus that allows the cancellation of gravity on a fluid using magnetic forces. The present system was designed for liquid oxygen studies over the range 0.001 - 5 g s. This fluid is an essential component of any flight mission using substantial amounts of liquid propellant, especially manned missions. The apparatus has been used to reduce the hydrostatic compression near the oxygen critical point and to demonstrate inverted phase separation. It could also be used to study pool boiling and two-phase heat transfer in Martian, Lunar or near-zero gravity, as well as phenomena such as Marangoni flow and convective instabilities. These studies would contribute directly to the reliability and optimization of the Moon and Mars flight programs.

  18. Physical and chemical evolution of reduced organic matter in the ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Blake, David F.

    1995-01-01

    Icy mantles on interstellar grains have been a topic of study in airborne astronomy. Recent laboratory analog studies of the yield of organic residue from UV photolyzed ices have shown that this mechanism can be the most significant source of complex reduced organic matter in the interstellar medium. However, the total yield is a function of the occurrence of heating events that evaporate the ice, i.e. T is greater than 130 K, and the mechanism for such events is debated. Recently, we proposed that the recombination of radicals in the ice does not need high temperature excursions and, instead, occurs during a structural transformation of water ice at temperatures in the range 38 - 68 K.

  19. Physical Activity and Reported Barriers to Activity Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kaabi, Juma; Al-Maskari, Fatma; Afandi, Bachar; Parkar, Hasratali; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the physical activity practice among type 2 diabetic patients in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of type 2 diabetic patients who participated in the outpatient clinics in Al-Ain District, during 2006. The patients completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire, and measurements of blood pressure, body mass index, body fat, abdominal circumference, glycemic control (HbA1c), and fasting lipid profile. RESULTS: Of the 390 patients recruited, only 25% reported an increase in their physical activity levels following the diagnosis of diabetes, and only 3% reported physical activity levels that meet the recommended guidelines. More than half of the study subjects had uncontrolled hypertension (53%) and unacceptable lipid profiles; 71% had a high low-density lipoprotein (LDL), 73% had low high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and 59% had hypertriglyceridemia. Forty-four percent were obese and a further 34% were overweight. Abdominal obesity was also common (59%). Only 32% had an acceptable glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS: The physical activity practice of type 2 diabetic patients in the UAE is largely inadequate to meet the recommended level necessary to prevent or ameliorate diabetic complications. Interventions aiming at overcoming the barriers to physical activity are urgently needed. PMID:20043039

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  1. Six physical education lessons a week can reduce cardiovascular risk in school children aged 6-13 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Heidi Klakk; Andersen, Lars B; Heidemann, Malene Søborg

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) originates during childhood and adolescence. Schools are potentially effective settings for early public health prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of six physical education (PE) lessons on children's CVD risk. Methods.......01). Six PE lessons per week had a beneficial effect on triglycerides (TG) levels (-0.18 SD, 95% CI: -0.36 to 0.00), systolic blood pressure (SBP) (-0.22 SD, 95% CI: -0.42 to -0.02) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (-0.17 SD, 95% CI: -0.34 to 0.01). Conclusions: Six PE lessons at school can reduce children...

  2. Physical pretreatments of wastewater algae to reduce ash content and improve thermal decomposition characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Ting; Ma, Junchao; Zhang, Yuanhui; Gai, Chao; Qian, Wanyi

    2014-10-01

    Previous study showed high ash content in wastewater algae (WA) has a negative effect on bio-crude oil formation in hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). This study explored the effect of different pretreatments on ash reduction and the thermal decomposition of WA. Single-stage (e.g. centrifugation) and two-stage pretreatments (e.g. centrifugation followed by ultrasonication, C+U) were used. The apparent activation energy of the thermal decomposition (E(a)) of pretreated algae was determined. HTL was conducted to study how different pretreatments may impact on bio-crude oil formation. Compared to untreated samples, the ash content of algae with centrifugation was reduced from 28.6% to 18.6%. With C+U pretreatments, E(a) was decreased from 50.2 kJ/mol to 35.9 kJ/mol and the bio-crude oil yield was increased from 30% to 55%. These results demonstrate that pretreatments of C+U can improve the thermal decomposition behavior of WA and enhance the bio-crude oil conversion efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Strength training and light physical activity reduces the apnea-hypopnea index in institutionalized older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Bliwise, Donald L.; Puri, Shipra; Rogers, Sandy; Richards, Kathy C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of 7-weeks of resistance training and walking on the apneahypopnea index (AHI) in institutionalized older adults compared to a usual care control group. Design Secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled-trial. Setting Ten nursing and three assisted living facilities in Arkansas. Participants Institutionalized older adults. Interventions Exercise group (EG) performed supervised resistance training to arm and hip extensors on 3 days a week with additional 2 days a week of light walking. Usual care group (UC) participated in the usual activities provided within their living facility. Measurements 2 nights of polysomnography before and following 7-week intervention. Results Adjusted means in the EG group showed a decrease in AHI from 20.2 (SD±1.3) at baseline to 16.7 (SD±0.9) at 7 weeks. Absolute strength gains were not associated with improved AHI. Conclusion Supervised resistance training and light walking reduced the severity of OSA in institutionalized older adults. PMID:25294621

  4. Prevalence of Physical Activity in the United States: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E. Ainsworth, PhD, MPH

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The health benefits of regular cardiovascular exercise are well-known. Such exercise, however, has traditionally been defined as vigorous physical activity, such as jogging, swimming, or aerobic dance. Exercise of moderate intensity also promotes health, and many U.S. adults may be experiencing the health benefits of exercise through lifestyle activities of moderate intensity, such as yard work, housework, or walking for transportation. Until recently, public health surveillance systems have not included assessments of this type of physical activity, focusing on exercise of vigorous intensity. We used an enhanced surveillance tool to describe the prevalence and amount of both moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity physical activity among U.S. adults. Methods We analyzed data from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based, random-digit–dialed telephone survey administered to U.S. adults aged 18 years and older (n = 82,834 men and 120,286 women. Physical activity behavior was assessed using questions designed to quantify the frequency of participation in moderate- or vigorous-intensity physical activities performed during leisure time or for household chores and transportation. Results Overall, 45% of adults (48% of men and 43% of women were active at recommended levels during nonworking hours (at least 30 minutes five or more days per week in moderate-intensity activities, equivalent to brisk walking, or at least 20 minutes three or more days per week in vigorous activities, equivalent to running, heavy yard work, or aerobic dance. Less than 16% of adults (15% of men and 17% of women reported no moderate or vigorous activity in a usual week. Conclusion Integrating surveillance of lifestyle activities into national systems is possible, and doing so may provide a more accurate representation of the prevalence of recommended levels of physical activity. These results, however, suggest that the majority of U

  5. Physical, bioactive and sensory quality parameters of reduced sugar chocolates formulated with natural sweeteners as sucrose alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Komes, Draženka; Dujmović, Marko; Karlović, Sven; Biškić, Matija; Brnčić, Mladen; Ježek, Damir

    2015-01-15

    In this study, sugar alcohols, dietary fibers, syrups and natural sweeteners were used as sucrose alternatives in the production of reduced sugar chocolates (50% of cocoa parts) with enhanced bioactive profile. Formulated chocolates were evaluated for their physical (particle size distribution, texture) and sensory properties, sugar composition, polyphenolic compounds content and antioxidant capacity. All produced reduced sugar chocolates ensured >20% lower calorific value than conventional chocolate (prepared with sucrose). Formulated chocolates containing stevia leaves and peppermint exhibited the best sensory properties (especially with regard to mouthfeel, sweetness and herbal aroma), as well as the highest polyphenolic content and antioxidant capacity. Particle size and hardness of chocolates increased in comparison to conventional chocolate, in particular when the combination of fructose and isomalt or lactitol was used. The bioactive profile of produced chocolates was enriched with phenolic acids, flavone (luteolin and apigenin) and flavonol (quercetin) derivatives, which were not identified in control chocolate.

  6. Participant report for National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom) Hole Plate No. 137

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Morace, Renate Erica

    International pour l’Etude Scientifique des Techniques de Production Mécanique (CIRP). In the project, 15 research laboratories have been involved from 9 countries: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA. A total of 24 CMMs were used to measure an optomechanical hole...

  7. Early Mobilization Reduces Duration of Mechanical Ventilation and Intensive Care Unit Stay in Patients With Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chou, Willy; Chan, Khee-Siang; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Yuan, Kuo-Shu; Chao, Chien-Ming; Chen, Chin-Ming

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of a quality improvement program to introduce early mobilization on the outcomes of patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) in the intensive care unit (ICU). A retrospective observational study. Nineteen-bed ICU at a medical center. Adults patients with MV (N=153) admitted to a medical ICU. A multidisciplinary team (critical care nurse, nursing assistant, respiratory therapist, physical therapist, patient's family) initiated the protocol within 72 hours of MV when patients become hemodynamically stable. We did early mobilization twice daily, 5d/wk during family visits (30min each time), and cooperated with family, if possible. MV duration, rate of successful weaning, and length of ICU and hospital stay. We enrolled 63 patients in the before protocol group and 90 in the after protocol group. The 2 groups were well matched in age, sex, body height, body weight, body mass index, disease severity, cause of intubation, number of comorbidities, and most underlying diseases. After protocol group patients had shorter MV durations (4.7d vs 7.5d; PICU stays (6.9d vs 9.9d; P=.001) than did before protocol group patients. Early mobilization was negatively associated with the duration of MV (β=-.269; PICU shortened MV durations and ICU stays. A multidisciplinary team that includes the patient's family can work together to improve the patient's clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reducing patient wait times and improving resource utilization at British Columbia Cancer Agency's ambulatory care unit through simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibáñez, Pablo; Chow, Vincent S; French, John; Puterman, Martin L; Tyldesley, Scott

    2009-12-01

    We consider an ambulatory care unit (ACU) in a large cancer centre, where operational and resource utilization challenges led to overcrowding, excessive delays, and concerns regarding safety of critical patient care duties. We use simulation to analyze the simultaneous impact of operations, scheduling, and resource allocation on patient wait time, clinic overtime, and resource utilization. The impact of these factors has been studied before, but usually in isolation. Further, our model considers multiple clinics operating concurrently, and includes the extra burden of training residents and medical students during patient consults. Through scenario analyses we found that the best outcomes were obtained when not one but multiple changes were implemented simultaneously. We developed configurations that achieve a reduction of up to 70% in patient wait times and 25% in physical space requirements, with the same appointment volume. The key findings of the study are the importance of on time clinic start, the need for improved patient scheduling; and the potential improvements from allocating examination rooms flexibly and dynamically among individual clinics within each of the oncology programs. These findings are currently being evaluated for implementation by senior management.

  9. Trends in No Leisure-Time Physical Activity--United States, 1988-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Latetia V.; Harris, Carmen D.; Carlson, Susan A.; Kruger, Judy; Fulton, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine trends in the prevalence of no leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) from 1988 to 2010. Method: Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, 35 states and the District of Columbia reported information on no LTPA from 1988 to 1994; all states reported no LTPA from 1996 to 2010. Results: No…

  10. Purposeful Movement: The Integration of Physical Activity into a Mathematics Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kailey; Dinkel, Danae; Schaffer, Connie; Hiveley, Seth; Colpitts, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Classroom physical activity (PA) has been linked to a multitude of health and academic benefits. However, due to barriers such as lack of time and resources many teachers are not implementing classroom PA to the degree they would like to. One innovative solution is to integrate classroom PA into academic concepts. Based on self-determination…

  11. School bullying among adolescents in the United States: physical, verbal, relational, and cyber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Iannotti, Ronald J; Nansel, Tonja R

    2009-10-01

    Four forms of school bullying behaviors among US adolescents and their association with sociodemographic characteristics, parental support, and friends were examined. Data were obtained from the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) 2005 Survey, a nationally representative sample of grades 6-10 (N = 7,182). The revised Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire was used to measure physical, verbal, and relational forms of bullying. Two items were added using the same format to measure cyber bullying. For each form, four categories were created: bully, victim, bully-victim, and not involved. Multinomial logistic regressions were applied, with sociodemographic variables, parental support, and number of friends as predictors. Prevalence rates of having bullied others or having been bullied at school for at least once in the last 2 months were 20.8% physically, 53.6% verbally, 51.4% socially, or 13.6% electronically. Boys were more involved in physical or verbal bullying, whereas girls were more involved in relational bullying. Boys were more likely to be cyber bullies, whereas girls were more likely to be cyber victims. African-American adolescents were involved in more bullying (physical, verbal, or cyber) but less victimization (verbal or relational). Higher parental support was associated with less involvement across all forms and classifications of bullying. Having more friends was associated with more bullying and less victimization for physical, verbal, and relational forms but was not associated with cyber bullying. Parental support may protect adolescents from all four forms of bullying. Friends associate differentially with traditional and cyber bullying. Results indicate that cyber bullying is a distinct nature from that of traditional bullying.

  12. Partial Sleep Deprivation Reduces the Efficacy of Orexin-A to Stimulate Physical Activity and Energy Expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePorter, Danielle P; Coborn, Jamie E; Teske, Jennifer A

    2017-10-01

    Sufficient sleep is required for weight maintenance. Sleep deprivation due to noise exposure stimulates weight gain by increasing hyperphagia and reducing energy expenditure (EE). Yet the mechanistic basis underlying the weight gain response is unclear. Orexin-A promotes arousal and negative energy balance, and orexin terminals project to the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), which is involved in sleep-to-wake transitions. To determine whether sleep deprivation reduces orexin function in VLPO and to test the hypothesis that sleep deprivation would attenuate the orexin-A-stimulated increase in arousal, physical activity (PA), and EE. Electroencephalogram, electromyogram, distance traveled, and EE were determined in male Sprague-Dawley rats following orexin-A injections into VLPO both before and after acute (12-h) and chronic (8 h/d, 9 d) sleep deprivation by noise exposure. Orexin-A in the VLPO significantly increased arousal, PA, total EE, and PA-related EE and reduced sleep and respiratory quotient before sleep deprivation. In contrast to after acute sleep deprivation in which orexin-A failed to stimulate EE during PA only, orexin-A failed to significantly increase arousal, PA, fat oxidation, total EE, and PA-related EE after chronic sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation may reduce sensitivity to endogenous stimuli that enhance EE due to PA and thus stimulate weight gain. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  13. Empowering Sedentary Adults to Reduce Sedentary Behavior and Increase Physical Activity Levels and Energy Expenditure: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal A. Barwais

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 4-week intervention in which an online personal activity monitor (Gruve-Technologies™ was used to reduce sedentary behavior among sedentary adults. Method: Eighteen, sedentary adult volunteers (12 men, six women, mean age 29 ± 4.0 years were recruited to participate in the study. Time spent in sedentary activities and light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity physical activity and energy expenditure were assessed during waking hours using the monitor and the 7-day SLIPA Log at both baseline and post-intervention. Results: A significant decrease of 33% (3.1 h/day; p < 0.001 was found between the time spent in sedentary activities measured at baseline (9.4 ± 1.1 h/day and at the end of the 4-week intervention (6.3 ± 0.8 h/day. Consequent to the changes in sedentary time, significant increases were found in the amount of time spent in light- (45% (2.6 h/day, p < 0.001, moderate- (33% (1 h/day p < 0.001, vigorous-intensity physical activity (39% (0.16 h/day, p < 0.001, and energy expenditure (47% (216.7 kcal/day, p < 0.001. Conclusion: This monitor contributes to a meaningful reduction in time spent in sedentary activities and has a large effect on energy expenditure and physical activity patterns.

  14. IMPACT OF CANINE ASSISTED THERAPY ON EMOTIONS AND MOTIVATION LEVEL IN CHILDREN WITH REDUCED MOBILITY IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niewiadomska Monika

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Canine assisted therapy is increasingly used in the treatment of children with various diseases. The participation of a dog in classes evokes positive emotions in children, which are often an important factor in the success of a therapy. Purpose: The aim of this study was to present the influence of emotions on the level of motivation toward physical activity in children with reduced mobility. Material: The study involved six 5-year-old children, i.e. 5 boys and one girl, who had refused to participate in physical activity classes. They reacted with anxiety, anger and did not want to exercise. Assessment of feelings and emotions of the children was based on observations and interviews with parents. Results: After introducing a dog to the physical activity classes, the children changed their attitude not only to training, but also to themselves and their classmates. There was an observed increase in their motivation for the exercises. Such a significant impact of a dog on child’s emotions can be very important in the therapeutic process and is reported and recognized by many specialists. Conclusions: Canine assisted therapy sessions could be promoted in the treatment of children with locomotor impairment, as well as with other disabilities such as autism, obesity, cerebral palsy, learning difficulties and depression.

  15. Efficacy of application technology of managing physical exercise by the musical accompaniment to reduce school anxiety first form pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnova Y.V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to study the need to improve the mental state of first-graders and the possibility of achieving this goal, the lesson of physical culture at the expense of proper use of musical accompaniment exercise. Material : participated in the experiment experimental, control and background group (only 55 students of first class. Results : argues that music has a regulating effect on mental and physiological state of a person. It is noted that the combined effects of exercise and music on the body and psyche of a child reduces total anxiety in school. Also reduces the fear in a meaningful situation knowledge test. Found that the effect of exercise without music and with various embodiments use musical accompaniment in the lesson to address interpersonal relations student and the teacher has no significant difference. Conclusions : as a result of the pedagogical experiment to identify significantly positive, confirming the effectiveness of the technology of managing physical exercise by the musical accompaniment for the performance of most indicators of school anxiety.

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  19. The relationship between physical intimate partner violence and sexually transmitted infection among women in India and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiwak, Rae; Afifi, Tracie O; Halli, Shiva; Garcia-Moreno, Claudia; Sareen, Jitender

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association between physical intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) in two national samples. Data came from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions Wave 2 (n=34,653) and the National Family Health Survey-3 (n=124 385). Ever-married women between the ages of 20 and 49 were asked if they had experienced physical violence by their partner in the past year. Outcomes were presence of doctor confirmed HIV and self-reported STI. Age at first intercourse was examined as a mediator of the relationship between IPV and STI. Logistic regression examined associations between IPV, age at first intercourse and STI. Compared to individuals with no physical IPV, risk for STI was higher for individuals who experienced past year IPV living in the United States and India, however once controlling for age at first intercourse, age, education, household wealth/income and past year sexual violence, the relationship between IPV, and STI was significant in the American sample [(AOR)=1.65, 95% (CI)=1.21-2.26], however not for individuals living in India [(AOR)=1.75, 95% (CI)=0.84-3.65]. Individuals with exposure to physical IPV are at increased odds for STI. Age at first intercourse although a marker of risk, may not be an accurate marker of risky sexual behavior in both samples.

  20. Plasticity, political economy, and physical growth status of Guatemala Maya children living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogin, B; Loucky, J

    1997-01-01

    Migration of Maya refugees to the United States since the late 1970s affords the opportunity to study the consequences of life in a new environment on the growth of Maya children. The children of this study live in Indiantown, Florida, and Los Angeles, California. Maya children between 4 and 14 years old (n = 240) were measured for height, weight, fatness, and muscularity. Overall, compared with reference data for the United States, the Maya children are, on average, healthy and well nourished. They are taller and heavier and carry more fat and muscle mass than Maya children living in a village in Guatemala. However, they are shorter, on average, than children of black, Mexican-American, and white ethnicity living in Indiantown. Children of Maya immigrants born in the United States tend to be taller than immigrant children born in Guatemala or Mexico. Families that invest economic and social resources in their children have taller children. More economic successful families have taller children. Migration theory and political economy theory from the social sciences are combined with plasticity theory and life history theory (parental investment) from biology to interpret these data.

  1. An Approach for Measuring the Sorptive Behavior of Odorants Using a Multifunction Thermal Desorber Unit: Preliminary Tests on Reduced Sulfur Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Woo Joo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sorptive behavior of reduced sulfur compounds (RSC was investigated using a combination of thermal desorber (TD unit and gas chromatography (GC. To examine the sorptive properties of RSC on textile materials, two types of experiments were conducted under experimental conditions favorable for sorptive processes. In all the experiments, gaseous standards of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were supplied to initiate the adsorption processes on textile pieces. The textile pieces were then forced to release those adsorbed RSC under a fixed condition. It was found that the extent of adsorption, if evaluated quantitatively, occurred at approximately 1/1000 to 1/100 of the level of RSC standards supplied originally to induce adsorption. It also indicated that RSC adsorption was affected very sensitively by the initial exposure durations to induce RSC adsorption with an exponential decrease in relative recovery (RR values with increasing exposure time. The relative sorptive patterns, when compared between different RSCs, were affected most sensitively by such factors as molecular weight and/or physical contact conditions.

  2. Physical activity and relaxation in the work setting to reduce the need for recovery: what works for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formanoy, Margriet A G; Dusseldorp, Elise; Coffeng, Jennifer K; Van Mechelen, Iven; Boot, Cecile R L; Hendriksen, Ingrid J M; Tak, Erwin C P M

    2016-08-24

    .81). Finally, for office workers who worked more hours overtime there was no effect of the physical environmental intervention. The results suggest that a social environmental intervention might be more beneficial for younger workers, and a physical environmental intervention might be more beneficial for employees with a few hours overtime to reduce the NFR. NTR2553.

  3. Nicotine Content and Physical Properties of Large Cigars and Cigarillos in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszowski, Bartosz; Thanner, Meridith Hill; Pickworth, Wallace B; Taylor, Kenneth M; Hull, Lynn C; Schroeder, Megan J

    2017-03-04

    Cigars are combusted tobacco products consisting of filler, binder, and wrapper, which are derived from tobacco. Despite the abundance of literature on the composition of traditional combusted cigarettes, research is limited on the physical and chemical properties of cigars. Therefore, research on cigar properties may be useful to better understand their health impact. In this study, twenty large cigar and cigarillo products were characterized for physical properties (ie, weight, length, and diameter), filler nicotine content, and tobacco pH. Tobacco pH was used to calculate free nicotine content, free nicotine concentration, and percent free nicotine for all cigars using the Henderson-Hasselbach equation. An additional analysis was performed on a second batch of two large cigar and two cigarillo brands to determine within-brand consistency. All analyses were performed in triplicate. The initial analysis of the twenty cigars showed that cigars exhibited wide variation in product size and nicotine content, although tobacco pH was similar across cigars. Furthermore, in the two large cigar and cigarillo brands analyzed a second time, there was considerable within-brand variance in nicotine content and concentration between the first and second analyses. While only a small sample of commercially-available cigars was analyzed, our data suggest there is wide variability in nicotine content and some physical properties in the domestic cigar market. The data may help to inform potential future regulatory decisions related to these products. This study reveals some of the challenges to experimental cigar research and illustrates the need to characterize cigar products (eg, nicotine and tobacco content) before use in clinical studies. Additional studies and characterization of the physical and chemical properties of cigars may be useful to further understand these products' toxicity, abuse potential, and public health impact.

  4. Physical Dating Violence in Spain and the United Kingdom and the Importance of Relationship Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viejo, C; Monks, C P; Sánchez, V; Ortega-Ruiz, R

    2016-05-01

    Mixed-gender friendships, romantic relationships, and sexual behaviors increase during adolescence as a normal part of development. However, some studies have revealed potential risks to these types of social relationships. Different authors have indicated that dating violence among adolescents is an issue for concern. To date, there has been little research on this topic cross-nationally. This study examined and compared the prevalence and characteristics of physical dating violence among young people aged between 15 and 18 years in England and Spain (N = 200 in Spain, N = 199 in England), and how being involved (or not) in this violence relates to romantic relationship quality. Results indicated that approximately 23% of young people reported victimization and 30% reported perpetrating physical dating violence. In both countries, most of those involved in physical dating violence reported involvement in reciprocal violence (displaying both aggression and victimization). Those young people involved in dating violence reported higher levels on scales assessing negative aspects of relationship quality compared with those not involved, but there were no significant differences in positive aspects of relationship quality. Furthermore, different patterns appeared relating to the severity of violence and country. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for theory and practice.

  5. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  6. The International System of Units (SI) in Oceanography. Report of IAPSO Working Group on Symbols, Units and Nomenclature in Physical Oceanography (SUN). Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science 45. IAPSO Publication Scientifique No. 32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    This report introduces oceanographers to the International System of Units (SI) in physical oceanography. The SI constitutes a universal language, designed to be understood by all scientists. It facilitates their mutual comprehension and exchange of views and results of their work. The first part of the report is devoted to physical quantities,…

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  8. A preliminary study of physical units teaching in the junior high school%初中物理“单位”教学初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄贵茹

    2016-01-01

    “单位”教学在整个物理教学中必须占有举足轻重的地位。因为如果只是数字而没有相应的物理量单位,则该数据就只能是一串阿拉伯数字,没有任何的物理意义。同时单位教学还可以在物理教学中起到承上启下、画龙点睛的作用。%The teaching of units should play an important role in physics teaching. If numbers go without corresponding physical units,they have no physical meanings. At the same time,the teaching of units is a connection link in physical teaching. It also adds add the finishing touch to the physical teaching.

  9. Does breastfeeding reduce acute procedural pain in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsti, Liisa; Oberlander, Timothy F; Brant, Rollin

    2011-11-01

    Managing acute procedural pain effectively in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit remains a significant problem. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of breastfeeding for reducing pain and to determine if breastfeeding skills were altered after this treatment. Fifty-seven infants born at 30-36 weeks gestational age were randomized to be breastfed (BF) or to be given a soother during blood collection. Changes in the Behavioral Indicators of Infant Pain (BIIP) and in mean heart rate (HR) across 3 phases of blood collection were measured. In the BF group, the Premature Infant Breastfeeding Behaviors (PIBBS) scale was scored before and 24 hours after blood collection. Longitudinal regression analysis was used to compare changes in Lance/squeeze and Recovery phases of blood collection between groups, with gestational age at birth, baseline BIIP scores, and mean HR included as covariates. Differences in PIBBS scores were assessed using a paired t-test. Relationships between PIBBS scores, BIIP scores, and HR were evaluated with Pearson correlations. No differences between treatment groups were found: BIIP (P=0.44, confidence interval [CI] -1.60-0.69); HR (P=0.73, CI -7.0-10.0). Infants in the BF group showed improved PIBBS scores after the treatment (Ppain indices or interfere with the acquisition of breastfeeding skills. Exploratory analyses indicate there may be benefit for infants with mature breastfeeding abilities.

  10. Mitigating an increase of specific power consumption in a cryogenic air separation unit at reduced oxygen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Rohit; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2017-02-01

    Specific power consumed in a Linde double column air separation unit (ASU) increases as the quantity of oxygen produced at a given purity is decreased due to the changes of system requirement or market demand. As the plant operates in part load condition, the specific power consumption (SPC) increases as the total power consumption remains the same. In order to mitigate the increase of SPC at lower oxygen production, the operating pressure of high pressure column (HPC) can be lowered by extending the low pressure column (LPC) by a few trays and adding a second reboiler. As the duty of second reboiler in LPC is increased, the recovery of oxygen decreases with a lowering of the HPC pressure. This results in mitigation of the increase of SPC of the plant. A Medium pressure ASU with dual reboiler that produces pressurised gaseous and liquid products of oxygen and nitrogen is simulated in Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a commercial process simulator to determine SPC at varying oxygen production. The effects of reduced pressure of air feed into the cold box on the size of heat exchangers (HX) are analysed. Operation strategy to obtain various oxygen production rates at varying demand is also proposed.

  11. P15 - Reduced Physical Activity Correlates with Osteopenic or Osteoporotic Status in Postmenopausal Women: Preliminary Results from the Prof Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, P.; Coli, G.; Argentiero, A.; Neglia, C.; Chitano, G.; Paladini, D.; Mundi, S.; Paladini, L.; Greco, M.; Girasoli, C.; Gianicolo, M. E.; Pantile, V.; Argentiero, D.; De Padova, G.; Pansa, L.; Nibio, L.; Di Giuseppe, P.; Minosi, A.; Cirasino, L.; Laselva, G.; Scialpi, M.; Benvenuto, M.; D’Angela, D.; Brandi, M. L.; Distante, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Italy has a considerable yearly incidence of osteoporotic fractures: about 300,000. In this context, preventive strategies are based mainly on early identification of people at higher risk of fractures and of clinical risk factors. Within the PROF (Prevention of Osteoporotic Fractures) project, i.e. a synergic effort of researchers and clinicians aimed at preventing osteoporotic fractures in Southern Apulia (Salento), a region with an increasing number of elderly people, we investigated the correlation between reduced physical activity and osteopenic or osteoporotic status in postmenopausal women. Methods: During the years 2009–2010, 5665 postmenopausal women (mean age 62 years, range 39 to 86) underwent quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) measurement at the heel and phalanx. Demographic and anamnestic data were recorded for all the patients, including BMI, nutrition, menopause, physical activity, previous fractures, familial fragility fractures. Three demineralisation categories were identified a priori: a) Demineralisation, when any T-score <−1.0 SD was observed; b) Severe demineralisation, whenever a T-score <−2.0 was observed, corresponding to a higher risk of fracture; c) Osteoporosis, whenever a T-score <−2.5±0.2 (for the heel) or T-score <−3.2±0.2 (for the phalanx) was observed. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed in order to assess the correlation between low physical activity (patients declaring themselves to be completely sedentary) and osteopenic or osteoporotic status. Results: Of the 5665 women, demineralisation was observed in 4487 patients (79%), corresponding to severe osteopenia or osteoporotic status in 2823 women (50% of all the examined subjects) and frank osteoporosis in 846 patients (15%). In total, of the 1255 women with a clinical history of reduced physical activity, 1058 (84.3%) presented demineralisation corresponding at least to an osteopenic status. In addition, demineralisation typical of severe osteopenia

  12. Low Dopamine D2 Receptor Increases Vulnerability to Obesity Via Reduced Physical Activity, Not Increased Appetitive Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Jeff A; Faust, Rudolf P; Turkson, Susie; Ye, Honggang; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2016-06-01

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) has received much attention in obesity studies. Data indicate that D2R is reduced in obesity and that the TaqA1 D2R variant may be more prevalent among obese persons. It is often suggested that reduced D2R generates a reward deficiency and altered appetitive motivation that induces compulsive eating and contributes to obesity. Although dopamine is known to regulate physical activity, it is often neglected in these studies, leaving open the question of whether reduced D2R contributes to obesity through alterations in energy expenditure and activity. We generated a D2R knockdown (KD) mouse line and assessed both energy expenditure and appetitive motivation under conditions of diet-induced obesity. The KD mice did not gain more weight or show increased appetitive motivation compared with wild-type mice in a standard environment; however, in an enriched environment with voluntary exercise opportunities, KD mice exhibited dramatically lower activity and became more obese than wild-type mice, obtaining no protective benefit from exercise opportunities. These data suggest the primary contribution of altered D2R signaling to obesity lies in altered energy expenditure rather than the induction of compulsive overeating. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Moving the Barricades to Physical Activity: A Qualitative Analysis of Open Streets Initiatives Across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Amy A; Hipp, J Aaron; Lokuta, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Ciclovía, or Open Streets initiatives, are events where streets are opened for physical activity and closed to motorized traffic. Although the initiatives are gaining popularity in the United States, little is known about planning and implementing them. The goals of this paper are to explore the development and implementation of Open Streets initiatives and make recommendations for increasing the capacity of organizers to enhance initiative success. Phenomenology with qualitative analysis of structured interviews was used. Study setting was urban and suburban communities in the United States. Study participants were organizers of Open Streets initiatives in U.S. cities. Using a list of 47 events held in 2011, 27 lead organizers were interviewed by telephone about planning, implementation, and lessons learned. The interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. A phenomenologic approach was used, an initial coding tool was developed after reviewing a sample of transcripts, and constant comparative coding methodology was applied. Themes and subthemes were generated from codes. The most common reasons for initiation were to highlight or improve health and transportation. Most initiatives aimed to reach the general population, but some targeted families, children, or specific neighborhoods. Getting people to understand the concept of Open Streets was an important challenge. Other challenges included lack of funding and personnel, and complex logistics. These initiatives democratize public space for citizens while promoting physical activity, social connectedness, and other broad agendas. There are opportunities for the research community to contribute to the expanse and sustainability of Open Streets, particularly in evaluation and dissemination.

  14. Physics-based animation of large-scale splashing liquids, elastoplastic solids, and model-reduced flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszewski, Daniel James

    several enhancements to model-reduced fluid simulation that allow improved simulation bases and two-way solid-fluid coupling. Specifically, we present a basis enrichment scheme that allows us to combine data-driven or artistically derived bases with more general analytic bases derived from Laplacian Eigenfunctions. Additionally, we handle two-way solid-fluid coupling in a time-splitting fashion---we alternately timestep the fluid and rigid body simulators, while taking into account the effects of the fluid on the rigid bodies and vice versa. We employ the vortex panel method to handle solid-fluid coupling and use dynamic pressure to compute the effect of the fluid on rigid bodies. Taken together, these contributions have advanced the state-of-the art in physics-based animation and are practical enough to be used in production pipelines.

  15. Unit of Analysis: Impact of Silverman and Solmon's Article on Field-Based Intervention Research in Physical Education in the U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weidong; Chen, Yung-Ju; Xiang, Ping; Xie, Xiuge; Li, Yilin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the impact of the Silverman and Solmon article (1998) on how researchers handle the unit of analysis issue in their field-based intervention research in physical education in the United States and summarize statistical approaches that have been used to analyze the data, and (b) provide…

  16. Physical attractiveness and reproductive success in humans: Evidence from the late 20 century United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Markus

    2009-09-01

    Physical attractiveness has been associated with mating behavior, but its role in reproductive success of contemporary humans has received surprisingly little attention. In the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (1244 women, 997 men born between 1937 and 1940) we examined whether attractiveness assessed from photographs taken at age ~18 predicted the number of biological children at age 53-56. In women, attractiveness predicted higher reproductive success in a nonlinear fashion, so that attractive (second highest quartile) women had 16% and very attractive (highest quartile) women 6% more children than their less attractive counterparts. In men, there was a threshold effect so that men in the lowest attractiveness quartile had 13% fewer children than others who did not differ from each other in the average number of children. These associations were partly but not completely accounted for by attractive participants' increased marriage probability. A linear regression analysis indicated relatively weak directional selection gradient for attractiveness (β=0.06 in women, β=0.07 in men). These findings indicate that physical attractiveness may be associated with reproductive success in humans living in industrialized settings.

  17. Successions and diversity of humic-reducing microorganisms and their association with physical-chemical parameters during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Xinyu; He, Xiaosong; Huang, Caihong; Tan, Wenbing; Gao, Rutai; Zhang, Hui; Li, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Humic-reducing microorganisms (HRMs) could utilize humic substances (HS) as terminal electron mediator to promote the biodegradation of recalcitrant pollutants. However, the dynamics of HRMs during composting has not been explored. Here, high throughput sequencing technology was applied to investigate the patterns of HRMs during three composting systems. A total of 30 main genera of HRMs were identified in three composts, with Proteobacteria being the largest phylum. HRMs were detected with increased diversity and abundance and distinct patterns during composting, which were significantly associated with dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen and germination index. Regulating key physical-chemical parameters is a process control of HRMs community composition, thus promoting the redox capability of the compost. The redox capability of HRMs were strengthened during composting, suggesting that HRMs of the compost may play an important role on pollutant degradation of the compost or when they are applied to the contaminated soils.

  18. Both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduce the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Heenan

    Full Text Available Biological motion stimuli, such as orthographically projected stick figure walkers, are ambiguous about their orientation in depth. The projection of a stick figure walker oriented towards the viewer, therefore, is the same as its projection when oriented away. Even though such figures are depth-ambiguous, however, observers tend to interpret them as facing towards them more often than facing away. Some have speculated that this facing-the-viewer bias may exist for sociobiological reasons: Mistaking another human as retreating when they are actually approaching could have more severe consequences than the opposite error. Implied in this hypothesis is that the facing-towards percept of biological motion stimuli is potentially more threatening. Measures of anxiety and the facing-the-viewer bias should therefore be related, as researchers have consistently found that anxious individuals display an attentional bias towards more threatening stimuli. The goal of this study was to assess whether physical exercise (Experiment 1 or an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2 would significantly affect facing-the-viewer biases. We hypothesized that both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation would decrease facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers, but not for bottom- or top-half-only human stimuli, as these carry less sociobiological relevance. On the other hand, we expected that the anxiety induction task (Experiment 2 would increase facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. In both experiments, participants completed anxiety questionnaires, exercised on a treadmill (Experiment 1 or performed an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2, and then immediately completed a perceptual task that allowed us to assess their facing-the-viewer bias. As hypothesized, we found that physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduced facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. Our

  19. Regular physical activity modifies smoking-related lung function decline and reduces risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Aymerich, J; Lange, Peter; Benet, M

    2007-01-01

    RATIONALE: We have previously reported that regular physical activity reduces risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation. We hypothesized that higher levels of regular physical activity could reduce the risk of COPD by modifying smoking-related lung function decline....... OBJECTIVE: To estimate the longitudinal association between regular physical activity and FEV(1) and FVC decline and COPD risk. METHODS: A population-based sample (n = 6,790) was recruited and assessed with respect to physical activity, smoking, lung function, and other covariates, in Copenhagen in 1981......-1983, and followed until 1991-1994. Mean level of physical activity between baseline and follow-up was classified into "low," "moderate," and "high." FEV(1) and FVC decline rates were expressed as milliliters per year. COPD was defined as FEV(1)/FVC physical activity and FEV...

  20. Participant report for National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom) Hole Plate No. 137

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Morace, Renate Erica

    International pour l’Etude Scientifique des Techniques de Production Mécanique (CIRP). In the project, 15 research laboratories have been involved from 9 countries: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA. A total of 24 CMMs were used to measure an optomechanical hole...... procedure of own choice. In this report, the results of a single participant are analysed and compared with the reference values provided by DTU. The purpose of the report is to collect information from the participant and present the result of the data analysis. Furthermore, comments from the participant...... are expected by the organizer and the information will be used in the preparation of the final report....

  1. Natural antioxidant ice cream acutely reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular function and physical performance in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguigni, Valerio; Manco, Melania; Sorge, Roberto; Gnessi, Lucio; Francomano, Davide

    2017-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of several diseases. Polyphenols have been shown to be beneficial against ROS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a natural antioxidant ice cream on oxidative stress, vascular function, and physical performance. In this controlled, single-blind, crossover study, 14 healthy individuals were randomized to consume 100 g of either antioxidant ice cream containing dark cocoa powder and hazelnut and green tea extracts or milk chocolate ice cream (control ice cream). Participants were studied at baseline and 2 h after ingesting ice cream. Serum polyphenols, antioxidant status (ferric-reducing ability of plasma [FRAP]), nitric oxide (NOx) bioavailability, markers of oxidative stress (determination of reactive oxygen metabolites [d-ROMs] and hydrogen peroxide [H2O2]), endothelium function (flow-mediated dilation [FMD] and reactive hyperemia index [RHI]), and exercise tolerance (stress test) were assessed, and the double product was measured. Serum polyphenols (P ice cream ingestion. No changes were found after control ice cream ingestion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that a natural ice cream rich in polyphenols acutely improved vascular function and physical performance in healthy individuals through a reduction in oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  4. Does eccentric exercise reduce pain and improve strength in physically active adults with symptomatic lower extremity tendinosis? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasielewski, Noah J; Kotsko, Kevin M

    2007-01-01

    To critically review evidence for the effectiveness of eccentric exercise to treat lower extremity tendinoses. Databases used to locate randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included PubMed (1980-2006), CINAHL (1982-2006), Web of Science (1995-2006), SPORT Discus (1980-2006), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and the Cochrane Collaboration Database. Key words included tendon, tendonitis, tendinosis, tendinopathy, exercise, eccentric, rehabilitation, and therapy. The criteria for trial selection were (1) the literature was written in English, (2) the research design was an RCT, (3) the study participants were adults with a clinical diagnosis of tendinosis, (4) the outcome measures included pain or strength, and (5) eccentric exercise was used to treat lower extremity tendinosis. Specific data were abstracted from the RCTs, including eccentric exercise protocol, adjunctive treatments, concurrent physical activity, and treatment outcome. The calculated post hoc statistical power of the selected studies (n = 11) was low, and the average methodologic score was 5.3/10 based on PEDro criteria. Eccentric exercise was compared with no treatment (n = 1), concentric exercise (n = 5), an alternative eccentric exercise protocol (n = 1), stretching (n = 2), night splinting (n = 1), and physical agents (n = 1). In most trials, tendinosis-related pain was reduced with eccentric exercise over time, but only in 3 studies did eccentric exercise decrease pain relative to the control treatment. Similarly, the RCTs demonstrated that strength-related measures improved over time, but none revealed significant differences relative to the control treatment. Based on the best evidence available, it appears that eccentric exercise may reduce pain and improve strength in lower extremity tendinoses, but whether eccentric exercise is more effective than other forms of therapeutic exercise for the resolution of tendinosis symptoms remains questionable.

  5. The management in the sphere of physical culture and sport at the level of administrative and territorial units: traditions and innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Savchenko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze the activity of subjects of management in the sphere of physical culture and sport at the level of territorial administrative units. Material & Methods: the legal analysis of a feature of management in the sphere of physical culture and sport of administrative and territorial units of the various level. Results: the main activities of administrative structures of the governmental authorities and the local governments are allocated. Conclusions: it is revealed that the sphere of physical culture and sport needs the improvement in the conditions of decentralization, offers on its reforming are considered.

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  8. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  9. Park availability and physical activity, TV time, and overweight and obesity among women: Findings from Australia and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Jenny; Abbott, Gavin; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja A; Besenyi, Gina M; Lamb, Karen E

    2016-03-01

    This study examined relationships between three measures of park availability and self-reported physical activity (PA), television viewing (TV) time, and overweight/obesity among women from Australia and the United States. Having more parks near home was the only measure of park availability associated with an outcome. Australian women (n=1848) with more parks near home had higher odds of meeting PA recommendations and lower odds of being overweight/obese. In the US sample (n=489), women with more parks near home had lower odds of watching >4h TV per day. A greater number of parks near home was associated with lower BMI among both Australian and US women. Evidence across diverse contexts provides support to improve park availability to promote PA and other health behaviors.

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  11. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  13. A translational research intervention to reduce screen behaviours and promote physical activity among children: Switch-2-Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Jo; Jorna, Michelle; Hume, Clare; Arundell, Lauren; Chahine, Natalie; Tienstra, Myrthe; Crawford, David

    2011-09-01

    Translational or implementation research that assesses the effectiveness of strategies to promote health behaviours among children that have been previously tested under 'ideal' conditions is rarely reported. Switch-2-Activity aimed to examine the effectiveness of an abbreviated programme delivered by teachers targeting children's television viewing, computer use, physical activity and potential mediators of behaviour change. Fifteen schools from disadvantaged areas in Melbourne, Australia agreed to participate in the study (43% school-level response rate). Out of the 1566 Grades 5 and 6 (9-12 year old) children invited to take part in the study, 1048 (67% response rate) provided informed consent. Schools were randomized to either an intervention or wait-list control condition. Teachers delivered six lessons, which included strategies such as self-monitoring, behavioural contracting and budgeting of screen time. Children completed a self-report survey at baseline and post-intervention examining screen-based behaviours, physical activity, self-efficacy and behavioural capability. Teachers reported implementation of and attitudes to the programme. Seventy-one per cent of teachers delivered at least four of the six lessons. Most teachers reported that the materials were easy to follow and deliver; however, many teachers reported modifying the materials in some way. Among boys, there were favourable small intervention effects on weekend screen time [(coefficient = -0.62, 95% 95% confidence interval: -1.15, -0.10, p = 0.020)]. The intervention also had significant positive effects on children's self-efficacy for reducing television viewing and on behavioural capability (television viewing styles). Future studies that assess the translation of efficacious programmes and that test whether such programmes are equally effective in different settings (e.g. in the family setting) are urgently required.

  14. Simultaneous POMC gene transfer to hypothalamus and brainstem increases physical activity, lipolysis and reduces adult-onset obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Rodrigues, Enda; Li, Gang; Gao, Yongxin; King, Michael; Carter, Christy S; Tumer, Nihal; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Scarpace, Philip J

    2011-04-01

    Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are identified in two brain sites, the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in brainstem. Earlier pharmacological and POMC gene transfer studies demonstrate that melanocortin activation in either site alone improves insulin sensitivity and reduces obesity. The present study, for the first time, investigated the long-term efficacy of POMC gene transfer concurrently into both sites in the regulation of energy metabolism in aged F344xBN rats bearing adult-onset obesity. Pair feeding was included to reveal food-independent POMC impact on energy expenditure. We introduced adeno-associated virus encoding either POMC or green fluorescence protein to the two brain areas in 22-month-old rats, then recorded food intake and body weight, assessed oxygen consumption, serum leptin, insulin and glucose, tested voluntary wheel running, analysed POMC expression, and examined fat metabolism in brown and white adipose tissues. POMC mRNA was significantly increased in both the hypothalamus and NTS region at termination. Relative to pair feeding, POMC caused sustained weight reduction and additional fat loss, lowered fasting insulin and glucose, and augmented white fat hormone-sensitive lipase activity and brown fat uncoupling protein 1 level. By wheel running assessment, the POMC animals ran twice the distance as the Control or pair-fed rats. Thus, the dual-site POMC treatment ameliorated adult-onset obesity effectively, involving a moderate hypophagia lasting ∼60 days, enhanced lipolysis and thermogenesis, and increased physical activity in the form of voluntary wheel running. The latter finding provides a clue for countering age-related decline in physical activity. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  15. Patterns of physical activity in free-living adults in the Southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchowski, M S; Acra, S; Majchrzak, K M; Sun, M; Chen, K Y

    2004-05-01

    To examine the relationship between the amount and patterns of physical activity (PA), body fatness, and age in a heterogeneous adult population in the free living. Cross-sectional study of the amount of PA over a 1-week period. The amount of body movements during PA (PA counts*10(3)) and time spent on various PA intensity categories were calculated from a triaxial accelerometer and compared with subject characteristics, including body fat from hydrodensitometry. Adult healthy men (n=48) and women (n=72) were recruited from the Nashville, Tennessee area and their PA was monitored in their free-living environment. The average weekday PA counts (176.5+/-60.3, P=0.002, r(2)=0.294), PA counts day-to-day variability (47.3+/-32.7, P=0.002, r(2)=0.286), daily maximum PA counts (241.9+/-89.2, P=0.001, r(2)=0.327), minute-to-minute variability on weekdays (0.281+/-0.091, P=0.001, r(2)=0.362), and the difference between maximum and minimum daily PA counts (130.6+/-78.3, P=0.008, r(2)=0.243) were significantly and negatively correlated with body fatness. During awake time, both men and women spent 10-12 h on low intensity (1.0-2.9 metabolic equivalents (METs)) PA, approximately 1 h on moderate (3.0-5.9 MET), and less than 10 min on vigorous (>6.0 MET) PA each day. On weekends, men and women spent more time at rest (1 MET), less time on low-intensity PA, and men spent more time on moderate PA than on weekdays. In adults living in the Southern US the amount of free-living PA was negatively correlated with body fatness. Both men and women spent the majority of active time on low and moderate PA. PA patterns on weekends were different than on weekdays and were related to sex and age, but not to body fatness. National Institutes of Health, US.

  16. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA). Coal Preparation Div.); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1991-02-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 184 raw coal channel samples, including anthracite, bituminous and lignite coals, collected from the Central Region of the United States. This is the second of a three volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in-depth characterization of each sample are presented alphabetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Central Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, section and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA)); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 543 raw coal samples collected from the Eastern Region of the United States. This is the first volume of a three-volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in- depth characterization of each sample are presented alphbetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties, and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Eastern Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, section, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 14 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Reduced soil cultivation and organic fertilization on organic farms: effects on crop yield and soil physical traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surböck, Andreas; Gollner, Gabriele; Klik, Andreas; Freyer, Bernhard; Friedel, Jürgen K.

    2017-04-01

    A continuous investment in soil fertility is necessary to achieve sustainable yields in organic arable farming. Crucial factors here besides the crop rotation are organic fertilization and the soil tillage system. On this topic, an operational group (Project BIOBO*) was established in the frame of an European Innovation Partnership in 2016 consisting of organic farmers, consultants and scientists in the farming region of eastern Austria. The aim of this group is the development and testing of innovative, reduced soil cultivation, green manure and organic fertilization systems under on-farm and on-station conditions to facilitate the sharing and transfer of experience and knowledge within and outside the group. Possibilities for optimization of the farm-specific reduced soil tillage system in combination with green manuring are being studied in field trials on six organic farms. The aim is to determine, how these measures contribute to an increase in soil organic matter contents, yields and income, to an improved nitrogen and nutrient supply to the crops, as well as support soil fertility in general. Within a long-term monitoring project (MUBIL), the effects of different organic fertilization systems on plant and soil traits have been investigated since 2003, when the farm was converted to organic management. The examined organic fertilization systems, i.e. four treatments representing stockless and livestock keeping systems, differ in lucerne management and the supply of organic manure (communal compost, farmyard manure, digestate from a biogas plant). Previous results of this on-station experiment have shown an improvement of some soil properties, especially soil physical properties, since 2003 in all fertilization systems and without differences between them. The infiltration rate of rainwater has increased because of higher hydraulic conductivity. The aggregate stability has shown also positive trends, which reduces the susceptibility to soil erosion by wind and

  19. Interventions incorporating physical and cognitive elements to reduce falls risk in cognitively impaired older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Vicky; Hood, Victoria; Kearney, Fiona

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a risk factor for falls. Older adults with cognitive impairment (such as dementia) have an increased risk of falling compared with age-matched individuals without a cognitive impairment. To reduce falls in this population, interventions could theoretically target and train both physical and cognitive abilities. Combining and addressing cognitive components in falls rehabilitation is a novel and emerging area of healthcare. The objective of this review was to identify the effectiveness of combined cognitive and physical interventions on the risk of falls in cognitively impaired older adults. Older persons who were 65 years or older and identified as having a cognitive impairment either through diagnosis or assessment of global cognition. Multifactorial or multiple interventions where physical and cognitive elements were combined was compared against standard care or a single element intervention. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials and experimental studies in which randomization was used. Outcomes related to falls, including falls rate, specific falls risk measures (i.e. Physiological Profile Assessment) or related clinical outcome measures (i.e. Timed Up and Go test, Tinetti and gait speed). A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review, including search of electronic databases: CENTRAL, JBISRIR, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL and PsychINFO. Initial keywords used were dementia, cognitive impairment, memory loss, exercise, rehabilitation and accidental falls. Grey literature (Google Scholar) and trials registers (Current Controlled Trials) searches were also completed. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) software. Data was extracted from articles included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from JBI-MAStARI. A quantitative meta-analysis was performed where

  20. How Much Can the Total Aleatory Variability of Empirical Ground Motion Prediction Equations Be Reduced Using Physics-Based Earthquake Simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T. H.; Wang, F.; Graves, R. W.; Callaghan, S.; Olsen, K. B.; Cui, Y.; Milner, K. R.; Juve, G.; Vahi, K.; Yu, J.; Deelman, E.; Gill, D.; Maechling, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) in common use predict the logarithmic intensity of ground shaking, lnY, as a deterministic value, lnYpred(x), conditioned on a set of explanatory variables x plus a normally distributed random variable with a standard deviation σT. The latter accounts for the unexplained variability in the ground motion data used to calibrate the GMPE and is typically 0.5-0.7 in natural log units. Reducing this residual or "aleatory" variability is a high priority for seismic hazard analysis, because the probabilities of exceedance at high Y values go up rapidly with σT. adding costs to the seismic design of critical facilities to account for the prediction uncertainty. However, attempts to decrease σT by incorporating more explanatory variables to the GMPEs have been largely unsuccessful (e.g., Strasser et al., SRL, 2009). An alternative is to employ physics-based earthquake simulations that properly account for source directivity, basin effects, directivity-basin coupling, and other 3D complexities. We have explored the theoretical limits of this approach through an analysis of large (> 108) ensembles of 3D synthetic seismograms generated for the Los Angeles region by SCEC's CyberShake project using the new tool of averaging-based factorization (ABF, Wang & Jordan, BSSA, 2014). The residual variance obtained by applying GMPEs to the CyberShake dataset matches the frequency-dependence of σT obtained for the GMPE calibration dataset. The ABF analysis allows us to partition this variance into uncorrelated components representing source, path, and site effects. We show that simulations can potentially reduce σT by about one-third, which could lower the exceedance probabilities for high hazard levels at fixed x by orders of magnitude. Realizing this gain in forecasting probability would have a broad impact on risk-reduction strategies, especially for critical facilities such as large dams, nuclear power plants, and energy transportation

  1. Feasibility and observed safety of interactive video games for physical rehabilitation in the intensive care unit: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Michelle E; Damluji, Abdulla; Zanni, Jennifer M; Needham, Dale M

    2012-04-01

    Early rehabilitation in the intensive care unit (ICU) improves patients' physical function. Despite reports of using commercially available interactive video game systems for rehabilitation, there are few data evaluating feasibility and safety as part of routine in-patient rehabilitation, particularly in the ICU. We conducted an observational study from September 1, 2009, to August 31, 2010, of adults admitted to a 16-bed medical ICU receiving video games as part of routine physical therapy (PT), evaluating use and indications and occurrence of 14 prospectively monitored safety events. Of 410 patients receiving PT in the medical ICU, 22 (5% of all patients; male, 64%; median age, 52 years) had 42 PT treatments with video games (median [interquartile range] per patient, 1.0 [1.0-2.0]). Main indications for video game therapy included balance (52%) and endurance (45%), and the most common activities included boxing (38%), bowling (24%), and balance board (21%). Of 42 treatments, 69% occurred while standing and 45% while mechanically ventilated. During 35 hours of PT treatment, 0 safety events occurred (95% upper confidence limit for safety event rate, 8.4%). Novel use of interactive video games as part of routine PT in critically ill patients is feasible and appears safe in our case series. Video game therapy may complement existing rehabilitation techniques for ICU patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    the PAG conveners

    2011-01-01

    The delivered LHC integrated luminosity of more than 1 inverse femtobarn by summer and more than 5 by the end of 2011 has been a gold mine for the physics groups. With 2011 data, we have submitted or published 14 papers, 7 others are in collaboration-wide review, and 75 Physics Analysis Summaries have been approved already. They add to the 73 papers already published based on the 2010 and 2009 datasets. Highlights from each physics analysis group are described below. Heavy ions Many important results have been obtained from the first lead-ion collision run in 2010. The published measurements include the first ever indications of Υ excited state suppression (PRL synopsis), long-range correlation in PbPb, and track multiplicity over a wide η range. Preliminary results include the first ever measurement of isolated photons (showing no modification), J/ψ suppression including the separation of the non-prompt component, further study of jet fragmentation, nuclear modification factor...

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      The period since the last CMS Bulletin has been historic for CMS Physics. The pinnacle of our physics programme was an observation of a new particle – a strong candidate for a Higgs boson – which has captured worldwide interest and made a profound impact on the very field of particle physics. At the time of the discovery announcement on 4 July, 2012, prominent signals were observed in the high-resolution H→γγ and H→ZZ(4l) modes. Corroborating excess was observed in the H→W+W– mode as well. The fermionic channel analyses (H→bb, H→ττ), however, yielded less than the Standard Model (SM) expectation. Collectively, the five channels established the signal with a significance of five standard deviations. With the exception of the diphoton channel, these analyses have all been updated in the last months and several new channels have been added. With improved analyses and more than twice the i...

  4. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The Physics Groups are actively engaged on analyses of the first data from the LHC at 7 TeV, targeting many results for the ICHEP conference taking place in Paris this summer. The first large batch of physics approvals is scheduled for this CMS Week, to be followed by four more weeks of approvals and analysis updates leading to the start of the conference in July. Several high priority analysis areas were organized into task forces to ensure sufficient coverage from the relevant detector, object, and analysis groups in the preparation of these analyses. Already some results on charged particle correlations and multiplicities in 7 TeV minimum bias collisions have been approved. Only one small detail remains before ICHEP: further integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC! Beyond the Standard Model measurements that can be done with these data, the focus changes to the search for new physics at the TeV scale and for the Higgs boson in the period after ICHEP. Particle Flow The PFT group is focusing on the ...

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      2012 has started off as a very busy year for the CMS Physics Groups. Planning for the upcoming higher luminosity/higher energy (8 TeV) operation of the LHC and relatively early Rencontres de Moriond are the high-priority activities for the group at the moment. To be ready for the coming 8-TeV data, CMS has made a concerted effort to perform and publish analyses on the 5 fb−1 dataset recorded in 2011. This has resulted in the submission of 16 papers already, including nine on the search for the Higgs boson. In addition, a number of preliminary results on the 2011 dataset have been released to the public. The Exotica and SUSY groups approved several searches for new physics in January, such as searches for W′ and exotic highly ionising particles. These were highlighted at a CERN seminar given on 24th  January. Many more analyses, from all the PAGs, including the newly formed SMP (Standard Model Physics) and FSQ (Forward and Small-x QCD), were approved in February. The ...

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Demortier

    Physics-wise, the CMS week in December was dominated by discussions of the analyses that will be carried out in the “next six months”, i.e. while waiting for the first LHC collisions.  As presented in December, analysis approvals based on Monte Carlo simulation were re-opened, with the caveat that for this work to be helpful to the goals of CMS, it should be carried out using the new software (CMSSW_2_X) and associated samples.  By the end of the week, the goal for the physics groups was set to be the porting of our physics commissioning methods and plans, as well as the early analyses (based an integrated luminosity in the range 10-100pb-1) into this new software. Since December, the large data samples from CMSSW_2_1 were completed. A big effort by the production group gave a significant number of events over the end-of-year break – but also gave out the first samples with the fast simulation. Meanwhile, as mentioned in December, the arrival of 2_2 meant that ...

  8. A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Risky Sexual Behavior and Decrease Sexually Transmitted Infections in Latinas Living in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Meghan D.; Grayson, Cary T.; Witt, Lucy; Holden, Julie; Reid, Daniel; Kissinger, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of behavioral interventions in reducing risky sexual behavior and incident sexually transmitted infections (STI) among Latina women living in the United States. Studies were found by systematically searching the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsychInfo databases without language restriction.…

  9. Top-dressing nitrogen fertilizer rate contributes to decrease culm physical strength by reducing structural carbohydrate content in japonica rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wu-jun; WANG Shao-hua; WU Long-mei; DING Yan-feng; WENG Fei; WU Xiao-ran; LI Gang-hua; LIU Zheng-hui; TANG She; DING Cheng-qiang

    2016-01-01

    Lodging is an important factor limiting rice yield and quality by bending or breaking stem injaponica rice (Oryza sativaL.) production. The objectives of this study were to determine the mechanism of lodging resistance injaponica rice as affected by carbohydrate components, especialy its related arrangement in culm tissue and response to top-dressing nitrogen (N) fertilizer. Field experiments were conducted in Danyang County, Jiangsu Province, China, by using twojaponica rice vari-eties Wuyunjing 23 (lodging-resistance variety) and W3668 (lodging-susceptible variety) with three top-dressing N fertilizer rates (0, 135 and 270 kg N ha–1) in 2013 and 2014. Lodging related physical parameters, morphological characteristics and stem carbohydrate components were investigated at 30 d after ful heading stage. Results showed that with increasing N fertilizer rates, the lodging rate and lodging index increased rapidly primarily due to signiifcant reduction of breaking strength in twojaponica rice varieties. Correlation analysis revealed that breaking strength was signiifcantly and positively correlated with bending stress, but negatively correlated with section modulus, except for signiifcant correlation at W3668 in 2014. Higher stem plumpness status and structural carbohydrate contents signiifcantly enhanced stem stiffness, despite of lower non-structural carbohydrate. With higher N fertilizer rate, the culm wal thickness was almost identical, and culm diameter increased slightly. The structural carbohydrates, especialy for lignin content in culm, reduced signiifcantly under high N rate. Further histochemical staining analysis revealed that high N treatments decreased the lignin deposition rapidly in the sclerenchyma cels of mechanical tissue, large vascular bundle and smal vascular bundle region, which were consistent with reduction of bending stress, especialy for W3668 and thus, resulted in poor stem strength and higher lodging index. These results suggested that

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  11. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    The period since the last CMS bulletin has seen the end of proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy 8 TeV, a successful proton-lead collision run at 5 TeV/nucleon, as well as a “reference” proton run at 2.76 TeV. With these final LHC Run 1 datasets in hand, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have been busy analysing these data in preparation for the winter conferences. Moreover, despite the fact that the pp run only concluded in mid-December (and there was consequently less time to complete data analyses), CMS again made a strong showing at the Rencontres de Moriond in La Thuile (EW and QCD) where nearly 40 new results were presented. The highlight of these preliminary results was the eagerly anticipated updated studies of the properties of the Higgs boson discovered in July of last year. Meanwhile, preparations for Run 2 and physics performance studies for Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrade scenarios are ongoing. The Higgs analysis group produced updated analyses on the full Run 1 dataset (~25 f...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Christopher Hill

    2013-01-01

    Since the last CMS Bulletin, the CMS Physics Analysis Groups have completed more than 70 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete Run 1 dataset. In parallel the Snowmass whitepaper on projected discovery potential of CMS for HL-LHC has been completed, while the ECFA HL-LHC future physics studies has been summarised in a report and nine published benchmark analyses. Run 1 summary studies on b-tag and jet identification, quark-gluon discrimination and boosted topologies have been documented in BTV-13-001 and JME-13-002/005/006, respectively. The new tracking alignment and performance papers are being prepared for submission as well. The Higgs analysis group produced several new results including the search for ttH with H decaying to ZZ, WW, ττ+bb (HIG-13-019/020) where an excess of ~2.5σ is observed in the like-sign di-muon channel, and new searches for high-mass Higgs bosons (HIG-13-022). Search for invisible Higgs decays have also been performed both using the associ...

  14. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  15. Expected ozone benefits of reducing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired electricity generating units in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, Timothy; Bull, Emily; Canty, Timothy; He, Hao; Zalewsky, Eric; Woodman, Michael; Aburn, George; Ehrman, Sheryl; Dickerson, Russell R

    2017-03-01

    On hot summer days in the eastern United States, electricity demand rises, mainly because of increased use of air conditioning. Power plants must provide this additional energy, emitting additional pollutants when meteorological conditions are primed for poor air quality. To evaluate the impact of summertime NOx emissions from coal-fired electricity generating units (EGUs) on surface ozone formation, we performed a series of sensitivity modeling forecast scenarios utilizing EPA 2018 version 6.0 emissions (2011 base year) and CMAQ v5.0.2. Coal-fired EGU NOx emissions were adjusted to match the lowest NOx rates observed during the ozone seasons (April 1-October 31) of 2005-2012 (Scenario A), where ozone decreased by 3-4 ppb in affected areas. When compared to the highest emissions rates during the same time period (Scenario B), ozone increased ∼4-7 ppb. NOx emission rates adjusted to match the observed rates from 2011 (Scenario C) increased ozone by ∼4-5 ppb. Finally in Scenario D, the impact of additional NOx reductions was determined by assuming installation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) controls on all units lacking postcombustion controls; this decreased ozone by an additional 2-4 ppb relative to Scenario A. Following the announcement of a stricter 8-hour ozone standard, this analysis outlines a strategy that would help bring coastal areas in the mid-Atlantic region closer to attainment, and would also provide profound benefits for upwind states where most of the regional EGU NOx originates, even if additional capital investments are not made (Scenario A). With the 8-hr maximum ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) decreasing from 75 to 70 ppb, modeling results indicate that use of postcombustion controls on coal-fired power plants in 2018 could help keep regions in attainment. By operating already existing nitrogen oxide (NOx) removal devices to their full potential, ozone could be significantly curtailed, achieving ozone reductions by

  16. Can an incentive-based intervention increase physical activity and reduce sitting among adults? the ACHIEVE (Active Choices IncEntiVE) feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kylie; Hunter, Ruth F; Maple, Jaimie-Lee; Moodie, Marj; Salmon, Jo; Ong, Kok-Leong; Stephens, Lena D; Jackson, Michelle; Crawford, David

    2017-03-21

    Despite recent interest in the potential of incentivisation as a strategy for motivating healthier behaviors, little remains known about the effectiveness of incentives in promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior, and improving associated health outcomes. This pre-post-test design study investigated the feasibility, appeal and effects of providing non-financial incentives for promoting increased physical activity, reduced sedentary time, and reduced body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure among inactive middle-aged adults. Inactive men (n = 36) and women (n = 46) aged 40-65 years were recruited via a not-for-profit insurance fund and participated in a 4 month pre-post design intervention. Baseline and post-intervention data were collected on self-reported physical activity and sitting time (IPAQ-Long), BMI and blood pressure. Participants were encouraged to increase physical activity to 150 mins/week and reduce sedentary behavior by 150 mins/week in progressive increments. Incentives included clothing, recipe books, store gift vouchers, and a chance to win one of four Apple iPad Mini devices. The incentive component of the intervention was supported by an initial motivational interview and text messaging to encourage participants and provide strategies to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviors. Only two participants withdrew during the program, demonstrating the feasibility of recruiting and retaining inactive middle-aged participants. While two-thirds of the sample qualified for the easiest physical activity incentive (by demonstrating 100 mins physical activity/week or 100 mins reduced sitting time/week), only one third qualified for the most challenging incentive. Goals to reduce sitting appeared more challenging, with 43% of participants qualifying for the first incentive, but only 20% for the last incentive. More men than women qualified for most incentives. Mean leisure-time physical activity increased by 252

  17. Prepare, Do, Review: A Model Used to Reduce the Negative Feelings towards Laboratory Classes in an Introductory Chemistry Undergraduate Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, Dino; Wong, Lawrence; Maisey, Shannan; Clemons, Tristan D.

    2017-01-01

    Student feelings towards the laboratory component of an introductory chemistry unit were evaluated in an action research study, over a three-year period at the University of Western Australia. In 2013 we found that the percentage of students with negative feelings towards the laboratory increased over the duration of a semester. In 2014 we…

  18. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, John P., E-mail: john.gibbons@marybird.com [Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Antolak, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Roback, Donald M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Reid, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States); Khan, Faiz M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ′}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ′} ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  19. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John P; Antolak, John A; Followill, David S; Huq, M Saiful; Klein, Eric E; Lam, Kwok L; Palta, Jatinder R; Roback, Donald M; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M

    2014-03-01

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D'0, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D'0 = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D'0 ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of dm, with D'0 = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  20. Increasing the repeating units of ethylene glycol-based dimethacrylates directed toward reduced oxidative stress and co-stimulatory factors expression in human monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Izumi; Yui, Nobuhiko; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    The ethylene glycol-based dimethacrylates are commonly used in biomaterials and dental restorative materials as a cross-linking agent. In this study, toxic effect of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylates (PEG-DMAs) with various ethylene glycol repeating units was investigated in terms of cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and the expression of co-stimulatory factors in human leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells) to verify the effect of ethylene glycol repeating units. Note that the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient of PEG-based dimethacrylates decreased with increasing the ethylene glycol repeating units, indicating that the hydrophilicity of PEG-DMAs increased with ethylene glycol repeating units. The toxic effect of PEG-DMAs such as cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and the expression of CD86 in treated THP-1 cells are reduced with increasing the ethylene glycol repeating units in PEG-DMAs. However, the expression of CD54 in treated THP-1 cells was not influenced with the ethylene glycol repeating units and the maximal expression level of CD54 was observed at the concentration range of 2-4 mM for all samples. Accordingly, hydrophilic character of PEG-DMAs with long ethylene glycol chains definitely alleviates the some toxic aspect of PEG-based DMAs. This finding would provide important insight into the design of new biomaterials and dental materials with superior biocompatibility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Development and Implementation of a Smartphone Application to Promote Physical Activity and Reduce Screen-Time in Adolescent Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubans, David R.; Smith, Jordan J.; Skinner, Geoff; Morgan, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the development and implementation of a smartphone application (app) designed to promote physical activity and reduce screen-time in adolescent boys considered “at-risk” of obesity. Methods: An app was developed to support the delivery of a face-to-face school-based obesity prevention program known as the “Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time” (ATLAS) program. ATLAS was guided by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory and evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial with 361 boys (12.7 ± 0.5 years) in 14 secondary schools. Following the completion of the study, participants in the intervention group completed a process evaluation questionnaire and focus groups were conducted with 42 students to explore their general perceptions of the ATLAS program and their experience with the smartphone app. Barriers and challenges encountered in the development, implementation, and evaluation of the app are also described. Results: Participation in the study was not contingent on ownership of a smartphone, but 70% of participants in the intervention group reported having access to a smartphone or tablet device. Focus group participants reported an enjoyment of the program, and felt that it had provided them with new skills, techniques, and routines for the future. However, their engagement with the smartphone app was limited, due to a variety of reasons. Barriers to the implementation and evaluation of the app included limited access to smartphone devices, technical problems with the push notifications, lack of access to usage data, and the challenges of maintaining participants’ interest in using the app. Conclusion: Although participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the ATLAS program in general, the smartphone app was not used extensively. Additional strategies and features may be needed to enhance engagement in adolescent boys. PMID:24904909

  2. Development and Implementation of a Smartphone Application to Promote Physical Activity and Reduce Screen-time in Adolescent Boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Revalds Lubans

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The primary aim is to describe the development and implementation of a smartphone application (app designed to promote physical activity and reduce screen-time in adolescent boys ‘at risk’ of obesity from low-income communities.Methods: An app was developed to support the delivery of a face-to-face school-based obesity prevention program known as the ‘Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time’ (ATLAS program. ATLAS was guided by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory and evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial with 361 boys (12.7± 0.5 years in 14 secondary schools. Following the completion of the study, participants in the intervention group completed a process evaluation questionnaire and focus groups were conducted with 42 students to explore their general perceptions of the ATLAS program and their experience with the smartphone app. Barriers and challenges encountered in the development, implementation and evaluation of the app are also described.Results: Participation in the study was not contingent on ownership of a smartphone, but 70% of participants in the intervention group reported having access to a smartphone or tablet device. Focus group participants reported an enjoyment of the program, and felt that it had provided them with new skills, techniques, and routines for the future. However, their engagement with the smartphone app was limited, due to a variety of reasons. Barriers to the implementation and evaluation of the app included limited access to smartphone devices, technical problems with the push notifications, lack of access to usage data and the challenges of maintaining participants’ interest in using the app.Conclusions: Although participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the ATLAS program in general, the smartphone app was not used extensively. Additional strategies and features may be needed to enhance engagement in adolescent boys.

  3. Reviews Book: Sustainable Energy—Without the Hot Air Equipment: Doppler Effect Unit Book: The Physics of Rugby Book: Plastic Fantastic: How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World Equipment: Brunel Eyecam Equipment: 200x Digital Microscope Book: The Atom and the Apple: Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics Book: Physics 2 for OCR Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Sustainable Energy—Without the Hot Air This excellent book makes sense of energy facts and figures Doppler Effect Unit Another simple, effective piece of kit from SEP Plastic Fantastic: How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World Intriguing and unique write-up of an intellectual fraud case Brunel Eyecam An affordable digital eyepiece for your microscope 200x Digital Microscope An adjustable digital flexcam for classroom use The Atom and the Apple: Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics A fascinating round-up of the recent history of physics WORTH A LOOK The Physics of Rugby Book uses sport analogy and context to teach physics concepts Physics 2 for OCR Essential textbook for the course but otherwise pointless WEB WATCH Some free teaching materials are better than those you'd pay for

  4. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  5. Li2GeMo3O8: a novel reduced molybdenum oxide containing Mo3O13 cluster units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Gall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, dilithium germanium trimolybdenum octaoxide, consists of distorted hexagonal-close-packed oxygen layers with stacking sequence ABAC along [001] that are held together by alternating lithium–germanium and molybdenum layers. The two Li+ and Ge4+ ions all have site symmetry 3m. and occupy, respectively, tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the ratio 2:1. The Mo atom has a formal oxidation state of +3.3 and occupies an octahedral site (site symmetry .m. and forms strongly bonded triangular cluster units [Mo—Mo distance = 2.4728 (8 Å] involving three MoO6 octahedra that are each shared along two edges, constituting an Mo3O13 unit.

  6. A family support intervention to reduce stress among parents of preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Shahkolahi, Zahra; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Hajiheidari, Mahnoosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preterm infants constitute a large proportion of the newborn population in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Parents, as the main members of the care team, are not adequately supported as the focus is chiefly on infant care. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of a family support intervention on the stress levels among the parents of preterm infants in NICU. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, convenience sampling method was used to select ...

  7. A microenvironment approach to reducing sedentary time and increasing physical activity of children and adults at a playground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective. Test whether a micro-environment park intervention in Grand Forks, ND, movement of seating away from a playground, would increase the physical activity and length of stay of park users. Method. STUDY 1, summer 2012: physical activity of children and adults was assessed during baseline (...

  8. Mindful Staff Can Reduce the Use of Physical Restraints when Providing Care to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N.; Adkins, Angela D.; Singh, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of physical restraints has generated immense controversy in the delivery of services to individuals with intellectual disabilities. The current "zeitgeist" is that effective positive approaches obviate the need for using physical restraints. In a multiple baseline design, we sought to assess how training staff members in…

  9. Regular physical activity reduces hospital admission and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Aymerich, J; Lange, Peter; Benet, M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information about the influence of regular physical activity on the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is scarce. A study was undertaken to examine the association between regular physical activity and both hospital admissions for COPD and all-cause and specific mo...

  10. Production Increasing and Consumption Reducing for Low Pressure Alcoholization and Alkylation Unit%低压醇烃化系统提产降耗优化措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵阳

    2013-01-01

    The problems affect normal operation and high consumption of the unit during trial production , w hich include low methanol production , the alcoholization and alkylation unit not being able to maintain autothermal equilibrium and the high content trace organic impurities to cause the ammonia plant operation fluctuation etc . After analyzing the reasons and taking optimization measures , the production is increased and consumption is reduced in the alcoholization and alkylation unit .%基于试生产过程中出现的甲醇产量低、醇烃化系统不能维持自热平衡、出口微量高导致合成氨系统波动大等影响系统正常运行且消耗高的问题,分析其原因,制定优化措施,从而降低了能耗,提高了产量。

  11. A cluster-randomized controlled trial to reduce sedentary behavior and promote physical activity and health of 8-9 year olds: The Transform-Us! Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball Kylie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity (PA is associated with positive cardio-metabolic health and emerging evidence suggests sedentary behavior (SB may be detrimental to children's health independent of PA. The primary aim of the Transform-Us! study is to determine whether an 18-month, behavioral and environmental intervention in the school and family settings results in higher levels of PA and lower rates of SB among 8-9 year old children compared with usual practice (post-intervention and 12-months follow-up. The secondary aims are to determine the independent and combined effects of PA and SB on children's cardio-metabolic health risk factors; identify the factors that mediate the success of the intervention; and determine whether the intervention is cost-effective. Methods/design A four-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT with a 2 × 2 factorial design, with schools as the unit of randomization. Twenty schools will be allocated to one of four intervention groups, sedentary behavior (SB-I, physical activity (PA-I, combined SB and PA (SB+PA-I or current practice control (C, which will be evaluated among approximately 600 children aged 8-9 years in school year 3 living in Melbourne, Australia. All children in year 3 at intervention schools in 2010 (8-9 years will receive the intervention over an 18-month period with a maintenance 'booster' delivered in 2012 and children at all schools will be invited to participate in the evaluation assessments. To maximize the sample and to capture new students arriving at intervention and control schools, recruitment will be on-going up to the post-intervention time point. Primary outcomes are time spent sitting and in PA assessed via accelerometers and inclinometers and survey. Discussion To our knowledge, Transform-Us! is the first RCT to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies for reducing children's overall sedentary time, promoting PA and optimizing health outcomes. The integration

  12. Pedestrian-oriented zoning is associated with reduced income and poverty disparities in adult active travel to work, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F; Leider, Julien; Thrun, Emily; Nicholson, Lisa M; Slater, Sandy J

    2017-02-01

    Active travel to work can provide additional minutes of daily physical activity. While the literature points to the relationship between zoning, equity and socioeconomic status, and physical activity, no study has quantitatively explored these connections. This study examined whether zoning may help to moderate any income and poverty inequities in active travel and taking public transit to work. Research was conducted between May 2012 and June 2015. Zoning data were compiled for 3914 jurisdictions covering 45.45% of the U.S. population located in 471 of the most populous U.S. counties and 2 consolidated cities located in 48 states and the District of Columbia. (Sensitivity analyses also captured unincorporated areas which, with the municipalities, collectively covered ~72% of the U.S.

  13. Frequency and Risk Factors Associated with Cord Graft Failure after Transplant with Single-Unit Umbilical Cord Cells Supplemented by Haploidentical Cells with Reduced-Intensity Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Stephanie B; Liu, Hongtao; Shore, Tsiporah; Fan, Yun; Bishop, Michael; Cushing, Melissa M; Gergis, Usama; Godley, Lucy; Kline, Justin; Larson, Richard A; Martinez, Guadalupe; Mayer, Sebastian; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Stock, Wendy; Wickrema, Amittha; van Besien, Koen; Artz, Andrew S

    2016-06-01

    Delayed engraftment and cord graft failure (CGF) are serious complications after unrelated cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly when using low-cell-dose UCB units. The haplo-cord HSCT approach allows the use of a lower dose single UCB unit by co-infusion of a CD34(+) selected haploidentical graft, which provides early transient engraftment while awaiting durable UCB engraftment. We describe the frequency, complications, and risk factors of CGF after reduced-intensity conditioning haplo-cord HSCT. Among 107 patients who underwent haplo-cord HSCT, 94 were assessable for CGF, defined as risk of CGF. We conclude that assessing chimerism at day 30 may foretell impending CGF, and avoidance of high haploidentical cell doses may reduce risk of CGF after haplo-cord HSCT. However, long-term survival is possible after CGF because of predominant haploidentical or mixed chimerism and hematopoietic function.

  14. Midwife-led Care Model for Reducing Caesarean Rate: A Novel Concept for Worldwide Birth units where Standard Obstetric Care Still Dominates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caesarean rate has been increasing year by year in China and other countries in the world. In fact, caesarean section is associated with increased risk of maternal mortality and serious foetal pulmonary morbidity. To reduce caesarean rate, obstetricians in physician-based birth units get used to take early intervention for any delay in labour progress that could cause dystocia. However, standard obstetric care enhanced by obstetric power has not consistently been shown to reduce rate of caesarean delivery. Other than physician-based model, midwife-led model of care is aiming to promote normal birth by use of midwives’ skills as well as continuous support rather than augmentation of labour through excessive medical treatment. Midwife-led care model is novel to worldwide birth units where standard obstetric care still dominates. It has made some headway in efforts to reduce caesarean rate. The fact that standard obstetric care of childbirth have not consistently reduced rate of caesarean delivery encourages us for creating the hypotheses that midwife-led care model satisfying puerpera with care and support could minimise unnecessary obstetric intervention and facilitate vaginal birth, and finally reduces caesarean rate. This hypothesis, if confirmed, might have the potential to be disseminated elsewhere in the world, where most women still take standard obstetric care. Moreover, it has political implications for the national health-care policymaking.

  15. Child Physical Abuse Prevalence, Characteristics, Predictors, and Beliefs about Parent-Child Violence in South Asian, Middle Eastern, East Asian, and Latina Women in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maker, Azmaira H.; Shah, Priti V.; Agha, Zia

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the prevalence, characteristics, beliefs, and demographic predictors of parent-child physical violence among South Asian, Middle Eastern, East Asian, and Latina women in the United States. Two hundred fifty-one college-educated women from a middle to high SES (South Asian/Middle Eastern, n = 93; East Asian, n = 72;…

  16. Alignment between the Physics Content Standard and the Standardized Test: A Comparison among the United States-New York State, Singapore, and China-Jiangsu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Baohui; Liang, Ling L.; Fulmer, Gavin; Kim, Beaumie; Yuan, Haiquan

    2009-01-01

    Alignment between content standards and standardized tests is a significant issue to society, science pedagogy, and test validation. To better understand the issues related to alignment, this study compares the alignment in physics among three education systems: Jiangsu (China), New York State (United States), and Singapore. The same coding…

  17. Regular physical activity reduces hospital admission and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Aymerich, J; Lange, Peter; Benet, M;

    2006-01-01

    mortality in COPD subjects. METHODS: From a population-based sample recruited in Copenhagen in 1981-3 and 1991-4, 2386 individuals with COPD (according to lung function tests) were identified and followed until 2000. Self-reported regular physical activity at baseline was classified into four categories......BACKGROUND: Information about the influence of regular physical activity on the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is scarce. A study was undertaken to examine the association between regular physical activity and both hospital admissions for COPD and all-cause and specific...

  18. Use of antiviral drugs to reduce household transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebody, Richard G; Harris, Ross; Kafatos, George; Chamberland, Mary; Campbell, Colin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; McLean, Estelle; Andrews, Nick; White, Peter J; Wynne-Evans, Edward; Green, Jon; Ellis, Joanna; Wreghitt, Tim; Bracebridge, Sam; Ihekweazu, Chikwe; Oliver, Isabel; Smith, Gillian; Hawkins, Colin; Salmon, Roland; Smyth, Bryan; McMenamin, Jim; Zambon, Maria; Phin, Nick; Watson, John M

    2011-06-01

    The United Kingdom implemented a containment strategy for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 through administering antiviral agents (AVs) to patients and their close contacts. This observational household cohort study describes the effect of AVs on household transmission. We followed 285 confirmed primary cases in 259 households with 761 contacts. At 2 weeks, the confirmed secondary attack rate (SAR) was 8.1% (62/761) and significantly higher in persons 50 years of age (18.9% vs. 1.2%, psecondary case-patients, 45 had not received AV prophylaxis. The effectiveness of AV prophylaxis in preventing infection was 92%.

  19. Participatory ergonomics to reduce exposure to psychosocial and physical risk factors for low back pain and neck pain: Results of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.T.; Proper, K.I.; Anema, J.R.; Knol, D.L.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the effectiveness of the Stay@Work participatory ergonomics programme to reduce workers9 exposure to psychosocial and physical risk factors. Methods: 37 departments (n=3047 workers) from four Dutch companies participated in this cluster randomised controlled trial

  20. Reduced glucose tolerance and insulin resistance induced by steroid treatment, relative physical inactivity, and high-calorie diet impairs the incretin effect in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K B; Vilsbøll, T; Bagger, J I

    2010-01-01

    The loss of incretin effect in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus may be secondary to impaired glucose homeostasis. We investigated whether reduced glucose tolerance and insulin resistance induced by steroid treatment, relative physical inactivity, and high-calorie diet in healthy young males...

  1. Regular physical activity reduces hospital admission and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Aymerich, J; Lange, Peter; Benet, M

    2006-01-01

    .97). Low, moderate and high levels of regular physical activity were associated with an adjusted lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 0.76, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.90) and respiratory mortality (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.02). No effect modification was found for sex, age group, COPD severity......BACKGROUND: Information about the influence of regular physical activity on the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is scarce. A study was undertaken to examine the association between regular physical activity and both hospital admissions for COPD and all-cause and specific...... mortality in COPD subjects. METHODS: From a population-based sample recruited in Copenhagen in 1981-3 and 1991-4, 2386 individuals with COPD (according to lung function tests) were identified and followed until 2000. Self-reported regular physical activity at baseline was classified into four categories...

  2. Exercise reduces C-reactive protein and improves physical function in automotive workers with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Kook; Jung, Ilho; Kim, Jae Hee

    2008-06-01

    Little is known about the effect of exercise on C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with low back pain (LBP). The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of 8-week exercise intervention on CRP and physical function in automotive workers with LBP. Thirteen male workers (40 +/- 6 years) with LBP completed an 8-week multicomponent exercise intervention program which consisted of resistance training, swimming, stretching and hiking. Serum CRP concentration and physical functions were measured at baseline and after 8-week exercise intervention. Compared to baseline, CRP levels decreased by 38% (P = 0.005), back flexibility improved, isokinetic leg strengths increased (all P back strength tended to increase. The results of the present study show that CRP levels decrease with exercise in subjects with LBP and physical function improves. This suggests that exercise-related decreases in inflammation in persons with LBP are associated with improvements in physical function.

  3. Influence of combined dust reducing carpet and compact air filtration unit on the indoor air quality of a classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Hartog, J.J. de; Reijnaerts, J.; Beckmann, G.; Anzion, R.B.M.; Poels, K.; Godderis, L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary schools mostly rely on natural ventilation but also have an interest in affordable technology to improve indoor air quality (IAQ). Laboratory tests show promising results for dust reducing carpets and compact air filtration systems but there is no information available on the performance of

  4. A Multi-Objective Unit Commitment Model for Setting Carbon Tax to Reduce CO2 Emission: Thailand's Electricity Generation Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuchjarin Intalar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon tax policy is a cost-effective instrument for emission reduction. However, setting the carbon tax is one of the challenging task for policy makers as it will lead to higher price of emission-intensive sources especially the utility price. In a large-scale power generation system, minimizing the operational cost and the environmental impact are conflicting objectives and it is difficult to find the compromise solution. This paper proposes a methodology of finding a feasible carbon tax rate on strategic level using the operational unit commitment model. We present a multi-objective mixed integer linear programming model to solve the unit commitment problem and consider the environmental impacts. The methodology of analyzing of the effect of carbon tax rates on the power generation, operating cost, and CO2 emission is also provided. The trade-off relationship between total operating cost and total CO2 emission is presented in the Pareto-optimal curve to analyze the feasible carbon tax rate that is influencing on electricity operating cost. The significant outcome of this paper is a modeling framework for the policy makers to determine the possible carbon tax that can be imposed on the electricity generation.

  5. Attempts to reduce exposure to fungi, β-glucan, bacteria, endotoxin and dust in vegetable greenhouses and a packaging unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Tendal, Kira; Frederiksen, Margit W

    2014-01-15

    Indoor handling of large amounts of plant materials occurs in different occupational settings including greenhouses and causes exposure to bioaerosols. The bioaerosol components fungi, β-glucan, bacteria and endotoxin are involved in different airway symptoms and health effects can be dose-dependent. Therefore, there is a persistent need to reduce exposure. The aims of this study were to identify tasks causing exposure and to evaluate preventive measures aimed at reducing exposure of greenhouse workers to bioaerosols, and to study factors affecting the exposure. We have focused on different exposure scenarios; one with high short-term exposure found during clearing of old cucumber plants; the other with long-term, mid-level exposure found during tomato picking, leaf nipping, stringing up tomato plants, and packaging of cucumbers. Clearing of non-dried cucumber plants compared with clearing of dried cucumber plants significantly reduced the exposure to dust, endotoxin, bacteria, fungal spores and β-glucan. More endotoxin and fungi are emitted and more of the emitted particles were of respirable size if the leaves were dried. Along the cucumber packaging line, exposure levels were highly specific to each personal subtask. The subtask 'unloading of cucumbers' was the source of exposure making task ventilation or shielding of the process a possibility. Elimination of leaf debris on the floor reduced the exposure to fungi significantly. However, leaf debris on the floor did not contribute significantly to the exposure to dust, endotoxin and bacteria. Furthermore, to eliminate leaf debris, it had to be cleared away and this was associated with a higher exposure to dust and endotoxin. The age of the plants affected the exposure level to bioaerosols with higher exposures from old plants. In conclusion, different tasks and subtasks cause very different exposure levels. It is possible to reduce exposure by identifying subtasks causing the exposure and by modifying work

  6. Willingness of men who have sex with men (MSM in the United States to be circumcised as adults to reduce the risk of HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin B Begley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circumcision reduces HIV acquisition among heterosexual men in Africa, but it is unclear if circumcision may reduce HIV acquisition among men who have sex with men (MSM in the United States, or whether MSM would be willing to be circumcised if recommended. METHODS: We interviewed presumed-HIV negative MSM at gay pride events in 2006. We asked uncircumcised respondents about willingness to be circumcised if it were proven to reduce risk of HIV among MSM and perceived barriers to circumcision. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify covariates associated with willingness to be circumcised. RESULTS: Of 780 MSM, 133 (17% were uncircumcised. Of these, 71 (53% were willing to be circumcised. Willingness was associated with black race (exact odds ratio [OR]: 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-9.8, non-injection drug use (OR: 6.1, 95% CI: 1.8-23.7 and perceived reduced risk of penile cancer (OR: 4.7, 95% CI: 2.0-11.9. The most commonly endorsed concerns about circumcision were post-surgical pain and wound infection. CONCLUSIONS: Over half of uncircumcised MSM, especially black MSM, expressed willingness to be circumcised. Perceived risks and benefits of circumcision should be a part of educational materials if circumcision is recommended for MSM in the United States.

  7. Recommended Levels of Physical Activity Are Associated with Reduced Risk of the Metabolic Syndrome in Mexican-Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenghui; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; Reininger, Belinda; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To measure the association between physical activity and the metabolic syndrome risk in Mexican-Americans. Methods Participants were drawn from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (n = 3,414), a randomly selected Mexican-American cohort in Texas on the US-Mexico border. Moderate and vigorous physical activity was assessed using reliable and validated instruments. The metabolic syndrome was defined as having 3 or more metabolic abnormalities. Results One thousand five hundred and twenty-four participants of the cohort (45.02%) were found to have the metabolic syndrome. Compared to participants who did not meet US physical activity guidelines, participants who met physical activity guidelines of 150 moderate and vigorous minutes per week (≥ 600 MET adjusted minutes) had 36% lower risk for the metabolic syndrome (OR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.42–0.98), and participants with total minutes per week of moderate and vigorous/strenuous activity greater than 743 MET adjusted minutes had 37% lower risk for the metabolic syndrome (OR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.42–0.94) compared with their counterparts, after adjusting for age, gender, annual household income, body mass index, smoking and alcohol drinking status, total portions of fruit and vegetable intake, census tracts and blocks, and survey version for physical activity. Conclusions Meeting or exceeding physical activity guidelines significantly was inversely associated with the risk for the metabolic syndrome in Mexican-Americans. Improving levels of physical activity appears to be an effective target for the metabolic syndrome prevention and control among Mexican-Americans independent of other factors. PMID:27054324

  8. Current trends in reducing cardiovascular risk factors in the United States: focus on worksite health and wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalin, Lawrence P; Myers, Jonathan; Kaminsky, Leonard; Briggs, Paige; Forman, Daniel E; Patel, Mahesh J; Pinkstaff, Sherry O; Arena, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Health care in the United States (US) is changing with a broad provision of health care services to every American due to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) slated to begin in January of 2014. An important aspect of the ACA is that US companies may begin to offer health insurance incentives to employees for participating in health and wellness initiatives. Moreover, since US employers directly absorb many of the financial costs associated with the high degree of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors present in their personnel, employers may be financially vested in improving employee health. However, employers must also consider the costs of developing and maintaining programs to improve employee health and their return on investment (ROI). This review will identify key risk factors to address in a worksite health and wellness program and to examine the performance of such programs in improving CV risk factors and their ROI.

  9. Sodium modelling to reduce intradialytic hypotension during haemodialysis for acute kidney injury in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Katherine E; Ghassemi, Fatimah; Flythe, Jennifer E; Feng, Mengling; Ghassemi, Marzyeh; Celi, Leo Anthony; Brunelli, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Intradialytic hypotension often complicates haemodialysis for patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and may impact renal recovery. Sodium modelling is sometimes used as prophylaxis against intradialytic hypotension in the chronic haemodialysis population, but there is little evidence for its use among critically ill patients with AKI. A retrospective cohort with AKI requiring intermittent haemodialysis in the intensive care unit from 2001 to 2008 was used to study the association of prophylactic sodium modelling and multiple outcomes. Outcomes included a composite of in-hospital death or dialysis dependence at hospital discharge, as well as intradialytic hypotension, ultrafiltration goal achievement and net ultrafiltration volume. Associations were estimated using logistic regression, mixed linear models and generalized estimating equations adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. One hundred and ninety-one individuals who underwent 892 sessions were identified; sodium modelling was prescribed in 27.1% of the sessions. In adjusted analyses, sodium modelling was not significantly associated with intradialytic hypotension (P = 0.67) or with the ultrafiltration goal achievement (P = 0.06). Sodium modelling during the first dialysis session was numerically associated with lower risk for the composite of in-hospital death or dialysis dependence: adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 0.39 (0.15-1.02; P = 0.06); however, this association did not reach statistical significance. We did not observe statistically significant associations between sodium modelling and improved outcomes among AKI patients receiving intermittent dialysis in the intensive care unit. However, suggestive findings warrant further study. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  10. Role of lignin in reducing life-cycle carbon emissions, water use, and cost for United States cellulosic biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scown, Corinne D; Gokhale, Amit A; Willems, Paul A; Horvath, Arpad; McKone, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Cellulosic ethanol can achieve estimated greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions greater than 80% relative to gasoline, largely as a result of the combustion of lignin for process heat and electricity in biorefineries. Most studies assume lignin is combusted onsite, but exporting lignin to be cofired at coal power plants has the potential to substantially reduce biorefinery capital costs. We assess the life-cycle GHG emissions, water use, and capital costs associated with four representative biorefinery test cases. Each case is evaluated in the context of a U.S. national scenario in which corn stover, wheat straw, and Miscanthus are converted to 1.4 EJ (60 billion liters) of ethanol annually. Life-cycle GHG emissions range from 4.7 to 61 g CO2e/MJ of ethanol (compared with ∼ 95 g CO2e/MJ of gasoline), depending on biorefinery configurations and marginal electricity sources. Exporting lignin can achieve GHG emission reductions comparable to onsite combustion in some cases, reduce life-cycle water consumption by up to 40%, and reduce combined heat and power-related capital costs by up to 63%. However, nearly 50% of current U.S. coal-fired power generating capacity is expected to be retired by 2050, which will limit the capacity for lignin cofiring and may double transportation distances between biorefineries and coal power plants.

  11. Modernizing the boiler installation for unit no. 3 at the Kashirskaya GRES to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.A. Smyshlyaev; S.A. Evdokimov; L.G. Dubovitskaya; I.A. Kochetkov; E. K. Verbovetskii [JSC ' Inzhiniringovaya Kompaniya ZIOMAR' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of modernizing the Pp-1050-25-545 KGZh (P-50R) boiler is to reduce the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to levels consistent with modern requirements. The following engineering steps were taken, with liquid slag removal from the boiler, to attain NOx levels of 700-750 mg/m{sup 3} for operation with coal and 125 mg/m{sup 3} for operation with natural gas - three-stage combustion with natural gas as the reducing fuel (about 15% thermal) burning in the recirculating gases; and - use of low-emission coal-dust burners with dust feed at high concentrations, overflow burners, and tertiary draft nozzles to lower the amount of excess air in the active combustion zone. The NOx level was further reduced to 570 g/m{sup 3} (just for operation with coal) by using a selective noncatalytic nitrogen oxide reduction system with injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor into the boiler in a zone with temperatures of 950{sup o}C.

  12. Performance Analysis of Bit-Width Reduced Floating-Point Arithmetic Units in FPGAs: A Case Study of Neural Network-Based Face Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoon Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper implements a field programmable gate array- (FPGA- based face detector using a neural network (NN and the bit-width reduced floating-point arithmetic unit (FPU. The analytical error model, using the maximum relative representation error (MRRE and the average relative representation error (ARRE, is developed to obtain the maximum and average output errors for the bit-width reduced FPUs. After the development of the analytical error model, the bit-width reduced FPUs and an NN are designed using MATLAB and VHDL. Finally, the analytical (MATLAB results, along with the experimental (VHDL results, are compared. The analytical results and the experimental results show conformity of shape. We demonstrate that incremented reductions in the number of bits used can produce significant cost reductions including area, speed, and power.

  13. Physical Activity Is Associated with Reduced Implicit Learning but Enhanced Relational Memory and Executive Functioning in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Jennifer C.; Grove, George A.; Wollam, Mariegold E.; Uyar, Fatma; Mataro, Maria; Cohen, Neal J.; Howard, Darlene V.; Howard, James H.; Erickson, Kirk I.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity improves explicit memory and executive cognitive functioning at the extreme ends of the lifespan (i.e., in older adults and children). However, it is unknown whether these associations hold for younger adults who are considered to be in their cognitive prime, or for implicit cognitive functions that do not depend on motor sequencing. Here we report the results of a study in which we examine the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and (1) explicit relational memory, (2) executive control, and (3) implicit probabilistic sequence learning in a sample of healthy, college-aged adults. The main finding was that physical activity was positively associated with explicit relational memory and executive control (replicating previous research), but negatively associated with implicit learning, particularly in females. These results raise the intriguing possibility that physical activity upregulates some cognitive processes, but downregulates others. Possible implications of this pattern of results for physical health and health habits are discussed. PMID:27584059

  14. Accelerometer Measured Level of Physical Activity Indoors and Outdoors During Preschool Time in Sweden and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raustorp, A.; Pagels, P.; Boldemann, C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is important to understand the correlates of physical activity in order to influence policy and create environments that promote physical activity among preschool children. We compared preschoolers' physical activity in Swedish and in US settings and objectively examined differences...

  15. Managing a Basic Unit Responsible for a Basic Discipline: The Physics Department at the Technical University, Aachen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhof, B. U.

    1983-01-01

    The administrative structure of the physics department in a major European technical university is described, particularly with regard to the organization of teaching and research functions. The department is subdivided into an institute of theoretical physics and several institutes of experimental physics, with a more important subdivision into…

  16. Design of the Physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Effectiveness Study (PACES):A randomized controlled trial to evaluate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of physical exercise in improving physical fitness and reducing fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waart, Hanna; Stuiver, Martijn M.; van Harten, Willem H.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Aaronson, Neil K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cancer chemotherapy is frequently associated with a decline in general physical condition, exercise tolerance, and muscle strength and with an increase in fatigue. While accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity and exercise interventions during chemotherapy treatment may

  17. Design of the Physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Effectiveness Study (PACES):A randomized controlled trial to evaluate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of physical exercise in improving physical fitness and reducing fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waart, van Hanna; Stuiver, Martijn M.; Harten, van Wim H.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Aaronson, Neil K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cancer chemotherapy is frequently associated with a decline in general physical condition, exercise tolerance, and muscle strength and with an increase in fatigue. While accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity and exercise interventions during chemotherapy treatment may con

  18. Design of the physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Effectiveness Study (PACES): a randomized controlled trial to evaluate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of physical exercise in improving physical fitness and reducing fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Waart; M.M. Stuiver; W.H. van Harten; G.S. Sonke; N.K. Aaronson

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer chemotherapy is frequently associated with a decline in general physical condition, exercise tolerance, and muscle strength and with an increase in fatigue. While accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity and exercise interventions during chemotherapy treatment may cont

  19. A systematic review and meta-analysis of behavioral interventions to reduce HIV risk behaviors of Hispanics in the United States and Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Jeffrey H; Kay, Linda S; Passin, Warren F; Lyles, Cynthia M; Crepaz, Nicole; Marín, Barbara V

    2007-01-01

    This systematic review examines the overall efficacy of HIV behavioral interventions designed to reduce HIV risk behaviors or incident sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among Hispanics residing in the United States or Puerto Rico. Data from 20 randomized and nonrandomized trials (N = 6,173 participants) available through January 2006 were included in this review. Interventions successfully reduced the odds of unprotected sex and number of sex partners, increased the odds of condom use, and decreased the odds of acquiring new STD infections. Interventions successful in reducing the odds of any sex risk behavior used non-peer deliverers; included >or=4 intervention sessions; taught condom use or problem solving skills; or addressed barriers to condom use, sexual abstinence, or peer norms. Interventions that included the Hispanic cultural belief of machismo or those developed based on ethnographic interviews were successful in reducing the odds of sex risk behaviors among non-drug users. Interventions targeting injection drug users (IDUs; N = 3,569) significantly reduced the odds of injection drug use and the odds of sharing cotton or cookers, but did not significantly reduce the odds of engaging in risky sex behavior or needle sharing. Further development of culturally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for Hispanic populations, particularly men and persons living with HIV, are warranted.

  20. Harnessing different motivational frames via mobile phones to promote daily physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior in aging adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Abby C; Hekler, Eric B; Grieco, Lauren A; Winter, Sandra J; Sheats, Jylana L; Buman, Matthew P; Banerjee, Banny; Robinson, Thomas N; Cirimele, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices are a promising channel for delivering just-in-time guidance and support for improving key daily health behaviors. Despite an explosion of mobile phone applications aimed at physical activity and other health behaviors, few have been based on theoretically derived constructs and empirical evidence. Eighty adults ages 45 years and older who were insufficiently physically active, engaged in prolonged daily sitting, and were new to smartphone technology, participated in iterative design development and feasibility testing of three daily activity smartphone applications based on motivational frames drawn from behavioral science theory and evidence. An "analytically" framed custom application focused on personalized goal setting, self-monitoring, and active problem solving around barriers to behavior change. A "socially" framed custom application focused on social comparisons, norms, and support. An "affectively" framed custom application focused on operant conditioning principles of reinforcement scheduling and emotional transference to an avatar, whose movements and behaviors reflected the physical activity and sedentary levels of the user. To explore the applications' initial efficacy in changing regular physical activity and leisure-time sitting, behavioral changes were assessed across eight weeks in 68 participants using the CHAMPS physical activity questionnaire and the Australian sedentary behavior questionnaire. User acceptability of and satisfaction with the applications was explored via a post-intervention user survey. The results indicated that the three applications were sufficiently robust to significantly improve regular moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity and decrease leisure-time sitting during the 8-week behavioral adoption period. Acceptability of the applications was confirmed in the post-intervention surveys for this sample of midlife and older adults new to smartphone technology. Preliminary data exploring sustained use

  1. Harnessing different motivational frames via mobile phones to promote daily physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior in aging adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby C King

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are a promising channel for delivering just-in-time guidance and support for improving key daily health behaviors. Despite an explosion of mobile phone applications aimed at physical activity and other health behaviors, few have been based on theoretically derived constructs and empirical evidence. Eighty adults ages 45 years and older who were insufficiently physically active, engaged in prolonged daily sitting, and were new to smartphone technology, participated in iterative design development and feasibility testing of three daily activity smartphone applications based on motivational frames drawn from behavioral science theory and evidence. An "analytically" framed custom application focused on personalized goal setting, self-monitoring, and active problem solving around barriers to behavior change. A "socially" framed custom application focused on social comparisons, norms, and support. An "affectively" framed custom application focused on operant conditioning principles of reinforcement scheduling and emotional transference to an avatar, whose movements and behaviors reflected the physical activity and sedentary levels of the user. To explore the applications' initial efficacy in changing regular physical activity and leisure-time sitting, behavioral changes were assessed across eight weeks in 68 participants using the CHAMPS physical activity questionnaire and the Australian sedentary behavior questionnaire. User acceptability of and satisfaction with the applications was explored via a post-intervention user survey. The results indicated that the three applications were sufficiently robust to significantly improve regular moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity and decrease leisure-time sitting during the 8-week behavioral adoption period. Acceptability of the applications was confirmed in the post-intervention surveys for this sample of midlife and older adults new to smartphone technology. Preliminary data

  2. Reduced motor unit discharge rates of maximal velocity dynamic contractions in response to a submaximal dynamic fatigue protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, B; Choi, I; Rice, C L

    2012-12-15

    Fatigability is highly task dependent wherein motor unit (MU) discharge rates and recruitment thresholds are affected differently depending on whether contractions are performed at maximal or submaximal intensities. Although much is described for isometric tasks, the behavior of MU properties during the production of maximal velocity dynamic contractions following submaximal fatiguing contractions is unknown. In seven young men, we evaluated changes in MU recruitment thresholds and MU discharge rates of the anconeus muscle during both submaximal and maximal dynamic elbow extensions following a submaximal dynamic fatiguing protocol of moderate intensity to velocity task failure. Velocity and power of the maximal dynamic contractions declined ∼45 and ∼55%, respectively, but these variables were unchanged for the submaximal target velocity contractions. Discharge rates of the 12 MUs at task failure were unchanged for submaximal dynamic contractions, but were decreased ∼20% for maximal dynamic and ballistic isometric contractions at task failure. MU recruitment thresholds of submaximal dynamic contractions decreased 52% at task failure, but were similar throughout the fatiguing protocol for maximal contractions. These findings support the concept of a common neural mechanism responsible for the relative declines in MU discharge rate associated with submaximal fatigability in both isometric and dynamic contractions.

  3. Short communication: Effect of whey protein addition and transglutaminase treatment on the physical and sensory properties of reduced-fat ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh, Erfan; Goudarzi, Mostafa; Jooyandeh, Hossein

    2017-07-01

    The effects of whey protein addition and transglutaminase treatment, alone and in combination, on the physical and sensory properties of reduced-fat ice cream were investigated. Adding whey protein with or without enzyme treatment decreased melting rate, overrun, and hardness of the reduced-fat ice cream; however, the enzyme-treated sample had a higher melting rate and overrun and softer texture. Whey protein-fortified samples showed higher melting resistance, but lower overrun and firmer texture compared with the enzyme-treated sample without added whey protein. Whey protein addition with or without transglutaminase treatment caused an increase in apparent viscosity and a decrease in flow index of the reduced-fat ice cream; nevertheless, the flow behavior of full-fat sample was most similar to the enzyme-treated reduced-fat sample with no added whey protein. Descriptive sensory analyses showed that neither whey protein addition nor transglutaminase treatment significantly influenced the flavor and odor of reduced-fat ice cream, but they both noticeably improved the color and texture of the final product. The results of this study suggest that whey protein addition with transglutaminase treatment improves the physical and sensory properties of reduced-fat ice cream more favorably than does whey protein addition or transglutaminase treatment alone. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stress Management in Physical Education Class: An Experiential Approach to Improve Coping Skills and Reduce Stress Perceptions in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Christin; Feldmeth, Anna Karina; Brand, Serge; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In most physical education (PE) syllabuses, promoting life skills constitutes an important educational objective. The aim of this study was to implement a coping training program (EPHECT) within regular PE and to evaluate its effects on coping and stress among vocational students. Eight classes from a vocational school were selected for study;…

  5. Physical activity and relaxation in the work setting to reduce the need for recovery: what works for whom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Formanoy, M.A.; Dusseldorp, E.; Coffeng, J.K.; Mechelen, I. van; Boot, C.R.; Hendriksen, I.J.; Tak, E.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To recover from work stress, a worksite health program aimed at improving physical activity and relaxation may be valuable. However, not every program is effective for all participants, as would be expected within a "one size fits all" approach. The effectiveness of how the program is de

  6. The Effect of Reduced Physical Activity and Retraining on Blood Lipids and Body Composition in Young and Older Adult Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Jesper; Gram, Martin; Vigelsø, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of physical inactivity and subsequent re-training on cardiovascular risk factors in seventeen young (Y; 23.4±0.5) and fifteen older adult (O; 68.1±1.1 yrs.) men who underwent 14 days of one leg immobilization followed by six weeks of training. Body weight remained unchanged...

  7. Stress Management in Physical Education Class: An Experiential Approach to Improve Coping Skills and Reduce Stress Perceptions in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Christin; Feldmeth, Anna Karina; Brand, Serge; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In most physical education (PE) syllabuses, promoting life skills constitutes an important educational objective. The aim of this study was to implement a coping training program (EPHECT) within regular PE and to evaluate its effects on coping and stress among vocational students. Eight classes from a vocational school were selected for study;…

  8. Physical activity and relaxation in the work setting to reduce the need for recovery: what works for whom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Formanoy, M.A.; Dusseldorp, E.; Coffeng, J.K.; Mechelen, I. van; Boot, C.R.; Hendriksen, I.J.; Tak, E.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To recover from work stress, a worksite health program aimed at improving physical activity and relaxation may be valuable. However, not every program is effective for all participants, as would be expected within a "one size fits all" approach. The effectiveness of how the program is

  9. Effectiveness of a Mobile Outreach and Crisis Services unit in reducing psychiatric symptoms in a population of homeless persons with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D W; Warnock, J K

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a time-lag design to evaluate the effectiveness of a Mobile Outreach and Crisis Services unit in remitting psychiatric symptomatology, improving global functioning, and decreasing homelessness in a population of homeless, severely mentally ill residing in a mid-sized urban center. Using a time-lag study design, two groups of subjects--25 individuals before receiving services (control group) and 25 individuals after receiving services (experimental group)--were contrasted across outcome measures. The results indicate that a MOCS unit utilizing a Program for Assertive Community Treatment mode was effective in significantly decreasing psychiatric symptomatology, reducing homelessness, and increasing global functioning. If carefully implemented and interpreted, a time-lag design may be a means of providing valuable feedback and information in a timely manner.

  10. Sedentary and physically active behavior patterns among low-income African-American and white adults living in the southeastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah S Cohen

    Full Text Available Increased sedentary behavior and lack of physical activity are associated with increased risk for many chronic diseases. Differences in leisure-time physical activity between African American and white adults have been suggested to partially explain racial disparities in chronic disease outcomes, but expanding the definition of physical activity to include household and occupational activities may reduce or even eliminate racial differences in total physical activity. The objective of this study was to describe patterns of active and sedentary behaviors in black and white adults and to examine these behaviors across demographic measures. Sedentary and physically active behaviors were obtained from a validated physical activity questionnaire in 23,021 black men, 9,899 white men, 32,214 black women, and 15,425 white women (age 40-79 at enrollment into the Southern Community Cohort Study. Descriptive statistics for sedentary time; light, moderate, and vigorous household/occupational activity; sports/exercise; total activity; and meeting current physical activity recommendations via sports/exercise were examined for each race-sex group. Adjusted means were calculated using multiple linear regression models across demographic measures. Study participants spent approximately 60% of waking time in sedentary behaviors. Blacks reported more television viewing time than whites (45 minutes for females, 15 minutes for males, but when sitting time was expressed as a proportion of overall awake time, minimal racial differences were found. Patterns of light, moderate, and vigorous household/occupational activity were similar in all race/sex groups. 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans were followed by 16% of women and 25% of men independent of race. Overall, black and white men and women in this study spent the majority of their daily time in sedentary behaviors and less than one-fourth followed current guidelines for physical activity. These

  11. Intelligent Physical Exercise Training proves effective in enhancing muscle strength and reducing musculoskeletal pain in a workplace setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Justesen, Just Bendix; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    Background: Physical exercise training interventions at the workplace may cause health benefits but not all employees may benefit from the same program despite having the same occupational exposure. The present aim was to individually tailor Intelligent Physical Exercise Training (IPET) for office...... workers based on health checks and to assess the effect on musculoskeletal health (Sjøgaard G et al. BMC Public Health 2014, 14:652). Methods: Office workers were at each of 6 companies randomized 1:1 to a training group, TG (N=194) or a reference group, REF (N=195). TG received one-hour supervised high...... balance. In total 32 individual training programs were developed but 9 of those covered more than 85 % of the participants’ needs, most of which included neck/shoulder strength training and cardio training. Trial registration was in ClinicalTrials.gov, number: NCT01366950. Results: There were no baseline...

  12. Classic psychedelic use is associated with reduced psychological distress and suicidality in the United States adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Peter S; Thorne, Christopher B; Clark, C Brendan; Coombs, David W; Johnson, Matthew W

    2015-03-01

    Mental health problems are endemic across the globe, and suicide, a strong corollary of poor mental health, is a leading cause of death. Classic psychedelic use may occasion lasting improvements in mental health, but the effects of classic psychedelic use on suicidality are unknown. We evaluated the relationships of classic psychedelic use with psychological distress and suicidality among over 190,000 USA adult respondents pooled from the last five available years of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2008-2012) while controlling for a range of covariates. Lifetime classic psychedelic use was associated with a significantly reduced odds of past month psychological distress (weighted odds ratio (OR)=0.81 (0.72-0.91)), past year suicidal thinking (weighted OR=0.86 (0.78-0.94)), past year suicidal planning (weighted OR=0.71 (0.54-0.94)), and past year suicide attempt (weighted OR=0.64 (0.46-0.89)), whereas lifetime illicit use of other drugs was largely associated with an increased likelihood of these outcomes. These findings indicate that classic psychedelics may hold promise in the prevention of suicide, supporting the view that classic psychedelics' most highly restricted legal status should be reconsidered to facilitate scientific study, and suggesting that more extensive clinical research with classic psychedelics is warranted. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Occupational versus leisure-time physical activity in reducing cardiovascular risks and mortality among ethnic Chinese adults in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gwo-Chi; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Hsieh, Shiau-Fu; Chen, Chun-Yen; Tsai, Wen-Hsiang; Su, Ta-Chen

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations of occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Physical activity data from the Baeck questionnaire was available for 1706 participants. During a follow-up period, there were 215 cases of CVD and 438 deaths. With the lowest tertile as the reference, the hazard ratios (HRs) for CVD and mortality in the highest tertiles of LTPA were 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.46-0.92) and 0.73 (95% CI = 0.58-0.92). In contrast, the HRs for CVD and mortality in the highest tertiles of OPA were 1.75 (95% CI = 1.10-2.80) and 1.53 (95% CI = 1.06-2.22). The association between OPA and the risk of CVD and mortality was significant in men but not in women. Our findings suggest that high OPA imposes harmful effects on the risk of CVD and mortality, particularly among men.

  14. One-year randomized controlled trial with different physical-activity programs to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulders among office workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Søgaard, Karen; Hansen, Ernst A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluates the effect of two different worksite physical-activity interventions on neck-shoulder symptoms, together with perceived work ability and sick leave among office workers. METHODS: An examiner-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted with 549 office workers....... At baseline the work ability index (WAI) was close to 90% of the maximum score, and the mean sick leave was 5 days per year, both being unaffected by the interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Different physical-activity interventions were successful in reducing neck-shoulder symptoms, and SRT was superior to APE...... in the primary prevention of such symptoms. The initially relatively high WAI was the most probable reason for no further increase in WAI. Likewise the mean sick leave the year before the intervention was very low, and it was probably not possible to reduce it further....

  15. Analysis of the effectiveness of moderate levels of physical activity to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Martin Garcia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: a. The determination of the efficacy of physical activity in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease; b. The Analysis of the relative changes in the levels of cardiovascular disease risk according to different intensities of physical activity (low-moderate. Methodology: The search was performed for studies with PUBMED data base. Then, the mean effect size of the studies included in the meta-analysis was calculated and Egger's test was applied to rule out any possible publication bias. Upon detection of heterogeneity, we proceeded to an analysis of the moderating variables. Results: A mean effect size of 0.762 (95% confidence interval 0678-0857 was obtained. Then The Egger test was applied which yielded a p-value of 0.67 (CI 0.95, such that the absence of publication bias was confirmed. The analysis of the moderating variables determined that the ensuing years (p = 0.000, 95% CI and the countries of study (p = 0.0096; 95% CI in part explain the heterogeneity detected. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the practice of physical activity at moderate intensities provides a protective effect on the individuals who make physical activity by reducing the risk these individuals to cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Can physical activity be used as a tool to reduce depression in patients after a cardiac event? What is the evidence? A systematic literature study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzon, Ellis; Abidi, Taha; Bahtsevani, Christel

    2015-04-01

    A reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reported in the Western world, but post-infarction depression often occurs and is related to poor medical outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the scientific literature by a systematic review, in order to find evidence for whether physical activity can be a tool to reduce depression in patients who have suffered a cardiac event. Three databases were systematically searched (PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane), and the GRADE protocol was used in combination with a revised Amstar-protocol for the systematic review. Scientific reports fitting the area were scarce. Finally, ten studies were included in this study: one meta-analysis, five randomized controlled trials, and four clinical trials. The results showed low to moderate evidence for the use of low to moderate levels of exercise as a tool to reduce depression in post-coronary artery event patients. This study concluded positive effects of physical activity as a tool to reduce depression in post-coronary artery event patients. Physiotherapists could be further involved in increasing physical activity after cardiac events. More studies are needed in the area.

  17. Reduced risk of Parkinson's disease associated with lower body mass index and heavy leisure-time physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sääksjärvi, Katri; Knekt, Paul; Männistö, Satu; Lyytinen, Jukka; Jääskeläinen, Tuija; Kanerva, Noora; Heliövaara, Markku

    2014-04-01

    The risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well established. We therefore examined the prediction of various lifestyle factors on the incidence of PD in a cohort drawn from the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey, conducted in 1973-1976. The study population comprised 6,715 men and women aged 50-79 years and free of PD at the baseline. All of the subjects completed a baseline health examination (including height and weight measurements) and a questionnaire providing information on leisure-time physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. During a 22-year follow-up, 101 incident cases of PD occurred. The statistical analyses were based on Cox's model including age, sex, education, community density, occupation, coffee consumption, body mass index (BMI), leisure-time physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption as independent variables. At first, BMI was not associated with PD risk, but after exclusion of the first 15 years of follow-up, an elevated risk appeared at higher BMI levels (P for trend 0.02). Furthermore, subjects with heavy leisure-time physical activity had a lower PD risk than those with no activity [relative risk (RR) 0.27, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.90]. In variance with findings for other chronic diseases, current smokers had a lower PD risk than those who had never smoked (RR 0.23, 95 % CI 0.08-0.67), and individuals with moderate alcohol intake (at the level of Parkinson's disease, but more research is needed.

  18. Developing an award program for children's settings to support healthy eating and physical activity and reduce the risk of overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honisett, Suzy; Woolcock, Suzi; Porter, Creina; Hughes, Ian

    2009-09-18

    This paper aimed to identify the best way to engage, motivate and support early childhood services (ECS) and primary schools (PS) to create policy and practise changes to promote healthy eating and physical activity. This information would be used to develop a suitable program to implement within these children's settings to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity. The Medical Research Council's (UK) framework for the design and evaluation of complex interventions was used to guide the development of the healthy eating and physical activity program suitable for ECS and PS. Within this framework a range of evaluation methods, including stakeholder planning, in-depth interviews with ECS and PS staff and acceptability and feasibility trials in one local government area, were used to ascertain the best way to engage and support positive changes in these children's settings. Both ECS and PS identified that they had a role to play to improve children's healthy eating and physical activity. ECS identified their role in promoting healthy eating and physical activity as important for children's health, and instilling healthy habits for life. PS felt that these were health issues, rather than educational issues; however, schools saw the link between healthy eating and physical activity and student learning outcomes. These settings identified that a program that provides a simple guide that recognises good practise in these settings, such as an award scheme using a health promoting schools approach, as a feasible and acceptable way for them to support children's healthy eating and physical activity. Through the process of design and evaluation a program - Kids - 'Go for your life', was developed to promote and support children's healthy eating and physical activity and reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity. Kids - 'Go for your life' used an award program, based on a health promoting schools approach, which was demonstrated to be a suitable model to

  19. Developing an award program for children's settings to support healthy eating and physical activity and reduce the risk of overweight and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Creina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper aimed to identify the best way to engage, motivate and support early childhood services (ECS and primary schools (PS to create policy and practise changes to promote healthy eating and physical activity. This information would be used to develop a suitable program to implement within these children's settings to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity. Methods The Medical Research Council's (UK framework for the design and evaluation of complex interventions was used to guide the development of the healthy eating and physical activity program suitable for ECS and PS. Within this framework a range of evaluation methods, including stakeholder planning, in-depth interviews with ECS and PS staff and acceptability and feasibility trials in one local government area, were used to ascertain the best way to engage and support positive changes in these children's settings. Results Both ECS and PS identified that they had a role to play to improve children's healthy eating and physical activity. ECS identified their role in promoting healthy eating and physical activity as important for children's health, and instilling healthy habits for life. PS felt that these were health issues, rather than educational issues; however, schools saw the link between healthy eating and physical activity and student learning outcomes. These settings identified that a program that provides a simple guide that recognises good practise in these settings, such as an award scheme using a health promoting schools approach, as a feasible and acceptable way for them to support children's healthy eating and physical activity. Conclusion Through the process of design and evaluation a program - Kids - 'Go for your life', was developed to promote and support children's healthy eating and physical activity and reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity. Kids - 'Go for your life' used an award program, based on a health promoting

  20. Dr Julia King CBE FREng, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (United Kingdom), visiting the NA48 experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 02: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (right) with A. Ceccucci and K. Peach. Photo 05: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (centre) with A. Ceccucci and C. Lazzeroni. Photo 08: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (second from left) with (left to right) R. Barlow, J. Wood, N. McCubbin, K. Peach, A. Ceccucci, C. Lazzeroni, M. Patel and D. Munday.

  1. Development of an extensive database of mechanical and physical properties for reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsukawa, S. E-mail: jitsukawa@ifmif.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Tamura, M.; Schaaf, B. van der; Klueh, R.L.; Alamo, A.; Petersen, C.; Schirra, M.; Spaetig, P.; Odette, G.R.; Tavassoli, A.A.; Shiba, K.; Kohyama, A.; Kimura, A

    2002-12-01

    Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies of the reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H (8Cr-2W-0.04Ta-0.1C) before and after irradiation are reported. The design concept used for the development of this alloy is also introduced. A large number of collaborative test results including those generated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) implementing agreements are collected and are used to evaluate the feasibility of using reduced-activation martensitic steels for fusion reactor structural materials, with F82H as one of the reference alloys. All the specimens used in these tests were prepared from plates obtained from 5-ton heats of F82H supplied to all participating laboratories by JAERI. Many of the results have been entered into relational databases with emphasis on traceability of records on how the specimens were prepared from plates and ingots.

  2. Toward the physical basis of thermophilic proteins: linking of enriched polar interactions and reduced heat capacity of unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2002-01-01

    The enrichment of salt bridges and hydrogen bonding in thermophilic proteins has long been recognized. Another tendency, featuring lower heat capacity of unfolding (DeltaC(p)) than found in mesophilic proteins, is emerging from the recent literature. Here we present a simple electrostatic model to illustrate that formation of a salt-bridge or hydrogen-bonding network around an ionized group in the folded state leads to increased folding stability and decreased DeltaC(p). We thus suggest that the reduced DeltaC(p) of thermophilic proteins could partly be attributed to enriched polar interactions. A reduced DeltaC(p) might serve as an indicator for the contribution of polar interactions to folding stability. PMID:12496083

  3. Exploring the Relationship of Outdoor Recreational Resources to Physical Inactivity, Obesity and Diabetes for the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Access to outdoor recreational resources is important for promoting healthy behavior and physical activity, which may decrease the risk of disease. To date, no study has examined the relationship between access to outdoor recreational resources (including protected l...

  4. Physical training at sub-threshold intensity reduces the prevalence of hepatic steatosis after high-fat diet in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdemar Guedes da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of swimming physical training with sub-threshold load on the prevalence of hepatic steatosis in Wistar rats fed high-fat diets (cafeteria or baru. After 2 months of cafeteria diet administration, the rats were separated into 6 groups: Sedentary or Trained Baru diet; Sedentary or Trained Cafeteria diet; Sedentary or Trained standard diet. The trained groups were subjected to swimming exercise at sub-threshold intensity (2% of body weight during 8 weeks, 5x/week, 1h/day. The body weight and hepatohistological changes were analyzed. Sedentary groups fed high-fat diets presented higher body weight gain when compared to control trained group. The swimming training at the proposed intensity was able to prevent the hepatic steatosis in rats fed high-fat diets.

  5. The relationship of prejudicial attitudes to psychological, social, and physical well-being within a sample of college students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Khanh T; Holmberg, Michelle D; Ho, Ivy K; Haynes, Michelle C

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of prejudicial attitudes to psychological, social, and physical well-being among 495 college students in the Northeast region of the United States. Prejudicial attitudes included racism, sexism, homophobia, physical disability bias, weight/body-size bias, and anti-immigrant sentiment. As a secondary objective, we examined the associations among the various forms of prejudice and their relationship to key demographic and personal characteristics. We also examined the associations between psychological, social, and physical well-being. The results indicated that specific forms of prejudice, especially racism and sexism, were negative correlates of psychological, social, and/or physical well-being. The results also indicated that there may exist a prejudicial syndrome, linking diverse forms of prejudice. Furthermore, poor functioning in one area of well-being (e.g., psychological health) is related to poor functioning in other areas of well-being (social and physical health). Overall, this study provides important implications for future research and prevention programs in the area of prejudice and well-being.

  6. A factors influencing applicant selection of entry-level physical therapist education programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Kim Curbow; Weber, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Physical therapist education programs must compete for qualified applicants due to a nationwide reduction in the applicant pool. To develop successful recruitment strategies, faculty members need information on factors influencing applicant selection of a program. The purpose of this study was to analyze factors influencing selection of an entry-level physical therapist education program. Survey subjects were students enrolled in the first professional year of an accredited entry-level physical therapist education program. A survey instrument was developed based on the literature and interviews with physical therapist students and faculty members. Results of pilot studies to determine face and content validity were acceptable. Stratified random cluster sampling was applied to select 66 entry-level physical therapy programs from an available population of 150 of the 199 accredited programs. Forty-nine programs were not included in the population for various reasons. Using a five-point Likert scale, subjects rated the influence of 51 items on their selection of a specific physical therapist education program. The overall return rate was 70.4% (1,250 surveys returned). Data were analyzed by response frequency. Four factors were selected as "very influential" by 50% or more of the subjects: degree offered, accreditation status, perception of educational quality, and program atmosphere. Additional factors selected by 45% or more of respondents as "very influential" were pass rate on licensing examination, marketability of degree, student/faculty ratio, and small class size. Factors rated "not influential" by 50% or more of subjects included ethnic, cultural, and gender issues. Since 1998, the physical therapy profession has experienced changes in entry-level degree requirements, practice requirements, and employment opportunities, resulting in increased competition for qualified applicants to education programs. The information gained in this study may assist faculty in

  7. Does Physical Production of Nanoparticles Reduce Their Ecotoxicity? A Case of Lower Toxicity of AgNPs Produced by Laser Ablation to Zebrafish (Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Johari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of nano-materials has increased in various aspects of human life. However, possible outbreak of nano-materials toxicity in humans and other organisms is one of the future challenges. Different chemical precursors which are used in chemical approaches for production of nano-materials may have secondary and sometimes toxic effects in living organisms. These secondary effects may be reduced in physical approaches due to not use of chemicals. To test this hypothesis, acute toxic effects of two types of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs which were produced by physical (top-down and chemical (bottom-up methods on survival rate of Zebrafish (Danio rerio were compared. According to the results, AgNPs produced by physical method were 38 times less toxic than ones generated by chemical method and therefore, the hypothesis was approved. The estimated 96 hr LC50 values of AgNPs produced by physical and chemical methods for zebra fish were 0.540 ± 0.032 and 0.014 ± 0.001 mg/L, respectively. According to these values and regarding the rules of European Union, both types of AgNPs are considered as highly toxic chemicals to aquatic organisms. Generally, AgNPs seems to have toxic effects on aquatic organisms regardless of the method used for their production, and so, their accidental or intentional entrance into the aquatic ecosystems should be inhibited.

  8. A combined early cognitive and physical rehabilitation program for people who are critically ill: the activity and cognitive therapy in the intensive care unit (ACT-ICU) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel, Nathan E; Jackson, James C; Girard, Timothy D; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Schiro, Elena; Work, Brittany; Pun, Brenda T; Boehm, Leanne; Gill, Thomas M; Ely, E Wesley

    2012-12-01

    In the coming years, the number of survivors of critical illness is expected to increase. These survivors frequently develop newly acquired physical and cognitive impairments. Long-term cognitive impairment is common following critical illness and has dramatic effects on patients' abilities to function autonomously. Neuromuscular weakness affects similar proportions of patients and leads to equally profound life alterations. As knowledge of these short-term and long-term consequences of critical illness has come to light, interventions to prevent and rehabilitate these devastating consequences have been sought. Physical rehabilitation has been shown to improve functional outcomes in people who are critically ill, but subsequent studies of physical rehabilitation after hospital discharge have not. Post-hospital discharge cognitive rehabilitation is feasible in survivors of critical illness and is commonly used in people with other forms of acquired brain injury. The feasibility of early cognitive therapy in people who are critically ill remains unknown. The purpose of this novel protocol trial will be to determine the feasibility of early and sustained cognitive rehabilitation paired with physical rehabilitation in patients who are critically ill from medical and surgical intensive care units. This is a randomized controlled trial. The setting for this trial will be medical and surgical intensive care units of a large tertiary care referral center. The participants will be patients who are critically ill with respiratory failure or shock. Patients will be randomized to groups receiving usual care, physical rehabilitation, or cognitive rehabilitation plus physical rehabilitation. Twice-daily cognitive rehabilitation sessions will be performed with patients who are noncomatose and will consist of orientation, memory, and attention exercises (eg, forward and reverse digit spans, matrix puzzles, letter-number sequences, pattern recognition). Daily physical

  9. A Combined Early Cognitive and Physical Rehabilitation Program for People Who Are Critically Ill: The Activity and Cognitive Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit (ACT-ICU) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James C.; Girard, Timothy D.; Pandharipande, Pratik P.; Schiro, Elena; Work, Brittany; Pun, Brenda T.; Boehm, Leanne; Gill, Thomas M.; Ely, E. Wesley

    2012-01-01

    Background In the coming years, the number of survivors of critical illness is expected to increase. These survivors frequently develop newly acquired physical and cognitive impairments. Long-term cognitive impairment is common following critical illness and has dramatic effects on patients' abilities to function autonomously. Neuromuscular weakness affects similar proportions of patients and leads to equally profound life alterations. As knowledge of these short-term and long-term consequences of critical illness has come to light, interventions to prevent and rehabilitate these devastating consequences have been sought. Physical rehabilitation has been shown to improve functional outcomes in people who are critically ill, but subsequent studies of physical rehabilitation after hospital discharge have not. Post-hospital discharge cognitive rehabilitation is feasible in survivors of critical illness and is commonly used in people with other forms of acquired brain injury. The feasibility of early cognitive therapy in people who are critically ill remains unknown. Objective The purpose of this novel protocol trial will be to determine the feasibility of early and sustained cognitive rehabilitation paired with physical rehabilitation in patients who are critically ill from medical and surgical intensive care units. Design This is a randomized controlled trial. Setting The setting for this trial will be medical and surgical intensive care units of a large tertiary care referral center. Patients The participants will be patients who are critically ill with respiratory failure or shock. Intervention Patients will be randomized to groups receiving usual care, physical rehabilitation, or cognitive rehabilitation plus physical rehabilitation. Twice-daily cognitive rehabilitation sessions will be performed with patients who are noncomatose and will consist of orientation, memory, and attention exercises (eg, forward and reverse digit spans, matrix puzzles, letter

  10. Design of the Physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Effectiveness Study (PACES:A randomized controlled trial to evaluate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of physical exercise in improving physical fitness and reducing fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonke Gabe S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer chemotherapy is frequently associated with a decline in general physical condition, exercise tolerance, and muscle strength and with an increase in fatigue. While accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity and exercise interventions during chemotherapy treatment may contribute to maintaining cardiorespiratory fitness and strength, the results of studies conducted to date have not been consistent. Additional research is needed to determine the optimal intensity of exercise training programs in general and in particular the relative effectiveness of supervised, outpatient (hospital- or physical therapy practice-based versus home-based programs. Methods This multicenter, prospective, randomized trial will evaluate the effectiveness of a low to moderate intensity, home-based, self-management physical activity program, and a high intensity, structured, supervised exercise program, in maintaining or enhancing physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength, in minimizing fatigue and in enhancing the health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast or colon cancer (n = 360 are being recruited from twelve hospitals in the Netherlands, and randomly allocated to one of the two treatment groups or to a 'usual care' control group. Performance-based and self-reported outcomes are assessed at baseline, at the end of chemotherapy and at six month follow-up. Discussion This large, multicenter, randomized clinical trial will provide additional empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical exercise during adjuvant chemotherapy in enhancing physical fitness, minimizing fatigue, and maintaining or enhancing patients' quality of life. If demonstrated to be effective, exercise intervention programs will be a welcome addition to the standard program of care offered to patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Trial registration This study is registered at

  11. Linear units improve articulation between social and physical constructs: An example from caregiver parameterization for children supported by complex medical technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezruczko, N.; Stanley, T.; Battle, M.; Latty, C.

    2016-11-01

    Despite broad sweeping pronouncements by international research organizations that social sciences are being integrated into global research programs, little attention has been directed toward obstacles blocking productive collaborations. In particular, social sciences routinely implement nonlinear, ordinal measures, which fundamentally inhibit integration with overarching scientific paradigms. The widely promoted general linear model in contemporary social science methods is largely based on untransformed scores and ratings, which are neither objective nor linear. This issue has historically separated physical and social sciences, which this report now asserts is unnecessary. In this research, nonlinear, subjective caregiver ratings of confidence to care for children supported by complex, medical technologies were transformed to an objective scale defined by logits (N=70). Transparent linear units from this transformation provided foundational insights into measurement properties of a social- humanistic caregiving construct, which clarified physical and social caregiver implications. Parameterized items and ratings were also subjected to multivariate hierarchical analysis, then decomposed to demonstrate theoretical coherence (R2 >.50), which provided further support for convergence of mathematical parameterization, physical expectations, and a social-humanistic construct. These results present substantial support for improving integration of social sciences with contemporary scientific research programs by emphasizing construction of common variables with objective, linear units.

  12. [Physical inactivity among adults and elderly living in areas covered by primary healthcare units with and without the Family Health Program in Pernambuco State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; Siqueira, Fernando Vinholes; Figueiroa, José Natal; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Silveira, Denise Silva da; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; Hallal, Pedro C

    2010-03-01

    The epidemiological transition in Brazil has been explained partially by the low levels of physical activity. However, few studies have explored physical inactivity in low-income population groups. Within this context, primary healthcare units gain strategic importance. This article describes the prevalence of sedentary lifestyle and associated factors in a cross-sectional study, including 1,018 adults and 1,010 elderly adults in 10 cities in Pernambuco State. Prevalence of sedentary lifestyle was 37.8% (95%CI: 34.0-40.2) in adults and 68.3% (95%CI: 65.3-71.3) in the elderly. Identification of physical activity as the most important factor for good health was associated with sedentary lifestyle in elderly adults. A lower proportion of sedentary lifestyle among non-elderly adults was associated with good self-reported health status. We concluded that sedentary lifestyle prevalence is high in elderly and non-elderly people covered by primary healthcare units in Pernambuco State as compared to the South of Brazil.

  13. The impact and process of a community-led intervention on reducing environmental inequalities related to physical activity and healthy eating - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grogan Sarah C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing recognition that a sedentary lifestyle is being driven, at least in part, by environmental factors that affect individuals' physical activity choices and health behaviours. In other words, the environments in which we live, and with which we interact, have become ones that encourage lifestyle choices that decrease physical activity and encourage over-consumption of foods. However, evidence from community-led interventions to change local neighbourhood environments to support physical activity and healthy eating is lacking. This article summarises the research protocol developed to evaluate a community-led intervention "My Health Matters" aimed at reducing health inequalities relating to increasing physical activity and healthy eating as defined by community members themselves. Methods/Design This study includes three of the most deprived electoral wards in Stoke-on-Trent. In each of these areas, environmental factors including proximity of physical activity spaces, greenspace and leisure facilities, neighbourhood connectivity and walkability, land-use-mix and population density, traffic, safety and crime, and food outlets will be mapped using Geographical Information Systems (GIS. A community postal survey of randomly selected addresses assessing environmental characteristics relating to physical activity, perceived health status, social capital, fruit and vegetable consumption and levels of physical activity will be undertaken (baseline and at 2 year follow-up. Based on baseline findings an intervention will be designed and implemented over a 2 year period that includes the following; use of community participatory research to build effective community partnerships; use of partnership consensus to identify, prioritise and design intervention(s related to specific health disparities; recruitment of local residents to help with the delivery and sustainability of target intervention(s; and the development of

  14. Implementation of a guideline for physical therapy in the postoperative period of upper abdominal surgery reduces the incidence of atelectasis and length of hospital stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Possa, S; Braga Amador, C; Meira Costa, A; Takahama Sakamoto, E; Seiko Kondo, C; Maida Vasconcellos, A L; Moran de Brito, C M; Pereira Yamaguti, W

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a physical therapy guideline for patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery (UAS) in reducing the incidence of atelectasis and length of hospital stay in the postoperative period. A "before and after" study design with historical control was used. The "before" period included consecutive patients who underwent UAS before guideline implementation (intervention). The "after" period included consecutive patients after guideline implementation. Patients in the pre-intervention period were submitted to a program of physical therapy in which the treatment planning was based on the individual experience of each professional. On the other hand, patients who were included in the post-intervention period underwent a standardized program of physical therapy with a focus on the use of additional strategies (EPAP, incentive spirometry and early mobilization). There was a significant increase in the use of incentive spirometry and positive expiratory airway pressure after guideline implementation. Moreover, it was observed that early ambulation occurred in all patients in the post-intervention period. No patient who adhered totally to the guideline in the post-intervention period developed atelectasis. Individuals in the post-intervention period presented a shorter length of hospital stay (9.2±4.1 days) compared to patients in the pre-intervention period (12.1±8.3 days) (p<0.05). The implementation of a physical therapy guideline for patients undergoing UAS resulted in reduced incidence of atelectasis and reduction in length of hospital stay in the postoperative period. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Reducing the use of seclusion for mental disorder in a prison: implementing a high support unit in a prison using participant action research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giblin Yvette

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vulnerable prisoners and mentally disordered offenders who present with risk of harm to self or others were accommodated in Special Observation Cells (SOCs isolated from others for considerable periods of time. This practice has been criticised by the Council of Europe Committee for the Prevention of Torture. The objective of this initiative was to reduce the use of seclusion within the prison and to improve the care of vulnerable and mentally ill prisoners within the prison. Results The prison studied is a committal centre for sentenced prisoners with an official bed capacity of 630. The forensic mental health in-reach team, in co-operation with the prison health service followed the 'spiral' of planning, action and fact finding about the results of the action. In December 2010 a 10 bed High Support Unit (HSU was established within the prison. During the first year, 96 prisoners were admitted. A third (35% reported psychotic symptoms, 28% were referred due to the immediate risk of self-harm, 17% were accommodated for medical treatments and increased observation, 13% received specialised treatment by the Addiction Psychiatry team, 6% presented with emotional distress. One prisoner was accommodated on the HSU due to the acute risk he posed to others. A major mental illness was diagnosed in 29%, 20% required short-term increased support for crisis intervention and were found not to have a mental illness. A further 10% were deemed to be feigning symptoms of mental illness to seek refuge in the HSU. 7% had personality disorder as their primary diagnosis and 4% had a learning disability. Stratifying risk within the prison population through the provision of the HSU decreased the total episodes of seclusion in the prison by 59% (p Conclusions The next step is to further stratify risk by establishing a low support unit to serve as a step-down from the high support unit.

  16. A simplified prevention bundle with dual hand hygiene audit reduces early-onset ventilator-associated pneumonia in cardiovascular surgery units: An interrupted time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kang-Cheng; Kou, Yu Ru; Lin, Fang-Chi; Wu, Chieh-Hung; Feng, Jia-Yih; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Shiung, Tao-Fen; Chung, Kwei-Chun; Tung, Yu-Hsiu; Yang, Kuang-Yao; Chang, Shi-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effect of a simplified prevention bundle with alcohol-based, dual hand hygiene (HH) audit on the incidence of early-onset ventilation-associated pneumonia (VAP). This 3-year, quasi-experimental study with interrupted time-series analysis was conducted in two cardiovascular surgery intensive care units in a medical center. Unaware external HH audit (eHH) performed by non-unit-based observers was a routine task before and after bundle implementation. Based on the realistic ICU settings, we implemented a 3-component bundle, which included: a compulsory education program, a knowing internal HH audit (iHH) performed by unit-based observers, and a standardized oral care (OC) protocol with 0.1% chlorhexidine gluconate. The study periods comprised 4 phases: 12-month pre-implementation phase 1 (eHH+/education-/iHH-/OC-), 3-month run-in phase 2 (eHH+/education+/iHH+/OC+), 15-month implementation phase 3 (eHH+/education+/iHH+/OC+), and 6-month post-implementation phase 4 (eHH+/education-/iHH+/OC-). A total of 2553 ventilator-days were observed. VAP incidences (events/1000 ventilator days) in phase 1-4 were 39.1, 40.5, 15.9, and 20.4, respectively. VAP was significantly reduced by 59% in phase 3 (vs. phase 1, incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.41, P = 0.002), but rebounded in phase 4. Moreover, VAP incidence was inversely correlated to compliance of OC (r2 = 0.531, P = 0.001) and eHH (r2 = 0.878, P audit provides better improvement in HH practice. Accordingly, we suggest dual HH audit and consistent bundle performance does matter in quality-of-care VAP prevention.

  17. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Prolonged treatment with pramipexole promotes physical interaction of striatal dopamine D3 autoreceptors with dopamine transporters to reduce dopamine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Hernández, Javier; Afonso-Oramas, Domingo; Cruz-Muros, Ignacio; Salas-Hernández, Josmar; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Moratalla, Rosario; Millan, Mark J; González-Hernández, Tomás

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT), a membrane glycoprotein expressed in dopaminergic neurons, clears DA from extracellular space and is regulated by diverse presynaptic proteins like protein kinases, α-synuclein, D2 and D3 autoreceptors. DAT dysfunction is implicated in Parkinson's disease and depression, which are therapeutically treated by dopaminergic D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R) agonists. It is, then, important to improve our understanding of interactions between D3R and DAT. We show that prolonged administration of pramipexole (0.1mg/kg/day, 6 to 21 days), a preferential D3R agonist, leads to a decrease in DA uptake in mouse striatum that reflects a reduction in DAT affinity for DA in the absence of any change in DAT density or subcellular distribution. The effect of pramipexole was absent in mice with genetically-deleted D3R (D3R(-/-)), yet unaffected in mice genetically deprived of D2R (D2R(-/-)). Pramipexole treatment induced a physical interaction between D3R and DAT, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assay. Furthermore, it promoted the formation of DAT dimers and DAT association with both D2R and α-synuclein, effects that were abolished in D3R(-/-) mice, yet unaffected in D2R(-/-) mice, indicating dependence upon D3R. Collectively, these data suggest that prolonged treatment with dopaminergic D3 agonists provokes a reduction in DA reuptake by dopaminergic neurons related to a hitherto-unsuspected modification of the DAT interactome. These observations provide novel insights into the long-term antiparkinson, antidepressant and additional clinical actions of pramipexole and other D3R agonists.

  19. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Accelerometer thresholds: Accounting for body mass reduces discrepancies between measures of physical activity for individuals with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiber, Lilian; Christensen, Rebecca A G; Jamnik, Veronica K; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether accelerometer thresholds that are adjusted to account for differences in body mass influence discrepancies between self-report and accelerometer-measured physical activity (PA) volume for individuals with overweight and obesity. We analyzed 6164 adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2003-2006. Established accelerometer thresholds were adjusted to account for differences in body mass to produce a similar energy expenditure (EE) rate as individuals with normal weight. Moderate-, vigorous-, and moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA) durations were measured using established and adjusted accelerometer thresholds and compared with self-report. Durations of self-report were longer than accelerometer-measured MVPA using established thresholds (normal weight: 57.8 ± 2.4 vs 9.0 ± 0.5 min/day, overweight: 56.1 ± 2.7 vs 7.4 ± 0.5 min/day, and obesity: 46.5 ± 2.2 vs 3.7 ± 0.3 min/day). Durations of subjective and objective PA were negatively associated with body mass index (BMI) (P overweight and obese groups by 6.0 ± 0.3 min/day and 17.7 ± 0.8 min/day, respectively (P overweight and obese groups. However, accelerometer-measured PA generally remained shorter than durations of self-report within all BMI categories. Further research may be necessary to improve analytical approaches when using objective measures of PA for individuals with overweight or obesity.

  1. Physical Activity: A Viable Way to Reduce the Risks of Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Vascular Dementia in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Miyake, Hiroji; Buchowski, Maciej S.; Shimada, Mieko; Yoshitake, Yutaka; Kim, Angela S.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2017-01-01

    A recent alarming rise of neurodegenerative diseases in the developed world is one of the major medical issues affecting older adults. In this review, we provide information about the associations of physical activity (PA) with major age-related neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, and mild cognitive impairment. We also provide evidence of PA’s role in reducing the risks of these diseases and helping to improve cognitive outcomes in older adults. Finally, we describe some potential mechanisms by which this protective effect occurs, providing guidelines for future research. PMID:28230730

  2. One-year randomized controlled trial with different physical-activity programs to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulders among office workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Søgaard, Karen; Hansen, Ernst A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluates the effect of two different worksite physical-activity interventions on neck-shoulder symptoms, together with perceived work ability and sick leave among office workers. METHODS: An examiner-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted with 549 office workers...... in the primary prevention of such symptoms. The initially relatively high WAI was the most probable reason for no further increase in WAI. Likewise the mean sick leave the year before the intervention was very low, and it was probably not possible to reduce it further....

  3. Physical Activity: A Viable Way to Reduce the Risks of Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Vascular Dementia in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Gallaway

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A recent alarming rise of neurodegenerative diseases in the developed world is one of the major medical issues affecting older adults. In this review, we provide information about the associations of physical activity (PA with major age-related neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, and mild cognitive impairment. We also provide evidence of PA’s role in reducing the risks of these diseases and helping to improve cognitive outcomes in older adults. Finally, we describe some potential mechanisms by which this protective effect occurs, providing guidelines for future research.

  4. Participation in School Physical Education and Selected Dietary Patterns among High School Students--United States, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Examines the prevalence of self-reported enrollment, attendance, and participation in school physical education, noting dietary patterns among students in grades 9-12 from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Percentages of students participating varied significantly. Males participated and exercised more than females. Very few students…

  5. Student Misconceptions during Two Invasion Game Units in Physical Education: A Qualitative Investigation of Student Thought Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Molly K.; Graber, Kim C.

    2000-01-01

    Described misconceptions of elementary students participating in physical education, testing ways of recording and classifying types of misconceptions. Data from observations, videotapes, interviews, and document analysis indicated that misconceptions fell into categories representing motor skill execution and confusion over terminology, strategy,…

  6. Accelerometer measured level of physical activity indoors and outdoors during preschool time in Sweden and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raustorp, Anders; Pagels, Peter; Boldemann, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    It is important to understand the correlates of physical activity (PA) to influence policy and create environments that promote PA among preschool children. We compared preschoolers' PA in Swedish and in US settings and objectively examined differences boys' and girls' indoor and outdoor PA regar...

  7. Developing an acoustic method for reducing North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) ship strike mortality along the United States eastern seaboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Kaitlyn Allen

    North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis ) are among the world's most endangered cetaceans. Although protected from commercial whaling since 1949, North Atlantic right whales exhibit little to no population growth. Ship strike mortality is the leading known cause of North Atlantic right whale mortality. North Atlantic right whales exhibit developed auditory systems, and vocalize in the frequency range that dominates ship acoustic signatures. With no behavioral audiogram published, current literature assumes these whales should be able to acoustically detect signals in the same frequencies they vocalize. Recorded ship acoustic signatures occur at intensities that are similar or higher to those recorded by vocalizing North Atlantic right whales. If North Atlantic right whales are capable of acoustically detecting oncoming ship, why are they susceptible to ship strike mortality? This thesis models potential acoustic impediments to North Atlantic right whale detection of oncoming ships, and concludes the presence of modeled and observed bow null effect acoustic shadow zones, located directly ahead of oncoming ships, are likely to impair the ability of North Atlantic right whales to detect and/or localize oncoming shipping traffic. This lack of detection and/or localization likely leads to a lack of ship strike avoidance, and thus contributes to the observed high rates of North Atlantic right whale ship strike mortality. I propose that North Atlantic right whale ship strike mortality reduction is possible via reducing and/or eliminating the presence of bow null effect acoustic shadow zones. This thesis develops and tests one method for bow null effect acoustic shadow zone reduction on five ships. Finally, I review current United States policy towards North Atlantic right whale ship strike mortality in an effort to determine if the bow null effect acoustic shadow zone reduction method developed is a viable method for reducing North Atlantic right whale ship

  8. Investigation of four problems on the units of material and its properties, energy with heat and temperature in the secondary school physics textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavcar, Nevzat; Özen, Ali Ihsan

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, three units in textbooks in accordance with the 2013 Secondary School Physics Curriculum were analyzed in defined four problems, and some recommendations were made. The study carried out in the Spring semester of education year 2015-2016, within the scope of an undergraduate course. Method of the study is the descriptive model based on qualitative research technics. The data collection instruments were textbook evaluation reports prepared by the participants and pre-service teachers, and presentations reflecting teachers' and pre-service teachers' ideas on the textbooks. A document analysis was conducted by means of these data collection tools. It has been concluded that in the related units a significant shortcoming is not found regarding being student-centered, activity and contex-based approximations. However, some shortcomings were found in activity-gain concordance with measurement and evaluation applications. On the basis of the collected data, some recommendations for improving the textbooks have been presented.

  9. Investigation of four problems on the units of Force and Motion with Pressure and Buoyancy in the secondary school physics textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavcar, Nevzat; Kaya, Uǧur

    2017-02-01

    In the study the four problems defined on three units in the textbooks in accordance with the 2013 Secondary School Physics Curriculum have been investigated. The study carried out in the Spring semester of education year 2015 - 2016, within the scope of an undergraduate course. Method of the study is the descriptive model based on qualitative research technics. The data collection instruments were textbook evaluation reports prepared by the participants and pre -service teachers, and presentations reflecting teachers' and pre-service teachers' ideas on the textbooks. A document analysis was conducted by means of these data collection tools. It has been concluded that in the related units a significant shortcoming is not found regarding being student-centered, activity-based and contex-based approximations. However, some shortcomings were found in activity-gain concordance with assessment and evaluation applications. On the basis of the collected data, some recommendations for improving the textbooks have been presented.

  10. Ringing in the new physics: The politics and technology of electron colliders in the United States, 1956--1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Elizabeth

    The ``November Revolution'' of 1974 and the experiments that followed consolidated the place of the Standard Model in modern particle physics. Much of the evidence on which these conclusions depended was generated by a new type of tool: colliding beam storage rings, which had been considered physically unfeasible twenty years earlier. In 1956 a young experimentalist named Gerry O'Neill dedicated himself to demonstrating that such an apparatus could do useful physics. The storage ring movement encountered numerous obstacles before generating one of the standard machines for high energy research. In fact, it wasn't until 1970 that the U.S. finally broke ground on its first electron-positron collider. Drawing extensively on archival sources and supplementing them with the personal accounts of many of the individuals who took part, Ringing in the New Physics examines this instance of post-World War II techno-science and the new social, political and scientific tensions that characterize it. The motivations are twofold: first, that the chronicle of storage rings may take its place beside mathematical group theory, computer simulations, magnetic spark chambers, and the like as an important contributor to a view of matter and energy which has been the dominant model for the last twenty-five years. In addition, the account provides a case study for the integration of the personal, professional, institutional, and material worlds when examining an episode in the history or sociology of twentieth century science. The story behind the technological development of storage rings holds fascinating insights into the relationship between theory and experiment, collaboration and competition in the physics community, the way scientists obtain funding and their responsibilities to it, and the very nature of what constitutes ``successful'' science in the post- World War II era.

  11. Recent Temporal Trends in Parent-Reported Physical Activity in Children in the United States, 2009 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Davis, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to provide recent temporal trends in parent-reported physical activity in children (6-11 years) between 2009 and 2014. Data from the 2009 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. The analytic sample included 3946 children. Parent proxy of child physical activity at each of the 3 2-year cycles was assessed. For the entire sample, there was a quadratic trend, with the number of days children engaged in at least 60 min/d of physical activity increasing in the period 2011 to 2012 (6.12 days) when compared with the period 2009 to 2010 (5.96 days) and then decreasing in the period 2013 to 2014 (5.83 days). A similar quadratic trend was evident for boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites (particularly boys), and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age percentile based on sex. A negative linear trend was observed for those above the poverty level and non-Hispanic whites (particularly girls). In conclusion, these findings provide suggestive evidence that over the past 6 years (1999-2014), parents report that children's physical activity has slightly decreased in the latest years, with this observation being most pronounced in boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites, and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age and sex percentile. Encouragingly, however, across all evaluated subpopulations, most children (55%-82%), as determined by their parents, engaged in 60 min/d of physical activity (consistent with government recommendations).

  12. Personality disorders and physical comorbidities in adults from the United States: data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Shae E; El-Gabalawy, Renée; Brennan, Sharon L; Bolton, James M; Sareen, Jitender; Berk, Michael; Chanen, Andrew M; Pasco, Julie A; Williams, Lana J

    2015-05-01

    There is a paucity of research examining the relationship between personality disorders (PDs) and chronic physical comorbidities. Consequently, we investigated associations between individual PDs and PD Clusters, and various common disease groups [cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, arthritis and gastrointestinal disease (GI)] in a nationally representative survey of adults from the United States. This study utilized pooled data (n = 34,653; ≥20 years) from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. PDs were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule- Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Physical conditions were based on self-reports of being diagnosed by a health professional. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regressions examined the relationship between PDs and physical conditions. After adjustment (sociodemographic factors, past-year mood, anxiety and substance use disorders), Clusters A, B and C PDs were each associated with physical conditions (all p ≤ 0.01). Of the individual PDs, schizoid, schizotypal, narcissistic, borderline and obsessive-compulsive PDs were associated with CVD (all p ≤ 0.01) among younger adults. Paranoid, antisocial, borderline and avoidant PDs and younger adults with schizoid, schizotypal and obsessive-compulsive PDs were each associated with arthritis (all p ≤ 0.01). Significant associations were seen between paranoid, schizoid and schizotypal PDs and diabetes (all p ≤ 0.01). Finally, schizotypal, antisocial, borderline and narcissistic PDs were associated with GI conditions (all p ≤ 0.01). PDs were consistently associated with physical conditions. Investigation of PDs and their relationship with physical health outcomes warrant further research attention as these findings have important clinical implications.

  13. A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Risky Sexual Behavior and Decrease Sexually Transmitted Infections in Latinas Living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Meghan D; Grayson, Cary T; Witt, Lucy; Holden, Julie; Reid, Daniel; Kissinger, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of behavioral interventions in reducing risky sexual behavior and incident sexually transmitted infections (STI) among Latina women living in the United States. Studies were found by systematically searching the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsychInfo databases without language restriction. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts and full texts of articles to find randomized control trials testing the effects of behavioral interventions aimed at changing risky sexual behavior among Latinas. Articles were selected using prespecified inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers extracted data from the included trials in duplicate using a standardized data extraction form. Six randomized control trials met the inclusion criteria for a total of 2,909 participants. Using random effects models with inverse variance weighting, we found a protective effect of the behavioral intervention on reported risky sexual behavior (odds ratio = 0.52; 95% confidence interval = 0.42, 0.64) and on incident nonviral STI (odds ratio = 0.65; 95% confidence interval = 0.46, 0.93). Behavioral interventions targeted toward Latina populations are effective in reducing risky sexual behaviors and incident STI and should be considered by policymakers as a potential tool for HIV/STI prevention in this population.

  14. A combined dynamical and statistical downscaling technique to reduce biases in climate projections: an example for winter precipitation and snowpack in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R.; Wang, S.-Y.; Gillies, R. R.

    2016-04-01

    Large biases associated with climate projections are problematic when it comes to their regional application in the assessment of water resources and ecosystems. Here, we demonstrate a method that can reduce systematic biases in regional climate projections. The global and regional climate models employed to demonstrate the technique are the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The method first utilized a statistical regression technique and a global reanalysis dataset to correct biases in the CCSM-simulated variables (e.g., temperature, geopotential height, specific humidity, and winds) that are subsequently used to drive the WRF model. The WRF simulations were conducted for the western United States and were driven with (a) global reanalysis, (b) original CCSM, and (c) bias-corrected CCSM data. The bias-corrected CCSM data led to a more realistic regional climate simulation of precipitation and associated atmospheric dynamics, as well as snow water equivalent (SWE), in comparison to the original CCSM-driven WRF simulation. Since most climate applications rely on existing global model output as the forcing data (i.e., they cannot re-run or change the global model), which often contain large biases, this method provides an effective and economical tool to reduce biases in regional climate downscaling simulations of water resource variables.

  15. Monitoring of physical health parameters for inpatients on a child and adolescent mental health unit receiving regular antipsychotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Nida; Saeed, Shoaib; Drewek, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Physical health monitoring of patients receiving antipsychotics is vital. Overall it is estimated that individuals suffering with conditions like schizophrenia have a 20% shorter life expectancy than the average population, moreover antipsychotic use has been linked to a number of conditions including diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease.[1-4] The severity of possible adverse effects to antipsychotics in adults has raised awareness of the importance of monitoring physical health in this population. However, there is little literature available as to the adverse effects of these medications in the child and adolescent community, which make physical health monitoring in this predominantly antipsychotic naïve population even more important. An expert group meeting in the UK has laid down recommendations in regards to screening and management of adult patients receiving antipsychotics, however no specific guidelines have been put in place for the child and adolescent age group.[5] The aim of this audit was to establish whether in-patients receiving antipsychotics had the following investigations pre-treatment and 12 weeks after treatment initiation: body mass index, hip-waist circumference, blood pressure, ECG, urea and electrolytes, full blood count, lipid profile, random glucose level, liver function test, and prolactin. This is in addition to a pre-treatment VTE risk assessment. These standards were derived from local trust guidelines, NICE guidelines on schizophrenia [6] and The Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines.[7] We retrospectively reviewed 39 electronic case notes in total, of which 24 cases were post intervention. Intervention included the use of a prompting tool. This tool was filed in the physical health files of all patients receiving antipsychotics which was intended as a reminder to doctors regarding their patient's need for physical health monitoring. Professionals involved in the monitoring of such parameters were educated in the importance and

  16. Minibeam Therapy With Protons and Light Ions: Physical Feasibility and Potential to Reduce Radiation Side Effects and to Facilitate Hypofractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham, E-mail: avraham.dilmanian@stonybrook.edu [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Neurology, and Radiology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York (United States); Eley, John G. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Despite several advantages of proton therapy over megavoltage x-ray therapy, its lack of proximal tissue sparing is a concern. The method presented here adds proximal tissue sparing to protons and light ions by turning their uniform incident beams into arrays of parallel, small, or thin (0.3-mm) pencil or planar minibeams, which are known to spare tissues. As these minibeams penetrate the tissues, they gradually broaden and merge with each other to produce a solid beam. Methods and Materials: Broadening of 0.3-mm-diameter, 109-MeV proton pencil minibeams was measured using a stack of radiochromic films with plastic spacers. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the broadening in water of minibeams of protons and several light ions and the dose from neutron generated by collimator. Results: A central parameter was tissue depth, where the beam full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 0.7 mm, beyond which tissue sparing decreases. This depth was 22 mm for 109-MeV protons in a film stack. It was also found by simulations in water to be 23.5 mm for 109 MeV proton pencil minibeams and 26 mm for 116 MeV proton planar minibeams. For light ions, all with 10 cm range in water, that depth increased with particle size; specifically it was 51 mm for Li-7 ions. The ∼2.7% photon equivalent neutron skin dose from the collimator was reduced 7-fold by introducing a gap between the collimator and the skin. Conclusions: Proton minibeams can be implemented at existing particle therapy centers. Because they spare the shallow tissues, they could augment the efficacy of proton therapy and light particle therapy, particularly in treating tumors that benefit from sparing of proximal tissues such as pediatric brain tumors. They should also allow hypofractionated treatment of all tumors by allowing the use of higher incident doses with less concern about proximal tissue damage.

  17. Physical functional outcome assessment of patients with major burns admitted to a UK Burn Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailes, Sarah T; Engelsman, Kayleen; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Determining the discharge outcome of burn patients can be challenging and therefore a validated objective measure of functional independence would assist with this process. We developed the Functional Assessment for Burns (FAB) score to measure burn patients' functional independence. FAB scores were taken on discharge from ICU (FAB 1) and on discharge from inpatient burn care (FAB 2) in 56 patients meeting the American Burn Association criteria for major burn. We retrospectively analysed prospectively collected data to measure the progress of patients' physical functional outcomes and to evaluate the predictive validity of the FAB score for discharge outcome. Mean age was 38.6 years and median burn size 35%. Significant improvements were made in the physical functional outcomes between FAB 1 and FAB 2 scores (ppatients were discharged home, 8 of these with social care. 8 patients were transferred to another hospital for further inpatient rehabilitation. FAB 1 score (≤ 9) is strongly associated with discharge outcome (pburn patients.

  18. Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

  19. Professor Tony F. Chan Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences National Science Foundation United States of America on 23rd May 2007. Here visiting ATLAS experiment with P. Jenni and M. Tuts.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Professor Tony F. Chan Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences National Science Foundation United States of America on 23rd May 2007. Here visiting ATLAS experiment with P. Jenni and M. Tuts.

  20. The main physical properties of planosol in maize (Zea mays L.) cultivation under different long-term reduced tillage practices in the Baltic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kstutis Romaneckas; Egidijusarauskis; DovilAviienyt; Sidona Buragien; David Arney

    2015-01-01

    The impact of sustainable reduced til age (RT) on the physical properties of soil is wel documented worldwide;however, there is no precise information about the inlfuence of long-term RT or no-til (NT) on the soils at the boundary for grain maize-growing in the semi-humid subarctic climate conditions of the Baltic states, especial y on the formation of a hard-ened upper soil layer (10–15 cm in depth)-“loosening hardpan”. This study was carried out at the Research Station of Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Lithuania from 2009–2012. The investigations were based on a long-term (since 1988) ifeld experiment. The aim of the investigation was to ascertain the inlfuence of reduced primary til age on the main soil’s physical properties. This study examined soils that were deep ploughing (DP), shal ow ploughing (SP), deep cultivation (DC), shal ow cultivation (SC), and no-til (NT). Reducing the til age intensity to NT had no signiifcant effect on the structural soil’s composition;however, the stability of the structure of the>1 and>0.25 mm-size fractions was signiifcantly higher in the non-reversibly til ed (DC, SC) and NT plots. The penetration resistance of the DP soils was less after primary til age and wintering, and became similar to the NT plots at the end of the maize growth season. After primary til age and wintering, the soil moisture content in the upper soil layer (0–5 cm depth) of the NT plots was 17–49 and 16–18%higher than that in the DP. Long-term reduction of primary til age up to NT general y had no signiifcant effect on the moisture content and soil bulk density of the 0–10 and 10–20 cm layers. The results showed that long-term RT stabilized the physical quality of soil. Less soil penetration resistance was established in the DP plots compared to both RT and NT, however, indicators of the formation of a uniform“loosening hardpan”layer were not found. It is summarized that long-term RT or NT systems stabilize, or may increase

  1. Plasma and adipose tissue level of angiopoietin-like 7 (ANGPTL7) are increased in obesity and reduced after physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Cherian, Preethi; Al-Khairi, Irina; Madhu, Dhanya; Tiss, Ali; Warsam, Samia; Alhubail, Asma; Sriraman, Devarajan; Al-Refaei, Faisal; Abubaker, Jehad

    2017-01-01

    ANGPTL7 is a member of the Angiopoietin-like (ANGPTL) protein family that is composed of eight proteins (1-8). Increasing evidence is associating ANGPTL proteins to obesity and insulin resistance. The biological role of ANGPTL7 is yet to be understood except for a recently proposed role in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. This study was designed to shed light on the function of ANGPTL7 in obesity and its modulation by physical exercise as well as its potential association with lipid profile. A total of 144 subjects were enrolled in this study and finished three months of physical exercise. The participants were classified based on their BMI, 82 subjects were non-obese and 62 obese. ANGPTL7 levels in plasma and adipose tissue were measured by ELISA, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In this study, we showed that ANGPTL7 level was increased in the plasma of obese subjects (1249.05± 130.39 pg/mL) as compared to non-obese (930.34 ± 87.27 pg/mL) (p-Value = 0.032). ANGPTL7 Gene and protein expression levels in adipose tissue also showed over two fold increase. Physical exercise reduced circulating level of ANGPTL7 in the obese subjects to 740.98± 127.18 pg/mL, (p-Value = 0.007). ANGPTL7 expression in adipose tissue was also reduced after exercise. Finally, ANGPTL7 circulating level showed significant association with TG level in the obese subjects (R2 = 0.183, p-Value = 0.03). In conclusion, our data shows for the first time that obesity increases the level of ANGPTL7 in both plasma and adipose tissue. Increased expression of ANGPTL7 might play a minor role in the regulation of TG level in obese subjects either directly or through interaction with other ANGPTL protein members. Physical exercise reduced the level of ANGPTL7 highlighting the potential for targeting this protein as a therapeutic target for regulating dyslipidemia.

  2. Plasma and adipose tissue level of angiopoietin-like 7 (ANGPTL7) are increased in obesity and reduced after physical exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Preethi; Al-Khairi, Irina; Madhu, Dhanya; Tiss, Ali; Warsam, Samia; Alhubail, Asma; Sriraman, Devarajan; Al-Refaei, Faisal; Abubaker, Jehad

    2017-01-01

    Objective ANGPTL7 is a member of the Angiopoietin-like (ANGPTL) protein family that is composed of eight proteins (1–8). Increasing evidence is associating ANGPTL proteins to obesity and insulin resistance. The biological role of ANGPTL7 is yet to be understood except for a recently proposed role in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. This study was designed to shed light on the function of ANGPTL7 in obesity and its modulation by physical exercise as well as its potential association with lipid profile. Methods A total of 144 subjects were enrolled in this study and finished three months of physical exercise. The participants were classified based on their BMI, 82 subjects were non-obese and 62 obese. ANGPTL7 levels in plasma and adipose tissue were measured by ELISA, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results In this study, we showed that ANGPTL7 level was increased in the plasma of obese subjects (1249.05± 130.39 pg/mL) as compared to non-obese (930.34 ± 87.27 pg/mL) (p-Value = 0.032). ANGPTL7 Gene and protein expression levels in adipose tissue also showed over two fold increase. Physical exercise reduced circulating level of ANGPTL7 in the obese subjects to 740.98± 127.18 pg/mL, (p-Value = 0.007). ANGPTL7 expression in adipose tissue was also reduced after exercise. Finally, ANGPTL7 circulating level showed significant association with TG level in the obese subjects (R2 = 0.183, p-Value = 0.03). Conclusion In conclusion, our data shows for the first time that obesity increases the level of ANGPTL7 in both plasma and adipose tissue. Increased expression of ANGPTL7 might play a minor role in the regulation of TG level in obese subjects either directly or through interaction with other ANGPTL protein members. Physical exercise reduced the level of ANGPTL7 highlighting the potential for targeting this protein as a therapeutic target for regulating dyslipidemia. PMID:28264047

  3. Effect of increasing the protein-to-fat ratio and reducing fat content on the chemical and physical properties of processed cheese product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinee, T P; O'Callaghan, D J

    2013-01-01

    Scientific studies indicate that the intake of dietary fat and saturated fats in the modern Western diet is excessive and contributes adversely to health, lifestyle, and longevity. In response, manufacturers of cheese and processed cheese products (PCP) are pursuing the development of products with reduced fat contents. The present study investigated the effect of altering the fat level (13.8, 18.2, 22.7, 27.9, and 32.5 g/100g) in PCP on their chemical and physical properties. The PCP were formulated in triplicate to different fat levels using Cheddar cheese, skim milk cheese, anhydrous milk fat, emulsifying salt (ES), NaCl, and water. The formulations were designed to give fixed moisture (~53 g/100g) and ES:protein ratio (0.105). The resultant PCP, and their water-soluble extracts (WSE), prepared from a macerated blend of PCP and water at a weight ratio of 1:2, were analyzed at 4d. Reducing the fat content significantly increased the firmness of the unheated PCP and reduced the flowability and maximum loss tangent (fluidity) of the melted PCP. These changes coincided with increases in the levels of total protein, water-soluble protein, water-insoluble protein, and water-soluble Ca, and a decrease in the molar ratio of water-soluble Ca to soluble P. However, both water-soluble Ca and water-soluble protein decreased when expressed as percentages of total protein and total Ca, respectively, in the PCP. The high level of protein was a major factor contributing to the deterioration in physical properties as the fat content of PCP was reduced. Diluting the protein content or reducing the potential of the protein to aggregate, and thereby form structures that contribute to rigidity, may provide a means for improving quality of reduced-fat PCP by using natural cheese with lower intact casein content and lower calcium:casein ratio, for example, or by decreasing the ratio of sodium phosphate to sodium citrate-based ES.

  4. [Effects of physics on development of optometry in the United States from the late 19th to the mid 20th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal-Young

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, it was studied how physics affected development of optometry in the United States, from aspects of formation and academization of optometry. It was also revealed that history of optometry was analogous to history of engineering. Optics in the 19th century was divided into electromagnetic study of light and visual optics. Development of the visual optics promoted professionalization of ophthalmology that had already started in the 18th century. The visual optics also stimulated formation of optometry and optometrists body in the late 19th century of the United States. The American optometrists body were originated from opticians who had studied visual optics. Publication of several English academic textbooks on visual optics induced appearance of educated opticians (and jewelers). They acquired a right to do the eye examination in the early 20th century after C. F. Prentice's trial in 1897, evolving into optometrists. The opticians could be considered as craftsmen, and they were divided into (dispensing) opticians and optometrists. Such history of American optometrists body is analogous to that of engineers body in the viewpoints of craftsmen origin and separation from craftsmen. Engineers were also originated from educated craftsmen, but were separated from craftsmen when engineering was built up. Education system and academization of optometry was strongly influenced by physics, too. When college education of optometry started at American universities, it was not belonged to medical school but to physics department. Physics and optics were of great importance in curriculum, and early faculty members were mostly physicists. Optometry was academized in the 1920s by the college education, standardization of curriculum, and formation of the American Academy of Optometry. This is also analogous to history of engineering, which was academized by natural sciences, especially by mathematics and physics. The reason why optometry was academized not by

  5. United States Adolescents' Television, Computer, Videogame, Smartphone, and Tablet Use: Associations with Sugary Drinks, Sleep, Physical Activity, and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2017-03-01

    To quantify the relationships between youth use of television (TV) and other screen devices, including smartphones and tablets, and obesity risk factors. TV and other screen device use, including smartphones, tablets, computers, and/or videogames, was self-reported by a nationally representative, cross-sectional sample of 24 800 US high school students (2013-2015 Youth Risk Behavior Surveys). Students also reported on health behaviors including sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake, physical activity, sleep, and weight and height. Sex-stratified logistic regression models, adjusting for the sampling design, estimated associations between TV and other screen device use and SSB intake, physical activity, sleep, and obesity. Approximately 20% of participants used other screen devices for ≥5 hours daily. Watching TV ≥5 hours daily was associated with daily SSB consumption (aOR = 2.72, 95% CI: 2.23, 3.32) and obesity (aOR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.40, 2.27). Using other screen devices ≥5 hours daily was associated with daily SSB consumption (aOR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.69, 2.32), inadequate physical activity (aOR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.69, 2.25), and inadequate sleep (aOR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.54, 2.08). Using smartphones, tablets, computers, and videogames is associated with several obesity risk factors. Although further study is needed, families should be encouraged to limit both TV viewing and newer screen devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducing the use of seclusion for mental disorder in a prison: implementing a high support unit in a prison using participant action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Yvette; Kelly, Andy; Kelly, Enda; Kennedy, Harry G; Mohan, Damian

    2012-04-09

    Vulnerable prisoners and mentally disordered offenders who present with risk of harm to self or others were accommodated in Special Observation Cells (SOCs) isolated from others for considerable periods of time. This practice has been criticised by the Council of Europe Committee for the Prevention of Torture. The objective of this initiative was to reduce the use of seclusion within the prison and to improve the care of vulnerable and mentally ill prisoners within the prison. The prison studied is a committal centre for sentenced prisoners with an official bed capacity of 630. The forensic mental health in-reach team, in co-operation with the prison health service followed the 'spiral' of planning, action and fact finding about the results of the action. In December 2010 a 10 bed High Support Unit (HSU) was established within the prison. During the first year, 96 prisoners were admitted. A third (35%) reported psychotic symptoms, 28% were referred due to the immediate risk of self-harm, 17% were accommodated for medical treatments and increased observation, 13% received specialised treatment by the Addiction Psychiatry team, 6% presented with emotional distress. One prisoner was accommodated on the HSU due to the acute risk he posed to others. A major mental illness was diagnosed in 29%, 20% required short-term increased support for crisis intervention and were found not to have a mental illness. A further 10% were deemed to be feigning symptoms of mental illness to seek refuge in the HSU. 7% had personality disorder as their primary diagnosis and 4% had a learning disability. Stratifying risk within the prison population through the provision of the HSU decreased the total episodes of seclusion in the prison by 59% (p < 0.001) in addition to providing a more effective psychiatric in-reach service to the prison. Pathways between the prison and the forensic psychiatric hospital saw no change in activity but improved continuity of care. The next step is to further

  7. Predictors of Low Uptake of Prenatal Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid, and Acellular Pertussis Immunization in Privately Insured Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Anne M; Layton, J Bradley; Li, Dongmei; Hudgens, Michael G; Boggess, Kim A; McGrath, Leah J; Weber, David J; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia

    2017-04-01

    To examine the uptake of prenatal tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) immunization among pregnant women in the United States. Using MarketScan data, we conducted a historical cohort study among pregnant women with employer-based commercial insurance in the United States who delivered between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. We examined temporal trends of uptake, predictors of uptake, and timing of Tdap immunization. Among 1,222,384 eligible pregnancies in 1,147,711 women, receipt of prenatal Tdap immunization increased from 0.0% of women who delivered in January 2010 to 9.8% who delivered in October 2012 (the date of the recommendation by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Tdap during every pregnancy) to 44.4% who delivered in December 2014. Among women who received Tdap during pregnancy, the majority were immunized between 27 weeks and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation per the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendation. In multivariable analyses among women who delivered between November 2012 and December 2014, rates of prenatal Tdap immunization were lower for women younger than 25 years of age (eg, 20-24 compared with 30-34 years rate ratio [RR] 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-0.88), with other children (eg, three compared with zero children: RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.84-0.88), residing in the South compared with the Midwest (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.80-0.82), or with emergency department visits in early pregnancy (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.92-0.95). The proportion of pregnant women who received prenatal Tdap increased with increasing gestational age at birth. By the end of 2014, fewer than half of pregnant women in the United States were receiving prenatal Tdap immunization. Implementation and dissemination strategies are needed to increase Tdap coverage among pregnant women, especially those who are young, have other children, or reside in the South.

  8. Physical characterization and in vitro evaluation of some generic medications available in pharma market of United Arab Emirates (UAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Rasool, Bazigha K; Khan, Saeed A.; Shamsueldin, Eiman; Sadik, Raghad

    2011-01-01

    This study is the first attempt in UAE to prove the trustworthiness of the in vitro evaluation to assess the reliability of the generic medications comparing to the brand name. Five generic medicines, two Local (codes: L1, L2), three Arabic (codes: A1, A2 and A3) and the International brand (code: I1) of diclofenac sodium (DS) sustained release tablets, as a model product, was collected randomly from the UAE pharma market. The products were characterized by physical parameters including weigh...

  9. Designing an intervention to help people with colorectal adenomas reduce their intake of red and processed meat and increase their levels of physical activity: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowswell George

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cases of colorectal cancer (CRC arise from adenomatous polyps and malignant potential is greatest in high risk adenomas. There is convincing observational evidence that red and processed meat increase the risk of CRC and that higher levels of physical activity reduce the risk. However, no definitive randomised trial has demonstrated the benefit of behaviour change on reducing polyp recurrence and no consistent advice is currently offered to minimise patient risk. This qualitative study aimed to assess patients’ preferences for dietary and physical activity interventions and ensure their appropriate and acceptable delivery to inform a feasibility trial. Methods Patients aged 60–74 included in the National Health Service Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (NHSBCSP were selected from a patient tracking database. After a positive faecal occult blood test (FOBt, all had been diagnosed with an intermediate or high risk adenoma (I/HRA at colonoscopy between April 2008 and April 2010. Interested patients and their partners were invited to attend a focus group or interview in July 2010. A topic guide, informed by the objectives of the study, was used. A thematic analysis was conducted in which transcripts were examined to ensure that all occurrences of each theme had been accounted for and compared. Results Two main themes emerged from the focus groups: a experiences of having polyps and b changing behaviour. Participants had not associated polyp removal with colorectal cancer and most did not remember being given any information or advice relating to this at the time. Heterogeneity of existing diet and physical activity levels was noted. There was a lack of readiness to change behaviour in many people in the target population. Conclusions This study has confirmed and amplified recently published factors involved in developing interventions to change dietary and physical activity behaviour in this population. The need to tailor

  10. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance Time in the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter,David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, robert; Zande, Chris Vande

    2012-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR - Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post- Shuttle 6-year service life.

  11. Effect of culturally relevant pedagogy on Latino students' engagement and content mastery on states of matter unit in physical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jennifer

    This research, in response to the lack of empirical evidence of the impact of culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) on Latino students in science education, examined the effect CRP on Latino students' engagement and content mastery. Quantitative research was conducted with a treatment group that received an intervention unit on states of matter with CRP approaches and a comparison group that did not receive the intervention. The sample comprised approximately 189 eighth-grade students from a Southern Californian middle school. The research findings reveal that CRP approaches had a statistically significant positive effect on student engagement of all ethnic groups in this study, particularly Latino students, while CRP approaches had a statistically significant negative effect on Latino students' content mastery. Three recommendations result from this study, including professional development of CRP for educators, professional development of CRP for educational leaders, and using CRP to address multiculturalism.

  12. Physical physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Schulman, Mark

    2006-01-01

    "Protons, electrons, positrons, quarks, gluons, muons, shmuons! I should have paid better attention to my high scholl physics teacher. If I had, maybe I could have understood even a fration of what Israeli particle physicist Giora Mikenberg was talking about when explaining his work on the world's largest science experiment." (2 pages)

  13. The Combination of SAT and SBT Protocols May Help Reduce the Incidence of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in the Burn Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yann-Leei Larry; Sims, Kaci D; Butts, Charles C; Frotan, M Amin; Kahn, Steven; Brevard, Sidney B; Simmons, Jon D

    There are few published reports on the unique nature of burn patients using a paired spontaneous awakening and spontaneous breathing protocol. A combined protocol was implemented in our burn intensive care unit (ICU) on January 1, 2012. This study evaluates the impact of this protocol on patient outcomes in a burn ICU. We performed a retrospective review of our burn registry over 4 years, including all patients placed on mechanical ventilation. In the latter 2 years, patients meeting criteria underwent daily spontaneous awakening trial; if successful, spontaneous breathing trial was performed. Patient data included age, burn size, percent full-thickness burn, tracheostomy, and inhalation injury. Outcome measures included ventilator days, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, pneumonia, and disposition. Data were analyzed using Graphpad Prism and IBM SPSS software, with statistical significance defined as P < .05. There were 171 admissions in the preprotocol period and 136 after protocol implementation. Protocol patients had greater percent full-thickness burns, but did not differ in other characteristics. The protocol group had significantly shorter ICU length of stay, fewer ventilator days, and lower pneumonia incidence. Hospital length of stay, disposition, and mortality were not significantly different. Among patients with inhalation injuries, the protocol group exhibited fewer ventilator and ICU days. Protocol implementation in a burn ICU was accompanied by decreased ventilator days and a reduced incidence of pneumonia. A combined spontaneous awakening and breathing protocol is safe and may improve clinical practice in the burn ICU.

  14. Participating in politics resembles physical activity: general action patterns in international archives, United States archives, and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenji; Handley, Ian M; Albarracín, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    A series of studies examined whether political participation can emerge from general patterns of indiscriminate activity. In the first two studies, general action tendencies were measured by combining national and state-level indicators of high activity (e.g., impulsiveness, pace of life, and physical activity) from international and U.S. data. This action-tendency index positively correlated with a measure of political participation that consisted of voting behaviors and participation in political demonstrations. The following two experimental studies indicated that participants exposed to action words (e.g., go, move) had stronger intentions to vote in an upcoming election and volunteered more time to make phone calls on behalf of a university policy than participants exposed to inaction words did (e.g., relax, stop). These studies suggest that political participation can be predicted from general tendencies toward activity present at the national and state levels, as well as from verbal prompts suggestive of activity.

  15. Electrochemical state and internal variables estimation using a reduced-order physics-based model of a lithium-ion cell and an extended Kalman filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetzel, KD; Aldrich, LL; Trimboli, MS; Plett, GL

    2015-03-15

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the present value of electrochemical internal variables in a lithium-ion cell in real time, using readily available measurements of cell voltage, current, and temperature. The variables that can be estimated include any desired set of reaction flux and solid and electrolyte potentials and concentrations at any set of one-dimensional spatial locations, in addition to more standard quantities such as state of charge. The method uses an extended Kalman filter along with a one-dimensional physics-based reduced-order model of cell dynamics. Simulations show excellent and robust predictions having dependable error bounds for most internal variables. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High Prestroke Physical Activity Is Associated with Reduced Infarct Growth in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Treated with Intravenous tPA and Randomized to Remote Ischemic Perconditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauenfeldt, Rolf Ankerlund; Hougaard, Kristina D; Mouridsen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    infarct growth in a cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous tPA and randomized to remote ischemic perconditioning. METHODS: In this predefined subanalysis, data from a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) on AIS was used......-on to intravenous thrombolysis, the level of PA the week before the stroke was associated with decreased 24-h infarct growth and final infarct size. These results are highly encouraging and stress the need for further exploration of the potentially protective effects of both PA and remote ischemic conditioning.......BACKGROUND: A high prestroke physical activity (PA) level is associated with reduced stroke rate, stroke mortality, better functional outcome, and possible neuroprotective abilities. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible neuroprotective effect of prestroke PA on 24-h cerebral...

  17. Effects of Model Resolution and Subgrid-Scale Physics on the Simulation of Daily Precipitation in the Continental United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, P B; Iorio, J P; Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S L; Khairoutdinov, M; Randall, D

    2004-07-28

    We analyze simulations of the global climate performed at a range of spatial resolutions to assess the effects of horizontal spatial resolution on the ability to simulate precipitation in the continental United States. The model investigated is the CCM3 general circulation model. We also preliminarily assess the effect of replacing cloud and convective parameterizations in a coarse-resolution (T42) model with an embedded cloud-system resolving model (CSRM). We examine both spatial patterns of seasonal-mean precipitation and daily-timescale temporal variability of precipitation in the continental United States. For DJF and SON, high-resolution simulations produce spatial patterns of seasonal-mean precipitation that agree more closely with observed precipitation patterns than do results from the same model (CCM3) at coarse resolution. However, in JJA and MAM, there is little improvement in spatial patterns of seasonal-mean precipitation with increasing resolution, particularly in the Southeast. This is owed to the dominance of convective (i.e., parameterized) precipitation in these two seasons. We further find that higher-resolution simulations have more realistic daily precipitation statistics. In particular, the well-known tendency at coarse resolution to have too many days with weak precipitation and not enough intense precipitation is partially eliminated in higher-resolution simulations. However, even at the highest resolution examined here (T239), the simulated intensity of the mean and of high-percentile daily precipitation amounts is too low. This is especially true in the Southeast, where the most extreme events occur. A new GCM, in which a cloud-resolving model (CSRM) is embedded in each grid cell and replaces convective and stratiform cloud parameterizations, solves this problem, and actually produces too much precipitation in the form of extreme events. However, in contrast to high-resolution versions of CCM3, this model produces little improvement in

  18. The Physical Design of Special Chain Pumping Unit%特种链条抽油机结构设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王集思; 刘兴德; 卢伟宏

    2016-01-01

    设计一种长冲程、大泵径、低冲次,适合稠油、高粘、多砂等作业工况的特种链条抽油机。该机采用特殊链条结构可实现链节的无油自润滑传动;采用无游梁式换向机构,通过特种销轴和特种链节,实现换向无冲击和换向无受力死点。%Design a kind of special chain pumping unit with the characteristics of long stroke,large pump diameter and low speed,suitable for heavy oil,high viscosity,sand etc.operating mode.This machine USES the special chain structure can realize self-lubrication chain transmission;Adopting no-beam steering,through special pin and special link,achieve the reversing no impact and the reversing no dead point.

  19. Effects of radiant exposure and wavelength spectrum of light-curing units on chemical and physical properties of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Fonseca Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In this study, we evaluated the influence of different radiant exposures provided by single-peak and polywave light-curing units (LCUs on the degree of conversion (DC and the mechanical properties of resin cements. Materials and Methods Six experimental groups were established for each cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE; LuxaCore Dual, Ivoclar Vivadent; Variolink, DMG, according to the different radiant exposures (5, 10, and 20 J/cm2 and two LCUs (single-peak and polywave. The specimens were made (7 mm in length × 2 mm in width × 1 mm in height using silicone molds. After 24 hours of preparation, DC measurement was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The same specimens were used for the evaluation of mechanical properties (flexural strength, FS; elastic modulus, E by a three-point bending test. Data were assessed for normality, after which two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were performed. Results No properties of the Variolink cement were influenced by any of the considered experimental conditions. In the case of the RelyX ARC cement, DC was higher when polywave LCU was used; FS and E were not influenced by the conditions evaluated. The LuxaCore cement showed greater sensitivity to the different protocols. Conclusions On the basis of these results, both the spectrum of light emitted and the radiant exposure used could affect the properties of resin cements. However, the influence was material-dependent.

  20. Reduced Disparities in Birth Rates Among Teens Aged 15-19 Years - United States, 2006-2007 and 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Lisa; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Cox, Shanna; Kroelinger, Charlan; Besera, Ghenet; Brittain, Anna; Fuller, Taleria R; Koumans, Emilia; Barfield, Wanda

    2016-04-29

    Teen childbearing can have negative health, economic, and social consequences for mothers and their children (1) and costs the United States approximately $9.4 billion annually (2). During 1991-2014, the birth rate among teens aged 15-19 years in the United States declined 61%, from 61.8 to 24.2 births per 1,000, the lowest rate ever recorded (3). Nonetheless, in 2014, the teen birth rate remained approximately twice as high for Hispanic and non-Hispanic black (black) teens compared with non-Hispanic white (white) teens (3), and geographic and socioeconomic disparities remain (3,4), irrespective of race/ethnicity. Social determinants associated with teen childbearing (e.g., low parental educational attainment and limited opportunities for education and employment) are more common in communities with higher proportions of racial and ethnic minorities (4), contributing to the challenge of further reducing disparities in teen births. To examine trends in births for teens aged 15-19 years by race/ethnicity and geography, CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) data at the national (2006-2014), state (2006-2007 and 2013-2014), and county (2013-2014) levels. To describe socioeconomic indicators previously associated with teen births, CDC analyzed data from the American Community Survey (ACS) (2010-2014). Nationally, from 2006 to 2014, the teen birth rate declined 41% overall with the largest decline occurring among Hispanics (51%), followed by blacks (44%), and whites (35%). The birth rate ratio for Hispanic teens and black teens compared with white teens declined from 2.9 to 2.2 and from 2.3 to 2.0, respectively. From 2006-2007 to 2013-2014, significant declines in teen birth rates and birth rate ratios were noted nationally and in many states. At the county level, teen birth rates for 2013-2014 ranged from 3.1 to 119.0 per 1,000 females aged 15-19 years; ACS data indicated unemployment was higher, and education attainment and family income were lower in