WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit physician staffing

  1. The effect of physician staffing model on patient outcomes in a medical progressive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, E J; Damaghi, N; Shakespeare, W G; Sherman, M S

    2016-04-01

    Although evidence supports the impact of intensivist physician staffing in improving intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes, the optimal coverage for progressive care units (PCU) is unknown. We sought to determine how physician staffing models influence outcomes for intermediate care patients. We conducted a retrospective observational comparison of patients admitted to the medical PCU of an academic hospital during 12-month periods of high-intensity and low-intensity staffing. A total of 318 PCU patients were eligible for inclusion (143 high-intensity and 175 low-intensity). We found that low-intensity patients were more often stepped up from the emergency department and floor, whereas high-intensity patients were ICU transfers (61% vs 42%, P = .001). However, Mortality Probability Model scoring was similar between the 2 groups. In adjusted analysis, there was no association between intensity of staffing and hospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-1.99; P = .69) or PCU mortality (odds ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-2.45; P = .69). There was also no difference in subsequent ICU admission rates or in PCU length of stay. We found no evidence that high-intensity intensivist physician staffing improves outcomes for intermediate care patients. In a strained critical care system, our study raises questions about the role of the intensivist in the graded care options between intensive and conventional ward care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Generalizable items and modular structure for computerised physician staffing calculation on intensive care units.

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    Weiss, Manfred; Marx, Gernot; Iber, Thomas

    2017-08-04

    Intensive care medicine remains one of the most cost-driving areas within hospitals with high personnel costs. Under the scope of limited budgets and reimbursement, realistic needs are essential to justify personnel staffing. Unfortunately, all existing staffing models are top-down calculations with a high variability in results. We present a workload-oriented model, integrating quality of care, efficiency of processes, legal, educational, controlling, local, organisational and economic aspects. In our model, the physician's workload solely related to the intensive care unit depends on three tasks: Patient-oriented tasks, divided in basic tasks (performed in every patient) and additional tasks (necessary in patients with specific diagnostic and therapeutic requirements depending on their specific illness, only), and non patient-oriented tasks. All three tasks have to be taken into account for calculating the required number of physicians. The calculation tool further allows to determine minimal personnel staffing, distribution of calculated personnel demand regarding type of employee due to working hours per year, shift work or standby duty. This model was introduced and described first by the German Board of Anesthesiologists and the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine in 2008 and since has been implemented and updated 2012 in Germany. The modular, flexible nature of the Excel-based calculation tool should allow adaption to the respective legal and organizational demands of different countries. After 8 years of experience with this calculation, we report the generalizable key aspects which may help physicians all around the world to justify realistic workload-oriented personnel staffing needs.

  3. Benefits of High-Intensity Intensive Care Unit Physician Staffing under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Logani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act signed into law by President Obama, with its value-based purchasing program, is designed to link payment to quality processes and outcomes. Treatment of critically ill patients represents nearly 1% of the gross domestic product and 25% of a typical hospital budget. Data suggest that high-intensity staffing patterns in the intensive care unit (ICU are associated with cost savings and improved outcomes. We evaluate the literature investigating the cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of high-intensity ICU physician staffing as recommended by The Leapfrog Group (a consortium of companies that purchase health care for their employees and identify ways to overcome barriers to nationwide implementation of these standards. Hospitals that have implemented the Leapfrog initiative have demonstrated reductions in mortality and length of stay and increased cost savings. High-intensity staffing models appear to be an immediate cost-effective way for hospitals to meet the challenges of health care reform.

  4. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

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    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of a physician-staffed helicopter on outcome in patients admitted to a stroke unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Rasmussen, Lars S.; Lohse, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transportation by helicopter may reduce time to hospital admission and improve outcome. We aimed to investigate the effect of transport mode on mortality, disability, and labour market affiliation in patients admitted to the stroke unit. Methods: Prospective, observational study with 5...... patients. Primary outcome was long-term mortality after admission to the stroke unit. Results: Of the 1679 patients admitted to the stroke unit, 1068 were eligible for inclusion. Mortality rates were 9.04 per 100 person-years at risk (PYR) in GEMS patients and 9.71 per 100 PYR in HEMS patients (IRR = 1...... for neurological outcome is probably difficult to detect by considering mortality, but for the secondary analyses we had less statistical power as illustrated by the wide confidence intervals. Conclusion: Helicopter transport of stroke patients was not associated with reduced mortality or disability, nor improved...

  6. Medical staffing in Ontario neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, B; Mitchell, A; Hunsberger, M; Blatz, S; Watts, J; Dent, P; Sinclair, J; Southwell, D

    1989-06-01

    Advances in technology have improved the survival rates of infants of low birth weight. Increasing service commitments together with cutbacks in Canadian training positions have caused concerns about medical staffing in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Ontario. To determine whether an imbalance exists between the supply of medical personnel and the demand for health care services, in July 1985 we surveyed the medical directors, head nurses and staff physicians of nine tertiary level NICUs and the directors of five postgraduate pediatric residency programs. On the basis of current guidelines recommending an ideal neonatologist:patient ratio of 1:6 (assuming an adequate number of support personnel) most of the NICUs were understaffed. Concern about the heavy work pattern and resulting lifestyle implications has made Canadian graduates reluctant to enter this subspecialty. We propose strategies to correct staffing shortages in the context of rapidly increasing workloads resulting from a continuing cutback of pediatric residency positions and restrictions on immigration of foreign trainees.

  7. Prehospital interventions before and after implementation of a physician-staffed helicopter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Asger; Wulffeld, Sandra; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Implementation of a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) in eastern Denmark was associated with increased survival for severely injured patients. This study aimed to assess the potential impact of advanced prehospital interventions by comparing the proportion...

  8. Improving Staffing and Nurse Engagement in a Neuroscience Intermediate Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolski, Charles; Britt, Pheraby; Ramos, Leah C

    2017-06-01

    The neuroscience intermediate unit is a 23-bed unit that was initially staffed with a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:4 to 1:5. In time, the unit's capacity to care for the exceeding number of progressively acute patients fell short of the desired goals in the staff affecting the nurse satisfaction. The clinical nurses desired a lower nurse-patient ratio. The purpose of this project was to justify a staffing increase through a return on investment and increased quality metrics. This initiative used mixed methodology to determine the ideal staffing for a neuroscience intermediate unit. The quantitative section focused on a review of the acuity of the patients. The qualitative section was based on descriptive interviews with University Healthcare Consortium nurse managers from similar units. The study reviewed the acuity of 9,832 patient days to determine the accurate acuity of neuroscience intermediate unit patients. Nurse managers at 12 University Healthcare Consortium hospitals and 8 units at the Medical University of South Carolina were contacted to compare staffing levels. The increase in nurse staffing contributed to an increase in many quality metrics. There were an 80% decrease in controllable nurse turnover and a 75% reduction in falls with injury after the lowered nurse-patient ratio. These 2 metrics established a return on investment for the staffing increase. In addition, the staffing satisfaction question on the Press Ganey employee engagement survey increased from 2.44 in 2013 to 3.72 in 2015 in response to the advocacy of the bedside nurses.

  9. Impact of a physician-staffed helicopter on a regional trauma system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselfeldt, R; Steinmetz, J; Jans, H

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to compare the trauma system before and after implementing a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (PS-HEMS). Our hypothesis was that PS-HEMS would reduce time from injury to definitive care for severely injured patients.......This study aims to compare the trauma system before and after implementing a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (PS-HEMS). Our hypothesis was that PS-HEMS would reduce time from injury to definitive care for severely injured patients....

  10. Quality of life following trauma before and after implementation of a physician-staffed helicopter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Rasmussen, L.S.; Hesselfeldt, R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implementation of a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (PS-HEMS) in Denmark was associated with lower 30-day mortality in severely injured trauma patients and less time on social subsidy. However, the reduced 30-day mortality in severely injured patients might...... be at the expense of a worse functional outcome and quality of life (QoL) in those who survive. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a physician-staffed helicopter on long-term QoL in trauma patients. METHODS: Prospective, observational study including trauma patients who survived at least 3 years...

  11. Comparison of nurse staffing based on changes in unit-level workload associated with patient churn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ronda G; Bobay, Kathleen L; Jolly, Nicholas A; Suby, Chrysmarie

    2015-04-01

    This analysis compares the staffing implications of three measures of nurse staffing requirements: midnight census, turnover adjustment based on length of stay, and volume of admissions, discharges and transfers. Midnight census is commonly used to determine registered nurse staffing. Unit-level workload increases with patient churn, the movement of patients in and out of the nursing unit. Failure to account for patient churn in staffing allocation impacts nurse workload and may result in adverse patient outcomes. Secondary data analysis of unit-level data from 32 hospitals, where nursing units are grouped into three unit-type categories: intensive care, intermediate care, and medical surgical. Midnight census alone did not account adequately for registered nurse workload intensity associated with patient churn. On average, units were staffed with a mixture of registered nurses and other nursing staff not always to budgeted levels. Adjusting for patient churn increases nurse staffing across all units and shifts. Use of the discharges and transfers adjustment to midnight census may be useful in adjusting RN staffing on a shift basis to account for patient churn. Nurse managers should understand the implications to nurse workload of various methods of calculating registered nurse staff requirements. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A consensus-based template for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Andreas J; Lockey, David; Kurola, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    -staffed pre-hospital services in Europe. METHODS: Using predefined criteria, we recruited sixteen European experts in the field of pre-hospital care. These experts were guided through a four-step modified nominal group technique. The process was carried out using both e-mail-based communication and a plenary...... have established a core data set for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services. We believe that this template could facilitate future studies within the field and facilitate standardised reporting and future shared research efforts in advanced pre-hospital care....

  13. Implementation of a mechanical CPR device in a physician staffed HEMS - a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Simon; Strapazzon, Giacomo; Brodmann, Monika; Fop, Ernst; Masoner, Christian; Rauch, Lydia; Forti, Alessandro; Pietsch, Urs; Mair, Peter; Brugger, Hermann

    2018-04-28

    In this prospective, observational study we describe the incidence and characteristics of out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) cases who received mechanical CPR, after the implementation of a mechanical CPR device (LUCAS 2; Physio Control, Redmond, WA, USA) in a physician staffed helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) in South Tyrol, Italy. During the study period (06/2013-04/2016), 525 OHCA cases were registered by the dispatch centre, 271 (51.6%) were assisted by HEMS. LUCAS 2 was applied in 18 (6.6%) of all HEMS-assisted OHCA patients; ten were treated with LUCAS 2 at the scene only, and eight were transported to hospital with ongoing CPR. Two (11.1%) of the 18 patients survived long term with full neurologic recovery. In seven of eight patients transferred to hospital with ongoing CPR, CPR was ceased in the emergency room without further intervention. Retrospectively, all HEMS-assisted OHCA cases were screened for proposed indication criteria for prolonged CPR. Thirteen patients fulfilled these criteria, but only two of them were transported to hospital. Based on these results, we propose a standard operating procedure for HEMS-assisted patients with refractory OHCA in a region without hospitals with ECLS capacity.

  14. Physician staffed helicopter emergency medical service dispatch via centralised control or directly by crew – case identification rates and effect on the Sydney paediatric trauma system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garner Alan A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe paediatric trauma patients benefit from direct transport to dedicated Paediatric Trauma Centres (PTC. Parallel case identification systems utilising paramedics from a centralised dispatch centre versus the crew of a physician staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS allowed comparison of the two systems for case identification rates and subsequent timeliness of direct transfer to a PTC. Methods Paediatric trauma patients over a two year period from the Sydney region with an Injury Severity Score (ISS > 15 were retrospectively identified from a state wide trauma registry. Overall paediatric trauma system performance was assessed by comparisons of the availability of the physician staffed HEMS for patient characteristics, transport mode (direct versus indirect and the times required for the patient to arrive at the paediatric trauma centre. The proportion of patients transported directly to a PTC was compared between the times that the HEMS service was available versus the time that it was unavailable to determine if the HEMS system altered the rate of direct transport to a PTC. Analysis of variance was used to compare the identifying systems for various patient characteristics when the HEMS was available. Results Ninety nine cases met the inclusion criteria, 44 when the HEMS system was operational. Patients identified for physician response by the HEMS system were significantly different to those that were not identified with higher median ISS (25 vs 18, p = 0.011, and shorter times to PTC (67 vs 261mins, p = 0.015 and length of intensive care unit stays (2 vs 0 days, p = 0.045. Of the 44 cases, 21 were not identified, 3 were identified by the paramedic system and 20 were identified by the HEMS system, (P  Conclusions Physician staffed HEMS crew dispatch is significantly more likely to identify cases of severe paediatric trauma and is associated with a greater proportion of transports

  15. Factors Influencing Quality of Pain Management in a Physician Staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Nicole; Kaserer, Alexander; Albrecht, Roland; Seifert, Burkhardt; Tissi, Mario; Spahn, Donat R; Maurer, Konrad; Stein, Philipp

    2017-07-01

    Pain is frequently encountered in the prehospital setting and needs to be treated quickly and sufficiently. However, incidences of insufficient analgesia after prehospital treatment by emergency medical services are reported to be as high as 43%. The purpose of this analysis was to identify modifiable factors in a specific emergency patient cohort that influence the pain suffered by patients when admitted to the hospital. For that purpose, this retrospective observational study included all patients with significant pain treated by a Swiss physician-staffed helicopter emergency service between April and October 2011 with the following characteristics to limit selection bias: Age > 15 years, numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain documented at the scene and at hospital admission, NRS > 3 at the scene, initial Glasgow coma scale > 12, and National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics score helicopter emergency service associated with insufficient pain management. A total of 778 patients were included in the analysis. Insufficient pain management (NRS > 3 at hospital admission) was identified in 298 patients (38%). Factors associated with insufficient pain management were higher National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics scores, high NRS at the scene, nontrauma patients, no analgesic administration, and treatment by a female physician. In 16% (128 patients), despite ongoing pain, no analgesics were administered. Factors associated with this untreated persisting pain were short time at the scene (below 10 minutes), secondary missions of helicopter emergency service, moderate pain at the scene, and nontrauma patients. Sufficient management of severe pain is significantly better if ketamine is combined with an opioid (65%), compared to a ketamine or opioid monotherapy (46%, P = .007). In the studied specific Swiss cohort, nontrauma patients, patients on secondary missions, patients treated only for a short time at the scene before transport, patients who receive no

  16. Nurse staffing patterns and hospital efficiency in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Nuchols, B A

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory study was to assess the effects of four nurse staffing patterns on the efficiency of patient care delivery in the hospital: registered nurses (RNs) from temporary agencies; part-time career RNs; RN rich skill mix; and organizationally experienced RNs. Using Transaction Cost Analysis, four regression models were specified to consider the effect of these staffing plans on personnel and benefit costs and on non-personnel operating costs. A number of additional variables were also included in the models to control for the effect of other organization and environmental determinants of hospital costs. Use of career part-time RNs and experienced staff reduced both personnel and benefit costs, as well as total non-personnel operating costs, while the use of temporary agencies for RNs increased non-personnel operating costs. An RN rich skill mix was not related to either measure of hospital costs. These findings provide partial support of the theory. Implications of our findings for future research on hospital management are discussed.

  17. Nurses' perceptions of critical issues requiring consideration in the development of guidelines for professional registered nurse staffing for perinatal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Lyndon, Audrey; Wilson, Jane; Ruhl, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To solicit input from registered nurse members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) on critical considerations for review and revision of existing nurse staffing guidelines. Thematic analysis of responses to a cross-sectional on-line survey question: "Please give the staffing task force your input on what they should consider in the development of recommendations for staffing of perinatal units." Members of AWHONN (N = 884). Descriptions of staffing concerns that should be considered when evaluating and revising existing perinatal nurse staffing guidelines. Consistent themes identified included the need for revision of nurse staffing guidelines due to requirements for safe care, increases in patient acuity and complexity, invisibility of the fetus and newborn as separate and distinct patients, difficulties in providing comprehensive care during labor and for mother-baby couplets under current conditions, challenges in staffing small volume units, and the negative effect of inadequate staffing on nurse satisfaction and retention. Participants overwhelmingly indicated current nurse staffing guidelines were inadequate to meet the needs of contemporary perinatal clinical practice and required revision based on significant changes that had occurred since 1983 when the original staffing guidelines were published. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  18. Physician staffed helicopter emergency medical service dispatch via centralised control or directly by crew - case identification rates and effect on the Sydney paediatric trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Alan A; Lee, Anna; Weatherall, Andrew

    2012-12-18

    Severe paediatric trauma patients benefit from direct transport to dedicated Paediatric Trauma Centres (PTC). Parallel case identification systems utilising paramedics from a centralised dispatch centre versus the crew of a physician staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) allowed comparison of the two systems for case identification rates and subsequent timeliness of direct transfer to a PTC. Paediatric trauma patients over a two year period from the Sydney region with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 were retrospectively identified from a state wide trauma registry. Overall paediatric trauma system performance was assessed by comparisons of the availability of the physician staffed HEMS for patient characteristics, transport mode (direct versus indirect) and the times required for the patient to arrive at the paediatric trauma centre. The proportion of patients transported directly to a PTC was compared between the times that the HEMS service was available versus the time that it was unavailable to determine if the HEMS system altered the rate of direct transport to a PTC. Analysis of variance was used to compare the identifying systems for various patient characteristics when the HEMS was available. Ninety nine cases met the inclusion criteria, 44 when the HEMS system was operational. Patients identified for physician response by the HEMS system were significantly different to those that were not identified with higher median ISS (25 vs 18, p = 0.011), and shorter times to PTC (67 vs 261mins, p = 0.015) and length of intensive care unit stays (2 vs 0 days, p = 0.045). Of the 44 cases, 21 were not identified, 3 were identified by the paramedic system and 20 were identified by the HEMS system, (P system was available (RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.20-2.73). The median time (minutes) to arrival at the PTC was shorter when HEMS available (HEMS available 92, IQR 50-261 versus HEMS unavailable 296, IQR 84-583, P < 0.01). Physician staffed

  19. [Differences in practice among physicians staffing an emergency department in relation to years of experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, Pablo; Inchaurza, Estibaliz; Illarramendi, Aiora; Urbina, Ohiana; González, Laura; Miró, Òscar

    2015-06-01

    To determine differences in certain variables reflecting clinical practice in a group of emergency physicians with varying levels of experience and to explore whether differences are associated with experience. Retrospective observational study of differences in variables reflecting emergency physicians' practice between 2005 and 2012. We studied work variables (months worked, patients treated, caseload distribution according to triage levels), patient management variables (consultation with other specialists, admissions, ambulance requests), diagnostic procedures ordered (simple radiographs, laboratory tests, ultrasound or computed tomography imaging), and time patients discharged home spent in the department (arrival to discharge). We explored relationships between these variables and the emergency physician's experience using linear regression analysis, followed by the construction of multivariable models to adjust for physician characteristics. Data for 50 emergency medicine physicians, in 291 years of work, were analyzed. The specialists' experience ranged from 1 to 22 years (mean [SD], 9.5 [5.8] years). They attended between 47 and 158 patients monthly (mean, 86 [19] patients). The physicians' experience was inversely and independently related to the mean number of patients attended monthly and the percentage of patients assigned a triage level of 1 or 2. Experience was directly and independently related to discharged patients' time spent in the emergency department and number of simple radiographs ordered. All associations were small (R2<0.010), however. Those variables continued to show statistically significant associations after increasingly complex modeling to adjust for the following physician variables: physician, age, sex, specialty, residency training in the same hospital). The practice of emergency physicians with more accumulated experience shows slight but significant differences from the practice of less experienced physicians.

  20. Airway management by physician-staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Services - a prospective, multicentre, observational study of 2,327 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, Geir Arne; Heltne, Jon-Kenneth; Lockey, David; Burns, Brian; Sandberg, Mårten; Fredriksen, Knut; Hufthammer, Karl Ove; Soti, Akos; Lyon, Richard; Jäntti, Helena; Kämäräinen, Antti; Reid, Bjørn Ole; Silfvast, Tom; Harm, Falko; Sollid, Stephen J M

    2015-08-07

    Despite numerous studies on prehospital airway management, results are difficult to compare due to inconsistent or heterogeneous data. The objective of this study was to assess advanced airway management from international physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical services. We collected airway data from 21 helicopter emergency medical services in Australia, England, Finland, Hungary, Norway and Switzerland over a 12-month period. A uniform Utstein-style airway template was used for collecting data. The participating services attended 14,703 patients on primary missions during the study period, and 2,327 (16 %) required advanced prehospital airway interventions. Of these, tracheal intubation was attempted in 92 % of the cases. The rest were managed with supraglottic airway devices (5 %), bag-valve-mask ventilation (2 %) or continuous positive airway pressure (0.2 %). Intubation failure rates were 14.5 % (first-attempt) and 1.2 % (overall). Cardiac arrest patients showed significantly higher first-attempt intubation failure rates (odds ratio: 2.0; 95 % CI: 1.5-2.6; p < 0.001) compared to non-cardiac arrest patients. Complications were recorded in 13 %, with recognised oesophageal intubation being the most frequent (25 % of all patients with complications). For non-cardiac arrest patients, important risk predictors for first-attempt failure were patient age (a non-linear association) and administration of sedatives (reduced failure risk). The patient's sex, provider's intubation experience, trauma type (patient category), indication for airway intervention and use of neuromuscular blocking agents were not risk factors for first-attempt intubation failure. Advanced airway management in physician-staffed prehospital services was performed frequently, with high intubation success rates and low complication rates overall. However, cardiac arrest patients showed significantly higher first-attempt failure rates compared to non-cardiac arrest patients. All

  1. [Model to predict staffing for anesthesiology and post-anesthesia intensive care units and pain clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, J; Moral, V; Villalonga, A; Pelegrí, D; Gomar, C; Montero, A

    2001-01-01

    Human resources account for a large part of the budgets of anesthesia and post-anesthesia intensive care units and pain clinics (A-PICU-PC). Adequate staffing is a key factor in providing for both effective care and professional staff development. Changes in professional responsibilities have rendered obsolete the concept of one anesthesiologist per operating room. Duties must be analyzed objectively to facilitate understanding between hospital administrators and A-PICU-PC chiefs of service when assigning human resources. The Catalan Society of Anesthesiology, Post-anesthesia Intensive Care and Pain Therapy has developed a model for estimating requirements for A-PICU-PC staffing based on three factors: 1) Definition of staff positions that must be filled and criteria for assigning human resources; 2) Estimation of non-care-related time required by the department for training, teaching, research and internal management, and 3) Estimation of staff required to cover absences from work for vacations, personal leave or illness. The model revealed that the ratio of number of staff positions to number of persons employed by an A-PICU-PC is approximately 1.3. Differences in the nature of services managed by an A-PICU-PC or the type of hospital might change the ratio slightly. The model can be applied universally, independently of differences that might exist among departments. Widespread application would allow adoption of a common language to be used by health care managers and A-PICU-PC departments when discussing a basis for consensus about our specialty.

  2. Variation in cancer surgical outcomes associated with physician and nurse staffing: a retrospective observational study using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunaga Hideo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effects of professional staffing on cancer surgical outcomes. The present study aimed to investigate the association between cancer surgical outcomes and physician/nurse staffing in relation to hospital volume. Methods We analyzed 131,394 patients undergoing lung lobectomy, esophagectomy, gastrectomy, colorectal surgery, hepatectomy or pancreatectomy for cancer between July and December, 2007–2008, using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database linked to the Survey of Medical Institutions data. Physician-to-bed ratio (PBR and nurse-to-bed ratio (NBR were determined for each hospital. Hospital volume was categorized into low, medium and high for each of six cancer surgeries. Failure to rescue (FTR was defined as a proportion of inhospital deaths among those with postoperative complications. Multi-level logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between physician/nurse staffing and FTR, adjusting for patient characteristics and hospital volume. Results Overall inhospital mortality was 1.8%, postoperative complication rate was 15.2%, and FTR rate was 11.9%. After adjustment for hospital volume, FTR rate in the group with high PBR (≥19.7 physicians per 100 beds and high NBR (≥77.0 nurses per 100 beds was significantly lower than that in the group with low PBR ( Conclusions Well-staffed hospitals confer a benefit for cancer surgical patients regarding reduced FTR, irrespective of hospital volume. These results suggest that consolidation of surgical centers linked with migration of medical professionals may improve the quality of cancer surgical management.

  3. Strategic foresight, leadership, and the future of rural healthcare staffing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers-Hild, Connie

    2018-05-01

    This article uses a strategic foresight tool, megatrends, to examine forces influencing long-term healthcare staffing in the rural United States. Two megatrends-exponential advances in science and technology and the continued evolution of the decentralized global marketplace-will influence and ultimately help shape the future of rural healthcare. Successful health ecosystems of the future will need to be customer-driven, more affordable, and tech-savvy. Successful evolution in an era of continuous change will require a blend of intentional engagement with stakeholders, strategic foresight, and future-focused leadership. More research is needed to fully understand not only the challenges of rural healthcare but also the emerging opportunities.

  4. Animated Simulation: Determining Cost Effective Nurse Staffing for an Acute Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-19

    Rate - Unscheduled Physician Visits Post- - Decubitus Ulcer Rate Discharge - Nosocomial Infection Rate (total) - Patient Knowledge of Disease...Condition - Nosocomial Urinary Tract Infection Rate and Care Requirements - Nosocomial Pneumonia Rate - Nosocomial Surgical Wound Infection Rate PROCESS...Nagaprasanna, 1988). A maternity unit at Bristol Hospital displayed dissatisfaction with their patient classification system. They found the patient

  5. Neuroscience Intermediate-Level Care Units Staffed by Intensivists: Clinical Outcomes and Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeremanteng, Kwadwo; Hendin, Ariel; Bhardwaj, Kalpana; Thavorn, Kednapa; Neilipovitz, Dave; Kubelik, Dalibour; D'Egidio, Gianni; Stotts, Grant; Rosenberg, Erin

    2017-01-01

    With an aging population and increasing numbers of intensive care unit admissions, novel ways of providing quality care at reduced cost are required. Closed neurointensive care units improve outcomes for patients with critical neurological conditions, including decreased mortality and length of stay (LOS). Small studies have demonstrated the safety of intermediate-level units for selected patient populations. However, few studies analyze both cost and safety outcomes of these units. This retrospective study assessed clinical and cost-related outcomes in an intermediate-level neurosciences acute care unit (NACU) before and after the addition of an intensivist to the unit's care team. Starting in October 2011, an intensivist-led model was adopted in a 16-bed NACU unit, including daytime coverage by a dedicated intensivist. Data were obtained from all patients admitted 1 year prior to and 2 years after this intervention. Primary outcomes were LOS and hospital costs. Safety outcomes included mortality and readmissions. Descriptive and analytic statistics were calculated. Individual and total patient costs were calculated based on per-day NACU and ward cost estimates and significance measured using bootstrapping. A total of 2931 patients were included over the study period. Patients were on average 59.5 years and 53% male. The most common reasons for admission were central nervous system (CNS) tumor (27.6%), ischemic stroke (27%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (11%). Following the introduction of an intensivist, there was a significant reduction in NACU and hospital LOS, by 1 day and 3 days, respectively. There were no differences in readmissions or mortality. Adding an intensivist produced an individual cost savings of US$963 in NACU and US$2687 per patient total hospital stay. An intensivist-led model of intermediate-level neurointensive care staffed by intensivists is safe, decreases LOS, and produces cost savings in a system increasingly strained to provide quality

  6. Costs, Staffing, and Services of Assisted Living in the United States: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisling-Rundgren, Amy; Paul, David P; Coustasse, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Assisted-living facilities (ALFs), which provide a community for residents who require assistance throughout their day, are an important part of the long-term-care system in the United States. The costs of ALFs are paid either out of pocket, by Medicaid, or by long-term-care insurance. Monthly costs of ALFs have increased over the past 5 years on an average of 4.1%. The purpose of this research was to examine the future trends in ALFs in the United States to determine the impact of health care on costs. The methodology for this study was a literature review, and a total of 32 sources were referenced. Trends in monthly costs of ALFs have increased from 2004 to 2014. Within the past 5 years, there has been an increase on average of 4.1% in assisted-living costs. Medicaid is one payer for residents of ALFs, whereas another alternative is the use of long-term-care insurance. Unfortunately, Medicare does not pay for ALFs. Staffing concerns in ALFs are limited because of each state having different rules and regulations. Turnover and retention rates of nurses in ALFs are suggested to be high, whereas vacancy rate for nurses is suggested to be lower. The baby-boomer generation can be one contribution to the increase in costs. Over the years, there has been an increase in Alzheimer disease, which has had also an effect on cost in ALFs.

  7. Factors that guide nurse managers regarding the staffing of agency nurses in intensive care units at private hospitals in Pretoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karien Jooste

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Staffing needs affect the nursing department’s budget, staff productivity, the quality of care provided to patients and even the retention of nurses. It is unclear how the role players (the nursing agency manager, the nurse manager and the agency nurse perceive the staffing of agency nurses in intensive care units (ICUs. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the factors that guide nurse managers regarding the staffing of agency nurses in ICUs at private hospitals in Pretoria. A quantitative exploratory and descriptive design was used. A survey by means of a structured questionnaire was carried out. Probability sampling was implemented to obtain a study sample (n = 124. One similar self-administered 5-point scale instrument was completed by the participants. Data was analysed by means of descriptive and inferential statistics. The principles of validity and reliability were adhered to and ethical considerations were also taken into account. The results indicated limitations in the determining of posts, recruitment and advertising, as well as the selection and appointment of agency nurses in ICUs at private hospitals in Pretoria. Recommendations on staffing are made to nurse managers in ICUs.

  8. Factors that guide nurse managers regarding the staffing of agency nurses in intensive care units at private hospitals in Pretoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karien Jooste

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staffing needs affect the nursing department’s budget, staff productivity, the quality of care provided to patients and even the retention of nurses. It is unclear how the role players (the nursing agency manager, the nurse manager and the agency nurse perceive the staffing of agency nurses in intensive care units (ICUs. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the factors that guide nurse managers regarding the staffing of agency nurses in ICUs at private hospitals in Pretoria. A quantitative exploratory and descriptive design was used. A survey by means of a structured questionnaire was carried out. Probability sampling was implemented to obtain a study sample (n = 124. One similar self-administered 5-point scale instrument was completed by the participants. Data was analysed by means of descriptive and inferential statistics. The principles of validity and reliability were adhered to and ethical considerations were also taken into account. The results indicated limitations in the determining of posts, recruitment and advertising, as well as the selection and appointment of agency nurses in ICUs at private hospitals in Pretoria. Recommendations on staffing are made to nurse managers in ICUs.

  9. Economic Feasibility of Staffing the Intensive Care Unit with a Communication Facilitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Nita; Benkeser, David; Coe, Norma B; Engelberg, Ruth A; Curtis, J Randall

    2016-12-01

    In the intensive care unit (ICU), complex decision making by clinicians and families requires good communication to ensure that care is consistent with the patients' values and goals. To assess the economic feasibility of staffing ICUs with a communication facilitator. Data were from a randomized trial of an "ICU communication facilitator" linked to hospital financial records; eligible patients (n = 135) were admitted to the ICU at a single hospital with predicted mortality ≥30% and a surrogate decision maker. Adjusted regression analyses assessed differences in ICU total and direct variable costs between intervention and control patients. A bootstrap-based simulation assessed the cost efficiency of a facilitator while varying the full-time equivalent of the facilitator and the ICU mortality risk. Total ICU costs (mean 22.8k; 95% CI, -42.0k to -3.6k; P = 0.02) and average daily ICU costs (mean, -0.38k; 95% CI, -0.65k to -0.11k; P = 0.006)] were reduced significantly with the intervention. Despite more contacts, families of survivors spent less time per encounter with facilitators than did families of decedents (mean, 25 [SD, 11] min vs. 36 [SD, 14] min). Simulation demonstrated maximal weekly savings with a 1.0 full-time equivalent facilitator and a predicted ICU mortality of 15% (total weekly ICU cost savings, $58.4k [95% CI, $57.7k-59.2k]; weekly direct variable savings, $5.7k [95% CI, $5.5k-5.8k]) after incorporating facilitator costs. Adding a full-time trained communication facilitator in the ICU may improve the quality of care while simultaneously reducing short-term (direct variable) and long-term (total) health care costs. This intervention is likely to be more cost effective in a lower-mortality population.

  10. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident duty hour new standards: history, changes, and impact on staffing of intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastores, Stephen M; O'Connor, Michael F; Kleinpell, Ruth M; Napolitano, Lena; Ward, Nicholas; Bailey, Heatherlee; Mollenkopf, Fred P; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently released new standards for supervision and duty hours for residency programs. These new standards, which will affect over 100,000 residents, take effect in July 2011. In response to these new guidelines, the Society of Critical Care Medicine convened a task force to develop a white paper on the impact of changes in resident duty hours on the critical care workforce and staffing of intensive care units. A multidisciplinary group of professionals with expertise in critical care education and clinical practice. Relevant medical literature was accessed through a systematic MEDLINE search and by requesting references from all task force members. Material published by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and other specialty organizations was also reviewed. Collaboratively and iteratively, the task force corresponded by electronic mail and held several conference calls to finalize this report. The new rules mandate that all first-year residents work no more than 16 hrs continuously, preserving the 80-hr limit on the resident workweek and 10-hr period between duty periods. More senior trainees may work a maximum of 24 hrs continuously, with an additional 4 hrs permitted for handoffs. Strategic napping is strongly suggested for trainees working longer shifts. Compliance with the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour standards will compel workflow restructuring in intensive care units, which depend on residents to provide a substantial portion of care. Potential solutions include expanded utilization of nurse practitioners and physician assistants, telemedicine, offering critical care training positions to emergency medicine residents, and partnerships with hospitalists. Additional research will be necessary to evaluate the impact of the new standards on patient safety, continuity of care, resident learning, and staffing in the intensive care unit.

  11. The Staffing Policies of Swedish Companies at their Chinese Production Units

    OpenAIRE

    Dolinska, Nina; Hrlovic, Dzenita; Swane, Katarina

    2006-01-01

    Increasing production costs and high pressure from the consumers are leading Swedish companies towards an expansion to China. Since more and more companies are moving their production, we found it interesting to study the problems they might encounter while employing personnel. The purpose of this dissertation is to analyse what staffing policies companies choose and variables that influence the decision at Swedish production plants in China. Ethnocentric, polycentric and geocentric polic...

  12. Contraceptive use by female physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, E

    1999-11-01

    Little is known about female physicians' personal contraceptive use, and such usage could influence their prescribing patterns. We used data from the Women Physicians' Health Study, a large (n = 4501) national study, administered in 1993-1994, on characteristics of female physicians in the United States. These female physicians (ages 30-44 years) were more likely to use contraception than women in the general population (ages 15-44 years); this was true even when the physicians were compared with only other women of high socioeconomic status and when stratified by ethnicity, age, and number of children. Physicians were also more likely to use intrauterine devices, diaphragms, or condoms, and less likely to use female or male sterilization than were other women. Younger female physicians were especially unlikely to use permanent methods, particularly when compared with their age-matched counterparts in the general population. One fifth of contracepting physicians used more than one type of contraceptive; the most frequently used combination was spermicide with a barrier method. Female physicians contracept differently than do women in the general population, in ways consistent with delaying and reducing total fertility. Physicians' personal characteristics have been shown to influence their patient counseling practices, including their contraception-related attitudes and practices. Although female physicians' clinical advice might differ from their personal practices, as women physicians become more prevalent, their contraceptive choices could influence those of their patients.

  13. Staffing in postnatal units: is it adequate for the provision of quality care? Staff perspectives from a state-wide review of postnatal care in Victoria, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumley Judith

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background State-wide surveys of recent mothers conducted over the past decade in Victoria, one state of Australia, have identified that women are consistently less satisfied with the care they received in hospital following birth compared with other aspects of maternity care. Little is known of caregivers' perspectives on the provision ofhospital postnatal care: how care is organised and provided in different hospitals; what constrains the provision of postnatal care (apart from funding and what initiatives are being undertaken to improve service delivery. A state-widereview of organisational structures and processes in relation to the provision of hospital postnatal care in Victoria was undertaken. This paper focuses on the impact of staffing issues on the provision of quality postnatal care from the perspective of care providers. Methods A study of care providers from Victorian public hospitals that provide maternity services was undertaken. Datawere collected in two stages. Stage one: a structured questionnaire was sent to all public hospitals in Victoria that provided postnatal care (n = 73, exploring the structure and organisation of care (e.g. staffing, routine observations, policy framework and discharge planning. Stage two: 14 maternity units were selected and invited to participate in a more in-depth exploration of postnatal care. Thirty-eight key informant interviews were undertaken with midwives (including unit managers, associate unit managers and clinical midwives and a medical practitioner from eachselected hospital. Results Staffing was highlighted as a major factor impacting on the provision of quality postnatal care. There were significant issues associated with inadequate staff/patient ratios; staffing mix; patient mix; prioritisation of birth suites over postnatal units; and the use of non-permanent staff. Forty-three percent of hospitals reported having only midwives (i.e. no non-midwives providing postnatal care

  14. A survey of nurse staffing levels in interventional radiology units throughout the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, A.; Robertson, I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To supplement previous surveys analysing provision of interventional radiology (IR), in-hours (IH) and out-of-hours (OOH), by specifically surveying the level of nursing support provided. Materials and methods: A web-based questionnaire was distributed to all British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) members. This addressed several aspects of radiology nursing support for IR procedures, both IH and OOH. Results: Sixty percent of respondents indicated that they have a formal OOH service. Of these, all have a dedicated nursing rota, with the vast majority operating with one nurse. IH, 77% of respondents always have a scrubbed nurse assistant, but this reduces to 40% OOH. IH, 4% never have a scrubbed radiology nurse assistant, which rises to 25% OOH. IH, 75% of respondents always have a radiology nurse dedicated to patient monitoring, but this reduces to 20% OOH. IH, 3% never have a radiology nurse dedicated to patient monitoring, which rises to 42% OOH. Conclusion: A significant disparity exists in the level of IR nursing support between IH and OOH. The majority of sites provide a single nurse with ad hoc additional support. This is potentially putting patients at increased risk. Radiology nurses are integral to the safe and sustainable provision of IR OOH services and a greater focus is required to ensure adequate and safe staffing levels for 24/7 IR services. - Highlights: • A significant disparity exists between the level of nursing support provided in-hours and OOH. • This applies to both the availability of a nurse to scrub and to monitor the patient. • Having a dedicated 24/7 nursing rota is mandatory to providing a deliverable OOH service.

  15. Effective Staffing Takes a Village: Creating the Staffing Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavigan, Margaret; Fitzpatrick, Therese A; Miserendino, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The traditional approaches to staffing and scheduling are often ineffective in assuring sufficient budgeting and deployment of staff to assure the right nurse at the right time for the right cost. As hospital merger activity increases, this exercise is further complicated by the need to rationalize staffing across multiple enterprises and standardize systems and processes. This Midwest hospital system successfully optimized staffing at the unit and enterprise levels by utilizing operations research methodologies. Savings were reinvested to improve staffing models which provided sufficient nonproductive coverage and patient-driven ratios. Over/under-staffing was eliminated in support of the system's recognition that adequate resource planning and deployment are critical to the culture of safety.

  16. Design studies on staffing requirements for the new generation nuclear power units of WWER-640 and BN-800 reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovyov, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper outlines the main staffing requirements for the new generation power units with nuclear reactors. These requirements were developed taking into account IAEA recommendations. NPP staffing structure is described, including the main and auxiliary personnel. The main principles of personnel number determination are given. Special attention is taken to the issues of personnel skill and training, including both theoretical education and practical work on the power units in operation. The use of simulators, system of knowledge control and structure of training are considered. ''Shopless'' staffing structure approach is proposed for the NPP, assuming that the main scope of repair work is performed by the central repair organization, thus increasing the quality of repair and decreasing the number of personnel on the plant. Data are given on the personnel number for the WWER-640 and the BN-800 reactor designs. Specialists of the ''ATOMENERGOPROJECT'' Institute started their work on staffing on the early development stage of the basic design of WWER-640 reactor power unit which is the forerunner of the new generation reactors. This work was based on the approaches taken by the chief engineers of NPPs in operation during their meeting held in 1989 in Kalinin NPP. At this meeting definite decision was taken on changing over to involving manufacturer in the repair work of NPP components using manufacturer's technology. In 1992 the meeting of representatives of suppliers of the main components was held where representatives of ''ATOMENERGOREMONT'' and ''LENENERGOREMONT'' were present. The suppliers agreed on carrying out repair works on the components they produced. For this purpose special departments were set up having some experience. This repair work is already carried out by ''ATOMENERGOREMONT'' on some nuclear power plants. ''LENENERGOREMONT'' has gained considerable experience in this kind of repair work on the turbines of LO-1 and LO-2 NPP in Finland. Within the

  17. Current staffing personnel and areas of activity of the units of SSPA radio physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angulo Pain, E.; Roldan Arjona, J. M.; Carrasco Rodriguez, J. L.; Guerrero Alcaide, R.; Almansa Lopez, J.; Rodriguez Castillo, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    The work arises from the Andalucia society of hospital Radiophysics as a study of the situation in the year 2012 in Andalusia, in terms of human resources and equipment in charge of services or units clinics of management of Radiophysics of the health public system of Andalusia (SSPA). Clinical management units are organizational structures established by the service Andalucia health (SAS) which are governed by agreements in the area of health care management providing that coverage. (Author)

  18. The cost-effectiveness of physician staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) transport to a major trauma centre in NSW, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Colman; Jan, Stephen; Curtis, Kate; Tzannes, Alex; Li, Qiang; Palmer, Cameron; Dickson, Cara; Myburgh, John

    2012-11-01

    Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) are highly resource-intensive facilities that are well established as part of trauma systems in many high-income countries. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a physician-staffed HEMS intervention in combination with treatment at a major trauma centre versus ground ambulance or indirect transport (via a referral hospital) in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Cost and effectiveness estimates were derived from a cohort of trauma patients arriving at St George Hospital in NSW, Australia during an 11-year period. Adjusted estimates of in-hospital mortality were derived using logistic regression and adjusted hospital costs were estimated through a general linear model incorporating a gamma distribution and log link. These estimates along with other assumptions were incorporated into a Markov model with an annual cycle length to estimate a cost per life saved and a cost per life-year saved at one year and over a patient's lifetime respectively in three patient groups (all patients; patients with serious injury [Injury Severity Score>12]; patients with traumatic brain injury [TBI]). Results showed HEMS to be more costly but more effective at reducing in-hospital mortality leading to a cost per life saved of $1,566,379, $533,781 and $519,787 in all patients, patients with serious injury and patients with TBI respectively. When modelled over a patient's lifetime, the improved mortality associated with HEMS led to a cost per life year saved of $96,524, $50,035 and $49,159 in the three patient groups respectively. Sensitivity analyses revealed a higher probability of HEMS being cost-effective in patients with serious injury and TBI. Our investigation confirms a HEMS intervention is associated with improved mortality in trauma patients, especially in patients with serious injury and TBI. The improved benefit of HEMS in patients with serious injury and TBI leads to improved estimated cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  19. Development, Validation, and Implementation of a Clinic Nurse Staffing Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeken, Debra Jean; Wakefield, Douglas; Kite, Cora; Linebaugh, Jeanette; Mitchell, Blair; Parkinson, Deidre; Misra, Madhukar

    2017-10-01

    Ensuring that the level of nurse staffing used to care for patients is appropriate to the setting and service intensity is essential for high-quality and cost-effective care. This article describes the development, validation, and implementation of the clinic technical skills permission list developed specifically to guide nurse staffing decisions in physician clinics of an academic medical center. Results and lessons learned in using this staffing guideline are presented.

  20. Physician Emigration from Sub-Saharan Africa to the United States: Analysis of the 2011 AMA Physician Masterfile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankwanchi, Akhenaten Benjamin Siankam; Özden, Çağlar; Vermund, Sten H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The large-scale emigration of physicians from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to high-income nations is a serious development concern. Our objective was to determine current emigration trends of SSA physicians found in the physician workforce of the United States. Methods and Findings We analyzed physician data from the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Health Workforce Statistics along with graduation and residency data from the 2011 American Medical Association Physician Masterfile (AMA-PM) on physicians trained or born in SSA countries who currently practice in the US. We estimated emigration proportions, year of US entry, years of practice before emigration, and length of time in the US. According to the 2011 AMA-PM, 10,819 physicians were born or trained in 28 SSA countries. Sixty-eight percent (n = 7,370) were SSA-trained, 20% (n = 2,126) were US-trained, and 12% (n = 1,323) were trained outside both SSA and the US. We estimated active physicians (age ≤70 years) to represent 96% (n = 10,377) of the total. Migration trends among SSA-trained physicians increased from 2002 to 2011 for all but one principal source country; the exception was South Africa whose physician migration to the US decreased by 8% (−156). The increase in last-decade migration was >50% in Nigeria (+1,113) and Ghana (+243), >100% in Ethiopia (+274), and >200% (+244) in Sudan. Liberia was the most affected by migration to the US with 77% (n = 175) of its estimated physicians in the 2011 AMA-PM. On average, SSA-trained physicians have been in the US for 18 years. They practiced for 6.5 years before US entry, and nearly half emigrated during the implementation years (1984–1999) of the structural adjustment programs. Conclusion Physician emigration from SSA to the US is increasing for most SSA source countries. Unless far-reaching policies are implemented by the US and SSA countries, the current emigration trends will persist, and the US will remain a leading

  1. Physicians' perspectives of pharmacist-physician collaboration in the United Arab Emirates: Findings from an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, S; Stewart, K; Chapman, C B; Kong, D C M

    2018-03-28

    Interprofessional collaborative care has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Physicians' views on collaboration with pharmacists give an insight into what contributes to a well-functioning team. Little is known about these views from low and ​middle-income countries and nothing from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The purpose of this study is to investigate physicians' opinions on collaborative relationships with community pharmacists in the UAE. Semi-structured individual interviews and group discussions are conducted with a purposive sample of physicians. Thematic analysis based on the framework approach is used to generate themes. A total of 53 physicians participated. Three themes about collaboration emerged: perceived benefits of collaboration, facilitators of collaboration and perceived barriers to collaboration. Perceived benefits include reducing the burden on physicians, having the pharmacist as an extra safety check within the system, having the pharmacist assist patients to manage their medications: coping with side effects, reducing drug waste and costs, and attaining professional and health-system gains. Perceived facilitators included awareness and trust building, professional role definition, pharmacists' access to patient records and effective communication. Perceived barriers included patient and physician acceptance, logistic and financial issues and perceived pharmacist competence. This study has, for the first time, provided useful information to inform the future development of pharmacist-physician collaboration in the UAE and other countries with similar healthcare systems.

  2. Attitudes toward Suicide: Italian and United States Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, George; Perrone, Luisa

    1993-01-01

    Administered Suicide Opinion Questionnaire to 100 Italian and 100 U.S. physicians, comparable in age, gender, and medical field. Found significant difference on seven of eight scales, with Italian physicians showing greater agreement on mental illness, right to die, religion, impulsivity, normality, aggression, and moral evil scales. Found gender…

  3. Sex differences in physician burnout in the United States and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linzer, Mark; McMurray, Julia E.; Visser, Mechteld R. M.; Oort, Frans J.; Smets, Ellen; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to determine if there are sex differences in physician burnout in the Netherlands and, if not, to explore why they are present in the United States. METHODS: Separate physician surveys were conducted in the United States (n=2326) and the Netherlands (n=1426). Thirty-three percent of US

  4. A Reflection and Comparison of Physician Training in the United States of America and United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit S. Aiyer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available As a final year medical student at the University of Birmingham in England, I am very familiar with the training structure of physicians in the National Health Service (NHS. Recently, I had the opportunity to do 4 months of clinical electives at the University of Massachusetts in Worcester, Massachusetts and Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, New York. This experience allowed me to gain insight on the American training system for medical student graduates that provided a new perspective on physician training. The following reflection will be based on my experiences in the two countries and focus on the working guidelines for junior doctors in the United States that is based on the Accredited Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME Duty Hours protocol, and will be compared to the European Work Time Directive (EWTD guidelines for British junior doctors.

  5. End-of-life care beliefs among Hindu physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Vijaya Sivalingam; Saeed, Fahad; Sinnakirouchenan, Ramapriya; Holley, Jean L; Srinivasan, Sinnakirouchenan

    2015-02-01

    Several studies from the United States and Europe showed that physicians' religiosity is associated with their approach to end-of-life care beliefs. No such studies have focused exclusively on Hindu physicians practicing in the United States. A 34-item questionnaire was sent to 293 Hindu physicians in the United States. Most participants believed that their religious beliefs do not influence their practice of medicine and do not interfere with withdrawal of life support. The US practice of discussing end-of-life issues with the patient, rather than primarily with the family, seems to have been adopted by Hindu physicians practicing in the United States. It is likely that the ethical, cultural, and patient-centered environment of US health care has influenced the practice of end-of-life care by Hindu physicians in this country. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. NURSE STAFFING AND RENAL ANAEMIA OUTCOMES IN HAEMODIALYSIS CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlingmark, Julia; Hedström, Mariann; Lindberg, Magnus

    2016-09-01

    Current trends in renal anaemia management place greater emphasis, and thus increased workload, on the role of the nurse in haemodialysis settings. However, there is little evidence that demonstrates the relationship between nurse staffing and patient outcomes. To describe nurse staffing in haemodialysis settings, its relationship with target levels of renal anaemia management and to describe target level achievement for different ways of organising anaemia management. Cross-sectional audit. Forty (out of 78) haemodialysis centres in Sweden reported quality assurance data. The numbers of bedside registered nurses, licensed nurse assistants and patients undergoing haemodialysis during a predefined morning shift; type of anaemia management and achieved target levels of anaemia management. The mean patient:registered nurse ratio was 2.4 and the mean patient:nurse assistant ratio was 12.8. There were no significant relationships between registered nurse staffing and target level achievement. On average, 45.6% of the patients had haemoglobin within the target levels at centres applying nurse-driven anaemia management, compared with 47.3% at physician-driven centres. These cross-sectional data suggest that renal anaemia outcomes are unrelated to the patient:registered nurse ratio. There is, however, room for improvement in renal anaemia management in the units included in this study, particularly the achievement of target levels of haemoglobin and transferrin saturation. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  7. Patient-care time allocation by nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David L; Gregg, Sara R; Owens, Daniel S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-02-15

    Use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants ("affiliates") is increasing significantly in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite this, few data exist on how affiliates allocate their time in the ICU. The purpose of this study was to understand the allocation of affiliate time into patient-care and non-patient-care activity, further dividing the time devoted to patient care into billable service and equally important but nonbillable care. We conducted a quasi experimental study in seven ICUs in an academic hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. After a period of self-reporting, a one-time monetary incentive of $2,500 was offered to 39 affiliates in each ICU in which every affiliate documented greater than 75% of their time devoted to patient care over a 6-month period in an effort to understand how affiliates allocated their time throughout a shift. Documentation included billable time (critical care, evaluation and management, procedures) and a new category ("zero charge time"), which facilitated record keeping of other patient-care activities. At baseline, no ICUs had documentation of 75% patient-care time by all of its affiliates. In the 6 months in which reporting was tied to a group incentive, six of seven ICUs had every affiliate document greater than 75% of their time. Individual time documentation increased from 53% to 84%. Zero-charge time accounted for an average of 21% of each shift. The most common reason was rounding, which accounted for nearly half of all zero-charge time. Sign out, chart review, and teaching were the next most common zero-charge activities. Documentation of time spent on billable activities also increased from 53% of an affiliate's shift to 63%. Time documentation was similar regardless of during which shift an affiliate worked. Approximately two thirds of an affiliate's shift is spent providing billable services to patients. Greater than 20% of each shift is spent providing equally important but not reimbursable

  8. Attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration: a cross-cultural study of male and female physicians and nurses in the United States and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, M; Nasca, T J; Cohen, M J; Fields, S K; Rattner, S L; Griffiths, M; Ibarra, D; de Gonzalez, A A; Torres-Ruiz, A; Ibarra, G; Garcia, A

    2001-01-01

    Inter-professional collaboration between physicians and nurses, within and between cultures, can help contain cost and insure better patient outcomes. Attitude toward such collaboration is a function of the roles prescribed in the culture that guide professional behavior. The purpose of the study was to test three research hypotheses concerning attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration across genders, disciplines, and cultures. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration was administered to 639 physicians and nurses in the United States (n = 267) and Mexico (n = 372). Attitude scores were compared by gender (men, women), discipline (physicians, nurses), and culture (United States, Mexico) by using a three-way factorial analysis of variance design. Findings confirmed the first research hypothesis by demonstrating that both physicians and nurses in the United States would express more positive attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration than their counterparts in Mexico. The second research hypothesis, positing that nurses as compared to physicians in both countries would express more positive attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration, was also supported. The third research hypothesis that female physicians would express more positive attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration than their male counterparts was not confirmed. Collaborative education for medical and nursing students, particularly in cultures with a hierarchical model of inter-professional relationship, is needed to promote positive attitudes toward complementary roles of physicians and nurses. Faculty preparation for collaboration is necessary in such cultures before implementing collaborative education.

  9. International migration patterns of physicians to the United States: a cross-national panel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Peter S

    2007-12-01

    To analyze the dynamics of physician international migration patterns and identify the countries deviating most from expected migration rates. A negative binomial log-linear model of physician migration to the United States from every other country was constructed using a panel of country-level data for years 1994-2000. The model was used to identify factors associated with physician migration and to identify countries with higher or lower rates of physician migration than expected. Physician migration varied with a country's GDP per capita in an inverse-U pattern, with highest migration rates from middle-income countries. The absence of medical schools, immigrant networks in the United States, medical instruction in English, proximity to the United States, and the lack of political and civil liberties were also associated with higher migration rates. Countries with higher-than-predicted migration rates included Iceland, Albania, Armenia, Dominica, Lebanon, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, and Bulgaria. Countries with lower-than-predicted migration rates included Mexico, Japan, Brazil, Zimbabwe, Mauritania, Portugal, Senegal, and France. This analysis shows that many of the most powerful factors associated with physician migration are difficult or impossible for countries to change through public policy. GDP per capita and proximity to the U.S. are two of the most powerful predictors of physician migration. Networks of immigrants in the U.S. and fewer political and civil liberties also put countries at higher risk for physician emigration. Several other factors that were associated with physician migration might be more easily amenable to policy intervention. These factors include the absence of a medical school and medical instruction in English. Policies addressing these factors would involve making several difficult tradeoffs, however. Other examples of policies that are effective in minimizing physician migration might be found by examining countries with lower

  10. Views of United States Physicians and Members of the American Medical Association House of Delegates on Physician-assisted Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Simon N.; Brown, Byron W.; Brody, Howard; Alcser, Kirsten H.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Greely, Henry T.

    2001-01-01

    Ascertained the views of physicians and physician leaders toward legalization of physician-assisted suicide. Results indicated members of AMA House of Delegates strongly oppose physician-assisted suicide, but rank-and-file physicians show no consensus either for or against its legalization. Although the debate is adversarial, most physicians are…

  11. Analysis of the actual number of physicians in radiotherapy units in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenberger, R.; Witucki, G.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Physician workload directly influences the ability of an institution to provide high standards in radiotherapy services. Materials and Methods: Data of 189 radiotherapy units of the DEGRO survey 2000 complemented and corrected (Table 1) are analyzed with simple and multiple linear regression (models in Table 2). Results: In 21 private radiotherapy facilities actual numbers of physicians split up in 0.19 for every 1,000 megavoltage courses per year, 1.8 per megavoltage unit, 0.68 for every ten beds for inpatients minus 0.67 or plus 1.2 physicians per facility providing radiotherapy only or combined with other services, respectively. Radiotherapy units in hospitals were analyzed in two groups, i.e. radiotherapy only (n=69) or in combination with other services (n=59). In the latter, reported numbers of physicians split up in 3.2 for every 1,000 megavoltage courses per year, minus 0.13 per megavoltage unit, 0.87 for every ten beds for inpatients, plus 2.2 per facility. Units providing radiotherapy only had 0.86 physicians for every 1,000 megavoltage courses per year plus 1.0 per megavoltage unit plus 0.97 for every ten beds plus 1.0 per facility. In 36 radiotherapy university clinics actual numbers of physicians split up in 2.4 for every 1,000 megavoltage courses per year, 1.7 per megavoltage unit, 0.86 for every ten beds for inpatients, plus 1.5 per clinic. For confidence limits see Table 3, for results of univariate analysis Figures 1 and 2. Conclusion: In German radiotherapy facilities, physician workload varies considerably. It exceeds that reported for the USA by a substantial margin. (orig.) [de

  12. The communication between patient relatives and physicians in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicekci, Faruk; Duran, Numan; Ayhan, Bunyamin; Arican, Sule; Ilban, Omur; Kara, Iskender; Turkoglu, Melda; Yildirim, Fatma; Hasirci, Ismail; Karaibrahimoglu, Adnan; Kara, Inci

    2017-07-17

    Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are often physically unable to communicate with their physicians. Thus, the sharing of information about the on-going treatment of the patients in ICUs is directly related to the communication attitudes governing a patient's relatives and the physician. This study aims to analyze the attitudes displayed by the relatives of patients and the physician with the purpose of determining the communication between the two parties. For data collection, two similar survey forms were created in context of the study; one for the relatives of the patients and one for the ICU physicians. The questionnaire included three sub-dimensions: informing, empathy and trust. The study included 181 patient relatives and 103 ICU physicians from three different cities and six hospitals. Based on the results of the questionnaire, identification of the mutual expectations and substance of the messages involved in the communication process between the ICU patients' relatives and physicians was made. The gender and various disciplines of the physicians and the time of the conversation with the patients' relatives were found to affect the communication attitude towards the patient. Moreover, the age of the patient's relatives, the level of education, the physician's perception, and the contact frequency with the patient when he/she was healthy were also proven to have an impact on the communication attitude of the physician. This study demonstrates the mutual expectations and substance of messages in the informing, empathy and trust sub-dimensions of the communication process between patient relatives and physicians in the ICU. The communication between patient relatives and physicians can be strengthened through a variety of training programs to improve communication skills.

  13. More than half the families of mobile intensive care unit patients experience inadequate communication with physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaty, Guillaume; Ageron, François-Xavier; Minguet, Laetitia; Courtiol, Guillaume; Escallier, Christophe; Henniche, Adeline; Maignan, Maxime; Briot, Raphaël; Carpentier, Françoise; Savary, Dominique; Labarere, José; Danel, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to assess comprehension by family members of the patient's severity in the prehospital setting. We conducted a cross-sectional study in four mobile intensive care units (ICUs, medicalized ambulances) in France from June to October 2012. Nurses collected data on patients, patient's relatives, and mobile ICU physicians. For each patient, one relative and one physician independently rated the patient's severity using a simplified version of the Clinical Classification of Out-of-Hospital Emergency Patients scale (CCMS). Relatives were also asked to assess their interview with the physician. The primary outcome was agreement between the relative's and physician's ratings of the patient's severity. Data were available for 184 patients, their relatives, and mobile ICU physicians. Full and partial agreement between relatives and physicians regarding the patient's severity was found for 79 (43%) and 121 (66%) cases, respectively [weighted kappa = 0.32 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.23-0.42)]. Relatives overestimated the patient's severity assessed by the physician [6 (5-8) vs. 4 (3-7), p communicated by mobile ICU physicians.

  14. Specialized Training on Addictions for Physicians in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontchev, Gramen V.; Housel, Timothy R.; Callahan, James F.; Kunz, Kevin B.; Miller, Michael M.; Blondell, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States accredited residency programs in addiction exist only for psychiatrists specializing in addiction psychiatry (ADP); nonpsychiatrists seeking training in addiction medicine (ADM) can train in nonaccredited "fellowships," or can receive training in some ADP programs, only to not be granted a certificate of completion of…

  15. Implementation of a physician-staffed helicopter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Pedersen, Frants; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare air (AIR) and ground transport (GRD) of STEMI patients bound for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI).......This study aimed to compare air (AIR) and ground transport (GRD) of STEMI patients bound for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI)....

  16. Moral distress, autonomy and nurse-physician collaboration among intensive care unit nurses in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikola, Maria N K; Albarran, John W; Drigo, Elio; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Kalafati, Maria; Mpouzika, Meropi; Tsiaousis, George Z; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D E

    2014-05-01

    To explore the level of moral distress and potential associations between moral distress indices and (1) nurse-physician collaboration, (2) autonomy, (3) professional satisfaction, (4) intention to resign, and (5) workload among Italian intensive care unit nurses. Poor nurse-physician collaboration and low autonomy may limit intensive care unit nurses' ability to act on their moral decisions. A cross-sectional correlational design with a sample of 566 Italian intensive care unit nurses. The intensity of moral distress was 57.9 ± 15.6 (mean, standard deviation) (scale range: 0-84) and the frequency of occurrence was 28.4 ± 12.3 (scale range: 0-84). The mean score of the severity of moral distress was 88.0 ± 44 (scale range: 0-336). The severity of moral distress was associated with (1) nurse-physician collaboration and dissatisfaction on care decisions (r = -0.215, P intention to resign (r = 0.244, P intention of nurses to resign (r = -0. 209, P intention to resign, whereas poor nurse-physician collaboration appears to be a pivotal factor accounting for nurses' moral distress. Enhancement of nurse-physician collaboration and nurses' participation in end-of-life decisions seems to be a managerial task that could lead to the alleviation of nurses' moral distress and their retention in the profession. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Support for immigration reduction and physician distrust in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank L Samson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Health research indicates that physician trust in the United States has declined over the last 50 years. Paralleling this trend is a decline in social capital, with researchers finding a negative relationship between immigration-based diversity and social capital. This article examines whether physician distrust is also tied to immigration-based diversity and declining social capital. Methods: Data come from the 2012 General Social Survey, one of the gold standards of US public opinion surveys, using a national probability sample of 1080 adult US respondents. Key measures included support for reducing levels of immigration to the United States and multiple measures of physician trust. Results: The results of ordinary least squares regressions, using survey weights, indicate that support for reducing immigration is positively linked to physician distrust, bringing physician distrust into the orbit of research on diversity and declining social capital. Models controlled for age, education, income, gender, race, nativity, conservatism, unemployed status, lack of health insurance, and self-rated health. Furthermore, analyses of a subset of respondents reveal that measures of general trust and some forms of institutional trust do not explain away the association between support for immigration reduction and physician distrust, though confidence in science as an institution appears relevant. Conclusion: Consistent with diversity and social capital research, this article finds that an immigration attitude predicts physician distrust. Physician distrust may not be linked just to physician–patient interactions, the structure of the health care system, or health policies, but could also be tied to declining social trust in general.

  18. Screening and treatment for short cervical length in pregnancy: a physician survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Bridget; DiBenedetti, Dana B; Weiss, Herman; Zhou, Xiaolei; Reynolds, Maria; Berghella, Vincenzo; Hassan, Sonia S

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate how physicians in the United States (US) screen for, define, and treat a short cervix to prevent preterm birth. This was a cross-sectional, web-based survey of 500 physicians treating pregnant patients with a short cervix in the US. Respondents' geographic region was monitored to ensure balance across the nine US Census divisions. Respondents were predominantly obstetrician/gynecologists (86%, 429/500; mean age 49 years). Physicians reported that a median of 90% of their pregnant patients undergo cervical length screening; 81% (407/500) use transvaginal ultrasound. Physicians consult multiple evidence sources to inform their patient care, most commonly clinical guidelines (83%; 413/500) and published research (70%; 349/500). Most physicians (98%; 490/500) reported treating pregnant patients with a short cervix; 95% (474/500) use synthetic and/or natural progestogen, alone or in combination with other treatment modalities. If reimbursement was not a concern, 47% of physicians (230/500) would choose vaginal progesterone as their preferred treatment to prevent preterm birth in all patients with a short cervix, and 45% (218/500) would choose a synthetic progestogen. US guidelines recommend transvaginal ultrasound for cervical length screening; 81% of physicians in this study reported using this method. Most physicians surveyed use progestogens to treat a short cervix, with approximately half choosing a synthetic progestin (45%) and half choosing natural progesterone (47%) as their preferred treatment, despite national guidelines recommending only vaginal natural progesterone for this indication. Additional physician education is required to implement current and best practices.

  19. United States private-sector physicians and pharmaceutical contract research: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jill A; Kalbaugh, Corey A

    2012-01-01

    There have been dramatic increases over the past 20 years in the number of nonacademic, private-sector physicians who serve as principal investigators on US clinical trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. However, there has been little research on the implications of these investigators' role in clinical investigation. Our objective was to study private-sector clinics involved in US pharmaceutical clinical trials to understand the contract research arrangements supporting drug development, and specifically how private-sector physicians engaged in contract research describe their professional identities. We conducted a qualitative study in 2003-2004 combining observation at 25 private-sector research organizations in the southwestern United States and 63 semi-structured interviews with physicians, research staff, and research participants at those clinics. We used grounded theory to analyze and interpret our data. The 11 private-sector physicians who participated in our study reported becoming principal investigators on industry clinical trials primarily because contract research provides an additional revenue stream. The physicians reported that they saw themselves as trial practitioners and as businesspeople rather than as scientists or researchers. Our findings suggest that in addition to having financial motivation to participate in contract research, these US private-sector physicians have a professional identity aligned with an industry-based approach to research ethics. The generalizability of these findings and whether they have changed in the intervening years should be addressed in future studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  20. United States private-sector physicians and pharmaceutical contract research: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Fisher

    Full Text Available There have been dramatic increases over the past 20 years in the number of nonacademic, private-sector physicians who serve as principal investigators on US clinical trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. However, there has been little research on the implications of these investigators' role in clinical investigation. Our objective was to study private-sector clinics involved in US pharmaceutical clinical trials to understand the contract research arrangements supporting drug development, and specifically how private-sector physicians engaged in contract research describe their professional identities.We conducted a qualitative study in 2003-2004 combining observation at 25 private-sector research organizations in the southwestern United States and 63 semi-structured interviews with physicians, research staff, and research participants at those clinics. We used grounded theory to analyze and interpret our data. The 11 private-sector physicians who participated in our study reported becoming principal investigators on industry clinical trials primarily because contract research provides an additional revenue stream. The physicians reported that they saw themselves as trial practitioners and as businesspeople rather than as scientists or researchers.Our findings suggest that in addition to having financial motivation to participate in contract research, these US private-sector physicians have a professional identity aligned with an industry-based approach to research ethics. The generalizability of these findings and whether they have changed in the intervening years should be addressed in future studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  1. Attitudes of pediatric intensive care unit physicians towards the use of cognitive aids: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Matthew J; Kramer, Chelsea; Tremblay, Sébastien; Côté, Luc

    2016-05-21

    Cognitive aids are increasingly recommended in clinical practice, yet little is known about the attitudes of physicians towards these tools. We employed a qualitative, descriptive design to explore physician attitudes towards cognitive aids in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Semi-structured interviews elicited the opinions of a convenience sample of practicing PICU physicians towards the use of cognitive aids. We analyzed interview data for thematic content to examine the three factors of intention to use cognitive aids as defined by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), attitudes, social norms, and perceived control. Analysis of 14 interviews suggested that in the PICU setting, cognitive aids are widely used. Discovered themes related to their use touched on all three TPB factors of intention and included: aids are perceived to improve team communication; aids may improve patient safety; aids may hinder clinician judgment; physicians may resist implementation if it occurs prior to demonstration of benefit; effective adoption requires cognitive aids to be integrated into local workplace culture; and implementation should take physician concerns into account. Our sample of PICU physicians were open to cognitive aids in their practice, as long as such aids preserve the primacy of clinical judgment, focus on team communication, demonstrate effectiveness through preliminary testing, and are designed and implemented with the local culture and work environment in mind. Future knowledge translation efforts to implement cognitive aids would benefit from consideration of these issues.

  2. Divorce among physicians and other healthcare professionals in the United States: analysis of census survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Dan P; Seabury, Seth A; Jena, Anupam B

    2015-02-18

    To estimate the prevalence and incidence of divorce among US physicians compared with other healthcare professionals, lawyers, and non-healthcare professionals, and to analyze factors associated with divorce among physicians. Retrospective analysis of nationally representative surveys conducted by the US census, 2008-13. United States. 48,881 physicians, 10,086 dentists, 13,883 pharmacists, 159,044 nurses, 18,920 healthcare executives, 59,284 lawyers, and 6,339,310 other non-healthcare professionals. Logistic models of divorce adjusted for age, sex, race, annual income, weekly hours worked, number of years since marriage, calendar year, and state of residence. Divorce outcomes included whether an individual had ever been divorced (divorce prevalence) or became divorced in the past year (divorce incidence). After adjustment for covariates, the probability of being ever divorced (or divorce prevalence) among physicians evaluated at the mean value of other covariates was 24.3% (95% confidence interval 23.8% to 24.8%); dentists, 25.2% (24.1% to 26.3%); pharmacists, 22.9% (22.0% to 23.8%); nurses, 33.0% (32.6% to 33.3%); healthcare executives, 30.9% (30.1% to 31.8%); lawyers, 26.9% (26.4% to 27.4%); and other non-healthcare professionals, 35.0% (34.9% to 35.1%). Similarly, physicians were less likely than those in most other occupations to divorce in the past year. In multivariable analysis among physicians, divorce prevalence was greater among women (odds ratio 1.51, 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 1.63). In analyses stratified by physician sex, greater weekly work hours were associated with increased divorce prevalence only for female physicians. Divorce among physicians is less common than among non-healthcare workers and several health professions. Female physicians have a substantially higher prevalence of divorce than male physicians, which may be partly attributable to a differential effect of hours worked on divorce. © Ly et al 2015.

  3. Reduction of Hospital Physicians' Workflow Interruptions: A Controlled Unit-Based Intervention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weigl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly interruptive clinical environments may cause work stress and suboptimal clinical care. This study features an intervention to reduce workflow interruptions by re-designing work and organizational practices in hospital physicians providing ward coverage. A prospective, controlled intervention was conducted in two surgical and two internal wards. The intervention was based on physician quality circles - a participative technique to involve employees in the development of solutions to overcome work-related stressors. Outcome measures were the frequency of observed workflow interruptions. Workflow interruptions by fellow physicians and nursing staff were significantly lower after the intervention. However, a similar decrease was also observed in control units. Additional interviews to explore process-related factors suggested that there might have been spill-over effects in the sense that solutions were not strictly confined to the intervention group. Recommendations for further research on the effectiveness and consequences of such interventions for professional communication and patient safety are discussed.

  4. Study of the uses of Information and Communication Technologies by Pain Treatment Unit Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel Fernandez, Jorge; Sánchez Ledesma, María José; López Millan, Manuel; García Cenador, María Begoña

    2017-05-01

    Adequate use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in health has been shown to save the patient and caregiver time, improve access to the health system, improve diagnosis and control of disease or treatment. All this results in cost savings, and more importantly, they help improve the quality of service and the lives of patients. The purpose of this study is to analyse the differences in the uses of this ICTs between those physicians that belong to Pain Treatment Units (PU) and other physicians that work in pain not linked to these PUs. An online survey, generated by Netquest online survey tool, was sent to both groups of professionals and the data collected was statistical analysed through a logistic regression methodology which is the Logit binomial model. Our results show that those physicians that belong to PUs use ICTs more frequently and consider it more relevant to their clinical practice.

  5. Emergency Physicians at War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muck, Andrew E; Givens, Melissa; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Mason, Phillip E; Goolsby, Craig

    2018-05-01

    Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF-A) in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) represent the first major, sustained wars in which emergency physicians (EPs) fully participated as an integrated part of the military's health system. EPs proved invaluable in the deployments, and they frequently used the full spectrum of trauma and medical care skills. The roles EPs served expanded over the years of the conflicts and demonstrated the unique skill set of emergency medicine (EM) training. EPs supported elite special operations units, served in medical command positions, and developed and staffed flying intensive care units. EPs have brought their combat experience home to civilian practice. This narrative review summarizes the history, contributions, and lessons learned by EPs during OEF-A/OIF and describes changes to daily clinical practice of EM derived from the combat environment.

  6. Emergency Physicians at War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Givens

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF-A in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF represent the first major, sustained wars in which emergency physicians (EPs fully participated as an integrated part of the military’s health system. EPs proved invaluable in the deployments, and they frequently used the full spectrum of trauma and medical care skills. The roles EPs served expanded over the years of the conflicts and demonstrated the unique skill set of emergency medicine (EM training. EPs supported elite special operations units, served in medical command positions, and developed and staffed flying intensive care units. EPs have brought their combat experience home to civilian practice. This narrative review summarizes the history, contributions, and lessons learned by EPs during OEF-A/OIF and describes changes to daily clinical practice of EM derived from the combat environment.

  7. Staffing for infectious diseases, clinical microbiology and infection control in hospitals in 2015: results of an ESCMID member survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Y; Nir-Paz, R; Pulcini, C; Cookson, B; Beović, B; Tacconelli, E; Nathwani, D; Vatcheva-Dobrevska, R; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Hell, M; Saenz, H; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to assess the current status of infectious diseases (ID), clinical microbiology (CM) and infection control (IC) staffing in hospitals and to analyse modifiers of staffing levels. We conducted an Internet-based survey of European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases members and affiliates, collecting data on hospital characteristics, ID management infrastructure, ID/IC-related activities and the ratio of physicians per 100 hospital beds. Regression analyses were conducted to examine factors associated with the physician-bed ratio. Five hundred sixty-seven hospital responses were collected between April and June 2015 from 61 countries, 81.2% (384/473) from Europe. A specialized inpatient ward for ID patients was reported in 58.4% (317/543) of hospitals. Rates of antibiotic stewardship programmes (ASP) and surveillance activities in survey hospitals were high, ranging from 88% to 90% for local antibiotic guidelines and 70% to 82% for programmes monitoring hospital-acquired infections. The median ID/CM/IC physician per 100 hospital beds ratio was 1.12 (interquartile range 0.56-2.13). In hospitals performing basic ASP and IC (including local antibiotic guidelines and monitoring device-related or surgical site infections), the ratio was 1.21 (interquartile range 0.57-2.14). Factors independently associated with higher ratios included compliance with European Union of Medical Specialists standards, smaller hospital size, tertiary-care institution, presence of a travel clinic, beds dedicated to ID and a CM unit. More than half of respondents estimated that additional staffing is needed for appropriate IC or ID management. No standard of physician staffing for ID/CM/IC in hospitals is available. A ratio of 1.21/100 beds will serve as an informed point of reference enabling ASP and infection surveillance. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Migraine-preventive prescription patterns by physician specialty in ambulatory care settings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Hiroko; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-03-01

    Many adults with migraine who require preventive therapy are often not prescribed the proper medications. The most likely reason is that primary care physicians are unacquainted with preventive medications for migraine. The present study assessed the migraine-preventive prescription patterns in office visits using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2009 in the United States. Patients who were 18 years or older and diagnosed with migraine were included in the analysis. In accordance with the recommendations of the headache guidelines, we included beta-blockers, antidepressants, triptans for short-term prevention of menstrual migraine, and other triptans for acute treatment. Weighted visits of adults with migraine prescribed with preventive medication ranged from 32.8% in 2006 to 38.6% in 2009. Visits to primary care physicians accounted for 72.6% of the analyzed adult migraine visits. Anticonvulsants (odds ratio [OR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.57, p  < 0.001) and triptans for menstrual migraine (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28-0.91, p  = 0.025) were less frequently prescribed by primary care physicians compared with specialty care physicians, such as neurologists and psychiatrists. There were no significant differences in the prescription patterns of antidepressants and beta-blockers between primary and specialty care physicians. Beta-blockers were prescribed to patients with comorbidity of hypertension, and antidepressants were used by patients with comorbidity of depression. There are differences in the prescription patterns of certain type of preventive medications between primary care physicians and specialty care physicians.

  9. Migraine-preventive prescription patterns by physician specialty in ambulatory care settings in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Takaki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many adults with migraine who require preventive therapy are often not prescribed the proper medications. The most likely reason is that primary care physicians are unacquainted with preventive medications for migraine. The present study assessed the migraine-preventive prescription patterns in office visits using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2009 in the United States. Patients who were 18 years or older and diagnosed with migraine were included in the analysis. In accordance with the recommendations of the headache guidelines, we included beta-blockers, antidepressants, triptans for short-term prevention of menstrual migraine, and other triptans for acute treatment. Weighted visits of adults with migraine prescribed with preventive medication ranged from 32.8% in 2006 to 38.6% in 2009. Visits to primary care physicians accounted for 72.6% of the analyzed adult migraine visits. Anticonvulsants (odds ratio [OR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14–0.57, p < 0.001 and triptans for menstrual migraine (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28–0.91, p = 0.025 were less frequently prescribed by primary care physicians compared with specialty care physicians, such as neurologists and psychiatrists. There were no significant differences in the prescription patterns of antidepressants and beta-blockers between primary and specialty care physicians. Beta-blockers were prescribed to patients with comorbidity of hypertension, and antidepressants were used by patients with comorbidity of depression. There are differences in the prescription patterns of certain type of preventive medications between primary care physicians and specialty care physicians.

  10. Staffing and job satisfaction: nurses and nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice; Lee, Kyung Hee

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between staffing and job satisfaction of registered nurses (RNs) and nursing assistants (NAs). Although a number of previous studies have demonstrated the link between the numbers of patients cared for on the last shift and/or perceptions of staffing adequacy, we could find only one study that utilized a measure of actual staffing (opposed to perceptions of staffing adequacy) and correlated it with job satisfaction of registered nurses. This cross-sectional study included 3523 RNs and 1012 NAs in 131 patient care units. Staff were surveyed to determine job satisfaction and demographic variables. In addition, actual staffing data were collected from each of the study units. Hours per patient day was a significant positive predictor for registered nurse job satisfaction after controlling for covariates. For NAs, a lower skill mix was marginally significant with higher job satisfaction. In addition, the more work experience the NAs reported, the lower their job satisfaction. Adequate staffing levels are essential for RN job satisfaction whereas NA job satisfaction depends on the number of assistive personnel in the mix of nursing staff. Two implications are (1) providing adequate staffing is critical to maintain RN job satisfaction and (2) the NA job needs to be re-engineered to make it a more attractive and satisfying career. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Attitudes towards euthanasia among Greek intensive care unit physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranidiotis, Georgios; Ropa, Julia; Mprianas, John; Kyprianou, Theodoros; Nanas, Serafim

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the attitudes of Greek intensive care unit (ICU) medical and nursing staff towards euthanasia. ICU physicians and nurses deal with end-of-life dilemmas on a daily basis. Therefore, the exploration of their stances on euthanasia is worthwhile. This was a descriptive quantitative study conducted in three ICUs in Athens. The convenience sample included 39 physicians and 107 nurses. Of respondents, 52% defined euthanasia inaccurately, as withholding or withdrawal of treatment, while 15% ranked limitation of life-support among the several forms of euthanasia, together with active shortening of the dying process and physician - assisted suicide. Only one third of participants defined euthanasia correctly. While 59% of doctors and 64% of nurses support the legalization of active euthanasia, just 28% and 26% of them, respectively, agree with it ethically. Confusion prevails among Greek ICU physicians and nurses regarding the definition of euthanasia. The majority of staff disagrees with active euthanasia, but upholds its legalization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transfers from intensive care unit to hospital ward: a multicentre textual analysis of physician progress notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla N; Leigh, Jeanna Parsons; Kamran, Hasham; Bagshaw, Sean M; Fowler, Rob A; Dodek, Peter M; Turgeon, Alexis F; Forster, Alan J; Lamontagne, Francois; Soo, Andrea; Stelfox, Henry T

    2018-01-28

    Little is known about documentation during transitions of patient care between clinical specialties. Therefore, we examined the focus, structure and purpose of physician progress notes for patients transferred from the intensive care unit (ICU) to hospital ward to identify opportunities to improve communication breaks. This was a prospective cohort study in ten Canadian hospitals. We analyzed physician progress notes for consenting adult patients transferred from a medical-surgical ICU to hospital ward. The number, length, legibility and content of notes was counted and compared across care settings using mixed-effects linear regression models accounting for clustering within hospitals. Qualitative content analyses were conducted on a stratified random sample of 32 patients. A total of 447 patient medical records that included 7052 progress notes (mean 2.1 notes/patient/day 95% CI 1.9-2.3) were analyzed. Notes written by the ICU team were significantly longer than notes written by the ward team (mean lines of text 21 vs. 15, p notes; mean agreement of patient issues was 42% [95% CI 31-53%]. Qualitative analyses identified eight themes related to focus (central point - e.g., problem list), structure (organization, - e.g., note-taking style), and purpose (intention - e.g., documentation of patient course) of the notes that varied across clinical specialties and physician seniority. Important gaps and variations in written documentation during transitions of patient care between ICU and hospital ward physicians are common, and include discrepancies in documentation of patient information.

  13. Cystic fibrosis physicians' perspectives on the timing of referral for lung transplant evaluation: a survey of physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Kathleen J; Somayaji, Ranjani; Lease, Erika D; Goss, Christopher H; Aitken, Moira L

    2017-01-19

    Prior studies reveal that a significant proportion of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and advanced lung disease are not referred for lung transplant (LTx) evaluation. We sought to assess expert CF physician perspectives on the timing of LTx referral and investigate their LTx knowledge. We developed an online anonymous survey that was distributed by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) to the medical directors of all CFF-accredited care centers in the United States in 2015. The survey addressed only adult patients (≥18 years old) and was sent to 119 adult CF physicians, 86 CFF-affiliated CF physicians (who see adults and children, but have smaller program sizes than adult or pediatric centers), and 127 pediatric CF physicians (who see some adults, but mostly children). The focus of the questions was on CFF-care center characteristics, physician experience and indications/contraindications to referral for LTx evaluation. There were 114/332 (34%) total responses to the survey. The response rates were: 57/119 (48%) adult physicians, 12/86 (14%) affiliate physicians and 43/127 (34%) pediatric physicians; 2 physicians did not include their CFF center type. Despite the poor ability of FEV 1  < 30% to predict death within 2 years, 94% of responding CF physicians said they would refer an adult patient for LTx evaluation if the patient's lung function fell to FEV 1  < 30% predicted. Only 54% of respondents report that pulmonary hypertension would trigger referral. Pulmonary hypertension is an internationally recommended indication to list a patient for LTx (not just for referral for evaluation). Very few physicians (N = 17, 15%) employed components of the lung allocation score (LAS) to determine the timing of referral for LTx evaluation. Interestingly, patient preference not to undergo LTx was "often" or "always" the primary patient-related reason to defer referral for LTx evaluation for 41% (47/114) of respondents. Some potential barriers to timely LTx

  14. Attitudes and Practices of Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; Urwin, John W; Cohen, Joachim

    2016-07-05

    The increasing legalization of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide worldwide makes it important to understand related attitudes and practices. To review the legal status of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide and the available data on attitudes and practices. Polling data and published surveys of the public and physicians, official state and country databases, interview studies with physicians, and death certificate studies (the Netherlands and Belgium) were reviewed for the period 1947 to 2016. Currently, euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide can be legally practiced in the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Colombia, and Canada (Quebec since 2014, nationally as of June 2016). Physician-assisted suicide, excluding euthanasia, is legal in 5 US states (Oregon, Washington, Montana, Vermont, and California) and Switzerland. Public support for euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in the United States has plateaued since the 1990s (range, 47%-69%). In Western Europe, an increasing and strong public support for euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide has been reported; in Central and Eastern Europe, support is decreasing. In the United States, less than 20% of physicians report having received requests for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, and 5% or less have complied. In Oregon and Washington state, less than 1% of licensed physicians write prescriptions for physician-assisted suicide per year. In the Netherlands and Belgium, about half or more of physicians reported ever having received a request; 60% of Dutch physicians have ever granted such requests. Between 0.3% to 4.6% of all deaths are reported as euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide in jurisdictions where they are legal. The frequency of these deaths increased after legalization. More than 70% of cases involved patients with cancer. Typical patients are older, white, and well-educated. Pain is mostly not reported as the primary motivation. A large portion of patients receiving

  15. Staffing, overtime, and shift scheduling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent events at the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant have demonstrated the need to establish a quantifiable basis for assessing the safety significance of long work hours on nuclear power plant operators. The incidents at TMI-2, Chernobyl, and Bhopal, which all occurred during the late evening/night shift, further highlight the importance of the relationship between shift scheduling and performance. The objective of this project is to estimate, using statistical analysis on data from the nuclear industry, the effects on safety of staffing levels, overtime, and shift scheduling for operators and maintenance personnel. Regarding staffing levels, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently has no explicit regulation concerning the minimum acceptable levels of staffing in a plant that has an operating license. The NRC has no systematic method for collecting data on the number of licensed operators on the operating crews. In 1982 the NRC recommended that plants write into their technical specifications a model policy on overtime. Currently, 77 nuclear power plant units have the model policy or a modification of it written into their technical specifications; 33 units have no policy on overtime. The model policy sets limits on overtime for safety related personnel, although these limits can be exceeded with plant manger approval. The US nuclear power industry has three types of shift schedules: (1) forward-rotating 8-hour/day shift schedules, (2) backward-rotating 8-hour/day schedules, and (3) 12-hour/day schedules

  16. Organizational and safety culture in Canadian intensive care units: relationship to size of intensive care unit and physician management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodek, Peter M; Wong, Hubert; Jaswal, Danny; Heyland, Daren K; Cook, Deborah J; Rocker, Graeme M; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Dale, Craig; Fowler, Robert; Ayas, Najib T

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe organizational and safety culture in Canadian intensive care units (ICUs), to correlate culture with the number of beds and physician management model in each ICU, and to correlate organizational culture and safety culture. In this cross-sectional study, surveys of organizational and safety culture were administered to 2374 clinical staff in 23 Canadian tertiary care and community ICUs. For the 1285 completed surveys, scores were calculated for each of 34 domains. Average domain scores for each ICU were correlated with number of ICU beds and with intensivist vs nonintensivist management model. Domain scores for organizational culture were correlated with domain scores for safety culture. Culture domain scores were generally favorable in all ICUs. There were moderately strong positive correlations between number of ICU beds and perceived effectiveness at recruiting/retaining physicians (r = 0.58; P organizational and safety culture. Differences in perceptions between staff in larger and smaller ICUs highlight the importance of teamwork across units in larger ICUs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Underrepresentation of Women and Minorities in the United States IR Academic Physician Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Mikhail C S S; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Richard, Chase; Chapman, Christina H; Laporte, Angelique; Both, Stefan; Thomas, Charles R; Deville, Curtiland

    2016-12-01

    To assess the United States interventional radiology (IR) academic physician workforce diversity and comparative specialties. Public registries were used to assess demographic differences among 2012 IR faculty and fellows, diagnostic radiology (DR) faculty and residents, DR subspecialty fellows (pediatric, abdominal, neuroradiology, and musculoskeletal), vascular surgery and interventional cardiology trainees, and 2010 US medical school graduates and US Census using binomial tests with .001 significance level (Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons). Significant trends in IR physician representation were evaluated from 1992 to 2012. Women (15.4%), blacks (2.0%), and Hispanics (6.2%) were significantly underrepresented as IR fellows compared with the US population. Women were underrepresented as IR (7.3%) versus DR (27.8%) faculty and IR fellows (15.4%) versus medical school graduates (48.3%), DR residents (27.8%), pediatric radiology fellows (49.4%), and vascular surgery trainees (27.7%) (all P < .001). IR ranked last in female representation among radiologic subspecialty fellows. Blacks (1.8%, 2.1%, respectively, for IR faculty and fellows); Hispanics (1.8%, 6.2%); and combined American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (1.8%, 0) showed no significant differences in representation as IR fellows compared with IR faculty, DR residents, other DR fellows, or interventional cardiology or vascular surgery trainees. Over 20 years, there was no significant increase in female or black representation as IR fellows or faculty. Women, blacks, and Hispanics are underrepresented in the IR academic physician workforce relative to the US population. Given prevalent health care disparities and an increasingly diverse society, research and training efforts should address IR physician workforce diversity. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cost analysis of nursing home registered nurse staffing times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, David A; Horn, Susan D; Smout, Randall J

    2005-05-01

    To examine potential cost savings from decreased adverse resident outcomes versus additional wages of nurses when nursing homes have adequate staffing. A retrospective cost study using differences in adverse outcome rates of pressure ulcers (PUs), urinary tract infections (UTIs), and hospitalizations per resident per day from low staffing and adequate staffing nursing homes. Cost savings from reductions in these events are calculated in dollars and compared with costs of increasing nurse staffing. Eighty-two nursing homes throughout the United States. One thousand three hundred seventy-six frail elderly long-term care residents at risk of PU development. Event rates are from the National Pressure Ulcer Long-Term Care Study. Hospital costs are estimated from Medicare statistics and from charges in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. UTI costs and PU costs are from cost-identification studies. Time horizon is 1 year; perspectives are societal and institutional. Analyses showed an annual net societal benefit of 3,191 dollars per resident per year in a high-risk, long-stay nursing home unit that employs sufficient nurses to achieve 30 to 40 minutes of registered nurse direct care time per resident per day versus nursing homes that have nursing time of less than 10 minutes. Sensitivity analyses revealed a robust set of estimates, with no single or paired elements reaching the cost/benefit equality threshold. Increasing nurse staffing in nursing homes may create significant societal cost savings from reduction in adverse outcomes. Challenges in increasing nurse staffing are discussed.

  19. Fabulous award for staffing app.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    A safe staffing app giving up-to-date information on the number of nurses on the wards at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust scooped top prize at the inaugural Academy of Fabulous NHS Stuffawards in London last week.

  20. 77 FR 14832 - Plumchoice, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ...., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing, and Technisource..., Insight Global Staffing, and Technisource, Scarborough, Maine. The workers are engaged in activities... leased workers from Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing, and Technisource, Scarborough, Maine, who...

  1. E-Cigarette Advice to Patients From Physicians and Dentists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Olivier; McMillen, Robert C; Klein, Jonathan D; Winickoff, Jonathan P

    2018-06-01

    To report on adults' recall of discussion by physicians and dentists about e-cigarettes. A nationally representative cross-sectional survey (Internet and random digit dialing) in the United States. Adults who ever used e-cigarettes. Participant-reported discussion about the potential benefits and harms of e-cigarettes with their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the past 12 months. Fisher exact test for the analysis between benefits and harms for each type of provider and for rates of advice between provider types. Among the 3030 adults who completed the survey, 523 (17.2%) had ever used e-cigarettes. Of those who had seen their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the last year, 7.3%, 1.7%, and 10.1%, respectively, reported discussing potential harms of e-cigarettes. Conversely, 5.8%, 1.7%, and 9.3% of patients who had seen their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the last year reported that the clinician discussed the potential benefits of e-cigarettes. Each clinician type was as likely to discuss harms as benefits. Rates of advice were similar between doctors and child's doctors but lower for dentists. Rates were comparable when the analysis was limited to current e-cigarette users, participants with children, or those who reported using both e-cigarettes and combusted tobacco. Few physicians and dentists discuss either the harms or benefits of e-cigarettes with their patients. These data suggest an opportunity to educate, train, and provide resources for physicians and dentists about e-cigarettes and their use.

  2. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients' rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients' rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals.

  3. Executive Summary: 30th Report on Physician Assistant Educational Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lindsey M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this executive summary was to provide an overview of key findings from By the Numbers: 30th Report on Physician Assistant Educational Programs in the United States. The 2014 Program Survey is a Web-based survey and is administered annually to all member physician assistant (PA) program directors. This executive summary will focus on 4 of the 7 sections of the survey instrument: general, financial, program personnel, and students. The typical PA program's sponsoring institution is private and in a nonacademic health center. Most PA programs (93.0%) offer a master's degree as the primary or highest credential. The average total program budget was $2,221,751 (SD=$2,426,852). The average total resident tuition was $64,961, and the average total nonresident tuition was $75,964. Overall, 181 programs reported 1843 program faculty. Of those, 1467 were identified as core faculty and 376 were identified as adjunct faculty. A typical first-year PA student is 26 years old (SD=2.51), female (70.3%, n=5898), non-Hispanic (89.3%, n=3631), White (79.9%, n=3712), and has an overall undergraduate and science grade point average (GPA) of 3.52 (SD=0.14) and 3.47 (SD=0.16), respectively. In 2014, there were approximately 7556 graduates from 164 responding programs. By gaining a better understanding of the characteristics of PA programs and their faculty and students, policy makers can be better informed. Physician assistant educators and stakeholders are encouraged to use this information to advance and advocate for the profession.

  4. Staffing and structure of infection prevention and control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patricia W; Dick, Andrew; Pogorzelska, Monika; Horan, Teresa C; Furuya, E Yoko; Larson, Elaine

    2009-06-01

    The nature of infection prevention and control is changing; however, little is known about current staffing and structure of infection prevention and control programs. Our objectives were to provide a snapshot of the staffing and structure of hospital-based infection prevention and control programs in the United States. A Web-based survey was sent to 441 hospitals that participate in the National Healthcare Safety Network. The response rate was 66% (n = 289); data were examined on 821 professionals. Infection preventionist (IP) staffing was significantly negatively related to bed size, with higher staffing in smaller hospitals (P hospital epidemiologists were reported to have authority to close beds for outbreaks always or most of the time (n = 225, 78%). Only 32% (n = 92) reported using an electronic surveillance system to track infections. This study is the first to provide a comprehensive description of current infection prevention and control staffing, organization, and support in a select group of hospitals across the nation. Further research is needed to identify effective staffing levels for various hospital types as well as examine how the IP role is changing over time.

  5. The Islamic Revolution of Iran and migration of physicians to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaghy, Hossain A; Shajari, Anoshiravan

    2013-10-01

    Following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 in Iran, the trend of migration of physicians from the country continued. The total number of Iranian physicians migrated to the United States (US) increased from 1625 before revolution in 1974, to 5045 in 2010, thirty years post-revolution. The percentage of medical graduates migrating to the US, in the same period dropped from 15% to 5%. The reasons for this drop were restrictions imposed, along with creation of good postgraduate residency and fellowship programs in Iran. Following the revolution, the number of medical schools increased from 13 to 48. Despite all the restrictions and impediments for post-revolution medical graduates, over 500 medical graduates from newly established medical schools found their ways into the healthcare system of the US.     In spite of all hardships of eight years of imposed war, and 30 years of the US sanctions, Iran has been able to maintain good progress in its healthcare, education, and research in medicine and other branches of science and technology.

  6. Physicians' perceptions of quality of care, professional autonomy, and job satisfaction in Canada, Norway, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyssen, Reidar; Palmer, Karen S; Solberg, Ingunn B; Voltmer, Edgar; Frank, Erica

    2013-12-15

    We lack national and cross-national studies of physicians' perceptions of quality of patient care, professional autonomy, and job satisfaction to inform clinicians and policymakers. This study aims to compare such perceptions in Canada, the United States (U.S.), and Norway. We analyzed data from large, nationwide, representative samples of physicians in Canada (n = 3,213), the U.S. (n = 6,628), and Norway (n = 657), examining demographics, job satisfaction, and professional autonomy. Among U.S. physicians, 79% strongly agreed/agreed they could provide high quality patient care vs. only 46% of Canadian and 59% of Norwegian physicians. U.S. physicians also perceived more clinical autonomy and time with their patients, with differences remaining significant even after controlling for age, gender, and clinical hours. Women reported less adequate time, clinical freedom, and ability to provide high-quality care. Country differences were the strongest predictors for the professional autonomy variables. In all three countries, physicians' perceptions of quality of care, clinical freedom, and time with patients influenced their overall job satisfaction. Fewer U.S. physicians reported their overall job satisfaction to be at-least-somewhat satisfied than did Norwegian and Canadian physicians. U.S. physicians perceived higher quality of patient care and greater professional autonomy, but somewhat lower job satisfaction than their colleagues in Norway and Canada. Differences in health care system financing and delivery might help explain this difference; Canada and Norway have more publicly-financed, not-for-profit health care delivery systems, vs. a more-privately-financed and profit-driven system in the U.S. None of these three highly-resourced countries, however, seem to have achieved an ideal health care system from the perspective of their physicians.

  7. Application of total care time and payment per unit time model for physician reimbursement for common general surgery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Holubar, Stefan D; Figy, Sean; Chen, Lilian; Montagne, Shirley A; Rosen, Joseph M; Desimone, Joseph P

    2012-06-01

    The relative value unit system relies on subjective measures of physician input in the care of patients. A payment per unit time model incorporates surgeon reimbursement to the total care time spent in the operating room, postoperative in-house, and clinic time to define payment per unit time. We aimed to compare common general surgery operations by using the total care time and payment per unit time method in order to demonstrate a more objective measurement for physician reimbursement. Average total physician payment per case was obtained for 5 outpatient operations and 4 inpatient operations in general surgery. Total care time was defined as the sum of operative time, 30 minutes per hospital day, and 30 minutes per office visit for each operation. Payment per unit time was calculated by dividing the physician reimbursement per case by the total care time. Total care time, physician payment per case, and payment per unit time for each type of operation demonstrated that an average payment per time spent for inpatient operations was $455.73 and slightly more at $467.51 for outpatient operations. Partial colectomy with primary anastomosis had the longest total care time (8.98 hours) and the least payment per unit time ($188.52). Laparoscopic gastric bypass had the highest payment per time ($707.30). The total care time and payment per unit time method can be used as an adjunct to compare reimbursement among different operations on an institutional level as well as on a national level. Although many operations have similar payment trends based on time spent by the surgeon, payment differences using this methodology are seen and may be in need of further review. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Use and Characteristics of Electronic Health Record Systems among Office-Based Physician Practices: United States, ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Technical Information Service NCHS Use and Characteristics of Electronic Health Record Systems Among Office-based ... physicians that collects information on physician and practice characteristics, including the adoption and use of EHR systems. ...

  9. The Pathologist Workforce in the United States: II. An Interactive Modeling Tool for Analyzing Future Qualitative and Quantitative Staffing Demands for Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robboy, Stanley J; Gupta, Saurabh; Crawford, James M; Cohen, Michael B; Karcher, Donald S; Leonard, Debra G B; Magnani, Barbarajean; Novis, David A; Prystowsky, Michael B; Powell, Suzanne Z; Gross, David J; Black-Schaffer, W Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Pathologists are physicians who make diagnoses based on interpretation of tissue and cellular specimens (surgical/cytopathology, molecular/genomic pathology, autopsy), provide medical leadership and consultation for laboratory medicine, and are integral members of their institutions' interdisciplinary patient care teams. To develop a dynamic modeling tool to examine how individual factors and practice variables can forecast demand for pathologist services. Build and test a computer-based software model populated with data from surveys and best estimates about current and new pathologist efforts. Most pathologists' efforts focus on anatomic (52%), laboratory (14%), and other direct services (8%) for individual patients. Population-focused services (12%) (eg, laboratory medical direction) and other professional responsibilities (14%) (eg, teaching, research, and hospital committees) consume the rest of their time. Modeling scenarios were used to assess the need to increase or decrease efforts related globally to the Affordable Care Act, and specifically, to genomic medicine, laboratory consolidation, laboratory medical direction, and new areas where pathologists' expertise can add value. Our modeling tool allows pathologists, educators, and policy experts to assess how various factors may affect demand for pathologists' services. These factors include an aging population, advances in biomedical technology, and changing roles in capitated, value-based, and team-based medical care systems. In the future, pathologists will likely have to assume new roles, develop new expertise, and become more efficient in practicing medicine to accommodate new value-based delivery models.

  10. Improvements in nuclear plant staffing resulting from the AP600 design programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycoff, C.

    2001-01-01

    The staffing for a single-unit AP600 is estimated to require a staff for operation and maintenance about 32% smaller than current generation power plants of similar size. These staffing reductions are driven primarily by various features incorporated into the AP600 plant design. (author)

  11. Amicus Curiae Brief for the United States Supreme Court on Mental Health Issues Associated with "Physician-Assisted Suicide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Gordon, Judith R.

    2002-01-01

    After providing background material related to the Supreme Court cases on "physician-assisted suicide" (Washington v. Glucksberg, 1997, and Vacco v. Quill, 1997), this article presents the amicus curiae brief that was submitted to the United States Supreme Court by 2 national mental health organizations, a state psychological association, and an…

  12. The practice of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in the United States: adherence to proposed safeguards and effects on physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, E J; Daniels, E R; Fairclough, D L; Clarridge, B R

    1998-08-12

    Despite intense debates about legalization, there are few data examining the details of actual euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) cases in the United States. To determine whether the practices of euthanasia and PAS are consistent with proposed safeguards and the effect on physicians of having performed euthanasia or PAS. Structured in-depth telephone interviews. Randomly selected oncologists in the United States. Adherence to primary and secondary safeguards for the practice of euthanasia and PAS; regret, comfort, and fear of prosecution from performing euthanasia or PAS. A total of 355 oncologists (72.6% response rate) were interviewed on euthanasia and PAS. On 2 screening questions, 56 oncologists (15.8%) reported participating in euthanasia or PAS; 53 oncologists (94.6% response rate) participated in in-depth interviews. Thirty-eight of 53 oncologists described clearly defined cases of euthanasia or PAS. Twenty-three patients (60.5%) both initiated and repeated their request for euthanasia or PAS, but 6 patients (15.8%) did not participate in the decision for euthanasia or PAS. Thirty-seven patients (97.4%) were experiencing unremitting pain or such poor physical functioning they could not perform self-care. Physicians sought consultation in 15 cases (39.5%). Overall, oncologists adhered to all 3 main safeguards in 13 cases (34.2%): (1) having the patient initiate and repeat the request for euthanasia or PAS, (2) ensuring the patient was experiencing extreme physical pain or suffering, and (3) consulting with a colleague. Those who adhered to the safeguards had known their patients longer and tended to be more religious. In 28 cases (73.7%), the family supported the decision. In all cases of pain, patients were receiving narcotic analgesia. Fifteen patients (39.5%) were enrolled in a hospice. While 19 oncologists (52.6%) received comfort from having helped a patient with euthanasia or PAS, 9 (23.7%) regretted having performed euthanasia or PAS, and

  13. Nurse staffing, medical staffing and mortality in Intensive Care: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Elizabeth; Barron, David N; Harrison, David; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Rowan, Kathy; Sanderson, Colin

    2014-05-01

    To investigate whether the size of the workforce (nurses, doctors and support staff) has an impact on the survival chances of critically ill patients both in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in the hospital. Investigations of intensive care outcomes suggest that some of the variation in patient survival rates might be related to staffing levels and workload, but the evidence is still equivocal. Information about patients, including the outcome of care (whether the patient lived or died) came from the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) Case Mix Programme. An Audit Commission survey of ICUs conducted in 1998 gave information about staffing levels. The merged dataset had information on 65 ICUs and 38,168 patients. This is currently the best available dataset for testing the relationship between staffing and outcomes in UK ICUs. A cross-sectional, retrospective, risk adjusted observational study. Multivariable, multilevel logistic regression. ICU and in-hospital mortality. After controlling for patient characteristics and workload we found that higher numbers of nurses per bed (odds ratio: 0.90, 95% confidence interval: [0.83, 0.97]) and higher numbers of consultants (0.85, [0.76, 0.95]) were associated with higher survival rates. Further exploration revealed that the number of nurses had the greatest impact on patients at high risk of death (0.98, [0.96, 0.99]) whereas the effect of medical staffing was unchanged across the range of patient acuity (1.00, [0.97, 1.03]). No relationship between patient outcomes and the number of support staff (administrative, clerical, technical and scientific staff) was found. Distinguishing between direct care and supernumerary nurses and restricting the analysis to patients who had been in the unit for more than 8h made little difference to the results. Separate analysis of in-unit and in-hospital survival showed that the clinical workforce in intensive care had a greater impact on ICU mortality than on

  14. Raising the Bar with Trades Staffing Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Theodore J.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the APPA's Trades Staffing Guidelines Task Force for college campus building maintenance and presents descriptions of the proposed guideline levels and a matrix of indicators for the Trades Staffing Guidelines. The levels and matrix are intended to mimic features of the custodial staffing guidelines. (GR)

  15. Nurses' and physicians' perceptions of Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit for delirium detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenbøll-Collet, Marie; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    of this study was to identify nurses' and physicians' perceived professional barriers to using the CAM-ICU in Danish ICUs. Methods: This study uses a qualitative explorative multicentre design using focus groups and a semi-structured interview guide. Five focus groups with nurses (n=20) and four with physicians......-ICU screening affected nursing care, clinical judgment and professional integrity; (2) Instrument reliability: nurses and physicians expressed concerns about CAM-ICU assessment in non-sedated patients, patients with multi-organ failure or patients influenced by residual sedatives/opioids; and (3) Clinical...... consequence: after CAM-ICU assessment, physicians lacked evidence-based treatment options, and nurses lacked physician acknowledgment and guidelines for disclosing CAM-ICU results to patients. Conclusion: In this study, ICU nurses and physicians raised a number of concerns regarding the use of the CAM...

  16. Seasonal variation in family member perceptions of physician competence in the intensive care unit: findings from one academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jennifer P; Kachniarz, Bart; O'Reilly, Kristin; Howell, Michael D

    2015-04-01

    Researchers have found mixed results about the risk to patient safety in July, when newly minted physicians enter U.S. hospitals to begin their clinical training, the so-called "July effect." However, patient and family satisfaction and perception of physician competence during summer months remain unknown. The authors conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of 815 family members of adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients who completed the Family Satisfaction with Care in the Intensive Care Unit instrument from eight ICUs at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, between April 2008 and June 2011. The association of ICU care in the summer months (July-September) versus other seasons and family perception of physician competence was examined in univariable and multivariable analyses. A greater proportion of family members described physicians as competent in summer months as compared with winter months (odds ratio [OR] 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-3.0; P = .003). After adjustment for patient and proxy demographics, severity of illness, comorbidities, and features of the admission in a multivariable model, seasonal variation of family perception of physician competence persisted (summer versus winter, OR of judging physicians competent 2.4; 95% CI 1.3-4.4; P = .004). Seasonal variation exists in family perception of physician competence in the ICU, but opposite to the "July effect." The reasons for this variation are not well understood. Further research is necessary to explore the role of senior provider involvement, trainee factors, system factors such as handoffs, or other possible contributors.

  17. How do physicians weigh benefits and risks associated with treatments in patients with osteoarthritis in the United Kingdom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, Nigel K; Hauber, A Brett; Mohamed, Ateesha F; Johnson, F Reed; Peloso, Paul M; Watson, Douglas J; Mavros, Panagiotis; Gammaitoni, Arnold; Sen, Shuvayu S; Taylor, Stephanie D

    2012-05-01

    To quantify the relative importance that UK physicians attach to the benefits and risks of current drugs when making treatment decisions for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Physicians treating at least 10 patients with OA per month completed an online discrete-choice experiment survey and answered 12 treatment-choice questions comparing medication profiles. Medication profiles were defined by 4 benefits (reduction in ambulatory pain, resting pain, stiffness, and difficulty doing daily activities) and 3 treatment-related risks [bleeding ulcer, stroke, and myocardial infarction (MI)]. Each physician made medication choices for 3 of 9 hypothetical patients (varied by age, history of MI, hypertension, and history of gastrointestinal bleeding). Importance weights were estimated using a random-parameters logit model. Treatment-related risks physicians were willing to accept in exchange for various reductions in ambulatory and resting pain also were calculated. The final sample was 475. A reduction in ambulatory pain from 75 mm to 25 mm (1.6 units) was 1.1 times as important as an increase in MI risk from 0% to 1.5% (1.5 units). The greatest importance was for eliminating a 3% treatment-related risk of MI or stroke. On average, physicians were willing to accept an increase in bleeding ulcer risk of 0.7% (95% CI 0.4%-1.7%) for a reduction in ambulatory pain of 75 mm to 50 mm. When presented with well-known benefits and risks of OA treatments, physicians placed greater importance on the risks than on the analgesic properties of the drug. This has implications for the reporting of the results of clinical research to physicians.

  18. Conformity to the surviving sepsis campaign international guidelines among physicians in a general intensive care unit in Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mung'ayi, V; Karuga, R

    2010-08-01

    There are emerging therapies for managing septic critically-ill patients. There is little data from the developing world on their usage. To determine the conformity rate for resuscitation and management bundles for septic patients amongst physicians in a general intensive care unit. Cross sectional observational study. The general intensive care unit, Aga Khan University Hospital,Nairobi. Admitting physicians from all specialties in the general intensive care unit. The physicians had high conformity rates of 92% and 96% for the fluid resuscitation and use of va so pressors respectively for the initial resuscitation bundle. They had moderate conformity rates for blood cultures prior to administering antibiotics (57%) and administration of antibiotics within first hour of recognition of septic shock (54%). There was high conformity rate to the glucose control policy (81%), use of protective lung strategy in acute lung injury/Acute respiratory distress syndrome, venous thromboembolism prophylaxis (100%) and stress ulcer prophylaxis (100%) in the management bundle. Conformity was moderate for use of sedation, analgesia and muscle relaxant policy (69%), continuous renal replacement therapies (54%) and low for steroid policy (35%), administration ofdrotrecogin alfa (0%) and selective digestive decontamination (15%). There is varying conformity to the international sepsis guidelines among physicians caring for patients in our general ICU. Since increased conformity would improve survival and reduce morbidity, there is need for sustained education and guideline based performance improvement.

  19. Nurse dose: linking staffing variables to adverse patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Sidani, Souraya; Covell, Christine L; Antonakos, Cathy L

    2011-01-01

    Inconsistent findings in more than 100 studies have made it difficult to explain how variation in nurse staffing affects patient outcomes. Nurse dose, defined as the level of nurses required to provide patient care in hospital settings, draws on variables used in staffing studies to describe the influence of many staffing variables on outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the construct validity of nurse dose by determining its association with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and reported patient falls on a sample of inpatient adult acute care units. Staffing data came from 26 units in Ontario, Canada, and Michigan. Financial and human resource data were data sources for staffing variables. Sources of data for MRSA came from infection control departments. Incident reports were the data source for patient falls. Data analysis consisted of bivariate correlations and Poisson regression. Bivariate correlations revealed that nurse dose attributes (active ingredient and intensity) were associated significantly with both outcomes. Active ingredient (education, experience, skill mix) and intensity (full-time employees, registered nurse [RN]:patient ratio, RN hours per patient day) were significant predictors of MRSA. Coefficients for both attributes were negative and almost identical. Both attributes were significant predictors of reported patient falls, and coefficients were again negative, but coefficient sizes differed. By conceptualizing nurse and staffing variables (education, experience, skill mix, full-time employees, RN:patient ratio, RN hours per patient day) as attributes of nurse dose and by including these in the same analysis, it is possible to determine their relative influence on MRSA infections and reported patient falls.

  20. Facets of career satisfaction for women physicians in the United States: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Rabab; Raymer, Lindsay; Kunik, Mark; Fisher, Joslyn

    2012-01-01

    Women make up a growing proportion of the physician workforce, and their career satisfaction may affect their health. The authors hypothesized that many facets adversely affecting career satisfaction in women physicians were extrinsic, therefore, preventable or modifiable. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature in English published through February 2010 to examine facets of career satisfaction of U.S. women physicians. The authors used the women physician AND job satisfaction OR career satisfaction Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms, and reviewed bibliographies of key articles to ensure inclusion of relevant studies. The authors used the "Strengthening the Reporting of Observation Studies in Epidemiology" quality tool. Of an initial 1,000 studies, only 30 met the inclusion criteria. Facets reported most frequently to influence career satisfaction for women physicians were income/prestige, practice characteristics, and personal/family characteristics. Overall, career satisfaction for women and men physicians was 73.4% (range = 56.4% to 90%) and 73.2% (range = 59% to 90%), respectively. When compared with men, women physicians were more concerned with perceived lack of time for relationships with patients, colleagues, and family; less satisfied with mentoring relationships and support from all sources; and less satisfied with career-advancement opportunities, recognition, and salary. Career satisfaction can affect health, as well as health and safety of patients. Many factors adversely affecting career satisfaction for women physicians are extrinsic and, therefore, modifiable.

  1. Effect of Pharmacist Participation During Physician Rounds and Prescription Error in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlina A. Turnodihardjo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patient’s safety is now a prominent issue in pharmaceutical care because of adverse drug events that is common in hospitalized patients. Majority of error are likely occured during prescribing, which is the first stage of pharmacy process. Prescription errors mostly occured in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU, which is due to the severity of the illness of its patients as well as the large number of medications prescribed. Pharmacist participation actually could reduce prescribing error made by doctors. The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of pharmacist participation during physician rounds on prescription errors in the ICU. This study was a quasi-experimental design with one group pre-post test. A prospective study was conducted from April to May 2015 by screening 110 samples of orders. Screening was done to identify type of prescription errors. Prescription error was defined as error in the prescription writing process – incomplete information and not according to agreement. Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze the differences in prescribing errors. The results showed that there was the differences between prescription errors before and during the pharmacist participation (p<0.05. There was also a significant negative correlation between the frequency of pharmacist recommendation on drug ordering and prescription errors (r= –0.638; p<0.05. It means the pharmacist participation was one of the strategies that can be adopted to prevent in prescribing errors and implementation of collaboration between both doctors and pharmacists. In other words, the supporting hospital management system which would encourage interpersonal communication among health care proffesionals is needed.

  2. Life-sustaining treatment decisions in Portuguese intensive care units: a national survey of intensive care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Teresa; Fonseca, Teresa; Pereira, Sofia; Lencastre, Luís

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the opinion of Portuguese intensive care physicians regarding 'do-not-resuscitate' (DNR) orders and decisions to withhold/withdraw treatment. A questionnaire was sent to all physicians working on a full-time basis in all intensive care units (ICUs) registered with the Portuguese Intensive Care Society. A total of 266 questionnaires were sent and 175 (66%) were returned. Physicians from 79% of the ICUs participated. All participants stated that DNR orders are applied in their units, and 98.3% stated that decisions to withhold treatment and 95.4% stated that decisions to withdraw treatment are also applied. About three quarters indicated that only the medical group makes these decisions. Fewer than 15% of the responders stated that they involve nurses, 9% involve patients and fewer than 11% involve patients' relatives in end-of-life decisions. Physicians with more than 10 years of clinical experience more frequently indicated that they involve nurses in these decisions (P atheist doctors more frequently involve patients' relatives in decisions to withhold/withdraw treatment (P religious beliefs of the respondents influences the way in which these decisions are made.

  3. Psychosocial determinants of self-reported hand hygiene behaviour: a survey comparing physicians and nurses in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lengerke, T; Lutze, B; Graf, K; Krauth, C; Lange, K; Schwadtke, L; Stahmeyer, J; Chaberny, I F

    2015-09-01

    Research applying psychological behaviour change theories to hand hygiene compliance is scarce, especially for physicians. To identify psychosocial determinants of self-reported hand hygiene behaviour (HHB) of physicians and nurses in intensive care units (ICUs). A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire that applied concepts from the Health Action Process Approach on hygienic hand disinfection was conducted in 10 ICUs and two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation units at Hannover Medical School, Germany. Self-reported compliance was operationalized as always disinfecting one's hands when given tasks associated with risk of infection. Using seven-point Likert scales, behavioural planning, maintenance self-efficacy and action control were assessed as psychological factors, and personnel and material resources, organizational problems and cooperation on the ward were assessed as perceived environmental factors. Multiple logistic regression analysis was employed. In total, 307 physicians and 348 nurses participated in this study (response rates 70.9% and 63.4%, respectively). Self-reported compliance did not differ between the groups (72.4% vs 69.4%, P = 0.405). While nurses reported stronger planning, self-efficacy and action control, physicians indicated better personnel resources and cooperation on the ward (P Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physician experiences and preferences in the treatment of HR+/HER2− metastatic breast cancer in the United States: a physician survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Peggy L.; Hao, Yanni; Xie, Jipan; Li, Nanxin; Zhong, Yichen; Zhou, Zhou; Signorovitch, James E.; Wu, Eric Q.

    2015-01-01

    Sequential endocrine therapy (ET) is recommended for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2−) metastatic breast cancer (mBC) and without visceral symptoms. Chemotherapy (CT) can be considered after sequential ETs, but is associated with adverse side effects. We assessed physicians' preferences and self-reported prescribing patterns for ET and CT in the treatment of HR+/HER2− mBC at community practices in the United States. Community-based oncologists/hematologists from a nationwide online panel who treated postmenopausal women with HR+/HER2− mBC were invited to complete a survey, blinded to the identity of study sponsor. Treatment preferences were collected by treatment class of ET-based regimens versus CT and by agent for postmenopausal HR+/HER2− mBC patients after prior nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor use in the adjuvant or mBC setting. Among 213 physicians who completed the survey, 78% were male, 71% were based in small/intermediate practices (2–9 oncologists/subspecialists), 55% had >10 years of experience, and 58% referred to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines when treating mBC. Among first-line ETs, anastrozole was the most frequently used treatment (35%), followed by everolimus-based (EVE, 34%) and fulvestrant-based (FUL, 15%) therapy. After first-line ET, the most preferred second- and third-line treatments were ET monotherapy (48% and 39%), ET combination therapy (31% and 19%), and CT monotherapy (13% and 30%). Comparing EVE versus FUL, physicians preferred EVE in all lines but first line. Efficacy was the most important consideration for treatment choice. Physicians prescribed CT in early lines mainly because of visceral symptoms. This survey of treatment patterns for HR+/HER2− mBC in community practice suggested that after first-line ET, ET mono- or combination therapy was commonly used for the second- and third-line treatments and CT

  5. Synthesis of the project leadership staffing needs for successful development of alternative delivery programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This research provides a synthesis of practices in organizational structuring and professional staffing of the innovative delivery units in several state DOTs across the nation that are actively utilizing alternative project delivery. Several major c...

  6. Nursing teamwork, staff characteristics, work schedules, and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Lee, Hyunhwa

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore whether and how staff characteristics, staffing, and scheduling variables are associated with the level of teamwork in nursing staff on acute care hospital patient units. This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 1,758 nursing staff members from two different hospitals on 38 patient care units who completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey in 2008. This study focused on nursing teams who are stationed on a particular patient care unit (as opposed to visitors to the units). The return rate was 56.9%. The sample was made up of 77.4% nurses (registered nurses and licensed practical nurses), 11.9% assistive personnel, and 7.9% unit secretaries. Teamwork varied by unit and service type, with the highest scores occurring in pediatrics and maternity and the lowest scores on the medical-surgical and emergency units. Staff with less than 6 months of experience, those working 8- or 10-hour shifts (as opposed to 12 hours or a combination of 8 and 12 hours), part-time staff (as opposed to full time), and those working on night shift had higher teamwork scores. The higher teamwork scores were also associated with no or little overtime. The higher perception of the adequacy of staffing and the fewer patients cared for on a previous shift, the higher the teamwork scores. There is a relationship between selected staff characteristics, aspects of work schedules, staffing, and teamwork. Nursing staff want to work where teamwork is high, and perceptions of good staffing lead to higher teamwork. Higher teamwork scores correlated with those who worked less overtime.

  7. Cognitive and Other Strategies to Mitigate the Effects of Fatigue. Lessons from Staff Physicians Working in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Natalie; Ayas, Najib T; Stelfox, Henry T; Peets, Adam D

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue is common among physicians and adversely affects their performance. To identify strategies that attending physicians use when fatigued to maintain clinical performance in the intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a qualitative study using focus groups and structured interviews of attending ICU physicians working in academic centers in Canada. In three focus group meetings, we engaged a total of 11 physicians to identify strategies used to prevent and cope with fatigue. In the focus groups, 21 cognitive strategies were identified and classified into 9 categories (minimizing number of tasks, using techniques to improve retention of details, using a structured approach to patient care, asking for help, improving opportunities for focusing, planning ahead, double-checking, adjusting expectations, and modulating alertness). In addition, various lifestyle strategies were mentioned as important in preventing fatigue (e.g., protecting sleep before call, adequate exercise, and limiting alcohol). Telephone interviews were then conducted (n = 15 physicians) with another group of intensivists. Structured questions were asked about the strategies identified in the focus groups that were most useful during ICU activities. In the interviews, the most useful and frequently used strategies were prioritizing tasks that need to be done immediately and postponing tasks that can wait, working systematically, using a structured approach, and avoiding distractions. ICU physicians reported using a variety of deliberate cognitive and lifestyle strategies to prevent and cope with fatigue. Given the low cost and intuitive nature of the majority of these strategies, further investigations should be done to better characterize their effectiveness in improving performance.

  8. Characteristics of Public, Private, and Bureau of Indian Education Elementary and Secondary School Teachers in the United States: Results From the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey. First Look. NCES 2009-324

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Jared

    2009-01-01

    This report presents selected findings from the school teacher data files of the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is a nationally representative sample survey of public, private, and Bureau of Indian Education-funded (BIE) K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The public school…

  9. The ability of intensive care unit physicians to estimate long-term prognosis in survivors of critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ivo W; Cremer, Olaf L; de Lange, Dylan W; Slooter, Arjen J C; van Delden, Johannes Hans J M; van Dijk, Diederik; Peelen, Linda M

    2018-02-01

    To assess the reliability of physicians' prognoses for intensive care unit (ICU) survivors with respect to long-term survival and health related quality of life (HRQoL). We performed an observational cohort-study in a single mixed tertiary ICU in The Netherlands. ICU survivors with a length of stay >48h were included. At ICU discharge, one-year prognosis was estimated by physicians using the four-option Sabadell score to record their expectations. The outcome of interest was poor outcome, which was defined as dying within one-year follow-up, or surviving with an EuroQoL5D-3L index <0.4. Among 1399 ICU survivors, 1068 (76%) subjects were expected to have a good outcome; 243 (18%) a poor long-term prognosis; 43 (3%) a poor short-term prognosis, and 45 (3%) to die in hospital (i.e. Sabadell score levels). Poor outcome was observed in 38%, 55%, 86%, and 100% of these groups respectively (concomitant c-index: 0.61). The expected prognosis did not match observed outcome in 365 (36%) patients. This was almost exclusively (99%) due to overoptimism. Physician experience did not affect results. Prognoses estimated by physicians incorrectly predicted long-term survival and HRQoL in one-third of ICU survivors. Moreover, inaccurate prognoses were generally the result of overoptimistic expectations of outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physician training in aerospace medicine--an historical review in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doarn, Charles R; Mohler, Stanley R

    2013-02-01

    The training of U.S. physicians in aviation medicine closely followed the development of reliable airplanes. This training has matured as aviation and space travel have become more routine over the past several decades. In the U.S., this training began in support of military pilots who were flying increasingly complex aircraft in the early part of the 20th century. As individuals reached into the stratosphere, low Earth orbit, and eventually to the Moon, physicians were trained not only through military efforts but in academic settings as well. This paper provides an historical summary of how physician training in aerospace medicine developed in the U.S., citing both the development of the military activities and, more importantly, the perspectives of the academic programs. This history is important as we move forward in the development of commercial space travel and the needs that such a business model will be required to meet.

  11. A new safety event reporting system improves physician reporting in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerer, Douglas J E; Nast, Patricia A; Harris, Carolyn B; Krauss, Melissa J; Jones, Rebecca M; Boyle, Walter A; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M; Dunagan, W Claiborne; Fraser, Victoria J

    2006-06-01

    Medical errors are common, and physicians have notably been poor medical error reporters. In the SICU, reporting was generally poor and reporting by physicians was virtually nonexistent. This study was designed to observe changes in error reporting in an SICU when a new card-based system (SAFE) was introduced. Before implementation of the SAFE reporting system, education was given to all SICU healthcare providers. The SAFE system was introduced into the SICU for a 9-month period from March 2003 through November 2003, to replace an underused online system. Data were collected from the SAFE card reports and the online reporting systems during introduction, removal, and reimplementation of these cards. Reporting rates were calculated as number of reported events per 1,000 patient days. Reporting rates increased from 19 to 51 reports per 1,000 patient days after the SAFE cards were introduced into the ICU (preporting increased most, rising from 0.3 to 5.8 reports per 1,000 patient days; nursing reporting also increased from 18 to 39 reports per 1,000 patient days (both preporting declined to 0 reports per 1,000 patient days (p=0.01) and rose to 8.1 (p=0.001) when the cards were returned, similar to nursing results. A higher proportion of physician reports were events that caused harm compared with no effect (p reporting system, combined with appropriate education, improved overall reporting in the SICU, especially among physician providers. Nurses were more likely to use reporting systems than were physicians. Physician reports were more likely to be of events that caused harm.

  12. Physician Attitudes Toward Adult Vaccines and Other Preventive Practices, United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Laura P; Bridges, Carolyn B; Harpaz, Rafael; Allison, Mandy A; O' Leary, Sean T; Crane, Lori A; Brtnikova, Michaela; Stokley, Shannon; Beaty, Brenda L; Jimenez-Zambrano, Andrea; Kempe, Allison

    2016-01-01

    We described the following among U.S. primary care physicians: (1) perceived importance of vaccines recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices relative to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) preventive services, (2) attitudes toward the U.S. adult immunization schedule, and (3) awareness and use of Medicare preventive service visits. We conducted an Internet and mail survey from March to June 2012 among national networks of general internists and family physicians. We received responses from 352 of 445 (79%) general internists and 255 of 409 (62%) family physicians. For a 67-year-old hypothetical patient, 540/606 (89%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 87, 92) of physicians ranked seasonal influenza vaccine and 487/607 (80%, 95% CI 77, 83) ranked pneumococcal vaccine as very important, whereas 381/604 (63%, 95% CI 59, 67) ranked Tdap/Td vaccine and 288/607 (47%, 95% CI 43, 51) ranked herpes zoster vaccine as very important (pimportant than Tdap/Td and herpes zoster vaccines. For the hypothetical patient aged 30 years, the number and percentage of physicians who reported that the Tdap/Td vaccine (377/604; 62%, 95% CI 59, 66) is very important was greater than the number and percentage who reported that the seasonal influenza vaccine (263/605; 43%, 95% CI 40, 47) is very important (pimportant than was any vaccine. A total of 172 of 587 physicians (29%) found aspects of the adult immunization schedule confusing. Among physicians aware of "Welcome to Medicare" and annual wellness visits, 492/514 (96%, 95% CI 94, 97) and 329/496 (66%, 95% CI 62, 70), respectively, reported having conducted fewer than 10 such visits in the previous month. Despite lack of prioritization of vaccines by ACIP, physicians are prioritizing some vaccines over others and ranking some vaccines below other preventive services. These attitudes and confusion about the immunization schedule may result in missed opportunities for vaccination. Medicare preventive visits are not

  13. Texas Nurse Staffing Trends Before and After Mandated Nurse Staffing Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Terry; Heui Bae, Sung; Murry, Nicole; Hamilton, Patti

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the evolution of mandated nurse staffing committees in Texas from 2002 to 2009 and presents a study that analyzed nurse staffing trends in Texas using a secondary analysis of hospital staffing data (N = 313 hospitals) from 2000 to 2012 obtained from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey. Nurse staffing patterns based on three staffing variables for registered nurses (RNs), licensed vocational nurses (LVNs), and total licensed nurses were identified: full-time equivalents per 1,000 adjusted patient days, productive hours per adjusted patient day, and RN skill mix. Similar to national trends between 2000 and 2012, most Texas hospitals experienced an increase in RN and total nurse staffing, decrease in LVN staffing, and an increase in RN skill mix. The magnitude of total nurse staffing changes in Texas (5% increase) was smaller than national trends (13.6% increase). Texas's small, rural, government hospitals and those with the highest preregulation staffing levels experienced the least change in staffing between 2000 and 2012: median change of 0 to .13 full-time equivalents per 1,000 adjusted patient days and median change in productive hours per patient day of 0 to .23. The varying effects of staffing committees in different organizational contexts should be considered in future staffing legislative proposals and other policy initiatives. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Management of Helicobacter Pylori in the United States: Results from a national survey of gastroenterology physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Traci T; Scranton, Rebecca A; Brown, Heidi E; Harris, Robin B; Chen, Zhao; Musuku, Sunitha; Oren, Eyal

    2017-07-01

    We sought to determine current knowledge and practices among gastroenterology physicians and assess adherence to current guidelines for H. pylori management. Online surveys were distributed in 2014 to practicing gastroenterology physicians for information related to the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection. A total of 582 completed surveys were reviewed. The H. pylori screening test used "almost always" was gastric biopsy obtained during endoscopy (histology) (59%) followed by stool antigen test (20%). Standard triple therapy for 14days was commonly prescribed by 53% of respondents. The stool antigen test was most frequently chosen to confirm H. pylori eradication (51%), although only 58% of physicians checked for eradication in patients who underwent treatment. Adherence to current American College of Gastroenterology guidelines is low. Although more physicians treat patients with a positive H. pylori test, only half ensure eradication after treatment. Improving knowledge of the resistance patterns of H. pylori may be critical to ensure successful eradication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Communication patterns of primary care physicians in the United States and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.; Roter, D.L.; Hulsman, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While international comparisons of medical practice have noted differences in length of visit, few studies have addressed the dynamics of visit exchange. OBJECTIVES: To compare the communication of Dutch and U.S. hypertensive patients and their physicians in routine medical visits.

  16. Communication patterns of primary care physicians in the United States and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, Jozien M.; Roter, Debra L.; Hulsman, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    While international comparisons of medical practice have noted differences in length of visit, few studies have addressed the dynamics of visit exchange. To compare the communication of Dutch and U.S. hypertensive patients and their physicians in routine medical visits. Secondary analysis of visit

  17. Cost consideration in the clinical guidance documents of physician specialty societies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer A T; Pearson, Steven D

    2013-06-24

    Despite increasing concerns regarding the cost of health care, the consideration of costs in the development of clinical guidance documents by physician specialty societies has received little analysis. To evaluate the approach to consideration of cost in publicly available clinical guidance documents and methodological statements produced between 2008 and 2012 by the 30 largest US physician specialty societies. Qualitative document review. Whether costs are considered in clinical guidance development, mechanism of cost consideration, and the way that cost issues were used in support of specific clinical practice recommendations. Methodological statements for clinical guidance documents indicated that 17 of 30 physician societies (57%) explicitly integrated costs, 4 (13%) implicitly considered costs, 3 (10%) intentionally excluded costs, and 6 (20%) made no mention. Of the 17 societies that explicitly integrated costs, 9 (53%) consistently used a formal system in which the strength of recommendation was influenced in part by costs, whereas 8 (47%) were inconsistent in their approach or failed to mention the exact mechanism for considering costs. Among the 138 specific recommendations in these guidance documents that included cost as part of the rationale, the most common form of recommendation (50 [36%]) encouraged the use of a specific medical service because of equal effectiveness and lower cost. Slightly more than half of the largest US physician societies explicitly consider costs in developing their clinical guidance documents; among these, approximately half use an explicit mechanism for integrating costs into the strength of recommendations. Many societies remain vague in their approach. Physician specialty societies should demonstrate greater transparency and rigor in their approach to cost consideration in documents meant to influence care decisions.

  18. Strategic alliance between the infectious diseases specialist and intensive care unit physician for change in antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, D; Belloni, R

    2005-02-01

    There is a general consensus that antimicrobial use in intensive care units (ICU) is greater than that in general wards. By implementing a strategy of systematic infectious disease consultations in agreement with the ICU chief, we have modified the antibiotic prescription habits of the ICU physician. A reduction was observed in the use of selected antibiotics (third-generation cephalosporins, vancomycin, carbapenems and piperacillin-tazobactam), with a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay for ICU patients and lower antibiotic costs without negative impact on patient mortality. Leadership by the infectious diseases consultant in combination with commitment by ICU physicians is a simple and effective method to change antibiotic prescription habits in the ICU.

  19. The absence of cruelty is not the presence of humanness: physicians and the death penalty in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivot Joel B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The death penalty by lethal injection is a legal punishment in the United States. Sodium Thiopental, once used in the death penalty cocktail, is no longer available for use in the United States as a consequence of this association. Anesthesiologists possess knowledge of Sodium Thiopental and possible chemical alternatives. Further, lethal injection has the look and feel of a medical act thereby encouraging physician participation and comment. Concern has been raised that the death penalty by lethal injection, is cruel. Physicians are ethically directed to prevent cruelty within the doctor-patient relationship and ethically prohibited from participation in any component of the death penalty. The US Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty is not cruel per se and is not in conflict with the 8th amendment of the US constitution. If the death penalty is not cruel, it requires no further refinement. If, on the other hand, the death penalty is in fact cruel, physicians have no mandate outside of the doctor patient relationship to reduce cruelty. Any intervention in the name of cruelty reduction, in the setting of lethal injection, does not lead to a more humane form of punishment. If physicians contend that the death penalty can be botched, they wrongly direct that it can be improved. The death penalty cocktail, as a method to reduce suffering during execution, is an unverifiable claim. At best, anesthetics produce an outward appearance of calmness only and do not address suffering as a consequence of the anticipation of death on the part of the condemned.

  20. The absence of cruelty is not the presence of humanness: physicians and the death penalty in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivot, Joel B

    2012-12-03

    The death penalty by lethal injection is a legal punishment in the United States. Sodium Thiopental, once used in the death penalty cocktail, is no longer available for use in the United States as a consequence of this association. Anesthesiologists possess knowledge of Sodium Thiopental and possible chemical alternatives. Further, lethal injection has the look and feel of a medical act thereby encouraging physician participation and comment. Concern has been raised that the death penalty by lethal injection, is cruel. Physicians are ethically directed to prevent cruelty within the doctor-patient relationship and ethically prohibited from participation in any component of the death penalty. The US Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty is not cruel per se and is not in conflict with the 8th amendment of the US constitution. If the death penalty is not cruel, it requires no further refinement. If, on the other hand, the death penalty is in fact cruel, physicians have no mandate outside of the doctor patient relationship to reduce cruelty. Any intervention in the name of cruelty reduction, in the setting of lethal injection, does not lead to a more humane form of punishment. If physicians contend that the death penalty can be botched, they wrongly direct that it can be improved. The death penalty cocktail, as a method to reduce suffering during execution, is an unverifiable claim. At best, anesthetics produce an outward appearance of calmness only and do not address suffering as a consequence of the anticipation of death on the part of the condemned.

  1. STAF: A Powerful and Sophisticated CAI System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loach, Ken

    1982-01-01

    Describes the STAF (Science Teacher's Authoring Facility) computer-assisted instruction system developed at Leeds University (England), focusing on STAF language and major program features. Although programs for the system emphasize physical chemistry and organic spectroscopy, the system and language are general purpose and can be used in any…

  2. Assertion Practices and Beliefs Among Nurses and Physicians on an Inpatient Pediatric Medical Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jennifer; Simmons, Ryan; Barnard, Juliana

    2016-05-01

    Teamwork and communication are critical elements of safe and effective patient care. Standardized communication tools have been implemented in many health care organizations, but little is known about attitudes and perceptions of assertion, the willingness to "speak up," by nurses and physicians at an academic pediatric institution. We conducted 6 focus groups with nurses, residents, and attending physicians using a standardized semistructured focus group guide to promote discussion. Focus groups were recorded and transcribed, and results were analyzed by 2 independent reviewers to identify thematic content. Three themes emerged: (1) interpersonal factors, (2) organizational factors, and (3) complexity of care environment. Subthemes were the roles of hierarchy, relationships, and communication and personality style; the value of using standardized communication tools such as SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation), direct face-to-face communication, and geographic and technology factors; and the need for coordinated communication and agreement across care team members about the care plans. Nurses reported reliance on peers for decision-making, on when and how to assert on behalf of patient care. Nurses and residents experienced barriers to assertion from concerns of relationships and their position within professional hierarchies. Attending physicians were supportive of being asserted to by any care team provider. Interpersonal relationships, power dynamics, and organizational factors impact care team providers' willingness to assert in the inpatient setting. Standardized communication tools are effective. Further development and implementation of communication models that support experience, peer reliance, and direct face-to-face communication are warranted to improve assertion communication in the inpatient setting

  3. Physician discretion is safe and may lower stress test utilization in emergency department chest pain unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Anthony M; Arrighi, James A; Siket, Matthew S; Gibbs, Frantz J

    2012-03-01

    Chest pain unit (CPU) observation with defined stress utilization protocols is a common management option for low-risk emergency department patients. We sought to evaluate the safety of a joint emergency medicine and cardiology staffed CPU. Prospective observational trial of consecutive patients admitted to an emergency department CPU was conducted. A standard 6-hour observation protocol was followed by cardiology consultation and stress utilization largely at their discretion. Included patients were at low/intermediate risk by the American Heart Association, had nondiagnostic electrocardiograms, and a normal initial troponin. Excluded patients were those with an acute comorbidity, age >75, and a history of coronary artery disease, or had a coexistent problem restricting 24-hour observation. Primary outcome was 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events-defined as death, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction, revascularization, or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A total of 1063 patients were enrolled over 8 months. The mean age of the patients was 52.8 ± 11.8 years, and 51% (95% confidence interval [CI], 48-54) were female. The mean thrombolysis in myocardial infarction and Diamond & Forrester scores were 0.6% (95% CI, 0.51-0.62) and 33% (95% CI, 31-35), respectively. In all, 51% (95% CI, 48-54) received stress testing (52% nuclear stress, 39% stress echocardiogram, 5% exercise, 4% other). In all, 0.9% patients (n = 10, 95% CI, 0.4-1.5) were diagnosed with a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and 2.2% (n = 23, 95% CI, 1.3-3) with acute coronary syndrome. There was 1 (95% CI, 0%-0.3%) case of a 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events. The 51% stress test utilization rate was less than the range reported in previous CPU studies (P < 0.05). Joint emergency medicine and cardiology management of patients within a CPU protocol is safe, efficacious, and may safely reduce stress testing rates.

  4. Shifting tides in the emigration patterns of Canadian physicians to the United States: a cross-sectional secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Thomas R; Petterson, Stephen; Finnegan, Sean; Bazemore, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The relative ease of movement of physicians across the Canada/US border has led to what is sometimes referred to as a 'brain drain' and previous analysis estimated that the equivalent of two graduating classes from Canadian medical schools were leaving to practice in the US each year. Both countries fill gaps in physician supply with international medical graduates (IMGs) so the movement of Canadian trained physicians to the US has international ramifications. Medical school enrolments have been increased on both sides of the border, yet there continues to be concerns about adequacy of physician human resources. This analysis was undertaken to re-examine the issue of Canadian physician migration to the US. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2015 American Medical Association (AMA) Masterfile to identify and locate any graduates of Canadian schools of medicine (CMGs) working in the United States in direct patient care. We reviewed annual reports of the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS); the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry (CAPER); and the Canadian Collaborative Centre for Physician Resources (C3PR). Beginning in the early 1990s the number of CMGs locating in the U.S. reached an all-time high and then abruptly dropped off in 1995. CMGs are going to the US for post-graduate training in smaller numbers and, are less likely to remain than at any time since the 1970's. This four decade retrospective found considerable variation in the migration pattern of CMGs to the US. CMGs' decision to emigrate to the U.S. may be influenced by both 'push' and 'pull' factors. The relative strength of these factors changed and by 2004, more CMGs were returning from abroad than were leaving and the current outflow is negligible. This study supports the need for medical human resource planning to assume a long-term view taking into account national and international trends to avoid the rapid changes that were observed. These results are of importance to medical

  5. [Impact of Increased Supply of Newly Licensed Nurses on Hospital Nurse Staffing and Policy Implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunmi; You, Sunju; Kim, Jinhyun

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of increasing the supply of newly licensed nurses on improving the hospital nurse staffing grades for the period of 2009~2014. Using public administrative data, we analyzed the effect of newly licensed nurses on staffing in 1,594 hospitals using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) ordered logistic regression, and of supply variation on improving staffing grades in 1,042 hospitals using GEE logistic regression. An increase of one newly licensed nurse per 100 beds in general units had significantly lower odds of improving staffing grades (grades 6~0 vs. 7) (odds ratio=0.95, p=.005). The supply of newly licensed nurses increased by 32% from 2009 to 2014, and proportion of hospitals whose staffing grade had improved, not changed, and worsened was 19.1%, 70.1%, and 10.8% respectively. Compared to 2009, the supply variation of newly licensed nurses in 2014 was not significantly related to the increased odds of improving staffing grades in the region (OR=1.02, p=.870). To achieve a balance in the regional supply and demand for hospital nurses, compliance with nurse staffing legislation and revisions in the nursing fee differentiation policy are needed. Rather than relying on increasing nurse supply, retention policies for new graduate nurses are required to build and sustain competent nurse workforce in the future. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  6. Woodrow Wilson's hidden stroke of 1919: the impact of patient-physician confidentiality on United States foreign policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Richard P; Storey, Christopher M; Guthikonda, Bharat; Missios, Symeon; Nanda, Anil; Cooper, John M

    2015-07-01

    World War I catapulted the United States from traditional isolationism to international involvement in a major European conflict. Woodrow Wilson envisaged a permanent American imprint on democracy in world affairs through participation in the League of Nations. Amid these defining events, Wilson suffered a major ischemic stroke on October 2, 1919, which left him incapacitated. What was probably his fourth and most devastating stroke was diagnosed and treated by his friend and personal physician, Admiral Cary Grayson. Grayson, who had tremendous personal and professional loyalty to Wilson, kept the severity of the stroke hidden from Congress, the American people, and even the president himself. During a cabinet briefing, Grayson formally refused to sign a document of disability and was reluctant to address the subject of presidential succession. Wilson was essentially incapacitated and hemiplegic, yet he remained an active president and all messages were relayed directly through his wife, Edith. Patient-physician confidentiality superseded national security amid the backdrop of friendship and political power on the eve of a pivotal juncture in the history of American foreign policy. It was in part because of the absence of Woodrow Wilson's vocal and unwavering support that the United States did not join the League of Nations and distanced itself from the international stage. The League of Nations would later prove powerless without American support and was unable to thwart the rise and advance of Adolf Hitler. Only after World War II did the United States assume its global leadership role and realize Wilson's visionary, yet contentious, groundwork for a Pax Americana. The authors describe Woodrow Wilson's stroke, the historical implications of his health decline, and its impact on United States foreign policy.

  7. Genital Herpes - Initial Visits to Physicians' Offices, United States, 1966-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 48. Genital Herpes — Initial Visits to Physicians’ Offices, United States, 1966 – ... Statistics page . NOTE : The relative standard errors for genital herpes estimates of more than 100,000 range from ...

  8. Extension Staffing Models to Serve 4-H Clientele in Changing Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna R. Gillespie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In response to budget cuts in 2002, 4-H staffing models were restructured. The response by University of Idaho Extension was intended to continue meeting the needs of Idaho’s citizens with fewer UI Extension faculty. This staffing reorganization led to the formation of the District III 4-H Team who united to bring stronger 4-H programs to south central Idaho and expand programs to underserved audiences. Information from surveys and interviews over the past seven years reflects the effectiveness, challenges and successes of the District III 4-H Team. In Making the Best Better: 4-H Staffing Patterns and Trends in the Largest Professional Network in the Nation (2007, author Kirk A. Astroth notes a nationwide change in 4-H leadership at the county level from 4-H faculty to program assistants or coordinators. The information gathered in our research may help other states determine staffing models to meet the needs of clientele in these changing times.

  9. Knowledge of binge eating disorder: a cross-sectional survey of physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supina, Dylan; Herman, Barry K; Frye, Carla B; Shillington, Alicia C

    2016-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED)--now a designated disorder in the DSM-5--is the most prevalent eating disorder (ED), affecting 2-3% of the US population. This survey of US physicians assesses how BED is diagnosed, treated and referred. Internists, family practitioners, obstetrics/gynecologist (OB/GYNs) and psychiatrists were randomly selected from a nationally-representative panel. Participants completed an online survey and reviewed case vignettes consistent with DSM-5-defined BED, then answered questions to elicit whether they would assess for psychiatric conditions including EDs. Those reporting they would screen and who correctly identified BED in vignettes received additional questions about BED diagnosis, treatment, and referral patterns. Of 278 physicians surveyed, 96% were board-certified and 87% had practiced >10 years. 23% were psychiatrists, 27% family practitioners, 31% internists and 19% OB/GYNs. 92% were 'somewhat likely' to screen for ED after reviewing DSM-5-consistent vignettes. 206 (74%) correctly identified BED. Of these, 33% and 68% reported they proactively screen eating habits for all patients and obese patients, respectively. 10% reported not screening eating habits even in the presence of ED symptoms. Fewer than half reported using DSM criteria in Diagnosing BED, and 56 (27%) did not recognize BED to be a discreet ED. Although ED awareness is improving, understanding BED as a distinct ED is lacking, which may result in low rates of screening and diagnosis. This study illustrates how taking a complete patient history (including probing BED characteristics) may be an effective first-line strategy for clinicians to facilitate optimal care for these patients.

  10. Staffing in Radiotherapy: An Activity Based Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy requires competent professional staff to ensure safe and effective patient treatment and management. There is a need to provide guidelines that recommend appropriate staffing levels to support the initiation of new services as well as the expansion or upgrade of existing services as even simple upgrades or replacement of existing equipment may have a significant impact on staffing needs. Similarly, the introduction of education and training programmes will require staffing adjustments. A calculation algorithm was developed to predict staffing levels based on the inputs that are known or can be easily estimated. This publication complements other IAEA publications used to support the initiation of basic radiation medicine services including Setting up a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, published in 2008

  11. Relationships of demographic background and practice setting among practicing physician assistants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muma, Richard D; Kelley, Justin; Lies, Shawn

    2010-01-01

    it is assumed that minority health care providers continue to work in primary care and in underserved areas in higher proportions than their nonminority counterparts, regardless of changing workforce practice patterns. The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether this assumption still holds true among US physician assistants (PAs) in light of recent PA specialization. This assumption is important as there is continuing evidence that a similar background between providers and patients can be beneficial to the provider-patient relationship and to patient outcomes. A secondary purpose was to determine the relationships between various demographic variables (eg, race) and current practice specialty and population served among all PAs. this cross-sectional study measured demographic and practice setting survey data. A random sample of 10,500 PAs was surveyed. the main finding was that minority PAs were more likely to care for the underserved (31.9% vs. 19.3%) and to work in primary care practices (38.8% vs. 29.3%) than were nonminorities. A significant relationship was also found between serving underserved populations and nonmarried status, as well as age over 39 (these groups were more likely to serve this population, p time of high school graduation was significantly related to caring for underserved individuals (p Minority PAs were more likely to care for the underserved and work in primary care settings. Certain other demographic variables among all respondents were also significantly related to service to the underserved and work in primary care settings.

  12. Job satisfaction levels of physician assistant faculty in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, Evelyn C; Leafman, Joan S; Wallace, Lisa; Stewart, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Understanding job satisfaction in academia is important in order to recruit and retain faculty. Faculty members with greater job dissatisfaction are more likely to leave than faculty members who are satisfied. Physician assistant (PA) faculty job satisfaction needs to be assessed to determine which job facets are satisfying or dissatisfying. A quantitative descriptive study was done using a Web-based survey sent to PA faculty. The Job Descriptive Index (JDI), a validated survey, was used to measure levels of job satisfaction. The means for each facet were calculated to indicate levels of satisfaction with the job overall, work, supervision, co-workers, pay, promotion, levels of stress, and trustworthiness in management. Correlations were run among demographic factors, salary, and overall job satisfaction. Of the 1,241 PA faculty that received the survey, 239 responses (19.3% response rate) met the criteria for study inclusion. The highest level of satisfaction was with one's co-workers (mean 46.83, range 0 to 54). The promotion facet received the lowest mean level of satisfaction with a 22.2 (range 0 to 54). A small correlation was found between job satisfaction and academic rank (r = -.153, P = .020). Job satisfaction is linked to increased productivity and performance. It is important to understand job satisfaction to make improvements in the appropriate areas. Overall, the results indicate that PA faculty are satisfied with their jobs. Further research is needed to understand the factors that contribute to satisfaction among PA faculty.

  13. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia in the Intensive Care Unit: A Dialogue on Core Ethical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goligher, Ewan C.; Ely, E. Wesley; Sulmasy, Daniel P.; Bakker, Jan; Raphael, John; Volandes, Angelo E.; Patel, Bhavesh M.; Payne, Kate; Hosie, Annmarie; Churchill, Larry; White, Douglas B.; Downar, James

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many patients are admitted to the intensive care unit at or near the end of their lives. Consequently, the increasingly common debate regarding physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia (PAS/E) holds implications for the practice of critical care medicine. The objective of this manuscript is to explore core ethical issues related to PAS/E from the perspective of healthcare professionals and ethicists on both sides of the debate. Synthesis We identified four issues highlighting the key areas of ethical tension central to evaluating PAS/E in medical practice: (1) the benefit or harm of death itself, (2) the relationship between PAS/E and withholding or withdrawing life support, (3) the morality of a physician deliberately causing death, and (4) the management of conscientious objection related to PAS/E in the critical care setting. We present areas of common ground as well as important unresolved differences. Conclusions We reached differing positions on the first three core ethical questions and achieved significant agreement on how critical care clinicians should manage conscientious objections related to PAS/E. The alternative positions presented in this paper may serve to promote open and informed dialogue within the critical care community. PMID:28098622

  14. Factors that affect implementation of a nurse staffing directive: results from a qualitative multi-case evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Claire H; Annis, Ann M; Forman, Jane; Krein, Sarah L; Yankey, Nicholas; Duffy, Sonia A; Taylor, Beth; Sales, Anne E

    2016-08-01

    To assess implementation of the Veterans Health Administration staffing methodology directive. In 2010 the Veterans Health Administration promulgated a staffing methodology directive for inpatient nursing units to address staffing and budget forecasting. A qualitative multi-case evaluation approach assessed staffing methodology implementation. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted from March - June 2014 with Nurse Executives and their teams at 21 facilities. Interviews focused on the budgeting process, implementation experiences, use of data, leadership support, and training. An implementation score was created for each facility using a 4-point rating scale. The scores were used to select three facilities (low, medium and high implementation) for more detailed case studies. After analysing interview summaries, the evaluation team developed a four domain scoring structure: (1) integration of staffing methodology into budget development; (2) implementation of the Directive elements; (3) engagement of leadership and staff; and (4) use of data to support the staffing methodology process. The high implementation facility had leadership understanding and endorsement of staffing methodology, confidence in and ability to work with data, and integration of staffing methodology results into the budgeting process. The low implementation facility reported poor leadership engagement and little understanding of data sources and interpretation. Implementation varies widely across facilities. Implementing staffing methodology in facilities with complex and changing staffing needs requires substantial commitment at all organizational levels especially for facilities that have traditionally relied on historical levels to budget for staffing. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Human Resources Staffing Plan for the Tank Farm Contractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOSLEY, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Human Resources Staffing Plan quantified the equivalent staffing needs required for the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) and its subcontractors to execute the readiness to proceed baseline between FY 2000-2008. The TFC staffing needs were assessed along with the staffings needs of Fluor Hanford and the privatization contractor. The plan then addressed the staffing needs and recruitment strategies required to execute the baseline

  16. Using simulation to isolate physician variation in intensive care unit admission decision making for critically ill elders with end-stage cancer: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnato, Amber E; Hsu, Heather E; Bryce, Cindy L; Lave, Judith R; Emlet, Lillian L; Angus, Derek C; Arnold, Robert M

    2008-12-01

    To determine the feasibility of high-fidelity simulation for studying variation in intensive care unit admission decision making for critically ill elders with end-stage cancer. Mixed qualitative and quantitative analysis of physician subjects participating in a simulation scenario using hospital set, actors, medical chart, and vital signs tracings. The simulation depicted a 78-yr-old man with metastatic gastric cancer, life-threatening hypoxia most likely attributable to cancer progression, and stable preferences to avoid intensive care unit admission and intubation. Two independent raters assessed the simulations and subjects completed a postsimulation web-based survey and debriefing interview. Peter M. Winter Institute for Simulation Education and Research at the University of Pittsburgh. Twenty-seven hospital-based attending physicians, including 6 emergency physicians, 13 hospitalists, and 8 intensivists. Outcomes included qualitative report of clinical verisimilitude during the debriefing interview, survey-reported diagnosis and prognosis, and observed treatment decisions. Independent variables included physician demographics, risk attitude, and reactions to uncertainty. All (100%) reported that the case and simulation were highly realistic, and their diagnostic and prognostic assessments were consistent with our intent. Eight physicians (29.6%) admitted the patient to the intensive care unit. Among the eight physicians who admitted the patient to the intensive care unit, three (37%) initiated palliation, two (25%) documented the patient's code status (do not intubate/do not resuscitate), and one intubated the patient. Among the 19 physicians who did not admit the patient to the intensive care unit, 13 (68%) initiated palliation and 5 (42%) documented code status. Intensivists and emergency physicians (p = 0.048) were more likely to admit the patient to the intensive care unit. Years since medical school graduation were inversely associated with the

  17. The distribution of the h-index among academic emergency physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Lawrence A; St John, Alex; Stolz, Uwe; Matheson, Lincoln; Simpson, Allan; Denninghoff, Kurt R

    2013-10-01

    Hirsch's h-index (h) attempts to measure the combined academic impact and productivity of a scientist by counting the number of publications by an author, ranked in descending order by number of citations, until the paper number equals the number of citations. This approach provides a natural number or index of the number of publications and the number of citations per publication. H was first described in physics and was demonstrated to be highly predictive of continued academic activity, including recognized measures of scientific excellence such as membership in the National Academy of Sciences and being a Nobel laureate. Citation rates, research environments, and years of experience all affect h, making any comparisons appropriate only for scientists working in the same field for a similar time period. The authors are unaware of any report describing the distribution of h among academic emergency physicians (AEPs). The objective was to describe the distribution of h for AEPs and to determine whether Hirsch's demonstration of the h-index as a predictor of continued scholarly activity among physicists would also apply to AEPs. Academic EPs were identified from lists provided on allopathic U.S. emergency medicine (EM) residency program websites. "Harzing's Publish or Perish," a free program available on the Web that queries Google Scholar, was used to calculate h for each AEP. Agreement between raters was analyzed on a subset of 100 EPs. An analysis of the 20 EPs with the top h-indices was performed to characterize the entire body of their scholarly work, and their h-indices were calculated at 12 and 24 years into their careers. A total of 4,744 AEPs from 136 programs were evaluated. Nine programs did not publicly list the faculty at their institutions and were excluded. A linear weighted kappa was used to measure rater concordance, with agreement of 98.3% and κ = 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.861 to 0.957). The majority of AEPs had h-indices of zero or

  18. Chronic Subjunctivity, or, How Physicians Use Diabetes and Insomnia to Manage Futures in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Meyer, Matthew; Callahan-Kapoor, Celina

    2017-01-01

    Prognostication has become central to medical practice, offering clinicians and patients views of particular futures enabled by biomedical expertise and technologies. Drawing on research on diabetes care and sleep medicine in the United States, in this article we suggest that subjectivity is increasingly modeled on medical understandings of chronic illness. These chronic conceptions of the self and society instill in individuals an anxiety about future health outcomes that, in turn, motivate practices oriented at self-care to avoid negative health outcomes and particular medical futures. At its most extreme, these anxieties of self-care trouble conceptions of self and social belonging, particularly in the future tense, leading patients and clinicians to consider intergenerational and public health based on the threats that individual patients pose for others.

  19. Electronic health records to support obesity-related patient care: Results from a survey of United States physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, Kayla L; Dooyema, Carrie A; Onufrak, Stephen J; Foltz, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    Obesity-related electronic health record functions increase the rates of measuring Body Mass Index, diagnosing obesity, and providing obesity services. This study describes the prevalence of obesity-related electronic health record functions in clinical practice and analyzes characteristics associated with increased obesity-related electronic health record sophistication. Data were analyzed from DocStyles, a web-based panel survey administered to 1507 primary care providers practicing in the United States in June, 2013. Physicians were asked if their electronic health record has specific obesity-related functions. Logistical regression analyses identified characteristics associated with improved obesity-related electronic health record sophistication. Of the 88% of providers with an electronic health record, 83% of electronic health records calculate Body Mass Index, 52% calculate pediatric Body Mass Index percentile, and 32% flag patients with abnormal Body Mass Index values. Only 36% provide obesity-related decision support and 17% suggest additional resources for obesity-related care. Characteristics associated with having a more sophisticated electronic health record include age ≤45years old, being a pediatrician or family practitioner, and practicing in a larger, outpatient practice. Few electronic health records optimally supported physician's obesity-related clinical care. The low rates of obesity-related electronic health record functions currently in practice highlight areas to improve the clinical health information technology in primary care practice. More work can be done to develop, implement, and promote the effective utilization of obesity-related electronic health record functions to improve obesity treatment and prevention efforts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. An international comparison of commercial nuclear power plant staffing regulations and practice, 1980--1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.; Hauth, J.; Terrill, E.; Berk, B.; Gore, B.

    1994-03-01

    In this report an international review of regulatory and industry practices is provided in the area of nuclear power plant staffing during the 1980s in Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The objective of this review is to highlight trends in staffing regulatory approaches, industry practices, and issues of concern in other countries that have potential relevance to nuclear power plant staffing issues in the United States. The decade of the 1980s was marked by a great deal of growth in nuclear power operations internationally; however, growth of nuclear power is not expected to continue in the 1990s except in France and Japan. A continuum of regulatory approaches to staffing was identified, ranging from prescribed regulations that are applied to all licensees (Germany is most similar to the United States in this regard), to indirect staffing regulations where the regulatory authority oversees plant operating practices that are agreed to in the plant operating license (most notably, France and the United Kingdom). Most of the changes observed in staffing regulations and practices in the early 1980s were made in response to the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 nuclear power plant (TMI) in 1979. These changes included the widespread issuance of new operator and licensing requirements and the establishment of national training centers. After the post-TMI changes were implemented, a period of relative stability followed. Changes in the latter half of the 1980s have focused on continuing improvements and additions to training curricula and methods, most notably increased reliance on simulator training

  1. Alternative staffing services. Contract transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, C

    1992-03-01

    Contract medical transcription services can be of great assistance in meeting the demands for transcription, without jeopardizing patient, physician, or institutional confidentiality. You simply must require the contract service to provide at least the same degree of protection and preservation of confidentiality that you should require inhouse. To achieve this you must make these requirements explicit, comprehensive, comprehensible, believable, and enforceable. Discuss the requirements with prospective contractors. Review them at least annually with existing contractors and when contracts are due for renewal. Be sure to specify the consequence of breaching confidentiality, and if there are breaches, enforce the terms of the contract. Consult your institution's legal counsel both in developing the contract and in enforcing its provisions. Take into consideration your department's and institution's policies, AHIMA's statement on confidentiality, as well as local, state, and federal laws. Above all, never lose sight of the patient. Ultimately, it is not patient information that you are obligated to protect. It is the patient.

  2. Clinical Impact of a Pharmaceutical Care Programme Developed in a Family Health Unit: Results of a Pharmacist-Physician Collaboration in the Treatment of Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Condinho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The positive impact of pharmacist-physician collaborative care has been reported in the international literature, although examples of this impact are limited in Portugal. We aim to underline the clinical added value for hypertensive patients that results from pharmacist-physician collaborations. Methods: A community trial was conducted at a Portuguese family health unit for 19 months. The intervention group was randomly selected from the global records and members of the group received pharmaceutical care in addition to physician care. The comparison group received only physician care. Both groups were comparable at the beginning of the study. In the intervention group, we analysed the hypertensive patients to evaluate the impact of pharmacist-physician collaboration on the patients’ blood pressure levels. This evaluation was performed by comparing the obtained blood pressure levels with the levels at baseline and between the groups. Results: A total of 17 patients with hypertension were enrolled in the pharmaceutical care programme, 12 of whom were female. The mean age was 68.50±3.26 years and, on average, each patient consumed 6.06±0.93 medicinal products. Thirteen patients were uncontrolled. Compared with the baseline, the intervention group achieved mean reductions of 28.85±5.90 mmHg (p < 0.0005 and 11.23±2.75 mmHg (p < 0.005 in their systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Considering the comparison group, improvements of 18.63±6.44 mmHg (p = 0.011 in systolic blood pressure and 9.03±2.63 mmHg ( p < 0.005 in diastolic blood pressure were observed. Conclusion: Pharmacist-physician collaborative care adds clinical value to the typical physician care provided to hypertensive patients within the context of a Portuguese family health unit.

  3. Improving Resident Communication in the Intensive Care Unit. The Proceduralization of Physician Communication with Patients and Their Surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C; McSparron, Jakob I; Clardy, Peter F; Sullivan, Amy M; Hayes, Margaret M

    2016-09-01

    Effective communication between providers and patients and their surrogates in the intensive care unit (ICU) is crucial for delivery of high-quality care. Despite the identification of communication as a key education focus by the American Board of Internal Medicine, little emphasis is placed on teaching trainees how to effectively communicate in the ICU. Data are conflicting on the best way to teach residents, and institutions vary on their emphasis of communication as a key skill. There needs to be a cultural shift surrounding the education of medical residents in the ICU: communication must be treated with the same emphasis, precision, and importance as placing a central venous catheter in the ICU. We propose that high-stakes communications between physicians and patients or their surrogates must be viewed as a medical procedure that can be taught, assessed, and quality controlled. Medical residents require training, observation, and feedback in specific communication skill sets with the goal of achieving mastery. It is only through supervised training, practice in real time, observation, and feedback that medical residents can become skillful practitioners of communication in the ICU.

  4. Support sought for petition on safer staffing levels in Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    RCN WALES is urging the public to sign an e-petition supporting draft legislation on safe staffing. The petition calls for support for the Safe Nursing Staffing Levels (Wales) Bill, drawn up by Welsh Liberal Democrat leader Kirsty Williams.

  5. 42 CFR 9.9 - Facility staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facility staffing. 9.9 Section 9.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS STANDARDS OF CARE FOR... Biosafety Officer must have experience in developing and monitoring biohazards and dealing with biosafety...

  6. Staffing Policy for Solving the Information Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Tolstoy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Determining staffing policy implementation of information security tasks is given. The basic requirements that must be taken into account when developing policies are defined. The policy framework is determined and recommendations for the design of such policies are formulated. Requirements for the implementation of the policy are defined.

  7. Staffing the Global Organization: "Cultural Nomads"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ruth; Fisher, Ron; Harvey, Michael; Moeller, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the evolution of international staffing in an increasingly globalized and hypercompetitive marketplace. As the issue of staff retention becomes critical in global organizations, it is important to understand the types of managers that may be on or assigned to overseas assignments. The purpose of this article is to present a…

  8. Physician Approaches to Conflict with Families Surrounding End-of-Life Decision-making in the Intensive Care Unit. A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehter, Hashim M; McCannon, Jessica B; Clark, Jack A; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2018-02-01

    Families of critically ill patients are often asked to make difficult decisions to pursue, withhold, or withdraw aggressive care or resuscitative measures, exercising "substituted judgment" from the imagined standpoint of the patient. Conflict may arise between intensive care unit (ICU) physicians and family members regarding the optimal course of care. To characterize how ICU physicians approach and manage conflict with surrogates regarding end-of-life decision-making. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 18 critical care physicians from four academically affiliated hospitals. Interview transcripts were analyzed using methods of grounded theory. Physicians described strategies for engaging families to resolve conflict about end-of-life decision-making and tending to families' emotional health. Physicians commonly began by gauging family receptiveness to recommendations from the healthcare team. When faced with resistance to recommendations for less aggressive care, approaches ranged from deference to family wishes to various persuasive strategies designed to change families' minds, and some of those strategies may be counterproductive or harmful. The likelihood of deferring to family in the event of conflict was associated with the perceived sincerity of the family's "substituted judgment" and the ability to control patient pain and suffering. Physicians reported concern for the family's emotional needs and made efforts to alleviate the burden on families by assuming decision-making responsibility and expressing nonabandonment and commitment to the patient. Physicians were attentive to repairing damage to their relationship with the family in the aftermath of conflict. Finally, physicians described their own emotional responses to conflict, ranging from frustration and anxiety to satisfaction with successful resolution of conflict. Critical care physicians described a complex and multilayered approach to physician-family conflict. The reported strategies

  9. Hospitals with higher nurse staffing had lower odds of readmissions penalties than hospitals with lower staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Matthew D; Berez, Julie; Small, Dylan S

    2013-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act's Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) penalizes hospitals based on excess readmission rates among Medicare beneficiaries. The aim of the program is to reduce readmissions while aligning hospitals' financial incentives with payers' and patients' quality goals. Many evidence-based interventions that reduce readmissions, such as discharge preparation, care coordination, and patient education, are grounded in the fundamentals of basic nursing care. Yet inadequate staffing can hinder nurses' efforts to carry out these processes of care. We estimated the effect that nurse staffing had on the likelihood that a hospital was penalized under the HRRP. Hospitals with higher nurse staffing had 25 percent lower odds of being penalized compared to otherwise similar hospitals with lower staffing. Investment in nursing is a potential system-level intervention to reduce readmissions that policy makers and hospital administrators should consider in the new regulatory environment as they examine the quality of care delivered to US hospital patients.

  10. Maintenance Staffing Standards for Zero-Based Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew C.; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Discusses school preventive maintenance and the variables associated with maintenance staffing standards that address a zero-based budgeting environment. Explores preventive-maintenance measurement for staffing requirements, defines staffing levels and job descriptions, and outlines the factors to consider when creating a maintenance program and…

  11. Perceptions of diabetes control among physicians and people with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled on basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brod, Meryl; Pfeiffer, Kathryn M; Barnett, Anthony H

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large proportion of people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) remain uncontrolled on basal insulin. Yet, there is limited understanding of how people with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (PWUD) perceive control and insulin intensification and whether their perceptions differ from those...... of physicians. The purpose of the study was to investigate perceptions of control and views on insulin intensification among physicians and PWUD. Research design and methods Web surveys of 1012 PWUD on basal insulin and 300 physicians were conducted in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Results...... very/extremely important for deciding whether or not diabetes is well controlled. In contrast PWUD were significantly more likely to place importance on a variety of factors, including energy levels (74.5% vs. 33.0%, p 

  12. EMS-physicians' self reported airway management training and expertise; a descriptive study from the Central Region of Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rognås Leif K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prehospital advanced airway management, including prehospital endotracheal intubation is challenging and recent papers have addressed the need for proper training, skill maintenance and quality control for emergency medical service personnel. The aim of this study was to provide data regarding airway management-training and expertise from the regional physician-staffed emergency medical service (EMS. Methods The EMS in this part of The Central Region of Denmark is a two tiered system. The second tier comprises physician staffed Mobile Emergency Care Units. The medical directors of the programs supplied system data. A questionnaire addressing airway management experience, training and knowledge was sent to the EMS-physicians. Results There are no specific guidelines, standard operating procedures or standardised program for obtaining and maintaining skills regarding prehospital advanced airway management in the schemes covered by this study. 53/67 physicians responded; 98,1% were specialists in anesthesiology, with an average of 17,6 years of experience in anesthesiology, and 7,2 years experience as EMS-physicians. 84,9% reported having attended life support course(s, 64,2% an advanced airway management course. 24,5% fulfilled the curriculum suggested for Danish EMS physicians. 47,2% had encountered a difficult or impossible PHETI, most commonly in a patient in cardiac arrest or a trauma patient. Only 20,8% of the physicians were completely familiar with what back-up devices were available for airway management. Conclusions In this, the first Danish study of prehospital advanced airway management, we found a high degree of experience, education and training among the EMS-physicians, but their equipment awareness was limited. Check-outs, guidelines, standard operating procedures and other quality control measures may be needed.

  13. Physician Appraisals: Key Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klich Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to identify key criteria being used for physician appraisals and to find how communication skills of physicians are valued in those appraisals. ScienceDirect and EBSCOhost databases were used for this search. The results show that a physician appraisal is underestimated both theoretically and empirically. The particular gap exists with respect to the communication skills of physicians, which are rarely present in medical training syllabi and physician assessments. The article contributes to the theoretical discourse on physician appraisals and points out at the inconsistency between the high status of physicians as a key hospital resource on the one hand and, on the other hand, at inadequate and poorly researched assessment of their performance with a special emphasis on communication skills. The article may inspire health managers to develop and implement up-to-date assessment forms for physicians and good managerial practices in this respect in hospitals and other health care units.

  14. Optimizing Team Dynamics: An Assessment of Physician Trainees and Advanced Practice Providers Collaborative Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Cortney B; Simone, Shari; Bagdure, Dayanand; Garber, Nan A; Bhutta, Adnan

    2016-09-01

    The presence of advanced practice providers has become increasingly common in many ICUs. The ideal staffing model for units that contain both advanced practice providers and physician trainees has not been described. The objectives of this study were to evaluate ICU staffing models that include physician trainees and advanced practice providers and their effects on patient outcomes, resident and fellow education, and training experience. A second aim was to assess strategies to promote collaboration between team members. PubMed, CINAHL, OVID MEDLINE, and Cochrane Review from 2002 to 2015. Experimental study designs conducted in an ICU setting. Two reviewers screened articles for eligibility and independently abstracted data using the identified search terms. We found 21 articles describing ICU team structure and outcomes. Four articles were found describing the impact of advanced practice providers on resident or fellow education. Two articles were found discussing strategies to promote collaboration between advanced practice providers and critical care fellows or residents. Several articles were identified describing the utilization of advanced practice providers in the ICU and the impact of models of care on patient outcomes. Limited data exist describing the impact of advanced practice providers on resident and fellow education and training experience. In addition, there are minimal data describing methods to enhance collaboration between providers. Future research should focus on determining the optimal ICU team structure to improve patient outcomes, education of trainees, and job satisfaction of team members and methods to promote collaboration between advanced practice providers and physicians in training.

  15. Is there a (volunteer) doctor in the house? Free clinics and volunteer physician referral networks in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Stephen L; Jellinek, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Although community health centers and public hospitals are the most visible safety-net providers, physicians in private practice are the main source of care for the uninsured and Medicaid enrollees. Yet the number of these physicians providing free care is declining, even as the need for their services increases. One promising strategy for halting the decline is to strengthen and increase volunteer health care programs: free clinics and physician-referral networks. This report reviews the state of these programs and suggests ways to improve them. Given the limits of volunteerism, the authors conclude that only national health insurance will solve the problem of the uninsured.

  16. Avoiding mandatory hospital nurse staffing ratios: an economic commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerhaus, Peter I

    2009-01-01

    The imposition of mandatory hospital nurse staffing ratios is among the more visible public policy initiatives affecting the nursing profession. Although the practice is intended to address problems in hospital nurse staffing and quality of patient care, this commentary argues that staffing ratios will lead to negative consequences for nurses involving the equity, efficiency, and costs of producing nursing care in hospitals. Rather than spend time and effort attempting to regulate nurse staffing, this commentary offers alternatives strategies that are directed at fixing the problems that motivate the advocates of staffing ratios.

  17. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: terrorism preparedness among office-based physicians, United States, 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2007-07-24

    This investigation describes terrorism preparedness among U.S. office-based physicians and their staffs in identification and diagnosis of terrorism-related conditions, training methods and sources, and assistance with diagnosis and reporting. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is an annual national probability survey of approximately 3,000 U.S. nonfederal, office-based physicians. Terrorism preparedness items were added in 2003 and 2004. About 40 percent of physicians or their staffs received training for anthrax or smallpox, but less than one-third received training for any of the other exposures. About 42.2 percent of physicians, 13.5 percent of nurses, and 9.4 percent of physician assistants and nurse practitioners received training in at least one exposure. Approximately 56.2 percent of physicians indicated that they would contact state or local public health officials for diagnostic assistance more frequently than federal agencies and other sources. About 67.1 percent of physicians indicated that they would report a suspected terrorism-related condition to the state or local health department, 50.9 percent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 27.5 percent to the local hospital, and 1.8 percent to a local elected official's office. Approximately 78.8 percent of physicians had contact information for the local health department readily available. About 53.7 percent had reviewed the diseases reportable to health departments since September 2001, 11.3 percent had reviewed them before that month, and 35 percent had never reviewed them.

  18. Diversity by race, Hispanic ethnicity, and sex of the United States medical oncology physician workforce over the past quarter century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Curtiland; Chapman, Christina H; Burgos, Ramon; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Both, Stefan; Thomas, Charles R

    2014-09-01

    To assess the medical oncology (MO) physician workforce diversity by race, Hispanic ethnicity, and sex, with attention to trainees. Public registries were used to assess 2010 differences among MO practicing physicians, academic faculty, and fellows; internal medicine (IM) residents; and the US population, using binomial tests with P diversity remains unchanged. For Blacks alone, representation as MO fellows is decreased compared with IM residents, suggesting greater disparity in MO training. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Use of the ICU Nurse-Physician Questionnaire (ICU N-P-Q): testing reliability and validity in neonatal intensive care units in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hatoko; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Mori, Rintaro; Nishida, Toshihiko; Kusuda, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takeo

    2016-05-09

    Although communication among health providers has become a critical part of improving quality of care, few studies on this topic have been conducted in Japan. This study aimed to examine the reliability and validity of the Intensive Care Unit Nurse-Physician Questionnaire (ICU N-P-Q) for use among nurses and physicians in neonatal ICUs (NICUs) in Japan. A Japanese translation of the ICU N-P-Q was administered to physicians and nurses working at 40 NICUs across Japan, which were participating in the Improvement of NICU Practice and Team Approach Cluster randomized controlled trial (INTACT). We used the principal components analysis to evaluate the factor structure of the instruments. Convergent validity was assessed by examining correlations between the subscales of Communication and Conflict Management of the ICU N-P-Q and the subscales and total score of the Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale (NPCS). Correlations between the subscales of Communication and Conflict Management by correlation with scales that refer to performance, including Job Satisfaction and Unit Effectiveness, were calculated to test the criterion validity. In total, 2006 questionnaires were completed by 316 physicians and 1690 nurses. The exploratory factor analysis revealed 15 factors in the physicians' questionnaire and 12 in the nurses' questionnaire. Convergent validity was confirmed, except for 'Between-group Accuracy' and 'Cooperativeness' in the physicians' scale, and for 'Between-group Accuracy' and 'Sharing of Patient Information' in the nurses' scale. Correlations between the subscales of communication and outcomes were confirmed in the nurses' questionnaire but were not fully supported in the physicians' questionnaire. Although the psychometric property behaved somewhat differently by occupation, the present findings provide preliminary support for the utility of the common item structure with the original scale, to measure the degree and quality of communication and collaboration

  20. Requirements for SSC central computing staffing (conceptual)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, J.

    1985-01-01

    Given a computation center with --10,000 MIPS supporting --1,000 users, what are the staffing requirements? The attempt in this paper is to list the functions and staff size required in a central computing or centrally supported computing complex. The organization assumes that although considerable computing power would exist (mostly for online) in the four interaction regions (IR) that there are functions/capabilities better performed outside the IR and in this model at a ''central computing facility.'' What follows is one staffing approach, not necessarily optimal, with certain assumptions about numbers of computer systems, media, networks and system controls, that is, one would get the best technology available. Thus, it is speculation about what the technology may bring and what it takes to operate it. From an end user support standpoint it is less clear, given the geography of an SSC, where and what the consulting support should look like and its location

  1. Radiotherapy staffing in the European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lievens, Yolande; Defourny, Noémie; Coffey, Mary

    2014-01-01

    includes a detailed analysis of radiotherapy staffing (questionnaire items 47-60), analysed in relation to the annual number of treatment courses and the socio-economic status of the countries. The analysis was conducted between February and July 2014, and is based on validated responses from 24 of the 40...... of countries can be distinguished on the basis of available personnel resources and socio-economic status. CONCLUSIONS: The average personnel figures in Europe are now consistent with, or even more favourable than the QUARTS recommendations, probably reflecting a combination of better availability as such......, in parallel with the current use of more complex treatments than a decade ago. A considerable variation in available personnel and delivered courses per year however persists among the highest and lowest staffing levels. This not only reflects the variation in cancer incidence and socio-economic determinants...

  2. Staffing for Cyberspace Operations: Summary of Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    military-unique knowledge or skills required; (2) military incumbency is required by law, Executive Order, treaty or international agreement (e.g., DPH...civilian employment . 1 Thomas H. Barth et al., “(U) Staffing for Cyberspace Operations,” IDA Paper P...DoD cyberspace strategies, doctrine, and current concepts of operation and employment for CMF. Additionally, the team conducted interviews with

  3. Capacity Adjustment through Contingent Staffing Outsourcing

    OpenAIRE

    Neubert , Gilles; Adjadj , Philippe

    2009-01-01

    International audience; For a long time, contingent staffing was considered as the responsability of the Human Resource department. The high needs of workforce flexibility combined with disseminated agencies have led some companies to a great number of labor suppliers. This situation has produced important cost variation, poor quality of service, and important risk due to the mistunderstanding by local managers of legal considerations. To face this situation, companies have started to move fr...

  4. Impact of staffing parameters on operational reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.A.; Houghton, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on a project related to human resource management of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank program. Safety and reliability of waste tank operations is impacted by several issues, including not only the design of the tanks themselves, but also how operations and operational personnel are managed. As demonstrated by management assessments performed by the Tiger Teams, DOE believes that the effective use of human resources impacts environment safety, and health concerns. For the of the current paper, human resource management activities are identified as ''Staffing'' and include the of developing the functional responsibilities and qualifications of technical and administrative personnel. This paper discusses the importance of staff plans and management in the overall view of safety and reliability. The work activities and procedures associated with the project, a review of the results of these activities, including a summary of the literature and a preliminary analysis of the data. We conclude that although identification of staffing issues and the development of staffing plans contributes to the overall reliability and safety of the HLW tanks, the relationship is not well understood and is in need of further development

  5. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debban, B.L.

    1996-03-01

    Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project's current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M ampersand O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M ampersand O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins

  6. Impact of staffing parameters on operational reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.A.; Houghton, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on a project related to human resource management of the Department of Energy (DOEs) High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank program. Safety and reliability of waste tank operations is impacted by several issues, including not only the design of the tanks themselves, but also how operations and operational personnel are managed. As demonstrated by management assessments performed by the Tiger Teams, DOE believes that the effective use of human resources impacts environment, safety, and health concerns. For the purposes of the current paper, human resource management activities are identified as 'Staffing' and include the process of developing the functional responsibilities and qualifications of technical and administrative personnel. This paper discusses the importance of staff plans and management in the overall view of safety and reliability, the work activities and procedures associated with the project, a review of the results of these activities, including a summary of the literature and a preliminary analysis of the data. We conclude that, although identification of staffing issues and the development of staffing plans contributes to the overall reliability and safety of the HLW tanks, the relationship is not well understood and is in need of further development

  7. Knowledge and Attitude of ER and Intensive Care Unit Physicians toward Do-Not-Resuscitate in a Tertiary Care Center in Saudi Arabia: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Alaa; Alrasheed, Norah; Ali, Alaa; Allaf, Ahmad; Almudaiheem, Najd; Ali, Youssuf; Alghabban, Ahmad; Alsalolami, Sami

    2018-04-01

    Only a few studies from Arab Muslim countries address do-not-resuscitate (DNR) practice. The knowledge of physicians about the existing policy and the attitude towards DNR were surveyed. The objective of this study is to identify the knowledge of the participants of the local DNR policy and barriers of addressing DNR including religious background. A questionnaire has been distributed to Emergency Room (ER) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) physicians. A total of 112 physicians mostly Muslims (97.3%). About 108 (96.4%) were aware about the existence of DNR policy in our institute. 107 (95.5%) stated that DNR is not against Islamic. Only (13.4%) of the physicians have advance directives and (90.2%) answered they will request to be DNR if they have terminal illness. Lack of patients and families understanding (51.8%) and inadequate training (35.7%) were the two most important barriers for effective DNR discussion. Patients and families level of education (58.0%) and cultural factors (52.7%) were the main obstacles in initiating a DNR order. There is a lack of knowledge about DNR policy which makes the optimization of DNR process difficult. Most physicians wish DNR for themselves and their patients at the end of life, but only a few of them have advance directives. The most important barriers for initializing and discussing DNR were lack of patient understanding, level of education, and the culture of patients. Most of the Muslim physicians believe that DNR is not against Islamic rules. We suggest that the DNR concept should be a part of any training program.

  8. A Study of National Physician Organizations’ Efforts to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Monica E.; Wilson, Shannon C.; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Lypson, Monica; Cordasco, Kristina; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Bright, Cedric; Brown, Arleen F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To characterize national physician organizations’ efforts to reduce health disparities and identify organizational characteristics associated with such efforts. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2009 and June 2010. The authors used two-sample t tests and chi-square tests to compare the proportion of organizations with disparity-reducing activities between different organizational types (e.g., primary care versus subspecialty organizations, small [5,000 members]). Inclusion criteria required physician organizations to be (1) focused on physicians, (2) national in scope, and (3) membership based. Results The number of activities per organization ranged from 0 to 22. Approximately half (53%) of organizations had 0 or 1 disparity-reducing activities. Organiza-tional characteristics associated with having at least 1 disparity-reducing effort included membership size (88% of large groups versus 58% of small groups had at least 1 activity; P = .004) and the presence of a health disparities committee (95% versus 59%; P organizations and racial/ethnic minority physician organizations were more likely to have disparity-reducing efforts, although findings were not statistically significant. Common themes addressed by activities were health care access, health care disparities, workforce diversity, and language barriers. Common strategies included education of physicians/trainees and patients/general public, position statements, and advocacy. Conclusions Despite the national priority to eliminate health disparities, more than half of national physician organizations are doing little to address this problem. Primary care and minority physician organizations, and those with disparities committees, may provide leadership to extend the scope of disparity-reduction efforts. PMID:22534593

  9. Current staffing personnel and areas of activity of the units of SSPA radio physics; Dotacion actual de personal y ambitos de actuacion de las unidades de radiofisica del SSPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo Pain, E.; Roldan Arjona, J. M.; Carrasco Rodriguez, J. L.; Guerrero Alcaide, R.; Almansa Lopez, J.; Rodriguez Castillo, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    The work arises from the Andalucia society of hospital Radiophysics as a study of the situation in the year 2012 in Andalusia, in terms of human resources and equipment in charge of services or units clinics of management of Radiophysics of the health public system of Andalusia (SSPA). Clinical management units are organizational structures established by the service Andalucia health (SAS) which are governed by agreements in the area of health care management providing that coverage. (Author)

  10. The Association of Team-Specific Workload and Staffing with Odds of Burnout Among VA Primary Care Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Simonetti, Joseph A; Clinton, Walter L; Wood, Gordon B; Taylor, Leslie; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Fihn, Stephan D; Nelson, Karin M

    2017-07-01

    Work-related burnout is common in primary care and is associated with worse patient safety, patient satisfaction, and employee mental health. Workload, staffing stability, and team completeness may be drivers of burnout. However, few studies have assessed these associations at the team level, and fewer still include members of the team beyond physicians. To study the associations of burnout among primary care providers (PCPs), nurse care managers, clinical associates (MAs, LPNs), and administrative clerks with the staffing and workload on their teams. We conducted an individual-level cross-sectional analysis of survey and administrative data in 2014. Primary care personnel at VA clinics responding to a national survey. Burnout was measured with a validated single-item survey measure dichotomized to indicate the presence of burnout. The independent variables were survey measures of team staffing (having a fully staffed team, serving on multiple teams, and turnover on the team), and workload both from survey items (working extended hours), and administrative data (patient panel overcapacity and average panel comorbidity). There were 4610 respondents (estimated response rate of 20.9%). The overall prevalence of burnout was 41%. In adjusted analyses, the strongest associations with burnout were having a fully staffed team (odds ratio [OR] = 0.55, 95% CI 0.47-0.65), having turnover on the team (OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.43-1.94), and having patient panel overcapacity (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.01-1.40). The observed burnout prevalence was 30.1% lower (28.5% vs. 58.6%) for respondents working on fully staffed teams with no turnover and caring for a panel within capacity, relative to respondents in the inverse condition. Complete team staffing, turnover among team members, and panel overcapacity had strong, cumulative associations with burnout. Further research is needed to understand whether improvements in these factors would lower burnout.

  11. [Imbalance of distribution of physicians in the Arab world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Matri, A

    1990-01-01

    The Arab world, as a whole, now has 8.5 medical doctors per 10,000 population. This average covers a great diversity of national situations; for example 0.6 doctors per 10,000 population in Somalia, and 17.5 doctors per 10,000 population in Qatar. From the viewpoint of medical staffing, the Arab countries can be grouped into four categories: (i) Countries with low medical density: their national staff is scarce, they do not have a long academic tradition, and they have to rely on foreign physicians (Yemen, Djibouti, Somalia, Mauritania). (ii) Countries with acceptable medical density: they have strengthened their medical training system during the last decades, their production of medical graduates is now fairly high, and there is seemingly a threat of oversupply (Algeria, Tunisia, Syria, Iraq). (iii) Countries with relatively high medical density: their medical staffing is below that of developed countries, but their economic possibilities are reduced, which leads to an oversupply; these countries are exporters of medical manpower (Egypt, Jordan). (iv) Countries that import medical manpower although their own medical density is quite high: their medical training is recent or non-existent and their health system relies to a great extent on foreign doctors (Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Libya, Kuwait). They are all oil producers. In brief, a shortage and an oversupply of medical doctors coexist in the Arab world, and concerted action is required.

  12. Mental Health-related Physician Office Visits by Adults Aged 18 and Over: United States, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Donald; Albert, Michael; McCaig, Linda F

    2018-06-01

    In 2016, mental illness affected about 45 million U.S. adults (1). Although mental health-related office visits are often made to psychiatrists (2), primary care physicians can serve as the main source of treatment for patients with mental health issues (3); however, availability of provider type may vary by geographic region (3,4). This report uses data from the 2012-2014 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) to examine adult mental healthrelated physician office visits by specialty and selected patient characteristics. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  13. Evolution and application of the competencies and educational milestones in physician graduate education in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Philibert

    2015-01-01

    The development of the milestones and initial testing by communities of practice in internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, emergency medicine, neurological surgery and urology establishes the initial validity argument for the milestones. Further validity evidence will require study of the value of the milestones in assessment and accreditation, and linking educational outcomes to the performance and clinical outcomes of physicians in practice.

  14. Current practice trends in allergy: results of a united states survey of otolaryngologists, allergist-immunologists, and primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Matthew W; Marple, Bradley F; Leatherman, Bryan; Mims, J Whit; Fornadley, John; Veling, Maria; Lin, Sandra Y

    2014-10-01

    Clinical practices for the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease evolve over time in response to a variety of forces. The techniques used by various physician specialties are not clearly defined and may vary from published descriptions or recommendations in the literature. This work is a Web-based survey enrolling 250 U.S. physicians in the following specialties: otolaryngology (ENT), allergy-immunology (A/I), and primary care (PCP). Respondents reported that skin-prick testing is the most common diagnostic testing method, followed by in vitro specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) testing. ENTs were more likely to use intradermal testing compared to other specialties (p = 0.0003 vs A/I; p 60). Significant use of home immunotherapy injections (defined as >10% of immunotherapy patients) ranged from 27% to 36% of physicians, with no statistically significant difference noted based upon specialty. PCPs reported greater use of sublingual immunotherapy (PCP, 68%; A/I, 45%; otolaryngology, 35%; A/I vs PCP, p = 0.005; ENT vs PCP p allergy testing and treatment methods are employed by U.S. physicians, with some differences noted based upon specialty. Home immunotherapy continues to be employed in allergy practices, and sublingual immunotherapy is a common form of delivery, especially in primary care practices. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  15. Ethical decision making in intensive care units: a burnout risk factor? Results from a multicentre study conducted with physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Carla; Ribeiro, Orquídea; Fonseca, António M; Carvalho, Ana Sofia

    2014-02-01

    Ethical decision making in intensive care is a demanding task. The need to proceed to ethical decision is considered to be a stress factor that may lead to burnout. The aim of this study is to explore the ethical problems that may increase burnout levels among physicians and nurses working in Portuguese intensive care units (ICUs). A quantitative, multicentre, correlational study was conducted among 300 professionals. The most crucial ethical decisions made by professionals working in ICU were related to communication, withholding or withdrawing treatments and terminal sedation. A positive relation was found between ethical decision making and burnout in nurses, namely, between burnout and the need to withdraw treatments (p=0.032), to withhold treatments (p=0.002) and to proceed to terminal sedation (p=0.005). This did not apply to physicians. Emotional exhaustion was the burnout subdimension most affected by the ethical decision. The nurses' lack of involvement in ethical decision making was identified as a risk factor. Nevertheless, in comparison with nurses (6%), it was the physicians (34%) who more keenly felt the need to proceed to ethical decisions in ICU. Ethical problems were reported at different levels by physicians and nurses. The type of ethical decisions made by nurses working in Portuguese ICUs had an impact on burnout levels. This did not apply to physicians. This study highlights the need for education in the field of ethics in ICUs and the need to foster inter-disciplinary discussion so as to encourage ethical team deliberation in order to prevent burnout.

  16. New law on staffing levels will save lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Good news about nurse staffing levels can be hard to find, so how fantastic that a protracted campaign in Wales finally paid off last week with the passage of legislation to ensure hospital wards are staffed safely. Next month, the Queen will give royal assent to the Safe Nurse Staffing Levels (Wales) Bill, which will save lives, produce better outcomes and enhance the patient experience of care.

  17. Survey of United States Army Physician Opinion: The Issue of Written ’Do Not Resuscitate’ Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    Westminister Press, 1975), p. 176-7. 71Cushing, p. 29. 72Alexander, p. 26. 73Kevin M. McIntyre, "Mediolegal Aspects of Decision Making in Resuscitation and Life...34Physicians Opinions Toward Legislation Defining Death and Withholding Life Support," Southern Medical Journal 74 (February 1981): 215-18. 82Norman K...Louis S. Let the Patient Decide. Philadelphia: The Westminister Press, 1978. Browning, Mary H. and Lewis, Edith P. comps. The Dying Patient: A Nursing

  18. Incorporating nurse absenteeism into staffing with demand uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Kayse Lee; Liu, Boying; Daskin, Mark S; Duck, Mary; Wang, Zhehui; Mwenesi, Rama; Schapiro, Hannah

    2017-03-01

    Increased nurse-to-patient ratios are associated negatively with increased costs and positively with improved patient care and reduced nurse burnout rates. Thus, it is critical from a cost, patient safety, and nurse satisfaction perspective that nurses be utilized efficiently and effectively. To address this, we propose a stochastic programming formulation for nurse staffing that accounts for variability in the patient census and nurse absenteeism, day-to-day correlations among the patient census levels, and costs associated with three different classes of nursing personnel: unit, pool, and temporary nurses. The decisions to be made include: how many unit nurses to employ, how large a pool of cross-trained nurses to maintain, how to allocate the pool nurses on a daily basis, and how many temporary nurses to utilize daily. A genetic algorithm is developed to solve the resulting model. Preliminary results using data from a large university hospital suggest that the proposed model can save a four-unit pool hundreds of thousands of dollars annually as opposed to the crude heuristics the hospital currently employs.

  19. Economic evaluation of nurse staffing and nurse substitution in health care: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryakin, Yevgeniy; Griffiths, Peter; Maben, Jill

    2011-04-01

    Several systematic reviews have suggested that greater nurse staffing as well as a greater proportion of registered nurses in the health workforce is associated with better patient outcomes. Others have found that nurses can substitute for doctors safely and effectively in a variety of settings. However, these reviews do not generally consider the effect of nurse staff on both patient outcomes and costs of care, and therefore say little about the cost-effectiveness of nurse-provided care. Therefore, we conducted a scoping literature review of economic evaluation studies which consider the link between nurse staffing, skill mix within the nursing team and between nurses and other medical staff to determine the nature of the available economic evidence. Scoping literature review. English-language manuscripts, published between 1989 and 2009, focussing on the relationship between costs and effects of care and the level of registered nurse staffing or nurse-physician substitution/nursing skill mix in the clinical team, using cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, or cost-benefit analysis. Articles selected for the review were identified through Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and Google Scholar database searches. After selecting 17 articles representing 16 unique studies for review, we summarized their main findings, and assessed their methodological quality using criteria derived from recommendations from the guidelines proposed by the Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health Care. In general, it was found that nurses can provide cost effective care, compared to other health professionals. On the other hand, more intensive nurse staffing was associated with both better outcomes and more expensive care, and therefore cost effectiveness was not easy to assess. Although considerable progress in economic evaluation studies has been reached in recent years, a number of methodological issues remain. In the future

  20. Rostering from staffing levels: a branch-and-price approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Egbert; Veltman, Bart

    Many rostering methods first create shifts from some given staffing levels, and after that create rosters from the set of created shifts. Although such a method has some nice properties, it also has some bad ones. In this paper we outline a method that creates rosters directly from staffing levels.

  1. Brown & Smith Communication Solutions: A Staffing System Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Erika E.; Doll, Jessica L.; Bergman, Shawn M.; Heggestad, Eric D.

    2018-01-01

    Developing students' practical skills in strategic staffing and selection within the classroom can be challenging. This article describes a staffing system simulation designed to engage students and develop applied skills in strategic recruiting, assessment, and evaluation of job applicants. Instructors looking for a multifaceted team project…

  2. Does the STAF score help detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in acute stroke patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, S; Rizos, T; Güntner, J; Hug, A; Jenetzky, E; Krumsdorf, U; Veltkamp, R

    2013-01-01

    Detecting paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (pAF) soon after acute cerebral ischaemia has a major impact on secondary stroke prevention. Recently, the STAF score, a composite of clinical and instrumental findings, was introduced to identify stroke patients at risk of pAF. We aimed to validate this score in an independent study population. Consecutive patients admitted to our stroke unit with acute ischaemic stroke were prospectively enrolled. The diagnostic work-up included neuroimaging, neuroultrasound, baseline 12-channel electrocardiogram (ECG), 24-h Holter ECG, continuous ECG monitoring, and echocardiography. Presence of AF was documented according to the medical history of each patient and after review of 12-lead ECG, 24-h Holter ECG, or continuous ECG monitoring performed during the stay on the ward. Additionally, a telephone follow-up visit was conducted for each patient after 3 months to inquire about newly diagnosed AF. Items for each patient-age, baseline NIHSS, left atrial dilatation, and stroke etiology according to the TOAST criteria - were assessed to calculate the STAF score. Overall, 584 patients were enrolled in our analysis. AF was documented in 183 (31.3%) patients. In multivariable analysis, age, NIHSS, left atrial dilatation, and absence of vascular etiology were independent predictors for AF. The logistic AF-prediction model of the STAF score revealed fair classification accuracy in receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with an area under the curve of 0.84. STAF scores of ≥5 had a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 74% for predicting AF. The value of the STAF score for predicting the risk of pAF in stroke patients is limited. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  3. The Effects of Emotional Intelligence (EI Items Education on Job Related Stress in Physicians and Nurses who Work in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Nooryan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Intensive care units (ICUs are recognized as stressful environments. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of emotional intelligence education items on job related stress on physicians and nurses who work in intensive care units at hospitals of Yerevan, Armenia. Methods: A interventional study design was implemented with 106 registered hospital physicians and nurses, who were widely distributed all the way through. Case group was taught about 15 E.I items. For data collection, the 20-question Berger situational (overt anxiety questionnaire, the 20-item personality (covert anxiety questionnaire, and the Bar-on emotional intelligence questionnaire with 133 questions were used. Statistical descriptive methods, chi-square (X2 and t-tests were used to analyze data. Results: The research achievements revealed that the average score of the case group`s situational anxiety was 46.59 before intervention, which decreased to 39.95 after the training of the items of emotional intelligence. The average score of situational anxiety of control group was 44.32 before intervention which increased to 44.76 after examination. There was a meaningful statistical difference between case and control group after education of emotional intelligence`s items (p=0.001. Conclusion: Results of the current study showed that physicians and nurses experience high level of stress. The ability to effectively deal with emotion intelligence and emotional information in the workplace assists employees in coping with occupational stress and should be developed in stress managing trainings.

  4. The issue of legal protection of the intensive care unit physician within the context of patient consent to treatment. Part I: conscious patient, refusing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewiera, Jacek; Trnka, Jakub; Kübler, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    In daily clinical practice, physicians working in intensive care units (ICUs) face situations when their professional duty to protect the patient's life is in conflict with the obligation to respect the will of the patient and to assess his or her chances of treatment. Although the mere fact of conflict between these fundamental values for the ICU physician is a natural and obvious element in the chosen specialisation, many 'non-medical' circumstances make the given conflict not only very difficult but also dangerous for the physician. So far, the ethical and legal aspects of dying have been commented upon by a large group of lawyers and experts involved in the interpretation of the Polish regulations. The authors believe that a detailed analysis of the regulations should be carried out by persons of legal education, possessing a genuine medical experience associated with the specificity of end of life care in ICUs. In this paper, the authors have compared the current regulations of legislative acts of the common law relating to medical activities at anaesthesiology and intensive care units as well as based on the judgements of the common court of law over the past ten years. In the act of dissuading an ICU doctor from a medical procedure, all factors influencing the doctor's responsibility should be taken into account in accordance with the criminal law. In the case of a patient's death due to a refusal of treatment with the patient's full awareness, and given proper notification as to the consequences of refusing treatment, the doctor's responsibility lies under article 150 of the Polish penal code.

  5. Physician Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Physician Compare, which meets Affordable Care Act of 2010 requirements, helps you search for and select physicians and other healthcare professionals enrolled in...

  6. Cross-cultural comparisons of attitudes toward schizophrenia amongst the general population and physicians: a series of web-based surveys in Japan and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Misty; Hori, Hiroaki; Sartorius, Norman; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-02-28

    Cross-cultural differences in attitudes toward schizophrenia are suggested, while no studies have compared such attitudes between the United States and Japan. In our previous study in Japan (Hori et al., 2011), 197 subjects in the general population and 112 physicians (excluding psychiatrists) enrolled in a web-based survey using an Internet-based questionnaire format. Utilizing the identical web-based survey method in the United States, the present study enrolled 172 subjects in the general population and 45 physicians. Participants' attitudes toward schizophrenia were assessed with the English version of the 18-item questionnaire used in our previous Japanese survey. Using exploratory factor analysis, we identified four factors labeled "social distance," "belief of dangerousness," "underestimation of patients' abilities," and "skepticism regarding treatment." The two-way multivariate analysis of covariance on the four factors, with country and occupation as the between-subject factors and with potentially confounding demographic variables as the covariates, revealed that the general population in the US scored significantly lower than the Japanese counterparts on the factors "social distance" and "skepticism regarding treatment" and higher on "underestimation of patients' abilities." Our results suggest that culture may have an important role in shaping attitudes toward mental illness. Anti-stigma campaigns that target culture-specific biases are considered important. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Results of the 2013 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology career planning survey of practicing physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Golden, Daniel W; Mohindra, Pranshu; Kharofa, Jordan

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to develop insights about the job application process for graduating radiation oncology residents from the perspective of those involved in hiring. In May and June 2013, a nationwide electronic survey was sent to 1,671 practicing radiation oncologists in academic and private practice settings. Descriptive statistics are reported. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed. Surveys were completed by 206 physicians. Ninety-six percent were willing to hire individuals directly from residency. Participants believed that the first half of the fourth postgraduate year is the most appropriate time for residents to begin networking and the beginning of the fifth postgraduate year is the most appropriate time to begin contacting practices in pursuit of employment. Seventy percent began interviewing 4 to 9 months before the job start date, and 84% interviewed ≤6 candidates per available position. The 5 most important factors to participants when evaluating prospective candidates were (from most to least important) work ethic, personality, interview impression, experience in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and flexibility. Factors that participants believed should be most important to candidates when evaluating practices included a collegial environment; emphasis on best patient care; quality of equipment, physics, dosimetry, and quality assurance; quality of the support staff and facility; and a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Those in academics rated research-related factors higher than those in private practice, who rated business-related factors higher. The perspectives of practicing physicians on the job application process are documented to provide a comprehensive resource for current and future residents and employers. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Night and day in the VA: associations between night shift staffing, nurse workforce characteristics, and length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cordova, Pamela B; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Schmitt, Susan K; Stone, Patricia W

    2014-04-01

    In hospitals, nurses provide patient care around the clock, but the impact of night staff characteristics on patient outcomes is not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine the association between night nurse staffing and workforce characteristics and the length of stay (LOS) in 138 veterans affairs (VA) hospitals using panel data from 2002 through 2006. Staffing in hours per patient day was higher during the day than at night. The day nurse workforce had more educational preparation than the night workforce. Nurses' years of experience at the unit, facility, and VA level were greater at night. In multivariable analyses controlling for confounding variables, higher night staffing and a higher skill mix were associated with reduced LOS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Technical basis for staffing levels at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Morisseau, D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to provide a technical basis for the establishment of criteria for minimum staffing levels of licensed and non-licensed NPP shift personnel. Minimum staffing levels for the purpose of this study, are defined as those necessary for successful accomplishment of all safety and additional functions that must be performed in order for the licensee to meet applicable regulatory requirements. This project involves a multi-faceted approach to the investigation of the issue. Relevant NRC documentation was identified and reviewed. Using the information obtained from this documentation review, a test plan was developed to aid in the collection of further information regarding the adequacy of current shift staffing levels. The test plan addresses three different activities to be conducted to provide information to the NRC for use in the assessment of current minimum staffing levels. The first activity is collection of data related to industry shift staffing practices through site visits to seven nuclear power plants. The second activity is a simulator study, which will use licensed operator crews responding to a simulated event, under two different staffing levels. Finally, workload models will be constructed for both licensed and non-licensed personnel, using a priori knowledge of the simulator scenarios with data resulting from one of the staffing levels studied in the simulator, and the data collected from the site visits. The model will then be validated against the data obtained from the second staffing level studied in the simulator. The validated model can then be used to study the impact of changing staffing-related variables on the plant shift crew`s ability to effectively mitigate an event.

  10. The impact of ethics and work-related factors on nurse practitioners' and physician assistants' views on quality of primary healthcare in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Connie M; Zhou, Qiuping Pearl; Hanlon, Alexandra; Danis, Marion; Grady, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) provide primary care services for many American patients. Ethical knowledge is foundational to resolving challenging practice issues, yet little is known about the importance of ethics and work-related factors in the delivery of quality care. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess whether the quality of the care that practitioners deliver is influenced by ethics and work-related factors. This paper is a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional self-administered mailed survey of 1,371 primary care NPs and PAs randomly selected from primary care and primary care subspecialties in the United States. Ethics preparedness and confidence were significantly associated with perceived quality of care (pfactors. Investing in ethics education and addressing restrictive practice environments may improve collaborative practice, teamwork, and quality of care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement equivalence of patient safety climate in Chinese hospitals: can we compare across physicians and nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junya

    2018-06-11

    Self-report instruments have been widely used to better understand variations in patient safety climate between physicians and nurses. Research is needed to determine whether differences in patient safety climate reflect true differences in the underlying concepts. This is known as measurement equivalence, which is a prerequisite for meaningful group comparisons. This study aims to examine the degree of measurement equivalence of the responses to a patient safety climate survey of Chinese hospitals and to demonstrate how the measurement equivalence method can be applied to self-report climate surveys for patient safety research. Using data from the Chinese Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Climate from six Chinese hospitals in 2011, we constructed two groups: physicians and nurses (346 per group). We used multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses to examine progressively more stringent restrictions for measurement equivalence. We identified weak factorial equivalence across the two groups. Strong factorial equivalence was found for Organizational Learning, Unit Management Support for Safety, Adequacy of Safety Arrangements, Institutional Commitment to Safety, Error Reporting and Teamwork. Strong factorial equivalence, however, was not found for Safety System, Communication and Peer Support and Staffing. Nevertheless, further analyses suggested that nonequivalence did not meaningfully affect the conclusions regarding physician-nurse differences in patient safety climate. Our results provide evidence of at least partial equivalence of the survey responses between nurses and physicians, supporting mean comparisons of its constructs between the two groups. The measurement equivalence approach is essential to ensure that conclusions about group differences are valid.

  12. Noise exposure during prehospital emergency physicians work on Mobile Emergency Care Units and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Christian Tofte; Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Brøchner, Anne C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS)....... initiatives. Although no hearing loss was demonstrated in the personnel of the ground-based units, a reduced function of the outer sensory hair cells was found in the HEMS group following missions.......BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS......). A second objective was to identify any occupational hearing loss amongst prehospital personnel. METHODS: Noise exposure during work in the MECU and HEMS was measured using miniature microphones worn laterally to the auditory canals or within the earmuffs of the helmet. All recorded sounds were analysed...

  13. Wage, Work Environment, and Staffing: Effects on Nurse Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that hospitals with better nurse staffing and work environments have better nurse outcomes—less burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intention to leave the job. Many studies, however, have not accounted for wage effects, which may confound findings. By using a secondary analysis with cross-sectional administrative data and a four-state survey of nurses, we investigated how wage, work environment, and staffing were associated with nurse outcomes. Logistic regression models, with and without wage, were used to estimate the effects of work environment and staffing on burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intent to leave. We discovered that wage was associated with job dissatisfaction and intent to leave but had little influence on burnout, while work environment and average patient-to-nurse ratio still have considerable effects on nurse outcomes. Wage is important for good nurse outcomes, but it does not diminish the significant influence of work environment and staffing on nurse outcomes. PMID:25121923

  14. The Implications of Flexible Staffing Arrangements for Job Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Houseman, Susan N.; Polivka, Anne E.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the job stability of workers in a wide range of flexible staffing arrangements: agency temporary, direct-hire temporary, on-call, contract company, independent contractor, and regular part-time work. We draw upon two data sources in our analysis. The first is a nationwide survey of employers on their use of flexible staffing arrangements conducted by the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. This survey provides evidence on why employers use various types of flex...

  15. The United States Revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (2006: New challenges to balancing patient rights and physician responsibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGregor Joan L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advance health care directives and informed consent remain the cornerstones of patients' right to self-determination regarding medical care and preferences at the end-of-life. However, the effectiveness and clinical applicability of advance health care directives to decision-making on the use of life support systems at the end-of-life is questionable. The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA has been revised in 2006 to permit the use of life support systems at or near death for the purpose of maximizing procurement opportunities of organs medically suitable for transplantation. Some states have enacted the Revised UAGA (2006 and a few of those have included amendments while attempting to preserve the uniformity of the revised Act. Other states have introduced the Revised UAGA (2006 for legislation and remaining states are likely to follow soon. The Revised UAGA (2006 poses challenges to the Patient Self Determination Act (PSDA embodied in advance health care directives and individual expression about the use of life support systems at the end-of-life. The challenges are predicated on the UAGA revising the default choice to presumption of donation intent and the use of life support systems to ensure medical suitability of organs for transplantation. The default choice trumps the expressed intent in an individual's advance health care directive to withhold and/or withdraw life support systems at the end-of-life. The Revised UAGA (2006 overrides advance directives on utilitarian grounds, which is a serious ethical challenge to society. The subtle progression of the Revised UAGA (2006 towards the presumption about how to dispose of one's organs at death can pave the way for an affirmative "duty to donate". There are at least two steps required to resolve these challenges. First, physicians and hospitals must fulfill their responsibilities to educate patients on the new legislations and document their preferences about the use of life support

  16. The Need for Higher Minimum Staffing Standards in U.S. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Schnelle, John F.; McGregor, Margaret; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2016-01-01

    Many U.S. nursing homes have serious quality problems, in part, because of inadequate levels of nurse staffing. This commentary focuses on two issues. First, there is a need for higher minimum nurse staffing standards for U.S. nursing homes based on multiple research studies showing a positive relationship between nursing home quality and staffing and the benefits of implementing higher minimum staffing standards. Studies have identified the minimum staffing levels necessary to provide care consistent with the federal regulations, but many U.S. facilities have dangerously low staffing. Second, the barriers to staffing reform are discussed. These include economic concerns about costs and a focus on financial incentives. The enforcement of existing staffing standards has been weak, and strong nursing home industry political opposition has limited efforts to establish higher standards. Researchers should study the ways to improve staffing standards and new payment, regulatory, and political strategies to improve nursing home staffing and quality. PMID:27103819

  17. Impact of nurse work environment and staffing on hospital nurse and quality of care in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantsupawat, Apiradee; Srisuphan, Wichit; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Wichaikhum, Orn-Anong; Aungsuroch, Yupin; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-12-01

    To determine the impact of nurse work environment and staffing on nurse outcomes, including job satisfaction and burnout, and on quality of nursing care. Secondary data analysis of the 2007 Thai Nurse Survey. The sample consisted of 5,247 nurses who provided direct care for patients across 39 public hospitals in Thailand. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the impact of nurse work environment and staffing on nurse outcomes and quality of care. Nurses cared for an average of 10 patients each. Forty-one percent of nurses had a high burnout score as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory; 28% of nurses were dissatisfied with their job; and 27% rated quality of nursing care as fair or poor. At the hospital level, after controlling for nurse characteristics (age, years in unit), the addition of each patient to a nurse's workload was associated with a 2% increase in the odds on nurses reporting high emotional exhaustion (odds ratio [OR] 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.03; p work environments were about 30% less likely to report fair to poor care quality (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.48-0.98; p work environments. The addition of each patient to a nurse's workload was associated with a 4% increase in the odds on nurses reporting quality of nursing care as fair or poor (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.02-1.05; p work environments and nurse staffing in Thai hospitals holds promise for reducing nurse burnout, thus improving nurse retention at the hospital bedside as well as potentially improving the quality of care. Nurses should work with management and policymakers to achieve safe staffing levels and good work environments in hospitals throughout the world. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Ontario: linking nursing outcomes, workload and staffing decisions in the workplace: the Dashboard Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Nancy; Morgan, Beverley

    2012-03-01

    Research shows that nurses want to provide more input into assessing patient acuity, changes in patient needs and staffing requirements. The Dashboard Project involved the further development and application of an electronic monitoring tool that offers a single source of nursing, patient and organizational information. It is designed to help inform nurse staffing decisions within a hospital setting. The Dashboard access link was installed in computers in eight nursing units within the Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS) network. The Dashboard indicators are populated from existing information/patient databases within the Decision Support Department at HHS. Committees composed of the unit manager, staff nurses, project coordinator, financial controller and an information controller met regularly to review the Dashboard indicators. Participants discussed the ability of the indicators to reflect their patients' needs and the feasibility of using the indicators to inform their clinical staffing plans. Project findings suggest that the Dashboard is a work in progress. Many of the indicators that had originally been incorporated were refined and will continue to be revised based on suggestions from project participants and further testing across HHS. Participants suggested the need for additional data, such as the time that nurses are off the unit (for code blue response, patient transfers and accompanying patients for tests); internal transfers/bed moves to accommodate patient-specific issues and particularly to address infection control issues; deaths and specific unit-centred data in addition to the generic indicators. The collaborative nature of the project enabled staff nurses and management to work together on a matter of high importance to both, providing valuable recommendations for shared nursing and interprofessional planning, further Dashboard development and project management.

  19. A strategy for optimizing staffing to improve the timeliness of inpatient phlebotomy collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Aileen P; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Torrence-Hill, Joi N; Goonan, Ellen M; Gustafson, Michael L; Melanson, Stacy E F

    2011-12-01

    The timely availability of inpatient test results is a key to physician satisfaction with the clinical laboratory, and in an institution with a phlebotomy service may depend on the timeliness of blood collections. In response to safety reports filed for delayed phlebotomy collections, we applied Lean principles to the inpatient phlebotomy service at our institution. Our goal was to improve service without using additional resources by optimizing our staffing model. To evaluate the effect of a new phlebotomy staffing model on the timeliness of inpatient phlebotomy collections. We compared the median time of morning blood collections and average number of safety reports filed for delayed phlebotomy collections during a 6-month preimplementation period and 5-month postimplementation period. The median time of morning collections was 17 minutes earlier after implementation (7:42 am preimplementation; interquartile range, 6:27-8:48 am; versus 7:25 am postimplementation; interquartile range, 6:20-8:26 am). The frequency of safety reports filed for delayed collections decreased 80% from 10.6 per 30 days to 2.2 per 30 days. Reallocating staff to match the pattern of demand for phlebotomy collections throughout the day represents a strategy for improving the performance of an inpatient phlebotomy service.

  20. Physician Order Entry Clerical Support Improves Physician Satisfaction and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contratto, Erin; Romp, Katherine; Estrada, Carlos A; Agne, April; Willett, Lisa L

    2017-05-01

    To examine the impact of clerical support personnel for physician order entry on physician satisfaction, productivity, timeliness with electronic health record (EHR) documentation, and physician attitudes. All seven part-time physicians at an academic general internal medicine practice were included in this quasi-experimental (single group, pre- and postintervention) mixed-methods study. One full-time clerical support staff member was trained and hired to enter physician orders in the EHR and conduct previsit planning. Physician satisfaction, productivity, timeliness with EHR documentation, and physician attitudes toward the intervention were measured. Four months after the intervention, physicians reported improvements in overall quality of life (good quality, 71%-100%), personal balance (43%-71%), and burnout (weekly, 43%-14%; callousness, 14%-0%). Matched for quarter, productivity increased: work relative value unit (wRVU) per session increased by 20.5% (before, April-June 2014; after, April-June 2015; range -9.2% to 27.5%). Physicians reported feeling more supported, more focused on patient care, and less stressed and fatigued after the intervention. This study supports the use of physician order entry clerical personnel as a simple, cost-effective intervention to improve the work lives of primary care physicians.

  1. The effects of ownership, staffing level and organisational justice on nurse commitment, involvement, and satisfaction: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Elovainio, Marko; Kouvonen, Anne; Kuusio, Hannamaria; Noro, Anja; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Sinervo, Timo

    2011-12-01

    Elderly care systems have undergone a lot of changes in many European countries, including Finland. Most notably, the number of private for-profit firms has increased. Previous studies suggest that employee well-being and the quality of care might differ according to the ownership type. The present study examined whether the ownership type and the staffing level were associated with organisational commitment, job involvement, and job satisfaction. In addition, we examined the potential moderating effect of organisational justice on these associations. Cross-sectional questionnaire study. 1047 Finnish female staff members aged 18-69 years working in sheltered housing or nursing homes (units n=179). The relationships were studied with analyses of covariance (ANCOVA), adjusting for the effects of age and case-mix. Organisational commitment and job satisfaction levels were low in for-profit sheltered homes when justice levels were low, but when justice levels were high, for-profit sheltered homes did not differ from other ownership types. Similarly, organisational justice acted as a buffer against low commitment resulting from low staffing levels. Staffing levels were lowest in public sheltered homes and highest in not-for-profit sheltered homes. The results show that organisational justice can act as a buffer against low organisational commitment that results from low staffing levels and working in for-profit sheltered homes. Increasing justice in regard to the management, outcomes, and procedures in the organisation would thus be important. 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Excellence and evidence in staffing: a data-driven model for excellence in staffing (2nd edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Margarita; Batcheller, Joyce; Blouin, Ann Scott; Behrens, Elizabeth; Bradley, Carol; Brown, Mary J; Brown, Diane Storer; Bolton, Linda Burnes; Borromeo, Annabelle R; Burtson, Paige; Caramanica, Laura; Caspers, Barbara A; Chow, Marilyn; Christopher, Mary Ann; Clarke, Sean P; Delucas, Christine; Dent, Robert L; Disser, Tony; Eliopoulos, Charlotte; Everett, Linda Q; Garcia, Amy; Glassman, Kimberly; Goodwin, Susan; Haagenson, Deb; Harper, Ellen; Harris, Kathy; Hoying, Cheryl L; Hughes-Rease, Marsha; Kelly, Lesly; Kiger, Anna J; Kobs-Abbott, Ann; Krueger, Janelle; Larson, Jackie; March, Connie; Martin, Deborah Maust; Mazyck, Donna; Meenan, Penny; McGaffigan, Patricia; Myers, Karen K; Nell, Kate; Newcomer, Britta; Cathy, Rick; O'Rourke, Maria; Rosa, Billy; Rose, Robert; Rudisill, Pamela; Sanford, Kathy; Simpson, Roy L; Snowden, Tami; Strickland, Bob; Strohecker, Sharon; Weems, Roger B; Welton, John; Weston, Marla; Valentine, Nancy M; Vento, Laura; Yendro, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA, 2010) and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM, 2011) Future of Nursing report have prompted changes in the U.S. health care system. This has also stimulated a new direction of thinking for the profession of nursing. New payment and priority structures, where value is placed ahead of volume in care, will start to define our health system in new and unknown ways for years. One thing we all know for sure: we cannot afford the same inefficient models and systems of care of yesterday any longer. The Data-Driven Model for Excellence in Staffing was created as the organizing framework to lead the development of best practices for nurse staffing across the continuum through research and innovation. Regardless of the setting, nurses must integrate multiple concepts with the value of professional nursing to create new care and staffing models. Traditional models demonstrate that nurses are a commodity. If the profession is to make any significant changes in nurse staffing, it is through the articulation of the value of our professional practice within the overall health care environment. This position paper is organized around the concepts from the Data-Driven Model for Excellence in Staffing. The main concepts are: Core Concept 1: Users and Patients of Health Care, Core Concept 2: Providers of Health Care, Core Concept 3: Environment of Care, Core Concept 4: Delivery of Care, Core Concept 5: Quality, Safety, and Outcomes of Care. This position paper provides a comprehensive view of those concepts and components, why those concepts and components are important in this new era of nurse staffing, and a 3-year challenge that will push the nursing profession forward in all settings across the care continuum. There are decades of research supporting various changes to nurse staffing. Yet little has been done to move that research into practice and operations. While the primary goal of this position paper is to generate research

  3. [Economic Crisis and Portuguese National Health Service Physicians: Findings from a Descriptive Study of Their Perceptions and Reactions from Health Care Units in the Greater Lisbon Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Inês; Russo, Giuliano; Gonçalves, Luzia; Perelman, Julian; Pita Barros, Pedro

    2017-04-28

    In Europe, scant scientific evidence exists on the impact of economic crisis on physicians. This study aims at understanding the adjustments made by public sector physicians to the changing conditions, and their perceptions on the market for medical services in the Lisbon metropolitan area. A random sample of 484 physicians from São José Hospital and health center groups in Cascais and Amadora, to explore their perceptions of the economic crisis, and the changes brought to their workload. This paper provides a descriptive statistical analysis of physicians' responses. In connection to the crisis, our surveyed physicians perceived an increase in demand but a decrease of supply of public health services, as well as an increase in the supply of health services by the private sector. Damaging government policies for the public sector, and the rise of private services and insurance providers were identified as game changers for the sector. Physicians reported a decrease in public remuneration (- 30.5%) and a small increase of public sector hours. A general reduction in living standard was identified as the main adaptation strategy to the crisis. Passion for the profession, its independence and flexibility, were the most frequently mentioned compensating factors. A percentage of 15% of physicians declared considering migration as a possibility for the near future. The crisis has brought non-negligible changes to physicians' working conditions and to the wider market for medical services in Portugal. The physicians' intrinsic motivation for the professions helped counterbalance salary cuts and deteriorating working conditions.

  4. Physician Reimbursement: From Fee-for-Service to MACRA, MIPS and APMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Phillip; Mosley, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    To a significant degree, "healthcare reform" is a movement to change how both physicians and healthcare facilities are compensated, with value replacing volume as the key compensation metric. The goal of this movement has not yet been accomplished, but the process is accelerating. In this article, we track how the arc of physician compensation is bending, how the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act will drive further changes to physician compensation models, and how these changes may affect physician practice patterns and physician staffing in the future.

  5. Interprofessional communication with hospitalist and consultant physicians in general internal medicine: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotlib Conn Lesley

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in General Internal Medicine [GIM] settings have shown that optimizing interprofessional communication is important, yet complex and challenging. While the physician is integral to interprofessional work in GIM there are often communication barriers in place that impact perceptions and experiences with the quality and quantity of their communication with other team members. This study aims to understand how team members’ perceptions and experiences with the communication styles and strategies of either hospitalist or consultant physicians in their units influence the quality and effectiveness of interprofessional relations and work. Methods A multiple case study methodology was used. Thirty-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with physicians, nurses and other health care providers [e.g. physiotherapist, social worker, etc.] working across 5 interprofessional GIM programs. Questions explored participants’ experiences with communication with all other health care providers in their units, probing for barriers and enablers to effective interprofessional work, as well as the use of communication tools or strategies. Observations in GIM wards were also conducted. Results Three main themes emerged from the data: [1] availability for interprofessional communication, [2] relationship-building for effective communication, and [3] physician vs. team-based approaches. Findings suggest a significant contrast in participants’ experiences with the quantity and quality of interprofessional relationships and work when comparing the communication styles and strategies of hospitalist and consultant physicians. Hospitalist staffed GIM units were believed to have more frequent and higher caliber interprofessional communication and collaboration, resulting in more positive experiences among all health care providers in a given unit. Conclusions This study helps to improve our understanding of the collaborative environment

  6. Physician suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preven, D W

    1981-01-01

    The topic of physician suicide has been viewed from several perspectives. The recent studies which suggest that the problem may be less dramatic statistically, do not lessen the emotional trauma that all experience when their lives are touched by the grim event. Keeping in mind that much remains to be learned about suicides in general, and physician suicide specifically, a few suggestions have been offered. As one approach to primary prevention, medical school curriculum should include programs that promote more self-awareness in doctors of their emotional needs. If the physician cannot heal himself, perhaps he can learn to recognize the need for assistance. Intervention (secondary prevention) requires that doctors have the capacity to believe that anyone, regardless of status, can be suicidal. Professional roles should not prevent colleague and friend from identifying prodromal clues. Finally, "postvention" (tertiary prevention) offers the survivors, be they family, colleagues or patients, the opportunity to deal with the searing loss in a therapeutic way.

  7. Medicaid payment rates, case-mix reimbursement, and nursing home staffing--1996-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhanlian; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Zinn, Jacqueline; Mor, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    We examined the impact of state Medicaid payment rates and case-mix reimbursement on direct care staffing levels in US nursing homes. We used a recent time series of national nursing home data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting system for 1996-2004, merged with annual state Medicaid payment rates and case-mix reimbursement information. A 5-category response measure of total staffing levels was defined according to expert recommended thresholds, and examined in a multinomial logistic regression model. Facility fixed-effects models were estimated separately for Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN), and Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) staffing levels measured as average hours per resident day. Higher Medicaid payment rates were associated with increases in total staffing levels to meet a higher recommended threshold. However, these gains in overall staffing were accompanied by a reduction of RN staffing and an increase in both LPN and CNA staffing levels. Under case-mix reimbursement, the likelihood of nursing homes achieving higher recommended staffing thresholds decreased, as did levels of professional staffing. Independent of the effects of state, market, and facility characteristics, there was a significant downward trend in RN staffing and an upward trend in both LPN and CNA staffing. Although overall staffing may increase in response to more generous Medicaid reimbursement, it may not translate into improvements in the skill mix of staff. Adjusting for reimbursement levels and resident acuity, total staffing has not increased after the implementation of case-mix reimbursement.

  8. Development of the staffing evaluation technique for mental tasks of the advanced main control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh Tsungling; Yang Chihwei; Lin Chiuhsiangjoe

    2011-01-01

    The key goals of staffing and qualifications review element are to ensure that the right numbers of people with the appropriate skills and abilities are available to support plant operations and events. If the staffing level is too few, excessive stress that caused human errors possibly will be placed on the operators. Accordingly, this study developed a staffing evaluation technique based on CPM-GOMS for the mental tasks such as operations in the advanced main control room. A within-subject experiment was designed to examine the validity of the staffing evaluation technique. The results indicated the performance of evaluated staffing level via the staffing evaluation technique was significantly higher than that of non-evaluated staffing level; thus, validity of the staffing evaluation technique can be accepted. Finally, the implications for managerial practice on the findings of this study were discussed. (author)

  9. Staffing the Principalship: Finding, Coaching, and Mentoring School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, Suzette

    2004-01-01

    "Help Wanted" signs are springing up outside schools. The shortage of school administrators is not coming, it is here. To thwart the shortage and keep schools on the cutting edge, diligence in cultivating, training, and inspiring a new generation of school leaders--especially for the principalship, must be exercised. Staffing the Principalship…

  10. Staffing UK University Campuses Overseas: Lessons from MNE Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, John; Wood, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article suggests that as their internal labor markets become more multinational in scope, UK universities may acquire similar staffing characteristics to commercial multinational enterprises (MNEs). Comparing evidence from four UK universities with several surveys of MNEs it concludes that, although there are broad similarities in the…

  11. Flexible Training Strategy (National Task Force on Medical Staffing)

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health (Ireland)

    2003-01-01

    Flexible Training Strategy (National Task Force on Medical Staffing) The Flexible Training Strategy, while endorsing flexible/part-time options recognises that the preferred option for the majority of doctors-in-training and consultants is most likely to continue to be full-time training and work. Click here to download PDF

  12. Healthcare security staffing for smaller facilities: where science meets art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining effective security resourcing and staffing for smaller healthcare facilities presents many difficulties, according to the author In this article, he provides guidance to security practitioners on taking existing data and translating it into a language that administration will understand and appreciate.

  13. Flexible nurse staffing based on hourly bed census predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Braaksma, Aleida; Burger, C.A.J.; Bakker, P.J.M; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    2012-01-01

    Workload on nursing wards depends highly on patient arrivals and patient lengths of stay, which are both inherently variable. Predicting this workload and staffing nurses accordingly is essential for guaranteeing quality of care in a cost effective manner. This paper introduces a stochastic method

  14. Flexible nurse staffing based on hourly bed census predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Braaksma, Aleida; Burger, C.A.J.; Bakker, P.J.M; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    Workloads in nursing wards depend highly on patient arrivals and lengths of stay, both of which are inherently variable. Predicting these workloads and staffing nurses accordingly are essential for guaranteeing quality of care in a cost-effective manner. This paper introduces a stochastic method

  15. 20 CFR 653.111 - State agency staffing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State agency staffing requirements. 653.111 Section 653.111 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SERVICES... ethnic characteristics in the work force shall be distributed in substantially the same proportion among...

  16. Influence of design improvements in optimising staffing of NPPs - an Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Three decades of operating experience in India has led to sustained high performance of NPP's. The staffing modules and policies are standardised. The basic functions of operation, maintenance, technical support and quality assurance are carried out by a team of 727 in-plant persons (for a 2 x 220 MW PHWR station) organised at five levels, for fifty positions in ten job families. The organisational factors that led to optimising of staff are described in the companion paper. This optimisation of manpower is a result of continuous learning - for (i) optimising quantum of workload and (ii) improving productivity. For the first category, design improvements over older Indian NPP's have increased reliability, operability, maintainability and human factors. Few examples: (i) improved man-machine interface in plant controls and on-power refuelling system with operator guidance, logging as well as diagnostic/health monitoring features; (ii) spread out layout for better access and ease of maintenance, separation of plant services for unit-1 from unit-2 and, removal of reactor auxiliaries out to separate buildings; (iii) reduction of maintenance tasks through redesigned equipment and improved condition monitoring means. However, design and procedural improvements also include additional equipment for upgradation of safety measures, e.g. larger number of safety related pumps separate switchyard control room and increased service system equipment. This paper outlines experience of design improvements in optimising staffing and uses a specific case illustration to establish the findings for better use of staff. (author)

  17. Patient-physician trust: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, D H; Campbell, B

    1997-02-01

    Patients' trust in their physicians has recently become a focus of concern, largely owing to the rise of managed care, yet the subject remains largely unstudied. We undertook a qualitative research study of patients' self-reported experiences with trust in a physician to gain further understanding of the components of trust in the context of the patient-physician relationship. Twenty-nine patients participants, aged 26 to 72, were recruited from three diverse practice sites. Four focus groups, each lasting 1.5 to 2 hours, were conducted to explore patients' experiences with trust. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded by four readers, using principles of grounded theory. The resulting consensus codes were grouped into seven categories of physician behavior, two of which related primarily to technical competence (thoroughness in evaluation and providing appropriate and effective treatment) and five of which were interpersonal (understanding patient's individual experience, expressing caring, communicating clearly and completely, building partnership/sharing power and honesty/respect for patient). Two additional categories were predisposing factors and structural/staffing factors. Each major category had multiple subcategories. Specific examples from each major category are provided. These nine categories of physician behavior encompassed the trust experiences related by the 29 patients. These categories and the specific examples provided by patients provide insights into the process of trust formation and suggest ways in which physicians could be more effective in building and maintaining trust.

  18. Economic Crisis and Portuguese National Health Service Physicians: Findings from a Descriptive Study of Their Perceptions and Reactions from Health Care Units in the Greater Lisbon Area

    OpenAIRE

    Inês Rego; Giuliano Russo; Luzia Gonçalves; Julian Perelman; Pedro Pita Barros

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In Europe, scant scientific evidence exists on the impact of economic crisis on physicians. This study aims at understanding the adjustments made by public sector physicians to the changing conditions, and their perceptions on the market for medical services in the Lisbon metropolitan area. Material and Methods: A random sample of 484 physicians from São José Hospital and health center groups in Cascais and Amadora, to explore their perceptions of the economic crisis, and the...

  19. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is

  20. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havig Anders

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78. Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses

  1. Physician-staffed emergency helicopter reduces transportation time from alarm call to highly specialized centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjaeldstad, A.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since 2007, the number of Danish emergency departments has decreased from 44 to 21. Longer distances to specialized treatment have increased the demand for advanced prehospital treatment. A Danish 24/7 Helicopter Emergency Medical System (HEMS) project in western Denmark was initiated......-to-centre) for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or severe injury (Injury Severity Score > 15). MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this prospective study with a matched historical control group, the time-to-doctor and the time-to-centre for patients with STEMI or severe injury transported by HEMS were...

  2. Staff Assist: A Resource to Improve Nursing Home Quality and Staffing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the creation and use of a web-based resource, designed to help nursing homes implement quality improvements through changes in staffing characteristics. Design and Methods: Information on staffing characteristics (i.e., staffing levels, turnover, stability, and use of agency staff), facility characteristics (e.g.,…

  3. Staffing Patterns in Public School Systems: Current Status and Trends, Update 2001. Research Snapshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alicia D.; Protheroe, Nancy; Parks, Michael C.

    Staffing patterns in American public-school systems are presented in this report of the 2000-01 school year. The report addresses the following: why information about staffing ratios is important; how many people currently work in public schools; what proportion of these are teachers, administrators, and support staff; current staffing patterns in…

  4. The Economics of an Admissions Holding Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Kraftin E; Martin, Richard

    2017-06-01

    With increasing attention to the actual cost of delivering care, return-on-investment calculations take on new significance. Boarded patients in the emergency department (ED) are harmful to clinical care and have significant financial opportunity costs. We hypothesize that investment in an admissions holding unit for admitted ED patients not only captures opportunity cost but also significantly lowers direct cost of care. This was a three-phase study at a busy urban teaching center with significant walkout rate. We first determined the true cost of maintaining a staffed ED bed for one patient-hour and compared it to alternative settings. The opportunity cost for patients leaving without being seen was then conservatively estimated. Lastly, a convenience sample of admitted patients boarding in the ED was observed continuously from one hour after decision-to-admit until physical departure from the ED to capture a record of every interaction with a nurse or physician. Personnel costs per patient bed-hour were $58.20 for the ED, $24.80 for an inpatient floor, $19.20 for the inpatient observation unit, and $10.40 for an admissions holding area. An eight-bed holding unit operating at practical capacity would free 57.4 hours of bed space in the ED and allow treatment of 20 additional patients. This could yield increased revenues of $27,796 per day and capture opportunity cost of $6.09 million over 219 days, in return for extra staffing costs of $218,650. Analysis of resources used for boarded patients was determined by continuous observation of a convenience sample of ED-boarded patients, which found near-zero interactions with both nursing and physicians during the boarding interval. Resource expense per ED bed-hour is more than twice that in non-critical care inpatient units. Despite the high cost of available resources, boarded non-critical patients receive virtually no nursing or physician attention. An admissions holding unit is remarkably effective in avoiding the

  5. The Economics of an Admissions Holding Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraftin E. Schreyer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With increasing attention to the actual cost of delivering care, return-on-investment calculations take on new significance. Boarded patients in the emergency department (ED are harmful to clinical care and have significant financial opportunity costs. We hypothesize that investment in an admissions holding unit for admitted ED patients not only captures opportunity cost but also significantly lowers direct cost of care. Methods: This was a three-phase study at a busy urban teaching center with significant walkout rate. We first determined the true cost of maintaining a staffed ED bed for one patient-hour and compared it to alternative settings. The opportunity cost for patients leaving without being seen was then conservatively estimated. Lastly, a convenience sample of admitted patients boarding in the ED was observed continuously from one hour after decision-to-admit until physical departure from the ED to capture a record of every interaction with a nurse or physician. Results: Personnel costs per patient bed-hour were $58.20 for the ED, $24.80 for an inpatient floor, $19.20 for the inpatient observation unit, and $10.40 for an admissions holding area. An eight-bed holding unit operating at practical capacity would free 57.4 hours of bed space in the ED and allow treatment of 20 additional patients. This could yield increased revenues of $27,796 per day and capture opportunity cost of $6.09 million over 219 days, in return for extra staffing costs of $218,650. Analysis of resources used for boarded patients was determined by continuous observation of a convenience sample of ED-boarded patients, which found near-zero interactions with both nursing and physicians during the boarding interval. Conclusion: Resource expense per ED bed-hour is more than twice that in non-critical care inpatient units. Despite the high cost of available resources, boarded non-critical patients receive virtually no nursing or physician attention. An

  6. Experiences and lessons learnt on staffing from the first Indian nuclear power plant (PHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Three decades of operating experience in India has led to sustained high performance of NPPs. The staffing modules and policies are standardised. The basic functions of operation, maintenance, technical support and quality assurance are carried out by a team of 727 in-plant persons (for a 2 x 220 MW PHWR station) organised at five levels, for fifty positions in ten job families. Specific qualification levels apply to each position - six at management positions, five licensed positions with the rest qualified through an equivalent training scheme. Practically all O and M activities are carried out on-site by the utility manpower with minimum involvement of contractors. The entire process of human resource development is in-house - with each NPP organisation comprised of 30% experienced staff transferred from older NPPs and 70% totally developed out of fresh recruits. Four to eight years lead time goes to qualify fresh recruits depending on the position. This optimisation of manpower is a result of continuous learning - through operating experience and regulatory feed back and self assessment for (i) optimising quantum of work load and (ii) improving productivity. For the first category, design improvements over older NPP's increased reliability, operability, maintainability and human factors are described separately in the companion paper. In this paper the organisation factors are discussed, starting with the initial lessons that demanded improved management and enhanced quality programmes and caused temporarily, high demand of staffing for bringing out new systems, e.g., (i) attaining maturity of units; (ii) standardising training, retraining and cross training and qualifications; (in) job rotations, (iv) in service inspection of reactor components; (v) quality audits. The experiences on subsequent optimisation of staffing levels are outlined. (author)

  7. Nurse staffing issues are just the tip of the iceberg: a qualitative study about nurses' perceptions of nurse staffing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostveen, Catharina J.; Mathijssen, Elke; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    To obtain in-depth insight into the perceptions of nurses in the Netherlands regarding current nurse staffing levels and use of nurse-to-patient-ratios (NPR) and patient classification systems (PCS). In response to rising health care demands due to ageing of the patient population and increasing

  8. Is there a role for physician involvement in introducing research to surrogate decision makers in the intensive care unit? (The Approach trial: a pilot mixed methods study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K E A; Rizvi, L; Smith, O M; Lee, Y; Lee, J; Wang, M; Brown, M; Parker, M; Premji, A; Leung, D; Hammond Mobilio, M; Gotlib-Conn, L; Nisenbaum, R; Santos, M; Li, Y; Mehta, S

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomized trial comparing two strategies [physician (MD) vs. non-physician (non-MD)] for approaching substitute decision makers (SDMs) for research and to evaluate SDMs' experiences in being approached for consent. A pilot mixed methods study of first encounters with SDMs. Of 137 SDMs (162 eligibility events), 67 and 70 were randomized to MD and non-MD introductions, respectively. Eighty SDMs (98 events) provided consent and 21 SDMs (24 events) declined consent for studies, including 2 SDMs who provided and declined consent. We identified few missed introductions [4/52 (7.7 %)] and protocol violations [6/117 (5.1 %)], high comfort, satisfaction and acceptance scores and similar consent rates in both arms. SDMs provided consent significantly more often when a patient update was provided in the MD arm. Most SDMs (85.7 %) felt that physician involvement was inconsequential and preferred physician time to be dedicated to patient care; however, SDM experiences were closely related to their recall of being approached and recall was poor. SDMs highlighted 7 themes of importance to them in research surrogate decision-making. SDMs prioritized the personal attributes of the person approaching them over professional designation and preferred physician time to be dedicated to patient care. A mixed methods design evaluated intervention fidelity and provided the rationale for not proceeding to a larger trial, despite achieving all feasibility metrics in the pilot trial. NCT01232621.

  9. Nursing home staffing requirements and input substitution: effects on housekeeping, food service, and activities staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowblis, John R; Hyer, Kathryn

    2013-08-01

    To study the effect of minimum nurse staffing requirements on the subsequent employment of nursing home support staff. Nursing home data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System merged with state nurse staffing requirements. Facility-level housekeeping, food service, and activities staff levels are regressed on nurse staffing requirements and other controls using fixed effect panel regression. OSCAR surveys from 1999 to 2004. Increases in state direct care and licensed nurse staffing requirements are associated with decreases in the staffing levels of all types of support staff. Increased nursing home nurse staffing requirements lead to input substitution in the form of reduced support staffing levels. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Comparing the staffing models of outsourcing in selected companies

    OpenAIRE

    Chaloupková, Věra

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with problems of takeover of employees in outsourcing. The capital purpose is to compare the staffing model of outsourcing in selected companies. To compare in selected companies I chose multi-criteria analysis. This thesis is dividend into six chapters. The first charter is devoted to the theoretical part. In this charter describes the basic concepts as outsourcing, personal aspects, phase of the outsourcing projects, communications and culture. The rest of thesis is devote...

  11. STAFFING DALAM ALQURAN DAN HADIS DITINJAU DARI MANAJEMEN PENDIDIKAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Andriani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staffing in an organization can be defined as a series of processes and efforts to acquire, develop, motivate, and evaluate the overall human resources. It is required within the organization in achieving its goals. In staffing, putting a person in a work should be in accordance with his capabilities and expertise so that all are expected to be achieved. Job placement principle is the principle of humanity, democracy, the right man on the right place, equal pay for equal work, unity of direction, the principle of unity of purpose, unity of command, Efficiency and Productivity Work. The concept is the placement, promotion, transfer and demotion. Staffing in the Qur'an and Hadith seen from education management is an employee must complete properly, responsibility, trust, has the capability and expertise, serve, work ethic, strong and trustworthy, honest, sincere, true and trustful, physical and mental strength, and high manners. Professionalism in view of sharia is characterized by three things, namely ahliyah (expertise, himmatul 'charity (high work ethic, trustworthy (reliable.

  12. Structure and staffing of radiotherapy physics in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D I

    1995-01-01

    In 1989 IPSM brought out a policy document on the role of the physical scientist in radiotherapy. At roughly the same time IPSM also produced recommended minimum staffing levels for the medical physics support of radiotherapy, which drew heavily on comprehensive reviews of both physicist and physics technician staffing carried out by the Scottish Radiotherapy Physicists Group in 1980 (updated in 1989). The IPSM figures remain professional recommendations and have not been taken up by any official body. However some of the Scottish figures were included in a SHHD Planning Council Scientific Advisory report and so have some measure of official endorsement. All these figures were derived specifically for the UK situation of essentially regional oncology centres, where generally medium to large radiotherapy departments are the norm, to concentrate equipment, expertise and experience. Thus there are approximately 60 centres for a population of 55 million. In addition the recommendations reflect the typical structure of UK departments, in terms of professional roles and relationships. The current situation regarding physicist and physics technician numbers is reviewed, using evidence from recent surveys. The UK and other recommendations are applied to a number of representative centres and the figures obtained are compared to each other and to the actual staffing levels

  13. Should physicians have facial piercings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Alison W; Wright, Seth W; Wrenn, Keith D; Bernard, Aline

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of patrons and medical school faculty about physicians with nontraditional facial piercings. We also examined whether a piercing affected the perceived competency and trustworthiness of physicians. Survey. Teaching hospital in the southeastern United States. Emergency department patrons and medical school faculty physicians. First, patrons were shown photographs of models with a nontraditional piercing and asked about the appropriateness for a physician or medical student. In the second phase, patrons blinded to the purpose of the study were shown identical photographs of physician models with or without piercings and asked about competency and trustworthiness. The third phase was an assessment of attitudes of faculty regarding piercings. Nose and lip piercings were felt to be appropriate for a physician by 24% and 22% of patrons, respectively. Perceived competency and trustworthiness of models with these types of piercings were also negatively affected. An earring in a male was felt to be appropriate by 35% of patrons, but an earring on male models did not negatively affect perceived competency or trustworthiness. Nose and eyebrow piercings were felt to be appropriate by only 7% and 5% of faculty physicians and working with a physician or student with a nose or eyebrow piercing would bother 58% and 59% of faculty, respectively. An ear piercing in a male was felt to be appropriate by 20% of faculty, and 25% stated it would bother them to work with a male physician or student with an ear piercing. Many patrons and physicians feel that some types of nontraditional piercings are inappropriate attire for physicians, and some piercings negatively affect perceived competency and trustworthiness. Health care providers should understand that attire may affect a patient's opinion about their abilities and possibly erode confidence in them as a clinician.

  14. The relationship between attendance at birth and maternal mortality rates: an exploration of United Nations' data sets including the ratios of physicians and nurses to population, GNP per capita and female literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J J; Wharrad, H

    2001-05-01

    The relationship between attendance at birth and maternal mortality rates: an exploration of United Nations' data sets including the ratios of physicians and nurses to population, GNP per capita and female literacy. This is the third and final paper drawing on data taken from United Nations (UN) data sets. The first paper examined the global distribution of health professionals (as measured by ratios of physicians and nurses to population), and its relationship to gross national product per capita (GNP) (Wharrad & Robinson 1999). The second paper explored the relationships between the global distribution of physicians and nurses, GNP, female literacy and the health outcome indicators of infant and under five mortality rates (IMR and u5MR) (Robinson & Wharrad 2000). In the present paper, the global distribution of health professionals is explored in relation to maternal mortality rates (MMRs). The proportion of births attended by medical and nonmedical staff defined as "attendance at birth by trained personnel" (physicians, nurses, midwives or primary health care workers trained in midwifery skills), is included as an additional independent variable in the regression analyses, together with the ratio of physicians and nurses to population, female literacy and GNP. To extend our earlier analyses by considering the relationships between the global distribution of health professionals (ratios of physicians and nurses to population, and the proportion of births attended by trained health personnel), GNP, female literacy and MMR. countries, regression analyses were performed using numbers of physicians, and numbers of nurses, per 1000 population, the proportion of births attended by trained health personnel, GNP per capita and female literacy as independent variables and MMRs as the dependent variable. Linear regression analyses show positive associations for MMRs and the ratios of physicians to population (73%, n=136), ratios of nurses to population (56%, n=137), and

  15. The Effects of Hospital-Level Factors on Patients' Ratings of Physician Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mona; Makarem, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication influences patient health outcomes and satisfaction with healthcare delivery. Yet, little is known about contextual factors that influence physicians' communication with their patients. The main purpose of this article is to examine organizational-level factors that influence patient perceptions of physician communication in inpatient settings. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and American Hospital Association data to determine patients' ratings of physician communication at the hospital level, and to collect information about hospital-level factors that can potentially influence physician communication. Our sample consisted of 2,756 hospitals. We ran a regression analysis to determine the predictors of poor physician communication, measured as the percentage of patients in a hospital who reported that physicians sometimes or never communicated well. In our sample of hospitals, this percentage ranged between 0% and 21%, with 25% of hospitals receiving poor ratings from more than 6% of patients. Three organizational factors had statistically significant negative associations with physician communication: for-profit ownership, hospital size, and hospitalists providing care in the hospital, On the other hand, the number of full-time-equivalent physicians and dentists per 10,000 inpatient days, physician ownership of the hospital, Medicare share of inpatient days, and public ownership were positively associated with patients' ratings of physician communication. Physician staffing levels are an understudied area in healthcare research. Our findings indicate that physician staffing levels affect the quality of physician communication with patients. Moreover, for-profit and larger hospitals should invest more in physician communication given the role that HCAHPS plays in value-based purchasing.

  16. Impact of an electronic health record operating room management system in ophthalmology on documentation time, surgical volume, and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David S; Read-Brown, Sarah; Tu, Daniel C; Lambert, William E; Choi, Dongseok; Almario, Bella M; Yackel, Thomas R; Brown, Anna S; Chiang, Michael F

    2014-05-01

    Although electronic health record (EHR) systems have potential benefits, such as improved safety and quality of care, most ophthalmology practices in the United States have not adopted these systems. Concerns persist regarding potential negative impacts on clinical workflow. In particular, the impact of EHR operating room (OR) management systems on clinical efficiency in the ophthalmic surgery setting is unknown. To determine the impact of an EHR OR management system on intraoperative nursing documentation time, surgical volume, and staffing requirements. For documentation time and circulating nurses per procedure, a prospective cohort design was used between January 10, 2012, and January 10, 2013. For surgical volume and overall staffing requirements, a case series design was used between January 29, 2011, and January 28, 2013. This study involved ophthalmic OR nurses (n = 13) and surgeons (n = 25) at an academic medical center. Electronic health record OR management system implementation. (1) Documentation time (percentage of operating time documenting [POTD], absolute documentation time in minutes), (2) surgical volume (procedures/time), and (3) staffing requirements (full-time equivalents, circulating nurses/procedure). Outcomes were measured during a baseline period when paper documentation was used and during the early (first 3 months) and late (4-12 months) periods after EHR implementation. There was a worsening in total POTD in the early EHR period (83%) vs paper baseline (41%) (P system implementation was associated with worsening of intraoperative nursing documentation time especially in shorter procedures. However, it is possible to implement an EHR OR management system without serious negative impacts on surgical volume and staffing requirements.

  17. Consequences of Inadequate Staffing Include Missed Care, Potential Failure to Rescue, and Job Stress and Dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Lyndon, Audrey; Ruhl, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate responses of registered nurse members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) to a survey that sought their recommendations for staffing guidelines and their perceptions of the consequences of inadequate nurse staffing. The goal was to use these member data to inform the work of the AWHONN nurse staffing research team. Secondary analysis of responses to the 2010 AWHONN nurse staffing survey. Online. AWHONN members (N = 884). Review of data from an online survey of AWHONN members through the use of thematic analysis for descriptions of the consequences of inadequate nurse staffing during the childbirth process. Three main themes emerged as consequences of inadequate staffing or being short-staffed: Missed Care, Potential for Failure to Rescue, and Job-Related Stress and Dissatisfaction. These themes are consistent with those previously identified in the literature related to inadequate nurse staffing. Based on the responses from participants in the 2010 AWHONN nurse staffing survey, consequences of inadequate staffing can be quite serious and may put patients at risk for preventable harm. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Agreement between physicians and non-physician clinicians in starting antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasan Ashwin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scarcity of physicians in sub-Saharan Africa – particularly in rural clinics staffed only by non-physician health workers – is constraining access to HIV treatment, as only they are legally allowed to start antiretroviral therapy in the HIV-positive patient. Here we present a pilot study from Uganda assessing agreement between non-physician clinicians (nurses and clinical officers and physicians in their decisions as to whether to start therapy. Methods We conducted the study at 12 government antiretroviral therapy sites in three regions of Uganda, all of which had staff trained in delivery of antiretroviral therapy using the WHO Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness guidelines for chronic HIV care. We collected seven key variables to measure patient assessment and the decision as to whether to start antiretroviral therapy, the primary variable of interest being the Final Antiretroviral Therapy Recommendation. Patients saw either a clinical officer or nurse first, and then were screened identically by a blinded physician during the same clinic visit. We measured inter-rater agreement between the decisions of the non-physician health workers and physicians in the antiretroviral therapy assessment variables using simple and weighted Kappa analysis. Results Two hundred fifty-four patients were seen by a nurse and physician, while 267 were seen by a clinical officer and physician. The majority (> 50% in each arm of the study were in World Health Organization Clinical Stages I and II and therefore not currently eligible for antiretroviral therapy according to national antiretroviral therapy guidelines. Nurses and clinical officers both showed moderate to almost perfect agreement with physicians in their Final Antiretroviral Therapy Recommendation (unweighted κ = 0.59 and κ = 0.91, respectively. Agreement was also substantial for nurses versus physicians for assigning World Health Organization Clinical

  19. Multiple mini-interview as a predictor of performance in the objective structured clinical examination among Physician Associates in the United Kingdom: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narendra; Bhardwaj, Shailaja; Rahman, Eqram

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Patient satisfaction and health care outcomes are directly linked to useful communication skills. Therefore, excellent interpersonal skills are imperative for health care professionals. Multiple mini-interview (MMI) is designed as a selection tool to assess the communication skills of applicants in medical schools during the admission process. However, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assesses students’ communication and clinical skills at the end of their academic terms. Recently, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK, adopted MMI in the selection process for the first cohort of MSc Physician Associate trainees for the academic year 2015–2016. This study aimed to determine the likelihood of MMI as a predictor of future performance of communication skills in the OSCE. Materials and methods The anonymous data of the average scores of communication skills attained in MMI and OSCE at the end of year 1 were collected for 30 students from the Physician Associate program team. Subsequently, Pearson’s correlation was computed to determine the relationship between the average scores of communication skills attained in MMI, and OSCE during trimester 2 and trimester 3 by the Physician Associate trainees. Results The study showed positive correlation between the scores of communication skills attained in MMI and OSCE during trimester 2 (r=0.956, n=30, p<0.001) and trimester 3 (r=0.966, n=30, p<0.001). Conclusion The study provides empirical evidence for the validity of MMI as a predictor of future performance of Physician Associate trainees’ communication skills during subsequent OSCEs. PMID:29695944

  20. Trends and quality of care in outpatient visits to generalist and specialist physicians delivering primary care in the United States, 1997-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Samuel T; Mafi, John N; Landon, Bruce E

    2014-06-01

    Although many specialists serve as primary care physicians (PCPs), the type of patients they serve, the range of services they provide, and the quality of care they deliver is uncertain. To describe trends in patient, physician, and visit characteristics, and compare visit-based quality for visits to generalists and specialists self-identified as PCPs. Cross-sectional study and time trend analysis. Nationally representative sample of visits to office-based physicians from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1997-2010. Proportions of primary care visits to generalist and specialists, patient characteristics, principal diagnoses, and quality. Among 84,041 visits to self-identified PCPs representing an estimated 4.0 billion visits, 91.5 % were to generalists, 5.9 % were to medical specialists and 2.6 % were to obstetrician/gynecologists. The proportion of PCP visits to generalists increased from 88.4 % in 1997 to 92.4 % in 2010, but decreased for medical specialists from 8.0 % to 4.8 %, p = 0.04). The proportion of medical specialist visits in which the physician self-identified as the patient's PCP decreased from 30.6 % in 1997 to 9.8 % in 2010 (p specialist PCPs take care of older patients (mean age 61 years), and dedicate most of their visits to chronic disease management (51.0 %), while generalist PCPs see younger patients (mean age 55.4 years) most commonly for new problems (40.5 %). Obstetrician/gynecologists self-identified as PCPs see younger patients (mean age 38.3 p specialists. Medical specialists are less frequently serving as PCPs for their patients over time. Generalist, medical specialist, and obstetrician/gynecologist PCPs serve different primary care roles for different populations. Delivery redesign efforts must account for the evolving role of generalist and specialist PCPs in the delivery of primary care.

  1. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  2. District nursing renascent as Wales adopts safe staffing levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labourne, Paul

    2018-05-02

    This article reflects on the history of the NHS in Wales and how this has led to its current structure. How this structure supports integrated working across primary, community and secondary care and how further integration with social care is moving forward and its direct effects on district nursing are explored. This article describes how district nursing is meeting these challenges. Support for district nurses as part of integrated multiprofessional teams is being developed to promote appropriately staffed teams centred on meeting the requirements of people within a designated area and ensuring that home is the best and first place of care.

  3. California's minimum-nurse-staffing legislation and nurses' wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Barbara; Harless, David W; Spetz, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, California became the first state to implement minimum-nurse-staffing ratios in acute care hospitals. We examined the wages of registered nurses (RNs) before and after the legislation was enacted. Using four data sets-the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey-we found that from 2000 through 2006, RNs in California metropolitan areas experienced real wage growth as much as twelve percentage points higher than the growth in the wages of nurses employed in metropolitan areas outside of California.

  4. Global perspective on training and staffing for paediatric cardiac critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronicki, Ronald A; Pollak, Uri; Argent, Andrew C; Kumar, R Krishna; Balestrini, Maria; Cogo, Paola; Cury Borim, Bruna; De Costa, Kumi; Beca, John; Shimizu, Naoki; Dominguez, Troy E

    2017-12-01

    This manuscript provides a global perspective on physician and nursing education and training in paediatric cardiac critical care, including available resources and delivery of care models with representatives from several regions of the world including Africa, Israel, Asia, Australasia, Europe, South America, and the United States of America.

  5. Westinghouse, DOE see apples, oranges in IG staffing report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-01-01

    The operator of the Energy Department's Savannah River weapons plant has at least 1,800 more employees than it needs, and could save $400 million over a five-year period by cutting its staff accordingly, a DOE inspector general study says. Most of the boat - 1,206 employees - was attributed to excessive numbers of managers, with the inspector general concluding that Westinghouse Savannah River Co. had roughly twice as many layers of management than two other DOE weapons contractors. The study also concluded that Westinghouse in fiscal year 1992 significantly understated its actual staffing levels in reports to DOE, failing to disclose 1,765 full-time employees or the equivalent hours worked. Through such underreporting Westinghouse was able to open-quotes circumvent staffing ceilings established by the department,close quotes the study added. Overall, DOE Inspector General John Layton said Westinghouse's staff levels substantially exceeded those needed for efficient operation of the South Carolina nuclear weapons facility. Layton based his analysis on efficiency standards attained by other DOE weapons plant contractors, such as Martin Marietta Energy Systems at DOE's Oak Ridge, Tenn., plant and EG ampersand G Rocky Flats, as well as widely utilized worker performance requirements used by the Navy and private sector companies that perform work similar to that done at Savannah River

  6. Obesity and intensive staffing needs of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John Alexander; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas George

    2018-06-05

    The objective of this study is to examine how increasing body mass index (BMI) among nursing home residents affects the amount of staffing assistance needed for activities of daily living (ADL). We analyzed 1,627,141 US nursing home residents reported in the 2013 Minimum Data Set in seven BMI categories, from underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m 2 ) to obesity Class IIIB (≥50 kg/m 2 ). Logistic regression models estimated the odds of nursing home-reported need for extensive (≥2 staff member) assistance needed for ADLs. The adjusted odds increased from 1.07 (95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.06-1.08) for Class I, 1.16 (95%CI 1.14-1.17) for Class II, 1.33 (95%CI 1.31-1.35) for Class IIIA, and 1.90 (95%CI 1.86-1.95) for Class IIIB obesity residents compared to residents of normal weight. As a nursing home resident's BMI increases, especially for BMI ≥40 kg/m 2 , the need for extensive staffing assistance with ADLs also increases substantially. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Does safety climate moderate the influence of staffing adequacy and work conditions on nurse injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Barbara A; Hughes, Linda C; Belyea, Michael; Chang, Yunkyung; Hofmann, David; Jones, Cheryl B; Bacon, Cynthia T

    2007-01-01

    Hospital nurses have one of the highest work-related injury rates in the United States. Yet, approaches to improving employee safety have generally focused on attempts to modify individual behavior through enforced compliance with safety rules and mandatory participation in safety training. We examined a theoretical model that investigated the impact on nurse injuries (back injuries and needlesticks) of critical structural variables (staffing adequacy, work engagement, and work conditions) and further tested whether safety climate moderated these effects. A longitudinal, non-experimental, organizational study, conducted in 281 medical-surgical units in 143 general acute care hospitals in the United States. Work engagement and work conditions were positively related to safety climate, but not directly to nurse back injuries or needlesticks. Safety climate moderated the relationship between work engagement and needlesticks, while safety climate moderated the effect of work conditions on both needlesticks and back injuries, although in unexpected ways. DISCUSSION AND IMPACT ON INDUSTRY: Our findings suggest that positive work engagement and work conditions contribute to enhanced safety climate and can reduce nurse injuries.

  8. A comparison of current Naval Facilities Engineering Command field office staffing methods, state staffing methods and the construction industry institutes owner contractor work structure

    OpenAIRE

    Monreal, Michael

    2001-01-01

    CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) Thesis document This report was generated by accepting a report topic contained in a list of topics on the Civil Engineer Corps Graduate School Information web page. The topic request and description is noted as follows: Topic. How to Measure Staffing Requirements in ROICC offices and Other Acquisition Functions with a description. Description: We base current staffing requirements on history and only adjust from what we have used in the past years. It is sus...

  9. High School Administrative Staffing in Washington State: Principal Perspectives on Resource Needs and Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steach, John C.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored how high school principals prioritize their work and utilize available human resources to adjust to inadequate administrative staffing. Analysis of staffing levels across the state of Washington and specifically inside two eastern Washington districts framed interview questions for central office administration…

  10. Why Employers Use Flexible Staffing Arrangements: Evidence from an Establishment Survey. Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Susan N.

    Use of flexible staffing arrangements--including temporary help agency, short-term, on-call, regular part-time, and contract workers--is widespread and two-thirds of employers believe this trend will increase in the near future. A study examined which employers use flexible staffing arrangements, why they use these arrangements, and their…

  11. A staffing decision support methodology using a quality loss function : a cross-disciplinary quantitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mincsovics, G.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding the quality loss implications of short staffing is essential in maintaining service quality on a limited budget. Objectives For elaborate financial control on staffing decisions, it is necessary to quantify the cost of the incidental quality loss that a given workload and

  12. Worthy Work, Unlivable Wages: The National Child Care Staffing Study, 1988-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitebook, Marcy; Howes, Carollee; Phillips, Deborah

    In 1988, the National Child Care Staffing Study first gathered information on staffing and quality from a sample of child care centers in five metropolitan areas--Atlanta, Boston, Detroit, Phoenix, and Seattle--and returned for updated information in 1992. In 1997, directors of the original sample of centers still in operation were contacted again…

  13. Pre-hospital critical care by anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, A J; Lossius, H M; Mikkelsen, S

    2013-01-01

    All Scandinavian countries provide anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services. Little is known of the incidence of critical illness or injury attended by these services. We aimed to investigate anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia with special emphasis on incidence...

  14. Development of Staffing Patterns in Six New Medical Schools Established 1952-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Resources Analysis Branch.

    This summary report of staffing patterns in 6 medical schools established between 1952 and 1960 is the first phase of a proposed study of biomedical staffing requirements in institutions of higher education, 1965-1975. The 6 schools are: the University of Miami, Albert Einstein College of medicine at Yeshiva University, the University of Florida,…

  15. 75 FR 28295 - Cummins Filtration, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower and Spherion Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    .... The Department has determined that workers from Spherion Staffing were sufficiently under the control..., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower and Spherion Staffing, Including On-Site Workers From Hagemeyer North America, Lake Mills, IA; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker...

  16. Lack of sensitivity of staffing for 8-hour sessions to standard deviation in daily actual hours of operating room time used for surgeons with long queues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Jaideep J; Dexter, Franklin

    2009-06-01

    At multiple facilities including some in the United Kingdom's National Health Service, the following are features of many surgical-anesthetic teams: i) there is sufficient workload for each operating room (OR) list to almost always be fully scheduled; ii) the workdays are organized such that a single surgeon is assigned to each block of time (usually 8 h); iii) one team is assigned per block; and iv) hardly ever would a team "split" to do cases in more than one OR simultaneously. We used Monte-Carlo simulation using normal and Weibull distributions to estimate the times to complete lists of cases scheduled into such 8 h sessions. For each combination of mean and standard deviation, inefficiencies of use of OR time were determined for 10 h versus 8 h of staffing. When the mean actual hours of OR time used averages standard deviation and relative cost of over-run to under-run. When mean > or = 8 h 50 min, 10 h staffing has higher OR efficiency. For 8 h 25 min standard deviation of 60 min and relative cost of over-run to under-run of 2.0 versus (b) 8 h 48 min for normal, standard deviation of 0 min and relative cost ratio of 1.50. Although the simplest decision rule would be to staff for 8 h if the mean workload is standard deviation 60 min, and relative cost ratio of 2.00, the inefficiency of use of OR time would be 34% larger if staffing were planned for 8 h instead of 10 h. For surgical teams with 8 h sessions, use the following decision rule for anesthesiology and OR nurse staffing. If actual hours of OR time used averages or = 8 h 50 min, plan 10 h staffing. For averages in between, perform the full analysis of McIntosh et al. (Anesth Analg 2006;103:1499-516).

  17. Cost-Effective Adjustments to Nursing Home Staffing to Improve Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowblis, John R; Roberts, Amy Restorick

    2018-06-01

    Health care providers face fixed reimbursement rates from government sources and need to carefully adjust staffing to achieve the highest quality within a given cost structure. With data from the Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reports (1999-2015), this study holistically examined how staffing levels affect two publicly reported measures of quality in the nursing home industry, the number of deficiency citations and the deficiency score. While higher staffing consistently yielded better quality, the largest quality improvements resulted from increasing administrative registered nurses and social service staffing. After adjusting for wages, the most cost-effective investment for improving overall deficiency outcomes was increasing social services. Deficiencies related to quality of care were improved most by increasing administrative nursing and social service staff. Quality of life deficiencies were improved most by increasing social service and activities staff. Approaches to improve quality through staffing adjustments should target specific types of staff to maximize return on investment.

  18. Staffing and Workflow of a Maturing Institutional Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora L. Madsen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Institutional repositories (IRs have become established components of many academic libraries. As an IR matures it will face the challenge of how to scale up its operations to increase the amount and types of content archived. These challenges involve staffing, systems, workflows, and promotion. In the past eight years, Kansas State University's IR (K-REx has grown from a platform for student theses, dissertations, and reports to also include faculty works. The initial workforce of a single faculty member was expanded as a part of a library-wide reorganization, resulting in a cross-departmental team that is better able to accommodate the expansion of the IR. The resultant need to define staff responsibilities and develop resources to manage the workflows has led to the innovations described here, which may prove useful to the greater library community as other IRs mature.

  19. Staffing and training experience at the Bilibino nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukhvetov, F.

    2001-01-01

    Bilibino NPP has four 12 MW(e) water cooled graphite moderated channel reactors. The plant has been in operation since 1973 in conditions of isolated local energy system in a remote area with extreme climatic conditions. The plant accounts for almost 70 per cent of energy produced in the region, it also provides heating to the regional centre. The plant's organisational structure is on the whole consistent with the standard structure of other NPPs of ex-USSR. At the same time there are some specific features due to high cost of personnel in the prime cost of the generated energy. As a result a need arises to broaden the task of catering for each worker and, therefore, to extend and increase the level of training. The number of high-quality personnel is on the increase. A method of step-by-step training is widely used at all work areas for training operations personnel. At the end of each step a worker is engaged in independent activities at this work area. When a plant is located in a remote area efficient and effective maintenance becomes highly instrumental. The engineering and design support on the part of the utility and equipment manufacturer begins to play a greater role. Activities to optimise the plant organisational structure were mostly characterised by merging of subdivisions and by some change in the proportion of different categories of personnel. It would be an optimum decision to put all supporting services, namely, logistics, book-keeping and staffing departments, within the utility's authority. Operations experience of the Bilibino plant will certainly be valuable for projection, location choice and staffing of plants with small and medium reactors. (author)

  20. Managerial Ownership in Nursing Homes: Staffing, Quality, and Financial Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sean Shenghsiu; Bowblis, John R

    2017-06-20

    Ownership of nursing homes (NHs) has primarily focused broadly on differences between for-profit (FP), nonprofit (NFP), and government-operated facilities. Yet, among FPs, the understanding of detailed ownership structures at individual NHs is rather limited. Particularly, NH administrators may hold significant equity interests in their facilities, leading to heterogeneous financial incentives and NH outcomes. Through the principal-agent theory, this article studies how managerial ownership of individual facilities affects NH outcomes. We use a unique panel dataset of Ohio NHs (2005-2010) to empirically examine the relationship between managerial equity ownership and NH staffing, quality, and financial performance. We identify facility administrators as owner-managers if they have more than 5% of the equity stakes or are relatives of the owners. The statistical analysis is based on the pooled ordinary least squares and NH-fixed effect models. We find that owner-managed NHs are associated with higher nursing staff levels compared to other FP NHs. Surprisingly, despite higher staffing levels, owner-managed NHs are not associated with better quality and we find no statistically significant difference in financial performance between owner-managed and nonowner-managed FP NHs. Our results do not support the principal-agent model and we offer alternative explanations for future research. Our findings provide empirical evidence that NH ownership structures are more nuanced than simply broadly categorizing facilities as FP or NFP, and our results do not fully align with the standard principal-agent model. The role of managerial ownership should be considered in future NH research and policy discussions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Preparing emergency personnel in dialysis: a just-in-time training program for additional staffing during disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoler, Genevieve B; Johnston, James R; Stevenson, Judy A; Suyama, Joe

    2013-06-01

    There are 341 000 patients in the United States who are dependent on routine dialysis for survival. Recent large-scale disasters have emphasized the importance of disaster preparedness, including supporting dialysis units, for people with chronic disease. Contingency plans for staffing are important for providing continuity of care for a technically challenging procedure such as dialysis. PReparing Emergency Personnel in Dialysis (PREP-D) is a just-in-time training program designed to train individuals having minimum familiarity with the basic steps of dialysis to support routine dialysis staff during a disaster. A 5-module educational program was developed through a collaborative, multidisciplinary effort. A pilot study testing the program was performed using 20 nontechnician dialysis facility employees and 20 clinical-year medical students as subjects. When comparing pretest and posttest scores, the entire study population showed a mean improvement of 28.9%, with dialysis facility employees and medical students showing improvements of 21.8% and 36.4%, respectively (P just-in-time training format. The knowledge gained by using the PREP-D program during a staffing shortage may allow for continuity of care for critical services such as dialysis during a disaster.

  2. Designing and Staffing the ITER Organization (Designing and staffing the Organization to build teams for ITER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kaname; Amenc-Antoni, Pascale [ITER Organisation (France)

    2008-07-01

    ITER, 'the way' in Latin, is not only a machine to be built in Cadarache, it is a newly established international organization - called the ITER Organization- that seven Members (European Union, Japan, Korea, China, India, Russian Federation, United States of America), representing more than half the world's population, have decided to set up to achieve this project. The official organization is new, but European, Japanese, Russian and American teams have been working for more than 20 years to make this project a reality, in Naka, Garching and San Diego. It was the first challenge for the ITER management to have these very experienced researchers and engineers come to Cadarache. Many of them have already come or will come later. They are now being joined by colleagues from the national fusion institutions of the three countries that have become part of the ITER project more recently, China, Korea and India; professionals who are new to fusion and also administrative specialists needed for the management of such an organization. The IO is therefore facing additional big challenges: moving from the research period to the construction period and recruiting the most competent people for this, creating a single team with staff from different cultures and with different experiences in a single organization, working towards a single goal: building the machine and making it a success. Selecting people with a broad range of experience through international competition, while taking into account a fair distribution among the seven Members is of major importance. From 7 persons in March 2006, including the General Manager, Kaname Ikeda, the IO has more than 250 people staff today, with almost 100 people under recruitment. 600 professionals are expected to be on site at the peak period, by 2013, with, in addition, a large number of subcontractors. (authors)

  3. Physicians' group seeks nuclear arms ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, M S

    1985-08-02

    The history and recent activities of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) are reported. Founded in 1980 by cardiologists Bernard Lown of the United States and Eugene Chazov of the Soviet Union, the group has attracted well over 100,000 members from 51 countries. Following the organization's fifth congress in Budapest in June 1985, a four-city tour of the United States by three American and four Soviet physicians was co-sponsored by IPPNW, Physicians for Social Responsibility, and the Soviet Committee of Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War. Through separate lecture series aimed at physicians and laypersons, the doctors sought to persuade colleagues to take an active stand against nuclear war, and to increase public awareness of the medical realities of a nuclear attack. A similar tour of the Soviet Union is planned.

  4. Factors influencing successful physician recruitment in pediatrics and internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kelvin; Camfield, Peter; Breau, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the study was to survey recently hired physicians to Canadian Academic Departments of Pediatric and Internal Medicine to understand the factors that underlay successful recruitment. Recruits and Chairs agreed on the 10 most important values. Chairs overvalued the 10 least important Recruit values. Statistical analysis revealed five core themes - in order of importance they are: family lifestyle and opportunities, compensation methodology, children/community (housing, schools, recreational), professional working conditions (technology, staffing, facilities), and academic opportunities. Core themes varied by demographics and academic profile.

  5. 77 FR 63872 - Alternative Management Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc., Personnel Management Group, Inc...., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc., Personnel Management Group, Inc., Select Staffing, and... follows: ''All workers of Alternative Management Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time...

  6. 77 FR 40638 - Syniverse Technologies, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Insight Global Stone Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ..., Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Insight Global Stone Staffing, and Randstad Formerly Known..., Massachusetts, including on-site leased workers from Insight Global, Stone Staffing, Randstad formerly known as... Insight Global, Stone Staffing, Randstad, formerly known as Sapphire Technologies, were employed on-site...

  7. Applying WHO's 'workforce indicators of staffing need' (WISN) method to calculate the health worker requirements for India's maternal and child health service guarantees in Orissa State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, Amy; Mohanty, Manmath K; Das, Abhijit; House, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    In one district of Orissa state, we used the World Health Organization's Workforce Indicators of Staffing Need (WISN) method to calculate the number of health workers required to achieve the maternal and child health 'service guarantees' of India's National Rural Health Mission (NRHM). We measured the difference between this ideal number and current staffing levels. We collected census data, routine health information data and government reports to calculate demand for maternal and child health services. By conducting 54 interviews with physicians and midwives, and six focus groups, we were able to calculate the time required to perform necessary health care tasks. We also interviewed 10 new mothers to cross-check these estimates at a global level and get assessments of quality of care. For 18 service centres of Ganjam District, we found 357 health workers in our six cadre categories, to serve a population of 1.02 million. Total demand for the MCH services guaranteed under India's NRHM outpaced supply for every category of health worker but one. To properly serve the study population, the health workforce supply should be enhanced by 43 additional physicians, 15 nurses and 80 nurse midwives. Those numbers probably under-estimate the need, as they assume away geographic barriers. Our study established time standards in minutes for each MCH activity promised by the NRHM, which could be applied elsewhere in India by government planners and civil society advocates. Our calculations indicate significant numbers of new health workers are required to deliver the services promised by the NRHM.

  8. U.K. physicians' attitudes toward active voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, George E; Lancaster, Carol J; Clark, David; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Noble, William

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the views of geriatric medicine physicians and intensive care physicians in the United Kingdom on the topics of active voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide revealed rather different attitudes. Eighty percent of geriatricians, but only 52% of intensive care physicians, considered active voluntary euthanasia as never justified ethically. Gender and age did not play a major part in attitudinal differences of the respondents. If the variability of attitudes of these two medical specialties are anywhere near illustrative of other physicians in the United Kingdom, it would be difficult to formulate and implement laws and policies concerning euthanasia and assisted suicide. In addition, ample safeguards would be required to receive support from physicians regarding legalization.

  9. The impact of managed care penetration and hospital quality on efficiency in hospital staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Lee R; Magnussen, Jon

    2002-01-01

    The state of California has recently mandated minimum nurse-staffing ratios, raising concerns about possible affects on hospital efficiency. In this study, we examine how market factors and quality were related to staffing levels in California hospitals in 1995 (prior to implementation of the new law). We are particularly interested in the affect of managed care penetration on this aspect of hospital efficiency because the call to legislative action was predicated on fears that hospitals were reducing staffing below optimal levels in response to managed care pressures. We derive a unique measure of excess staffing in hospitals based on a data envelopment analysis (DEA) production function model, which explicitly includes ancillary care among the inputs and outputs. This careful specification of production is important because ancillary care use has risen relative to daily hospital services, with the spread of managed care and advances in medical technology. We find that market share (adjusted for size) and market concentration are the major determinants of excess staffing while managed care penetration is insignificant. We also find that poor quality (outcomes worse than expected) is associated with less efficient staffing. These findings suggest that the larger, more efficient urban hospitals will be penalized more heavily under binding staffing ratios than smaller, less-urban hospitals.

  10. Staffing decision processes and issues: Case studies of seven US Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.; Roussel, A.; Baker, K.; Durbin, N.; Hunt, P.; Hauth, J.; Forslund, C.; Terrill, E.; Gore, B.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this report is to identify how decisions are made regarding staffing levels and positions for a sample of U.S. nuclear power plants. In this report, a framework is provided for understanding the major forces driving staffing and the implications of staffing decisions for plant safety. The focus of this report is on driving forces that have led to changes in staffing levels and to the establishment of new positions between the mid-1980s and the early 1990s. Processes used at utilities and nuclear power plants to make and implement these staffing decisions are also discussed in the report. While general trends affecting the plant as a whole are presented, the major emphasis of this report is on staffing changes and practices in the operations department, including the operations shift crew. The findings in this report are based on interviews conducted at seven nuclear power plants and their parent utilities. A discussion of the key findings is followed by a summary of the implications of staffing issues for plant safety

  11. The relationship of California's Medicaid reimbursement system to nurse staffing levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B; Kang, Taewoon; Collier, Eric; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-10-01

    Policy initiatives at the Federal and state level are aimed at increasing staffing in nursing homes. These include direct staffing standards, public reporting, and financial incentives. To examine the impact of California's Medicaid reimbursement for nursing homes which includes incentives directed at staffing. Two-stage limited-information maximum-likelihood regressions were used to model the relationship between staffing [registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants hours per resident day] and the Medicaid payment rate, accounting for the specific structure of the payment system, endogeneity of payment and case-mix, and controlling for facility and market characteristics. A total of 927 California free-standing nursing homes in 2006. The model included facility characteristics (case-mix, size, ownership, and chain affiliation), market competition and excess demand, labor supply and wages, unemployment, and female employment. The instrumental variable for Medicaid reimbursement was the peer group payment rate for 7 geographical market areas, and the instrumental variables for resident case-mix were the average county revenues for professional therapy establishments and the percent of county population aged 65 and over. Consistent with the rate incentives and rational expectation behavior, expected nursing home reimbursement rates in 2008 were associated with increased RN staffing levels in 2006 but had no relationship with licensed practical nurse and certified nursing assistant staffing. The effect was estimated at 2 minutes per $10 increase in rate. The incentives in the Medicaid system impacted only RN staffing suggesting the need to improve the state's rate setting methodology.

  12. Medical physics staffing for radiation oncology: a decade of experience in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Jerry J.; Patterson, Michael S.; Beaulieu, Luc; Sharpe, Michael B.; Schreiner, L. John; MacPherson, Miller S.; Van Dyk, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The January 2010 articles in The New York Times generated intense focus on patient safety in radiation treatment, with physics staffing identified frequently as a critical factor for consistent quality assurance. The purpose of this work is to review our experience with medical physics staffing, and to propose a transparent and flexible staffing algorithm for general use. Guided by documented times required per routine procedure, we have developed a robust algorithm to estimate physics staffing needs according to center‐specific workload for medical physicists and associated support staff, in a manner we believe is adaptable to an evolving radiotherapy practice. We calculate requirements for each staffing type based on caseload, equipment inventory, quality assurance, educational programs, and administration. Average per‐case staffing ratios were also determined for larger‐scale human resource planning and used to model staffing needs for Ontario, Canada over the next 10 years. The workload specific algorithm was tested through a survey of Canadian cancer centers. For center‐specific human resource planning, we propose a grid of coefficients addressing specific workload factors for each staff group. For larger scale forecasting of human resource requirements, values of 260, 700, 300, 600, 1200, and 2000 treated cases per full‐time equivalent (FTE) were determined for medical physicists, physics assistants, dosimetrists, electronics technologists, mechanical technologists, and information technology specialists, respectively. PACS numbers: 87.55.N‐, 87.55.Qr PMID:22231223

  13. Optimizing staffing, quality, and cost in home healthcare nursing: theory synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Claire Su-Yeon

    2017-08-01

    To propose a new theory pinpointing the optimal nurse staffing threshold delivering the maximum quality of care relative to attendant costs in home health care. Little knowledge exists on the theoretical foundation addressing the inter-relationship among quality of care, nurse staffing, and cost. Theory synthesis. Cochrane Library, PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCOhost Web and Web of Science (25 February - 26 April 2013; 20 January - 22 March 2015). Most of the existing theories/models lacked the detail necessary to explain the relationship among quality of care, nurse staffing and cost. Two notable exceptions are: 'Production Function for Staffing and Quality in Nursing Homes,' which describes an S-shaped trajectory between quality of care and nurse staffing and 'Thirty-day Survival Isoquant and Estimated Costs According to the Nurse Staff Mix,' which depicts a positive quadric relationship between nurse staffing and cost according to quality of care. A synthesis of these theories led to an innovative multi-dimensional econometric theory helping to determine the maximum quality of care for patients while simultaneously delivering nurse staffing in the most cost-effective way. The theory-driven threshold, navigated by Mathematical Programming based on the Duality Theorem in Mathematical Economics, will help nurse executives defend sufficient nurse staffing with scientific justification to ensure optimal patient care; help stakeholders set an evidence-based reasonable economical goal; and facilitate patient-centred decision-making in choosing the institution which delivers the best quality of care. A new theory to determine the optimum nurse staffing maximizing quality of care relative to cost was proposed. © 2017 The Author. Journal of Advanced Nursing © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Higher fees paid to US physicians drive higher spending for physician services compared to other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugesen, Miriam J; Glied, Sherry A

    2011-09-01

    Higher health care prices in the United States are a key reason that the nation's health spending is so much higher than that of other countries. Our study compared physicians' fees paid by public and private payers for primary care office visits and hip replacements in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We also compared physicians' incomes net of practice expenses, differences in financing the cost of medical education, and the relative contribution of payments per physician and of physician supply in the countries' national spending on physician services. Public and private payers paid somewhat higher fees to US primary care physicians for office visits (27 percent more for public, 70 percent more for private) and much higher fees to orthopedic physicians for hip replacements (70 percent more for public, 120 percent more for private) than public and private payers paid these physicians' counterparts in other countries. US primary care and orthopedic physicians also earned higher incomes ($186,582 and $442,450, respectively) than their foreign counterparts. We conclude that the higher fees, rather than factors such as higher practice costs, volume of services, or tuition expenses, were the main drivers of higher US spending, particularly in orthopedics.

  15. Metadata Quality in Institutional Repositories May be Improved by Addressing Staffing Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Stovold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Moulaison, S. H., & Dykas, F. (2016. High-quality metadata and repository staffing: Perceptions of United States–based OpenDOAR participants. Cataloging & Classification Quarterly, 54(2, 101-116. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01639374.2015.1116480 Objective – To investigate the quality of institutional repository metadata, metadata practices, and identify barriers to quality. Design – Survey questionnaire. Setting – The OpenDOAR online registry of worldwide repositories. Subjects – A random sample of 50 from 358 administrators of institutional repositories in the United States of America listed in the OpenDOAR registry. Methods – The authors surveyed a random sample of administrators of American institutional repositories included in the OpenDOAR registry. The survey was distributed electronically. Recipients were asked to forward the email if they felt someone else was better suited to respond. There were questions about the demographics of the repository, the metadata creation environment, metadata quality, standards and practices, and obstacles to quality. Results were analyzed in Excel, and qualitative responses were coded by two researchers together. Main results – There was a 42% (n=21 response rate to the section on metadata quality, a 40% (n=20 response rate to the metadata creation section, and 40% (n=20 to the section on obstacles to quality. The majority of respondents rated their metadata quality as average (65%, n=13 or above average (30%, n=5. No one rated the quality as high or poor, while 10% (n=2 rated the quality as below average. The survey found that the majority of descriptive metadata was created by professional (84%, n=16 or paraprofessional (53%, n=10 library staff. Professional staff were commonly involved in creating administrative metadata, reviewing the metadata, and selecting standards and documentation. Department heads and advisory committees were also involved in standards and documentation

  16. The impact of HMO penetration on the relationship between nurse staffing and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Barbara A; Harless, David W; McCue, Michael

    2005-07-01

    While there are a number of studies examining the relationship between nurse staffing and quality, none has examined structural differences in the relationship between nurse staffing and quality contingent upon the level of managed care penetration. We used administrative data, and a dynamic panel data model to examine this relationship in a panel of 422 acute care hospitals from 1990 to 1995. We found that there were significant differences in the relationship between nurse staffing and both mortality and length of stay depending upon the level of HMO penetration in the hospital's market.

  17. The geographic distribution of the otolaryngology workforce in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lango, Miriam N; Handorf, Elizabeth; Arjmand, Ellis

    2017-01-01

    To describe the deployment of otolaryngologists and evaluate factors associated with the geographic distribution of otolaryngologists in the United States. Cross-sectional study. The otolaryngology physician supply was defined as the number of otolaryngologists per 100,000 in the hospital referral region (HRR). The otolaryngology physician supply was derived from the American Medical Association Masterfile or from the Medicare Enrollment and Provider Utilization Files. Multiple linear regression tested the association of population, physician, and hospital factors on the supply of Medicare-enrolled otolaryngologists/HRR. Two methods of measuring the otolaryngology workforce were moderately correlated across hospital referral regions (Pearson coefficient 0.513, P = .0001); regardless, the supply of otolaryngology providers varies greatly over different geographic regions. Otolaryngologists concentrate in regions with many other physicians, particularly specialist physicians. The otolaryngology supply also increases with regional population income and education levels. Using AMA-derived data, there was no association between the supply of otolaryngologists and staffed acute-care hospital beds and the presence of an otolaryngology residency-training program. In contrast, the supply of otolaryngology providers enrolled in Medicare independently increases for each HRR by 0.8 per 100,000 for each unit increase in supply of hospital beds (P otolaryngology residency-training program (P = .006), accounting for all other factors. Irrespective of methodology, the supply of otolaryngologists varies widely across geographic regions in the United States. For Medicare beneficiaries, regional hospital factors-including the presence of an otolaryngology residency program-may improve access to otolaryngology services. NA Laryngoscope, 127:95-101, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Longitudinal comparative evaluation of the equivalence of an integrated peer-support and clinical staffing model for residential mental health rehabilitation: a mixed methods protocol incorporating multiple stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen; Dark, Frances; Newman, Ellie; Korman, Nicole; Meurk, Carla; Siskind, Dan; Harris, Meredith

    2016-06-02

    A novel staffing model integrating peer support workers and clinical staff within a unified team is being trialled at community based residential rehabilitation units in Australia. A mixed-methods protocol for the longitudinal evaluation of the outcomes, expectations and experiences of care by consumers and staff under this staffing model in two units will be compared to one unit operating a traditional clinical staffing. The study is unique with regards to the context, the longitudinal approach and consideration of multiple stakeholder perspectives. The longitudinal mixed methods design integrates a quantitative evaluation of the outcomes of care for consumers at three residential rehabilitation units with an applied qualitative research methodology. The quantitative component utilizes a prospective cohort design to explore whether equivalent outcomes are achieved through engagement at residential rehabilitation units operating integrated and clinical staffing models. Comparative data will be available from the time of admission, discharge and 12-month period post-discharge from the units. Additionally, retrospective data for the 12-month period prior to admission will be utilized to consider changes in functioning pre and post engagement with residential rehabilitation care. The primary outcome will be change in psychosocial functioning, assessed using the total score on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Planned secondary outcomes will include changes in symptomatology, disability, recovery orientation, carer quality of life, emergency department presentations, psychiatric inpatient bed days, and psychological distress and wellbeing. Planned analyses will include: cohort description; hierarchical linear regression modelling of the predictors of change in HoNOS following CCU care; and descriptive comparisons of the costs associated with the two staffing models. The qualitative component utilizes a pragmatic approach to grounded theory, with

  19. Physician Fee Schedule Search

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This website is designed to provide information on services covered by the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS). It provides more than 10,000 physician services,...

  20. Physicians' Job Satisfaction.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    doctors and retention of the existing doctors, in addition to the ... an employee's well-being Examples of job resources are job ..... increase physician job satisfaction for ensuring the .... both pay and benefits physicians at private hospitals.

  1. The Validity of Online Patient Ratings of Physicians: Analysis of Physician Peer Reviews and Patient Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Robert J; Priestley, Jennifer Lewis; Zhou, Yiyun; Culligan, Patrick J

    2018-04-09

    Information from ratings sites are increasingly informing patient decisions related to health care and the selection of physicians. The current study sought to determine the validity of online patient ratings of physicians through comparison with physician peer review. We extracted 223,715 reviews of 41,104 physicians from 10 of the largest cities in the United States, including 1142 physicians listed as "America's Top Doctors" through physician peer review. Differences in mean online patient ratings were tested for physicians who were listed and those who were not. Overall, no differences were found between the online patient ratings based upon physician peer review status. However, statistical differences were found for four specialties (family medicine, allergists, internal medicine, and pediatrics), with online patient ratings significantly higher for those physicians listed as a peer-reviewed "Top Doctor" versus those who were not. The results of this large-scale study indicate that while online patient ratings are consistent with physician peer review for four nonsurgical, primarily in-office specializations, patient ratings were not consistent with physician peer review for specializations like anesthesiology. This result indicates that the validity of patient ratings varies by medical specialization. ©Robert J McGrath, Jennifer Lewis Priestley, Yiyun Zhou, Patrick J Culligan. Originally published in the Interactive Journal of Medical Research (http://www.i-jmr.org/), 09.04.2018.

  2. Patient-physician communication regarding electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Michael B; Giovenco, Daniel P; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2015-01-01

    Smokers are likely asking their physicians about the safety of e-cigarettes and their potential role as a cessation tool; however, the research literature on this communication is scant. A pilot study of physicians in the United States was conducted to investigate physician-patient communication regarding e-cigarettes. A total of 158 physicians were recruited from a direct marketing e-mail list and completed a short, web-based survey between January and April 2014. The survey addressed demographics, physician specialty, patient-provider e-cigarette communication, and attitudes towards tobacco harm reduction. Nearly two-thirds (65%) of physicians reported being asked about e-cigarettes by their patients, and almost a third (30%) reported that they have recommended e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool. Male physicians were significantly more likely to endorse a harm reduction approach. Physician communication about e-cigarettes may shape patients' perceptions about the products. More research is needed to explore the type of information that physicians share with their patients regarding e-cigarettes and harm reduction.

  3. Physician heal thyself

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compared to overweight or obese physicians, normal‑weight physicians were significantly more likely to discuss weight loss with their obese patients, according to a study among. 500 primary care physicians, undertaken by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.[4]. A recent, highly accessed ...

  4. Turnover, staffing, skill mix, and resident outcomes in a national sample of US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkoff, Alison M; Han, Kihye; Storr, Carla L; Lerner, Nancy; Johantgen, Meg; Gartrell, Kyungsook

    2013-12-01

    The authors examined the relationship of staff turnover to selected nursing home quality outcomes, in the context of staffing and skill mix. Staff turnover is a serious concern in nursing homes as it has been found to adversely affect care. When employee turnover is minimized, better care quality is more likely in nursing homes. Data from the National Nursing Home Survey, a nationally representative sample of US nursing homes, were linked to Nursing Home Compare quality outcomes and analyzed using logistic regression. Nursing homes with high certified nursing assistant turnover had significantly higher odds of pressure ulcers, pain, and urinary tract infections even after controlling for staffing, skill mix, bed size, and ownership. Nurse turnover was associated with twice the odds of pressure ulcers, although this was attenuated when staffing was controlled. This study suggests turnover may be more important in explaining nursing home (NH) outcomes than staffing and skill mix and should therefore be given greater emphasis.

  5. Staffing Levels and Inpatient Outcomes at Military Health Care Facilities: A Resource-Based View

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yap, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Using a Resource-Based Theory/View of the firm, this study examined if increased inpatient staffing levels at military hospitals can generate a competitive advantage based on better patient quality outcomes...

  6. Staffing to Maximize Profit for Call Centers with Impatient and Repeat-Calling Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by call center practice, we study the optimal staffing of many-server queues with impatient and repeat-calling customers. A call center is modeled as an M/M/s+M queue, which is developed to a behavioral queuing model in which customers come and go based on their satisfaction with waiting time. We explicitly take into account customer repeat behavior, which implies that satisfied customers might return and have an impact on the arrival rate. Optimality is defined as the number of agents that maximize revenues net of staffing costs, and we account for the characteristic that revenues are a direct function of staffing. Finally, we use numerical experiments to make certain comparisons with traditional models that do not consider customer repeat behavior. Furthermore, we indicate how managers might allocate staffing optimally with various customer behavior mechanisms.

  7. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory were 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  8. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  9. The nuclear education and staffing challenge: Rebuilding critical skills in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.A.; Bond, L.J.; Waltar, A.E.; Leber, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of nuclear legacies, global security, nonproliferation, homeland security and national defense, radiobiology and nuclear energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. Current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs are presented. (author)

  10. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Rural Washington Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Scott C; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-06-01

    One role of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) is to meet the growing demand for access to rural health care. Critical Access Hospitals, those with less than 25 beds, are usually located in rural communities, often providing continuity of care that clinics cannot deliver. Because little is known about staffing in these small hospital emergency departments, an exploratory study was undertaken using a mixed-methods approach. In Washington State, 18 of the 39 Critical Access Hospitals staff their emergency departments with PAs and NPs. Utilization data were collected through structured interviews by phone or in person on site. Most PAs and NPs lived within the community and staffing tended to be either 24 hours in-house or short notice if they lived or worked nearby. Emergency department visits ranged from 200 to 25,000 per year. All sites were designated level V or IV trauma centers and often managed cardiac events, significant injuries and, in some larger settings, obstetrics. In most instances, PAs were the sole providers in the emergency departments, albeit with physician backup and emergency medical technician support if a surge of emergency cases arose. Two-thirds of the PAs had graduated within the last 5 years. Most preferred the autonomy of the emergency department role and all expressed job satisfaction. Geographically, the more remote a Washington State Critical Access Hospital is, the more likely it will be staffed by PAs/NPs. The diverse utilization of semiautonomous PAs and NPs and their rise in rural hospital employment is a new workforce observation that requires broader investigation.

  11. The relationship of staffing and work environment with implicit rationing of nursing care in Swiss nursing homes--A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Franziska; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Hamers, Jan P H; Engberg, Sandra; Simon, Michael; Schwendimann, René

    2015-09-01

    Implicit rationing of nursing care refers to the withdrawal of or failure to carry out necessary nursing care activities due to lack of resources, in the literature also described as missed care, omitted care, or nursing care left undone. Under time constraints, nurses give priority to activities related to vital medical needs and the safety of the patient, leaving out documentation, rehabilitation, or emotional support of patients. In nursing homes, little is known about the occurrence of implicit rationing of nursing care and possible contributing factors. The purpose of this study was (1) to describe levels and patterns of self-reported implicit rationing of nursing care in Swiss nursing homes and (2) to explore the relationship between staffing level, turnover, and work environment factors and implicit rationing of nursing care. Cross-sectional, multi-center sub-study of the Swiss Nursing Home Human Resources Project (SHURP). Nursing homes from all three language regions of Switzerland. A random selection of 156 facilities with 402 units and 4307 direct care workers from all educational levels (including 25% registered nurses). We utilized data from established scales to measure implicit rationing of nursing care (Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care), perceptions of leadership ability and staffing resources (Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index), teamwork and safety climate (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire), and work stressors (Health Professions Stress Inventory). Staffing level and turnover at the unit level were measured with self-developed questions. Multilevel linear regression models were used to explore the proposed relationships. Implicit rationing of nursing care does not occur frequently in Swiss nursing homes. Care workers ration support in activities of daily living, such as eating, drinking, elimination and mobilization less often than documentation of care and the social care of nursing homes residents. Statistically

  12. The effects of nurse staffing on hospital financial performance: competitive versus less competitive markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Damian; Neff, Donna; Al-Amin, Mona; Nogle, June; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals facing financial uncertainty have sought to reduce nurse staffing as a way to increase profitability. However, nurse staffing has been found to be important in terms of quality of patient care and nursing-related outcomes. Nurse staffing can provide a competitive advantage to hospitals and as a result of better financial performance, particularly in more competitive markets. In this study, we build on the Resource-Based View of the Firm to determine the effect of nurse staffing on total profit margin in more competitive and less competitive hospital markets in Florida. By combining a Florida statewide nursing survey with the American Hospital Association Annual Survey and the Area Resource File, three separate multivariate linear regression models were conducted to determine the effect of nurse staffing on financial performance while accounting for market competitiveness. The analysis was limited to acute care hospitals. Nurse staffing levels had a positive association with financial performance (β = 3.3, p = .02) in competitive hospital markets, but no significant association was found in less competitive hospital markets. Hospitals in more competitive hospital markets should reconsider reducing nursing staff, as these cost-cutting measures may be inefficient and negatively affect financial performance.

  13. Nurse burnout in China: a questionnaire survey on staffing, job satisfaction, and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Minmin; Ruan, Hui; Xing, Weijie; Hu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The investigators examined how nurse staffing affects nurse job satisfaction and quality of care. Inadequate nurse staffing is a worldwide issue with profound effects on nurse job satisfaction and quality of care. Few studies have examined the relationship between nurse staffing and job satisfaction and quality of care in China. A cross-sectional design was adopted, wherein 873 nurses were surveyed on demographics, nurse staffing, job-related burnout, job dissatisfaction, intent to leave, and quality of care. The median patient-nurse ratio was five; 45.1% nurses reported high levels of job-related burnout, and 55.6%, job dissatisfaction. In adjusted regression models, patient-nurse ratios of four or less were related to a decrease in the odds of job dissatisfaction (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.36-0.85) and increase in the odds of quality of care (odds ratio 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.02-2.82). Nurse staffing is associated with job dissatisfaction and quality of care. Nurse managers should maintain an adequate level of nurse staffing, referring to the patient-nurse ratio. They should create new initiatives to increase job satisfaction among nurses and to evaluate their effects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Effects of Nurse Staffing on Hospital Financial Performance: Competitive Versus Less Competitive Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Damian; Neff, Donna; Al-Amin, Mona; Nogle, June; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospitals facing financial uncertainty have sought to reduce nurse staffing as a way to increase profitability. However, nurse staffing has been found to be important in terms of quality of patient care and nursing related outcomes. Nurse staffing can provide a competitive advantage to hospitals and as a result better financial performance, particularly in more competitive markets Purpose In this study we build on the Resource-Based View of the Firm to determine the effect of nurse staffing on total profit margin in more competitive and less competitive hospital markets in Florida. Methodology/Approach By combining a Florida statewide nursing survey with the American Hospital Association Annual Survey and the Area Resource File, three separate multivariate linear regression models were conducted to determine the effect of nurse staffing on financial performance while accounting for market competitiveness. The analysis was limited to acute care hospitals. Findings Nurse staffing levels had a positive association with financial performance (β=3.3; p=0.02) in competitive hospital markets, but no significant association was found in less competitive hospital markets. Practice Implications Hospitals in more competitive hospital markets should reconsider reducing nursing staff, as these cost cutting measures may be inefficient and negatively affect financial performance. PMID:22543824

  15. Staffing requirements for future small and medium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuade, D.

    2001-01-01

    As power generators around the world grapple with the challenges of the environment, deregulation, competitions and changing prices of fuels, the economics of running a future power plant are influenced significantly by the component of labour costs. These costs, from plant staff, corporate support and purchased services, will affect the overall plant economics. To achieve improved efficiency and effectiveness of organization structures and staff, vendors and utilities are working jointly to apply lessons learned for future designs. This paper will examine the experience gained to date with Canadian CANDU 6 type reactors both in Canada and abroad. The strategies which have been very successful will be reviewed, together with the results of collaboration between Atomic Energy of Canada and the utilities. An assessment of the staffing numbers is provided as a comparison between current number at a Canadian utility and the projected number from a future plant with the improvements in the design. The influence to the overall plant economics are discussed with some broad generalities that look at the effects of increasing and reducing staff levels showing the probable impact on capacity factor. The lessons from other plants can contribute significantly to the performance improvement process. The paper points to the need for a balanced approach in the future for the distribution of operating maintenance and administration (OM and A) cost between nuclear safety studies; maintenance programs and staff training. In the future, utilities, together with the designers, will have to greatly improve plant maintenance and training. The improved design features detailed in the paper will support this strategy by utilizing operational experience. (author)

  16. Development of staffing evaluation principle for advanced main control room and the effect on situation awareness and mental workload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Hsieh, Tsung-Ling; Lin, Shiau-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A staffing evaluation principle was developed for the advanced main control room. • The principle proposed to improve situation awareness and mental workload. • The principle has good validity that was examined by experimental design. - Abstract: Situation awareness and mental workload, both of which influence operator performance in the advanced main control room of a nuclear power plant, can be affected by staffing level. The key goal of staffing is to ensure the proper number of personnel to support plant operations and events. If the staffing level is not adaptive, the operators may have low situation awareness and an excessive mental workload, which lead to human error. Accordingly, this study developed a staffing evaluation principle based on CPM-GOMS modeling for operations in the advanced main control room. A within-subject experiment was designed to examine the validity of the staffing evaluation principle. The results indicated that the situation awareness, mental workload, and operating performance of the staffing level determined by the staffing evaluation principle was significantly better than that of the non-evaluated staffing level; thus, the validity of the staffing evaluation technique is acceptable. The implications of the findings of this study on managerial practice are discussed

  17. Development of staffing evaluation principle for advanced main control room and the effect on situation awareness and mental workload

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe, E-mail: cjoelin@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Industrial Management, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Tsung-Ling, E-mail: bm1129@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Chiaan Village, Lungtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shiau-Feng, E-mail: g9602411@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Industrial Engineering, Chung-Yuan Christian University, 200, Chung Pei Road, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A staffing evaluation principle was developed for the advanced main control room. • The principle proposed to improve situation awareness and mental workload. • The principle has good validity that was examined by experimental design. - Abstract: Situation awareness and mental workload, both of which influence operator performance in the advanced main control room of a nuclear power plant, can be affected by staffing level. The key goal of staffing is to ensure the proper number of personnel to support plant operations and events. If the staffing level is not adaptive, the operators may have low situation awareness and an excessive mental workload, which lead to human error. Accordingly, this study developed a staffing evaluation principle based on CPM-GOMS modeling for operations in the advanced main control room. A within-subject experiment was designed to examine the validity of the staffing evaluation principle. The results indicated that the situation awareness, mental workload, and operating performance of the staffing level determined by the staffing evaluation principle was significantly better than that of the non-evaluated staffing level; thus, the validity of the staffing evaluation technique is acceptable. The implications of the findings of this study on managerial practice are discussed.

  18. Differences in nursing practice environment among US acute care unit types: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiSun; Boyle, Diane K

    2014-11-01

    The hospital nursing practice environment has been found to be crucial for better nurse and patient outcomes. Yet little is known about the professional nursing practice environment at the unit level where nurses provide 24-hour bedside care to patients. To examine differences in nursing practice environments among 11 unit types (critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, combined medical-surgical, obstetric, neonatal, pediatric, psychiatric, perioperative, and emergency) and by Magnet status overall, as well as four specific aspects of the practice environment. Cross-sectional study. 5322 nursing units in 519 US acute care hospitals. The nursing practice environment was measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index mean composite and four subscale scores were computed at the unit level. Two statistical approaches (one-way analysis of covariance and multivariate analysis of covariance analysis) were employed with a Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. In general, the nursing practice environment was favorable in all unit types. There were significant differences in the nursing practice environment among the 11 unit types and by Magnet status. Pediatric units had the most favorable practice environment and medical-surgical units had the least favorable. A consistent finding across all unit types except neonatal units was that the staffing and resource adequacy subscale scored the lowest compared with all other Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index subscales (nursing foundations for quality of care, nurse manager ability, leadership, and support, and nurse-physician relations). Unit nursing practice environments were more favorable in Magnet than non-Magnet hospitals. Findings indicate that there are significant variations in unit nursing practice environments among 11 unit types and by hospital Magnet status. Both hospital-level and unit-specific strategies should be considered

  19. Does daily nurse staffing match ward workload variability? Three hospitals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Uri; Bukchin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nurse shortage and rising healthcare resource burdens mean that appropriate workforce use is imperative. This paper aims to evaluate whether daily nursing staffing meets ward workload needs. Nurse attendance and daily nurses' workload capacity in three hospitals were evaluated. Statistical process control was used to evaluate intra-ward nurse workload capacity and day-to-day variations. Statistical process control is a statistics-based method for process monitoring that uses charts with predefined target measure and control limits. Standardization was performed for inter-ward analysis by converting ward-specific crude measures to ward-specific relative measures by dividing observed/expected. Two charts: acceptable and tolerable daily nurse workload intensity, were defined. Appropriate staffing indicators were defined as those exceeding predefined rates within acceptable and tolerable limits (50 percent and 80 percent respectively). A total of 42 percent of the overall days fell within acceptable control limits and 71 percent within tolerable control limits. Appropriate staffing indicators were met in only 33 percent of wards regarding acceptable nurse workload intensity and in only 45 percent of wards regarding tolerable workloads. The study work did not differentiate crude nurse attendance and it did not take into account patient severity since crude bed occupancy was used. Double statistical process control charts and certain staffing indicators were used, which is open to debate. Wards that met appropriate staffing indicators prove the method's feasibility. Wards that did not meet appropriate staffing indicators prove the importance and the need for process evaluations and monitoring. Methods presented for monitoring daily staffing appropriateness are simple to implement either for intra-ward day-to-day variation by using nurse workload capacity statistical process control charts or for inter-ward evaluation using standardized measure of nurse workload intensity

  20. Burnout among physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Romani, Maya; Ashkar, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a common syndrome seen in healthcare workers, particularly physicians who are exposed to a high level of stress at work; it includes emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. Burnout among physicians has garnered significant attention because of the negative impact it renders on patient care and medical personnel. Physicians who had high burnout levels reportedly committed more medical errors. Stress management programs that range from relaxation to ...

  1. Physicians, radiologists, and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, W.F.

    1973-01-01

    Factors involved in quality control in medical x-ray examinations to achieve the least possible exposure to the patient are discussed. It would be hoped that film quality will remain in the position of paramount importance that it must in order to achieve the greatest amount of diagnostic information on each radiographic examination. At the same time, it is hoped that this can be done by further reducing the exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation by the methods that have been discussed; namely, education of the physician, radiologist, and technologist, modern protective equipment and departmental construction, efficient collimation whether automatic or manual, calibration and output measurement of the radiographic and fluoroscopic units, ongoing programs of education within each department of radiographic facility, film badge monitoring, education of and cooperation with the nonradiologic physician, and hopefully, more intensive programs by the National and State Bureaus and Departments of Radiological Health in education and encouragement to the medical community. (U.S.)

  2. The association between nurse staffing and omissions in nursing care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter; Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Briggs, Jim; Maruotti, Antonello; Meredith, Paul; Smith, Gary B; Ball, Jane

    2018-03-08

    To identify nursing care most frequently missed in acute adult inpatient wards and to determine evidence for the association of missed care with nurse staffing. Research has established associations between nurse staffing levels and adverse patient outcomes including in-hospital mortality. However, the causal nature of this relationship is uncertain and omissions of nursing care (referred as missed care, care left undone or rationed care) have been proposed as a factor which may provide a more direct indicator of nurse staffing adequacy. Systematic review. We searched the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase and Medline for quantitative studies of associations between staffing and missed care. We searched key journals, personal libraries and reference lists of articles. Two reviewers independently selected studies. Quality appraisal was based on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality appraisal checklist for studies reporting correlations and associations. Data were abstracted on study design, missed care prevalence and measures of association. Synthesis was narrative. Eighteen studies gave subjective reports of missed care. Seventy-five per cent or more nurses reported omitting some care. Fourteen studies found low nurse staffing levels were significantly associated with higher reports of missed care. There was little evidence that adding support workers to the team reduced missed care. Low Registered Nurse staffing is associated with reports of missed nursing care in hospitals. Missed care is a promising indicator of nurse staffing adequacy. The extent to which the relationships observed represent actual failures, is yet to be investigated. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Becoming a Physician

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Payment Process Physician Payment Resource Center Reinventing Medical Practice Managing Your Practice CPT® (Current Procedural Terminology) Medicare & Medicaid Private Payer Reform Claims Processing & Practice ...

  4. American College of Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plus In this Section Clinical Guidelines & Recommendations Performance Measures Journals & Publications Clinical Resources & Products High Value Care Ethics & Professionalism Practice Resources Physician and Practice Timeline Upcoming important dates ...

  5. Real-world effectiveness of brentuximab vedotin versus physicians' choice chemotherapy in patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma following autologous stem cell transplantation in the United Kingdom and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagadailov, Erin A; Corman, Shelby; Chirikov, Viktor; Johnson, Courtney; Macahilig, Cynthia; Seal, Brian; Dalal, Mehul R; Bröckelmann, Paul J; Illidge, Tim

    2018-06-01

    This retrospective study compared effectiveness of (brentuximab vedotin) BV to other chemotherapies in patients with rrHL following an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Data originated from a medical chart review of patients treated in real-world clinical settings at 50 sites in the United Kingdom and Germany. Inverse probability of treatment weights based on propensity scores were used to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics between treatment groups. Among 312 rrHL patients included, 196 received BV and 116 received physicians' choice chemotherapy. Median PFS was significantly longer (27.0 months vs. 13.4 months; p = .0144) and 12-month OS survival greater (78.1% vs. 65.9%; p = .0129) with BV compared to chemotherapy. Documented adverse events included leukopenia (12.8%) and peripheral neuropathy (8.7%) for BV and leukopenia (12.1%), anemia (5.2%) and diarrhea (5.2%) for chemotherapy. In this real-world study, rrHL patients treated for relapse after ASCT with BV had longer median PFS and 12-month OS than patients receiving chemotherapy.

  6. Long-term follow-up of trauma patients before and after implementation of a Physician-Staffed Helicopter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, K.S.; Rasmussen, Lars S.; Lohse, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The first Danish Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) was introduced May 1st2010. The implementation was associated with lower 30-day mortality in severely injured patients. Theaim of this study was to assess the long-term effects of HEMS on labour market affiliation and mort......Introduction: The first Danish Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) was introduced May 1st2010. The implementation was associated with lower 30-day mortality in severely injured patients. Theaim of this study was to assess the long-term effects of HEMS on labour market affiliation...... adjusted for sex,age and Injury Severity Score. Results: Of the total 1994 patients, 1790 were eligible for mortality analyses and 1172 (n = 297 preHEMSand n = 875 post-HEMS) for labour market analyses. Incidence rates of involuntary earlyretirement or death were 2.40 per 100 person-years pre-HEMS and 2...

  7. Prehospital thoracostomy in patients with traumatic circulatory arrest: results from a physician-staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Ketelaars, R.; Wageningen, B. van; Biert, J.; Hoogerwerf, N.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Until recently, traumatic cardiac arrest (tCA) was believed to be associated with high mortality and low survival rates. New data suggest better outcomes. The most common error in tCA management is failing to treat a tension pneumothorax (TP). In the prehospital setting, we prefer

  8. Financial Viability of Emergency Department Observation Unit Billing Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Christopher W; Suri, Pawan; Caspers, Christopher G; Granovsky, Michael A; Neal, Keith; Ross, Michael A

    2018-05-16

    Outpatients receive observation services to determine the need for inpatient admission. These services are usually provided without the use of condition-specific protocols and in an unstructured manner, scattered throughout a hospital in areas typically designated for inpatient care. Emergency department observation units (EDOUs) use protocolized care to offer an efficient alternative with shorter lengths of stay, lower costs and higher patient satisfaction. EDOU growth is limited by existing policy barriers that prevent a "two-service" model of separate professional billing for both emergency and observation services. The majority of EDOUs use the "one-service" model, where a single composite professional fee is billed for both emergency and observation services. The financial implications of these models are not well understood. We created a Monte Carlo simulation by building a model that reflects current clinical practice in the United States and uses inputs gathered from the most recently available peer-reviewed literature, national survey and payer data. Using this simulation, we modeled annual staffing costs and payments for professional services under two common models of care in an EDOU. We also modeled cash flows over a continuous range of daily EDOU patient encounters to illustrate the dynamic relationship between costs and revenue over various staffing levels. We estimate the mean (±SD) annual net cash flow to be a net loss of $315,382 ±$89,635 in the one-service model and a net profit of $37,569 ±$359,583 in the two-service model. The two-service model is financially sustainable at daily billable encounters above 20 while in the one-service model, costs exceed revenue regardless of encounter count. Physician cost per hour and daily patient encounters had the most significant impact on model estimates. In the one-service model, EDOU staffing costs exceed payments at all levels of patient encounters, making a hospital subsidy necessary to create a

  9. Using a complex audit tool to measure workload, staffing and quality in district nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Esther; Hurst, Keith

    2014-05-01

    This major community, workload, staffing and quality study is thought to be the most comprehensive community staffing project in England. It involved over 400 staff from 46 teams in 6 localities and is unique because it ties community staffing activity to workload and quality. Scotland was used to benchmark since the same evidence-based Safer Nursing Care Tool methodology developed by the second-named author was used (apart from quality) and took into account population and geographical similarities. The data collection method tested quality standards, acuity, dependency and nursing interventions by looking at caseloads, staff activity and service quality and funded, actual, temporary and recommended staffing. Key findings showed that 4 out of 6 localities had a heavy workload index that stretched staffing numbers and time spent with patients. The acuity and dependency of patients leaned heavily towards the most dependent and acute categories requiring more face-to-face care. Some areas across the localities had high levels of temporary staff, which affected quality and increased cost. Skill and competency shortages meant that a small number of staff had to travel significantly across the county to deliver complex care to some patients.

  10. Twenty years of staffing, practice environment, and outcomes research in military nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrician, Patricia A; Loan, Lori A; McCarthy, Mary S; Swiger, Pauline; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara; Brosch, Laura Ruse; Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski

    Two decades ago, findings from an Institute of Medicine (IOM) report sparked the urgent need for evidence supporting relationships between nurse staffing and patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of nurse staffing, practice environment, and patient outcomes research, with an emphasis on findings from military studies. Lessons learned also are enumerated. This study is a review of the entire Military Nursing Outcomes Database (MilNOD) program of research. The MilNOD, in combination with evidence from other health care studies, provides nurses and leaders with information about the associations between staffing, patient outcomes, and the professional practice environment of nursing in the military. Leaders, therefore, have useful empirical evidence to make data-driven decisions. The MilNOD studies are the basis for the current Army nursing dashboard, and care delivery framework, called the Patent CaringTouch System. Future research is needed to identify ideal staffing based on workload demands, and provide leaders with factors to consider when operationalizing staffing recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physician assistant education: five countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Roderick S; Kuilman, Luppo

    2011-01-01

    Physician assistant (PA) education has undergone substantial change since the late 1960s. After four decades of development, other countries have taken a page from the American experience and launched their own instructional initiatives. The diversity in how different countries approach education and produce a PA for their nation's needs provides an opportunity to make comparisons. The intent of this study was to document and describe PA programs in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, and the United States. We reviewed the literature and contacted a network of academics in various institutions to obtain primary information. Each contact was asked a set of basic questions about the country, the PA program, and the deployment of graduates. Information on US PA programs was obtained from the Physician Assistant Education Association. At year's end 2010, the following was known about PA development: Australia, one program; Canada, four programs; United Kingdom, four programs; The Netherlands, five programs; the United States, 154 programs. Trends in program per capita growth remain the largest in the United States, followed by The Netherlands and Canada. The shortest program length was 24 months and the longest, 36 months. Outside the United States, almost all programs are situated in an academic health center ([AHC] defined as a medical university, a teaching hospital, and a nursing or allied health school), whereas only one-third of US PA programs are in AHCs. All non-US programs receive public/government funding whereas American programs are predominately private and depend on tuition to fund their programs. The PA movement is a global phenomenon. How PAs are being educated, trained, and deployed is known only on the basic level. We identify common characteristics, unique aspects, and trends in PA education across five nations, and set the stage for collaboration and analysis of optimal educational strategies. Additional information is needed on

  12. Kentucky physicians and politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VonderHaar, W P; Monnig, W B

    1998-09-01

    Approximately 19% of Kentucky Physicians are KEMPAC members or contribute to state legislative and Gubernatorial candidates. This limited study of political activity indicates that a small percentage of physicians participate in the political process. Despite the small number of contributors to state legislative candidates, KMA's legislative and lobbying effort is highly effective and members receive high quality service and representation in the political arena.

  13. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against hepatitis A and B in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a survey of family medicine and internal medicine physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, C T; Herzog, K; Chaudhari, S; Bini, E J; Weinshel, E H

    2012-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) is recommended for all patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, physician vaccination practices are suboptimal. Since training for family medicine (FM) and internal medicine (IM) physicians differ, we hypothesised that there are differences in knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against HAV and HBV in patients with chronic HCV between these two groups. A two-page questionnaire was mailed to 3000 primary care (FM and IM) physicians randomly selected from the AMA Physician Masterfile in 2005. The survey included questions about physician demographics, knowledge and attitudes regarding vaccination. Among the 3000 physicians surveyed, 1209 (42.2%) returned completed surveys. There were no differences between respondents and non-respondents with regard to age, gender, geographic location or specialty. More FM than IM physicians stated that HCV+ patients should not be vaccinated against HAV (23.7% vs. 11.8%, p infection, physicians often do not test or vaccinate susceptible individuals. Interventions are needed to overcome the barriers identified and improve vaccination rates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Invasive candidosis: contrasting the perceptions of infectious disease physicians and intensive care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Schultz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction We analyze how infectious disease physicians perceive and manage invasive candidosis in Brazil, in comparison to intensive care unit specialists. Methods A 38-question survey was administered to 56 participants. Questions involved clinicians' perceptions of the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of invasive candidosis. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The perception that candidemia not caused by Candida albicans occurs in less than 10% of patients is more commonly held by intensive care unit specialists (p=0.018. Infectious disease physicians almost always use antifungal drugs in the treatment of patients with candidemia, and antifungal drugs are not as frequently prescribed by intensive care unit specialists (p=0.006. Infectious disease physicians often do not use voriconazole when a patient's antifungal treatment has failed with fluconazole, which also differs from the behavior of intensive care unit specialists (p=0.019. Many intensive care unit specialists use fluconazole to treat candidemia in neutropenic patients previously exposed to fluconazole, in contrast to infectious disease physicians (p=0.024. Infectious disease physicians prefer echinocandins as a first choice in the treatment of unstable neutropenic patients more frequently than intensive care unit specialists (p=0.013. When candidemia is diagnosed, most infectious disease physicians perform fundoscopy (p=0.015, whereas intensive care unit specialists usually perform echocardiograms on all patients (p=0.054. Conclusions This study reveals a need to better educate physicians in Brazil regarding invasive candidosis. The appropriate management of this disease depends on more drug options being available in our country in addition to global coverage in private and public hospitals, thereby improving health care.

  15. Nursing Home Physicians' Assessments of Barriers and Strategies for End-of-Life Care in Norway and The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Anette; Zuidema, Sytse; Boersma, Froukje

    2017-01-01

    of patients’ family, pain- and symptom assessment protocols, EOL care guidelines, routines for advance care planning, and education in EOL care for physicians and nursing staff. Conclusions: Inadequate staffing levels, as well as lack of competence, time, and interest emerge as important barriers to quality...... physicians usually work part time in NHs. Thus, we aimed at assessing and comparing NH physicians’ perspectives on barriers and strategies for providing EOL care in NHs in Norway and in The Netherlands. Design: A cross-sectional study using an electronic questionnaire was conducted in 2015. Setting...... physicians’ perceptions of organizational, educational, financial, legal, and personal prerequisites for quality EOL care. Differences between the countries were compared using χ2 test and t-test. Results: Most respondents in both countries reported inadequate staffing, lack of skills among nursing personnel...

  16. Implementing the psychosocial standards in pediatric cancer: Current staffing and services available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialla, Michele A; Canter, Kimberly S; Chen, Fang Fang; Kolb, E Anders; Sandler, Eric; Wiener, Lori; Kazak, Anne E

    2017-11-01

    Fifteen evidence-based Standards for Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer and Their Families (Standards) were published in 2015. The Standards cover a broad range of topics and circumstances and require qualified multidisciplinary staff to be implemented. This paper presents data on the availability of psychosocial staff and existing practices at pediatric oncology programs in the United States, providing data that can be used to advocate for expanded services and prepare for implementation of the Standards. Up to three healthcare professionals from 144 programs (72% response rate) participated in an online survey conducted June-December 2016. There were 99 pediatric oncologists with clinical leadership responsibility (Medical Director/Clinical Director), 132 psychosocial leaders in pediatric oncology (Director of Psychosocial Services/Manager/most senior staff member), and 58 administrators in pediatric oncology (Administrative Director/Business Administrator/Director of Operations). The primary outcomes were number and type of psychosocial staff, psychosocial practices, and identified challenges in the delivery of psychosocial care. Over 90% of programs have social workers and child life specialists who provide care to children with cancer and their families. Fewer programs have psychologists (60%), neuropsychologists (31%), or psychiatrists (19%). Challenges in psychosocial care are primarily based on pragmatic issues related to funding and reimbursement. Most participating pediatric oncology programs appear to have at least the basic level of staffing necessary to implement of some of the Standards. However, the lack of a more comprehensive multidisciplinary team is a likely barrier in the implementation of the full set of Standards. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The effect of investor-owned chain acquisitions on hospital expenses and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, L M; Shortell, S M; McFall, S

    1989-01-01

    Much concern has been raised about the effect of "corporatization" of health through the expansion of investor-owned hospital chains. One method of expansion is through hospital acquisition. At issue is the question of the effect of acquisitions on expenses and on such patient care inputs as staffing levels. In this article, we examine the effect of acquisition by one investor-owned chain on hospital costs and staffing. Subsequent to acquisition, hospital costs increase and staffing decreases, relative to competitor hospitals. However, since investor-owned hospitals not recently acquired do not have higher cost levels than their competitors, the increase in costs appears to be due to factors associated with the acquisition itself rather than factors associated with being an investor-owned hospital. Under the retrospective payment system in effect at the time, revenues also were higher for acquired hospitals. Under prospective payment, increasing revenues has been more difficult, decreasing acquisition incentives. PMID:2807933

  18. Interim results of the study of control room crew staffing for advanced passive reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallbert, B.P.; Sebok, A.; Haugset, K.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the ways in which vendors expect the operations staff to interact with advanced passive plants by vendors have led to a need for reconsideration of the minimum shift staffing requirements of licensed Reactor Operators and Senior Reactor Operators contained in current federal regulations (i.e., 10 CFR 50.54(m)). A research project is being carried out to evaluate the impact(s) of advanced passive plant design and staffing of control room crews on operator and team performance. The purpose of the project is to contribute to the understanding of potential safety issues and provide data to support the development of design review guidance. Two factors are being evaluated across a range of plant operating conditions: control room crew staffing; and characteristics of the operating facility itself, whether it employs conventional or advanced, passive features. This paper presents the results of the first phase of the study conducted at the Loviisa nuclear power station earlier this year. Loviisa served as the conventional plant in this study. Data collection from four crews were collected from a series of design basis scenarios, each crew serving in either a normal or minimum staffing configuration. Results of data analyses show that crews participating in the minimum shift staffing configuration experienced significantly higher workload, had lower situation awareness, demonstrated significantly less effective team performance, and performed more poorly as a crew than the crews participating in the normal shift staffing configuration. The baseline data on crew configurations from the conventional plant setting will be compared with similar data to be collected from the advanced plant setting, and a report prepared providing the results of the entire study

  19. Nurse Staffing and Quality of Care of Nursing Home Residents in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Juh Hyun; Hyun, Ta Kyung

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between nurse staffing and quality of care in nursing homes in Korea. This study used a cross-sectional design to describe the relationship between nurse staffing and 15 quality-of-care outcomes. Independent variables were hours per resident day (HPRD), skill mix, and turnover of each nursing staff, developed with the definitions of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the American Health Care Association. Dependent variables were prevalence of residents who experienced more than one fall in the recent 3 months, aggressive behaviors, depression, cognitive decline, pressure sores, incontinence, prescribed antibiotics because of urinary tract infection, weight loss, dehydration, tube feeding, bed rest, increased activities of daily living, decreased range of motion, use of antidepressants, and use of restraints. Outcome variables were quality indicators from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid and 2013 nursing home evaluation manual by the Korean National Health Insurance Service. The effects of registered nurse (RN) HPRD was supported in fall prevention, decreased tube feeding, decreased numbers of residents with deteriorated range of motion, and decreased aggressive behavior. Higher turnover of RNs related to more residents with dehydration, bed rest, and use of antipsychotic medication. Study results supported RNs' unique contribution to resident outcomes in comparison to alternative nurse staffing in fall prevention, decreased use of tube feeding, better range of motion for residents, and decreased aggressive behaviors in nursing homes in Korea. More research is required to confirm the effects of nurse staffing on residents' outcomes in Korea. We found consistency in the effects of RN staffing on resident outcomes acceptable. By assessing nurse staffing levels and compositions of nursing staffs, this study contributes to more effective long-term care insurance by reflecting on appropriate policies, and ultimately

  20. Effects of Medicare payment changes on nursing home staffing and deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Yi, Deokhee; Norton, Edward C; Kilpatrick, Kerry E

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the effects of Medicare's Prospective Payment System (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and associated rate changes on quality of care as represented by staffing ratios and regulatory deficiencies. Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1996-2000 were linked with Area Resource File (ARF) and Medicare Cost Report data to form a panel dataset. A difference-in-differences model was used to assess effects of the PPS and the BBRA (Balanced Budget Refinement Act) on staffing and deficiencies, a design that allows the separation of the effects of the policies from general trends. Ordinary least squares and negative binomial models were used. The OSCAR and Medicare Cost Report data are self-reported by nursing facilities; ARF data are publicly available. Data were linked by provider ID and county. We find that professional staffing decreased and regulatory deficiencies increased with PPS, and that both effects were mitigated with the BBRA rate increases. The effects appear to increase with the percent of Medicare residents in the facility except, in some cases, at the highest percentage of Medicare. The findings on staffing are statistically significant. The effects on deficiencies, though exhibiting consistent signs and magnitudes with the staffing results, are largely insignificant. Medicare's PPS system and associated rate cuts for SNFs have had a negative effect on staffing and regulatory compliance. Further research is necessary to determine whether these changes are associated with worse outcomes. Findings from this investigation could help guide policy modifications that support the provision of quality nursing home care.

  1. Satisfaction, motivation, and intent to stay among Ugandan physicians: a survey from 18 national hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luboga, Sam; Hagopian, Amy; Ndiku, John; Bancroft, Emily; McQuide, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Uganda faces a colossal shortages of human resources for health. Previous literature has largely focused on those who leave. This paper reports on a study of physicians working in 18 public and private facilities in Uganda as part of a larger study of more than 641 hospital-based health workers in Uganda. We report what could entice physicians to stay longer, satisfaction with current positions, and future career intentions. This study took place in 18 Ugandan hospitals. We describe the 49 physicians who participated in 11 focus groups and the 63 physicians who completed questionnaires, out of a larger sample of 641 health workers overall. Only 37% of physicians said they were satisfied with their jobs, and 46% reported they were at risk of leaving the health sector or the country. After compensation, the largest contributors to dissatisfaction among physicians were quality of management, availability of equipment and supplies (including drugs), quality of facility infrastructure, staffing and workload, political influence, community location, and professional development. Physicians in our study were highly dissatisfied, with almost half the sample reporting a risk to leave the sector or the country. The established link in literature between physician dissatisfaction and departure from the health system suggests national and regional policy makers should consider interventions that address the contributors to dissatisfaction identified in our study. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Nursing Home Physicians' Assessments of Barriers and Strategies for End-of-Life Care in Norway and The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Anette; Zuidema, Sytse; Boersma, Froukje; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2017-08-01

    Working conditions in nursing homes (NHs) may hamper teamwork in providing quality end-of-life (EOL) care, especially the participation of NH physicians. Dutch NH physicians are specialists or trainees in elderly care medicine with NHs as the main workplace, whereas in Norway, family physicians usually work part time in NHs. Thus, we aimed at assessing and comparing NH physicians' perspectives on barriers and strategies for providing EOL care in NHs in Norway and in The Netherlands. A cross-sectional study using an electronic questionnaire was conducted in 2015. All NH physicians in Norway (approximately 1200-1300) were invited to participate; 435 participated (response rate approximately 35%). Of the total 1664 members of the Dutch association of elderly care physicians approached, 244 participated (response rate 15%). We explored NH physicians' perceptions of organizational, educational, financial, legal, and personal prerequisites for quality EOL care. Differences between the countries were compared using χ 2 test and t-test. Most respondents in both countries reported inadequate staffing, lack of skills among nursing personnel, and heavy time commitment for physicians as important barriers; this was more pronounced among Dutch respondents. Approximately 30% of the respondents in both countries reported their own lack of interest in EOL care as an important barrier. Suggested improvement strategies were routines for involvement of patients' family, pain- and symptom assessment protocols, EOL care guidelines, routines for advance care planning, and education in EOL care for physicians and nursing staff. Inadequate staffing levels, as well as lack of competence, time, and interest emerge as important barriers to quality EOL care according to Dutch and Norwegian NH physicians. Their perspectives were mostly similar, despite large educational and organizational differences. Key strategies for improving EOL care in their facilities comprise education and

  3. Implementing an inclusive staffing model for today's reference services a practical guide for librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Nims, Julia K; Stevens, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Reference service remains a core function of modern libraries. However, how and where we provide assistance has evolved with changing technologies and the shifting habits and preferences of our users. One way libraries can provide the on-demand, in-person assistance while managing and developing new services and resources that will benefit current and future users is to reconsider how their reference points and services are staffed and adopt a staff-based reference model. In Implementing an Inclusive Staffing Model for Today's Reference Services, Nims, Storm, and Stevens describe step-by-step

  4. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body for nuclear facilities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this safety guide is to provide recommendations for national authorities on the appropriate management system, organization and staffing for the regulatory body responsible for the regulation of nuclear facilities in order to achieve compliance with the applicable safety requirements. This safety guide covers the organization and staffing in relation to nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants. Nuclear power plants. Other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies. Spent fuel reprocessing plants. And radioactive waste management facilities such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This safety guide also covers issues related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation

  5. Electronic Health Record Use a Bitter Pill for Many Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigs, Stephen L; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) adoption among office-based physician practices in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. However, the challenges of using EHRs have resulted in growing dissatisfaction with the systems among many of these physicians. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to increase understanding of physician perceptions regarding the value of using EHR technology. Important findings included the belief among physicians that EHR systems need to be more user-friendly and adaptable to individual clinic workflow preferences, physician beliefs that lack of interoperability among EHRs is a major barrier to meaningful use of the systems, and physician beliefs that EHR use does not improve the quality of care provided to patients. These findings suggest that although government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption among office-based physician practices have produced positive results, additional support may be required in the future to maintain this momentum.

  6. Effects of learning climate and registered nurse staffing on medication errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, YunKyung; Mark, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the significance of learning from errors, little is known about how learning climate contributes to error reduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether learning climate moderates the relationship between error-producing conditions and medication errors. A cross-sectional descriptive study was done using data from 279 nursing units in 146 randomly selected hospitals in the United States. Error-producing conditions included work environment factors (work dynamics and nurse mix), team factors (communication with physicians and nurses' expertise), personal factors (nurses' education and experience), patient factors (age, health status, and previous hospitalization), and medication-related support services. Poisson models with random effects were used with the nursing unit as the unit of analysis. A significant negative relationship was found between learning climate and medication errors. It also moderated the relationship between nurse mix and medication errors: When learning climate was negative, having more registered nurses was associated with fewer medication errors. However, no relationship was found between nurse mix and medication errors at either positive or average levels of learning climate. Learning climate did not moderate the relationship between work dynamics and medication errors. The way nurse mix affects medication errors depends on the level of learning climate. Nursing units with fewer registered nurses and frequent medication errors should examine their learning climate. Future research should be focused on the role of learning climate as related to the relationships between nurse mix and medication errors.

  7. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler.

  8. Physician Referral Patterns

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The physician referral data was initially provided as a response to a Freedom of Information (FOIA) request. These files represent data from 2009 through June 2013...

  9. Physician-Owned Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 6001 of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 amended section 1877 of the Social Security Act to impose additional requirements for physician-owned hospitals to...

  10. Physician Shared Patient Patterns

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The physician referral data linked below was provided as a response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. These files represent the number of encounters a...

  11. 45 CFR 1336.65 - Staffing and organization of the Revolving Loan Fund: Responsibilities of the Loan Administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... organization table, including: (a) The structure and composition of the Board of Directors of the RLF; (b) The... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Staffing and organization of the Revolving Loan... Hawaiian Revolving Loan Fund Demonstration Project § 1336.65 Staffing and organization of the Revolving...

  12. New Directions for Academic Libraries in Research Staffing: A Case Study at National University of Ireland Galway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John

    2017-01-01

    New research needs, global developments and local shifts in emphasis are demanding a broader range of interactions by librarians with researchers and are challenging previous staffing structures. Research has a higher institutional profile and academic libraries have responded by creating new roles and staffing models, with stronger linkage across…

  13. 75 FR 45166 - Jeld-Wen, Inc., Hawkins Window Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Nicolet Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-71,014] Jeld-Wen, Inc., Hawkins Window Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Nicolet Staffing, Hawkins, WI; Notice of Negative...., Hawkins Window Division, including on-site leased workers of Nicolet Staffing, Hawkins, Wisconsin. Signed...

  14. Registered Nurse Staffing in Pennsylvania Nursing Homes: Comparison before and after Implementation of Medicare's Prospective Payment System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Katsuya; Mezey, Mathy

    1991-01-01

    Examined changes in resident acuity and registered nurse staffing in all nursing homes in Pennsylvania before and after introduction of Medicare Prospective Payment System (PPS) in 1983. Found that acuity of nursing home residents increased significantly since introduction of PPS, full-time registered nurse staffing remained unchanged, and…

  15. Achieving Gender Equity in Physician Compensation and Career Advancement: A Position Paper of the American College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkus, Renee; Serchen, Joshua; Moyer, Darilyn V; Bornstein, Sue S; Hingle, Susan Thompson

    2018-05-15

    Women comprise more than one third of the active physician workforce, an estimated 46% of all physicians-in-training, and more than half of all medical students in the United States. Although progress has been made toward gender diversity in the physician workforce, disparities in compensation exist and inequities have contributed to a disproportionately low number of female physicians achieving academic advancement and serving in leadership positions. Women in medicine face other challenges, including a lack of mentors, discrimination, gender bias, cultural environment of the workplace, imposter syndrome, and the need for better work-life integration. In this position paper, the American College of Physicians summarizes the unique challenges female physicians face over the course of their careers and provides recommendations to improve gender equity and ensure that the full potential of female physicians is realized.

  16. Training the physician assistant in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spenkelink-Schut, G.; ten Cate, O.Th.J.; Kort, H.S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of the physician assistant (PA) in the United States has served as a model for other countries in providing one solution for the challenges in their health care systems. In the Netherlands there is a growing shortage of adequately trained health care workers, an increasing demand for

  17. Determining Nurse Aide Staffing Requirements to Provide Care Based on Resident Workload: A Discrete Event Simulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, John F; Schroyer, L Dale; Saraf, Avantika A; Simmons, Sandra F

    2016-11-01

    Nursing aides provide most of the labor-intensive activities of daily living (ADL) care to nursing home (NH) residents. Currently, most NHs do not determine nurse aide staffing requirements based on the time to provide ADL care for their unique resident population. The lack of an objective method to determine nurse aide staffing requirements suggests that many NHs could be understaffed in their capacity to provide consistent ADL care to all residents in need. Discrete event simulation (DES) mathematically models key work parameters (eg, time to provide an episode of care and available staff) to predict the ability of the work setting to provide care over time and offers an objective method to determine nurse aide staffing needs in NHs. This study had 2 primary objectives: (1) to describe the relationship between ADL workload and the level of nurse aide staffing reported by NHs; and, (2) to use a DES model to determine the relationship between ADL workload and nurse aide staffing necessary for consistent, timely ADL care. Minimum Data Set data related to the level of dependency on staff for ADL care for residents in over 13,500 NHs nationwide were converted into 7 workload categories that captured 98% of all residents. In addition, data related to the time to provide care for the ADLs within each workload category was used to calculate a workload score for each facility. The correlation between workload and reported nurse aide staffing levels was calculated to determine the association between staffing reported by NHs and workload. Simulations to project staffing requirements necessary to provide ADL care were then conducted for 65 different workload scenarios, which included 13 different nurse aide staffing levels (ranging from 1.6 to 4.0 total hours per resident day) and 5 different workload percentiles (ranging from the 5th to the 95th percentile). The purpose of the simulation model was to determine the staffing necessary to provide care within each workload

  18. The Benefit Implications of Recent Trends in Flexible Staffing Arrangements. Staff Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Susan N.

    Workers in flexible staffing arrangementsincluding temporary agency, direct-hire temporary, on-call, and contract workersare much less likely than regular, direct-hire employees to be covered by laws mandating or regulating workplace benefits. They are also much less likely to receive pension, health insurance, and other benefits on the job.…

  19. Staffing a call center with uncertain non-stationary arrival rate and flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, S.; van Delft, C.; Jouini, O.; Koole, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a multi-period staffing problem in a single-shift call center. The call center handles inbound calls, as well as some alternative back-office jobs. The call arrival process is assumed to follow a doubly non-stationary stochastic process with a random mean arrival rate. The inbound calls

  20. Daddy's Gone to Colorado: Male-Staffed Child Care for Father-Absent Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Steve

    1978-01-01

    The article presents the goals, methods, and case examples of The Nutury, a predominantly male-staffed child care center serving single-parent children. The primary goal is to provide consistent relationships with men for children without a male model in their home. Clinical observations reveal positive life-styles and attitudes. (LPG)

  1. Survey of foreign reactor operator qualifications, training, and staffing requirements. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au, M.L.; DiSalvo, R.; Merschoff, E.

    1982-05-01

    The report is a compilation of the data obtained from a survey of foreign nuclear power plant operator requirements. Included among the considerations are: (1) shift staffing; (2) operator eligibility; (3) operator training programs; (4) operator licensing or certification; and (5) operator retraining. The data obtained from this survey are presented in matrix form and contrasted with U.S. requirements

  2. 76 FR 73683 - Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing, Andrews International, IBM Corporation... refrigerators and trash compactors. The notice was published in the Federal Register on October 25, 2010 (75 FR...

  3. 76 FR 72978 - Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing, Andrews International, IBM Corporation... workers are engaged in the production of refrigerators and trash compactors. The notice was published in...

  4. Nuclear power plant organization and staffing for improved performance: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    Experience from well operated nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world indicates that an organizational structure which efficiently supports plant operation is essential in economically achieving both high level of safety and operational performance. At the same time energy markets are being opened to competition in many Member States. It is in consideration of this new competitive energy market that the overall objective of this document is to provide NPP managers information on lessons learned on improving the organization and staffing of NPP activities. Within this overall objective, specific objectives are to: Identify organisational design and staffing principles, Provide examples of how NPPs implement these principles, Identify typical NPP staffing levels, Factors affecting these levels, and staffing trends among various NPP types. Although it is not expected that any particular utility or NPP manager would consider all of the suggestions provided here to be appropriate, it is anticipated that nearly every NPP manager in IAEA Member States would find some ideas useful in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of NPP activities

  5. Staffing, recruitment, training, qualification and certification of operating personnel of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Safety of public, occupational workers and the protection of environment should be assured while activities for economic and social progress are pursued. These activities include the establishment and utilisation of nuclear facilities and the use of radioactive sources. This safety guide provides guidance on the aspects of staffing, recruitment, training, qualification and certification of operating personnel of nuclear power plants

  6. Diagnostic Grouping among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Autistic Spectrum Disorders in Staffed Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felce, D.; Perry, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence to guide the commissioning of residential provision for adults with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) in the UK. We aim to explore the degree and impact of diagnostic congregation among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) and ASD living in staffed housing. Methods: One hundred and fifty-seven adults with…

  7. Nurse turnover in New Zealand: costs and relationships with staffing practises and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Nicola; Leung, William; Ashton, Toni; Rasmussen, Erling; Hughes, Frances; Finlayson, Mary

    2013-04-01

    To determine the rates and costs of nurse turnover, the relationships with staffing practises, and the impacts on outcomes for nurses and patients. In the context of nursing shortages, information on the rates and costs of nursing turnover can improve nursing staff management and quality of care. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected prospectively for 12 months. A re-analysis of these data used descriptive statistics and correlational analysis techniques. The cost per registered nurse turnover represents half an average salary. The highest costs were related to temporary cover, followed by productivity loss. Both are associated with adverse patient events. Flexible management of nursing resources (staffing below budgeted levels and reliance on temporary cover), and a reliance on new graduates and international recruitment to replace nurses who left, contributed to turnover and costs. Nurse turnover is embedded in staffing levels and practises, with costs attributable to both. A culture of turnover was found that is inconsistent with nursing as a knowledge workforce. Nurse managers did not challenge flexible staffing practices and high turnover rates. Information on turnover and costs is needed to develop strategies that retain nurses as knowledge-based workers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Successful Implementation of Six Sigma to Schedule Student Staffing for Circulation Service Desks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Janiece

    2013-01-01

    In fall of 2011 the University at Buffalo Libraries circulation department undertook Six Sigma training for the purpose of overhauling its student scheduling process. The department was able to mitigate significant staffing budgetary reductions and resource reallocations and to overcome the unique challenges of scheduling student labor for a…

  9. A Functional Model of Quality Assurance for Psychiatric Hospitals and Corresponding Staffing Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis-Gould, Edna; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A model for quality assurance (QA) in psychiatric hospitals is described. Its functions (general QA, utilization review, clinical records, evaluation, management information systems, risk management, and infection control), subfunctions, and corresponding staffing requirements are reviewed. This model was designed to foster standardization in QA…

  10. Improving value in primary total joint arthroplasty care pathways: changes in inpatient physical therapy staffing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E. Pelt, MD

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: A relatively simple change to staffing hours, using resources currently available to us, and little additional financial or institutional investment resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients ambulating on POD 0, with a modest reduction in both LOS and inpatient costs.

  11. Outcomes and Costs of Community Living: Semi-Independent Living and Fully Staffed Group Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felce, David; Perry, Jonathan; Romeo, Renee; Robertson, Janet; Meek, Andrea; Emerson, Eric; Knapp, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In a matched-groups design, costs and quality of life outcomes for adults with intellectual disabilities with relatively low support needs were compared between those in fully staffed group homes (n = 35) and in semi-independent living (n = 35). Data were collected on participant characteristics, setting organization, various lifestyle outcomes,…

  12. 75 FR 16512 - Willstaff Staffing Agency, Willstaff Crystal, Inc., and MDS Industrial Resources, Inc., Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Agency, Willstaff Crystal, Inc., and MDS Industrial Resources, Inc., Working On-Site at Tyler Pipe... MDS Industrial Resources, Inc., working on-site at Tyler Pipe Company, Waterworks Division, South... Staffing Agency, Willstaff Crystal, Inc., and MDS Industrial Resources, Inc., working on-site at Tyler Pipe...

  13. Library/Media Centers in U.S. Public Schools: Growth, Staffing, and Resources. Full Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Kathy D.; Holmes, Dwight R.

    2016-01-01

    At the request of New Business Item: 89 (NBI: 89) adopted at the 2015 NEA Representative Assembly, this study examines the extent to which students have access to public school library/media centers with qualified staff and up-to-date resources. The study explores trends in library/media center openings and closings as well as staffing patterns…

  14. Who Hires Social Workers? Structural and Contextual Determinants of Social Service Staffing in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Amy Restorick; Bowblis, John R

    2017-02-01

    Although nurse staffing has been extensively studied within nursing homes (NHs), social services has received less attention. The study describes how social service departments are organized in NHs and examines the structural characteristics of NHs and other macro-focused contextual factors that explain differences in social service staffing patterns using longitudinal national data (Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reports, 2009-2012). NHs have three patterns of staffing for social services, using qualified social workers (QSWs); paraprofessional social service staff; and interprofessional teams, consisting of both QSWs and paraprofessionals. Although most NHs employ a QSW (89 percent), nearly half provide social services through interprofessional teams, and 11 percent rely exclusively on paraprofessionals. Along with state and federal regulations that depend on facility size, other contextual and structural factors within NHs also influence staffing. NHs most likely to hire QSWs are large facilities in urban areas within a health care complex, owned by nonprofit organizations, with more payer mixes associated with more profitable reimbursement. QSWs are least likely to be hired in small facilities in rural areas. The influence of policy in supporting the professionalization of social service staff and the need for QSWs with expertise in gerontology, especially in rural NHs, are discussed. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  15. Reversing Course: The Troubled State of Academic Staffing and a Path Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Over the last generation, the instructional staffing system in American higher education has experienced a significant reduction in the proportion of jobs for full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty members and a dramatic growth in fixed-term full- and part-time instructional jobs without tenure. About 70 percent of the people teaching in…

  16. Creating pharmacy staffing-to-demand models: predictive tools used at two institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Paul; Ernster, Jason; Knoer, Scott

    2012-09-15

    The creation and implementation of data-driven staffing-to-demand models at two institutions are described. Predictive workload tools provide a guideline for pharmacy managers to adjust staffing needs based on hospital volume metrics. At Abbott Northwestern Hospital, management worked with the department's staff and labor management committee to clearly outline the productivity monitoring system and the process for reducing hours. Reference charts describing the process for reducing hours and a form to track the hours of involuntary reductions for each employee were created to further enhance communication, explain the rationale behind the new process, and promote transparency. The University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview, found a strong correlation between measured pharmacy workload and an adjusted census formula. If the daily census and admission report indicate that the adjusted census will provide enough workload for the fully staffed department, no further action is needed. If the census report indicates the adjusted census is less than the breakeven point, staff members are asked to leave work, either voluntarily or involuntarily. The opposite holds true for days when the adjusted census is higher than the breakeven point, at which time additional staff are required to synchronize worked hours with predicted workload. Successful staffing-to- demand models were implemented in two hospital pharmacies. Financial savings, as indicated by decreased labor costs secondary to reduction of staffed shifts, were approximately $42,000 and $45,500 over a three-month period for Abbott Northwestern Hospital and the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview, respectively. Maintenance of 100% productively allowed the departments to continue to replace vacant positions and avoid permanent staff reductions.

  17. Are Staffing, Work Environment, Work Stressors, and Rationing of Care Related to Care Workers' Perception of Quality of Care? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Franziska; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Hamers, Jan P H; Engberg, Sandra; Simon, Michael; Schwendimann, René

    2015-10-01

    To describe care worker-reported quality of care and to examine its relationship with staffing variables, work environment, work stressors, and implicit rationing of nursing care. Cross-sectional study. National, randomly selected sample of Swiss nursing homes, stratified according to language region and size. A total of 4311 care workers of all educational backgrounds (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nurse aides) from 402 units in 155 nursing homes completed a survey between May 2012 and April 2013. Care worker-reported quality of care was measured with a single item; predictors were assessed with established instruments (eg, Practice Environment Scale-Nurse Working Index) adapted for nursing home use. A multilevel logistic regression model was applied to assess predictors for quality of care. Overall, 7% of care workers rated the quality of care provided as rather low or very low. Important factors related to better quality of care were higher teamwork and safety climate (odds ratio [OR] 6.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.36-8.79); better staffing and resources adequacy (OR 2.94, 95% CI 2.08-4.15); less stress due to workload (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55-0.93); less implicit rationing of caring, rehabilitation, and monitoring (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.24-0.49); and less rationing of social care (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69-0.92). Neither leadership nor staffing levels, staff mix, or turnover was significantly related to quality of care. Work environment factors and organizational processes are vital to provide high quality of care. The improvement of work environment, support in handling work stressors, and reduction of rationing of nursing care might be intervention points to promote high quality of care in nursing homes. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Estudo preliminar sobre a qualidade de vida de médicos e enfermeiros intensivistas pediátricos e neonatais Estudio preliminar sobre la calidad de vida de médicos y enfermeros intensivistas pediátricos y neonatales Preliminary study about qualify of life of physicians and nurses working in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa de Cássia Fogaça

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparar a Qualidade de Vida (QV de médicos e enfermeiros que trabalham em UTI Pediátrica (PED e Neonatal (NEO e, também, avaliar se há diferença entre a QV na mesma categoria profissional, mas diferindo de acordo com a unidade de trabalho. Estudo descritivo com 37 médicos e 20 enfermeiros. O WHOQOL-100 foi utilizado. Médicos da PED diferiram estatisticamente no domínio VI (p=0,003, quando comparados com médicos da NEO. Médicos e enfermeiros da PED apresentaram diferença estatística significante no domínio V (p Comparar la Calidad de Vida (QV de médicos y enfermeros que trabajan en UTI Pediátrica (PED y neonatal (NEO y, también evaluar si existe diferencia entre la QV en la misma categoría profesional, aunque variando de acuerdo con la unidad de trabajo. Estudio descriptivo con 37 médicos y 20 enfermeros. Fue utilizado el WHOQOL-100. Los médicos de PED diferían estadísticamente en el dominio VI (p=0,003 en comparación con los médicos de NEO. Médicos y enfermeros de PED presentaron una diferencia estadística significativa en el dominio V (pCompare the Quality of Life (QL of doctors and nurses who work in Pediatric (PED and Neonatal (NEO Intensive Care Units, and to evaluate whether there are differences between the QL in the same job category, but differing according to the work unit. This descriptive study was performed with 37 physicians and 20 nurses. The WHOQOL100 was used. Physicians from the PED differ statistically in the field VI (p=0.003 compared with physicians from the NEO. Physicians and nurses from the PED showed a statistically significant difference in field V (p<0.01, while physicians and nurses from the NEO showed a statistically significant difference in field VI (p=0.05. The QL assessment of physicians and nurses working in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units was below the scores found in scientific literature, compared to studies that evaluated patients with chronic pain and mental health

  19. The effects of staffing and training on firm productivity and profit growth before, during, and after the Great Recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsang; Ployhart, Robert E

    2014-05-01

    This study integrates research from strategy, economics, and applied psychology to examine how organizations may leverage their human resources to enhance firm performance and competitive advantage. Staffing and training are key human resource management practices used to achieve firm performance through acquiring and developing human capital resources. However, little research has examined whether and why staffing and training influence firm-level financial performance (profit) growth under different environmental (economic) conditions. Using 359 firms with over 12 years of longitudinal firm-level profit data, we suggest that selective staffing and internal training directly and interactively influence firm profit growth through their effects on firm labor productivity, implying that staffing and training contribute to the generation of slack resources that help buffer and then recover from the effects of the Great Recession. Further, internal training that creates specific human capital resources is more beneficial for prerecession profitability, but staffing is more beneficial for postrecession recovery, apparently because staffing creates generic human capital resources that enable firm flexibility and adaptation. Thus, the theory and findings presented in this article have implications for the way staffing and training may be used strategically to weather economic uncertainty (recession effects). They also have important practical implications by demonstrating that firms that more effectively staff and train will outperform competitors throughout all pre- and postrecessionary periods, even after controlling for prior profitability. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. [Hippocrates' treatise physician].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøland, Anders

    2005-01-01

    This small treatise does not appear to have been published in Danish in its entirety. It gives a vivid picture of the physician in ancient Greece. The well known first chapter describes the attitudes and attributes of the doctor. It goes on discussing in some detail how the light should be in the surgery, the instruments to be used, the preparations of bandages and drugs, and the use of cupping instruments. The author stresses both the needs of the patient and the necessity of the physician's dignity and integrity.

  1. Clinical Databases for Chest Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Andrew M; Gabriel, Peter E

    2018-04-01

    A clinical database is a repository of patient medical and sociodemographic information focused on one or more specific health condition or exposure. Although clinical databases may be used for research purposes, their primary goal is to collect and track patient data for quality improvement, quality assurance, and/or actual clinical management. This article aims to provide an introduction and practical advice on the development of small-scale clinical databases for chest physicians and practice groups. Through example projects, we discuss the pros and cons of available technical platforms, including Microsoft Excel and Access, relational database management systems such as Oracle and PostgreSQL, and Research Electronic Data Capture. We consider approaches to deciding the base unit of data collection, creating consensus around variable definitions, and structuring routine clinical care to complement database aims. We conclude with an overview of regulatory and security considerations for clinical databases. Copyright © 2018 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Difficult physician-patient relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifsteck, S W

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the delivery of health care services in the United States are proceeding so rapidly that many providers are asking how the working relationships between doctors and patients will be effected. Accelerated by cost containment, quality improvement and the growth of managed care, these changes have caused some critics to feel that shorter visits and gatekeeper systems will promote an adversarial relationship between physicians and patients. However, proponents of the changing system feel that better prevention, follow-up care and the attention to customer service these plans can offer will lead to increased patient satisfaction and improved doctor-patient communication. Dedicated to addressing these concerns, the Bayer Institute for Health Care Communication was established in 1987 as a continuing medical education program (CME) focusing on this topic. A half-day workshop on clinician-patient communication to enhance health outcomes was introduced in 1992 and a second workshop, "Difficult' Clinician-Patient Relationships," was developed two years later. The two courses discussed in this article are offered to all physicians, residents, medical students, mid-level providers and other interested staff within the Carle system.

  3. Senior academic physicians and retirement considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Arthur J; Greenberg, Henry; Dwyer, Edward M; Klein, Helmut; Ryan, Daniel; Francis, Charles; Marcus, Frank; Eberly, Shirley; Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Gillespie, John; Goldstein, Robert; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Oakes, David; Thomsen, Poul Erik Bloch; Zareba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of academic senior physicians are approaching their potential retirement in good health with accumulated clinical and research experience that can be a valuable asset to an academic institution. Considering the need to let the next generation ascend to leadership roles, when and how should a medical career be brought to a close? We explore the roles for academic medical faculty as they move into their senior years and approach various retirement options. The individual and institutional considerations require a frank dialogue among the interested parties to optimize the benefits while minimizing the risks for both. In the United States there is no fixed age for retirement as there is in Europe, but European physicians are initiating changes. What is certain is that careful planning, innovative thinking, and the incorporation of new patterns of medical practice are all part of this complex transition and timing of senior academic physicians into retirement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Staffing Levels at National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision-Level Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ms, Suzie Aparicio; Welch Bacon, Cailee E; Parsons, John T; Bay, R Curtis; Cohen, Randy P; DeZeeuw, Terry; McLeod, Tamara C Valovich

    2015-12-01

    The "Appropriate Medical Coverage for Intercollegiate Athletics" (AMCIA) document was created to support assessment and calculation of athletic training personnel requirements. However, little is known regarding disparities between current and recommended staffing practices. To identify the staffing and employment characteristics of athletic health care services at Football Bowl Subdivision-level institutions. Cross-sectional study. Web-based survey. Head athletic trainers and athletic training staff members who were knowledgeable about budget and staff. The survey, Assessment of Staffing Levels at National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision-Level Institutions, was used to evaluate personal, university, and staff demographics; staffing and employment topics; and AMCIA variables and use. The survey was accessed and partially completed by 104 individuals (response rate = 84.6%). A total of 79 athletic trainers (response rate = 76%) completed the entire survey. One-third of the respondents (34.2%, n = 26) met the recommended number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) for football, two-thirds of the respondents (65.7%, n = 50) failed to meet the recommendation, and 26.2% (n = 27) were missing data needed for FTE calculation. Among those who did not meet the recommended FTEs (n = 50), 38.0% (n = 19) were within 1 FTE of being compliant, 26.0% (n = 13) were within 2 FTEs, and 24.0% (n = 12) were within 3 FTEs. About one-third of respondents (35.9%, n = 37) reported not using the AMCIA, citing lack of funding (29.7%, n = 11), lack of administrative support (21.6%, n = 8), and other reasons (37.8%, n = 14). The majority of institutions that used the AMCIA were able to provide justification for staffing. For most of the institutions that failed to meet their recommendation, adding 1-3 FTE athletic trainers for football would change their compliance status. A uniform definition of the term FTE within collegiate athletics is needed to allow for structured

  5. The Size and Scope of Collegiate Athletic Training Facilities and Staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, Andrew R; Petersen, Jeffrey C

    2017-08-01

      Athletic training facilities have been described in terms of general design concepts and from operational perspectives. However, the size and scope of athletic training facilities, along with staffing at different levels of intercollegiate competition, have not been quantified.   To define the size and scope of athletic training facilities and staffing levels at various levels of intercollegiate competition. To determine if differences existed in facilities (eg, number of facilities, size of facilities) and staffing (eg, full time, part time) based on the level of intercollegiate competition.   Cross-sectional study.   Web-based survey.   Athletic trainers (ATs) who were knowledgeable about the size and scope of athletic training programs.   Athletic training facility size in square footage; the AT's overall facility satisfaction; athletic training facility component spaces, including satellite facilities, game-day facilities, offices, and storage areas; and staffing levels, including full-time ATs, part-time ATs, and undergraduate students.   The survey was completed by 478 ATs (response rate = 38.7%) from all levels of competition. Sample means for facilities were 3124.7 ± 4425 ft 2 (290.3 ± 411 m 2 ) for the central athletic training facility, 1013 ± 1521 ft 2 (94 ± 141 m 2 ) for satellite athletic training facilities, 1272 ± 1334 ft 2 (118 ± 124 m 2 ) for game-day athletic training facilities, 388 ± 575 ft 2 (36 ± 53 m 2 ) for athletic training offices, and 424 ± 884 ft 2 (39 ± 82 m 2 ) for storage space. Sample staffing means were 3.8 ± 2.5 full-time ATs, 1.6 ± 2.5 part-time ATs, 25 ± 17.6 athletic training students, and 6.8 ± 7.2 work-study students. Division I schools had greater resources in multiple categories (P facilities in recent years was common, and almost half of ATs reported that upgrades have been approved for the near future.   This study provides benchmark descriptive data on athletic training staffing and

  6. Staffing Levels at National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision-Level Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    MS, Suzie Aparicio; Welch Bacon, Cailee E.; Parsons, John T.; Bay, R. Curtis; Cohen, Randy P.; DeZeeuw, Terry; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich

    2015-01-01

    Context The “Appropriate Medical Coverage for Intercollegiate Athletics” (AMCIA) document was created to support assessment and calculation of athletic training personnel requirements. However, little is known regarding disparities between current and recommended staffing practices. Objective To identify the staffing and employment characteristics of athletic health care services at Football Bowl Subdivision-level institutions. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants Head athletic trainers and athletic training staff members who were knowledgeable about budget and staff. Main Outcome Measure(s) The survey, Assessment of Staffing Levels at National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision-Level Institutions, was used to evaluate personal, university, and staff demographics; staffing and employment topics; and AMCIA variables and use. Results The survey was accessed and partially completed by 104 individuals (response rate = 84.6%). A total of 79 athletic trainers (response rate = 76%) completed the entire survey. One-third of the respondents (34.2%, n = 26) met the recommended number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) for football, two-thirds of the respondents (65.7%, n = 50) failed to meet the recommendation, and 26.2% (n = 27) were missing data needed for FTE calculation. Among those who did not meet the recommended FTEs (n = 50), 38.0% (n = 19) were within 1 FTE of being compliant, 26.0% (n = 13) were within 2 FTEs, and 24.0% (n = 12) were within 3 FTEs. About one-third of respondents (35.9%, n = 37) reported not using the AMCIA, citing lack of funding (29.7%, n = 11), lack of administrative support (21.6%, n = 8), and other reasons (37.8%, n = 14). Conclusions The majority of institutions that used the AMCIA were able to provide justification for staffing. For most of the institutions that failed to meet their recommendation, adding 1–3 FTE athletic trainers for football would change their

  7. A System-Wide Approach to Physician Efficiency and Utilization Rates for Non-Operating Room Anesthesia Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Mitchell H; Huynh, Tinh T; Breidenstein, Max W; O'Donnell, Stephen E; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Urman, Richard D

    2017-07-01

    There has been little in the development or application of operating room (OR) management metrics to non-operating room anesthesia (NORA) sites. This is in contrast to the well-developed management framework for the OR management. We hypothesized that by adopting the concept of physician efficiency, we could determine the applicability of this clinical productivity benchmark for physicians providing services for NORA cases at a tertiary care center. We conducted a retrospective data analysis of NORA sites at an academic, rural hospital, including both adult and pediatric patients. Using the time stamps from WiseOR® (Palo Alto, CA), we calculated site utilization and physician efficiency for each day. We defined scheduling efficiency (SE) as the number of staffed anesthesiologists divided by the number of staffed sites and stratified the data into three categories (SE 1). The mean physician efficiency was 0.293 (95% CI, [0.281, 0.305]), and the mean site utilization was 0.328 (95% CI, [0.314, 0.343]). When days were stratified by scheduling efficiency (SE 1), we found differences between physician efficiency and site utilization. On days where scheduling efficiency was less than 1, that is, there are more sites than physicians, mean physician efficiency (95% CI, [0.326, 0.402]) was higher than mean site utilization (95% CI, [0.250, 0.296]). We demonstrate that scheduling efficiency vis-à-vis physician efficiency as an OR management metric diverge when anesthesiologists travel between NORA sites. When the opportunity to scale operational efficiencies is limited, increasing scheduling efficiency by incorporating different NORA sites into a "block" allocation on any given day may be the only suitable tactical alternative.

  8. Modelling attending physician productivity in the emergency department: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua W; Davis, Samuel; Wilker, Elissa H; Wong, Matthew L; Litvak, Ori; Traub, Stephen J; Nathanson, Larry A; Sanchez, Leon D

    2018-05-01

    Emergency physician productivity, often defined as new patients evaluated per hour, is essential to planning clinical operations. Prior research in this area considered this a static quantity; however, our group's study of resident physicians demonstrated significant decreases in hourly productivity throughout shifts. We now examine attending physicians' productivity to determine if it is also dynamic. This is a retrospective cohort study, conducted from 2014 to 2016 across three community hospitals in the north-eastern USA, with different schedules and coverage. Timestamps of all patient encounters were automatically logged by the sites' electronic health record. Generalised estimating equations were constructed to predict productivity in terms of new patients per shift hour. 207 169 patients were seen by 64 physicians over 2 years, comprising 9822 physician shifts. Physicians saw an average of 15.0 (SD 4.7), 20.9 (SD 6.4) and 13.2 (SD 3.8) patients per shift at the three sites, with 2.97 (SD 0.22), 2.95 (SD 0.24) and 2.17 (SD 0.09) in the first hour. Across all sites, physicians saw significantly fewer new patients after the first hour, with more gradual decreases subsequently. Additional patient arrivals were associated with greater productivity; however, this attenuates substantially late in the shift. The presence of other physicians was also associated with slightly decreased productivity. Physician productivity over a single shift follows a predictable pattern that decreases significantly on an hourly basis, even if there are new patients to be seen. Estimating productivity as a simple average substantially underestimates physicians' capacity early in a shift and overestimates it later. This pattern of productivity should be factored into hospitals' staffing plans, with shifts aligned to start with the greatest volumes of patient arrivals. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved

  9. The African Family Physician

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    North America and Europe, and these serve us well up to a point. When a colleague ... Maybe we need a different set of principles to work by in the Afri- ... base the balance. ... The African Family Physician is dedicated to life-long learning and.

  10. Physician self-care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    impact on patient care, increasing the number of medical errors, lowering both patient and physician satisfaction and lengthening the recovery phase.[1-3]. Joan Halifax[4] has taught at programmes in palliative care for health professional caregivers for many years. She identified frequent challenges facing healthcare ...

  11. Physician-owned companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostuik, John P

    2007-05-15

    The author relates his experience in the development of a spinal implant development company (K2M) that is significantly advised by physicians. To provide information about the development of a spinal implant company (K2M) advised by a group of professional spinal surgeons. To relate the federal laws (STARK and anti-kickback) as they pertain to surgeon-influenced companies. To discuss the role of a scientific advisory board. A self-developed company was developed together with significant, but minority physician financial input and majority scientific advice. A privately owned spinal implant development corporation (K2M) was developed 3 years ago. Physician financial participation was less than 20% (Stark laws state no more than 40%). Users of product are greater than 60% non-investor physicians. The development of a large scientific advisory board has been very influential in product development. A privately owned spinal implant company (K2M) has been developed strictly within Federal laws. Its board of scientific advisors that receives recompense commissurate only with effort significantly impacts the company policy.

  12. Physicians and Insider Trading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Sinha, Michael S; Joffe, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Although insider trading is illegal, recent high-profile cases have involved physicians and scientists who are part of corporate governance or who have access to information about clinical trials of investigational products. Insider trading occurs when a person in possession of information that might affect the share price of a company's stock uses that information to buy or sell securities--or supplies that information to others who buy or sell--when the person is expected to keep such information confidential. The input that physicians and scientists provide to business leaders can serve legitimate social functions, but insider trading threatens to undermine any positive outcomes of these relationships. We review insider-trading rules and consider approaches to securities fraud in the health care field. Given the magnitude of the potential financial rewards, the ease of concealing illegal conduct, and the absence of identifiable victims, the temptation for physicians and scientists to engage in insider trading will always be present. Minimizing the occurrence of insider trading will require robust education, strictly enforced contractual provisions, and selective prohibitions against high-risk conduct, such as participation in expert consulting networks and online physician forums, by those individuals with access to valuable inside information.

  13. A comparison of ethical issues in nursing practice across nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mihyun; Jeon, Sang Hee; Hong, Hyun-Ja; Cho, Sung-Hyun

    2014-08-01

    The complexity and variety of ethical issues in nursing is always increasing, and those issues lead to special concerns for nurses because they have critical impacts on nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to gather comprehensive information about ethical issues in nursing practice, comparing the issues in different types of nursing units including general units, oncology units, intensive care units, operating rooms, and outpatient departments. The study used a descriptive research design. Ethics/human rights issues encountered by nurses in their daily nursing practice were identified by using the Ethical Issues Scale. The study sample included 993 staff nurses working in a university hospital in South Korea. This study was approved by the University Institutional Review Board. Completed questionnaires were returned sealed with signed informed consent. The most frequently and disturbingly encountered issues across nursing units were "conflicts in the nurse-physician relationship," "providing care with a possible risk to your health," and "staffing patterns that limit patient access to nursing care." The findings of this study showed that nurses from different nursing units experienced differences in the types or frequency of ethical issues. In particular, intensive care units had the greatest means of all the units in all three component scales including end-of-life treatment issues, patient care issues, and human rights issues. Nurses experienced various ethical challenges in their daily practice. Of the ethical issues, some were distinctively and frequently experienced by nurses in a specific unit. This study suggested that identifying and understanding specific ethical issues faced by nurses in their own areas may be an effective educational approach to motivate nurses and to facilitate nurses' reflection on their experiences. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Clinical Criteria for Physician Aid in Dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentlicher, David; Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Rich, Ben A

    2016-03-01

    More than 20 years ago, even before voters in Oregon had enacted the first aid in dying (AID) statute in the United States, Timothy Quill and colleagues proposed clinical criteria AID. Their proposal was carefully considered and temperate, but there were little data on the practice of AID at the time. (With AID, a physician writes a prescription for life-ending medication for a terminally ill, mentally capacitated adult.) With the passage of time, a substantial body of data on AID has developed from the states of Oregon and Washington. For more than 17 years, physicians in Oregon have been authorized to provide a prescription for AID. Accordingly, we have updated the clinical criteria of Quill, et al., based on the many years of experience with AID. With more jurisdictions authorizing AID, it is critical that physicians can turn to reliable clinical criteria. As with any medical practice, AID must be provided in a safe and effective manner. Physicians need to know (1) how to respond to a patient's inquiry about AID, (2) how to assess patient decision making capacity, and (3) how to address a range of other issues that may arise. To ensure that physicians have the guidance they need, Compassion & Choices convened the Physician Aid-in-Dying Clinical Criteria Committee, in July 2012, to create clinical criteria for physicians who are willing to provide AID to patients who request it. The committee includes experts in medicine, law, bioethics, hospice, nursing, social work, and pharmacy. Using an iterative consensus process, the Committee drafted the criteria over a one-year period.

  15. Front-line management, staffing and nurse-doctor relationships as predictors of nurse and patient outcomes. a survey of Icelandic hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdóttir, Sigrún; Clarke, Sean P; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Nutbeam, Don

    2009-07-01

    To investigate aspects of nurses' work environments linked with job outcomes and assessments of quality of care in an Icelandic hospital. Prior research suggests that poor working environments in hospitals significantly hinder retention of nurses and high quality patient care. On the other hand, hospitals with high retention rates (such as Magnet hospitals) show supportive management, professional autonomy, good inter-professional relations and nurse job satisfaction, reduced nurse burnout and improved quality of patient care. Cross-sectional survey of 695 nurses at Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavík. Nurses' work environments were measured using the nursing work index-revised (NWI-R) and examined as predictors of job satisfaction, the Maslach burnout inventory (MBI) and nurse-assessed quality of patient care using linear and logistic regression approaches. An Icelandic adaptation of the NWI-R showed a five-factor structure similar to that of Lake (2002). After controlling for nurses' personal characteristics, job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion and nurse rated quality of care were found to be independently associated with perceptions of support from unit-level managers, staffing adequacy, and nurse-doctor relations. The NWI-R measures elements of hospital nurses' work environments that predict job outcomes and nurses' ratings of the quality of patient care in Iceland. Efforts to improve and maintain nurses' relations with nurse managers and doctors, as well as their perceptions of staffing adequacy, will likely improve nurse job satisfaction and employee retention, and may improve the quality of patient care.

  16. Developing Staffing Models to Support Population Health Management And Quality Oucomes in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sheila A; Vlasses, Frances; Havey, Julia

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple demands and challenges inherent in establishing staffing models in ambulatory heath care settings today. If health care administrators establish a supportive physical and interpersonal health care environment, and develop high-performing interprofessional teams and staffing models and electronic documentation systems that track performance, patients will have more opportunities to receive safe, high-quality evidence-based care that encourages patient participation in decision making, as well as provision of their care. The health care organization must be aligned and responsive to the community within which it resides, fully invested in population health management, and continuously scanning the environment for competitive, regulatory, and external environmental risks. All of these challenges require highly competent providers willing to change attitudes and culture such as movement toward collaborative practice among the interprofessional team including the patient.

  17. Medical physics personnel for medical imaging: requirements, conditions of involvement and staffing levels-French recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isambert, Aurelie; Valero, Marc; Rousse, Carole; Blanchard, Vincent; Le Du, Dominique; Guilhem, Marie-Therese; Dieudonne, Arnaud; Pierrat, Noelle; Salvat, Cecile

    2015-01-01

    The French regulations concerning the involvement of medical physicists in medical imaging procedures are relatively vague. In May 2013, the ASN and the SFPM issued recommendations regarding Medical Physics Personnel for Medical Imaging: Requirements, Conditions of Involvement and Staffing Levels. In these recommendations, the various areas of activity of medical physicists in radiology and nuclear medicine have been identified and described, and the time required to perform each task has been evaluated. Criteria for defining medical physics staffing levels are thus proposed. These criteria are defined according to the technical platform, the procedures and techniques practised on it, the number of patients treated and the number of persons in the medical and paramedical teams requiring periodic training. The result of this work is an aid available to each medical establishment to determine their own needs in terms of medical physics. (authors)

  18. Medical physics personnel for medical imaging: requirements, conditions of involvement and staffing levels-French recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isambert, Aurélie; Le Du, Dominique; Valéro, Marc; Guilhem, Marie-Thérèse; Rousse, Carole; Dieudonné, Arnaud; Blanchard, Vincent; Pierrat, Noëlle; Salvat, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    The French regulations concerning the involvement of medical physicists in medical imaging procedures are relatively vague. In May 2013, the ASN and the SFPM issued recommendations regarding Medical Physics Personnel for Medical Imaging: Requirements, Conditions of Involvement and Staffing Levels. In these recommendations, the various areas of activity of medical physicists in radiology and nuclear medicine have been identified and described, and the time required to perform each task has been evaluated. Criteria for defining medical physics staffing levels are thus proposed. These criteria are defined according to the technical platform, the procedures and techniques practised on it, the number of patients treated and the number of persons in the medical and paramedical teams requiring periodic training. The result of this work is an aid available to each medical establishment to determine their own needs in terms of medical physics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Dynamic Staffing and Rescheduling in Software Project Management: A Hybrid Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujia Ge

    Full Text Available Resource allocation could be influenced by various dynamic elements, such as the skills of engineers and the growth of skills, which requires managers to find an effective and efficient tool to support their staffing decision-making processes. Rescheduling happens commonly and frequently during the project execution. Control options have to be made when new resources are added or tasks are changed. In this paper we propose a software project staffing model considering dynamic elements of staff productivity with a Genetic Algorithm (GA and Hill Climbing (HC based optimizer. Since a newly generated reschedule dramatically different from the initial schedule could cause an obvious shifting cost increase, our rescheduling strategies consider both efficiency and stability. The results of real world case studies and extensive simulation experiments show that our proposed method is effective and could achieve comparable performance to other heuristic algorithms in most cases.

  20. Economic evaluation of nurse staffing and nurse substitution in health care: a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, P; Goryakin, Y.; Maben, J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several systematic reviews have suggested that greater nurse staffing as well as a greater proportion of registered nurses in the health workforce is associated with better patient outcomes. Others have found that nurses can substitute for doctors safely and effectively in a variety of settings. However, these reviews do not generally consider the effect of nurse staff on both patient outcomes and costs of care, and therefore say little about the cost-effectiveness of nurse-provide...

  1. Effects of nurse staffing, work environments, and education on patient mortality: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunhee; Sloane, Douglas M; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Sera; Choi, Miyoung; Yoo, Il Young; Lee, Hye Sun; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-02-01

    While considerable evidence has been produced showing a link between nursing characteristics and patient outcomes in the U.S. and Europe, little is known about whether similar associations are present in South Korea. To examine the effects of nurse staffing, work environment, and education on patient mortality. This study linked hospital facility data with staff nurse survey data (N=1024) and surgical patient discharge data (N=76,036) from 14 high-technology teaching hospitals with 700 or more beds in South Korea, collected between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2008. Logistic regression models that corrected for the clustering of patients in hospitals were used to estimate the effects of the three nursing characteristics on risk-adjusted patient mortality within 30 days of admission. Risk-adjusted models reveal that nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and nurse education were significantly associated with patient mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00-1.10; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.88; and OR 0.91, CI 0.83-0.99; respectively). These odds ratios imply that each additional patient per nurse is associated with an 5% increase in the odds of patient death within 30 days of admission, that the odds of patient mortality are nearly 50% lower in the hospitals with better nurse work environments than in hospitals with mixed or poor nurse work environments, and that each 10% increase in nurses having Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree is associated with a 9% decrease in patient deaths. Nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and percentages of nurses having Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree in South Korea are associated with patient mortality. Improving hospital nurse staffing and work environments and increasing the percentages of nurses having Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree would help reduce the number of preventable in-hospital deaths. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A scientific model to determine the optimal radiographer staffing component in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipanga, A.N.; Ellmann, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Nuclear medicine in South Africa is developing fast. Much has changed since the constitution of a scientific model for determining an optimum number of radiographer posts in a Nuclear Medicine department in the late 1980's. Aim: The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the number of radiographers required by a Nuclear Medicine department can still be determined according to the norms established in 1988. Methods: A quantitative study using non-experimental evaluation design was conducted to determine the ratios between current radiographer workload and staffing norms. The workload ratios were analysed using the procedures statistics of the Nuclear Medicine department at Tygerberg Hospital. Radiographers provided data about their activities related to patient procedures, including information about the condition of the patients, activities in the radiopharmaceutical laboratory, and patient related administrative tasks. These were factored into an equation relating this data to working hours, including vacation and sick leave. The calculation of Activity Standards and an annual Standard Workload was used to finally calculate the staffing requirements for a Nuclear Medicine department. Results: Preliminary data confirmed that old staffing norms cannot be used in a modern Nuclear Medicine department. Protocols for several types of study have changed, including the additional acquisition of tomographic studies. Interest in the use of time-consuming non-imaging studies has been revived and should be factored Into the equation. Conclusions: All Nuclear Medicine departments In South Africa, where the types of studies performed have changed over the past years, should look carefully at their radiographer staffing ratio to ascertain whether the number of radiographers needed is adequate for the current workload. (author)

  3. The Changing Dynamics of Health Care: Physician Perceptions of Technology in Medical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Jerald D.

    2012-01-01

    Political, economic, and safety concerns have militated for the adoption of electronic health records (EHR) by physicians in the United States, but current rates of adoption have failed to achieve the expected levels. This qualitative phenomenological study of practicing physicians reveals obstacles to adoption. Maintaining the physicians'…

  4. UnitedHealth Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  5. Strategies for using international domain standards within a national context: The case of the Dutch temporary staffing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Erwin Johan Albert; van Bekkum, Michael; Verhoosel, Jack

    2009-01-01

    This paper will discuss strategies for using international domain standards within a national context. The various strategies are illustrated by means of a case study of the temporary staffing industry.

  6. Hospital nurse staffing and patient mortality, emotional exhaustion, and job dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halm, Margo; Peterson, Michelle; Kandels, Mary; Sabo, Julie; Blalock, Miriam; Braden, Rebecca; Gryczman, Anna; Krisko-Hagel, Kathryn; Larson, Dave; Lemay, Diane; Sisler, Bette; Strom, Linda; Topham, Debra

    2005-01-01

    To conduct an investigation similar to a landmark study that investigated the association between nurse-to-patient ratio and patient mortality, failure-to-rescue, emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction of nurses. Cross-sectional analysis of 2709 general, orthopedic, and vascular surgery patients, and 140 staff nurses (42% response rate) caring for these patients in a large Midwestern institution. The main outcome measures were mortality, failure-to-rescue, emotional exhaustion, and job dissatisfaction. Staffing was not a significant predictor of mortality or failure-to-rescue, nor did clinical specialty predict emotional exhaustion or job dissatisfaction. Although these findings reinforce adequate staffing ratios at this institution, programs that support nurses in their daily practice and positively impact job satisfaction need to be explored. The Nursing Research Council not only has heightened awareness of how staffing ratios affect patient and nurse outcomes, but also a broader understanding of how the research process can be used to effectively shape nurse's practice and work environments.

  7. Staffing requirements for future small and medium reactors (SMRs) based on operating experience and projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    At the time of this study there were about 160 small and medium sized nuclear power reactors (referred to as SMRs) in operation worldwide, and about 25 more under construction. Operation and maintenance costs for operating SMRs represent a substantial portion of the cost of electricity produced. Of these costs, the direct and indirect cost of staff represents the major cost component. In recent years, particularly since 1990, there has been increased interest in SMRs by many developing countries wishing to take advantage of nuclear power and several small and medium reactor designs are in various stages of development. To enhance the economic competitive position of SMRs relative to alternative methods of electricity generation, it is essential to ensure that new SMRs can be operated reliably and efficiently using the optimum number of staff. This publication reviews the lessons learned from the reactor operation, and the insights gained through the design of new SMRs, with a view to optimizing staffing in order to improve overall plant economics without compromising safety.This publication is intended to evaluate the estimated staffing size of various SMRs, the staff qualification and training required for the operation of future SMRs. and the key issues which impact the staffing requirements that should be considered in the development and deployment of future SMRs

  8. [Staffing levels in medical radiation physics in radiation therapy in Germany. Summary of a questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leetz, Hans-Karl; Eipper, Hermann Hans; Gfirtner, Hans; Schneider, Peter; Welker, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    To get a general idea of the actual staffing level situation in medical radiation physics in 1999 a survey was carried out by the task-group "Personalbedarf" of Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Physik (DGMP) among all DGMP-members who are active in this field. Main components for equipment and activities are defined in Report 8 and 10 of DGMP for staffing requirements in medical radiation physics. 322 forms were sent out, 173 of them have been evaluated. From the answers regarding equipment and activities numbers for staff are calculated by the methods given in Report 8 and 10 for this spot check target and compared with effective staffing levels. The data of the spot check are then extrapolated on total Germany. The result is a calculated deficit of 865 medical physicists for the whole physics staff, 166 of them in radiation therapy. From the age distribution of DGMP-members and the calculated deficit resulted a training capacity of about 100 medical physicists at all per year (19 in radiation therapy) if the deficit shall be cut back in 10 years.

  9. Is Theory Applied in Practice?A Stady of Linkage between Swedish MNC's Strategies and Húman Resource Staffing Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Ivinger, Linnea; Lindvetter, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Theory suggests that there is a linkage between strategies and human resource staffing policies. Our aim with the dissertation was to test if such a linkage could be proven in Swedish MNCs. Also, indications spoke for ethnocentric tendencies in MNCs. We wanted to test if this was the reality for Swedish companies. In order to test the linkage we had to categorise the companies’ strategies and human resource staffing policies. By a survey we concluded that there was not full consistency in the...

  10. Managing the negatives of experience in physician teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Experience is a key shaper of thought and action in the health care workplace and a fundamental component of management and professional policies dealing with improving quality of care. Physicians rely on experience to structure social interaction, to determine authority relations, and to resist organizational encroachments on their work and autonomy. However, an overreliance on experience within physician teams may paradoxically undermine learning, participation, and entrepreneurship, affecting organizational performance. Approximately 100 hours of direct observation of normal workdays for physician teams (n = 17 physicians) in two different work settings in a single academic medical center located in the Northeastern part of the United States. Qualitative data were collected from physician teams in the medical intensive care unit and trauma/general surgery settings. Data were transcribed and computer analyzed through an interactive process of open coding, theoretical sampling, and pattern recognition that proceeded longitudinally. Three particular experience-based schemas were identified that physician teams used to structure social relations and perform work. These schemas involved using experience as a commodity, trump card, and liberator. Each of these schemas consisted of strongly held norms, beliefs, and values that produced team dynamics with the potential for undermining learning, participation, and entrepreneurship in the group. Organizations may move to mitigate the negative impact of an overreliance on experience among physicians by promoting bureaucratic forms of control that enable physicians to engage learning, participation, and entrepreneurship in their work while not usurping existing and difficult-to-change cultural drivers of team behavior.

  11. [Burnout in physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzthaler, Ilsemarie; Kemmler, Georg; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    Burnout is a syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment. The primary objective of this study was to investigate both the prevalence and severity of burnout symptoms in a sample of clinical physicians from different speciality disciplines. A total of 69 clinical physicians ≤55 years who are working at the Medical University/regional Hospital Innsbruck were included into a cross-sectional study. Next to the assessment of sociodemographic and work-related variables the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used to investigate burnout symtoms. Overall, 8.8% of the study population showed high emotional exhaustion with high or moderate depersonalization and low personal accomplishment and therefore had a high risk to develop a burnout syndrom. 11.8% showed a moderade burnout risk. Neither sociodemographic variables nor the degree of educational qualification or speciality discipline had an influence on burnout symptoms. However, there was a positive correlation between scientific activity and personal accomplihment. Our results suggest that the dimension of burnout symtoms among clinical physicians in Austria has be taken seriously. Further research is needed to develop specific programs in terms of burnout prevention and burnout therapy.

  12. Medicare program; payment policies under the physician fee schedule, five-year review of work relative value units, clinical laboratory fee schedule: signature on requisition, and other revisions to part B for CY 2012. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    This final rule with comment period addresses changes to the physician fee schedule and other Medicare Part B payment policies to ensure that our payment systems are updated to reflect changes in medical practice and the relative value of services. It also addresses, implements or discusses certain statutory provisions including provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA) of 2008. In addition, this final rule with comment period discusses payments for Part B drugs; Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule: Signature on Requisition; Physician Quality Reporting System; the Electronic Prescribing (eRx) Incentive Program; the Physician Resource-Use Feedback Program and the value modifier; productivity adjustment for ambulatory surgical center payment system and the ambulance, clinical laboratory, and durable medical equipment prosthetics orthotics and supplies (DMEPOS) fee schedules; and other Part B related issues.

  13. Leveraging Telehealth to Bring Volunteer Physicians Into Underserved Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Rudin, Robert; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2017-06-01

    Many disadvantaged communities lack sufficient numbers of local primary care and specialty physicians. Yet tens of thousands of physicians, in particular those who are retired or semiretired, desire meaningful volunteer opportunities. Multiple programs have begun to use telehealth to bridge the gap between volunteer physicians and underserved patients. In this brief, we describe programs that are using this model and discuss the promise and pitfalls. Physician volunteers in these programs report that the work can be fulfilling and exciting, a cutting-edge yet convenient way to remain engaged and contribute. Given the projected shortfall of physicians in the United States, recruiting retired and semiretired physicians to provide care through telehealth increases the total supply of active physicians and the capacity of the existing workforce. However, programs typically use volunteers in a limited capacity because of uncertainty about the level and duration of commitment. Acknowledging this reality, most programs only use volunteer physicians for curbside consults rather than fully integrating them into longitudinal patient care. The part-time availability of volunteers may also be difficult to incorporate into the workflow of busy safety net clinics. As more physicians volunteer in a growing number of telehealth programs, the dual benefits of enriching the professional lives of volunteers and improving care for underserved communities will make further development of these programs worthwhile.

  14. Physician-industry relations. Part 1: individual physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Susan L

    2002-03-05

    This is part 1 of a 2-part paper on ethics and physician-industry relationships. Part 1 offers advice to individual physicians; part 2 gives recommendations to medical education providers and medical professional societies. Physicians and industry have a shared interest in advancing medical knowledge. Nonetheless, the primary ethic of the physician is to promote the patient's best interests, while the primary ethic of industry is to promote profitability. Although partnerships between physicians and industry can result in impressive medical advances, they also create opportunities for bias and can result in unfavorable public perceptions. Many physicians and physicians-in-training think they are impervious to commercial influence. However, recent studies show that accepting industry hospitality and gifts, even drug samples, can compromise judgment about medical information and subsequent decisions about patient care. It is up to the physician to judge whether a gift is acceptable. A very general guideline is that it is ethical to accept modest gifts that advance medical practice. It is clearly unethical to accept gifts or services that obligate the physician to reciprocate. Conflicts of interest can arise from other financial ties between physicians and industry, whether to outside companies or self-owned businesses. Such ties include honorariums for speaking or writing about a company's product, payment for participating in clinic-based research, and referrals to medical resources. All of these relationships have the potential to influence a physician's attitudes and practices. This paper explores the ethical quandaries involved and offers guidelines for ethical business relationships.

  15. [An analysis of appeals against the ruling of the occupational physician's lodged to the Department of Prevention and Safety in the Working Environment--Health Prevention and Occupational Epidemiology Operative Unit within the A.S.P. Palermo (Palermo Health Authority), years 2008-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsala, M G L; Morici, M; Lacca, G; Curcurù, L; Eduardo, E Costagliola; Ilardo, S; Trapani, E; Caracausi, R; Firenze, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the appeals against a "suitability judgment for work" lodged to the U.O.S. "Health Prevention and Occupational Epidemiology Operative Unit" of Department of Prevention and Safety in the Working Environment within the ASP Palermo (U.O.S.), from 2008 to 2010. Studying the appeals gives an indirect view on the occupational physician activity and allows to monitor their actions, analysis aims at highlighting those issues around which any planning and implementation of coordination activities should be focused.

  16. Physician practice management companies: should physicians be scared?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Rotter, A E; Brown, J A

    1999-01-01

    Physician practice management companies (PPMCs) manage nonclinical aspects of physician care and control physician groups by buying practice assets. Until recently, PPMCs were a favorite of Wall Street. Suddenly, in early 1998, the collapse of the MedPartners-PhyCor merger led to the rapid fall of most PPMC stock, thereby increasing wariness of physicians to sell to or invest in PPMCs. This article explores not only the broken promises made by and false assumptions about PPMCs, but also suggests criteria that physicians should use and questions would-be PPMC members should ask before joining. Criteria include: demonstrated expertise, a company philosophy that promotes professional autonomy, financial stability, freedom from litigation, and satisfied physicians already in the PPMC. The authors recommend that physicians seek out relatively small, single-specialty PPMCs, which hold the best promise of generating profits and permitting professional control over clinical decisions.

  17. Online professional networks for physicians: risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Jon L; Luks, Howard J; Sechrest, Randale

    2012-05-01

    The rapidly developing array of online physician-only communities represents a potential extraordinary advance in the availability of educational and informational resources to physicians. These online communities provide physicians with a new range of controls over the information they process, but use of this social media technology carries some risk. The purpose of this review was to help physicians manage the risks of online professional networking and discuss the potential benefits that may come with such networks. This article explores the risks and benefits of physicians engaging in online professional networking with peers and provides suggestions on risk management. Through an Internet search and literature review, we scrutinized available case law, federal regulatory code, and guidelines of conduct from professional organizations and consultants. We reviewed the OrthoMind.com site as a case example because it is currently the only online social network exclusively for orthopaedic surgeons. Existing case law suggests potential liability for orthopaedic surgeons who engage with patients on openly accessible social network platforms. Current society guidelines in both the United States and Britain provide sensible rules that may mitigate such risks. However, the overall lack of a strong body of legal opinions, government regulations as well as practical experience for most surgeons limit the suitability of such platforms. Closed platforms that are restricted to validated orthopaedic surgeons may limit these downside risks and hence allow surgeons to collaborate with one another both as clinicians and practice owners. Educating surgeons about the pros and cons of participating in these networking platforms is helping them more astutely manage risks and optimize benefits. This evolving online environment of professional interaction is one of few precedents, but the application of risk management strategies that physicians use in daily practice carries over

  18. Fatores que tornam estressante o trabalho de médicos e enfermeiros em terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal: estudo de revisão bibliográfica Factors that cause stress in physicians and nurses working in a pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit: bibliographic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa de Cássia Fogaça

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Revisão de literatura sobre estresse ocupacional e síndrome de burnout em médicos e enfermeiros que trabalham em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal. MÉTODOS: Os artigos foram identificados a partir das bases de dados MedLine, LILACS e SciElo, usando as palavras-chave estresse, burnout, médicos, enfermagem, unidade de terapia intensiva, unidade de cuidados intensivos pediátricos e unidades de cuidados intensivos neonatais. O período pesquisado foi de 1990 a 2007. RESULTADOS: Médicos e enfermeiros que trabalham em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal são candidatos a apresentarem estresse, alterações psicológicas e síndrome de Burnout. Pesquisas sobre o tema identificaram alterações importantes que acometem médicos e enfermeiros intensivistas: sobrecarga de trabalho, burnout, desejo de abandonar o trabalho e níveis elevados de cortisol entre outros fatores. CONCLUSÕES: Os profissionais que trabalham em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal , pela especificidade do seu trabalho, estão expostos ao risco do estresse ocupacional e, conseqüentemente ao Burnout. Estes dados sugerem a necessidade de serem feitas pesquisas, com o objetivo de desenvolver medidas preventivas e modelos de intervenção.OBJECTIVES: Bibliographic review on occupational stress and burnout presence in physicians and nurses that work in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. METHODS: The articles were selected from the MedLine, LILACS and SciElo data base using the key words: stress, burnout, physicians, nursing, intensive care unit, pediatric intensive care unit and neonatal intensive care unit. The studied period ranged from 1990 to 2007. RESULTS: Health professionals who work in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units are strong candidates for developing stress, psychological alterations and burnout syndrome. Researches on this subject identified important alterations suffered by these

  19. The patient-centered medical home neighbor: A primary care physician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsky, Christine A

    2011-01-04

    The American College of Physicians' position paper on the patient-centered medical home neighbor (PCMH-N) extends the work of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) as a means of improving the delivery of health care. Recognizing that the PCMH does not exist in isolation, the PCMH-N concept outlines expectations for comanagement, communication, and care coordination and broadens responsibility for safe, effective, and efficient care beyond primary care to include physicians of all specialties. As such, it is a fitting follow-up to the PCMH and moves further down the road toward improved care for complex patients. Yet, there is more work to be done. Truly transforming the U.S. health care system around personalized medical homes embedded in highly functional medical neighborhoods will require better staffing models; more robust electronic information tools; aligned incentives for quality and efficiency within payment and regulatory policies; and a culture of greater engagement of patients, their families, and communities.

  20. Home health care agency staffing patterns before and after the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, by rural and urban location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, William J; Spector, William; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 and other recent policies have led to reduced Medicare funding for home health agencies (HHAs) and visits per beneficiary. We examine the staffing characteristics of stable Medicare-certified HHAs across rural and urban counties from 1996 to 2002, a period encompassing the changes associated with the BBA and related policies. Data were drawn from Medicare Provider of Service files and the Area Resource File. The unit of analysis was the 3,126 counties in the United States, grouped into 5 categories: metropolitan, nonmetropolitan adjacent, and 3 nonmetropolitan nonadjacent groups identified by largest town size. Only relatively stable HHAs were included. We generated summary HHA staff statistics for each county group and year. All staff categories, other than therapists, declined from 1997 to 2002 across the metropolitan and nonmetropolitan county groupings. There were substantial population-adjusted decreases in stable HHA-based home health aides in all counties, including remote counties. The limited presence of stable HHA staff in certain nonmetropolitan county types has been exacerbated since implementation of the BBA, especially in the most rural counties. The loss of aides in more rural counties may limit the availability of home-based long-term care in these locations, where the need for long-term care is considerable. Future research should examine the degree to which the presence of HHA staff influences actual access and whether other paid and unpaid sources of care substitute for Medicare home health care in counties with limited supplies of HHA staff.

  1. Better Physician's 'Black Bags'

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The "black bag" is outgrowth of astronaut monitoring technology from NASA's Johnson Space Center. Technically known as the portable medical status system, a highly advanced physician's "black bag" weighs less than 30 pounds, yet contains equipment for monitoring and recording vital signs, electrocardiograms, and electroencephalograms. Liquid crystal displays are used to present 15 digits of data simultaneously for long periods of time without excessive use of battery power. Single printed circuit card contains all circuitry required to measure and display vital signs such as heart and respiration rate, temperature, and blood pressure.

  2. Medicare, physicians, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Joseph F

    2004-05-01

    There are many other provisions to the MMA. It is important to remind our patients that these changes are voluntary. If patients are satisfied with their current Medicare benefits and plan, they need not change to these new plans. However, as physicians we should familiarize ourselves with these new Medicare options so as to better advise our patients. For more information, visit www.ama-assn.org. The Medical Society of Delaware will strive to keep you informed as these new changes are implemented.

  3. A national physician survey of diagnostic error in paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrem, Lucy M; Fanshawe, Thomas R; Sharif, Farhana; Plüddemann, Annette; O'Neill, Michael B

    2016-10-01

    This cross-sectional survey explored paediatric physician perspectives regarding diagnostic errors. All paediatric consultants and specialist registrars in Ireland were invited to participate in this anonymous online survey. The response rate for the study was 54 % (n = 127). Respondents had a median of 9-year clinical experience (interquartile range (IQR) 4-20 years). A diagnostic error was reported at least monthly by 19 (15.0 %) respondents. Consultants reported significantly less diagnostic errors compared to trainees (p value = 0.01). Cognitive error was the top-ranked contributing factor to diagnostic error, with incomplete history and examination considered to be the principal cognitive error. Seeking a second opinion and close follow-up of patients to ensure that the diagnosis is correct were the highest-ranked, clinician-based solutions to diagnostic error. Inadequate staffing levels and excessive workload were the most highly ranked system-related and situational factors. Increased access to and availability of consultants and experts was the most highly ranked system-based solution to diagnostic error. We found a low level of self-perceived diagnostic error in an experienced group of paediatricians, at variance with the literature and warranting further clarification. The results identify perceptions on the major cognitive, system-related and situational factors contributing to diagnostic error and also key preventative strategies. • Diagnostic errors are an important source of preventable patient harm and have an estimated incidence of 10-15 %. • They are multifactorial in origin and include cognitive, system-related and situational factors. What is New: • We identified a low rate of self-perceived diagnostic error in contrast to the existing literature. • Incomplete history and examination, inadequate staffing levels and excessive workload are cited as the principal contributing factors to diagnostic error in this study.

  4. Physicians' perceptions of capacity building for managing chronic disease in seniors using integrated interprofessional care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Heckman, George; McKelvie, Robert; Jong, Philip; D'Elia, Teresa; Hillier, Loretta M

    2015-03-01

    To explore the barriers to and facilitators of adapting and expanding a primary care memory clinic model to integrate care of additional complex chronic geriatric conditions (heart failure, falls, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frailty) into care processes with the goal of improving outcomes for seniors. Mixed-methods study using quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) methods. Ontario. Family physicians currently working in primary care memory clinic teams and supporting geriatric specialists. Family physicians currently working in memory clinic teams (n = 29) and supporting geriatric specialists(n = 9) were recruited as survey participants. Interviews were conducted with memory clinic lead physicians (n = 16).Statistical analysis was done to assess differences between family physician ratings and geriatric specialist ratings related to the capacity for managing complex chronic geriatric conditions, the role of interprofessional collaboration within primary care, and funding and staffing to support geriatric care. Results from both study methods were compared to identify common findings. Results indicate overall support for expanding the memory clinic model to integrate care for other complex conditions. However, the current primary care structure is challenged to support optimal management of patients with multiple comorbidities, particularly as related to limited funding and staffing resources. Structured training, interprofessional teams, and an active role of geriatric specialists within primary care were identified as important facilitators. The memory clinic model, as applied to other complex chronic geriatric conditions, has the potential to build capacity for high-quality primary care, improve health outcomes,promote efficient use of health care resources, and reduce healthcare costs.

  5. Mining routinely collected acute data to reveal non-linear relationships between nurse staffing levels and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Alison; Cook, Rob; Jones, Sarahjane; Smith, Judith; Gough, Malcolm; Maxwell, Elaine; Punshon, Geoffrey; Radford, Mark

    2016-12-16

    Nursing is a safety critical activity but not easily quantified. This makes the building of predictive staffing models a challenge. The aim of this study was to determine if relationships between registered and non-registered nurse staffing levels and clinical outcomes could be discovered through the mining of routinely collected clinical data. The secondary aim was to examine the feasibility and develop the use of 'big data' techniques commonly used in industry for this area of healthcare and examine future uses. The data were obtained from 1 large acute National Health Service hospital trust in England. Routinely collected physiological, signs and symptom data from a clinical database were extracted, imported and mined alongside a bespoke staffing and outcomes database using Mathmatica V.10. The physiological data consisted of 120 million patient entries over 6 years, the bespoke database consisted of 9 years of daily data on staffing levels and safety factors such as falls. To discover patterns in these data or non-linear relationships that would contribute to modelling. To examine feasibility of this technique in this field. After mining, 40 correlations (pdata (such as the presence or absence of nausea) and staffing factors. Several inter-related factors demonstrated step changes where registered nurse availability appeared to relate to physiological parameters or outcomes such as falls and the management of symptoms. Data extraction proved challenging as some commercial databases were not built for extraction of the massive data sets they contain. The relationship between staffing and outcomes appears to exist. It appears to be non-linear but calculable and a data-driven model appears possible. These findings could be used to build an initial mathematical model for acute staffing which could be further tested. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Development of physician leadership competencies: perceptions of physician leaders, physician educators and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mindi K; Gartland, Myles P; Pugno, Perry A

    2004-01-01

    Research regarding the development of healthcare leadership competencies is widely available. However, minimal research has been published regarding the development of physician leadership competencies, despite growing recognition in recent years of the important need for effective physician leadership. Usingdata from an electronically distributed, self-administered survey, the authors examined the perceptions held by 110 physician leaders, physician educators, and medical students regarding the extent to which nine competencies are important for effective physician leadership, ten activities are indicative of physician leadership, and seven methods are effective for the development of physician leadership competencies. Results indicated that "interpersonal and communication skills" and "professional ethics and social responsibility" are perceived as the most important competencies for effective physician leadership. Furthermore, respondents believe "influencing peers to adopt new approaches in medicine" and "administrative responsibility in a healthcare organization" are the activities most indicative of effective physician leadership. Finally, respondents perceive"coaching or mentoring from an experienced leader" and "on-job experience (e.g., a management position)" as the most effective methods for developing physician leadership competencies. The implications of these findings for the education and development of physician leaders are discussed.

  7. Factors influencing physicians' choice of workplace: systematic review of drivers of attrition and policy interventions to address them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Koussa, Maria; Atun, Rifat; Bowser, Diana; Kruk, Margaret E

    2016-12-01

    The movement of skilled physicians from the public to the private sector is a key constraint to achieving universal health coverage and is currently affecting health systems worldwide. This systematic review aims to assess factors influencing physicians' choice of workplace, and policy interventions for retaining physicians in the public sector. Five literature databases were searched. Studies were included in the review if they focused on at least one of the following criteria: (i) incentives or motivators for retaining physicians in the public sector, (ii) pull factors that encouraged physicians to move to the private sector, (iii) push factors that forced physicians to leave the public sector, (iv) policy interventions or case studies that addressed physician retention in the public sector, and (v) qualitative reviews of policy interventions that were implemented in different health system settings. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria. Six major themes that affected physicians' choice of workplace were identified including: financial incentives, career development, infrastructure and staffing, professional work environment, workload and autonomy. The majority of the studies suggested that the use of financial incentives was a motivator in retaining physicians in the public sector. The review also identified policy interventions including: regulatory controls, incentives and management reforms. Regulatory controls and incentives were the two most frequently reported policy interventions. While factors affecting physicians' choice of workplace are country specific, financial incentives and professional development are core factors. Other factors are highly influenced by context, and thus, it would be useful for future cross-country research to use standardized data collection tools, allowing comparison of contextual factors as well as the examination of how context affects physician retention in the public sector.

  8. Ethical issues in the response to Ebola virus disease in United States emergency departments: a position paper of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Arvind; Asher, Shellie L; Wolf, Lisa; Geiderman, Joel M; Marco, Catherine A; McGreevy, Jolion; Derse, Arthur R; Otten, Edward J; Jesus, John E; Kreitzer, Natalie P; Escalante, Monica; Levine, Adam C

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa has presented a significant public health crisis to the international health community and challenged U.S. emergency departments (EDs) to prepare for patients with a disease of exceeding rarity in developed nations. With the presentation of patients with Ebola to U.S. acute care facilities, ethical questions have been raised in both the press and medical literature as to how U.S. EDs, emergency physicians (EPs), emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system should approach the current epidemic and its potential for spread in the domestic environment. To address these concerns, the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine developed this joint position paper to provide guidance to U.S. EPs, emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system on how to approach the ethical dilemmas posed by the outbreak of EVD. This paper will address areas of immediate and potential ethical concern to U.S. EDs in how they approach preparation for and management of potential patients with EVD. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  9. Strategic Staffing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ann B.

    2012-01-01

    Business and industry leaders do not flinch at the idea of placing top talent in struggling departments and divisions. This is not always the case in public education. The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools made a bold statement to its community in its strategic plan by identifying two key reform levers--(1) an effective principal leading each school;…

  10. FRAMING EFFECTS ON PHYSICIANS' JUDGMENT AND DECISION MAKING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh C; Krieger, Heather A; Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer S

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess physicians' susceptibility to framing effects in clinical judgment and decision making. A survey was administered online to 159 general internists in the United States. Participants were randomized into two groups, in which clinical scenarios varied in their framings: frequency vs percentage, with cost information vs without, female patient vs male patient, and mortality vs survival. Results showed that physicians' recommendations for patients in hypothetical scenarios were significantly different when the predicted probability of the outcomes was presented in frequency versus percentage form and when it was presented in mortality rate vs survival rate of the same magnitude. Physicians' recommendations were not different for other framing effects.

  11. Naturopathic physicians: holistic primary care and integrative medicine specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchy, Andrew P

    2011-12-01

    The use of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is increasing in the United States; there is a need for physician level practitioners who possess extensive training in both CAM and conventional medicine. Naturopathic physicians possess training that allows integration of modern scientific knowledge and the age-old wisdom of natural healing techniques. Naturopathic philosophy provides a framework to implement CAM in concert with conventional therapies. The naturopathic physician's expertise in both conventional medicine and CAM allows a practice style that provides excellent care through employing conventional and CAM modalities while utilizing modern research and evidence-based medicine.

  12. The practice and earnings of preventive medicine physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salive, M E

    1992-01-01

    A shortage of preventive medicine (PM) physicians exists in the United States. Researchers know little about these physicians' earnings and practice characteristics. The American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) mailed a survey to all self-identified PM physicians on the American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile. A total of 3,771 (54%) responded; respondents' sex and region of residence were typical for PM physicians in general, with a slight excess of older physicians and those reporting board certification. A total of 2,664 (71%) were working full time, with median earnings of $85,000 (mean $90,000). Among full-time physicians, relatively higher earnings were associated with the following characteristics: male sex; age 45 to 64 years; major source of income from clinical, business, or industrial sources, rather than governmental or academic; and PM board certification. Full-time PM physicians earned much less than office-based private practitioners in several primary care specialties in 1989. The gap in earnings between PM specialists in government positions and those in the private sector is also substantial. Both disparities may require creative solutions.

  13. Determinants of hospital fall rate trajectory groups: a longitudinal assessment of nurse staffing and organizational characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Damian; Schumacher, Jessica R; Duncan, R Paul; Hall, Allyson G; Neff, Donna F; Shorr, Ronald I

    2014-01-01

    Patient falls in acute care hospitals represent a significant patient safety concern. Although cross-sectional studies have shown that fall rates vary widely between acute care hospitals, it is not clear whether hospital fall rates remain consistent over time. The aim of this study was to determine whether hospitals can be categorized into fall rate trajectory groups over time and to identify nurse staffing and hospital characteristics associated with hospital fall rate trajectory groups. We conducted a 54-month (July 2006-December 2010) longitudinal study of U.S. acute care general hospitals participating in the National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators (2007). We used latent class growth modeling to categorize hospitals into groups based on their long-term fall rates. Nurse staffing and hospital characteristics associated with membership in the highest hospital fall rate group were identified using logistic regression. A sample of 1,529 hospitals (mean fall rate of 3.65 per 1,000 patient days) contributed data to the analysis. Latent class growth modeling findings classified hospital into three groups based on fall rate trajectories: consistently high (mean fall rate of 4.96 per 1,000 patient days), consistently medium (mean fall rate of 3.63 per 1,000 patient days), and consistently low (mean fall rate of 2.50 per 1,000 patient days). Hospitals with higher total nurse staffing (odds ratio [OR] = 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.85, 0.99]), Magnet status (OR = 0.49, 95% CI [0.35, 0.70]), and bed size greater than 300 beds (OR = 0.70, 95% CI [0.51, 0.94]) were significantly less likely to be categorized in the "consistently high" fall rate group. Over this 54-month period, hospitals were categorized into three groups based on long-term fall rates. Hospital-level factors differed among these three groups. This suggests that there may be hospitals in which "best practices" for fall prevention might be identified. In addition, administrators may be able

  14. Patient safety culture in obstetrics and gynecology and neonatology units: the nurses' and the midwives' opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeliene, Janina; Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Nadisauskiene, Ruta Jolanta; Tameliene, Rasa; Kudreviciene, Ausrele; Nedzelskiene, Irena; Macijauskiene, Jurate

    2018-04-22

    Patients treated in health care facilities that provide services in the fields of obstetrics, gynecology, and neonatology are especially vulnerable. Large multidisciplinary teams of physicians, multiple invasive and noninvasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and the use of advanced technologies increase the probability of adverse events. The evaluation of knowledge about patient safety culture among nurses and midwives working in such units and the identification of critical areas at a health care institution would reduce the number of adverse events and improve patient safety. The aim of the study was to evaluate the opinion of nurses and midwives working in clinical departments that provide services in the fields of obstetrics, gynecology, and neonatology about patient safety culture and to explore potential predictors for the overall perception of safety. We used the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) to evaluate nurses' and midwives' opinion about patient safety issues. The overall response rate in the survey was 100% (n = 233). The analysis of the dimensions of safety on the unit level showed that the respondents' most positive evaluations were in the Organizational Learning - Continuous Improvement (73.2%) and Feedback and Communication about Error (66.8%) dimensions, and the most negative evaluations in the Non-punitive Response to Error (33.5%) and Staffing (44.6%) dimensions. On the hospital level, the evaluation of the safety dimensions ranged between 41.4 and 56.8%. The percentage of positive responses in the outcome dimensions Frequency of Events Reported was 82.4%. We found a significant association between the outcome dimension Frequency of Events Reported and the Hospital Management Support for Patient Safety and Feedback and Communication about Error Dimensions. On the hospital level, the critical domains in health care facilities that provide services in the fields of obstetrics, gynecology, and neonatology were Teamwork

  15. The physician leader as logotherapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, E R

    1998-01-01

    Today's physicians feel helpless and angry about changing conditions in the medical landscape. This is due, in large part, to our postmodernist world view and the influence of corporations on medical practice. The life and work of existentialist psychiatrist Viktor Frankl is proposed as a role model for physicians to take back control of their profession. Physician leaders are in the best position to bring the teachings and insight of Frankl's logotherapy to rank-and-file physicians in all practice settings, as well as into the board rooms of large medical corporations. This article considers the spiritual and moral troubles of American medicine, Frankl's answer to that affliction, and the implications of logotherapy for physician organizations and leadership. Physician executives are challenged to take up this task.

  16. [Impact of nurse, nurses' aid staffing and turnover rate on inpatient health outcomes in long term care hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunmi; Lee, Ji Yun; Kang, Hyuncheol

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to explore the impact of registered nurse/nurses' aid (RN/NA) staffing and turnover rate on inpatient health outcomes in long term care hospitals. A secondary analysis was done of national data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Services including evaluation of long term care hospitals in October-December 2010 and hospital general characteristics in July-September 2010. Final analysis of data from 610 hospitals included RN/NA staffing, turnover rate of nursing staff and 5 patient health outcome indicators. Finding showed that, when variables of organization and community level were controlled, patients per RN was a significant indicator of decline in ADL for patients with dementia, and new pressure ulcer development in the high risk group and worsening of pressure ulcers. Patients per NA was a significant indicator for new pressure ulcer development in the low risk group. Turnover rate was not significant for any variable. To maintain and improve patient health outcomes of ADL and pressure ulcers, policies should be developed to increase the staffing level of RN. Studies are also needed to examine causal relation of NA staffing level, RN staffing level and patient health outcomes with consideration of the details of nursing practice.

  17. Prevention and management of "do not return" notices: a quality improvement process for supplemental staffing nursing agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade-Oshifogun, Jochebed Bosede; Dufelmeier, Thaddeus

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a quality improvement process for "do not return" (DNR) notices for healthcare supplemental staffing agencies and healthcare facilities that use them. It is imperative that supplemental staffing agencies partner with healthcare facilities in assuring the quality of supplemental staff. Although supplemental staffing agencies attempt to ensure quality staffing, supplemental staff are sometimes subjectively evaluated by healthcare facilities as "DNR." The objective of this article is to describe a quality improvement process to prevent and manage "DNR" within healthcare organizations. We developed a curriculum and accompanying evaluation tool by adapting Rampersad's problem-solving discipline approach: (a) definition of area(s) for improvement; (b) identification of all possible causes; (c) development of an action plan; (d) implementation of the action plan; (e) evaluation for program improvement; and (f) standardization of the process. Face and content validity of the evaluation tool was ascertained by input from a panel of experienced supplemental staff and nursing faculty. This curriculum and its evaluation tool will have practical implications for supplemental staffing agencies and healthcare facilities in reducing "DNR" rates and in meeting certification/accreditation requirements. Further work is needed to translate this process into future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nurses experiences regarding staffing patterns in the surgical wards of a private hospital in Gauteng South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloko Malatji

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe nurses' experiences regarding staffing patterns in the surgical wards of a private hospital in Gauteng in order to develop recommendations for staffing patterns in these wards. Methodology: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Data was collected by means of in-depth semi structured individual interviews from a purposive sample of professional nurses working in the surgical wards of this hospital. Data was analysed using Tesch's method of qualitative thematic analysis. Principles of trustworthiness and ethical principles to ensure the protection of human rights were applied throughout the study. Results: The findings of the study revealed one central theme which reflected that participants experienced the staffing patterns of the surgical wards negatively. Two main themes emerged as, nurses had negative experiences in the surgical wards as well as negative emotional experiences related to the staffing patterns. Conclusion: It is evident from the findings of the study that nurses are experiencing staffing patterns negatively.

  19. The organizational structure of an intensive care unit influences treatment of hypotension among critically ill patients: A retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, M. Dustin; Massa, Jennifer; Mueller, Ariel; Jinadasa, Sayuri P; Lee, Joon; Kothari, Rishi; Scott, Daniel J.; Callahan, Julie; Celi, Leo Anthony; Hacker, Michele R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior studies report that weekend admission to an intensive care unit is associated with increased mortality, potentially attributed to the organizational structure of the unit. This study aims to determine whether treatment of hypotension, a risk factor for mortality, differs according to level of staffing. Methods Using the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care database, we conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted to an intensive care unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center who experienced one or more episodes of hypotension. Episode(s) were categorized according to the staffing level, defined as high during weekday daytime (7am–7pm) and low during weekends or nighttime (7pm–7am). Results Patients with a hypotensive event on a weekend were less likely to be treated compared to those that occurred during the weekday daytime (p=0.02). No association between weekday daytime versus weekday nighttime staffing levels and treatment of hypotension was found (RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.98–1.07). Conclusion Patients with a hypotensive event on a weekend were less likely to be treated than patients with an event during high-staffing periods. No association between weekday nighttime staffing and hypotension treatment was observed. We conclude that treatment of a hypotensive episode relies on more than solely staffing levels. PMID:26975737

  20. Intubação orotraqueal: avaliação do conhecimento médico e das práticas clínicas adotadas em unidades de terapia intensiva Orotracheal intubation: physicians knowledge assessment and clinical practices in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Setsuko Yamanaka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o conhecimento médico sobre as técnicas de intubação e identificar as práticas mais realizadas. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo, envolvendo três diferentes unidades de terapia intensiva de um hospital universitário: da anestesiologia (ANEST, da pneumologia (PNEUMO e do pronto socorro (PS. Todos os médicos que trabalham nessas unidades e que concordaram em participar do estudo, responderam um questionário contendo dados demográficos e questões sobre intubação orotraqueal. RESULTADOS: Foram obtidos 85 questionários (90,42% dos médicos. ANEST teve maior média de idade (p = 0,001, com 43,5% sendo intensivistas. Foi referido uso da associação hipnótico e opióide (97,6% e pré oxigenação (91,8%, mas apenas 44,6% referiram utilização de coxim suboccipital, sem diferença entre as UTIs. Na ANEST, referiu-se maior uso de bloqueador neuromuscular (p OBJECTIVES: To assess the physician’s knowledge on intubation techniques and to identify the common practices. METHODS: This was a prospective study, involving three different intensive care units within a University hospital: Anesthesiology (ANEST, Pulmonology (PULMO and Emergency Department (ED. All physicians working in these units and consenting to participate in the study completed a questionnaire with their demographic data and questions on orotracheal intubation. RESULTS: 85 completed questionnaires were retrieved (90.42% of the physicians. ANEST had the higher mean age (p=0.001, being 43.5% of them intensivists. The use of hypnotic and opioid association was reported by 97.6%, and pre-oxygenation by 91.8%, but only 44.6% reported sub-occipital pad use, with no difference between the ICUs. On ANEST an increased neuromuscular blockade use was reported (p<0.000 as well as increased caution with full stomach (p=0.002. The rapid sequence knowledge was restricted (mean 2.20 ± 0.89, p=0.06 between the different units. The Sellick maneuver was known by 97.6%, but 72

  1. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  2. Physician-Rating Web Sites: Ethical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samora, Julie Balch; Lifchez, Scott D; Blazar, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    To understand the ethical and professional implications of physician behavior changes secondary to online physician-rating Web sites (PRWs). The American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) Ethics and Professionalism Committee surveyed the ASSH membership regarding PRWs. We sent a 14-item questionnaire to 2,664 active ASSH members who practice in both private and academic settings in the United States. We received 312 responses, a 12% response incidence. More than 65% of the respondents had a slightly or highly unfavorable impression of these Web sites. Only 34% of respondents had ever updated or created a profile for PRWs, although 62% had observed inaccuracies in their profile. Almost 90% of respondents had not made any changes in their practice owing to comments or reviews. One-third of respondents had solicited favorable reviews from patients, and 3% of respondents have paid to improve their ratings. PRWs are going to become more prevalent, and more research is needed to fully understand the implications. There are several ethical implications that PRWs pose to practicing physicians. We contend that it is morally unsound to pay for good reviews. The recourse for physicians when an inaccurate and potentially libelous review has been written is unclear. Some physicians have required patients to sign a waiver preventing them from posting negative comments online. We propose the development of a task force to assess the professional, ethical, and legal implications of PRWs, including working with companies to improve accuracy of information, oversight, and feedback opportunities. It is expected that PRWs will play an increasing role in the future; it is unclear whether there will be a uniform reporting system, or whether these online ratings will influence referral patterns and/or quality improvement. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Physician revalidation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkur, Sherry; Mossialos, Elias; Long, Morgan; McKee, Martin

    2008-08-01

    Despite the increasing attention on patient mobility, there remains a lack of European-level interest in assuring the sustained competence of health professionals. Specifically, the existing European legal framework fails to recognise the introduction of periodic revalidation and requirements to participate in continuing professional development in some countries. This study shows that the definitions and mechanisms of revalidation vary significantly across member states. While some countries, eg Austria, Germany and Spain, look to continuing medical education as a means to promote recertification and quality of care, other countries, eg Belgium, France and the Netherlands, also incorporate peer review. In the UK the proposed revalidation scheme would include elements of relicensure through appraisal and feedback as well as physician recertification. Divergence between countries also exists in monitoring and enforcement. The European Commission should explore the implications for professional mobility of the diversity in the regulation of the medical profession.

  4. Team physicians in college athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Mark E; Quigley, D Bradford; Wang, Frank; Balint, Christopher R; Boland, Arthur L

    2005-10-01

    There has been little documentation of what constitutes the clinical work of intercollegiate team physicians. Team physicians could be recruited based on the needs of athletes. A multidisciplinary team of physicians is necessary to treat college athletes. Most physician evaluations are for musculoskeletal injuries treated nonoperatively. Descriptive epidemiology study. For a 2-year period, a database was created that recorded information on team physician encounters with intercollegiate athletes at a major university. Data on imaging studies, hospitalizations, and surgeries were also recorded. The diagnoses for physician encounters with all undergraduates through the university's health service were also recorded. More initial athlete evaluations were for musculoskeletal diagnoses (73%) than for general medical diagnoses (27%) (P respiratory infections and dermatologic disorders, or multiple visits for concussions. Football accounted for 22% of all physician encounters, more than any other sport (P athletes did not require a greater number of physician encounters than did the general undergraduate pool of students on a per capita basis. Intercollegiate team physicians primarily treat musculoskeletal injuries that do not require surgery. General medical care is often single evaluations of common conditions and repeat evaluations for concussions.

  5. Race/ethnicity and workplace discrimination: results of a national survey of physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M; Jones, Beth A; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-11-01

    Promoting racial/ethnic diversity within the physician workforce is a national priority. However, the extent of racial/ethnic discrimination reported by physicians from diverse backgrounds in today's health-care workplace is unknown. To determine the prevalence of physician experiences of perceived racial/ethnic discrimination at work and to explore physician views about race and discussions regarding race/ethnicity in the workplace. Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006-2007. Practicing physicians (total n = 529) from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds in the United States. We examined physicians' experience of racial/ethnic discrimination over their career course, their experience of discrimination in their current work setting, and their views about race/ethnicity and discrimination at work. The proportion of physicians who reported that they had experienced racial/ethnic discrimination "sometimes, often, or very often" during their medical career was substantial among non-majority physicians (71% of black physicians, 45% of Asian physicians, 63% of "other" race physicians, and 27% of Hispanic/Latino(a) physicians, compared with 7% of white physicians, all p discrimination in their current work setting was substantial (59% of black, 39% of Asian, 35% of "other" race, 24% of Hispanic/Latino(a) physicians, and 21% of white physicians). Physician views about the role of race/ethnicity at work varied significantly by respondent race/ethnicity. Many non-majority physicians report experiencing racial/ethnic discrimination in the workplace. Opportunities exist for health-care organizations and diverse physicians to work together to improve the climate of perceived discrimination where they work.

  6. An MBA: the utility and effect on physicians' careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Selene G; Singh, Bikramjit

    2007-02-01

    Higher economic, legislative, legal, and administrative constraints in health-care services in the United States have led to an increase in physician dissatisfaction and a decrease in physician morale. In this study, we attempted to understand the motivation for a physician to enroll in a business school, and to discover the utility of the Master of Business Administration degree and how it changed the career path for the practicing clinician. We conducted a retrospective study in which a twenty-seven-question survey was distributed by the United States Postal Service and by e-mail to 161 physician graduates of three East Coast business schools. The results were evaluated, and a statistical analysis was performed. Eighty-seven physicians (54%) responded. Eight surveys were discarded because of incomplete data or stray marks, leaving seventy-nine surveys. The average age of the respondents was 41.4 years. The major motivations for going back to school included learning the business aspects of the health-care system (fifty-three respondents; 67%) and obtaining a more interesting job (forty-one respondents; 52%). The time that the respondents allocated for health-care-related activities before and after obtaining the degree was 58.3% and 31.8%, respectively, for patient care (p administrative responsibilities (p principles (thirty-three; 42%), working within a team (twenty-seven; 34%), and negotiating effectively (twenty-five; 32%). Sixty-four physicians (81%) believed that their business degree had been very useful or essential in the advancement of their careers. Many physicians decide to acquire a Master of Business Administration degree to understand the business of medicine. After they complete the degree program, their practice patterns substantially change, which is reflected particularly by an increase in time spent on administrative responsibilities. In order for physicians to overcome the multifaceted challenges of the evolving health-care system, it is

  7. Lessons learned from Gen II NPP staffing approaches applicable to new reactors - 15003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodnight, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses lessons learned from the operation of the Gen II fleet of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs), in terms of staffing, that can be applied to the final design, deployment, and operation of new reactor designs. The most significant of these lessons is the need to appropriately staff the facility, having the right number of people with the required skills and experience. This begs the question of how to identify those personnel requirements. For NPPs, there are five key factors that ultimately will determine the effectiveness and costs of operating nuclear power plants (NPPs): 1) The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) and the layout of the plant site; 2) The processes which the operating organization applies; 3) The organizational structure of the operating organization; 4) The organizational culture of the operating organization, and 5) The regulatory framework under which the licensee must operate. In summary, this paper identifies opportunities to minimize staffing and costs learned from Gen II NPPs that may be applicable for new nuclear plants. (author)

  8. ANALISIS FAKTOR-FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHI TURNOVER INTENTIONS PADA STAF KANTOR AKUNTAN PUBLIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Arianto Toly

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The high level of turnover intentions by accountant staffs had raised the potential cost for public accountant firms. The prior research done by Suwandi and Indriantoro (1999 had succesfully identified the process of turnover intentions, which related to the antecedents and consequences of job insecurity. The responses of 30 accountant staffs from some public accountant firms to a questionnaire designed to measure variables were analyzed using a Pearson's correlation coefficient. The result of this study was not generally consistent with Suwandi and Indriantoro (1999 because some hypotheses were rejected. This study identified that public accountant firm must be noticed organizational factors, such as organizational commitment, role conflict, role ambiguity, and organizational change. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Tingkat keinginan berpindah yang tinggi para staf akuntan telah menimbulkan biaya potensial untuk Kantor Akuntan Publik (KAP. Penelitian sebelumnya yang dilakukan oleh Suwandi dan Indriantoro (1999 telah berhasil mengidentifikasi proses keinginan berpindah, yang berhubungan dengan anteseden dan konsekuensi dari ketidakamanan kerja. Respon 30 staf akuntan dari beberapa KAP terhadap kuesioner yang dibuat untuk mengukur berbagai variabel, dianalisis menggunakan kofisien korelasi Pearson. Hasil dari studi ini secara umum tidak konsisten dengan Suwandi dan Indriantoro (1999 karena ditolaknya beberapa hipotesis. Studi ini mengidentifikasi bahwa KAP harus memberi perhatian terhadap beberapa faktor organisasional, seperti komitmen organisasional, konflik peran, ketidakjelasan peran, dan perubahan organisasional. Kata kunci: konflik peran; ketidakjelasan peran; perubahan organisasional; ketidakamanan kerja; komitmen organisasional; keinginan berpindah.

  9. Workload and time management in central cancer registries: baseline data and implication for registry staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan A; Mulvihill, Linda; Herrera, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The Workload and Time Management Survey of Central Cancer Registries was conducted in 2011 to assess the amount of time spent on work activities usually performed by cancer registrars. A survey including 39 multi-item questions,together with a work activities data collection log, was sent by email to the central cancer registry (CCR) manager in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Twenty-four central cancer registries (47%) responded to the survey.Results indicate that registries faced reductions in budgeted staffing from 2008-2009. The number of source records and total cases were important indicators of workload. Four core activities, including abstracting at the registry, visual editing,case consolidation, and resolving edit reports, accounted for about half of registry workload. We estimate an average of 12.4 full-time equivalents (FTEs) are required to perform all cancer registration activities tracked by the survey; however,estimates vary widely by registry size. These findings may be useful for registries as a benchmark for their own registry workload and time-management data and to develop staffing guidelines.

  10. Improving value in primary total joint arthroplasty care pathways: changes in inpatient physical therapy staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, Christopher E; Anderson, Mike B; Pendleton, Robert; Foulks, Matthew; Peters, Christopher L; Gililland, Jeremy M

    2017-03-01

    An early physical therapy (PT) care pathway was implemented to provide same-day ambulation after total joint arthroplasty by changing PT staffing hours. After receiving an exemption from our institutional review board, we performed a secondary data analysis on a cohort of patients that underwent primary TJA of the hip or knee 6 months before and 12 months after implementation of the change. Data on same-day ambulation rates, length of stay (LOS), and in-hospital costs were reviewed. Early evaluation and mobilization of patients by PT improved on postoperative day (POD) 0 from 64% to 85% after the change ( P ≤ .001). The median LOS before the change was 3.27 days compared to 3.23 days after the change ( P  = .014). Patients with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists scores were less likely to ambulate on POD 0 ( P  = .038) and had longer hospital stays ( P < .001). Early mobilization in the entire cohort was associated with a greater cost savings ( P < .001). A relatively simple change to staffing hours, using resources currently available to us, and little additional financial or institutional investment resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients ambulating on POD 0, with a modest reduction in both LOS and inpatient costs.

  11. Enhancing Nursing Staffing Forecasting With Safety Stock Over Lead Time Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    In balancing competing priorities, it is essential that nursing staffing provide enough nurses to safely and effectively care for the patients. Mathematical models to predict optimal "safety stocks" have been routine in supply chain management for many years but have up to now not been applied in nursing workforce management. There are various aspects that exhibit similarities between the 2 disciplines, such as an evolving demand forecast according to acuity and the fact that provisioning "stock" to meet demand in a future period has nonzero variable lead time. Under assumptions about the forecasts (eg, the demand process is well fit as an autoregressive process) and about the labor supply process (≥1 shifts' lead time), we show that safety stock over lead time for such systems is effectively equivalent to the corresponding well-studied problem for systems with stationary demand bounds and base stock policies. Hence, we can apply existing models from supply chain analytics to find the optimal safety levels of nurse staffing. We use a case study with real data to demonstrate that there are significant benefits from the inclusion of the forecast process when determining the optimal safety stocks.

  12. The National Day for the Libyan Physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmahdi A. Elkhammas

    2007-03-01

    it is time to celebrate a Libyan Physician Day (Youm attabeeb alleebi during which the Libyan physician is recognized in all health institutions at the level of the ministry, press, television, radio, as well as hospitals and rural health care units. During this day, we thank the Libyan physician for his/her hard work under diverse conditions and circumstances (1. During this day, we remind the physician of his/her duty toward humanity in general and Libyan citizens in particular. The physicians need to know that they have a moral and ethical (2 duty toward the Libyan citizen from birth to death. This duty extends to the poor and to the wealthy and it does not discriminate against colour, race, or religion of the citizen. This duty is purely humane and has no allegiance to political beliefs. We also remind the Libyan physician to extend his/her hands to colleagues in basic science, in different sectors of medical education, and the allied medical personnel. We all know that without nurses, pharmacists, physiotherapists, respiratory therapist, laboratory technicians, physicists and radiology technicians we can not perform our jobs. On this day, we inform the Libyan physicians that we love them and respect their field. The society and government should be united in providing them with decent living standards. The Libyan physicians are human and have needs and responsibilities toward their families and deserve a decent life. This acknowledgment by the society and the government gives them a moral boost. Hopefully, it would provide an incentive to work harder and to be creative to minimize the flux of the Libyan patients to the neighbouring countries for the treatment of simple ailments. I truly believe that the creation of a national day for the Libyan physician will be fruitful within few years of its initiation. It will certainly shed the light on this group of the Libyan society. It will remind physicians to give more consideration to interactions with members of the

  13. Social media: physicians-to-physicians education and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehring, Keith A; De Martino, Ivan; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Sculco, Peter K

    2017-06-01

    Physician to physician communication is essential for the transfer of ideas, surgical experience, and education. Social networks and online video educational contents have grown exponentially in recent years changing the interaction among physicians. Social media platforms can improve physician-to-physician communication mostly through video education and social networking. There are several online video platforms for orthopedic surgery with educational content on diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and surgical technique. Social networking instead is mostly centered on sharing of data, discussion of confidential topics, and job seeking. Quality of educational contents and data confidentiality represent the major drawbacks of these platforms. Orthopedic surgeons must be aware that the quality of the videos should be better controlled and regulated to avoid inaccurate information that may have a significant impact especially on trainees that are more prone to use this type of resources. Sharing of data and discussion of confidential topics should be extremely secure according the HIPAA regulations in order to protect patients' confidentiality.

  14. Integration of EEG lead placement templates into traditional technologist-based staffing models reduces costs in continuous video-EEG monitoring service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolls, Brad J; Lai, Amy H; Srinivas, Anang A; Reid, Robert R

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative cost reductions within different staffing models for continuous video-electroencephalography (cvEEG) service by introducing a template system for 10/20 lead application. We compared six staffing models using decision tree modeling based on historical service line utilization data from the cvEEG service at our center. Templates were integrated into technologist-based service lines in six different ways. The six models studied were templates for all studies, templates for intensive care unit (ICU) studies, templates for on-call studies, templates for studies of ≤ 24-hour duration, technologists for on-call studies, and technologists for all studies. Cost was linearly related to the study volume for all models with the "templates for all" model incurring the lowest cost. The "technologists for all" model carried the greatest cost. Direct cost comparison shows that any introduction of templates results in cost savings, with the templates being used for patients located in the ICU being the second most cost efficient and the most practical of the combined models to implement. Cost difference between the highest and lowest cost models under the base case produced an annual estimated savings of $267,574. Implementation of the ICU template model at our institution under base case conditions would result in a $205,230 savings over our current "technologist for all" model. Any implementation of templates into a technologist-based cvEEG service line results in cost savings, with the most significant annual savings coming from using the templates for all studies, but the most practical implementation approach with the second highest cost reduction being the template used in the ICU. The lowered costs determined in this work suggest that a template-based cvEEG service could be supported at smaller centers with significantly reduced costs and could allow for broader use of cvEEG patient monitoring.

  15. Physicians' obligations in radiation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    Physicians have responsibilities to develop effective radiation programs that will (1) protect the public's physical and emotional health, (2) prevent and/or minimize illnesses and injury, and (3) treat and rehabilitate all exposed individuals. To accomplish these goals, physicians should understand the basic elements of radiation physics, radiation biology, benefit/risk, radiation regulations, nuclear power production, and world energy needs

  16. HMO penetration and physicians' earnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, J; Mitchell, J M

    1999-11-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate whether cross-sectional variations in enrollment in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) affected physicians' earnings and hourly income in 1990. Using data from a nationally representative sample of 4,577 younger physicians (penetration is endogenous and used the instrumental variables approach to obtain unbiased estimates. HMO penetration had a negative and statistically significant impact on physicians earnings in 1990. A doubling of the average level of HMO penetration in the market is estimated to reduce annual earnings by 7% to 10.7%, and hourly earnings by approximately 6% to 9%. It appears that HMOs were successful in reducing physicians' annual and per hour earnings in 1990, presumably through a combination of fewer visits and lower payment rates for people covered by HMOs. Although these results cannot be generalized to all physicians, the experience of a younger cohort of physicians may still be a good indicator of the future effects of HMOs because younger physicians may be more susceptible to market forces than older and more established physicians. Moreover, these results may be somewhat conservative because they reflect market behavior in 1990, several years before the rapid growth and more aggressive market behavior of HMOs in recent years.

  17. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  18. Patient ethnicity and three psychiatric intensive care units compared: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Simpson, A.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Hall, C.

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric care units provide care to disturbed patients in a context of higher security and staffing levels. Although such units are numerous, few systematic comparisons have been made, and there are indications that ethnic minority groups may be over-represented. The aim of this study was to

  19. Administrative skills for academy physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluise, J J; Schmitz, C C; Bland, C J; McArtor, R E

    To function effectively within the multifaceted environment of the academic medical center, academic physicians need to heighten their understanding of the economics of the health care system, and further develop their leadership and managerial skills. A literature base on organizational development and management education is now available, which addresses the unique nature of the professional organization, including academic medical centers. This article describes an administration development curriculum for academic physicians. Competency statements, instructional strategies, and references provide health care educators with a model for developing administrative skills programs for academic physicians and other health care professionals. The continuing success of the academic medical center as a responsive health care system may depend on the degree to which academic physicians and their colleagues in other fields gain sophistication in self-management and organizational administration. Health care educators can apply the competencies and instructional strategies offered in this article to administrative development programs for physicians and other health professionals in their institutions.

  20. Shared consultant physician posts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    Our aim was to assess the acceptability and cost-efficiency of shared consultancy posts. Two consultant physicians worked alternate fortnights for a period of twelve months. Questionnaires were distributed to general practitioners, nurses, consultants and junior doctors affected by the arrangement. Patients or their next of kin were contacted by telephone. 1\\/17 of consultants described the experience as negative. 14\\/19 junior doctors reported a positive experience. 11 felt that training had been improved while 2 felt that it had been adversely affected. 17\\/17 GPs were satisfied with the arrangement. 1\\/86 nurses surveyed reported a negative experience. 1\\/48 patients were unhappy with the arrangement. An extra 2.2 (p<0.001) patients were seen per clinic. Length of stay was shortened by 2.49 days (p<0.001). A saving of 69,212 was made due to decreased locum requirements. We present data suggesting structured shared consultancy posts can be broadly acceptable and cost efficient in Ireland.

  1. Physicians' strikes and the competing bases of physicians' moral obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, D Robert

    2013-09-01

    Many authors have addressed the morality of physicians' strikes on the assumption that medical practice is morally different from other kinds of occupations. This article analyzes three prominent theoretical accounts that attempt to ground such special moral obligations for physicians--practice-based accounts, utilitarian accounts, and social contract accounts--and assesses their applicability to the problem of the morality of strikes. After critiquing these views, it offers a fourth view grounding special moral obligations in voluntary commitments, and explains why this is a preferable basis for understanding physicians' moral obligations in general and especially as pertaining to strikes.

  2. Running Head: Evaluation of Contract Versus VA-Staffed CBOCs. Evaluating Contract versus VA-Staffed Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs) Using Patient Satisfaction and Access Measures in the Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    staffed CBOC, with dependent variables adjusting for SHEP scores and case mix factors. The equation for the null hypothesis is Hho = In (estimated...that the model can be further improved through combining several of the satisfaction scores. The equation for the null hypothesis is that Hho = In

  3. Staffing Foreign Subsidiaries with Parent Country Nationals or Host Country Nationals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dörrenbächer, Christoph; Gammelgaard, Jens; McDonald, Frank

    captures the effects of PCN verses HCN managers on key characteristics of subsidiaries. The results of the study indicate that the PCN/HCN dichotomy widely used in the international staffing literature needs to take account of the following issues: First: The study confirms theoretical assumptions based...... on social capital theory that subsidiaries led by HCNs are more embedded in the host country's external environment (by having more frequent relationships with host country customers, suppliers and competitors). However, the study reveals that the assumed advantages PCN led subsidiaries have...... to the local institutional environment (HRM). Our study finds that this is also the case with regard to strategic decisions on financial control as well as on R&D and new product development. Third: On average, HCN led subsidiaries perform significantly better than PCN led subsidiaries with regard to sales...

  4. The relationship between UK hospital nurse staffing and emotional exhaustion and job dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheward, Louisa; Hunt, Jennifer; Hagen, Suzanne; Macleod, Margaret; Ball, Jane

    2005-01-01

    To explore the relationship between nurse outcomes (dissatisfaction and emotional exhaustion) and nurse workload, nurse characteristics and hospital variables. Concern about the impact of restructuring of nurse staffing, and reports of nurse shortages, on nurse and patient outcomes led to the research being reported on in this article. A questionnaire survey of registered nurses in Scotland and England. A questionnaire survey of the hospitals in which these nurses worked. Respondents in the two countries were similar in terms of demographic, work and employment characteristics. Significant relationships were found using the combined English and Scottish data between nurse patient ratios and (1) emotional exhaustion and (2) dissatisfaction with current job reported by nurses. Increasing numbers of patients to nurses was associated with increasing risk of emotional exhaustion and dissatisfaction with current job.

  5. Appendix VI: KHNP staffing plan of construction site office: ULCHIN 5 and 6 construction project (ROK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    KHNP, as an owner/operator organization, is responsible for all project activities including design, procurement, construction, and commissioning, for Korea's nuclear power plant (NPP) construction projects. Four separate functional offices of KHNP are set up to complete the construction management work. These offices are (1) home office, (2) field construction office, (3) field quality assurance office, and (4) field startup/commissioning office. This paper presents a staffing plan for the field construction office starting initial project implementation to final turnover to operations stages. It is recognized that the plan may not be applicable to other utility situations in terms of project management of site activity depending upon how the overall project contract is structured

  6. Working together: critical care nurses experiences of temporary staffing within Swedish health care: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg Jansson, Anna; Engström, Åsa

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe critical care nurses (CCN's) experiences of working with or as temporary agency staff. This explorative qualitative study is based on interviews with five agency CCNs and five regular CCNs, a total of ten interviews, focusing on the interviewees' experiences of daily work and temporary agency staffing. The interviews were analysed manually and thematically following an inductive approach. Four themes that illustrate both similarities and differences between regular and temporary agency CCNs emerged: "working close to patients versus being responsible for everything", "teamwork versus independence", "both groups needed" and "opportunities and challenges". The study findings illustrate the complexity of the working situation for agency and regular staff in terms of the organisation and management of the temporary agency nurses and the opportunities and challenges faced by both groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Achieving effective staffing through a shared decision-making approach to open-shift management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Nancy M; Nash, Jan; Hughes, Douglas; Douglas, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Managing costs while retaining qualified nurses and finding workforce solutions that ensure the delivery of high-quality patient care is of primary importance to nurse leaders and executive management. Leading healthcare organizations are using open-shift management technology as a strategy to improve staffing effectiveness and the work environment. In many hospitals, open-shift management technology has become an essential workforce management tool, nursing benefit, and recruitment and retention incentive. In this article, the authors discuss how a successful nursing initiative to apply automation to open-shift scheduling and fulfillment across a 3-hospital system had a broad enterprise-wide impact resulting in dramatic improvements in nurse satisfaction, retention, recruitment, and the bottom line.

  8. Professional Satisfaction and the Career Plans of US Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsky, Christine A; Dyrbye, Lotte N; West, Colin P; Satele, Daniel; Tutty, Michael; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the relationship between burnout, satisfaction with electronic health records and work-life integration, and the career plans of US physicians. Physicians across all specialties in the United States were surveyed between August 28, 2014, and October 6, 2014. Physicians provided information regarding the likelihood of reducing clinical hours in the next 12 months and the likelihood of leaving current practice within the next 24 months. Of 35,922 physicians contacted, 6880 (19.2%) returned surveys. Of the 6695 physicians in clinical practice at the time of the survey (97.3%), 1275 of the 6452 who responded (19.8%) reported it was likely or definite that they would reduce clinical work hours in the next 12 months, and 1726 of the 6496 who responded (26.6%) indicated it was likely or definite that they would leave their current practice in the next 2 years. Of the latter group, 126 (1.9% of the 6695 physicians in clinical practice at the time of the survey) indicated that they planned to leave practice altogether and pursue a different career. Burnout (odds ratio [OR], 1.81; 95% CI, 1.49-2.19; Pwork-life integration (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.27-2.14; Pwork hours and leave current practice. Nearly 1 in 5 US physicians intend to reduce clinical work hours in the next year, and roughly 1 in 50 intend to leave medicine altogether in the next 2 years to pursue a different career. If physicians follow through on these intentions, it could profoundly worsen the projected shortage of US physicians. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Physician attitudes towards pharmacological cognitive enhancement: safety concerns are paramount.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opeyemi C Banjo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The ethical dimensions of pharmacological cognitive enhancement have been widely discussed in academic circles and the popular media, but missing from the conversation have been the perspectives of physicians - key decision makers in the adoption of new technologies into medical practice. We queried primary care physicians in major urban centers in Canada and the United States with the aim of understanding their attitudes towards cognitive enhancement. Our primary hypothesis was that physicians would be more comfortable prescribing cognitive enhancers to older patients than to young adults. Physicians were presented with a hypothetical pharmaceutical cognitive enhancer that had been approved by the regulatory authorities for use in healthy adults, and was characterized as being safe, effective, and without significant adverse side effects. Respondents overwhelmingly reported increasing comfort with prescribing cognitive enhancers as the patient age increased from 25 to 65. When asked about their comfort with prescribing extant drugs that might be considered enhancements (sildenafil, modafinil, and methylphenidate or our hypothetical cognitive enhancer to a normal, healthy 40 year old, physicians were more comfortable prescribing sildenafil than any of the other three agents. When queried as to the reasons they answered as they did, the most prominent concerns physicians expressed were issues of safety that were not offset by the benefit afforded the individual, even in the face of explicit safety claims. Moreover, many physicians indicated that they viewed safety claims with considerable skepticism. It has become routine for safety to be raised and summarily dismissed as an issue in the debate over pharmacological cognitive enhancement; the observation that physicians were so skeptical in the face of explicit safety claims suggests that such a conclusion may be premature. Thus, physician attitudes suggest that greater weight be placed upon the

  10. Market effects on electronic health record adoption by physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Menachemi, Nir; Shewchuk, Richard M; Ginter, Peter M; Duncan, W Jack; Brooks, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    Despite the advantages of electronic health record (EHR) systems, the adoption of these systems has been slow among community-based physicians. Current studies have examined organizational and personal barriers to adoption; however, the influence of market characteristics has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of market characteristics on EHR adoption by physicians. Generalized hierarchal linear modeling was used to analyze EHR survey data from Florida which were combined with data from the Area Resource File and the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation. The main outcome variable was self-reported use of EHR by physicians. A total of 2,926 physicians from practice sizes of 20 or less were included in the sample. Twenty-one percent (n = 613) indicated that they personally and routinely use an EHR system in their practice. Physicians located in counties with higher physician concentration were found to be more likely to adopt EHRs. For every one-unit increase in nonfederal physicians per 10,000 in the county, there was a 2.0% increase in likelihood of EHR adoption by physicians (odds ratio = 1.02, confidence interval = 1.00-1.03). Health maintenance organization penetration rate and poverty level were not found to be significantly related to EHR adoption. However, practice size, years in practice, Medicare payer mix, and measures of technology readiness were found to independently influence physician adoption. Market factors play an important role in the diffusion of EHRs in small medical practices. Policy makers interested in furthering the adoption of EHRs must consider strategies that would enhance the confidence of users as well as provide financial support in areas with the highest concentration of small medical practices and Medicare beneficiaries. Health care leaders should be cognizant of the market forces that enable or constrain the adoption of EHR among their practices and those of their competitors.

  11. Counseling, Psychological, and Social Services Staffing: Policies in U.S. School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Nancy; Demissie, Zewditu

    2018-06-01

    Schools are in a unique position to meet the mental and behavioral health needs of children and adolescents because approximately 95% of young people aged 7-17 years attend school. Little is known, however, about policies related to counseling, psychological, and social services staffing in school districts. This study analyzed the prevalence of such policies in public school districts in the U.S. Data from four cycles (2000, 2006, 2012, and 2016) of the School Health Policies and Practices Study, a national survey periodically conducted to assess policies and practices for ten components of school health, were analyzed in 2017. The survey collected data related to counseling, psychological, and social services among nationally representative samples of school districts using online or mailed questionnaires. Sampled districts identified respondents responsible for or most knowledgeable about the content of each questionnaire. The percentage of districts with a district-level counseling, psychological, and social services coordinator increased significantly from 62.6% in 2000 to 79.5% in 2016. In 2016, 56.3% of districts required each school to have someone to coordinate counseling, psychological, and social services at the school. Fewer districts required schools at each level to have a specified ratio of counselors to students (16.2% for elementary schools, 16.8% for middle schools, and 19.8% for high schools), and the percentage of districts with these requirements has decreased significantly since 2012. Increases in the prevalence of district-level staffing policies could help increase the quantity and quality of counseling, psychological, and social services staff in schools nationwide, which in turn could improve mental and behavioral health outcomes for students. This article is part of a supplement entitled The Behavioral Health Workforce: Planning, Practice, and Preparation, which is sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

  12. Does mental health staffing level affect antipsychotic prescribing? Analysis of Italian national statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starace, Fabrizio; Mungai, Francesco; Barbui, Corrado

    2018-01-01

    In mental healthcare, one area of major concern identified by health information systems is variability in antipsychotic prescribing. While most studies have investigated patient- and prescriber-related factors as possible reasons for such variability, no studies have investigated facility-level characteristics. The present study ascertained whether staffing level is associated with antipsychotic prescribing in community mental healthcare. A cross-sectional analysis of data extracted from the Italian national mental health information system was carried out. For each Italian region, it collects data on the availability and use of mental health facilities. The rate of individuals exposed to antipsychotic drugs was tested for evidence of association with the rate of mental health staff availability by means of univariate and multivariate analyses. In Italy there were on average nearly 60 mental health professionals per 100,000 inhabitants, with wide regional variations (range 21 to 100). The average rate of individuals prescribed antipsychotic drugs was 2.33%, with wide regional variations (1.04% to 4.01%). Univariate analysis showed that the rate of individuals prescribed antipsychotic drugs was inversely associated with the rate of mental health professionals available in Italian regions (Kendall's tau -0.438, p = 0.006), with lower rates of antipsychotic prescriptions in regions with higher rates of mental health professionals. After adjustment for possible confounders, the total availability of mental health professionals was still inversely associated with the rate of individuals exposed to antipsychotic drugs. The evidence that staffing level was inversely associated with antipsychotic prescribing indicates that any actions aimed at decreasing variability in antipsychotic prescribing need to take into account aspects related to the organization of the mental health system.

  13. The Implications of Flexible Staffing Arrangements for Job Stability. Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper No. 99-056. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Susan N.; Polivka, Anne E.

    A study examined the job stability of workers in the following flexible staffing arrangements: agency temporary, direct-hire temporary, on-call, contract company, independent contractor, and regular part-time work. Two data sources were used in the analysis. The first was a nationwide survey of employers on their use of flexible staffing…

  14. 75 FR 77665 - Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing and Andrews International, Fort Smith... subject firm. The workers are engaged in the production of refrigerators and trash compactors. The company...

  15. Characteristics and Working Conditions of Moonlighting Teachers: Evidence from the 2011-2012 Schools and Staffing Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Paul G.; Heafner, Tina L.; Harden, Susan B.

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting, an employment practice where individuals work outside of their primary job, is popular within the public education sector. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey, this study examined both the characteristics and motivations of public school teachers across moonlighting categories.…

  16. 77 FR 63873 - Johnson Controls, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers of Valley Staffing and AZ Quality Hudson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... workers of Johnson Controls, Inc., including on-site leased workers from Valley Staffing, Hudson..., Wisconsin location of Johnson Controls, Inc. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under the control of the subject firm to be considered leased workers. Based on these findings...

  17. Applying cost accounting to operating room staffing in otolaryngology: time-driven activity-based costing and outpatient adenotonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Karthik; Goico, Brian; Arjmand, Ellis M

    2015-04-01

    (1) To describe the application of a detailed cost-accounting method (time-driven activity-cased costing) to operating room personnel costs, avoiding the proxy use of hospital and provider charges. (2) To model potential cost efficiencies using different staffing models with the case study of outpatient adenotonsillectomy. Prospective cost analysis case study. Tertiary pediatric hospital. All otolaryngology providers and otolaryngology operating room staff at our institution. Time-driven activity-based costing demonstrated precise per-case and per-minute calculation of personnel costs. We identified several areas of unused personnel capacity in a basic staffing model. Per-case personnel costs decreased by 23.2% by allowing a surgeon to run 2 operating rooms, despite doubling all other staff. Further cost reductions up to a total of 26.4% were predicted with additional staffing rearrangements. Time-driven activity-based costing allows detailed understanding of not only personnel costs but also how personnel time is used. This in turn allows testing of alternative staffing models to decrease unused personnel capacity and increase efficiency. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  18. Seniority Rules: Do Staffing Reforms Help Redistribute Teacher Quality and Reduce Teacher Turnover? CRPE Working Paper 2010-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Betheny; DeArmond, Michael; Goldhaber, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Education reformers routinely call on school districts to stop hiring teachers based on seniority, which they argue interferes with effective staffing, especially in disadvantaged schools. The few researchers who have empirically studied the issue, however, disagree about whether seniority-based hiring is systematically associated with staffing…

  19. 75 FR 43556 - Badger Meter, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Sourcepoint Staffing, Seek, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-73,666] Badger Meter, Inc... of Badger Meter, Inc., including on-site leased workers from Sourcepoint Staffing, Milwaukee... workers are engaged in the production of flow measurement devices and automatic meter reading equipment...

  20. 77 FR 29362 - Kohler Company, Malvern Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower Staffing and Dow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower Staffing and Dow Cleaning Services, Malvern, AR..., and components. The company reports that workers from Dow Cleaning Services were employed on-site at... leased from Dow Cleaning Services working on-site at the Malvern, Arkansas location of Kohler Company...

  1. Perceptions of 24/7 In-house Attending Coverage on Fellow Education and Autonomy in a Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Sonal T; Owens, Gabe E; Rajput, Shaili H; Charpie, John R; Kidwell, Kelley M; Mullan, Patricia B

    2015-01-01

    The 24/7 in-house attending coverage is emerging as the standard of care in intensive care units. Implementation costs, workforce feasibility, and patient outcomes resulting from changes in physician staffing are widely debated topics. Understanding the impact of staffing models on the learning environment for medical trainees and faculty is equally warranted, particularly with respect to trainee education and autonomy. This study aims to elicit the perceptions of pediatric cardiology fellows and attendings toward 24/7 in-house attending coverage and its effect on fellow education and autonomy. We surveyed pediatric cardiology fellows and attendings practicing in the pediatric cardiothoracic intensive care unit (PCTU) of a large, university-affiliated medical center, using structured Likert response items and open-ended questions, prior to and following the transition to 24/7 in-house attending coverage. All (100%) trainees and faculty completed all surveys. Both prior to and following transition to 24/7 in-house attending coverage, all fellows, and the majority of attendings agreed that the overnight call experience benefited fellow education. At baseline, trainees identified limited circumstances in which on-site attending coverage would be critical. Preimplementation concerns that 24/7 in-house attending coverage would negatively affect the education of fellows were not reflected following actual implementation of the new staffing policy. However, based upon open-ended questions, fellow autonomy was affected by the new paradigm, with fellows and attendings reporting decreased "appropriateness" of autonomy after implementation. Our prospective study, showing initial concerns about limiting the learning environment in transitioning to 24/7 in-house attending coverage did not result in diminished perceptions of the educational experience for our fellows but revealed an expected decrease in fellow autonomy. The study indirectly facilitated open discussions about

  2. Physician self-referral and physician-owned specialty facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Lawrence P

    2008-06-01

    Physician self-referral ranges from suggesting a follow-up appointment, to sending a patient to a facility in which the doctor has an ownership interest or financial relationship. Physician referral to facilities in which the physicians have an ownership interest is becoming increasingly common and not always medically appropriate. This Synthesis reviews the evidence on physician self-referral arrangements, their effect on costs and utilization, and their effect on general hospitals. Key findings include: the rise in self-referral is sparked by financial, regulatory and clinical incentives, including patient convenience and doctors trying to preserve their income in the changing health care landscape. Strong evidence suggests self-referral leads to increased usage of health care services; but there is insufficient evidence to determine whether this increased usage reflects doctors meeting an unmet need or ordering clinically inappropriate care. The more significant a physician's financial interest in a facility, the more likely the doctor is to refer patients there. Arrangements through which doctors receive fees for patient referrals to third-party centers, such as "pay-per-click," time-share, and leasing arrangements, do not seem to offer benefits beyond increasing physician income. So far, the profit margins of general hospitals have not been harmed by the rise in doctor-owned facilities.

  3. Yellow pages advertising by physicians. Are doctors providing the information consumers want most?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D D; Abernethy, A M

    1996-01-01

    Yellow pages listing are the most widely used form of physician advertising. Every month, approximately 21.6 million adults in the United States refer to the yellow pages before obtaining medical care. Mobile consumers--approximately 17% of the U.S. population who move each year--are heavy users of yellow pages. Consumers desire information on a physician's experience, but it is included in less than 1% of all physician display ads.

  4. American College of Emergency Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these... Read More More Than 850 Hours of Online Education Log In Now > Physicians Podcasts and Apps Reimbursement Quality Issues MOC Resource Center International Residents & Students Contracts & ... Medicine Foundation Online Buyers' Guide Emergency Care For You emCareers.org ...

  5. Physician Compare National Downloadable File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Physician Compare National Downloadable File is organized at the individual eligible professional level; each line is unique at the professional/enrollment...

  6. [Physicians' strikes--ethical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Shimon; Schwarzfuchs, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Strikes in general represent a solution based on a form of coercion. Historically, the striker caused direct damage to his employer, who was responsible for the perceived unfair treatment of the employee. In the case of strikes in the public sector, the employer is generally not harmed, but innocent citizens suffer in order to pressure the government agencies, a questionable practice from an ethical viewpoint. Physicians' strikes have more serious ethical problems. They cause suffering and death to innocent citizens. They violate the ethical codes to which physicians have committed themselves as professionals, and they seriously impair the trust of the public in physicians. Better and more ethical ways to provide fair compensation for physicians must be employed, perhaps like those used for judges and members of the IDF.

  7. Structuring competitive physician compensation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Kim; Turcotte, Claire

    2010-12-01

    When developing and reviewing their physician compensation programs, healthcare organizations should: Understand the market data. Test outcomes of incentive plans for fair market value. Check total compensation for fair market value and reasonableness.

  8. The physician as a manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, T J

    1982-02-01

    The practice of occupational medicine has undergone considerable change over the last decade. Increased awareness of potential health hazards associated with the workplace and its products and wastes, the interest of society and workers in these subjects, and related governmental regulation have resulted in expanded occupational health programs within industry. The occupational physician has become a key company resource in the optimal management of the business impacts of health-related issues. Health-related matters often have noteworthy business implications, and the occupational physician needs to spend considerable time as a manager in the planning, resourcing, implementation, evaluation, and stewardship of programs. Thus he is experiencing greater demands and often is inadequately prepared for this nonclinical, nonscientific role. Therefore, the preparation of occupational physicians to assume such managerial responsibilities needs to receive high priority. The physician must be willing to accept this challenge both to ensure the program's success and to retain a leadership position in occupational health programs.

  9. Administrative skills for academic physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluise, J J; Scmitz, C C; Bland, C J; McArtor, R E

    1989-01-01

    To function effectively within the multifaceted environment of the academic medical center, academic physicians need to heighten their understanding of the economics of the health care system, and further develop their leadership and managerial skills. A literature base on organizational development and management education now exists that addresses the unique nature of the professional organization, including academic medical centers. This article describes an administration development curriculum for academic physicians. Competency statements, instructional strategies and references provide the academic physician with guidelines for expanding their professional expertise to include organizational and management skills. The continuing success of the academic medical center as a responsive health care system may depend upon the degree to which academic physicians gain sophistication in self-management and organizational administration.

  10. Influence of pharmacists expertise on physicians prescription ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the prescribing behaviour of physicians. ... Keywords: Physician prescription behaviour, Pharmacist factor, Collaboration, Trustworthiness ... provide information relating to drug prescription, ... processing [22], which takes into consideration.

  11. Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory contains selected information on physicians, doctors of Osteopathy, limited licensed practitioners and...

  12. Abortion and compelled physician speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentlicher, David

    2015-01-01

    Informed consent mandates for abortion providers may infringe the First Amendment's freedom of speech. On the other hand, they may reinforce the physician's duty to obtain informed consent. Courts can promote both doctrines by ensuring that compelled physician speech pertains to medical facts about abortion rather than abortion ideology and that compelled speech is truthful and not misleading. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  13. Simulation team training for improved teamwork in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Christer; Gustafsson, Helena; Wallin, Carl-Johan; Meurling, Lisbet; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats; Hansson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to describe implementation of simulator-based medical team training and the effect of this programme on inter-professional working in an intensive care unit (ICU). Over a period of two years, 90 percent (n = 152) of the staff of the general ICU at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden, received inter-professional team training in a fully equipped patient room in their own workplace. A case study method was used to describe and explain the planning, formation, and results of the training programme. In interviews, the participants reported that the training had increased their awareness of the importance of effective communication for patient safety. The intervention had even had an indirect impact by creating a need to talk, not only about how to communicate efficaciously, but also concerning difficult care situations in general. This, in turn, had led to regular reflection meetings for nurses held three times a week. Examples of better communication in acute situations were also reported. However, the findings indicate that the observed improvements will not last, unless organisational features such as staffing rotas and scheduling of rounds and meetings can be changed to enable use of the learned behaviours in everyday work. Other threats to sustainability include shortage of staff, overtime for staff, demands for hospital beds, budget cuts, and poor staff communication due to separate meetings for nurses and physicians. The present results broaden our understanding of how to create and sustain an organizational system that supports medical team training.

  14. Function of "nontrauma" surgeons in level I trauma centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, J W

    1997-06-01

    Although the general "trauma" surgeon is usually the team leader in level I trauma centers, the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons is frequently ill-defined. This study was done to gain data in regard to actual use of subspecialists in busy centers. First, a survey of the patterns of staffing in 140 trauma centers was elicited by mail questionnaire, supplemented by telephone cells. Second, records of 400 consecutive patients at the Elvis Presley Trauma Center were reviewed to determine the use of subspecialists during the first 24 hours of care of individual patients. There were differences in the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons at different centers: in receiving, admitting, operating, and critical care areas and in privileges for admission and attending of inpatients. Consultation "guidelines" are used for many specific injuries. At our center, a mean of 1.92 subspecialists, in addition to general surgeons, were involved in the early care of each patient. Problems exist in many centers regarding the use of subspecialists, especially for management of facial and chest injuries. In some centers nonsurgeons function in the intensive care unit, and as admitting and attending physicians of trauma patients.

  15. Can Texas' Physicians Be as Diverse as Texas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sean

    2017-07-01

    The United States and Texas have a chronic shortage of doctors, but the shortage of minority physicians is even more acute. To address this, and the health disparities that come with it, Texas medical schools are working to increase minority enrollment, but challenges remain.

  16. Opioid prescribing habits of physicians in Kwara State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participants: These were physicians at the monthly workshops organized by the Pain and Palliative Care Unit of the hospital between August 2011 and July, 2012. Interventions: Pre-tested semi-structured questionnaires were used to obtain responses to questions on pain management including opioids utilization in the ...

  17. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers were…

  18. Clinical Information Systems Integration in New York City's First Mobile Stroke Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Benjamin R; Lerario, Michael P; Navi, Babak B; Ganzman, Adam C; Ribaudo, Daniel; Mir, Saad A; Pishanidar, Sammy; Lekic, Tim; Williams, Olajide; Kamel, Hooman; Marshall, Randolph S; Hripcsak, George; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Fink, Matthew E

    2018-01-01

    Mobile stroke units (MSUs) reduce time to thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke. These units are widely used, but the clinical information systems underlying MSU operations are understudied. The first MSU on the East Coast of the United States was established at New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYP) in October 2016. We describe our program's 7-month pilot, focusing on the integration of our hospital's clinical information systems into our MSU to support patient care and research efforts. NYP's MSU was staffed by two paramedics, one radiology technologist, and a vascular neurologist. The unit was equipped with four laptop computers and networking infrastructure enabling all staff to access the hospital intranet and clinical applications during operating hours. A telephone-based registration procedure registered patients from the field into our admit/discharge/transfer system, which interfaced with the institutional electronic health record (EHR). We developed and implemented a computerized physician order entry set in our EHR with prefilled values to permit quick ordering of medications, imaging, and laboratory testing. We also developed and implemented a structured clinician note to facilitate care documentation and clinical data extraction. Our MSU began operating on October 3, 2016. As of April 27, 2017, the MSU transported 49 patients, of whom 16 received tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Zero technical problems impacting patient care were reported around registration, order entry, or intranet access. Two onboard network failures occurred, resulting in computed tomography scanner malfunctions, although no patients became ineligible for time-sensitive treatment as a result. Thirteen (26.5%) clinical notes contained at least one incomplete time field. The main technical challenges encountered during the integration of our hospital's clinical information systems into our MSU were onboard network failures and incomplete clinical documentation. Future

  19. Does delivery volume of family physicians predict maternal and newborn outcome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.C. [Children' s and Women' s Health Centre, Dept. of Family Practice, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Family Practice, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Spence, A. [Children' s and Women' s Health Centre, Dept. of Family Practice, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kaczorowski, J. [McMaster Univ., Depts. of Family Medicine and of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Kelly, A. [Children' s and Women' s Health Centre, Dept. of Family Practice, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Health Care and Epidemiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Grzybowski, S. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Family Practice, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2002-05-01

    The number of births attended by individual family physicians who practice intrapartum care varies. We wanted to determine if the practice-volume relations that have been shown in other fields of medical practice also exist in maternity care practice by family doctors. For the period April 1997 to August 1998, we analyzed all singleton births at a major maternity teaching hospital for which the family physician was the responsible physician. Physicians were grouped into 3 categories on the basis of the number of births they attended each year: fewer than 12, 12 to 24, and 25 or more. Physicians with a low volume of deliveries (72 physicians, 549 births), those with a medium volume of deliveries (34 physicians, 871 births) and those with a high volume of deliveries (46 physicians, 3024 births) were compared in terms of maternal and newborn outcomes. The main outcome measures were maternal morbidity, 5-minute Apgar score and admission of the baby to the neonatal intensive care unit or special care unit. Secondary outcomes were obstetric procedures and consultation patterns. There was no difference among the 3 volume cohorts in terms of rates of maternal complications of delivery, 5-minute Apgar scores of less than 7 or admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit or the special care unit, either before or after adjustment for parity, pregnancy-induced hypertension, diabetes, ethnicity, lone parent status, maternal age, gestational age, newborn birth weight and newborn head circumference at birth. High-and medium-volume family physicians consulted with obstetricians less often than low-volume family physicians (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.586 [95% confidence interval, CI, 0.479-0.718] and 0.739 [95% Cl 0.583-0.935] respectively). High-and medium-volume family physicians transferred the delivery to an obstetrician less often than low-volume family physicians (adjusted OR 0.668 [95% CI 0.542-0.823] and 0.776 [95% Cl 0.607-0.992] respectively). Inductions were performed

  20. Does delivery volume of family physicians predict maternal and newborn outcome?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.C.; Spence, A.; Kaczorowski, J.; Kelly, A.; Grzybowski, S.

    2002-01-01

    The number of births attended by individual family physicians who practice intrapartum care varies. We wanted to determine if the practice-volume relations that have been shown in other fields of medical practice also exist in maternity care practice by family doctors. For the period April 1997 to August 1998, we analyzed all singleton births at a major maternity teaching hospital for which the family physician was the responsible physician. Physicians were grouped into 3 categories on the basis of the number of births they attended each year: fewer than 12, 12 to 24, and 25 or more. Physicians with a low volume of deliveries (72 physicians, 549 births), those with a medium volume of deliveries (34 physicians, 871 births) and those with a high volume of deliveries (46 physicians, 3024 births) were compared in terms of maternal and newborn outcomes. The main outcome measures were maternal morbidity, 5-minute Apgar score and admission of the baby to the neonatal intensive care unit or special care unit. Secondary outcomes were obstetric procedures and consultation patterns. There was no difference among the 3 volume cohorts in terms of rates of maternal complications of delivery, 5-minute Apgar scores of less than 7 or admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit or the special care unit, either before or after adjustment for parity, pregnancy-induced hypertension, diabetes, ethnicity, lone parent status, maternal age, gestational age, newborn birth weight and newborn head circumference at birth. High-and medium-volume family physicians consulted with obstetricians less often than low-volume family physicians (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.586 [95% confidence interval, CI, 0.479-0.718] and 0.739 [95% Cl 0.583-0.935] respectively). High-and medium-volume family physicians transferred the delivery to an obstetrician less often than low-volume family physicians (adjusted OR 0.668 [95% CI 0.542-0.823] and 0.776 [95% Cl 0.607-0.992] respectively). Inductions were performed

  1. Chapter 2. Surge capacity and infrastructure considerations for mass critical care. Recommendations and standard operating procedures for intensive care unit and hospital preparations for an influenza epidemic or mass disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hick, John L; Christian, Michael D; Sprung, Charles L

    2010-04-01

    To provide recommendations and standard operating procedures for intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital preparations for a mass disaster or influenza epidemic with a specific focus on surge capacity and infrastructure considerations. Based on a literature review and expert opinion, a Delphi process was used to define the essential topics including surge capacity and infrastructure considerations. Key recommendations include: (1) hospitals should increase their ICU beds to the maximal extent by expanding ICU capacity and expanding ICUs into other areas; (2) hospitals should have appropriate beds and monitors for these expansion areas; hospitals should develop contingency plans at the facility and government (local, state, provincial, national) levels to provide additional ventilators; (3) hospitals should develop a phased staffing plan (nursing and physician) for ICUs that provides sufficient patient care supervision during contingency and crisis situations; (4) hospitals should provide expert input to the emergency management personnel at the hospital both during planning for surge capacity as well as during response; (5) hospitals should assure that adequate infrastructure support is present to support critical care activities; (6) hospitals should prioritize locations for expansion by expanding existing ICUs, using postanesthesia care units and emergency departments to capacity, then step-down units, large procedure suites, telemetry units and finally hospital wards. Judicious planning and adoption of protocols for surge capacity and infrastructure considerations are necessary to optimize outcomes during a pandemic.

  2. Louisiana physician population trends: will increase in supply meet demand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julie A; Sessions, Blane A; Ali, Juzar; Rigby, Perry C

    2012-01-01

    Physician shortages in the United States are now recognized broadly and widespread by specialty and geography. While supply is increasing, demand inexorably rises. This situation will probably be further stressed post implementation of healthcare reform. The variations by region and by state are many and significant; this complexity is not fully understood nor yet characterized. Trends similar to the averages of the US have been identified in Louisiana, including the aging of physicians. Lack of physicians, both specialists and generalists, has been reported to compromise quality and effectiveness of healthcare. Thus, the importance of matching up supply and demand is evident. The supply of physicians is increasing in absolute number and in the physicians-to-population ratio. Variations in population, aging, geography, and specialties indicate, in some areas, that this may not be enough to deal with the increasing demand. This paper aims to assess historically how physician shortages may affect the balance of supply and demand in future healthcare delivery, particularly in Louisiana.

  3. Time to address gender inequalities against female physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannawi, Suad; Al Salmi, Issa

    2017-11-10

    Although the health care system depends heavily on female physicians, it discriminates against women and tends to concentrate female physicians' work in lower status occupations. Gender discrimination has structural, social, and cultural dimensions. Such discrimination is perceived differently by various stakeholders and the public. In addition, there is reluctance to publicly acknowledge gender discrimination, especially in the culturally conservative Middle East region. Gender discrimination leads to underrepresentation of female physicians in leadership roles and certain specialties and hence leads to less attention and understanding of the working conditions of female physicians and their roles in the health care system. The lack of accessible data in the region regarding gender discrimination among physicians leads to stakeholders failing to recognize the existence and magnitude of this type of discrimination. This article takes up the relatively neglected issue of gender discrimination in the health care workforce among the stakeholders of the Ministry of Health and Prevention of the United Arab Emirates. Future research should explore the extent of gender discrimination among physicians and the gender remuneration gap, together with other sorts of discrimination, perception of equal opportunity, and dominant stereotypes of men and women working in health care in relation to job obligation, promotion, retention, remuneration, and education. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Do family physicians electronic health records support meaningful use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lars E; Blackburn, Brenna; Ivins, Douglas; Mitchell, Jason; Matson, Christine; Phillips, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Spurred by government incentives, the use of electronic health records (EHRs) in the United States has increased; however, whether these EHRs have the functionality necessary to meet meaningful use (MU) criteria remains unknown. Our objective was to characterize family physician access to MU functionality when using a MU-certified EHR. Data were obtained from a convenience survey of family physicians accessing their American Board of Family Medicine online portfolio in 2011. A brief survey queried MU functionality. We used descriptive statistics to characterize the responses and bivariate statistics to test associations between MU and patient communication functions by presence of a MU-certified EHR. Out of 3855 respondents, 60% reported having an EHR that supports MU. Physicians with MU-certified EHRs were more likely than physicians without MU-certified EHRs to report patient registry activities (49.7% vs. 32.3%, p-valuevs. 56.4%, p-valuecommunication abilities were low regardless of EHR capabilities. Family physicians with MU-certified EHRs are more likely to report MU functionality; however, a sizeable minority does not report MU functions. Many family physicians with MU-certified EHRs may not successfully meet the successively stringent MU criteria and may face significant upgrade costs to do so. Cross sectional survey. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Physician leadership development at Cleveland Clinic: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Terri; Stoller, James K

    2016-06-01

    We aim to describe the rationale for and spectrum of leadership development programs, highlighting experience at a large healthcare institution (Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA). Developing leaders is a universal priority to sustain organizational success. In health care, significant challenges of ensuring quality and access and making care affordable are widely shared internationally and demand effective physician leadership. Yet, leadership competencies differ from clinical and scientific competencies and features of selecting and training physicians-who have been called "heroic lone healers" -often conspire against physicians being effective leaders or followers. Thus, developing leadership competencies in physicians is critical.Leadership development programs have been signature features of successful organizations and various Australian organizations offer such training (e.g. The Australian Leadership Foundation and the University of South Australia), but relatively few health care organizations have adopted the practice of offering such training, both in Australia and elsewhere. As a United States example of one such integrated program, the Cleveland Clinic, a large, closed-staff physician-led group practice in Cleveland, Ohio has offered physician leadership training for over 15 years. This paper describes the rationale, structure, and some of the observed impacts associated with this program. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  6. Recruitment of Physicians to Rural America: A View through the Lens of Transaction Cost Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fannin, J. Matthew; Barnes, James N.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Many rural hospitals in the United States continue to have difficulties recruiting physicians. While several studies have examined some of the factors affecting the nature of this problem, we know far less about the role of economic incentives between rural providers and physicians. Purpose: This conceptual article describes an economic…

  7. The Physician's Role in Prevention. Adolescent Alcoholism: Recognizing, Intervening, and Treating Series No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joseph V.; Krol, Ronald A.

    This document is one of seven publications contained in a series of materials for physicians on recognizing, intervening with, and treating adolescent alcoholism. The materials in this unit of study offer guidelines to help physicians make responsible and informed decisions about their roles with adolescent patients. Materials are presented which…

  8. Dehydration treatment practices among pediatrics-trained and non-pediatrics trained emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Jeranil; Liu, Deborah R; Nager, Alan L

    2012-04-01

    We sought to survey emergency physicians in the United States regarding the management of pediatric dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis. We hypothesized that responses from physicians with dedicated pediatric training (PT), that is, board certification in pediatrics or pediatric emergency medicine, would differ from responses of physicians with no dedicated pediatric training (non-PT). An anonymous survey was mailed to randomly selected members of the American College of Emergency Physicians and sent electronically to enrollees of Brown University pediatric emergency medicine listserv. The survey consisted of 17 multiple-choice questions based on a clinical scenario depicting a 2-year-old with acute gastroenteritis and moderate dehydration. Questions asked related to treatment preferences, practice setting, and training information. One thousand sixty-nine surveys were received: 997 surveys were used for data analysis, including 269 PT physicians and 721 non-PT physicians. Seventy-nine percent of PT physicians correctly classified the scenario patient as moderately dehydrated versus 71% of non-PT physicians (P = 0.063). Among those who correctly classified the patient, 121 PT physicians (58%) and 350 non-PT physicians (68%) would initially hydrate the patient with intravenous fluids. Pediatrics-trained physicians were more likely to initially choose oral or nasogastric hydration compared with non-PT physicians (P = 0.0127). Pediatrics-trained physicians were less likely to perform laboratory testing compared with the non-PT group (n = 92, 45%, vs n = 337, 66%; P dehydrated children, significantly more PT physicians, compared with non-PT physicians, follow established guidelines.

  9. The opinions of nurses and physicians related to euthanasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal İşler

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The research was conducted to investigate the opinions of nurses and physicians pertaining to euthanasia who are working at Internal Medicine, Surgery and Intensive Care Unit departments at Baskent University Ankara hospital.Methods: The research is a descriptive one. The sample consisted of 154 nurses and physicians who are working at Internal Medicine, Surgery and Intensive Care Unit departments at Baskent University Ankara hospital and accepted to participate and could be reached. A questionnaire with 30 items was used to collect data to obtain the socio-demographic characteristics and the opinions pertaining to euthanasia of nurses and physicians. Frequencies, mean values and chi-square tests were used in statistical analysis.Results: The participants didn’t approve euthanasia with a high ratio however it was determined that almost half of them asserted it as patient’s rights of a patient who want his/her death to be fastened and who has no chance to be cured and who are spending the last days of their life with unbearable pain. Except the age groups and marital status there was no significant difference found statistically between the opinions of physicians and nurses regarding euthanasia (p>0.05.Conclusion: It was stated that nurses and physicians consider not active euthanasia but passive euthanasia as acceptable.

  10. Health practices of Canadian physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Erica; Segura, Carolina

    2009-08-01

    To study the health and health practices of Canadian physicians, which can often influence patient health. Mailed survey. Canada. A random sample of 8100 Canadian physicians; 7934 were found to be eligible and 3213 responded (40.5% response rate). Factors that influence health, such as consumption of fruits and vegetables, amount of exercise and alcohol consumption, smoking status, body mass idex, and participation in preventive health screening measures, as well as work-life balance and emotional stability. Canadian physicians are healthy. More than 90% reported being in good to excellent health, and only 5% reported that poor physical or mental health made it difficult to handle their workload more than half the time in the previous month (although a quarter had reduced work activity because of long-term health conditions). Eight percent were obese, 3% currently smoked cigarettes, and 1% typically consumed 5 drinks or more on days when they drank alcohol. Physicians averaged 4.7 hours of exercise per week and ate fruits and vegetables 4.8 times a day. Their personal screening practices were largely compliant with Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommendations. They averaged 38 hours per week on patient care and 11 hours on other professional activities. Fifty-seven percent agreed that they had a good work-life balance, and 11% disagreed with the statement "If I can, I work when I am ill." Compared with self-reports from the general Canadian population, Canadian physicians, like American physicians, seem to be healthy and to have generally healthy behaviour. There is, however, room for improvement in physicians' personal and professional well-being, and improving their personal health practices could be an efficient and beneficent way to improve the health of all Canadians.

  11. Evaluation of Physicians' Cognitive Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Beckstead, Jason W; Elqayam, Shira; Reljic, Tea; Hozo, Iztok; Kumar, Ambuj; Cannon-Bowers, Janis; Taylor, Stephanie; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Turner, Brandon; Paidas, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Patient outcomes critically depend on accuracy of physicians' judgment, yet little is known about individual differences in cognitive styles that underlie physicians' judgments. The objective of this study was to assess physicians' individual differences in cognitive styles relative to age, experience, and degree and type of training. Physicians at different levels of training and career completed a web-based survey of 6 scales measuring individual differences in cognitive styles (maximizing v. satisficing, analytical v. intuitive reasoning, need for cognition, intolerance toward ambiguity, objectivism, and cognitive reflection). We measured psychometric properties (Cronbach's α) of scales; relationship of age, experience, degree, and type of training; responses to scales; and accuracy on conditional inference task. The study included 165 trainees and 56 attending physicians (median age 31 years; range 25-69 years). All 6 constructs showed acceptable psychometric properties. Surprisingly, we found significant negative correlation between age and satisficing (r = -0.239; P = 0.017). Maximizing (willingness to engage in alternative search strategy) also decreased with age (r = -0.220; P = 0.047). Number of incorrect inferences negatively correlated with satisficing (r = -0.246; P = 0.014). Disposition to suppress intuitive responses was associated with correct responses on 3 of 4 inferential tasks. Trainees showed a tendency to engage in analytical thinking (r = 0.265; P = 0.025), while attendings displayed inclination toward intuitive-experiential thinking (r = 0.427; P = 0.046). However, trainees performed worse on conditional inference task. Physicians capable of suppressing an immediate intuitive response to questions and those scoring higher on rational thinking made fewer inferential mistakes. We found a negative correlation between age and maximizing: Physicians who were more advanced in their careers were less willing to spend time and effort in an

  12. Developing a Physician׳s Professional Identity Through Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Kenneth E; Abercrombie, Caroline L

    2017-02-01

    Professionalism represents a fundamental characteristic of physicians. Professional organizations have developed professionalism competencies for physicians and medical students. The aim of teaching medical professionalism is to ensure the development of a professional identity in medical students. Professional identity formation is a process developed through teaching principles and appropriate behavioral responses to the stresses of being a physician. Addressing lapses and critical reflection is an important part of the educational process. The "hidden curriculum" within an institution plays an important role in professional identity formation. Assessment of professionalism involves multiple mechanisms. Steps in remediating professionalism lapses include (1) initial assessment, (2) diagnosis of problems and development of an individualized learning plan, (3) instruction encompassing practice, feedback and reflection and (4) reassessment and certification of competence. No reliable outcomes data exist regarding the effectiveness of different remediation strategies. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Physician education: expansion of the radiation protection practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classic, Kelly; Carlson, Stephanie; Vetter, Richard J.; Roessler, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    Over the past several years, physician knowledge of radiation risk and risk associated with medical exams involving radiation has been studied and found deficient. In some cases, radiation risk was overestimated leading to patient anxiety. In other cases, the risk was underestimated leading to cavalier ordering of medical radiation exams. Even physicians practicing in radiology were unable to accurately assess the risk for their patients. Many of the studies concluded that more effort is needed to educate the physician community on radiation risk. Objectives of the Health Physics Society, a not-for-profit society of radiation safety professionals, include dissemination of radiation safety information and public education. In 1996, the Society launched a Web site as one method to achieve its objectives (www.hps.org). On the Web site, the initial focus was to provide radiation information resources for the public, but more recently that was expanded to include specific resources for teachers, students, legislators and regulators, and first responders. In addition to these, the Society is adding educational resources for physicians. Published studies we reviewed suggest that physician education should include information about radiation risk, radiation effects, the amount of radiation dose from medical exams, and potential doses to the concepts when a mother undergoes medical exams involving radiation. The information we provide includes these topics as well as radiation basics (radiation units, radiation terms, radiation in the environment) separated into brief educational programs (slide shows). To complement these, topical information sheets are available. Also available is a tool allowing physicians to ask individual questions of our experts about radiation, radiation exposure, and radiation risk. This approach of providing information and resources to physicians not only provides a benefit to the physician personally, but especially to his or her patients

  14. [Dangerous liaisons--physicians and pharmaceutical sales representatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between physicians and detailers (even when legitimate ones) raise scientific and ethical questions. In Portugal little thinking and discussion has been done on the subject and the blames for bribery have monopolized the media. This work intended to review what has been said in medical literature about these interactions. How do physicians see themselves when interacting with pharmaceutical companies and their representatives? Do these companies in fact change their prescriptive behaviour, and, if so, how do they change it? How can physicians interact with detailers and still keep their best practice? A Medline research, from 1966 till 2002, was performed using the key-words as follows. A database similar to Medline but concerning medical journals published in Portugal, Index das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas, was also researched from 1992 to 2002. Pharmaceutical companies are profit bound and they allot promoting activities, and detailing in particular, huge amounts of money. Most physicians hold firmly to the belief that they are able to resist and not be influenced by drug companies promotion activities. Nevertheless, all previous works on literature tell us the opposite. Market research also indicates that detailers effectively promote drug sales. Various works also suggest that the information detailers provide to physicians may be largely incorrect, even comparing it to the written information provided by the pharmaceutical companies they work for. The frequency at which portuguese physicians (especially family physicians) contact with pharmaceutical sales representatives is higher than the frequency reported in countries where the available studies come from (namely, Canada and the United States of America). This may put portuguese physicians at a higher risk, making it imperative that work and wide debate are initiated among the class.

  15. Patient-Centered Handovers: Ethnographic Observations of Attending and Resident Physicians: Ethnographic Observations of Attending and Resident Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount-Campbell, Austin F; Rayo, Michael F; OʼBrien, James J; Allen, Theodore T; Patterson, Emily S

    Handover communication improvement initiatives typically employ a "one size fits all" approach. A human factors perspective has the potential to guide how to tailor interventions to roles, levels of experience, settings, and types of patients. We conducted ethnographic observations of sign-outs by attending and resident physicians in 2 medical intensive care units at one institution. Digitally audiotaped data were manually analyzed for content using codes and time spent using box plots for emergent categories. A total of 34 attending and 58 resident physician handovers were observed. Resident physicians spent more time for "soon to be discharged" and "higher concern" patients than attending physicians. Resident physicians spent less time discussing patients which they had provided care for within the last 3 days ("handbacks"). The study suggested differences for how handovers were conducted for attending and resident physicians for 3 categories of patients; handovers differ on the basis of role or level of expertise, patient type, and amount of prior knowledge of the patient. The findings have implications for new directions for subsequent research and for how to tailor quality improvement interventions based upon the role, level of experience, level of prior knowledge, and patient categories.

  16. Physician wages across specialties: informing the physician reimbursement debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Paul; Tancredi, Daniel; Jerant, Anthony; Kravitz, Richard L

    2010-10-25

    Disparities in remuneration between primary care and other physician specialties may impede health care reform by undermining the sustainability of a primary care workforce. Previous studies have compared annual incomes across specialties unadjusted for work hours. Wage (earnings-per-hour) comparisons could better inform the physician payment debate. In a cross-sectional analysis of data from 6381 physicians providing patient care in the 2004-2005 Community Tracking Study (adjusted response rate, 53%), we compared wages across broad and narrow categories of physician specialties. Tobit and linear regressions were run. Four broad specialty categories (primary care, surgery, internal medicine and pediatric subspecialties, and other) and 41 specific specialties were analyzed together with demographic, geographic, and market variables. In adjusted analyses on broad categories, wages for surgery, internal medicine and pediatric subspecialties, and other specialties were 48%, 36%, and 45% higher, respectively, than for primary care specialties. In adjusted analyses for 41 specific specialties, wages were significantly lower for the following than for the reference group of general surgery (wage near median, $85.98): internal medicine and pediatrics combined (-$24.36), internal medicine (-$24.27), family medicine (-$23.70), and other pediatric subspecialties (-$23.44). Wage rankings were largely impervious to adjustment for control variables, including age, race, sex, and region. Wages varied substantially across physician specialties and were lowest for primary care specialties. The primary care wage gap was likely conservative owing to exclusion of radiologists, anesthesiologists, and pathologists. In light of low and declining medical student interest in primary care, these findings suggest the need for payment reform aimed at increasing incomes or reducing work hours for primary care physicians.

  17. Identifying nurse staffing research in Medline: development and testing of empirically derived search strategies with the PubMed interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Michael; Hausner, Elke; Klaus, Susan F; Dunton, Nancy E

    2010-08-23

    The identification of health services research in databases such as PubMed/Medline is a cumbersome task. This task becomes even more difficult if the field of interest involves the use of diverse methods and data sources, as is the case with nurse staffing research. This type of research investigates the association between nurse staffing parameters and nursing and patient outcomes. A comprehensively developed search strategy may help identify nurse staffing research in PubMed/Medline. A set of relevant references in PubMed/Medline was identified by means of three systematic reviews. This development set was used to detect candidate free-text and MeSH terms. The frequency of these terms was compared to a random sample from PubMed/Medline in order to identify terms specific to nurse staffing research, which were then used to develop a sensitive, precise and balanced search strategy. To determine their precision, the newly developed search strategies were tested against a) the pool of relevant references extracted from the systematic reviews, b) a reference set identified from an electronic journal screening, and c) a sample from PubMed/Medline. Finally, all newly developed strategies were compared to PubMed's Health Services Research Queries (PubMed's HSR Queries). The sensitivities of the newly developed search strategies were almost 100% in all of the three test sets applied; precision ranged from 6.1% to 32.0%. PubMed's HSR queries were less sensitive (83.3% to 88.2%) than the new search strategies. Only minor differences in precision were found (5.0% to 32.0%). As with other literature on health services research, nurse staffing studies are difficult to identify in PubMed/Medline. Depending on the purpose of the search, researchers can choose between high sensitivity and retrieval of a large number of references or high precision, i.e. and an increased risk of missing relevant references, respectively. More standardized terminology (e.g. by consistent use of the

  18. Recruiting physicians without inviting trouble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, L J

    1989-05-01

    Many hospitals use physician recruitment strategies--generally assistance or employment strategies--to ensure medical staff loyalty. Although these strategies appeal to both hospitals and physicians, they are becoming increasingly problematic. Over the past three years, the government has issued pronouncements that question their legality. Thus any hospital considering physician recruitment strategies would be wise to evaluate them in light of various legal issues. such as reimbursement, nonprofit taxation, corporate practice of medicine, and certificate-of-need statutes. The consequences of failing to consider these issues can be ominous. The penalties for violating the proscribed remuneration provision of the Medicare act can include a fine, imprisonment, suspension from the Medicare and Medicaid programs, or loss of license. Payment issues can result in reduced reimbursement levels. Nonprofit taxation issues can trigger the loss of tax exemption. As a result of the corporate practice of medicine, a physician recruitment strategy may not be reimbursable by third-party payers or may even constitute the unauthorized practice of medicine. Finally, in some states, physician recruitment may trigger certificate-of-need review.

  19. Psychiatric rehabilitation education for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Abraham; Eastwood, Diane

    2013-06-01

    As part of a rapidly spreading reform toward recovery-oriented services, mental health care systems are adopting Psychiatric/Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR). Accordingly, PSR education and training programs are now available and accessible. Although psychiatrists and sometimes other physicians (such as family physicians) provide important services to people with serious mental illnesses and may, therefore, need knowledge and skill in PSR, it seems that the medical profession has been slow to participate in PSR education. Based on our experience working in Canada as academic psychiatrists who are also Certified Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practitioners (CPRPs), we offer descriptions of several Canadian initiatives that involve physicians in PSR education. Multiple frameworks guide PSR education for physicians. First, guidance is provided by published PSR principles, such as the importance of self-determination (www.psrrpscanada.ca). Second, guidance is provided by adult education (andragogy) principles, emphasizing the importance of addressing attitudes in addition to knowledge and skills (Knowles, Holton, & Swanson, 2011). Third, guidance in Canada is provided by Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) principles, which delineate the multiple roles of physicians beyond that of medical expert (Frank, 2005) and have recently been adopted in Australia (Boyce, Spratt, Davies, & McEvoy, 2011). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Workplace physical violence among hospital nurses and physicians in underserved areas in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuAlRub, Raeda Fawzi; Al Khawaldeh, Abdullah Talal

    2014-07-01

    To: (1) examine the incidence, frequency and contributing factors to workplace violence among nurses and physicians in underserved areas in Jordan, and (2) identify the existing policies and the management modalities to tackle workplace violence. Workplace violence is a major problem in healthcare organisations. An understanding of the nature of violence is essential to implementing successful management. A descriptive exploratory research design. The questionnaire that was developed in 2003 by the International Labor Office, the International Council of Nurses, the World Health Organization, and the Public Services International was used to collect data from a convenience sample of 521 Jordanian physicians and nurses (396 nurses, 125 physicians) who worked in hospitals located in underserved areas. Around 15% of the participants were exposed to physical violence. The factors that contributed to workplace violence were related to absence of policies, inadequate staffing and lack of communication skills. Only 16·9% of participants indicated that there were specific policies available for dealing with physical workplace violence. Strengthening security and providing training were some of the important factors indicated by participants for decreasing violence in the workplace. Workplace violence is a problem in underserved areas that needs attention from administrators. Most participants were very dissatisfied with the way the administrators dealt with the incidents. Instituting firm policies against perpetrators and developing protective violence guidelines to support healthcare staff in managing workplace violence are paramount to tackle the problem of workplace violence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.