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Sample records for unit outcome reporting

  1. Relationships between registered nurse staffing, processes of nursing care, and nurse-reported patient outcomes in chronic hemodialysis units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Flynn, Linda; Clarke, Sean P

    2008-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the effects of registered nurse (RN) staffing and processes of nursing care on patient outcomes in hemodialysis units. This research examined the effects of patient-to-RN ratios and necessary tasks left undone by RNs on the likelihood of nurse-reported frequent occurrences of adverse patient events in chronic hemodialysis units. Study findings revealed that high patient-to-RN ratios and increased numbers of tasks left undone by RNs were associated with an increased likelihood of frequent occurrences of dialysis hypotension, skipped dialysis treatments, shortened dialysis treatments, and patient complaints in hemodialysis units. These findings indicate that federal, state, and dialysis organization policies must foster staffing structures and processes of care in dialysis units that effectively utilize the invaluable skills and services of professional, registered nurses.

  2. Patient-Reported Outcomes From the United States Clinical Trial for a Hybrid Cochlear Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsall, David C; Arnold, Renée J G; Lionnet, Leonard

    2017-10-01

    To assess patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in individuals with significant residual low-frequency hearing and severe-to-profound high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) who received the hybrid cochlear implant (CI). Prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized, single-arm repeated measures, single-subject design. Tertiary centers, ambulatory care. Fifty adults with severe-to-profound high-frequency SNHL and residual low-frequency hearing with aided word recognition scores between 10 and 60% in the ear to be implanted, and in the contralateral ear greater than or equal to implant ear less than or equal to 80%. Therapeutic; hybrid CI. Speech, spatial and qualities of hearing scale (SSQ), device use questionnaire (DUQ), University of Washington Clinical Assessment of Music Perception (UW-CAMP) assessed preoperatively and after 6 and 12 (SSQ and DUQ only) months of hybrid CI use. Significant improvements in mean SSQ ratings were demonstrated at 6 and 12 months postactivation overall and for domains related to speech hearing, spatial hearing, and sound quality. Significant improvement was also found for overall satisfaction on the DUQ and across a number of specific listening situations in addition to aspects related to social engagement. UW-CAMP pitch discrimination and melody and timbre recognition abilities were not compromised postoperatively, allowing hybrid subjects to maintain superior music perception abilities than typically observed with standard CIs. Patients who received the hybrid CI demonstrated significant PRO benefits on the SSQ and the DUQ after 6 and 12 months of CI use. In addition, given the opportunity to maintain useful low-frequency acoustic hearing, patients retained music listening abilities, as assessed by the UW-CAMP.

  3. Pancreas transplant outcomes for United States (US) cases as reported to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) and the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruessner, Angelika C; Sutherland, David E R

    2008-01-01

    From December 16, 1966 to December 31, 2008 more than 30,000 pancreas transplants have been reported to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR), including > 22,000 from the United States and > 8,000 from outside the US. This report focused on the most recent outcomes for pancreas transplants performed in the US, since we had reliable follow-up information available for US cases only at this time. Between 2004 and 2008 the most common pancreas transplant category was a combined pancreas/kidney transplant (SPK) (73%). Nineteen percent of diabetic patients had already received a kidney transplant before undergoing a pancreas transplant (PAK). In those cases, 76% of all kidneys came from a living donor. Pancreas transplants alone (PTA) accounted for 9% of all pancreas transplants in diabetic patients. The number of pancreas transplants for diabetic patients decreased over the last 5 years, and the decrease was highest in PAK, followed by PTA and SPK. During this time period, the patient age at transplant increased due to an increased number of patients with type 2 diabetes reported as reason for transplantation. The decrease in the number of pancreas transplants provided the opportunity for better selection of deceased donors. We noticed a significant decrease in the age of the deceased donor. Only 6-8% of all reported donors were 45 years of age or older, and the majority of donors were between 15 and 30 years old. In all three pancreas transplant categories (SPK, PAK, and PTA), the majority of patients received antibody therapy for induction and a maintenance protocol of Tacrolimus in combination with MMF. In a growing number of patients, the maintenance protocol was Sirolimus based. In all protocols a strong trend of steroids avoidance could be seen and accounted for one third of all transplants. The overall outcome of pancreas transplantation improved significantly. Patient survival at one year is now better than 95% and reached 90% at 3 years post

  4. ENERGY STAR Unit Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These quarterly Federal Fiscal Year performance reports track the ENERGY STAR qualified HOME units that Participating Jurisdictions record in HUD's Integrated...

  5. Nursing unit teams matter: Impact of unit-level nurse practice environment, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, and quality of care, and patient adverse events--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Timmermans, Olaf; Weeks, Susan Mace; van Heusden, Danny; Wouters, Kristien; Franck, Erik

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the impact of nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events variables at the nursing unit level. Nurse practice environment studies show growing insights and knowledge about determining factors for nurse workforce stability, quality of care, and patient safety. Until now, international studies have primarily focused on variability at the hospital level; however, insights at the nursing unit level can reveal key factors in the nurse practice environment. A cross-sectional design with a survey. In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 1108 nurses assigned to 96 nursing units completed a structured questionnaire composed of various validated instruments measuring nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout, nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events. Associations between the variables were examined using multilevel modelling techniques. Various unit-level associations (simple models) were identified between nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout dimensions, and nurse reported outcome variables. Multiple multilevel models showed various independent variables such as nursing management at the unit level, social capital, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization as important predictors of nurse reported outcome variables such job satisfaction, turnover intentions, quality of care (at the unit, the last shift, and in the hospital within the last year), patient and family complaints, patient and family verbal abuse, patient falls, nosocomial infections, and medications errors. Results suggested a stable nurse work force, with the capability to achieve superior quality and patient safety outcomes, is associated with unit-level favourable perceptions of nurse work environment factors, workload, decision latitude, and social capital, as well low levels of burnout

  6. Residual Effects of Sleep Medications Are Commonly Reported and Associated with Impaired Patient-Reported Outcomes among Insomnia Patients in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Fitzgerald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. To measure the association of symptoms attributed to residual effects of sleep medication (e.g., drowsiness, difficulty concentrating, and impaired memory on self-reported functioning and satisfaction with these medications. Methods. Individuals using prescription medications for insomnia were invited to complete an Internet-based survey. Respondents were compared according to the presence of self-reported residual effects; relationships between severity of these effects and outcomes were modeled using regression. Measures included the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire, and SATMED-Q. Subgroup analyses were conducted with patients aged ≥65 years. Approximately 80% reported experiencing ≥1 residual effect. The severity of residual effects was associated with increased residual effect-related work impairment, including absenteeism (RR = 1.46, p<0.001, presenteeism (RR = 1.12, p<0.001, overall work impairment (RR = 1.13, p<0.001, and nonwork activity impairment (RR = 1.11, p<0.001. More severe residual symptoms were also associated with increased difficulty in home management (Beta = .31, p<0.001, ability to work (Beta = .31, p<0.001, social relationships, (Beta = .32, p<0.001, close personal relationships (Beta = .30, p<0.001, and lower medication satisfaction (Beta = -.37, p<0.001. Conclusions. Individuals using medications for insomnia commonly experience symptoms considered as residual effects, and these symptoms are associated with greater interference of sleep-related problems at work, at home, and with social relationships.

  7. Child Welfare Outcomes Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These annual reports to Congress are available on line at the Children's Bureau's website. They contain data from the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting...

  8. Identifying meaningful outcome measures for the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elizabeth A; Donelan, Karen; Henneman, Justin P; Berenholtz, Sean M; Miralles, Paola D; Krug, Allison E; Iezzoni, Lisa I; Charnin, Jonathan E; Pronovost, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Despite important progress in measuring the safety of health care delivery in a variety of health care settings, a comprehensive set of metrics for benchmarking is still lacking, especially for patient outcomes. Even in high-risk settings where similar procedures are performed daily, such as hospital intensive care units (ICUs), these measures largely do not exist. Yet we cannot compare safety or quality across institutions or regions, nor can we track whether safety is improving over time. To a large extent, ICU outcome measures deemed valid, important, and preventable by clinicians are unavailable, and abstracting clinical data from the medical record is excessively burdensome. Even if a set of outcomes garnered consensus, ensuring adequate risk adjustment to facilitate fair comparisons across institutions presents another challenge. This study reports on a consensus process to build 5 outcome measures for broad use to evaluate the quality of ICU care and inform quality improvement efforts.

  9. Improving Pupil Referral Unit Outcomes: Pupil Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Siobhan; Frederickson, Norah

    2013-01-01

    Concern has been expressed about the quality of alternative provision for young people with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties, and the poor academic and social outcomes many experience. Little research has sought the views of the young people themselves regarding the enablers and barriers to positive outcomes they have encountered. A…

  10. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  11. Development of a patient-reported outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Roos, Ewa M.;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a patient-reported outcome evaluating the impact of neck pain. The results of item generation and reduction and subscale structure in support of the content and construct validity of the measure are reported. METHODS: Items were generated from the literature and through focus....... CONCLUSION: The Neck OutcOme Score has excellent content validity and preliminary results support a 5-subscale structure. Additional work is needed to assess the reliability, further construct validity and responsiveness....

  12. Trip Report United Arab Emirates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, K; Rodgers, A

    2004-10-06

    Keith Nakanishi and Arthur Rodgers traveled to the United Arab Emirates in February, 2004 to continue an on-going technical collaboration with UAE University and to service the two temporary LLNL seismic stations. Nakanishi and Rodgers then participated in the Gulf Seismic Forum, which was organized by LLNL and sponsored by the University of Sharjah.

  13. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, Jeffrey P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-19

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2013 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3438 sites and 569 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  14. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, Jeffrey P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-02-29

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2012 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3389 sites and 540 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  15. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, Jeffrey P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-02-13

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2013 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3427 sites and 564 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  16. Properties and outcomes of spinal rehabilitation units in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromovich-Amit, Y; Biering-Sørensen, F; Baskov, V

    2009-01-01

    for rehabilitation (TAR), length of stay in rehabilitation (LOS), SCIM and spinal cord ability realization measurement index (SCI-ARMI) scores, SCIM gain, SCI-ARMI gain and rehabilitation efficiency (RE). RESULTS: Differences were found between the units in rehabilitation objectives, facilities and special equipment......OBJECTIVE: Compare rehabilitation after spinal cord lesions (SCL) in different countries. DESIGN: Multicenter comparative study. SETTING: Four spinal rehabilitation units, in Denmark, Russia, Lithuania and Israel. SUBJECTS: 199 SCL patients. INTERVENTIONS: Information was collected about unit...... properties, rehabilitation objectives, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale and spinal cord independence measure (SCIM) assessments, and patient data. chi (2)-test, t-test, ANOVA and ANCOVA were used for statistical analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Time from lesion onset to admission...

  17. Development of a patient-reported outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Søgaard, Karen; Roos, Ewa M;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a patient-reported outcome evaluating the impact of neck pain. The results of item generation and reduction and subscale structure in support of the content and construct validity of the measure are reported. METHODS: Items were generated from the literature and through focus...... deviation (SD) 15.9) years, range 24-85 years); 19 women) and 12 healthcare professionals were conducted before data saturation was achieved. A total of 196 patients with neck pain (mean age 47.8 (SD 13.7) years), range 18-89 years; 146 women) completed the preliminary questionnaire. Overall 35 items were....... CONCLUSION: The Neck OutcOme Score has excellent content validity and preliminary results support a 5-subscale structure. Additional work is needed to assess the reliability, further construct validity and responsiveness....

  18. [Patient-reported outcomes: definition and measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botturi, Davide; Rodella, Stefania

    2014-06-01

    The concept of "patient-reported outcomes" have been proposed by the Food and Drug Administration in the year 2000, in order to describe one of the different and potential sources of information on the drug's safety and effectiveness. It represents an "umbrella" term, which covers a multiplicity of meanings and primarily identifies a conceptual approach and a methodology specifically oriented to the patients' point of view on outcomes, instead of the traditional clinical and professional perspective. The patient-reported outcomes measures are frequently self-completed questionnaires. The measures can be classified in general and specific. The first one, general, relates to the assessment of the quality of life or the health status, in the general population or in subgroups with particular health problems (eg. SF-36 Health Survey, EQ-5D). The second one, specific, mainly relates to the assessment of particular types of symptoms (eg. pain, anxiety, fear, depression) and functions (eg. daily living activities), in population's subgroups with definite health problems, undergoing or not to a healthcare procedure (eg. Adult Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Kidney Disease Quality of Life Instrument, Oxford Hip Score, Oxford Knee Score). For the selection of an instrument a series of criteria needs to be taken into account, among which the psychometric properties, the expert judgement, the interpretability, the acceptability, and the feasibility of the entire process.

  19. Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in the upper extremity: the future of outcomes reporting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Meadows, Molly; Hamamoto, Jason T; Higgins, John D; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-02-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) serve an integral role in clinical research by helping to determine the impact of clinical care as experienced by the patient. With recent initiatives in health care policy and pay for performance, outcome reporting is now recognized as a policy-driven requirement in addition to a clinical research tool. For outcome measures to satisfy these regulatory requirements and provide value in understanding disease outcomes, they must be responsive and efficient. Recent research has uncovered certain concerns regarding traditional PROs in patients with upper extremity disability and injury. These include lack of consensus regarding selection of PROs for a given diagnoses, inconsistent techniques of administration of the same PROs, and the administrative burden to patients and providers of completing these forms. To address these limitations, emphasis has been placed on streamlining the outcomes reporting process, and, as a result, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) created the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). PROMIS forms were created to comprehensively and efficiently measure outcomes across multiple disease states, including orthopedics. These tools exist in computer adaptive testing and short forms with the intention of more efficiently measuring outcomes compared with legacy PROs. The goals of this review are to highlight the main components of PROMIS reporting tools and identify recent use of the scores in the upper extremity literature. The review will also highlight the research and health policy potentials and limitations of implementing PROMIS into everyday orthopedic practice. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient Reported Outcomes from Sacroiliac Joint Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Shane M.; Audley, Brittany N.; Sokunbi, Gbolabo; Puccio, Steven T.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective, case series. Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine morbidity, complications, and patient reported outcomes from minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion. Overview of Literature Lumbar back pain emanating from the SIJ can be surgically treated via a percutaneous approach in the appropriately selected patient with minimal morbidity and acceptable functional outcomes. Methods Patients diagnosed by >2 physical examination maneuvers and subjective relief from a computed tomography–guided lidocaine-bupivacaine-steroid injection underwent SIJ fusion after failing conservative management with a combination of oral anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and pelvic belt stabilization. Perioperative data collected include estimated blood loss (EBL) and operative time. Oswestry disability index, 12-item short form health survey (SF-12), visual analogue score, and functional status were analyzed. All complications were noted. Results The study cohort of 45 cases (69% female) achieved postoperative survey follow-up at 9.9 and 32.3 months. SF-12 physical component summary statistically improved while all other scores were equivalent. Mean EBL and operative time were 22 mL and 36 minutes, respectively. Initial survey showed that 64% of patients discontinued narcotics (29/45), 71% do not use an assistive device (32/45), and 15.6% do not work due to pain (7/45). 73% of patients stated they would have the surgery again (33/45). For the second survey, 65% of patients discontinued narcotics (26/40), 70% did not use an assistive device (28/40), and 17.5% did not work due to pain (7/40). A history of thoracolumbar instrumentation (16/45) did not significantly affect outcomes. Three complications described by screw malposition with neurologic deficit (6.7%) were treated with screw repositioning (1 case) and removal of a single superior implant (2 cases) with time to revision of 2.2 months. All three ultimately had resolution of

  1. Admissions to acute adolescent psychiatric units: a prospective study of clinical severity and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several countries have established or are planning acute psychiatric in-patient services that accept around-the-clock emergency admission of adolescents. Our aim was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of a cohort of patients at four Norwegian units. Methods We used a prospective pre-post observational design. Four units implemented a clinician-rated outcome measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA, which measures mental health problems and their severity. We collected also data about the diagnoses, suicidal problems, family situations, and the involvement of the Child Protection Service. Predictions of outcome (change in HoNOSCA total score were analysed with a regression model. Results The sample comprised 192 adolescents admitted during one year (response rate 87%. Mean age was 15.7 years (range 10-18 and 70% were girls. Fifty-eight per cent had suicidal problems at intake and the mean intake HoNOSCA total score was 18.5 (SD 6.4. The largest groups of main diagnostic conditions were affective (28% and externalizing (26% disorders. Diagnoses and other patient characteristics at intake did not differ between units. Clinical psychiatric disorders and developmental disorders were associated with severity (on HoNOSCA at intake but not with outcome. Of adolescents ≥ 16 years, 33% were compulsorily admitted. Median length of stay was 8.5 days and 75% of patients stayed less than a month. Compulsory admissions and length of stay varied between units. Mean change (improvement in the HoNOSCA total score was 5.1 (SD 6.2, with considerable variation between units. Mean discharge score was close to the often-reported outpatient level, and self-injury and emotional symptoms were the most reduced symptoms during the stay. In a regression model, unit, high HoNOSCA total score at intake, or involvement of the Child Protection Service predicted improvement during admission

  2. Homeschooled adolescents in the United States: developmental outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Hennessy, Sharon

    2014-06-01

    The mission of schools has broadened beyond academics to address risk behaviors such as substance use, delinquency, and socialization problems. With an estimated 3.4% of all U.S. youth being homeschooled, this study examines how U.S. homeschoolers fare on these outcomes given their lack of access to these school services. Adolescents (ages 12-17) from the 2002 through 2011 National Surveys of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) were divided based on school status (home vs. traditional schooling) and religious affiliation (stronger vs. weaker). Controlling for demographic differences, homeschoolers with weaker religious ties were three times more likely to report being behind their expected grade level and two and a half times more likely to report no extracurricular activities in the prior year than their traditionally schooled counterparts. This group was also more likely to report lax parental attitudes toward substance use. Findings suggest homeschoolers with weaker religious ties represent an at-risk group.

  3. Patient reported outcomes in benign multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hviid, Line E; Healy, Brian C; Rintell, David J; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Glanz, Bonnie I

    2011-07-01

    Benign MS patients have a mild course of disease and show no or minimal accumulation of disability over time. Little is known about the patient reported outcomes (PROs) in benign MS. The objective of the study was to compare PROs in benign MS patients and patients with similar disease duration or disability status, and to investigate how the definition of benign MS affected this outcome. Two groups of Benign MS patients (disease duration ≥15 years, Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score ≤1.5 [Benign-1.5], or ≤3.0 [Benign-3]) were compared with four other MS groups: disease duration ≥15 years, EDSS score >3.0 (Late-MS); disease duration MS). PROs included measures of QOL, fatigue, depression, and social support. Cognitive function was also assessed. Both benign groups had better PROs than Late MS patients on all measures (p QOL, depression, and fatigue were significantly different between Benign-1.5 and Early-MS groups (p QOL than Low EDSS-1.5, but was otherwise similar. Benign-3 patients had worse depression than Early-MS (p QOL and lower fatigue (p MS had better PROs than other groups of MS patients, suggesting that both disease duration and disability influence PROs. The study also showed a difference in PROs based on the way benign MS was defined.

  4. Nurses' work environments, care rationing, job outcomes, and quality of care on neonatal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefort, Christian M; Clarke, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the relationship between work environment characteristics and neonatal intensive care unit nurses' perceptions of care rationing, job outcomes, and quality of care. International evidence suggests that attention to work environments might improve nurse recruitment and retention, and the quality of care. However, comparatively little attention has been given to neonatal care, a specialty where patient and nurse outcomes are potentially quite sensitive to problems with staffing and work environments. Over a 6-month period in 2007-2008, a questionnaire containing measures of work environment characteristics, nursing care rationing, job satisfaction, burnout and quality of care was distributed to 553 nurses in all neonatal intensive care units in the province of Quebec (Canada). A total of 339 nurses (61.3%) completed questionnaires. Overall, 18.6% were dissatisfied with their job, 35.7% showed high emotional exhaustion, and 19.2% rated the quality of care on their unit as fair or poor. Care activities most frequently rationed because of insufficient time were discharge planning, parental support and teaching, and comfort care. In multivariate analyses, higher work environment ratings were related to lower likelihood of reporting rationing and burnout, and better ratings of quality of care and job satisfaction. Additional research on the determinants of nurse outcomes, the quality of patient care, and the impact of rationing of nursing care on patient outcomes in neonatal intensive care units is required. The Neonatal Extent of Work Rationing Instrument appears to be a useful tool for monitoring the extent of rationing of nursing care in neonatal units. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure’s (PROMs Conference Sheffield 2016: advances in patient reported outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Croudace

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents S1 Using computerized adaptive testing Tim Croudace S2 Well-being: what is it, how does it compare to health and what are the implications of using it to inform health policy John Brazier O1 “Am I going to get better?”—Using PROMs to inform patients about the likely benefit of surgery Nils Gutacker, Andrew Street O2 Identifying Patient Reported Outcome Measures for an electronic Personal Health Record Dan Robotham, Samantha Waterman, Diana Rose, Safarina Satkunanathan, Til Wykes O3 Examining the change process over time qualitatively: transformative learning and response shift Nasrin Nasr, Pamela Enderby O4 Developing a PROM to evaluate self-management in diabetes (HASMID: giving patients a voice Jill Carlton, Donna Rowen, Jackie Elliott, John Brazier, Katherine Stevens, Hasan Basarir, Alex Labeit O5 Development of the Primary Care Outcomes Questionnaire (PCOQ Mairead Murphy, Sandra Hollinghurst, Chris Salisbury O6 Developing the PKEX score- a multimodal assessment tool for patients with shoulder problems Dominic Marley, James Wilson, Amy Barrat, Bibhas Roy O7 Applying multiple imputation to multi-item patient reported outcome measures: advantages and disadvantages of imputing at the item, sub-scale or score level Ines Rombach, Órlaith Burke, Crispin Jenkinson, Alastair Gray, Oliver Rivero-Arias O8 Integrating Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs into routine primary care for patients with multimorbidity: a feasibility study Ian Porter, Jaheeda Gangannagaripalli, Charlotte Bramwell, Jose M. Valderas O9 eRAPID: electronic self-report and management of adverse-events for pelvic radiotherapy (RT patients Patricia Holch, Susan Davidson, Jacki Routledge, Ann Henry, Kevin Franks, Alex Gilbert, Kate Absolom & Galina Velikova O10 Patient reported outcomes (PROMs based recommendation in clinical guidance for the management of chronic conditions in the United Kingdom Ian Porter, Jose M.Valderas O11 Cross-sectional and

  6. Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report. EMIS Staff ECE Units 2005. Report Documentation. Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report is twofold. First, it helps School Districts and Educational Service Centers (ESC) ensure accuracy and validity of preschool staff, student and program data submitted to the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) through the Education Management Information System (EMIS). From this report, school…

  7. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  8. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roderick; Welk, Blayne

    2016-02-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can't be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose.

  9. Adult Hospice Social Work Intervention Outcomes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcide, Amary; Potocky, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    A descriptive and critical analysis of the available empirical literature on social work psychosocial intervention outcomes for adult hospice patients and caregivers was conducted. The electronic bibliographic databases CINHAL (EBSCO), MEDLINE, ProQuest, EMBASE, Campbell Collaboration, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library) were searched. Search criteria were (a) social work interventions, (b) intervention was tested, (c) adult hospice patients and/or caregivers, (d) studies within the United States, (e) and studies between 2004 and 2014. Of the 21 studies that met the initial search criteria, 5 publications met all review criteria. Based on assessment of study results, intervention effect, and quality of evidence, the ADAPT Problem-Solving Intervention (PSI) and the Hospice Caregiver Support Project have some indications of practical effect on caregiver quality of life, anxiety, stress, and problem-solving skills. The Caregiver Life Line (CaLL) intervention had little to no effect on caregiver role stress or coping skills. The few available studies provide foundational insight into the need for the expansion of research efforts to evaluate hospice social work interventions and document the contributions of social work to the field.

  10. Health outcomes among women trafficked for sex in the United States: a closer look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftic, Lisa R; Finn, Mary A

    2013-06-01

    Human trafficking is recognized as a major public health problem and a tragic transnational crime. Little is known about the health outcomes of victims of human trafficking. This study identifies the relationship of risk factors to physical, sexual, and mental health outcomes in three groups of women (N = 38) exploited for sex in the United States: international trafficking victims, domestic trafficking victims, and nontrafficked sex workers. To date this is the first study to examine the impact of risk factors on health outcomes using a sample of women trafficked for sex in the United States that includes both domestic and international victims. Overall, findings suggest that the experiences in sex work of domestic trafficking victims were dissimilar to those of international trafficking victims. Moreover, domestic trafficking victims displayed poorer health outcomes compared to international trafficking victims. In terms of risk factors, a higher percentage of women involved in street prostitution reported sexual health problems, co-occurring health issues, and addiction. Childhood physical/sexual victimization was related to poor physical health.

  11. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellar, Russell E; Tingey, Theresa M; Pope, Janet Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease that can damage multiple organs and reduce quality of life. Patient-reported outcome measures capture the patient's perspective. Some measures are specific to systemic sclerosis and others are general. Patient-reported outcomes in systemic sclerosis are important to aid in understanding the impact of systemic sclerosis on patients.

  12. Patient-reported outcome measures for asthma : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worth, Allison; Hammersley, Victoria; Knibb, Rebecca; Flokstra-de-Blok, Bertine; DunnGalvin, Audrey; Walker, Samantha; Dubois, Anthony EJ; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are measures of the outcome of treatment(s) reported directly by the patient or carer. There is increasing international policy interest in using these to assess the impact of clinical care. AIMS: To identify suitably validated PROMs for asthma a

  13. Outcomes for women admitted to a mother and baby unit: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Rebecca; Wittkowski, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Mother and baby units (MBUs) provide inpatient psychiatric care for mothers and their infants up to a year after childbirth. They are commissioned to support the mother-infant relationship as well as stabilize maternal mental health. As their efficacy at meeting these aims had not previously been systematically assessed, this paper reviewed the international literature relating to psychological outcomes following MBU admission. A systematic search of five databases identified 23 papers eligible for inclusion, reporting on a range of outcomes indicating positive effects on maternal mental health and the mother-infant relationship and an absence of adverse effects on child development. The review also highlighted specific groups responding less favorably to MBU admission, eg, mothers with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Although the included studies were of variable methodological quality, the research findings consistently indicated positive effects. Implications for research and clinical practice are outlined in the discussion.

  14. Building capacity for Health Impact Assessment: Training outcomes from the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchter, Joseph [Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutt, Candace, E-mail: awr8@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, 4770 Buford Highway MS/F-77, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Satariano, William A. [University of California Berkeley, School of Public Health, Division of Community Health and Human Development, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seto, Edmund [University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Despite the continued growth of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in the US, there is little research on HIA capacity-building. A comprehensive study of longer-term training outcomes may reveal opportunities for improving capacity building activities and HIA practice. Methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with HIA trainees in the United States to assess their outcomes and needs. Using a training evaluation framework, we measured outcomes across a spectrum of reaction, learning, behavior and results. Results: From 2006 to 2012, four organizations trained over 2200 people in at least 75 in-person HIA trainings in 29 states. We interviewed 48 trainees, selected both randomly and purposefully. The mean duration between training and interview was 3.4 years. Trainees reported that their training objectives were met, especially when relevant case-studies were used. They established new collaborations at the trainings and maintained them. Training appeared to catalyze more holistic thinking and practice, including a range of HIA-related activities. Many trainees disseminated what they learned and engaged in components of HIA, even without dedicated funding. Going forward, trainees need assistance with quantitative methods, project management, community engagement, framing recommendations, and evaluation. Conclusions: The research revealed opportunities for a range of HIA stakeholders to refine and coordinate training resources, apply a competency framework and leverage complimentary workforce development efforts, and sensitize and build the capacity of communities. - Highlights: • We interviewed HIA trainees in the United States to assess longer-term outcomes. • Training appeared to catalyze a range of beneficial partnerships and activities. • Trainees reported outstanding needs for specific skills and competencies. • There are various opportunities to improve training and capacity-building.

  15. Effects of nursing care and staff skill mix on patient outcomes within acute care nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Patricia; Davis, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study that evaluates the relationships between staffing indicators and patient outcomes at the hospital unit level. Nursing administrators should not only evaluate the impact staffing decisions have on patient outcomes at the hospital level but also examine these relationships at the unit level. The findings from this study have implications for nursing practice in the areas of staff orientation, education, and patient outcome monitoring.

  16. Button battery ingestion with different outcome : two case reports from a Tertiary care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Suman; Roy, Amrita; Chatterjee, Anirban; Roy, Bidhan Ch; Mondal, Sandip; Pramanik, Koushik

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion is a distinct type of foreign body ingestion in children because of their potential to cause major injury or life threatening consequences. According to National Poison Data System, United States of America, there is a 6.7 fold increase in the percentage of button battery ingestion with major or fatal outcomes from 1985-2009.  We are reporting two cases with history of accidental ingestion of button battery with different outcome

  17. Dedicated pediatric cardiac intensive care unit in a developing country: Does it improve the outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Balachandran

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions : Establishment of a dedicated pediatric cardiac intensive care unit has shown better outcomes in terms of earlier extubation, de-intensification, and discharge from the ICU. Blood stream infections were also reduced.

  18. Medical complications and outcomes at an onsite rehabilitation unit for older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulroy, M

    2013-09-01

    The rehabilitation of older patients in Ireland after an acute medical event occurs at dedicated onsite hospital units or at offsite centres. Information on medical complications and outcomes is inadequate.

  19. Improved Outcome of Severe Acute Pancreatitis in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polychronis Pavlidis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP is associated with serious morbidity and mortality. Our objective was to describe the case mix, management, and outcome of patients with SAP receiving modern critical care in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Methods. Retrospective analysis of patients with SAP admitted to the ICU in a single tertiary care centre in the UK between January 2005 and December 2010. Results. Fifty SAP patients were admitted to ICU (62% male, mean age 51.7 (SD 14.8. The most common aetiologies were alcohol (40% and gallstones (30%. On admission to ICU, the median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score was 17, the pancreatitis outcome prediction score was 8, and the median Computed Tomography Severity Index (CTSI was 4. Forty patients (80% tolerated enteral nutrition, and 46% received antibiotics for non-SAP reasons. Acute kidney injury was significantly more common among hospital nonsurvivors compared to survivors (100% versus 42%, . ICU mortality and hospital mortality were 16% and 20%, respectively, and median lengths of stay in ICU and hospital were 13.5 and 30 days, respectively. Among hospital survivors, 27.5% developed diabetes mellitus and 5% needed long-term renal replacement therapy. Conclusions. The outcome of patients with SAP in ICU was better than previously reported but associated with a resource demanding hospital stay and long-term morbidity.

  20. Pregnancy outcomes in women growing up with perinatally acquired HIV in the United Kingdom and Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Byrne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United Kingdom and Ireland more than 40% of individuals living with perinatally acquired HIV are now aged >16. Globally, increasing numbers of women with perinatally acquired HIV are becoming pregnant, but data on fertility and pregnancy outcomes is scarce. We present pregnancy outcome data for this emerging cohort. Methods: Pregnancies in diagnosed HIV-infected women in the United Kingdom and Ireland, and children diagnosed with HIV, are reported to the National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood. We analyzed data on pregnancies in women diagnosed aged ≤13 with perinatally acquired HIV, reported by June 2014. Results: A total of 759 females born before 2001, diagnosed with perinatally acquired HIV aged ≤13 years, and in care in the UK and Ireland have been reported. Forty-four of these (6% have had at least one pregnancy reported, with nineteen 2nd and four 3rd/4th pregnancies. Women's year of birth ranged from 1985 to 1996; 60% of women were UK/Irish-born and 39% African-born. Twenty one percent were diagnosed at 500 cells/µL in 36% of first pregnancies, 350–499 in 15% and 1000 in 5%. Forty four percent of live births were delivered by elective caesarean section (CS, 27% by emergency CS, 27% by planned vaginal delivery and with one unplanned vaginal delivery. Of 29 live births with viral load <50, 31% were delivered by elective CS, 17% by emergency CS and 52% by vaginal delivery. Fifteen percent of infants were delivered at 32–36 weeks gestation, and 2% at 30 weeks; 16% weighed 1.5–2.5 kg and 16% weighed <1.5 kg. Among 38 of the 51 infants where infection status is already reported, one is perinatally infected. Conclusions: Currently at least 6% of perinatally infected women in care in the UK and Ireland have experienced one or more pregnancies. Linking paediatric, pregnancy and second generation data will enable further monitoring of pregnancy outcomes in this newly emerging population.

  1. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J; Jacob, Gitta A; Brändle, Laura S; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes.

  2. Identifying and assessing strategies for evaluating the impact of mobile eye health units on health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shiwan; Turner, Angus; Tan, Irene; Muir, Josephine

    2017-08-14

    To identify and assess strategies for evaluating the impact of mobile eye health units on health outcomes. Systematic literature review. Worldwide. Peer-reviewed journal articles that included the use of a mobile eye health unit. Journal articles were included if outcome measures reflected an assessment of the impact of a mobile eye health unit on health outcomes. Six studies were identified with mobile services offering diabetic retinopathy screening (three studies), optometric services (two studies) and orthoptic services (one study). This review identified and assessed strategies in existing literature used to evaluate the impact of mobile eye health units on health outcomes. Studies included in this review used patient outcomes (i.e. disease detection, vision impairment, treatment compliance) and/or service delivery outcomes (i.e. cost per attendance, hospital transport use, inappropriate referrals, time from diabetic retinopathy photography to treatment) to evaluate the impact of mobile eye health units. Limitations include difficulty proving causation of specific outcome measures and the overall shortage of impact evaluation studies. Variation in geographical location, service population and nature of eye care providers limits broad application. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  3. Abdominal infections in the intensive care unit: characteristics, treatment and determinants of outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waele, J. De; Lipman, J.; Sakr, Y.; Marshall, J.C.; Vanhems, P.; Barrera Groba, C.; Leone, M.; Vincent, J.L.; Pickkers, P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal infections are frequent causes of sepsis and septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU) and are associated with adverse outcomes. We analyzed the characteristics, treatments and outcome of ICU patients with abdominal infections using data extracted from a one-day point preva

  4. HOME Participating Jurisdictions Vacant Units Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report is an MS Excel spreadsheet broken up by state, similar to the HOME Participating Jurisdiction's Open Activities Reports. The purpose of the HOME...

  5. Moose Survey-Inventory Progress Report : Unit 15A Kenai

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the 1972 moose surveys on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Game Management Unit 15(A). Harvest report returns indicate a hunter harvest of 193...

  6. Moose Survey-Inventory Progress Report : Unit 15C Homer

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the 1972 moose surveys on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Game Management Unit 15(C). Harvest report returns show a harvest of 170 bulls; this...

  7. Moose Survey-Inventory Progress Report : Unit 15B Soldotna

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the 1972 moose surveys on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Game Management Unit 15(B). Harvest report returns indicate a hunter harvest of 73...

  8. CTS United States experiments. A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, W. H.; Donoughe, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of the United States experiments activity to date. Wide segments of the population are involved in the Experiments Program including the scientific community, other government agencies, industry, and the education and health entities. The experiments are associated with both technological objectives and the demonstration of new community and social services via satellite.

  9. Application and investigation of a bound for outcome reporting bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamble Carrol

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct empirical evidence for the existence of outcome reporting bias is accumulating and this source of bias is recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. Methods A method for calculating the maximum bias in a meta-analysis due to publication bias is adapted for the setting where within-study selective non-reporting of outcomes is suspected, and compared to the alternative approach of missing data imputation. The properties of both methods are investigated in realistic small sample situations. Results The results suggest that the adapted Copas and Jackson approach is the preferred method for reviewers to apply as an initial assessment of robustness to within-study selective non-reporting. Conclusion The Copas and Jackson approach is a useful method for systematic reviewers to apply to assess robustness to outcome reporting bias.

  10. Outcome discrepancies and selective reporting: impacting the leading journals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhraig S Fleming

    Full Text Available Selective outcome reporting of either interesting or positive research findings is problematic, running the risk of poorly-informed treatment decisions. We aimed to assess the extent of outcome and other discrepancies and possible selective reporting between registry entries and published reports among leading medical journals.Randomized controlled trials published over a 6-month period from July to December 31st, 2013, were identified in five high impact medical journals: The Lancet, British Medical Journal, New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine and Journal of American Medical Association were obtained. Discrepancies between published studies and registry entries were identified and related to factors including registration timing, source of funding and presence of statistically significant results.Over the 6-month period, 137 RCTs were found. Of these, 18% (n = 25 had discrepancies related to primary outcomes with the primary outcome changed in 15% (n = 20. Moreover, differences relating to non-primary outcomes were found in 64% (n = 87 with both omission of pre-specified non-primary outcomes (39% and introduction of new non-primary outcomes (44% common. No relationship between primary or non-primary outcome change and registration timing (prospective or retrospective; P = 0.11, source of funding (P = 0.92 and presence of statistically significant results (P = 0.92 was found.Discrepancies between registry entries and published articles for primary and non-primary outcomes were common among trials published in leading medical journals. Novel approaches are required to address this problem.

  11. Patient reported outcomes: looking beyond the label claim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doward Lynda C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of patient reported outcome scales in clinical trials conducted by the pharmaceutical industry has become more widespread in recent years. The use of such outcomes is particularly common for products developed to treat chronic, disabling conditions where the intention is not to cure but to ameliorate symptoms, facilitate functioning or, ultimately, to improve quality of life. In such cases, patient reported evidence is increasingly viewed as an essential complement to traditional clinical evidence for establishing a product's competitive advantage in the marketplace. In a commercial setting, the value of patient reported outcomes is viewed largely in terms of their potential for securing a labelling claim in the USA or inclusion in the summary of product characteristics in Europe. Although, the publication of the recent US Food and Drug Administration guidance makes it difficult for companies to make claims in the USA beyond symptom improvements, the value of these outcomes goes beyond satisfying requirements for a label claim. The European regulatory authorities, payers both in the US and Europe, clinicians and patients all play a part in determining both the availability and the pricing of medicinal products and all have an interest in patient-reported data that go beyond just symptoms. The purpose of the current paper is to highlight the potential added value of patient reported outcome data currently collected and held by the industry for these groups.

  12. Outcome of ICU survivors: a comprehensive review. The role of patient-reported outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, C; Amaro, A; Dias, C; Costa-Pereira, A

    2012-10-01

    Problems survivors face after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge begin while they are still in the ward, where many of their specific problems may run unrecognized, but they assume a heavy weight when they arrive at their homes and face several kind of limitations, from being unable to climb stairs because of weight loss, asthenia, dyspnea or joint stiffness to anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Follow-up consultations have given us a better understanding of these specific problems, and the information gained has been used to improve intensive care itself and promote a quality service for patients and relatives. The aim of this article is to provide an overview on adult ICU outcome studies and discuss how they have influenced and improved the delivery of intensive care. We will explain how we went from real patients to outcome studies and what we have learned concerning the consequences of critical illness and critical care. Development of outcome studies, what we have learned through them and our own experience will be outlined focusing mainly in four topics: mortality, physical disability, neuropsychological disability and health-related quality of life. Interventions to improve outcome on these main topics will be presented, and we will explain how we went from outcome studies to clinical interventions, focusing on the most recent proposals of intervention to improve outcome. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  13. Hospital markup and operation outcomes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Faiz; Ejaz, Aslam; Makary, Martin A; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-07-01

    Although the price hospitals charge for operations has broad financial implications, hospital pricing is not subject to regulation. We sought to characterize national variation in hospital price markup for major cardiothoracic and gastrointestinal operations and to evaluate perioperative outcomes of hospitals relative to hospital price markup. All hospitals in which a patient underwent a cardiothoracic or gastrointestinal procedure were identified using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2012. Markup ratios (ratio of charges to costs) for the total cost of hospitalization were compared across hospitals. Risk-adjusted morbidity, failure-to-rescue, and mortality were calculated using multivariable, hierarchical logistic regression. Among the 3,498 hospitals identified, markup ratios ranged from 0.5-12.2, with a median markup ratio of 2.8 (interquartile range 2.7-3.9). For the 888 hospitals with extreme markup (greatest markup ratio quartile: markup ratio >3.9), the median markup ratio was 4.9 (interquartile range 4.3-6.0), with 10% of these hospitals billing more than 7 times the Medicare-allowable costs (markup ratio ≥7.25). Extreme markup hospitals were more often large (46.3% vs 33.8%, P markup ratio compared with 19.3% (n = 452) and 6.8% (n = 35) of nonprofit and government hospitals, respectively. Perioperative morbidity (32.7% vs 26.4%, P markup hospitals. There is wide variation in hospital markup for cardiothoracic and gastrointestinal procedures, with approximately a quarter of hospital charges being 4 times greater than the actual cost of hospitalization. Hospitals with an extreme markup had greater perioperative morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 200-BP-5 operable unit treatability test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The 200-BP-5 Operable Unit was established in response to recommendations presented in the 200 East Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE-RL 1993a). Recognizing different approaches to remediation, the groundwater AAMSR recommended separating groundwater from source and vadose zone operable units and subdividing 200 East Area groundwater into two operable units. The division between the 200-BP-5 and 200-PO-1 Operable Units was based principally on source operable unit boundaries and distribution of groundwater plumes derived from either B Plant or Plutonium/Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant liquid waste disposal sites.

  15. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This Quarter's Highlights include reports on the following tasks: (1) Mr. Wheeler completed a study for the 30th Weather Squadron at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in which he found precursors in weather observations that will help the forecasters determine when they will get strong wind gusts at their northern towers. The final report is now on the AMU website at http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/amu/final-reports/30ws-north-base-winds.pdf. (2) continued work on the second phase of verifying the performance of the MesoNAM weather model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). (3) continued work to improve the AMU peak wind tool by analyzing wind tower data to determine peak wind behavior during times of onshore and offshore flow. (4) continued updating lightning c1imatologies for KSC/CCAFS and other airfields around central Florida and created new c1imatologies for moisture and stability thresholds.

  16. Body hair transplantation: Case report of successful outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataram Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of body hair in to scalp has been suggested as an option to treat extensive cases of baldness with poor donor scalp. However, evidence about its long-term efficacy is yet lacking, with very few published reports and the routine use of the technique is still controversial. We report the satisfactory outcome in a case of extensive baldness in whom hairs from different donor areas such as chest, abdomen, arms, thighs were transplanted on to scalp.

  17. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfson, Ola; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and u...

  18. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures. PMID:25152661

  19. Patient-reported outcomes in left ventricular assist device therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Denollet, Johan; de Jonge, Nicolaas;

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have created today's potential for extending the lives of patients with end-stage heart failure. Few studies have examined the effect of LVAD therapy on patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as health status, quality of life...

  20. The impact of financial and nonfinancial incentives on business-unit outcomes over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Suzanne J; Luthans, Fred

    2006-01-01

    Unlike previous behavior management research, this study used a quasi-experimental, control group design to examine the impact of financial and nonfinancial incentives on business-unit (21 stores in a fast-food franchise corporation) outcomes (profit, customer service, and employee turnover) over time. The results showed that both types of incentives had a significant impact on all measured outcomes. The financial incentive initially had a greater effect on all 3 outcomes, but over time, the financial and nonfinancial incentives had an equally significant impact except in terms of employee turnover.

  1. Predictable Outcomes with Porcelain Laminate Veneers: A Clinical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Welson; Teixeira, Marcelo Lucchesi; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Jorge, Mônica Zacharias; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    This clinical report describes how to achieve predictable outcomes for anterior teeth esthetic restorations with porcelain laminate veneers by associating the digital planning and design of the restoration with interim restorations. The previous digital smile design of the restoration eliminates the communication barrier with the patient and assists the clinician throughout patient treatment. Interim restorations (diagnostic mock-ups) further enhance communication with the patient and prevent unnecessary tooth reduction for conservative tooth preparation. Adequate communication between patient and clinician contributes to successful definitive restorations and patient satisfaction with the final esthetic outcome.

  2. United States Data Center Energy Usage Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sartor, Dale [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Herrlin, Magnus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Koomey, Jonathan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Horner, Nathaniel [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Azevedo, Inês [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lintner, William [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report estimates historical data center electricity consumption back to 2000, relying on previous studies and historical shipment data, and forecasts consumption out to 2020 based on new trends and the most recent data available. Figure ES-1 provides an estimate of total U.S. data center electricity use (servers, storage, network equipment, and infrastructure) from 2000-2020. In 2014, data centers in the U.S. consumed an estimated 70 billion kWh, representing about 1.8% of total U.S. electricity consumption. Current study results show data center electricity consumption increased by about 4% from 2010-2014, a large shift from the 24% percent increase estimated from 2005-2010 and the nearly 90% increase estimated from 2000-2005. Energy use is expected to continue slightly increasing in the near future, increasing 4% from 2014-2020, the same rate as the past five years. Based on current trend estimates, U.S. data centers are projected to consume approximately 73 billion kWh in 2020.

  3. Patient-reported outcomes for total hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, Natalie J; Roos, Ewa M.

    2012-01-01

    , and high personal and financial cost associated with THA and TKA, patient-reported outcomes are required to ensure optimal selection of patients, and that postoperative outcomes outweigh the burden associated with surgical procedures. It is clear from the information presented that clinicians need...... to consider a number of factors when selecting a "good" patientreported outcome for use in their TJA patients. Not only does the instrument need to measure dimensions appropriate for THA and TKA patients, but it also needs to have minimal administrative burden, accessibility to a variety of clinicians...... and patients, reliability, validity, and responsiveness to change. Furthermore, knowledge regarding the minimal score that patients deem to be meaningful is useful in interpreting whether a patient has experienced real improvement in their condition after surgery. It is clear that further studies are required...

  4. Variation in outcomes in Veterans Affairs intensive care units with a computerized severity measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Render, Marta L; Kim, H Myra; Deddens, James; Sivaganesin, Siva; Welsh, Deborah E; Bickel, Karen; Freyberg, Ron; Timmons, Stephen; Johnston, Joseph; Connors, Alfred F; Wagner, Douglas; Hofer, Timothy P

    2005-05-01

    unit profiling and analysis of natural experiments to understand process and outcome links and quality efforts.

  5. Different school placements following language unit attendance: which factors affect language outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Botting, Nicola; Knox, Emma; Simkin, Zoë

    2002-01-01

    The study compared the outcomes of two groups of children who were attending language unit provision at 7 years of age. Of 242 children in the original study, 62 (28%) transferred to mainstream school placements at age 8 years. These children were then closely matched to children still attending language unit provision at this age using measures of non-verbal IQ, expression and comprehension. These two groups of children were compared on outcome at 11 years in the areas of language skill, non-verbal IQ and social behaviour. Teacher/speech-language therapist opinions of placement were also examined as factors affecting outcome. Results show that children who moved to mainstream provision at 8 years were more likely to be attending mainstream at 11 years, although the majority received extra support. No further differences were evident in outcome according to placement type. However, there was a main effect of teacher/therapist opinion on outcome--children whose teachers were not entirely happy with the 8-year placement performed more poorly at 11 years on language measures. There were no differences on any other measures. The findings suggest that follow-on placements for children attending language units need to be more closely in line with teacher's opinions and that more flexibility needs to be evident in school placement policy in order that appropriate educational settings can be arranged.

  6. Reporting outcomes of back pain trials: A modified Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froud, Robert; Eldridge, Sandra; Kovacs, Francisco;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a common and expensive health complaint. Many low back pain trials have been conducted, but these are reported in a variety of ways and are often difficult to interpret. AIM: To facilitate consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for future low back pain...... commonly used in back pain trials, are reported using between-group mean differences (accompanied by minimally important difference (between-group/population-level) thresholds where these exist), the proportion of participants improving and deteriorating according to established and relevant minimally...... pain experts reached a high level of consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for patient-reported outcomes in future low back pain trials. The statement has the potential to increase interpretability and improve patient care....

  7. Isolated inhalational injury: Clinical course and outcomes in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Chacko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Although smoke inhalation is well known to cause acute lung injury, there are few reports in literature that study the evolution, clinical course and outcomes of isolated inhalational lung injury in a modern intensive care setting. A major fire disaster provided us the opportunity to study victims of isolated inhalational injury admitted to our Multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit (MICU. Materials and Methods: We studied the clinical course, ICU and hospital outcomes of 13 victims of a fire disaster who required mechanical ventilation for isolated inhalational lung injury. All patients were followed up at regular intervals, and their functional status was assessed at 8 months after hospital discharge. Results: The Lung Injury Scores (LIS worsened to reach a nadir on Day 3 of injury. There was a significant correlation between the LIS on Day 3 and duration of mechanical ventilation (r = 0.8; P = 0.003, ICU (r = 0.8; P = 0.002 and hospital (r = 0.6; P = 0.02 days. Late-onset airway complications were encountered in four patients. Three of them required long-term artificial airways - two with a tracheostomy while the third patient required surgical insertion of a "T" tube. Persistent problems with phonation occurred in two patients. At 8 months postdischarge, all patients were independent with activities of daily living; all were back to work, except for two who continued to need artificial airways. Conclusions: Inhalational lung injury progresses over the first few days and is worst after 72 h. Late-onset airway complications may manifest after several weeks and require repeated intervention.

  8. Implementation and outcomes of commercial disease management programs in the United States: the disease management outcomes consolidation survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Fox, Kathe; Schmidt, Joseph; Roberts, Mark; Rindress, Donna; Hay, Joel

    2005-08-01

    Despite widespread adoption of disease management (DM) programs by US health plans, gaps remain in the evidence for their benefit. The Disease Management Outcomes Consolidation Survey was designed to gather data on DM programs for commercial health plans, to assess program success and DM effectiveness. The questionnaire was mailed to 292 appropriate health plan contacts; 26 plans covering more than 14 million commercial members completed and returned the survey. Respondents reported that DM plays a significant and increasing role in their organizations. Key reasons for adopting DM were improving clinical outcomes, reducing medical costs and utilization, and improving member satisfaction. More respondents were highly satisfied with clinical results than with utilization or cost outcomes of their programs (46%, 17%, and 13%, respectively). Detailed results were analyzed for 57 DM programs with over 230,000 enrollees. Most responding plans offered DM programs for diabetes and asthma, with return on investment (ROI) ranging from 0.16:1 to 4:1. Weighted by number of enrollees per DM program, average ROI was 2.56:1 for asthma (n = 1,136 enrollees) and 1.98:1 for diabetes (n = 25,364). Most (but not all) respondents reported reduced hospital admissions, increasing rates of preventive care, and improved clinical measures. Few respondents provided detailed information about DM programs for other medical conditions, but most that did reported positive outcomes. Lack of standardized methodology was identified as a major barrier to in-house program evaluation. Although low response rate precluded drawing many general conclusions, a clear need emerged for more rigorous evaluation methods and greater standardization of outcomes measurement.

  9. Patient- and clinician- reported outcome in eating disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Laura Vad; Frølich, Jacob Stampe; Gudex, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome is increasingly applied in health sciences. Patients with eating disorders (EDs) characteristically have a different opinion of their needs to that of the health professionals, which can lead to ambivalence towards treatment and immense compliance difficulties. This cross....... This association was not observed in bulimia nervosa (BN). We did not find a correlation between SF-36 scores and BMI in any of the diagnostic groups....

  10. Energy efficiency of computer power supply units - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aebischer, B. [cepe - Centre for Energy Policy and Economics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Huser, H. [Encontrol GmbH, Niederrohrdorf (Switzerland)

    2002-11-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the efficiency of computer power supply units, which decreases rapidly during average computer use. The background and the purpose of the project are examined. The power supplies for personal computers are discussed and the testing arrangement used is described. Efficiency, power-factor and operating points of the units are examined. Potentials for improvement and measures to be taken are discussed. Also, action to be taken by those involved in the design and operation of such power units is proposed. Finally, recommendations for further work are made.

  11. Relationship Between Patient-Reported Outcomes and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Morquio A Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Lampe MD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional analysis assessed the correlation between patient-reported outcomes (PROs and clinical outcomes in 24 German patients with Morquio A. Clinical outcomes included 6-minute walk test (6MWT, 3-minute stair climb (3MSC test, and joint range of motion as measures for endurance/mobility, forced vital capacity (FVC and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV as measures for respiratory function, and height as an important manifestation. The PROs included the EuroQoL (EQ 5D-5L (EQ5D-5L, to measure health-related QoL (HRQoL, and patients’ rating of their ability to walk, climb, or breathe. In adults, endurance and pulmonary function measures and height showed strong and statistically significant correlation with the patients’ EQ5D-5L (6MWT: R = .884, 3MSC test: R = .852, FVC: R = .815, MVV: R = .825, height: R = .842. The adult patients’ rating of their ability to walk and climb also correlated strongly with 6MWT (R = .839 and 3MSC test (R = .700 results. Improvements in these clinical outcomes may be robust surrogate parameters of a better EQ5D-5L/HRQoL in patients with Morquio A.

  12. Registering initial defaulters and reporting on their treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, A D; Rusen, I D; Chiang, C-Y; Hinderaker, S G; Enarson, D A

    2009-07-01

    This Unresolved Issues article highlights three original articles that appeared last year in the Journal discussing the phenomenon of initial defaulters. There are three important challenges with patients that appear in the laboratory sputum register but are not recorded in the tuberculosis (TB) patient register: the first is how to identify these patients, trace them and get them on to treatment as soon as possible; the second is how to register and report on these cases as part of the case-finding component of TB control; and the third is whether to include these initial default patients in the cohort analysis of treatment outcomes. We recommend a step-wise approach to these challenges and advocate that these patients be included, wherever possible, in the TB patient register and in the cohort analysis of treatment outcomes.

  13. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-30

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in U.S., including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in the U.S.

  14. Quarterly report -- Physics unit: October--December, 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, D.E.; Faulkner, J.E.; Ozeroff, J.

    1954-01-11

    This report is intended to be a description of current work being done by the Physics Unit at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation. The work is concerned mainly with the study of graphite-moderated natural uranium reactors for the production of plutonium on a large scale. In addition, varied physics problems associated with the operation of an industrial atomic plant are occasionally dealt with. The report is divided into four sections; lattice physics; nuclear physics; irradiation physics; and plant physics.

  15. RECALMIN: The association between management of Spanish National Health Service Internal Medical Units and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio; Javier Elola-Somoza, Francisco; Casariego-Vales, Emilio; Fernandez-Perez, Cristina; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Bernal, José Luis; Barba-Martín, Raquel

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the association between management of Internal Medical Units (IMUs) with outcomes (mortality and length of stay) within the Spanish National Health Service. Data on management were obtained from a descriptive transversal study performed among IMUs of the acute hospitals. Outcome indicators were taken from an administrative database of all hospital discharges from the IMUs. Spanish National Health Service. One hundred and twenty-four acute general hospitals with available data of management and outcomes (401 424 discharges). IMU risk standardized mortality rates were calculated using a multilevel model adjusted by Charlson Index. Risk standardized myocardial infarction and heart failure mortality rates were calculated using specific multilevel models. Length of stay was adjusted by complexity. Greater hospital complexity was associated with longer average length of stays (r: 0.42; P hospital mortality rates were higher at larger hospitals, but no significant differences were found when mortality was risk adjusted. There was an association between nurse workload with mortality rate for selected conditions (r: 0.25; P = 0.009). Safety committee and multidisciplinary ward rounds were also associated with outcomes. We have not found any association between complexity and intra-hospital mortality. There is an association between some management indicators with intra-hospital mortality and the length of stay. Better disease-specific outcomes adjustments and a larger number of IMUs in the sample may provide more insights about the association between management of IMUs with healthcare outcomes.

  16. Indications and outcome for obstetric patients' admission to intensive care unit: a 7-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lataifeh, I; Amarin, Z; Zayed, F; Al-Mehaisen, L; Alchalabi, H; Khader, Y

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to investigate the indications, interventions and clinical outcome of pregnant and newly delivered women admitted to the multidisciplinary intensive care unit at the King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan over a 7-year period from January 2002 to December 2008. The collected data included demographic characteristics of the patients, mode of delivery, pre-existing medical conditions, reason for admission, specific intervention, length of stay and maternal outcome. A total of 43 women required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), which represented 0.37% of all deliveries. The majority (95.3%) of patients were admitted to the ICU postpartum. The most common reasons for admissions were (pre)eclampsia (48.8%) and obstetric haemorrhage (37.2). The remainder included adult respiratory distress syndrome (6.9%), pulmonary embolism (2.3%) and neurological disorders (4.6%). Mechanical ventilation was required to support 18.6% of patients and transfusion of red blood cells was needed for 48.8% of patients. There were three maternal deaths (6.9%). A multidisciplinary team approach is essential to improve the management of hypertensive disorders and postpartum haemorrhage to achieve significant improvements in maternal outcome. A large, prospective study to know which women are at high risk of admission to the intensive care units and to prevent serious maternal morbidity and mortality is warranted.

  17. Glycated hemoglobin A: A predictor of outcome in trauma admissions to intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ruby Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Although large studies have demonstrated the association between hyperglycemia and adverse intensive care unit (ICU outcomes, it is yet unclear which subset of patients benefit from tight sugar control in ICU. Recent evidence suggests that stress induced hyperglycemia (SIH and co-incidentally detected diabetes mellitus are different phenomena with different prognoses. Differentiating SIH from diabetic hyperglycemia is challenging in ICU settings. We followed a cohort of trauma patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (SICU to evaluate if initial glycated hemoglobin A (HbA 1 c level predicts the outcome of admission. Materials and Methods: A cohort of 120 consecutive admissions to SICU following trauma were recruited and admission blood sugar and HbA 1 c were measured. Outcomes were prospectively measured by blinded ICU doctors. A logistic regression model was developed to assess if HbA 1 c predicts poor outcomes in these settings. Results: Nearly 24% of the participants had HbA 1 c ≥ 6. Those with HbA 1 c ≥ 6 had 3.14 times greater risk of poor outcome at the end of hospital stay when compared to those with HbA 1 c < 6 and this risk increased to an odds ratio of 4.57 on adjusting for other significant predictors: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, injury severity score, admission blood sugar and age at admission. Conclusions: Substantial proportion of trauma admissions has underlying diabetes. HbA 1 c, a measure of pre admission glycaemic status is an important predictor of ICU outcome in trauma patients.

  18. Strategies to use tablet computers for collection of electronic patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick-Makaroff, Kara; Molzahn, Anita

    2015-01-22

    Mobile devices are increasingly being used for data collection in research. However, many researchers do not have experience in collecting data electronically. Hence, the purpose of this short report was to identify issues that emerged in a study that incorporated electronic capture of patient-reported outcomes in clinical settings, and strategies used to address the issues. The issues pertaining to electronic patient-reported outcome data collection were captured qualitatively during a study on use of electronic patient-reported outcomes in two home dialysis units. Fifty-six patients completed three surveys on tablet computers, including the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale, and a satisfaction measure. Issues that arose throughout the research process were recorded during ethics reviews, implementation process, and data collection. Four core issues emerged including logistics of technology, security, institutional and financial support, and electronic design. Although use of mobile devices for data collection has many benefits, it also poses new challenges for researchers. Advance consideration of possible issues that emerge in the process, and strategies that can help address these issues, may prevent disruption and enhance validity of findings.

  19. Patients' characterization, hospital course and clinical outcomes in five Italian respiratory intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverino, Eva; Nava, Stefano; Ferrer, Miquel; Ceriana, Piero; Clini, Enrico; Spada, Elisa; Zanotti, Ercole; Trianni, Ludovico; Barbano, Luca; Fracchia, Claudio; Balbi, Bruno; Vitacca, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory intensive care units (RICU) dedicated to weaning could be suitable facilities for clinical management of "post-ICU" patients. We retrospectively analyzed the time course of patients' characteristics, clinical outcomes and medical staff utilization in five Italian RICUs by comparing three periods of 5 consecutive years (from 1991 to 2005). A total of 3,106 patients (age 76 +/- 4 years; 72% males) were analyzed. The number of co-morbidities per patient (from 1.8 to 3.0, p = 0.05) and the previous intensive care unit (ICU) stay (from 25 to 32 days, p = 0.002) increased over time. The doctor-to-patient ratio significantly decreased over time (from 1:3 to 1:5, p rehabilitative units (from 70 to 75%). The mortality rate increased over time (from 9 to 15%). Significant correlations between the doctor-to-patient ratio and the rates of weaning success (r = 0.679, p = 0.005), home discharge (r = 0.722, p = 0.002) and the RICU length of stay (LOS) (r = -0.683, p = 0.005) were observed. The clinical outcomes of our units worsened over 15 years, likely as consequence of admitting more severely ill patients. The potential further negative influence of reduced medical staff availability on weaning success, home discharge and LOS warrants future prospective investigations.

  20. Population-level differences in revascularization treatment and outcomes among various United States subpopulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garth Graham; Yang-Yu Karen Xiao; Dan Rappoport; Saima Siddiqi

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent general improvements in health care, significant disparities persist in the cardiovascular care of women and racial/ethnic minorities. This is true even when income, education level, and site of care are taken into consideration. Possible explanations for these disparities include socioeconomic considerations, elements of discrimination and racism that affect socioeconomic status, and access to adequate medical care. Coronary revascularization has become the accepted and recommended treatment for myocardial infarction(MI) today and is one of the most common major medical interventions in the United States, with more than 1 million procedures each year. This review discusses recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms, care and access to medical resources, and outcomes in revascularization as treatment for acute coronary syndrome, looking especially at women and minority populations in the United States. The data show that revascularization is used less in both female and minority patients. We summarize recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms related to MI; access to care, medical resources, and treatments; and outcomes in women, blacks, and Hispanics. The picture is complicated among the last group by the many Hispanic/Latino subgroups in the United States. Some differences in outcomes are partially explained by presentation symptoms and co-morbidities and external conditions such as local hospital capacity. Of particular note is the striking differential in both presentation co-morbidities and mortality rates seen in women, compared to men, especially in women ≤ 55 years of age. Surveillance data on other groups in the United States such as American Indians/Alaska Natives and the many Asian subpopulations show disparities in risk factors and co-morbidities, but revascularization as treatment for MI in these populations has not been adequately studied. Significant research is required to

  1. Shaped versus Round Implants in Breast Reconstruction: A Multi-Institutional Comparison of Surgical and Patient-Reported Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavanin, Nima; Clemens, Mark W; Pusic, Andrea L; Fine, Neil A; Hamill, Jennifer B; Kim, H Myra; Qi, Ji; Wilkins, Edwin G; Kim, John Y S

    2017-05-01

    Since the 2012 approval of shaped implants, their use in breast reconstruction has increased in the United States. However, large-scale comparisons of complications and patient-reported outcomes are lacking. The authors endeavored to compare surgical and patient-reported outcomes across implant types. The Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium database was queried for expander/implant reconstructions with at least 1-year postexchange follow-up (mean, 18.5 months). Outcomes of interest included postoperative complications, 1-year revisions, and patient-reported outcomes. Bivariate and mixed-effects regression analyses evaluated the effect of implant type on patient outcomes. Overall, 822 patients (73.5 percent) received round and 297 patients (26.5 percent) received shaped implants. Patients undergoing unilateral reconstructions with round implants underwent more contralateral symmetry procedures, including augmentations (round, 18.7 percent; shaped, 6.8 percent; p = 0.003) and reductions (round, 32.2 percent; shaped, 20.5 percent; p = 0.019). Shaped implants were associated with higher rates of infection (shaped, 6.1 percent; round, 2.3 percent; p = 0.002), that remained significant after multivariable adjustment. Other complication rates did not differ significantly between cohorts. Round and shaped implants experienced similar 2-year patient-reported outcome scores. This prospective, multicenter study is the largest evaluating outcomes of shaped versus round implants in breast reconstruction. Although recipients of round implants demonstrated lower infection rates compared with shaped implants, these patients were more likely to undergo contralateral symmetry procedures. Both implant types yielded comparable patient-reported outcome scores. With appropriate patient selection, both shaped and round implants can provide acceptable outcomes in breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  2. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report - Fourth Quarter FY-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 2009 (July - September 2009). Tasks reports include: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Objective Lightning Probability Tool. Phase III, (3) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting. Phase II, (4) Update and Maintain Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS), (5) Verify MesoNAM Performance (6) develop a Graphical User Interface to update selected parameters for the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLlT)

  3. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report Third Quarter FY-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Dreher, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2008 (April - June 2008). Tasks reported on are: Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), Anvil Forecast Tool in AWIPS Phase II, Completion of the Edward Air Force Base (EAFB) Statistical Guidance Wind Tool, Volume Averaged Height Integ rated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), Impact of Local Sensors, Radar Scan Strategies for the PAFB WSR-74C Replacement, VAHIRR Cost Benefit Analysis, and WRF Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base

  4. Hyperammonemia: A Report of Maternal Biliary Cirrhosis and Neonatal Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana J. Hussamy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although uncommon during pregnancy, cirrhosis results in multiple medical complications impacting both mother and fetus. Previous reports suggest liver dysfunction in pregnancy causes accumulation of neurotoxins within the maternal compartment that increases neonatal morbidity through placental transfer. We present a case of a 36-year-old G2P1 female with history of biliary cirrhosis presenting at 32-weeks' gestation with hepatic congestion progressing to hepatic encephalopathy prompting delivery. Umbilical cord sampling and postnatal infant testing demonstrated elevated ammonia levels which resolved by 12 hours of life without intervention. At discharge, the infant did not demonstrate evidence of neurologic deficit. We conclude that acute maternal hepatic encephalopathy and hyperammonemia due to chronic liver disease do not portend adverse neonatal outcomes, notably encephalopathy.

  5. Hyperammonemia: a report of maternal biliary cirrhosis and neonatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussamy, Deana J; Nelson, David B; Shivvers, Stephan A

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon during pregnancy, cirrhosis results in multiple medical complications impacting both mother and fetus. Previous reports suggest liver dysfunction in pregnancy causes accumulation of neurotoxins within the maternal compartment that increases neonatal morbidity through placental transfer. We present a case of a 36-year-old G2P1 female with history of biliary cirrhosis presenting at 32-weeks' gestation with hepatic congestion progressing to hepatic encephalopathy prompting delivery. Umbilical cord sampling and postnatal infant testing demonstrated elevated ammonia levels which resolved by 12 hours of life without intervention. At discharge, the infant did not demonstrate evidence of neurologic deficit. We conclude that acute maternal hepatic encephalopathy and hyperammonemia due to chronic liver disease do not portend adverse neonatal outcomes, notably encephalopathy.

  6. Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Systematic Review of the Literature Focusing on Reported Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Aswin; Hocking, Katie C; Broughton, Ellie; Turner, Carole; Santarius, Thomas; Hutchinson, Peter J; Kolias, Angelos G

    2016-07-01

    The plethora of studies in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has not resulted in the development of an evidence-based treatment strategy, largely due to heterogeneous outcome measures that preclude cross-study comparisons and guideline development. This study aimed to identify and quantify the heterogeneity of outcome measures reported in the CSDH literature and to build a case for the development of a consensus-based core outcome set. This systematic review adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews (CRD42014007266). All full-text English language studies with >10 patients (prospective) or >100 patients (retrospective) published after 1990 examining clinical outcomes in CSDH were eligible for inclusion. One hundred two eligible studies were found. There were 14 (13.7%) randomized controlled trials, one single arm trial (1.0%), 25 (24.5%) cohort comparison studies, and 62 (60.8%) prospective or retrospective cohort studies. Outcome domains reported by the studies included mortality (63.8% of included studies), recurrence (94.1%), complications (48.0%), functional outcomes (40.2%), and radiological (38.2%) outcomes. There was significant heterogeneity in the definitions of the outcome measures, as evidenced by the seven different definitions of the term "recurrence," with no definition given in 19 studies. The time-points of assessment for all the outcome domains varied greatly from inpatient/hospital discharge to 18 months. This study establishes and quantifies the heterogeneity of outcome measure reporting in CSDH and builds the case for the development of a robust consensus-based core outcome set for future studies to adhere to as part of the Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in CSDH (CODE-CSDH) project.

  7. Short- and long-term outcomes of AL amyloidosis patients admitted into intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinault, Damien; Canet, Emmanuel; Huart, Antoine; Jaccard, Arnaud; Ribes, David; Lavayssiere, Laurence; Venot, Marion; Cointault, Olivier; Roussel, Murielle; Nogier, Marie-Béatrice; Pichereau, Claire; Lemiale, Virginie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Attal, Michel; Chauveau, Dominique; Azoulay, Elie; Faguer, Stanislas

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare and threatening condition that may require intensive care because of amyloid deposit-related organ dysfunction or therapy-related adverse events. Although new multiple myeloma drugs have dramatically improved outcomes in AL amyloidosis, the outcomes of AL patients admitted into intensive care units (ICUs) remain largely unknown. Admission has been often restricted to patients with low Mayo Clinic staging and/or with a complete or very good immunological response at admission. In a retrospective multicentre cohort of 66 adult AL (n = 52) or AA (n = 14) amyloidosis patients, with similar causes of admission to an ICU, the 28-d and 6-month survival rates of AA patients were significantly higher compared to AL patients (93% vs. 60%, P = 0·03; 71% vs. 45%, P = 0·02, respectively). In AL patients, the simplified Index of Gravity Score (IGS2) was the only independent predictive factor for death by day 28, whereas the Mayo-Clinic classification stage had no influence. In Cox's multivariate regression model, only cardiac arrest and on-going chemotherapy at ICU admission significantly predicted death at 6 months. Short-term outcomes of AL patients admitted into an ICU were mainly related to the severity of the acute medical condition, whereas on-going chemotherapy for active amyloidosis impacted on long-term outcomes.

  8. Utilization of preventive care services and their effect on cardiovascular outcomes in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Vaidya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Varun Vaidya, Gautam Partha, Jennifer HowePharmacy Health Care Administration, Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Toledo College of Pharmacy, Toledo, OH, USAObjective: To describe and analyze utilization of preventive care services and their effect on cardiovascular outcomes in the United States.Methods: Data from the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS were used to analyze utilization of preventive care services and their effect on cardiovascular outcomes. Recommendations by the Seventh Report of the Joint Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure and the National Cholesterol Education Program were used to determine appropriate levels of preventive care utilization. Utilization of blood pressure screening and cholesterol checkup services were used as the dependent variable, while age, gender, race, ethnicity, insurance status, and perceived health status were used as independent variables. Since guidelines differ for people with elevated blood pressure, respondents with elevated blood pressure were identified in the MEPS database by self-reported diagnosis. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the population, while a multivariate logistic regression model was built to predict odds of utilizing appropriate levels of preventive services.Results: Total number of adult respondents for which data were available for blood pressure checkup and cholesterol checkup was 20,523 and 15,784, respectively. Overall, MEPS respondents were found to adhere to guideline recommendations for preventive care utilization. Multivariate logistic regression showed that odds of utilization of preventive care services were higher for elderly patients (age >65 years for blood pressure (odds ratio [OR] = 2.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.92–2.97 and cholesterol (OR = 3.05, 95% CI: 2.18–4.27 preventive services compared with younger population (age 18–54 years. Males had much lower odds of

  9. Establishing Core Outcome Domains in Hemodialysis: Report of the Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Consensus Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Wheeler, David C; Evangelidis, Nicole; Tugwell, Peter; Crowe, Sally; Van Biesen, Wim; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; O'Donoghue, Donal; Tam-Tham, Helen; Shen, Jenny I; Pinter, Jule; Larkins, Nicholas; Youssouf, Sajeda; Mandayam, Sreedhar; Ju, Angela; Craig, Jonathan C

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-informed decision making in clinical care and policy in nephrology is undermined by trials that selectively report a large number of heterogeneous outcomes, many of which are not patient centered. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Initiative convened an international consensus workshop on November 7, 2015, to discuss the identification and implementation of a potential core outcome set for all trials in hemodialysis. The purpose of this article is to report qualitative analyses of the workshop discussions, describing the key aspects to consider when establishing core outcomes in trials involving patients on hemodialysis therapy. Key stakeholders including 8 patients/caregivers and 47 health professionals (nephrologists, policymakers, industry, and researchers) attended the workshop. Attendees suggested that identifying core outcomes required equitable stakeholder engagement to ensure relevance across patient populations, flexibility to consider evolving priorities over time, deconstruction of language and meaning for conceptual consistency and clarity, understanding of potential overlap and associations between outcomes, and an assessment of applicability to the range of interventions in hemodialysis. For implementation, they proposed that core outcomes must have simple, inexpensive, and validated outcome measures that could be used in clinical care (quality indicators) and trials (including pragmatic trials) and endorsement by regulatory agencies. Integrating these recommendations may foster acceptance and optimize the uptake and translation of core outcomes in hemodialysis, leading to more informative research, for better treatment and improved patient outcomes.

  10. Vaginal birth after cesarean: neonatal outcomes and United States birth setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, Ellen L; Cheyney, Melissa; Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Emeis, Cathy; Lapidus, Jodi; Biel, Frances M; Wiedrick, Jack; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2017-04-01

    Women who seek vaginal birth after cesarean delivery may find limited in-hospital options. Increasing numbers of women in the United States are delivering by vaginal birth after cesarean delivery out-of-hospital. Little is known about neonatal outcomes among those who deliver by vaginal birth after cesarean delivery in- vs out-of-hospital. The purpose of this study was to compare neonatal outcomes between women who deliver via vaginal birth after cesarean delivery in-hospital vs out-of-hospital (home and freestanding birth center). We conducted a retrospective cohort study using 2007-2010 linked United States birth and death records to compare singleton, term, vertex, nonanomolous, and liveborn neonates who delivered by vaginal birth after cesarean delivery in- or out-of-hospital. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses were conducted to estimate unadjusted, absolute, and relative birth-setting risk differences. Analyses were stratified by parity and history of vaginal birth. Sensitivity analyses that involved 3 transfer status scenarios were conducted. Of women in the United States with a history of cesarean delivery (n=1,138,813), only a small proportion delivered by vaginal birth after cesarean delivery with the subsequent pregnancy (n=109,970; 9.65%). The proportion of home vaginal birth after cesarean delivery births increased from 1.78-2.45%. A pattern of increased neonatal morbidity was noted in unadjusted analysis (neonatal seizures, Apgar score cesarean delivery in out-of-hospital settings had higher odds of neonatal morbidity and death compared with women of higher parity. Women who had not birthed vaginally prior to out-of-hospital vaginal birth after cesarean delivery had higher odds of neonatal morbidity and mortality compared with women who had birthed vaginally prior to out-of-hospital vaginal birth after cesarean delivery. Sensitivity analyses generated distributions of plausible alternative estimates by outcome. Fewer than 1 in

  11. Predicting Outcomes on the Liver Transplant Waiting List in the United States: Accounting for Large Regional Variation in Organ Availability and Priority Allocation Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Allyson; Schladt, David P; Zeglin, Jessica; Pyke, Joshua; Kim, W Ray; Lake, John R; Roberts, John P; Hirose, Ryutaro; Mulligan, David C; Kasiske, Bertram L; Snyder, Jon J; Israni, Ajay K

    2016-10-01

    The probability of liver transplant and death on the waiting list in the United States varies greatly by donation service area (DSA) due to geographic differences in availability of organs and allocation of priority points, making it difficult for providers to predict likely outcomes after listing. We aimed to develop an online calculator to report outcomes by region and patient characteristics. Using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database, we included all prevalent US adults aged 18 years or older waitlisted for liver transplant, examined on 24 days at least 30 days apart over a 2-year period. Outcomes were determined at intervals of 30 to 365 days. Outcomes are reported by transplant program, DSA, region, and the nation for comparison, and can be shown by allocation or by laboratory model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score (6-14, 15-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-40), age, and blood type. Outcomes varied greatly by DSA; for candidates with allocation MELD 25-29, the 25th and 75th percentiles of liver transplant probability were 30% and 67%, respectively, at 90 days. Corresponding percentiles for death or becoming too sick to undergo transplant were 5% and 9%. Outcomes also varied greatly for candidates with and without MELD exception points. The waitlist outcome calculator highlights ongoing disparities in access to liver transplant and may assist providers in understanding and counseling their patients about likely outcomes on the waiting list.

  12. Predictors and outcome of obstetric admissions to intensive care unit: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shruti; Guleria, Kiran; Vaid, Neelam B; Suneja, Amita; Ahuja, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive observational study was carried out in Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital to identify predictors and outcome of obstetric admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Ninety consecutive pregnant patients or those up to 42 days of termination of pregnancy admitted to ICU from October 2010 to December 2011 were enrolled as study subjects with selection of a suitable comparison group. Qualitative statistics of both groups were compared using Pearson's Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Odds ratio was calculated for significant factors. Low socioeconomic status, duration of complaints more than 12 h, delay at intermediary facility, and peripartum hysterectomy increased probability of admission to ICU. High incidence of obstetric admissions to ICU as compared to other countries stresses on need for separate obstetric ICU. Availability of high dependency unit can decrease preload to ICU by 5%. Patients with hemorrhagic disorders and those undergoing peripartum hysterectomy need more intensive care.

  13. Patient reported outcomes in the assessment of premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althof, Stanley E

    2016-08-01

    The term 'Patient Reported Outcome', abbreviated as PRO, was introduced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which proposed guidance on the development and validation of PROs. Previously PROs were known as self-report diaries, event-logs, self-administered questionnaires, and clinician administered rating scales. PROs seek to capture the subjective perceptions of patients and/or partner's related to their specific symptoms, degree of bother, efficacy of a medication or psychotherapy intervention, and quality of life issues related to a specific condition. This article reviews the essential psychometric and regulatory agency requirements in the development of PROs. The constructs of reliability, various forms of validity, sensitivity, and specificity as well as concerns with translating a PRO into a different language are reviewed. Three PROs, the Premature Ejaculation Profile (PEP), the Index of Premature Ejaculation (IPE) and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) all used in the assessment of premature ejaculation (PE) are discussed. These questionnaires meet or exceed all the psychometric requirements and have been employed in clinical trials and observational studies of men with PE. The article concludes on discussing some of the limitations of PRO use and recommendations for the future.

  14. Effect of intensive care unit organizational model and structure on outcomes in patients with acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treggiari, Miriam M; Martin, Diane P; Yanez, N David; Caldwell, Ellen; Hudson, Leonard D; Rubenfeld, Gordon D

    2007-10-01

    Prior studies supported an association between intensive care unit (ICU) organizational model or staffing patterns and outcome in critically ill patients. To examine the association of closed versus open models with patient mortality across adult ICUs in King County (WA). Cohort study of patients with acute lung injury (ALI). ICU structure, organization, and patient care practices were assessed using self-administered mail questionnaires completed by the medical director and nurse manager. We defined closed ICUs as units that required patient transfer to or mandatory patient comanagement by an intensivist and open ICUs as those relying on other organizational models. Outcomes were obtained from the King County Lung Injury Project, a population-based cohort of patients with ALI. The main endpoint was hospital mortality. Of 24 eligible ICUs, 13 ICUs were designated closed and 11 open. Complete survey data were available for 23 (96%) ICUs. Higher physician and nurse availability was reported in closed versus open ICUs. A total of 684 of 1,075 (63%) of patients with ALI were cared for in closed ICUs. After adjusting for potential confounders, patients with ALI cared for in closed ICUs had reduced hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.53, 0.89; P = 0.004). Consultation by a pulmonologist in open ICUs was not associated with improved mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.74, 1.20; P = 0.62). These findings were robust for varying assumptions about the study population definition. Patients with ALI cared for in a closed-model ICU have reduced mortality. These data support recommendations to implement structured intensive care in the United States.

  15. Bariatric surgery outcomes: a single-center study in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abusnana S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah Abusnana,1 Sarah Abdi,1 Brigette Tagure,1 Murtada Elbagir,1 Almantas Maleckas2 1Rashid Center for Diabetes and Research, Ministry of Health, Ajman, United Arab Emirates; 2Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, LithuaniaBackground: Bariatric surgery has become an attractive treatment for severe obesity over the last decade, due to its impacts on weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the United Arab Emirates, a country where the rate of obesity is dramatically increasing bariatric surgery has gained popularity in recent years; however, published data on its outcomes in the Emirati population are lacking.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 95 patients who underwent bariatric surgery (ie, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy at the Rashid Center for Diabetes and Research in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Weight outcomes and metabolic marker data were abstracted at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively.Results: Laparoscopic RYGB was the main procedure performed by our bariatric unit. All variables demonstrated postoperative improvement. An average excess weight loss of 68% was observed at 12 months. Fat mass was the body component that decreased the most, with an average reduction of 46%. Additionally, lipid profiles were significantly different (P<0.01 at 12 months, with triglyceride levels improving by 27% and low-density lipoprotein levels improving by 21%. Similarly, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels decreased significantly (P<0.001 in patients with type 2 diabetes, with an average reduction of 73%.Conclusion: Our results show that a substantial short-term reduction in weight and significant improvements in metabolic markers followed bariatric surgery in severely obese Emirati patients. Our results are consistent with the outcomes of other internationally published studies. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether

  16. Inclusion criteria for outcomes of studies not clearly reported in Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Jos; Ijaz, Sharea; Mischke, Christina

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to survey how outcomes in recent Cochrane reviews were defined and used for inclusion of studies and how this compares with guidance on preventing outcome reporting bias. A survey of Cochrane reviews. We extracted data on the outcomes and how the outcomes were used for inclusion of studies in the review. We included 52 reviews with a mean of 8.4 (standard deviation, 4.3) outcomes. Of all reviews, 47 (90%) used primary and secondary outcomes as the names for their review's outcomes but without further definition. None reported using a core outcome set. Forty reviews (77%) did not explain if they used outcomes for inclusion of studies, 8 (15%) stated that studies were included if they reported either primary or secondary outcomes, 1 (2%) reported that outcomes were not used for inclusion, and for 3 (6%), this was unclear. In a sample of Cochrane reviews, most reviews did not state if outcomes were used for inclusion of studies. Better explanation of inclusion decisions is needed to be able to understand the risk of outcome reporting bias in a review. Consistent guidance in names and definitions for different types of outcomes used in systematic reviews is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatments and outcomes of peritoneal surface tumors through a centralized national service (United kingdom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, S; Renehan, A G; Parkinson, M F; Saunders, M P; Fulford, P E; Wilson, M S; O'Dwyer, S T

    2009-10-01

    Treatment of peritoneal surface malignancies with combined cytoreductive surgery and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy may improve oncologic outcome. To better define treatment pathways, five-year results in patients referred to one of two centralized national treatment centers in the United Kingdom were analyzed. A prospective database of patients referred to the Manchester Peritoneal Tumor Service, established in 2002, was analyzed. Outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier life tables and Cox models. Two hundred seventy-eight patients (median age, 56.9 (range, 16-86) years) were considered by a dedicated multidisciplinary team and tracked on seven clinical pathways. Among the 118 surgically treated, the most common diagnosis was pseudomyxoma peritonei (101 patients, 86%). Major complications occurred in 11 patients (9%); there was no 30-day mortality. Where complete cytoreduction was achieved, three-year and five-year tumor-related survival rates were 94% and 86%, respectively. In the Cox model, incompleteness of cytoreduction (P = 0.001) and high-grade tumor (P < 0.0001) were independent prognosticators of poor outcome. The establishment of a national treatment center has allowed refinement of techniques to achieve internationally recognized results. Having achieved low levels of morbidity and mortality in the treatment of mainly pseudomyxoma peritonei of appendiceal origin, the technique of cytoreductive surgery and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy may be considered for peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal origin.

  18. Area racism and birth outcomes among Blacks in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, David H; Clouston, Sean; Martz, Connor D; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Cooper, Hannah L F; Turpin, Rodman; Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth; Kramer, Michael R

    2017-04-13

    There is increasing evidence that racism is a cause of poor health outcomes in the United States, including adverse birth outcomes among Blacks. However, research on the health consequences of racism has faced measurement challenges due to the more subtle nature of contemporary racism, which is not necessarily amenable to assessment through traditionally used survey methods. In this study, we circumvent some of these limitations by examining a previously developed Internet query-based proxy of area racism (Stephens-Davidowitz, 2014) in relation to preterm birth and low birthweight among Blacks. Area racism was measured in 196 designated market areas as the proportion of total Google searches conducted between 2004 and 2007 containing the "n-word." This measure was linked to county-level birth data among Blacks between 2005 and 2008, which were compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics; preterm birth and low birthweight were defined as racism was associated with relative increases of 5% in the prevalence of preterm birth and 5% in the prevalence of low birthweight among Blacks. Our study provides evidence for the utility of an Internet query-based measure as a proxy for racism at the area-level in epidemiologic studies, and is also suggestive of the role of racism in contributing to poor birth outcomes among Blacks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Obstetric patients in a surgical intensive care unit: prognostic factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjahed, K; Hamoudi, D; Salmi, S; Barrou, L

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the incidence, prognostic factors and the outcome of obstetric patients admitted in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) during the ante-partum or postpartum period (within 6 weeks of delivery). Between 1995 and 2002, the patients transferred from the department of obstetrics were retrospectively included into the study. Demographics included: obstetric data, medical and surgical histories, diagnosis, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation system APACHE II score; and the occurrence of organ failure, therapeutic interventions, length of stay in the SICU and outcome were recorded. During the study period, 364 obstetric patients were admitted to the SICU. Obstetric admissions to the SICU represented 0.6% of all deliveries and the SICU utilisation rate was 14.96%. The main indications for admission were eclampsia (70.6%) and postpartum haemorrhage (16.2%). The overall mortality rate was 16.7% (n = 61). In a logistic regression model, risk factors for death included organ system failure (odds ratio (OR) = 3.95 confidence interval (CI) [1.84 - 8.48], bilirubin >12 mg/l (OR = 1.017 CI [1.00 - 1.03]), and prolonged prothrombin time (OR = 0.97 CI [0.95 - 0.99]). Median length of stay was longer in non- survivors (6.5 +/- 7.3 vs 5.5 +/- 4.6 days). Maternal condition on admission and associated complications are the major determinant of maternal outcome.

  20. Toxic Hazards Research Unit Annual Technical Report: 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    Holland, New York, 1980. Boyd, M. R., L. T. Burka, T. M. Harris, and B. J. Wilson, (1973), Lung- toxic furanoterpenoids produced by sweet potatoes ( IPOMOEA ...AFAMRL-TR-84-00 1 NNTRI-84-41 AD-A147 857 TOXIC HAZARDS RESEARCH UNIT ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT: � J. D. MACEIWEN E. H. VERNOT UNIVERSITY OF...ER * BRUCE 0. s’rUART, PhD * Director Toxic Hazards Division * .Air Force Aerospace Medical Research La racory SECURITY CLASSI FICA TI0N OF THIS PAGE

  1. Canada-United States air quality agreement : progress report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This biennial progress report highlighted actions undertaken by Canada and the United States in the last 2 years to address transboundary air pollution within the context of the Air Quality Agreement regarding acid rain and ground-level ozone. The report was divided into 3 sections. The first section provided information concerning commitments to emission reductions in acid rain and ozone annexes. Section 2 provided details of related air quality efforts. Section 3 presented information on scientific and technical cooperation and research, which included details of health effects and acid deposition effects, recovery efforts and critical loads and exceedances. The progress report also included the third 5-year comprehensive review of the Air Quality Agreement, which was organized in a question and answer format to address requirements in the agreement and public comments on the 2004 progress report. In October 2006, Canada's federal government tabled the Clean Air Act as a new legislation that would expand the government's authorities to take action to reduce air emissions of greenhouse gases and other air pollutants. The Notice of Intent to develop and implement regulations and other measures to reduce air emissions was also revealed. The regulations would address anthropogenic sources of air pollution, including fossil-fuel electricity production, petroleum industry, smelters, forest products, chemicals production and transportation. The report showed that over the last 2 years, both countries have reduced their emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and have made progress in meeting the requirements of the Ozone Annex to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Actions have focused on reducing emissions from major sources such as electric generating units, industrial sources, and on-road and nonroad transportation. It was concluded that to date, the agreement has provided opportunities for

  2. Associations Between Relative Value Units and Patient-Reported Back Pain and Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S. Gold PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe associations between health care utilization measures and patient-reported outcomes (PROs. Method: Primary data were collected from patients ≥65 years with low back pain visits from 2011 to 2013. Six PROs of pain and functionality were collected 12 and 24 months after the index visits and total and spine-specific relative value units (RVUs from electronic health records were tabulated over 1 year. We calculated correlation coefficients between RVUs and 12- and 24-month PROs and conducted linear regressions with each 12- and 24-month PRO as the outcome variables and RVUs as predictors of interest. Results: We observed very weak correlations between worse PROs at 12 and 24 months and greater 12-month utilization. In regression analyses, we observed slight associations between greater utilization and worse 12- and 24-month PROs. Discussion: We found that 12-month health care utilization is not strongly associated with PROs at 12 or 24 months.

  3. Associations Between Relative Value Units and Patient-Reported Back Pain and Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S. Gold PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe associations between health care utilization measures and patient-reported outcomes (PROs. Method: Primary data were collected from patients ≥65 years with low back pain visits from 2011 to 2013. Six PROs of pain and functionality were collected 12 and 24 months after the index visits and total and spine-specific relative value units (RVUs from electronic health records were tabulated over 1 year. We calculated correlation coefficients between RVUs and 12- and 24-month PROs and conducted linear regressions with each 12- and 24-month PRO as the outcome variables and RVUs as predictors of interest. Results: We observed very weak correlations between worse PROs at 12 and 24 months and greater 12-month utilization. In regression analyses, we observed slight associations between greater utilization and worse 12- and 24-month PROs. Discussion: We found that 12-month health care utilization is not strongly associated with PROs at 12 or 24 months.

  4. [Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in a pilot psychogeriatric unit: management and outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskas, P; Belqadi, S; Mazouzi, S; Daraux, J; Drunat, O

    2011-03-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD) are a major concern. The French government gave a consensual definition of reinforced intermediate-term care units for BPSD within the project "Plan Alzheimer 2008/2012". Our aim was to report one of the first experiences of this unit in France. Fifty-two patients (38 females, 14 males) were included, mean age 82.07±7.84 (73-97). About 80% of patients were improved and there was a high discharge rate to home of about 30%. Night-time behaviors, aberrant motor behaviors and agitation were the most frequent symptoms. Our study confirms that demented elderly patients greatly benefit from a specific BPSD care unit in agreement with the objective of Plan Alzheimer 2008/2012. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction: Quarterly Report and Semiannual Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-30

    Sector engineers, who provided day-to-day technical supervision and implementation management of GRD’s plan to bring Units 5 and 6 online . GRD...fax, and online contacts from people in Iraq, the United States, and throughout the world. Second quarter Reporting As of June 30, 2007, SIGIR...Task Force for Iraq Reconstruction SPOC Sector Project and Contracting Office Contractor TAMU Texas A&M University TBI Trade Bank of Iraq TF-BSO

  6. Readability of patient-reported outcome questionnaires for use with persons who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zraick, Richard I; Atcherson, Samuel R; Brown, Angela M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the readability of several published patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires for use with persons who stutter, and to compare the readability results to existing data about average reading levels for English-speaking adults living in the United States. Published PRO questionnaires were identified that are traditionally completed by persons who stutter in a self-administered format. Reading grade levels were analyzed using the Flesch Reading Ease, FOG, and FORCAST formulas as computed by a readability calculations software package. Descriptive statistics were computed across the questionnaires. The results of this study demonstrate that many of the PRO questionnaires exceeded the fifth to sixth grade reading levels recommended by health literacy experts. The clinician should consider the average reading level needed to understand a particular PRO questionnaire when administering it to a patient or their proxy. Likewise, developers of PRO questionnaires should consider reading level of respondents and include information about this when reporting psychometric data. The reader will get an overview over the literature on patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires and their use with persons who stutter and will be able to: (1) define readability, (2) describe how reading levels are determined for a given PRO questionnaire, (3) list the strengths and limitations of readability assessment in the evaluation of persons who stutter and (4) analyze the role of readability assessment in future PRO questionnaire development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reliability assessment of a hospital quality measure based on rates of adverse outcomes on nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggs, Vincent S

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to develop methods for assessing the reliability of scores on a widely disseminated hospital quality measure based on nursing unit fall rates. Poisson regression interactive multilevel modeling was adapted to account for clustering of units within hospitals. Three signal-noise reliability measures were computed. Squared correlations between the hospital score and true hospital fall rate averaged 0.52 ± 0.18 for total falls (0.68 ± 0.18 for injurious falls). Reliabilities on the other two measures averaged at least 0.70 but varied widely across hospitals. Parametric bootstrap data reflecting within-unit noise in falls were generated to evaluate percentile-ranked hospital scores as estimators of true hospital fall rate ranks. Spearman correlations between bootstrap hospital scores and true fall rates averaged 0.81 ± 0.01 (0.79 ± 0.01). Bias was negligible, but ranked hospital scores were imprecise, varying across bootstrap samples with average SD 11.8 (14.9) percentiles. Across bootstrap samples, hospital-measure scores fell in the same decile as the true fall rate in about 30% of cases. Findings underscore the importance of thoroughly assessing reliability of quality measurements before deciding how they will be used. Both the hospital measure and the reliability methods described can be adapted to other contexts involving clustered rates of adverse patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Progress and outcomes of health systems reform in the United Arab Emirates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koornneef, Erik; Robben, Paul; Blair, Iain

    2017-09-20

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) government aspires to build a world class health system to improve the quality of healthcare and the health outcomes for its population. To achieve this it has implemented extensive health system reforms in the past 10 years. The nature, extent and success of these reforms has not recently been comprehensively reviewed. In this paper we review the progress and outcomes of health systems reform in the UAE. We searched relevant databases and other sources to identify published and unpublished studies and other data available between 01 January 2002 and 31 March 2016. Eligible studies were appraised and data were descriptively and narratively synthesized. Seventeen studies were included covering the following themes: the UAE health system, population health, the burden of disease, healthcare financing, healthcare workforce and the impact of reforms. Few, if any, studies prospectively set out to define and measure outcomes. A central part of the reforms has been the introduction of mandatory private health insurance, the development of the private sector and the separation of planning and regulatory responsibilities from provider functions. The review confirmed the commitment of the UAE to build a world class health system but amongst researchers and commentators opinion is divided on whether the reforms have been successful although patient satisfaction with services appears high and there are some positive indications including increasing coverage of hospital accreditation. The UAE has a rapidly growing population with a unique age and sex distribution, there have been notable successes in improving child and maternal mortality and extending life expectancy but there are high levels of chronic diseases. The relevance of the reforms for public health and their impact on the determinants of chronic diseases have been questioned. From the existing research literature it is not possible to conclude whether UAE health system reforms are

  9. Scoring Systems for Outcome Prediction in a Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarchopoulos, Themistocles; Charitidou, Efstratia; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Charitos, Christos; Routsi, Christina

    2015-07-01

    Most scoring systems used to predict clinical outcome in critical care were not designed for application in cardiac surgery patients. To compare the predictive ability of the most widely used scoring systems (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score [SAPS] II, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA]) and of 2 specialized systems (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation [EuroSCORE] II and the cardiac surgery score [CASUS]) for clinical outcome in patients after cardiac surgery. Consecutive patients admitted to a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) were prospectively studied. Data on the preoperative condition, intraoperative parameters, and postoperative course were collected. EuroSCORE II, CASUS, and scores from 3 general severity-scoring systems (APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA) were calculated on the first postoperative day. Clinical outcome was defined as 30-day mortality and in-hospital morbidity. A total of 150 patients were included. Thirty-day mortality was 6%. CASUS was superior in outcome prediction, both in relation to discrimination (area under curve, 0.89) and calibration (Brier score = 0.043, χ(2) = 2.2, P = .89), followed by EuroSCORE II for 30-day mortality (area under curve, 0.87) and SOFA for morbidity (Spearman ρ= 0.37 and 0.35 for the CSICU length of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation, respectively; Wilcoxon W = 367.5, P = .03 for probability of readmission to CSICU). CASUS can be recommended as the most reliable and beneficial option for benchmarking and risk stratification in cardiac surgery patients. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  10. Psychometric properties of patient-reported outcome measures for hip arthroscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Joanne L; Collins, Natalie J; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are considered the gold standard when evaluating outcomes in a surgical population. While the psychometric properties of some PROs have been tested, the properties of newer PROs in patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery remain somewhat unknown.......Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are considered the gold standard when evaluating outcomes in a surgical population. While the psychometric properties of some PROs have been tested, the properties of newer PROs in patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery remain somewhat unknown....

  11. Quality and consistency of outcome reporting in clinical trials of immunosuppression in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Samia; Knight, Simon R

    2016-11-01

    Interpretation, comparison, and combination of results of clinical trials are reliant on accurate and complete reporting of outcomes. This study aimed to assess the quality and variability in outcome reporting in immunosuppression trials following renal transplantation. All randomized controlled trials comparing immunosuppressive interventions in renal transplant recipients published over a 5-year period were included. Outcomes reported in these studies were extracted, along with data regarding completeness of reporting and whether a clear definition of the method used to measure the outcome was provided. A total of 4760 outcomes were identified from 182 studies. Overall, 90.3% outcomes were completely reported; the remainder had missing data that would preclude use in meta-analysis; 31.5% manuscripts did not define a primary endpoint. Efficacy outcomes were more likely to be clearly defined than safety outcomes (OR: 0.022, P<.001) or patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) (OR: 0.014, P<.001). PROMs were reported in less than half of manuscripts, and only five reported quality-of-life data using a validated tool. There was significant variability in the way that common efficacy and safety outcomes were defined. Variability in the way that endpoints are selected and reported in trials in renal transplantation makes interpretation and comparison between studies difficult.

  12. Disease profile and Outcome of Newborn admitted to Neonatology unit of BPKIHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piush Kanodia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Neonatal period is a vulnerable time in which the newborn has to adapt to a totally new environment and is susceptible to many problems, which may even be life threatening. Every year, millions of neonates are born and a large proportion of them are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU for various indications. It is found that neonatal mortality rate is decreasing in Nepal but at a slower pace than infant and child mortality. In order to improve neonatal outcome, it is crucial to identify the areas where health care can be improved. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the clinical profile, pattern of diseases and common causes of mortality and morbidity in neonates admitted to neonatology unit.Materials & Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at neonatology unit of BPKIHS, from January 2014 to December 2014. A total of 1009 neonates (both inborn and out-born were admitted to neonatology division during the study period. Data was collected from the hospital record section. Ethical clearance was taken from the institutional ethical committee before the initiation of the study. Data was entered and descriptive analysis was done by using SPSS 20.0.Results: Total of 1009 neonates were admitted in neonatology unit. Among them, 349(34.5% cases were admitted due neonatal sepsis, 236 (23.3% due to prematurity and 233 (23.1% with birth asphyxia. Among birth asphyxia, 102(43.7% were in HIE III, 34.3% and 21.8% in HIE II and HIE I, respectively. The overall mortality was 47 (4.7% during hospital stay.Conclusion: Sepsis, prematurity and birth asphyxia were major causes for admission in NICU. All these etiologies are preventable up to some extent and, if detected earlier, can be effectively treated in order to reduce morbidity and mortalityJCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:20-24.

  13. The United States National Climate Assessment - Alaska Technical Regional Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markon, Carl J.; Trainor, Sarah F.; Chapin, F. Stuart; Markon, Carl J.; Trainor, Sarah F.; Chapin, F. Stuart

    2012-01-01

    been followed by a roughly 5°F increase since the 1980s. Many areas in the continuous permafrost zone have seen increases in temperature in the seasonally active layer and a decrease in re-freezing rates. Changes in the discontinuous permafrost zone are initially much more observable due to the resulting thermokarst terrain (land surface formed as ice rich permafrost thaws), most notable in boreal forested areas. Climate warming in Alaska has potentially broad implications for human health and food security, especially in rural areas, as well as increased risk for injury with changing winter ice conditions. Additionally, such warming poses the potential for increasing damage to existing water and sanitation facilities and challenges for development of new facilities, especially in areas underlain by permafrost. Non-infectious and infectious diseases also are becoming an increasing concern. For example, from 1999 to 2006 there was a statistically significant increase in medical claims for insectbite reactions in five of six regions of Alaska, with the largest percentage increase occurring in the most northern areas. The availability and quality of subsistence foods, normally considered to be very healthy, may change due to changing access, changing habitats, and spoilage of meat in food storage cellars. These and other trends and potential outcomes resulting from a changing climate are further described in this report. In addition, we describe new science leadership activities that have been initiated to address and provide guidance toward conducting research aimed at making available information for policy makers and land management agencies to better understand, address, and plan for changes to the local and regional environment. This report cites data in both metric and standard units due to the contributions by numerous authors and the direct reference of their data.

  14. Avatar Web-Based Self-Report Survey System Technology for Public Health Research: Technical Outcome Results and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel, Craig; Mierzwa, Stan; Gorbach, Pamina M; Souidi, Samir; Lally, Michelle; Zimet, Gregory; Interventions, Aids

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a specific Web-based self-report data collection system that was developed for a public health research study in the United States. Our focus is on technical outcome results and lessons learned that may be useful to other projects requiring such a solution. The system was accessible from any device that had a browser that supported HTML5. Report findings include: which hardware devices, Web browsers, and operating systems were used; the rate of survey completion; and key considerations for employing Web-based surveys in a clinical trial setting.

  15. Avatar Web-Based Self-Report Survey System Technology for Public Health Research: Technical Outcome Results and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel, Craig; Mierzwa, Stan; Gorbach, Pamina M.; Souidi, Samir; Lally, Michelle; Zimet, Gregory; Interventions, AIDS

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a specific Web-based self-report data collection system that was developed for a public health research study in the United States. Our focus is on technical outcome results and lessons learned that may be useful to other projects requiring such a solution. The system was accessible from any device that had a browser that supported HTML5. Report findings include: which hardware devices, Web browsers, and operating systems were used; the rate of survey completion; and key considerations for employing Web-based surveys in a clinical trial setting. PMID:28149445

  16. Disease-specific patient reported outcome tools for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Meenakshi; Pickard, A Simon; Block, Joel A; Kumar, Rajan B; Mikolaitis, Rachel A; Wilke, Caitlyn T; Rodby, Roger A; Fogg, Louis; Sequeira, Winston; Utset, Tammy O; Cash, Thomas F; Moldovan, Iona; Katsaros, Emmanuel; Nicassio, Perry; Ishimori, Mariko L; Kosinsky, Mark; Merrill, Joan T; Weisman, Michael H; Wallace, Daniel J

    2012-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can significantly affect both health and non-health-related quality of life (HRQOL and non-HRQOL). However, of the existent published patient-reported outcome (PRO) tools, none were developed from US patients, an ethnically diverse population. Furthermore, these tools do not address men with SLE or assess non-HRQOL issues. Herein, we present the development and validation of the Lupus Patient-Reported Outcome tool (LupusPRO) and discuss its clinical utility and research value compared with other PRO tools currently available for SLE. Beginning with a conceptual framework, items for LupusPRO were generated using feedback from women and men with SLE. The tool underwent iterations based on patient feedback and clinimetric and psychometric analyses. Validity (content, construct, and criterion) and reliability (internal consistency and test-retest) for the 44-item LupusPRO tool are presented. Consistent with the conceptual framework, items were identified that were related to HRQOL and non-HRQOL constructs. HRQOL domains included (1) lupus symptoms; (2) physical health (physical function, role physical); (3) pain-vitality; (4) emotional health (emotional function and role emotional); (5) body image; (6) cognition; (7) procreation; and (8) lupus medications. Non-HRQOL domains were (1) available social support and coping; (2) desires-goals; and (3) satisfaction with medical care. Internal consistency reliability (0.68-0.94), test-retest reliability (0.55-0.92), content, construct (r > 0.50 with SF-36), and criterion (r > -0.35 with disease activity) validity were fair to good. LupusPRO is a valid and reliable disease-targeted patient-reported health outcome tool that is generalizable to SLE patients in the United States of varied ethnic backgrounds and either gender. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The effects of maternity leave on children's birth and infant health outcomes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Maya

    2011-03-01

    This paper evaluates the impacts of unpaid maternity leave provisions of the 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) on children's birth and infant health outcomes in the United States. My identification strategy uses variation in pre-FMLA maternity leave policies across states and variation in which firms are covered by FMLA provisions. Using Vital Statistics data and difference-in-difference-in-difference methodology, I find that maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave. My results are robust to the inclusion of numerous controls for maternal, child, and county characteristics, state, year, and month fixed effects, and state-year interactions, as well as across several different specifications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of introduction of an acute surgical unit on management and outcomes of small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiienko, Anton M; Shakerian, Rose; Gorelik, Alexandra; Thomson, Benjamin N J; Skandarajah, Anita R

    2016-10-01

    The acute surgical unit (ASU) is a recently established model of care in Australasia and worldwide. Limited data are available regarding its effect on the management of small bowel obstruction. We compared the management of small bowel obstruction before and after introduction of ASU at a major tertiary referral centre. We hypothesized that introduction of ASU would correlate with improved patient outcomes. A retrospective review of prospectively maintained databases was performed over two separate 2-year periods, before and after the introduction of ASU. Data collected included demographics, co-morbidity status, use of water-soluble contrast agent and computed tomography. Outcome measures included surgical intervention, time to surgery, hospital length of stay, complications, 30-day readmissions, use of total parenteral nutrition, intensive care unit admissions and overall mortality. Total emergency admissions to the ASU increased from 2640 to 4575 between the two time periods. A total of 481 cases were identified (225 prior and 256 after introduction of ASU). Mortality decreased from 5.8% to 2.0% (P = 0.03), which remained significant after controlling for confounders with multivariate analysis (odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.08-0.73, P = 0.012). The proportion of surgically managed patients increased (20.9% versus 32.0%, P = 0.003) and more operations were performed within 5 days from presentation (76.6% versus 91.5%, P = 0.02). Fewer patients received water-soluble contrast agent (27.1% versus 18.4%, P = 0.02), but more patients were investigated with a computed tomography (70.7% versus 79.7%, P = 0.02). The ASU model of care resulted in decreased mortality, shorter time to intervention and increased surgical management. Overall complications rate and length of stay did not change. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  19. Poor Outcomes in Hepatic Amyloidosis: A Report of 2 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yue; Patel, Pruthvi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic amyloidosis is a rare disease entity that results from insoluble amyloid protein deposition in the liver. The disease often presents with vague, nonspecific clinical features. Currently, there is little literature describing treatment outcomes for biopsy-proven hepatic amyloidosis and current treatment guidelines recommend that patients enroll in a clinical trial due to insufficient evidence to suggest an optimal treatment regimen. Here, we present two cases of hepatic amyloidosis at an academic medical center and describe their presentation, treatment, and outcomes. These cases highlight the poor outcomes and difficult management of hepatic amyloidosis. Further understanding and investigation of this rare disease are warranted.

  20. A study of outcome and complications associated with temporary hemodialysis catheters in a Nigerian dialysis unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amira, Christiana Oluwatoyin; Bello, Babawale Taslim; Braimoh, Rotimi Williams

    2016-05-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheters are commonly used as temporary vascular access in patients with kidney failure who require immediate HD. The use of these catheters is limited by complications such as infections, thrombosis resulting in poor blood flow. We studied the complications and outcomes of nontunneled catheters used for vascular access in our dialysis unit. The records of all patients, with renal failure who were dialyzed over a two-year period and had a double lumen nontunneled catheter inserted, were retrieved. Catheter insertion was carried out under ultrasound guidance using the modified Seldinger technique. The demographic data of patients, etiology of chronic kidney disease, and complications and outcomes of these catheters were noted. Fifty-four patients with mean age 43.7 ± 15.8 years had 69 catheters inserted for a cumulative total of 4047 catheter-days. The mean catheter patency was 36.4 ± 37.2 days (range: 1-173 days). Thrombosis occluding the catheters was the most common complication and occurred in 58% of catheters leading to catheter malfunction, followed by infections in18.8% of catheters. During follow-up, 30 (43.5%) catheters were removed, 14 (20.3%) due to catheter malfunction, eight (11.6%) due to infection, five (7.2%) elective removal, and three (4.3%) due to damage. Thrombotic occlusion of catheters was a major limiting factor to the survival of HD catheters. Improvement in catheter patency can be achieved with more potent lock solutions.

  1. Outcome of mechanically ventilated patients initially denied admission to an intensive care unit and subsequently admitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Wasim; Schwartz, Naama; Finkelstein, Richard; Bisharat, Naiel

    2016-11-01

    The outcome of mechanically ventilated patients initially denied admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) and subsequently admitted is unclear. We compared outcomes of patients denied ICU admission and subsequently admitted, to those of patients admitted to the ICU and to patients refused ICU admission. The medical records of all the patients who were subjected to mechanical ventilation for at least 24h over a 4year period (2010-2014) were reviewed. Of 707 patients (757 admissions), 124 (18%) were initially denied ICU admission and subsequently admitted. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis showed significant association with death of: age, length of stay, nursing home residency, duration of mechanical ventilation, previous admission with mechanical ventilation, cause for mechanical ventilation, rate of failed extubations, associated morbidity (previous cerebrovascular accident, dementia, chronic renal failure), and occurrence of nosocomial bacteremia. The odds for death among patients denied ICU admission and subsequently transferred to the ICU compared to patients admitted directly to the ICU was 3.6 (95% CI: 1.9-6.7) (Padmission compared to those who were initially denied and subsequently admitted were not statistically significant (OR=1.7, 95% CI: 0.8-3.8). In conclusion, patients denied ICU admission and subsequently admitted face a considerable risk of morbidity and mortality. Their odds of death are nearly three times those admitted directly to the ICU. Late admission to the ICU does not appear to provide benefit compared to patients who remain in general medicine wards.

  2. Outcomes in achalasia from a surgical unit where pneumatic dilatation is first-line therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J M; Mongan, A-M; Manning, B J; Byrne, P; Lawler, P; Ravi, N; Reynolds, J V

    2010-08-01

    The management of achalasia remains controversial, with little consensus on the optimal patient treatment pathway. In our own esophageal unit, we offer pneumatic dilatation as the initial therapy in most patients as first-line therapy. In this study, we aimed to examine the safety and efficacy of our own approach to the management of patients with a diagnosis of achalasia, examining symptomatic outcomes, patient satisfaction, and need for further intervention, as well as examining patient factors associated with treatment failure. Sixty-seven consecutive patients underwent pneumatic dilatation as first-line therapy (53% male, mean age 46 years). All attended regular outpatient follow-up (mean 37, range 3-132 months). Twenty-five percent of patients required a second intervention because of symptom recurrence, at a median period of 4.5 months. Symptomatic outcomes were excellent or good in 80%. Significant predictors of treatment failure and poor symptom score included a younger age at the time of diagnosis and increased esophageal diameter on barium swallow. This study suggests that pneumatic dilatation is a safe and effective approach as first-line therapy in patients with newly diagnosed achalasia.

  3. Improving energy audit process and report outcomes through planning initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprau Coulter, Tabitha L.

    Energy audits and energy models are an important aspect of the retrofit design process, as they provide project teams with an opportunity to evaluate a facilities current building systems' and energy performance. The information collected during an energy audit is typically used to develop an energy model and an energy audit report that are both used to assist in making decisions about the design and implementation of energy conservation measures in a facility. The current lack of energy auditing standards results in a high degree of variability in energy audit outcomes depending on the individual performing the audit. The research presented is based on the conviction that performing an energy audit and producing a value adding energy model for retrofit buildings can benefit from a revised approach. The research was divided into four phases, with the initial three phases consisting of: 1.) process mapping activity - aimed at reducing variability in the energy auditing and energy modeling process. 2.) survey analysis -- To examine the misalignment between how industry members use the top energy modeling tools compared to their intended use as defined by software representatives. 3.) sensitivity analysis -- analysis of the affect key energy modeling inputs are having on energy modeling analysis results. The initial three phases helped define the need for an improved energy audit approach that better aligns data collection with facility owners' needs and priorities. The initial three phases also assisted in the development of a multi-criteria decision support tool that incorporates a House of Quality approach to guide a pre-audit planning activity. For the fourth and final research phase explored the impacts and evaluation methods of a pre-audit planning activity using two comparative energy audits as case studies. In each case, an energy audit professionals was asked to complete an audit using their traditional methods along with an audit which involved them first

  4. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Lund, Hans; Guyatt, GH

    2010-01-01

    Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta-analyses ......Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta...

  5. Cardiac Risk Assessment, Morbidity Prediction, and Outcome in the Vascular Intensive Care Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dover, Mary

    2013-09-17

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the predictive value of the Lee revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) for a standard vascular intensive care unit (ICU) population as well as assessing the utility of transthoracic echocardiography and the impact of prior coronary artery disease (CAD) and coronary revascularization on patient outcome. Design: This is a retrospective review of prospectively maintained Vascubase and prospectively collected ICU data. Materials and Methods: Data from 363 consecutive vascular ICU admissions were collected. Findings were used to calculate the RCRI, which was then correlated with patient outcomes. All patients were on optimal medical therapy (OMT) in the form of cardioselective β-blocker, aspirin, statin, and folic acid. Results: There was no relationship found between a reduced ejection fraction and patient outcome. Mortality was significantly increased for patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) as identified on echo (14.9% vs 6.5%, P = .028). The overall complication rates were significantly elevated for patients with valvular dysfunction. Discrimination for the RCRI on receiver-operating characteristic analysis was poor, with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of .621. Model calibration was reasonable with an Hosmer-Lemeshow Ĉ statistic of 2.726 (P = .256). Of those with known CAD, 41.22% of the patients receiving best medical treatment developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared to 35.3% of those who previously underwent percutaneous cardiac intervention and 23.5% of those who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting. There was 3-fold increase in major adverse clinical events in patients with troponin rise and LVH. Conclusions: The RCRI\\'s discriminatory capacity is low, and this raises difficulties in assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular intervention. The AMI is highest in the OMT group without prior cardiac intervention, which mandates protocols to

  6. Long-term outcomes of minor troponin elevations in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, A; Ghassemi, M; Szolovits, P; Park, S; Osorio, J; Dejam, A; Celi, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the short-term and long-term outcomes of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with minor troponin elevations. The retrospective study compared ICU patients with peak troponin elevation less than 0.1 ng/ml to those with only negative tests during their hospital stay. Data were gathered from ICUs at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center between 2001 and 2008. A total of 4224 patients (2547 controls and 1677 positives) were analysed. The primary outcome was mortality at one year. Secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality and hospital and ICU lengths of stay. After adjusting for age, sex, Simplified Acute Physiology Score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment and combined Elixhauser score, we found that minor troponin elevations (peak troponin elevation between 0.01 and 0.09 ng/ml) were associated with a higher one-year mortality (Hazard Ratio 1.22, P troponin presence; Hazard Ratio 1.03, P troponin increment). This relationship held for the subgroup of seven-day post-discharge survivors (Hazard Ratio 1.26, P troponin also significantly increased the net reclassification index over traditional risk markers for mortality prediction (net reclassification score 0.12, P troponin elevation was also associated with 30-day mortality (odds ratio 1.33, P=0.003). Importantly, troponin testing did not increase the adjusted mortality odds (P=0.9). Minor elevations in troponin substantially increase one-year, all-cause mortality in a stepwise fashion; it was also independently associated with 30-day mortality. We propose that minor elevations in troponin should not be regarded as clinically unimportant, but rather be included as a prognostic element if measured. We recommend prospective ICU studies to assess prognostic value of routine troponin determination.

  7. Outcomes of Emergency Medical Patients Admitted to an Intermediate Care Unit With Detailed Admission Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Catherine E; Sahetya, Sarina K; Bradsher, Robert W; Scholten, Eric L; Bain, William; Siddique, Shazia M; Hager, David N

    2017-01-01

    An important, but not well characterized, population receiving intermediate care is that of medical patients admitted directly from the emergency department. To characterize emergency medical patients and their outcomes when admitted to an intermediate care unit with clearly defined admission guidelines. Demographic data, admitting diagnoses, illness severity, comorbid conditions, lengths of stay, and hospital mortality were characterized for all emergency medical patients admitted directly to an intermediate care unit from July through December 2012. A total of 317 unique patients were admitted (mean age, 54 [SD, 16] years). Most patients were admitted with respiratory (26.5%) or cardiac (17.0%) syndromes. The mean (SD) Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score version II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score version II, and Charlson Comorbidity Index were 15.6 (6.5), 20.7 (11.8), and 2.7 (2.3), respectively. Severity of illness and length of stay were significantly different for patients who required intensive care within 24 hours of admission (n = 16) or later (n = 25), patients who continued with inter mediate care for more than 24 hours (n = 247), and patients who were downgraded or discharged in less than 24 hours (n = 29). Overall hospital mortality was 4.4% (14 deaths). Emergency medical patients with moderate severity of illness and comorbidity can be admitted to an intermediate level of care with relatively infrequent transfer to intensive care and relatively low mortality. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Outcome of Very Lov Birth Weight Infants in Neonatal Care Unit of Dicle University Faculty of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to determine mortality and morbidity rates and selected outcome variables for infants weighing less than 1500 g, who were admitted to the neonatal care unit of our hospital from April 2005 to February 2006.The number of VLBW admissions to the our neonatal care unit was 91, fourty one percent female and %49 were male. The mean birth weight was 1191±261 g and gestational age was 29±2.4 weeks. The mortality rate was 37.3 %. Antenatal steroids had been given to only 8% of mothers. The most important maternal risk factors were preeclampsia/eclampsia 30%, premature rupture of membranes 13%, hemorhage 8%. Respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed 47%, surfactant was given to 40% of these infants. The major causes of death were sepsis, respiratuar distres syndrome, and extreme prematurity.Compared with reports from other developed NICU, VLBW infants at our center had higher mortality rates. We conclude that, the major cause of high mortality rate depends on low-social –cultural –education conditions associated with insufficient prenatal care, neonatal care and inaccurate neonatal transport in our region.

  9. Piloting yoga and assessing outcomes in a residential behavioural health unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvain, S J; Miller, B; Lawhead, B A; Barbosa-Leiker, C; Anderson, A

    2015-04-01

    This study examined if adolescents on a residential behavioural health unit would participate in a yoga intervention. Yoga has been used as a mind-body practice for more than 2000 years; however, studies are limited regarding its effects on adolescents with mental illness on an inpatient unit. Yoga was added, twice weekly, to the program schedule. Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Adolescent Short Form (TEIQue-ASF) scores were measured over 8 weeks. Additional measures included daily numbers of quiet times, time outs, and point card scores. Twenty-two adolescents completed the study. The TEIQue-ASF assessment was able to detect changes in total scores over 8 weeks. Increased yoga participation was related to higher values of the TEIQue-ASF subdomain of sociability, increase in weekly point card totals, a decrease in behavioural time outs, and a decrease in combined behavioural interventions at various time points throughout the programme. This study was relevant because it was conducted on an adolescent inpatient unit. It provides support that yoga, as part of a residential programme, is a feasible intervention for adolescents with mental illness. Changes in the various measures cannot be directly linked to yoga because of lack of a comparison group. Additional studies with a larger sample, and randomization, are needed to evaluate the potential benefits of yoga and to determine if changes to the TEIQue-ASF can be attributed to yoga or other behavioural-based interventions. Little is known about how yoga will impact behavioural health outcomes for adolescents with mental illness in an inpatient setting. This study examined if adolescents on a residential behavioural health unit would participate in a yoga intervention to address emotional regulation. A single cohort study design was used. Yoga was added to the programme schedule twice weekly. Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Adolescent Short Form (TEIQue-ASF) scores and additional behavioural

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-01-01

    This Closure Report (CR) documents closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543, Liquid Disposal Units, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 543 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2007). CAU 543 is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada (Figure 1), and consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-07-01, Decon Pad; CAS 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 15-04-01, Septic Tank; CAS 15-05-01, Leachfield; CAS 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank; CAS 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area; CAS 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping; and CAS 06-07-01 is located at the Decontamination Facility in Area 6, adjacent to Yucca Lake. The remaining CASs are located at the former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm in Area 15. The purpose of this CR is to provide a summary of the completed closure activities, to document waste disposal, and to present analytical data confirming that the remediation goals were met. The closure alternatives consisted of closure in place for two of the CASs, and no further action with implementation of best management practices (BMPs) for the remaining five CASs.

  11. Sustainability in a global context: How does local factor affect the outcomes of CSR activities in international business units?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christa; Lauring, Jakob

    In recent years CSR has become increasingly important for the activities and branding of MNCs. While some studies have investigated CSR management and branding in domestic situations, fewer studies exist in the case of international business units (subsidiaries, joint ventures, and franchises...... as CSR branding outcomes). Our findings show that local values were positively associated with external CSR engagement and that employee relations were positively related to both internal and external CSR engagement. None of the local factors were significantly associated with CSR branding outcomes......). In this study, we use a sample consisting of 119 Danish business units that are located in China. We set out to investigate the relationship between local factors (the local business unit’s Chinese values and internal employee relations in the unit) and CSR outcomes (internal and external CSR engagement as well...

  12. Development and Validation of the Keele Musculoskeletal Patient Reported Outcome Measure (MSK-PROM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Hill

    Full Text Available To develop and validate a patient report outcome measure (PROM for clinical practice that can monitor health status of patients with a range of musculoskeletal (MSK disorders.Constructs for inclusion in the MSK-PROM were identified from a consensus process involving patients with musculoskeletal conditions, clinicians, purchasers of healthcare services, and primary care researchers. Psychometric properties of the brief tool, including face and construct validity, repeatability and responsiveness were assessed in a sample of patients with musculoskeletal pain consulting physiotherapy services in the United Kingdom (n=425.The consensus process identified 10 prioritised domains for monitoring musculoskeletal health status: pain intensity, quality of life, physical capacity, interference with social/leisure activities, emotional well-being, severity of most difficult thing, activities and roles, understanding independence, and overall impact. As the EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L is a widely adopted PROMs tool and covers the first four domains listed, to reduce patient burden to a minimum the MSK-PROM was designed to capture the remaining six prioritised domains which are not measured by the EQ-5D-5L. The tool demonstrated excellent reliability, construct validity, responsiveness and acceptability to patients and clinicians for use in clinical practice.We have validated a brief patient reported outcome measure (MSK-PROM for use in clinical practice to measure musculoskeletal health status and monitor outcomes over time using domains that are meaningful to patients and sensitive to change. Further work will establish whether the MSK-PROM is useful in other musculoskeletal healthcare settings.

  13. Achieving excellence in private intensive care units: The effect of transformational leadership and organisational culture on organisational change outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portia J. Jordan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Organisational change outcomes in private intensive care units are linked to higher patient satisfaction, improved quality of patient care, family support, cost-effective care practices and an increased level of excellence. Transformational leadership and fostering a positive organisational culture can contribute to these change outcomes.Research purpose: The study determined whether transformational leadership and a supportive organisational culture were evident in six private intensive care units in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. A conceptual framework to investigate the relationship between transformational leadership, organisational culture, and organisational change outcomes, was proposed and tested.Motivation for the study: The prevalence of transformational leadership, a positive organisational culture and their effect on organisational change outcomes in private healthcare industries require further research in order to generate appropriate recommendations.Research design, approach and method: A positivistic, quantitative design was used. A survey was conducted using a questionnaire which, in previous studies, produced scores with Cronbach’s alpha coefficients greater than 0.80, to collect data from a sample of 130 professional nurses in private intensive care units.Main findings: Transformational leadership and a positive organisational culture were evident in the private intensive care units sampled. A strong, positive correlation exists between transformational leadership, organisational culture, and organisational change outcomes. This correlation provides sufficient evidence to accept the postulated research hypotheses. Innovation and intellectual stimulation were identified as the factors in need of improvement.Practical or managerial implications: The findings of the study may be used by managers in intensive care units to promote organisational change outcomes, linked to transformational leadership and a positive

  14. An observational study of patient care outcomes sensitive to handover quality in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Nichole; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Redley, Bernice

    2017-05-19

    To identify patient care outcome indicators sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover between the anaesthetist and the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit nurse. The relationship between interprofessional clinical handover when patients are transferred from the operating theatre to the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes of subsequent patient care delivery is not well understood. Naturalistic, exploratory descriptive design using observation. Observations of 31 patient journeys through Post-Anaesthetic Care Units across three public and private hospitals. Characteristics of interprofessional handover on arrival in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, the trajectory of patient care activities in Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes were observed. Of the 821 care activities observed across 31 "patient journeys" in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, observations (assessments and vital signs) (52.5 %), communication (15.8 %) and pain management (assessment of pain and analgesic administration) (10.3%) were most common. Examination of patterns in handover communications and subsequent trajectories of patient care activities revealed three patient trajectory typologies and two patient outcome indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit: pain on discharge from the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and timely response to clinical deterioration. An additional process indicator, seeking missing information, was also identified. Patient's pain on discharge from Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, escalation of care in response to early signs of deterioration and the need for nurses to seek out missing information to deliver care are indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit. Future research should test these indicators. Patient outcomes sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover on patient

  15. Clinical Trial Registries Are of Minimal Use for Identifying Selective Outcome and Analysis Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Susan L.; Holmer, Haley K.; Fu, Rongwei; Ogden, Lauren A.; Viswanathan, Meera S.; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine selective outcome reporting (SOR) and selective analysis reporting (SAR) in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to explore the usefulness of trial registries for identifying SOR and SAR. Study Design and Setting: We selected one "index outcome" for each of three comparative effectiveness reviews…

  16. Establishing construct validity for the thyroid-specific patient reported outcome measure (ThyPRO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Bjorner, Jakob Bue; Groenvold, Mogens;

    2009-01-01

    To establish a reliable and valid scale structure of a patient-reported outcome measuring thyroid-specific quality of life.......To establish a reliable and valid scale structure of a patient-reported outcome measuring thyroid-specific quality of life....

  17. Variations in reporting of outcomes in randomized trials on diet and physical activity in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogozińska, Ewelina; Marlin, Nadine; Yang, Fen

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Trials on diet and physical activity in pregnancy report on various outcomes. We aimed to assess the variations in outcomes reported and their quality in trials on lifestyle interventions in pregnancy. METHODS: We searched major databases without language restrictions for randomized controll...

  18. Molecular epidemiology of a hepatitis C virus epidemic in a haemodialysis unit: outbreak investigation and infection outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanini Simone

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HCV is a leading cause of liver chronic diseases all over the world. In developed countries the highest prevalence of infection is reported among intravenous drug users and haemodialysis (HD patients. The present report is to identify the pathway of HCV transmission during an outbreak of HCV infection in a privately run haemodialysis (HD unit in Italy in 2005. Methods Dynamics of the outbreak and infection clinical outcomes were defined through an ambi-directional cohort study. Molecular epidemiology techniques were used to define the relationships between the viral variants infecting the patients and confirm the outbreak. Risk analysis and auditing procedures were carried out to define the transmission pathway(s. Results Of the 50 patients treated in the HD unit 5 were already anti-HCV positive and 13 became positive during the study period (AR = 28.9%. Phylogenic analysis identified that, all the molecularly characterized incident cases (10 out of 13, were infected with the same viral variant of one of the prevalent cases. The multivariate analysis and the auditing procedure disclosed a single event of multi-dose vials heparin contamination as the cause of transmission of the infection in 11 out of the 13 incident cases; 2 additional incident cases occurred possibly as a result of inappropriate risk management. Discussion More than 30% of all HCV infections in developed countries results from poor application of standard precautions during percutaneous procedures. Comprehensive strategy which included: educational programmes, periodical auditing on standard precaution, use of single-dose vials whenever possible, prospective surveillance for blood-borne infections (including a system of prompt notification and risk assessment/management dedicated staff are the cornerstone to contain and prevent outbreaks in HD Conclusions The outbreak described should serve as a reminder to HD providers that patients undergoing dialysis are

  19. Strategies for Monitoring Outcomes in HIV-Exposed Uninfected Children in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Claire; Tookey, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of pregnancies in women living with HIV is carried out on a national basis in the United Kingdom (UK) through the National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood. There are currently around 1100-1200 HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants born every year in the UK, where vertical transmission of HIV now occurs in fewer than 5 in every 1000 pregnancies. By the end of 2014, there was a cumulative total of more than 15,000 HEU children with any combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) exposure and more than 5000 with cART exposure from conception in the UK. HEU infants are increasingly being exposed to newer antiretroviral drugs for which less is known regarding both short- and long-term safety. In this commentary, we describe the approaches that have been taken to explore health outcomes in HEU children born in the UK. This includes the Children exposed to AntiRetroviral Therapy (CHART) Study, which was a consented follow-up study carried out in 2002-2005 of HEU children born in 1996-2004. The CHART Study showed that 4% of HEU children enrolled had a major health or development problem in early childhood; this was within expected UK norms, but the study was limited by small numbers and short-term follow-up. However, the problems with recruitment and retention that were encountered within the CHART Study demonstrated that comprehensive, clinic-based follow-up was not a feasible approach for long-term assessment of HEU children in the UK. We describe an alternative approach developed to monitor some aspects of their long-term health, involving the "flagging" of HEU infants for death and cancer registration with the UK Office for National Statistics. Some of the ethical concerns regarding investigation of long-term outcomes of in utero and perinatal exposure to antiretrovirals, including those relating to consent and confidentiality, are also discussed.

  20. Strategies for monitoring outcomes in HIV-exposed uninfected children in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eThorne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance of pregnancies in women living with HIV is carried out on a national basis in the United Kingdom (UK through the National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC. There are currently around 1100-1200 HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU infants born every year in the UK, where vertical transmission of HIV now occurs in fewer than five in every 1000 pregnancies. By the end of 2014, there was a cumulative total of more than 15,000 HEU children with any combination antiretroviral therapy (cART exposure and more than 5,000 with cART exposure from conception in the UK. HEU infants are increasingly being exposed to newer antiretroviral drugs for which less is known regarding both short and longer-term safety. In this commentary, we describe the approaches that have been taken to explore health outcomes in HEU children born in the UK. This includes the Children exposed to AntiRetroviral Therapy (CHART Study, which was a consented follow-up study carried out in 2002-2005 of HEU children born in 1996-2004. The CHART Study showed that 4% of HEU children enrolled had a major health or development problem in early childhood; this was within expected UK norms but the study was limited by small numbers and short-term follow-up. However, the problems with recruitment and retention that were encountered within the CHART Study demonstrated that comprehensive, clinic-based follow-up was not a feasible approach for long-term assessment of HEU children in the UK. We describe an alternative approach developed to monitor some aspects of their long-term health, involving the flagging of HEU infants for death and cancer registration with the UK Office for National Statistics. Some of the ethical concerns regarding investigation of long-term outcomes of in utero and perinatal exposure to antiretrovirals including those relating to consent and confidentiality are also discussed.

  1. A study of outcome and complications associated with temporary hemodialysis catheters in a Nigerian dialysis unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Oluwatoyin Amira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis (HD catheters are commonly used as temporary vascular access in patients with kidney failure who require immediate HD. The use of these catheters is limited by complications such as infections, thrombosis resulting in poor blood flow. We studied the complications and outcomes of nontunneled catheters used for vascular access in our dialysis unit. The records of all patients, with renal failure who were dialyzed over a two-year period and had a double lumen nontunneled catheter inserted, were retrieved. Catheter insertion was carried out under ultrasound guidance using the modified Seldinger technique. The demographic data of patients, etiology of chronic kidney disease, and complications and outcomes of these catheters were noted. Fifty-four patients with mean age 43.7 ± 15.8 years had 69 catheters inserted for a cumulative total of 4047 catheter-days. The mean catheter patency was 36.4 ± 37.2 days (range: 1-173 days. Thrombosis occluding the catheters was the most common complication and occurred in 58% of catheters leading to catheter malfunction, followed by infections in18.8% of catheters. During follow-up, 30 (43.5% catheters were removed, 14 (20.3% due to catheter malfunction, eight (11.6% due to infection, five (7.2% elective removal, and three (4.3% due to damage. Thrombotic occlusion of catheters was a major limiting factor to the survival of HD catheters. Improvement in catheter patency can be achieved with more potent lock solutions.

  2. Instructional Variables and Learning Outcomes. CSEIP Occasional Report #16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    A major aspect of the problem of evaluation concerns the measurement of educational outcomes. Such measurement involves, first of all, an inference regarding what is being learned, retained, or transferred. A description is given of the operations which underlie such inferences. It is contended that educational measurement needs to concern itself…

  3. Patient-reported outcome after fast-track knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben B; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe patient-related functional outcomes after fast-track total knee arthroplasty and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Furthermore, we wanted to assess physical areas where an additional need for rehabilitation could be identified, and finally, we...

  4. Outcome Measures in Functional Urology : Towards evaluation through patient reported outcome measures?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. 't Hoen (Lisette)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Pelvic floor disorders are characterized by four domains: urinary symptoms, anorectal symptoms, pelvic organ prolapse and sexual dysfunction. The symptoms of the different domains have a significant impact on patient’s quality of life. Traditional outcome measures, such a

  5. Flyway Habitat Management Unit Project report no. 1: Introduction to the Flyway Habitat Management Unit Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To reduce uncertainties and provide improved program guidance, we divided the coterminous United States into 164 management units, developed sets of key information...

  6. Ileus and Small Bowel Obstruction in an Emergency Department Observation Unit: Are there Outcome Predictors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L. Emerman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of our study was to describe the evaluation and outcome of patients with ileus and bowel obstruction admitted to an emergency department (ED observation unit (OU and to identify predictors of successful management for such patients. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 129 patients admitted to a university-affiliated, urban, tertiary hospital ED OU from January 1999 through November 2004. Inclusion criteria were all adult patients admitted to the OU with an ED diagnosis of ileus, partial small bowel obstruction, or small bowel obstruction, and electronic medical records available for review. The following variables were examined: ED diagnosis, history of similar admission, number of prior abdominal surgeries, surgery in the month before, administration of opioid analgesia at any time after presentation, radiographs demonstrating air–fluid levels or dilated loops of small bowel, hypokalemia, use of nasogastric decompression, and surgical consultation. Results: Treatment failure, defined as hospital admission from the OU, occurred in 65 (50.4% of 129 patients. Only the use of a nasogastric tube was associated with OU failure (21% discharged versus 79% requiring admission, P ¼ 0.0004; odds ratio, 5.294; confidence interval, 1.982–14.14. Conclusion: Half of the patients admitted to our ED OU with ileus or varying degrees of small bowel obstruction required hospital admission. The requirement of a nasogastric tube in such patients was associated with a greater rate of observation unit failure. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:404–407.

  7. Associations of patient safety outcomes with models of nursing care organization at unit level in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Carl-Ardy; D'amour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Clarke, Sean; Rivard, Michèle; Blais, Régis

    2013-04-01

    To examine the associations of four distinct nursing care organizational models with patient safety outcomes. Cross-sectional correlational study. Using a standardized protocol, patients' records were screened retrospectively to detect occurrences of patient safety-related events. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations of those events with four nursing care organizational models. Twenty-two medical units in 11 hospitals in Quebec, Canada, were clustered into 4 nursing care organizational models: 2 professional models and 2 functional models. Two thousand six hundred and ninety-nine were patients hospitalized for at least 48 h on the selected units. Composite of six safety-related events widely-considered sensitive to nursing care: medication administration errors, falls, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, unjustified restraints and pressure ulcers. Events were ultimately sorted into two categories: events 'without major' consequences for patients and events 'with' consequences. After controlling for patient characteristics, patient risk of experiencing one or more events (of any severity) and of experiencing an event with consequences was significantly lower, by factors of 25-52%, in both professional models than in the functional models. Event rates for both functional models were statistically indistinguishable from each other. Data suggest that nursing care organizational models characterized by contrasting staffing, work environment and innovation characteristics may be associated with differential risk for hospitalized patients. The two professional models, which draw mainly on registered nurses (RNs) to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support for nurses' professional practice, were associated with lower risks than are the two functional models.

  8. Short report: a new case report of human Mesocestoides infection in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Márius V; Galán-Puchades, M Teresa; Malone, John B

    2003-05-01

    The twenty-seventh documented case of human Mesocestoides infection, which corresponds to the seventh documented case in the United States, is reported. The case had its origin in Alexandria, Louisiana in the summer of 1998. The patient was a 19-month-old boy. The strobila consisted of 35 proglottids that included mature as well as gravid segments containing a ventral genital pore and a parauterine organ. After a detailed microscopic examination, the tapeworm was identified as belonging to the genus Mesocestoides. Mesocestoides variabilis is the probable species responsible for the infection, since the six cases previously reported in the United States were identified as this species. After the treatment with a single dose of praziquantel (10 mg/kg), the tapeworm segments were no longer detectable in the child's feces. A food-borne origin of this infection derived from culinary customs of the Acadian and Creole communities in Louisiana is proposed.

  9. Final Report: Self Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Russell [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kahn, Lawrence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kurtis, Kimberly [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Loreto, Giovanni [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Van Wyk, Jurie [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Canterero-Leal, Carlos [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This report outlines the development of a self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The self-roughening concrete produced as part of this research was assessed in SC structures at three scales: small-scale shear-friction specimens, mid-scale beams tested in in-plane and out-of-plane bending, and a full-scale validation test using an SC module produced by Westinghouse as part of the Plant Vogtle expansion. The experiments show that the self-roughening concrete can produce a cold-joint surface of 0.25 inches (6 mm) without external vibration during concrete placement. The experiments and subsequent analysis show that the shear friction provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9 can be used to assess the shear capacity of the cold-joints in SC modular construction, and that friction coefficient of 1.35 is appropriate for use with these provisions.

  10. Family history and disease outcomes in patients with Crohn's disease: A comparison between China and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Qi; Hu, Jun; Al Kazzi, Elie S; Akhuemonkhan, Eboselume; Zhi, Min; Gao, Xiang; de Paula Pessoa, Raquel Holand; Ghazaleh, Sami; Cornelius, Tuhina; Sabunwala, Suhel Abbas; Ghadermarzi, Shadi; Tripathi, Kartikeya; Lazarev, Mark; Hu, Pin-Jin; Hutfless, Susan

    2016-11-06

    To investigate the differences in family history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and clinical outcomes among individuals with Crohn's disease (CD) residing in China and the United States. We performed a survey-based cross-sectional study of participants with CD recruited from China and the United States. We compared the prevalence of IBD family history and history of ileal involvement, CD-related surgeries and IBD medications in China and the United States, adjusting for potential confounders. We recruited 49 participants from China and 145 from the United States. The prevalence of family history of IBD was significantly lower in China compared with the United States (China: 4.1%, United States: 39.3%). The three most commonly affected types of relatives were cousin, sibling, and parent in the United States compared with child and sibling in China. Ileal involvement (China: 63.3%, United States: 63.5%) and surgery for CD (China: 51.0%, United States: 49.7%) were nearly equivalent in the two countries. The lower prevalence of familial clustering of IBD in China may suggest that the etiology of CD is less attributed to genetic background or a family-shared environment compared with the United States. Despite the potential difference in etiology, surgery and ileal involvement were similar in the two countries. Examining the changes in family history during the continuing rise in IBD may provide further insight into the etiology of CD.

  11. Patterns and Outcomes Associated with Patient Migration for Liver Transplantation in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher P Croome

    Full Text Available Traveling to seek specialized care such as liver transplantation (LT is a reality in the United States. Patient migration has been attributed to organ availability. The aims of this study were to delineate patterns of patient migration and outcomes after LT.All deceased donor LT between 2008-2013 were extracted from UNOS data. Migrated patients were defined as those patients who underwent LT at a center in a different UNOS region from the region in which they resided and traveled a distance > 100 miles.Migrated patients comprised 8.2% of 28,700 LT performed. Efflux and influx of patients were observed in all 11 UNOS regions. Regions 1, 5, 6, and 9 had a net efflux, while regions 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 11 had a net influx of patients. After multivariate adjustment for donor and recipient factors, graft (p = 0.68 and patient survival (p = 0.52 were similar between migrated and non-migrated patients.A significant number of patients migrated in patterns that could not be explained alone by regional variations in MELD score and wait time. Migration may be a complex interplay of factors including referral patterns, specialized services at centers of excellence and patient preference.

  12. Frequency and outcome of patients with nonthyroidal illness syndrome in a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikat, Katharina; Langgartner, Julia; Buettner, Roland; Bollheimer, L Cornelius; Woenckhaus, Ulrike; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Wrede, Christian E

    2007-02-01

    Acute and chronic critical conditions are associated with reduced serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT(3)), free thyroxine FT(4), and thyrotropin, known as nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). It is still controversial whether these changes reflect a protective mechanism or a maladaptive process during prolonged illness. However, larger studies to determine the prevalence of the NTIS and its association with outcome in medical intensive care units (ICUs) are missing. Complete thyroid hormone levels from 247 of 743 patients admitted to our ICU between October 2002 and February 2004 were retrospectively evaluated. From these patients, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, ICU mortality, length of stay, mechanical ventilation, and concomitant medication were recorded. Ninety-seven patients (44.1%) had low FT(3) levels indicating an NTIS, either with normal (23.6%) or reduced (20.5%) serum thyrotropin levels. Of 97 patients with NTIS, 24 (23.3%) also showed reduced serum FT(4) levels. The NTIS was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, mortality, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combination of low FT(3) and low FT(4) was an independent risk factor for survival. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome is frequent at a medical ICU. A reduction of FT(4) together with FT(3) is associated with an increase in mortality and might reflect a maladaptive process, thereby worsening the disease.

  13. Effect of a "Lean" intervention to improve safety processes and outcomes on a surgical emergency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Peter; Kreckler, Simon; New, Steve; Sheena, Yezen; Handa, Ashok; Catchpole, Ken

    2010-11-02

    Emergency surgical patients are at high risk for harm because of errors in care. Quality improvement methods that involve process redesign, such as “Lean,” appear to improve service reliability and efficiency in healthcare. Interrupted time series. The emergency general surgery ward of a university hospital in the United Kingdom. Seven safety relevant care processes. A Lean intervention targeting five of the seven care processes relevant to patient safety. 969 patients were admitted during the four month study period before the introduction of the Lean intervention (May to August 2007), and 1114 were admitted during the four month period after completion of the intervention (May to August 2008). Compliance with the five process measures targeted for Lean intervention (but not the two that were not) improved significantly (relative improvement 28% to 149%; PLean can substantially and simultaneously improve compliance with a bundle of safety related processes. Given the interconnected nature of hospital care, this strategy might not translate into improvements in safety outcomes unless a system-wide approach is adopted to remove barriers to change.

  14. Severe acidosis does not predict fatal outcomes in intensive care unit patients: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Yoav; Zegerman, Alexander; Sorkine, Patrick; Matot, Idit

    2014-04-01

    Severe acidosis is a potentially life-threatening acid-base imbalance. The outcome of patients with severe acidosis has only been anecdotally described. We therefore assessed the discharge rate of such patients from the intensive care unit (ICU) and survival time after the event. A retrospective evaluation of medical records of patients admitted to the ICU of Tel Aviv Medical Center between 2005 and 2010, in whom arterial blood pH less than 6.8 was documented during their ICU stay, was performed. Twenty-eight patients were suitable for study entry. Septic shock was the most common underlying medical condition (33%). Nine (32.1%) patients were either discharged alive or survived for at least 30 days in the ICU after their arterial blood pH measurement was less than 6.8. More than a quarter of the patients with life-threatening acidosis (n = 8; 28.6%) were discharged home and returned to their prehospitalization daily activity. Mean follow-up period for these patients was 132 ± 111 weeks. Multivariate analysis identified hyperkalemia, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and Glasgow Coma Scale as determinants for ICU death after severe acidosis. A significant number of patients can outlast severe acidosis and return to their prehospitalization status. Larger studies are needed to define the patient population most likely to benefit from aggressive resuscitation efforts during severe acidosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 22 CFR 50.8 - Certification of Report of Birth Abroad of a United States Citizen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... United States Citizen. 50.8 Section 50.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS... Certification of Report of Birth Abroad of a United States Citizen. At any time subsequent to the issuance of a Consular Report of Birth Abroad of a Citizen of the United States of America, when requested and upon...

  16. Limiting Severe Outcomes and Impact on Intensive Care Units of Moderate-Intermediate 2009 Pandemic Influenza: Role of Infectious Diseases Units

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Carbonara; Giuseppe Bruno; Giuseppe Di Ciaula; Anna Donata Pantaleo; Gioacchino Angarano; Laura Monno

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The rate of severe outcomes of patients with 2009 pandemic (A/H1N1) influenza (2009pI) hospitalized in non-intensive care units (ICUs) has not been defined thus far. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the management of patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) of moderate intermediate severity in an infectious diseases unit (IDU) during the first wave of 2009pI and its influence on the burden of ICUs. METHODS: All patients hospitalized from October 27, 2009, to February 5, 20...

  17. The vitamin D hypothesis revisited: race-based disparities in birth outcomes in the United States and ultraviolet light availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Zaneta M

    2014-04-15

    Skin color has been proposed to contribute to race-based health disparities in the United States because of differences in ultraviolet (UV) light-induced vitamin D synthesis. The prediction of this hypothesis, herein named the UVD hypothesis, is that racial disparities in health outcomes are correlated with UV light availability. This paper investigates whether UV light availability is associated with disparities in the rates of low birth weight (LBW) and preterm birth (PTB) between whites and blacks, because these outcomes are thought to be influenced by vitamin D status and to shape disease risk in later life. Data on LBW and PTB from 2007 (n = 2,825,620 births) were compared with data on UV light exposure across the United States. Contrary to the predictions of the UVD hypothesis, LBW and PTB rate disparities were greatest in states with the highest UV light exposure. Notably, income inequality was positively and significantly related to LBW and PTB disparities, even after controlling for UV light availability. The results of this analysis demonstrate that there is a significant environmental gradient in racial disparities in birth outcomes in the United States, but other social or environmental factors associated with living in the southern United States are likely stronger contributors to disparities in birth outcomes than UV light-induced vitamin D status.

  18. Preliminary Findings on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents in an Inpatient Secure Adolescent Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Jenny; Wheatley, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    To date there is limited research examining the use of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA) with adolescents in secure care. The aim of this article is to examine the inter-rater reliability, concurrent validity and clinical utility of HoNOSCA in an adolescent secure psychiatric unit. Twenty-four…

  19. Capability Deprivation and Income Poverty in the United States, 1994 and 2004: Measurement Outcomes and Demographic Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Udaya R.

    2009-01-01

    Shifting focus from income to capability signifies an important milestone toward accurately measuring poverty and deprivation. This paper operationalizes capability deprivation in the United States and compares measurement outcomes among various capability approaches and between capability and income spaces. Of the three capability approaches…

  20. Clinical outcomes of a specialised inpatient unit for adults with mild to severe intellectual disability and mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Y; White, S E; Palucka, A M; Weiss, J; Bockus, S; Gofine, T

    2010-01-01

    Limitations of general psychiatric services have led to the development of specialised psychiatric programmes for patients with intellectual disability (ID) and mental health needs. Few studies have examined treatment outcomes of specialised inpatient units, and no studies have explored how the effects of intervention may differ for individuals at varying levels of cognitive ability. The present study examined clinical outcomes of inpatients with mild ID in contrast to inpatients with moderate to severe ID within the same service. Thirty-three patients (17 with mild ID and 16 with moderate to severe ID) discharged between 2006 and 2008 from a specialised inpatient unit in Canada for adults with ID and mental illness were studied. In addition to examining change in scores on clinical measures, outcomes with regard to length of stay, diagnostic change, residential change and re-admission to hospital were explored. Both groups demonstrated clinical improvement from admission to discharge. However, only patients with mild ID demonstrated improvements on the Global Assessment of Functioning. This study is one of the first to consider outcomes of higher and lower functioning individuals with ID on a specialised inpatient unit. Results suggest that outcomes may be different for these groups, and some clinical measures may be more sensitive to changes in patients with more severe disabilities.

  1. Geothermal Energy Development in the Eastern United States. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-10-01

    This document represents the final report from the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) of The Johns Hopkins University on its efforts on behalf of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Department of Energy (DOE). For the past four years, the Laboratory has been fostering development of geothermal energy in the Eastern United States. While the definition of ''Eastern'' has changed somewhat from time to time, basically it means the area of the continental United States east of the Rocky Mountains, plus Puerto Rico but excluding the geopressured regions of Texas and Louisiana. During these years, the Laboratory developed a background in geology, hydrology, and reservoir analysis to aid it in establishing the marketability of geothermal energy in the east. Contrary to the situation in the western states, the geothermal resource in the east was clearly understood to be inferior in accessible temperature. On the other hand, there were known to be copious quantities of water in various aquifers to carry the heat energy to the surface. More important still, the east possesses a relatively dense population and numerous commercial and industrial enterprises, so that thermal energy, almost wherever found, would have a market. Thus, very early on it was clear that the primary use for geothermal energy in the east would be for process heat and space conditioning--heating and cool electrical production was out of the question. The task then shifted to finding users colocated with resources. This task met with modest success on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. A great deal of economic and demographic analysis pinpointed the prospective beneficiaries, and an intensive ''outreach'' campaign was mounted to persuade the potential users to invest in geothermal energy. The major handicaps were: (1) The lack of demonstrated hydrothermal resources with known temperatures and expected longevity; and (2) The lack of a &apos

  2. Final Report: Self-Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Russell [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kahn, Lawrence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kurtis, Kimberly [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Loreto, Giovanni [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Van Wyk, Jurie [Westinghouse Inc., Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Canterero-Leal, Carlos [Westinghouse Inc., Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This report focuses on work completed on DE-NE0000667, Self-Consolidating Concrete for Modular Units, in connection with the Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (DOE-NEET) program. This project was completed in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with Westinghouse Corporation as the industrial partner. The primary objective of this project was to develop self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) mixtures so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The SCC mixtures developed were able to carry shearing forces across the cold-joint boundaries. This “self-roughening” was achieved by adding a tailored fraction of lightweight aggregate (LWA) to the concrete mix, some of which raised to the surface during curing, forming a rough surface on which subsequent concrete placements were made. The self-roughening behavior was validated through three sets of structural tests. Shear friction on small-scale specimens with cold joints was assessed using varying fractions of LWA and with varying amounts of external steel plate reinforcement. The results show that the shear friction coefficient, to be used with the provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9, can be taken as 1.35. Mid-scale beam tests were completed to assess the cold-joint capacity in both in-plane and out-of-plane bending. The results showed that the self-roughened joints performed as well as monolithic joints. The final assessment was a full-scale test using a steel composite module supplied by Westinghouse and similar in construction to

  3. A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter; Liu, Yu; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, Kathleen; Stock, Ronald; Chou, Li-Shan

    2014-04-01

    A previous randomized, controlled trial of tai chi showed improvements in objectively measured balance and other motor-related outcomes in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study evaluated whether patient-reported outcomes could be improved through exercise interventions and whether improvements were associated with clinical outcomes and exercise adherence. In a secondary analysis of the tai chi trial, patient-reported and clinical outcomes and exercise adherence measures were compared between tai chi and resistance training and between tai chi and stretching exercise. Patient-reported outcome measures were perceptions of health-related benefits resulting from participation, assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) and Vitality Plus Scale (VPS). Clinical outcome measures included motor symptoms, assessed by a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Examination (UPDRS-ME) and a 50-foot speed walk. Information on continuing exercise after the structured interventions were terminated was obtained at a 3-month postintervention follow-up. Tai chi participants reported significantly better improvement in the PDQ-8 (-5.77 points, P = 0.014) than did resistance training participants and in PDQ-8 (-9.56 points, P tai chi, patient-reported improvement in the PDQ-8 and VPS was significantly correlated with their clinical outcomes of UPDRS-ME and a 50-foot walk, but these correlations were not statistically different from those shown for resistance training or stretching. However, patient-reported outcomes from tai chi training were associated with greater probability of continued exercise behavior than were either clinical outcomes or patient-reported outcomes from resistance training or stretching. Tai chi improved patient-reported perceptions of health-related benefits, which were found to be associated with a greater probability of exercise adherence. The findings indicate the potential of patient perceptions to drive exercise

  4. Etiology and Outcome of Non-Traumatic Coma in Children Admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Khodapanahandeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-traumatic coma is a relatively common condition in children that may cause considerable mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine clinical presentation, etiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in children.Methods: In a retrospective cross sectional study over a period of 5 years, files of 150 children aged between 1 month and 14 years admitted with non-traumatic coma to pediatric intensive care unit of Rasool Akram hospital were reviewed. Historical, presenting symptoms, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Etiology of coma was determined on the basis of clinical history and relevant investigations. The outcome was recorded as died or neurological condition at discharge as normal, mild or sever disability. Chi-square test was used to test the differences in categorical variables.Findings: There were 63 (42% boys and 87 (58% girls. The mean±SD age of patients was 2.7±2.35 years. Systemic presentations including nausea, vomiting, fever, lethargy and poor feeding were more prominent in children under 2 years. Etiology of coma in 49 patients (32.7% was infectious (meningitis, encephalitis, respiratory and systemic. Other causes were status epilepticus 44 (29.4%, metabolic (diabetic ketoacidosis, inborn errors of metabolism 11 (7.3%, intoxications 10 (6.7%, accidental (drowning, electrical shock, suffocation 9 (6%, shunt dysfunction (secondary to congenital brain malformations 7 (4.6%, others (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, vasculitis, hypertensive encephalopathy 11 (7.3%, unknown 9 (6%. Infection occurred significantly (P=0.002 in children under 2 years of age, whereas accidents and intoxications were more prominent (P=0.004 in those between 2 and 6 years. Overall 25 children (16.6% died. Of those survived 16 became severely disabled. Accidents and infections had higher mortality compared to other groups (P<0.001 and P=0.02 respectively.Conclusion: Our results showed that infection was the

  5. Early Patient-Reported Outcomes Predict 3-Year Outcomes in Operatively Treated Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Kebaish, Khaled M; Sciubba, Daniel M; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Scheer, Justin K; Neuman, Brian J; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Burton, Douglas C; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Hostin, Richard A; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-06-01

    For patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD), surgical treatment may improve their health-related quality of life. This study investigates when the greatest improvement in outcomes occurs and whether incremental improvements in patient-reported outcomes during the first postoperative year predict outcomes at 3 years. Using a multicenter registry, we identified 84 adults with ASD treated surgically from 2008 to 2012 with complete 3-year follow-up. Pairwise t tests and multivariate regression were used for analysis. Significance was set at P years (both P year, ODI and SRS-22r scores improved by 19 and 0.5 points, respectively (both P year predicted 3-year outcomes in ODI and SRS-22r scores (adjusted R(2) = 0.52 and 0.42, respectively). There were no significant differences in the measured or predicted 3-year ODI (P = 0.991) or SRS-22r scores (P = 0.986). In surgically treated patients with ASD, the greatest improvements in outcomes occurred between 6 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. A model with incremental improvements from baseline to 6 weeks and from 6 weeks to 1 year can be used to predict ODI and SRS-22r scores at 3 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. TREATMENT OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS TREATED UNDER RNTCP IN KARAD TUBERCULOSIS UNIT

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    Vandana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP, India. OBJECTIVE: To study the treatment outcomes in patients treated under RNTCP &causes of defaulted, death, failure among them. MATERIAL & METHODS: This study was conducted in Karad Tuberculosis Unit (TU, Satara District, Maharashtra. Under Karad Tuberculosis Unit there were nine PHCs, Sub District Hospital and Krishna Hospital, six Designated Microscopy Centre’s (DMC, three Integrated Counseling and Testing Centre’s (ICTC – KH, SDH and Undale. All patients registered during January2008 to June 2009 i.e.806 were the study subjects. Before commencement of study permission of District Tuberculosis Officer (DTO was taken. STUDY TYPE: Longitudinal (Prospective Study. STUDY PLAN: Patients were interviewed using pre-tested semi structured questionnaires at their residence at the start of treatment, after completion of intensive phase and cohort was further followed up for approximately six months. RESULTS & OBSERVATIONS: Out of 233 new sputum smear positive (NSP patients, 214 had their sputum smear negative at the end of Intensive phase (IP; hence sputum conversion rate was 91.84% in present study. We found that233newsputum smear positive cases out of which 187 were cured. Thus the cure rate was 80.2%.Out of which 506 smear negative and extra pulmonary patients 462 completed treatment hence treatment completion rate was 91.30%. Out of 233 new smear sputum positive cases, 23 died thus death rate was 9.8%, 5 patients were treatment failure thus the failure rate was 2.1 %. 12 patients defaulted the treatment thus defaulted rate was5.15%.Due to tuberculosis 22 (2.7% patients died, 27 (3.3% due to HIV, 17 (2.1% defaulted due to migration, 5 (0.6% defaulted due to addiction of alcohol, 3 (0.4% defaulted due to not relief from symptoms, 1 (0.1% defaulted due to adverse reaction.16 (2% failed in due to initial heavy bacillary load. CONCLUSION: It is observed that our regimens

  7. Factors related to positive and negative outcomes in psychiatric inpatients in a General Hospital Psychiatric Unit: a proposal for an outcomes index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUGO KARLING MORESCHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background General Hospital Psychiatric Units have a fundamental importance in the mental health care systems. However, there is a lack of studies regarding the level of improvement of patients in this type of facility. Objective To assess factors related to good and poor outcomes in psychiatric inpatients using an index composed by clinical parameters easily measured. Methods Length of stay (LOS, Global Assessment of Functioning (variation and at discharge and Clinical Global Impression (severity and improvement were used to build a ten-point improvement index (I-Index. Records of psychiatric inpatients of a general hospital during an 18-month period were analyzed. Three groups (poor, intermediate and good outcomes were compared by univariate and multivariate models according to clinical and sociodemographic variables. Results Two hundred and fifty patients were included, with a percentage in the groups with poor, regular and good outcomes of 16.4%, 59,6% and 24.0% respectively. Poor outcome at the discharge was associated mainly with lower education, transient disability, antipsychotics use, chief complaint “behavioral change/aggressiveness” and psychotic features. Multivariate analysis found a higher OR for diagnoses of “psychotic disorders” and “personality disorders” and others variables in relation to protective categories in the poor outcome group compared to the good outcome group. Discussion Our I-Index proved to be an indicator of that allows an easy and more comprehensive evaluation to assess outcomes of inpatients than just LOS. Different interventions addressed to conditions such as psychotic disorders and disruptive chief complaints are necessary.

  8. Clinical and visual outcomes of patients with uveitis in the mid-Atlantic United States

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    Bajwa A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Asima Bajwa,1 Chang Sup Lee,1 Jim Patrie,2 Wenjun Xin,2 Ashvini K Reddy1 1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of uveitis patients at the University of Virginia. Methods: Retrospective, observational study of uveitis patients seen at the University of Virginia from 1984 to 2014. Parametric and nonparametric methods were used to analyze the change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA in relation to demographics, diagnoses, management, and complications. Results: The study included 644 eyes of 491 patients. Patients with mild visual loss (logMAR <0.4 at presentation were younger than those with severe visual loss (SVL, logMAR >1.0 (P=0.002. Females were more likely to have mild visual loss as compared to males (P=0.025. Median overall BCVA was logMAR 0.18 at initial and final presentation (P=1.00. Vision loss at diagnosis was a predictor for moderate visual loss (MVL, logMAR 0.4 to <1.0 to SVL at last follow-up (P<0.001. Eyes with ocular hypertension were positively associated with MVL and SVL as compared to normotensive eyes (1.89 times at baseline, 2.62 times at last follow-up. Median BCVA was 0.18 logMAR for the anterior uveitis (AU and 0.48 logMAR for the non-AU patients (P<0.001. AU patients were less likely to have SVL than non-AU group (P<0.001. AU group received local corticosteroids more frequently and systemic corticosteroids less commonly than non-AU patients (P<0.001. AU patients with MVL to SVL were more likely to have ophthalmic surgery (cataract, glaucoma or pars plana vitrectomy [PPV] than those without MVL or SVL (P<0.001. Non-AU patients with MVL to SVL were more likely to have PPV than those without MVL or SVL (P=0.001. Conclusion: Mean overall BCVA remained stable. Favorable visual results were associated with younger age, female gender, and AU. Poor visual prognosis was concomitant with SVL at presentation

  9. National Initiatives to Improve Healthcare Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Health Delivery Systems in Slovakia and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Robert; Caplanova, Anetta; Novak, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    While the United States and Slovakia offer different healthcare delivery systems, each country faces the same challenges of improving the health status of their populations. The authors explore the impact of their respective systems on the health of their populations and compare the health outcomes of both nations. They point out that socioeconomic factors play a far more important role in determining population health outcomes than do the structures of the systems surrounding the care delivery. The authors illustrate this finding through a comparison of the poverty and education levels of a selected minority group from each country in relation to the health outcomes for each population group. The comparison reveals that education is a more influential determinant in a population's health outcomes, than the improved access to care offered by a universal system.

  10. Improving Project Outcomes and Growing the Anaerobic Digestion Industy Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion ombudsmen assist with project development, ensure the long-term sustainability of projects, and help advance the industry. This report explores the benefits of anaerobic digestion ombudsmen and provides guidance for implementing them.

  11. Patient reported outcomes in the assessment of premature ejaculation

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley E. Althof

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘Patient Reported Outcome’, abbreviated as PRO, was introduced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which proposed guidance on the development and validation of PROs. Previously PROs were known as self-report diaries, event-logs, self-administered questionnaires, and clinician administered rating scales. PROs seek to capture the subjective perceptions of patients and/or partner’s related to their specific symptoms, degree of bother, efficacy of a medication or psychotherapy i...

  12. Typhoid perforation: Post-operative Intensive Care Unit care and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaila Oyegbade Akinwale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Typhoid perforation ileitis is a serious complication of typhoid fever, a common and unfortunate health problem in a resource-poor country like Nigeria. Following bowel perforation, treatment is usually by simple closure or bowel resection and anastomosis after adequate aggressive fluid resuscitation and electrolyte correction. Postoperatively, some of these patients do require management in Intensive Care Unit (ICU on account of sepsis or septic shock and to improve survival. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective observational study in which 67 consecutive patients who had exploratory laparotomy for typhoid perforation between August 2009 and October 2012 in the main operating theatre of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, were studied. The attending anaesthetists had the freedom of choosing the appropriate anaesthetic drugs depending on the patients' clinical condition. The reason for admission into the ICU, the types of organ support required and outcomes were recorded. Results: Twenty-five patients (37.3% out of 67 required critical care. Reasons for admission among others included poor respiratory effort, hypotension, septic shock and delayed recovery from anaesthesia. Twenty-one patients (84% required mechanical ventilation with a mean duration of 2.14 days (range 1–5 days. Fourteen patients required ionotropic support and the length of ICU stay ranged from 1 to 15 days (mean 4.32 days. Nineteen patients (76% were successfully managed and discharged to the ward while 24% (6 patients mortality rate was recorded. Conclusion: This study showed high rate of post-operative ICU admission in patients with typhoid perforation with a high demand for critical care involving mechanical ventilation and ionotropic support. In centres that manage patients presenting with typhoid ileitis and perforation, post-operative critical care should be available.

  13. Typhoid perforation: Post-operative Intensive Care Unit care and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinwale, Mukaila Oyegbade; Sanusi, Arinola A; Adebayo, Oluwaseun K

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid perforation ileitis is a serious complication of typhoid fever, a common and unfortunate health problem in a resource-poor country like Nigeria. Following bowel perforation, treatment is usually by simple closure or bowel resection and anastomosis after adequate aggressive fluid resuscitation and electrolyte correction. Postoperatively, some of these patients do require management in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on account of sepsis or septic shock and to improve survival. This is a prospective observational study in which 67 consecutive patients who had exploratory laparotomy for typhoid perforation between August 2009 and October 2012 in the main operating theatre of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, were studied. The attending anaesthetists had the freedom of choosing the appropriate anaesthetic drugs depending on the patients' clinical condition. The reason for admission into the ICU, the types of organ support required and outcomes were recorded. Twenty-five patients (37.3%) out of 67 required critical care. Reasons for admission among others included poor respiratory effort, hypotension, septic shock and delayed recovery from anaesthesia. Twenty-one patients (84%) required mechanical ventilation with a mean duration of 2.14 days (range 1-5 days). Fourteen patients required ionotropic support and the length of ICU stay ranged from 1 to 15 days (mean 4.32 days). Nineteen patients (76%) were successfully managed and discharged to the ward while 24% (6 patients) mortality rate was recorded. This study showed high rate of post-operative ICU admission in patients with typhoid perforation with a high demand for critical care involving mechanical ventilation and ionotropic support. In centres that manage patients presenting with typhoid ileitis and perforation, post-operative critical care should be available.

  14. Systematic review of the empirical evidence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Dwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased use of meta-analysis in systematic reviews of healthcare interventions has highlighted several types of bias that can arise during the completion of a randomised controlled trial. Study publication bias has been recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis and can make the readily available evidence unreliable for decision making. Until recently, outcome reporting bias has received less attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We review and summarise the evidence from a series of cohort studies that have assessed study publication bias and outcome reporting bias in randomised controlled trials. Sixteen studies were eligible of which only two followed the cohort all the way through from protocol approval to information regarding publication of outcomes. Eleven of the studies investigated study publication bias and five investigated outcome reporting bias. Three studies have found that statistically significant outcomes had a higher odds of being fully reported compared to non-significant outcomes (range of odds ratios: 2.2 to 4.7. In comparing trial publications to protocols, we found that 40-62% of studies had at least one primary outcome that was changed, introduced, or omitted. We decided not to undertake meta-analysis due to the differences between studies. CONCLUSIONS: Recent work provides direct empirical evidence for the existence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias. There is strong evidence of an association between significant results and publication; studies that report positive or significant results are more likely to be published and outcomes that are statistically significant have higher odds of being fully reported. Publications have been found to be inconsistent with their protocols. Researchers need to be aware of the problems of both types of bias and efforts should be concentrated on improving the reporting of trials.

  15. Traditional open-bay versus single-family room neonatal intensive care unit: a comparison of selected nutrition outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Erickson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Christina Erickson1, Kendra Kattelmann1, Jessica Remington1, Cuirong Ren2, Carol C Helseth3, Dennis C Stevens31Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences, 2Department of Plant Science, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA; 3Sanford Children's Hospital, Sioux Falls, SD, USABackground: In contrast to the traditional open-bay–type design of the neonatal intensive care unit (tNICU, infants in developmentally appropriate NICU (dNICU are housed in individual rooms with greater control of light and noise. Previous reports have documented positive influence of the dNICU in cardiorespiratory status, physiologic stability, and weight gain of the infants. The objective of this study was to explore selected nutrition outcomes of infants in the dNICU versus tNICU.Method: A prospective cohort study was conducted on infants with birth weight of 1500 g or less cared for in dNICU (n = 42 or tNICU (n = 31. Differences between days to reach full parenteral nutrition, full enteral nutrition, or full bottling were determined using analysis of covariance controlling for gestational age, birth weight, and clinical risk index for babies (CRIB acuity score.Results: There were no differences between the two groups in days to reach full parenteral and bottle feeding. The infants in the dNICU took fewer days to reach full enteral nutrition (20.8 days, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 17, 24.6 (dNICU vs 23.3 days, 95% CI: 17.1, 29.6 (tNICU, P = 0.04 than those in the tNICU.Conclusions: Although the two groups of infants only differed in the days to reach full enteral feeding, it is important to remember that the lack of difference may be clinically significant. Clinically, the infants in the dNICU were younger (gestational age and sicker (CRIB acuity score than the infants in the tNICU. Consequently, the results of this study support the change to dNICU, as the private room model provides a supportive environment for growth as evidenced by similar

  16. Discrepancies between patient-reported outcome measures when assessing urinary incontinence or pelvic-prolapse surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Due; Lose, Gunnar; Guldberg, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: In order to assess the outcome following surgery for urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) the importance of patient-reported outcome measures, in addition to the clinical objective measures, has been recognised. The International Consultation...

  17. A brief Patient-Reported Outcomes Quality of Life (PROQOL instrument to improve patient care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Ridgeway

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jeff Sloan and colleagues describe the development of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Quality of Life (PROQOL instrument, which captures and stores patient-recorded outcomes in the medical record for patients with diabetes. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  18. Survey report: moose surveys in lower Chignik Unit, May 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Federal Subsistence Board requested that moose surveys be flown in the area of the lower Chignik Unit proposed for closure to non-qualified moose hunters by the...

  19. Association of nursing overtime, nurse staffing and unit occupancy with medical incidents and outcomes of very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltempo, M; Lacroix, G; Cabot, M; Blais, R; Piedboeuf, B

    2017-09-21

    To examine the association of nursing overtime, nursing provision and unit occupancy rate with medical incident rates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the risk of mortality or major morbidity among very preterm infants. Single center retrospective cohort study of infants born within 23 to 29 weeks of gestational age or birth weight bed, level III NICU. Nursing overtime ratios (nursing overtime hours/total nursing hours), nursing provision ratios (nursing hours/recommended nursing hours based on patient dependency categories) and unit occupancy rates were pooled for all shifts during NICU hospitalization of each infant. Log-binomial models assessed their association with the composite outcome (mortality or major morbidity). Of the 257 infants that met the inclusion criteria, 131 (51%) developed the composite outcome. In the adjusted multivariable analyses, high (>3.4%) relative to low nursing overtime ratios (⩽3.4%) were not associated with the composite outcome (relative risk (RR): 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86 to 1.02). High nursing provision ratios (>1) were associated with a lower risk of the composite outcome relative to low ones (⩽1) (RR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90). NICU occupancy rates were not associated with the composite outcome (RR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.89 to 1.07, high (>100%) vs low (⩽100%)). Days with high nursing provision ratios (>1) were also associated with lower risk of having medical incidents (RR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.82 to 0.99). High nursing provision ratio during NICU hospitalization is associated with a lower risk of a composite adverse outcome in very preterm infants.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 21 September 2017; doi:10.1038/jp.2017.146.

  20. Ocular trauma treated with pars plana vitrectomy: early outcome report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaei, Seyed Ali; Soleimani, Mohammad; Kiarudi, Mohammad Yaser; Molaei, Saber; Rouzbahani, Mehdi; Mireshghi, Meysam; Zaeferani, Mohsen; Ghasempour, Mehrbod

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate demographic variables and visual outcomes, among patients with ocular injuries involving the posterior segment, managed with pars plana vitrectomy. METHODS The records of patients were studied retrospectively from March to September 2010, to determine the age, gender, place of occurrence of trauma, visual acuity, anatomical site, nature of injury, wound length, the presence of an afferent pupillary defect, and the timing of vitrectomy. The Ocular Trauma Score was measured. The minimum follow-up from presentation was 6mo. RESULTS Ninety patients (77 males, 13 females), with a mean age of 32.7±15.8y were included over the 6-month period. The majority of cases occurred in the workplace (47 patients), followed by home (14 patients). The mean visual acuity (logMAR) of patients significantly improved from 2.36±0.72 preoperatively to 1.50±1.14 postoperatively. Twenty-three patients had preoperative vision better than 2.0 logMAR, the postoperative visual acuity was significantly better among these patients than patients with worse than 2.0 logMAR (P7d) was not significantly different (P=0.66). Postoperative visual acuity was not significantly different between patients with injury in Zone I and II (P=0.64), but patients with injury in Zone III had significantly poorer visual acuity (P=0.02). Patients with relative afferent pupillary defect had significantly poorer postoperative visual acuity (P=0.02). Preoperative visual acuity, the difference of preoperative and postoperative visual acuity, and postoperative visual acuity were significantly different between groups with different ocular trauma scores (P<0.001). CONCLUSION Trauma is more likely to occur in men under 40y of age and in the workplace. The favorable final visual outcome is associated with the absence of afferent pupillary defect, ocular trauma score and presenting visual acuity as well as the zone of injury, and not associated with the timing of vitrectomy. PMID:27275432

  1. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Lund, Hans; Guyatt, GH

    2010-01-01

    Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta-analyses ......Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta......-analyses in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in high impact factor journals. Eligible were randomized controlled trials, using two or more PROs measuring pain or disability. A prioritized list was developed based on the capacity to discriminate between intervention...

  2. Patient-reported outcome and risk of revision after shoulder replacement for osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Polk, Anne; Brorson, Stig;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We used patient-reported outcome and risk of revision to compare hemiarthroplasty (HA) with total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and stemmed hemiarthroplasty (SHA) with resurfacing hemiarthroplasty (RHA) in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all pat...

  3. Sustainability in a global context: How does local factor affect the outcomes of CSR activities in international business units?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christa; Lauring, Jakob

    In recent years CSR has become increasingly important for the activities and branding of MNCs. While some studies have investigated CSR management and branding in domestic situations, fewer studies exist in the case of international business units (subsidiaries, joint ventures, and franchises...... as CSR branding outcomes). Our findings show that local values were positively associated with external CSR engagement and that employee relations were positively related to both internal and external CSR engagement. None of the local factors were significantly associated with CSR branding outcomes...

  4. The Effectiveness of Healthy Community Approaches on Positive Health Outcomes in Canada and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel Williams-Roberts

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy community approaches encompass a diverse group of population based strategies and interventions that create supportive environments, foster community behavior change and improve health. This systematic review examined the effectiveness of ten most common healthy community approaches (Healthy Cities/Communities, Smart Growth, Child Friendly Cities, Safe Routes to Schools, Safe Communities, Active Living Communities, Livable Communities, Social Cities, Age-Friendly Cities, and Dementia Friendly Cities on positive health outcomes. Empirical studies were identified through a search of the academic and grey literature for the period 2000–2014. Of the 231 articles retrieved, 26 met the inclusion criteria with four receiving moderate quality ratings and 22 poor ratings using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool. The majority of studies evaluated Safe Routes to School Programs and reported positive associations with students’ active commute patterns. Fewer studies assessed benefits of Smart Growth, Safe Communities, Active Living Communities and Age-Friendly Cities. The remaining approaches were relatively unexplored in terms of their health benefits however focused on conceptual frameworks and collaborative processes. More robust studies with longer follow-up duration are needed. Priority should be given to evaluation of healthy community projects to show their effectiveness within the population health context.

  5. Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in vertical counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2014-01-01

    and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark Introduction: Altered loading pattern of the medial aspect of the knee has been associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated......Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects Brekke AF1,2, Nielsen DB2, Holsgaard-Larsen A2 1School of physiotherapy, University College Zealand, Denmark 2Orthopaedic Research Unit, Department of Orthopaedics...

  6. Unicornuate uterus and pregnancy outcome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Mishra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mullerian duct anomalies (MDAs are congenital defects of the female genital tract that arise from abnormal embryological development of the Mullerian ducts. Unicornuate uterus with or without rudimentary horn is developmental anomaly which occurs due to abnormal or failed development of one of the paired mullerian duct or fusion of the ducts. Women with unicornuate uterus have increased incidence of obstetric complications like spontaneous abortions, preterm delivery and intrauterine foetal demise and gynaecological complications like infertility, endometriosis and dysmenorrhoea. A 25 years old, primigravida was admitted at 38 weeks 3 days gestational age with complaints of leaking per vaginum. She was induced with PGE2 gel under antibiotic coverage to prevent chorioamnionitis. She underwent emergency caesarean section for failure to progress and intra-operatively she was incidentally found to have unicornuate uterus with contralateral fallopian tube directly getting attached to the ovary. The baby cried immediately after birth, though it was growth retarded (IUGR. If pregnancy with unicornuate uterus is managed well, it can result in favourable obstetric outcome. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(12.000: 4522-4524

  7. Beyond Trauma: Post-resettlement Factors and Mental Health Outcomes Among Latino and Asian Refugees in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Isok

    2016-08-01

    War-related traumas impact refugees' mental health. Recent literature suggests that structural and sociocultural factors related to the resettlement also become critical in shaping refugees' mental health. So far, there is limited empirical evidence to support this claim among resettled refugees. Resettlement contextual factors that influence mental health outcomes were examined using Latino and Asian refugees (n = 656) from a nationally representative survey. Linear and logistic regressions predicted factors associated with the study's outcomes (self-reported mental health, mood disorders, and anxiety disorders). Post-resettlement traumas were significantly associated with mental health outcomes, but pre-resettlement traumas were not. Unemployment, everyday discrimination, and limited English were significantly associated with mental health outcomes among both Latino and Asian refugees. The outcomes indicate that resettlement contextual factors have a significant association with refugees' mental health. Therefore, future studies with refugees must pay closer attention to structural and sociocultural factors after resettlement.

  8. Hyperammonemia: A Report of Maternal Biliary Cirrhosis and Neonatal Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Hussamy, Deana J.; Nelson, David B.; Shivvers, Stephan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon during pregnancy, cirrhosis results in multiple medical complications impacting both mother and fetus. Previous reports suggest liver dysfunction in pregnancy causes accumulation of neurotoxins within the maternal compartment that increases neonatal morbidity through placental transfer. We present a case of a 36-year-old G2P1 female with history of biliary cirrhosis presenting at 32-weeks' gestation with hepatic congestion progressing to hepatic encephalopathy prompting del...

  9. Beowawe Bottoming Binary Unit - Final Technical Report for EE0002856

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Dale Edward

    2013-02-12

    This binary plant is the first high-output refrigeration based waste heat recovery cycle in the industry. Its working fluid is environmentally friendly and as such, the permits that would be required with a butane based cycle are not necessary. The unit is modularized, meaning that the unit’s individual skids were assembled in another location and were shipped via truck to the plant site. This project proves the technical feasibility of using low temperature brine The development of the unit led to the realization of low temperature, high output, and environmentally friendly heat recovery systems through domestic research and engineering. The project generates additional renewable energy for Nevada, resulting in cleaner air and reduced carbon dioxide emissions. Royalty and tax payments to governmental agencies will increase, resulting in reduced financial pressure on local entities. The major components of the unit were sourced from American companies, resulting in increased economic activity throughout the country.

  10. Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This feasibility study examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred alternative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965--1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area, groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228, and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9{times}10{sup {minus}5}.

  11. Motor-vehicle crash history and licensing outcomes for older drivers reported as medically impaired in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuser, Thomas M; Carr, David B; Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F

    2009-03-01

    The identification and evaluation of medically impaired drivers is an important safety issue. Medical fitness to drive is applicable to all ages but is particularly salient for older adults. Voluntary procedures, whereby various professionals and family members may report medical fitness concerns to State driver license bureaus, are common in the United States. This paper examines traffic crashes of drivers reported during 2001-2005 under the State of Missouri's voluntary reporting law (House Bill HB-1536) and the resulting licensing outcomes. Missouri's law is non-specific as to age, but the mean age of reported drivers was 80. Reports were submitted by police officers (30%), license office staff (27%), physicians (20%), family members (16%), and others (7%). The most common medical condition was dementia/cognitive (45%). Crash history for reported drivers was higher than that of controls, dating back to 1993, reaching a peak in 2001 when the crash involvement of reported drivers was 9.3% vs. 2.2% for controls--a fourfold difference. The crash involvement of reported drivers decreased rapidly after, indicating the impact of HB-1536 reporting with subsequent license revocation and to a lesser degree, mortality. Of the 4,100 reported individuals, 144 (3.5%) retained a driver's license after the process.

  12. Discrepancies in Outcome Reporting Exist Between Protocols and Published Oral Health Cochrane Systematic Reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Pandis

    Full Text Available To assess discrepancies in the analyzed outcomes between protocols and published reviews within Cochrane oral health systematic reviews (COHG on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR.All COHG systematic reviews on the CDSR and the corresponding protocols were retrieved in November 2014 and information on the reported outcomes was recorded. Data was collected at the systematic review level by two reviewers independently.One hundred and fifty two reviews were included. In relation to primary outcomes, 11.2% were downgraded to secondary outcomes, 9.9% were omitted altogether in the final publication and new primary outcomes were identified in 18.4% of publications. For secondary outcomes, 2% were upgraded to primary, 12.5% were omitted and 30.9% were newly introduced in the publication. Overall, 45.4% of reviews had at least one discrepancy when compared to the protocol; these were reported in 14.5% reviews. The number of review updates appears to be associated with discrepancies between final review and protocol (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.77, 5.74, p<0.001. The risk of reporting significant results was lower for both downgraded outcomes [RR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.17, 1.58, p = 0.24] and upgraded or newly introduced outcomes [RR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.36, 1.64, p = 0.50] compared to outcomes with no discrepancies. The risk of reporting significant results was higher for upgraded or newly introduced outcomes compared to downgraded outcomes (RR = 1.19, 95% CI: 0.65, 2.16, p = 0.57. None of the comparisons reached statistical significance.While no evidence of selective outcome reporting was found in this study, based on the present analysis of SRs published within COHG systematic reviews, discrepancies between outcomes in pre-published protocols and final reviews continue to be common. Solutions such as the use of standardized outcomes to reduce the prevalence of this issue may need to be explored.

  13. Narrative report Seneca Unit Erie National Wildlife Refuge Calendar year - 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seneca Unit of the Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins...

  14. Matagorda Island Unit, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Narrative Report for the Matagorda Island Unit of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during 1987. The report begins with...

  15. Aleutian Islands Unit : Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Aleutian Islands Unit of Alaska Maritime NWR and Bogoslof NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980 calendar year. The report...

  16. Matagorda Island Unit, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Narrative Report for the Matagorda Island Unit of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during 1989. The report begins with...

  17. Characteristics and outcome of stroke patients with cerebrovascular accident at the intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobi, Ku; Okojie, Nq

    2013-01-01

    Patients with severe stroke defined as NIHSS score >17 constituting about 15-20% of cerebrovascular accident require admission into the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). However the benefit of ICU admission for stroke patients remains controversial. Aim & Objectives: To determine the characteristics and outcome of patients with cerebrovascular accident managed at the Intensive Care Unit of University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Demographic characteristics, clinical features and course, treatment options and outcome of all stroke patients admitted in ICU from January 2002 to January 2012 were retrieved from the hospital records and analyzed. A patient before and after each stroke patient were selected as controls for the study. Primary outcome variable was ICU mortality, type of stroke whether ischemic or haemorrhagic, duration of stay, whether patients were transferred from the medical/stroke ward or from the accident and emergency department of the hospital. A total of thirty six (36) stroke patients were admitted into the ICU within the study period accounting for 5.6% of the total ICU admissions. The male: female ratio is 2:1 and patients aged >60 years accounted for 55.6%. Stroke patients admitted into ICU had a mortality rate of 77.8%. Patients with severe stroke admitted into the ICU were 4 times more likely to die compared to non-stroke patients in the ICU (p=0.002, OR=4.472). However, severe stroke had no significant impact on duration of ICU stay (p=0.454, OR=1.464). Stroke patients have a high mortality in the intensive care unit that is independent on the type and route of admission. Provision of the support equipment and instruments required for high dependency service in the intensive care unit and early admission should improve the outcome.

  18. Newman Unit 1 advanced solar repowering. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-04-01

    The five appendices give the selection process and system specification of the Newman Unit 1 solar repowering system, including the conceptual design drawings and diagrams; input data for the simulation program; and a review of the most important characteristics of the existing plant. (LEW)

  19. Unit 9 Bird Nesting Survey : Biological Summary Report : May 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the second year of the proposed 3 year survey project in Unit 9 of the Monte Vista NWR to look at breeding and nesting birds that use wet meadow/ wetland...

  20. Patient-reported outcome after total hip arthroplasty: comparison between lateral and posterior approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund, Signe; Broeng, Leif; Larsen, Anders Holsgaard

    2017-01-01

    . In this randomized controlled trial, we tested the hypothesis that patient-reported outcomes are better in patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA) with PA than in those who have undergone THA with LA, 12 months postoperatively. Patients and methods — 80 patients with hip osteoarthritis (mean age 61......Background and purpose — Criticism of the lateral approach (LA) for hip arthroplasty is mainly based on the risk of poor patient-reported outcomes compared to the posterior approach (PA). However, there have been no controlled studies comparing patient-reported outcomes between them......-Pain, HOOS-Quality-Of-Life, EQ-5D, UCLA Activity Score, and limping. Results — We found no statistically signifi cant difference in the improvements in HOOS-PS between the treatment groups at 12-month follow-up. All secondary outcomes showed similar results except for limping, where PA patients improved...

  1. Outcome of mucormycosis after treatment: report of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bellazreg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycoses are serious infections caused by filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales. They occur most often in immunocompromised patients. We report five cases of mucormycosis in patients hospitalized in the Infectious Diseases Department in Sousse – Tunisia between 2000 and 2013. They were 4 males and one female, mean age 60 years. Three patients were diabetic and one patient had acute leukemia. The locations of mucormycosis were rhinocerebral, rhino-orbital, auricular, pulmonary and cutaneous. The Mucorales isolated were Rhizopus arrhizus in 3 cases and Lichteimia in 2 cases. All patients were treated with amphotericin B and 2 patients had, in addition, surgical debridement. Two patients died and 2 kept peripheral facial paralysis.

  2. Yoga & Cancer Interventions: A Review of the Clinical Significance of Patient Reported Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nicole Culos-Reed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited research suggests yoga may be a viable gentle physical activity option with a variety of health-related quality of life, psychosocial and symptom management benefits. The purpose of this review was to determine the clinical significance of patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions conducted with cancer survivors. A total of 25 published yoga intervention studies for cancer survivors from 2004–2011 had patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, psychosocial or symptom measures. Thirteen of these studies met the necessary criteria to assess clinical significance. Clinical significance for each of the outcomes of interest was examined based on 1 standard error of the measurement, 0.5 standard deviation, and relative comparative effect sizes and their respective confidence intervals. This review describes in detail these patient-reported outcomes, how they were obtained, their relative clinical significance and implications for both clinical and research settings. Overall, clinically significant changes in patient-reported outcomes suggest that yoga interventions hold promise for improving cancer survivors' well-being. This research overview provides new directions for examining how clinical significance can provide a unique context for describing changes in patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions. Researchers are encouraged to employ indices of clinical significance in the interpretation and discussion of results from yoga studies.

  3. Feto-maternal outcomes in obstetric patients with near miss morbidity: an audit of obstetric high dependency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Anuradha; Dhope, Sheetal; Kamineni, Vasundhara

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate and compare the feto-maternal outcomes of pregnant women with potentially life-threatening complications (PLTC) and near miss events admitted to the obstetric high dependency units (OHDU). Pregnant women with PLTC admitted to the OHDU were enrolled. Feto-maternal outcomes, need for NICU admission and neonatal mortality, were compared between women without near miss events (controls) and those with near miss events. Of the 1505 admissions to the obstetric department during the study period, 1127 delivered at our hospital. Among the deliveries 125 (11%) women were admitted to the OHDU and 19 (15%) of them were referred to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the hospital. The incidence of near miss morbidity (n = 46) was 37% among the mothers admitted to OHDU and 4.1% among the deliveries. The outcomes were similar in both groups for mean birth weight (among live births), neonatal death and still birth or intra-uterine deaths. The mean duration of ICU stay, proportion of ICU admission, and the mean duration of hospital stay were significantly higher for women with near miss events. In the presence of standardized OHDU and an ICU, the feto-maternal outcomes of women with PLTC and near miss event are similar to those without near miss events.

  4. Implementation of a multidisciplinary team that includes a registered dietitian in a neonatal intensive care unit improved nutrition outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, Jennifer; Kattelmann, Kendra; Ren, Cuirong; Stevens, Dennis C

    This study determined whether nutrition outcomes of neonates who were receiving neonatal intensive care were improved with the implementation of a fully functioning multidisciplinary team that included a registered dietitian. A medical record review was conducted of neonates with birth weights of 1500 g or less who were cared for in Sanford Children's Hospital neonatal intensive care unit from January 1 to December 31, 2001 (prior to functioning multidisciplinary team establishment) and January 1 to December 31, 2004 (subsequent to establishment of a multidisciplinary team). Data from charts in the 2 time periods were examined for differences in nutrition outcomes. Outcome variables included length of stay, birth weight, discharge weight, weight gained for specified time periods, weight at full feeds, weight gain per day, length, head circumference, and number of days to start enteral feeding. Analysis of covariance, controlling for the effect of birth weight, was used to determine differences and was considered significant at P multidisciplinary team (1099 g, 95% CI: 955-1165 vs 1164 g, 95% CI: 1067-1211, respectively). Weight at discharge, total weight gained, total daily weight gained, daily weight gain from birth to the initiation of enteral feeds, daily weight gain from birth to full feeds, and head circumference growth were significantly greater for neonates in the postgroup than in the pre-multidisciplinary team group. Implementation of a multidisciplinary team that included a registered dietitian improved the nutrition outcomes of low birth weight infants in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  5. 19 CFR 12.40 - Seizure; disposition of seized articles; reports to United States attorney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure; disposition of seized articles; reports... § 12.40 Seizure; disposition of seized articles; reports to United States attorney. (a) Any book... United States attorney for his consideration and action. (b) Upon the seizure of articles or matter...

  6. Reporting unit size and measurement uncertainty: current Australian practice in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Robert C; Badrick, Tony

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to compare the reporting unit size used by Australian laboratories for routine chemistry and haematology tests to the unit size used by learned authorities and in standard laboratory textbooks and to the justified unit size based on measurement uncertainty (MU) estimates from quality assurance program data. MU was determined from Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) - Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) and RCPA Haematology Quality Assurance Program survey reports. The reporting unit size implicitly suggested in authoritative textbooks, the RCPA Manual, and the General Serum Chemistry program itself was noted. We also used published data on Australian laboratory practices.The best performing laboratories could justify their chemistry unit size for 55% of analytes while comparable figures for the 50% and 90% laboratories were 14% and 8%, respectively. Reporting unit size was justifiable for all laboratories for red cell count, >50% for haemoglobin but only the top 10% for haematocrit. Few, if any, could justify their mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) reporting unit sizes.The reporting unit size used by many laboratories is not justified by present analytical performance. Using MU estimates to determine the reporting interval for quantitative laboratory results ensures reporting practices match local analytical performance and recognises the inherent error of the measurement process.

  7. Health Equity Considerations for Developing and Reporting Patient-reported Outcomes in Clinical Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkovic, Jennifer; Barton, Jennifer L; Flurey, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    and how to address equity issues within the core outcome sets of domains and instruments. METHODS: We surveyed current and previous OMERACT meeting attendees and members of the Campbell and Cochrane Equity Group regarding whether to address equity issues within the OMERACT Filter 2.0 Core Outcome Sets...

  8. Discrepancies in Outcome Reporting Exist Between Protocols and Published Oral Health Cochrane Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Fleming, Padhraig S; Worthington, Helen; Dwan, Kerry; Salanti, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    To assess discrepancies in the analyzed outcomes between protocols and published reviews within Cochrane oral health systematic reviews (COHG) on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). All COHG systematic reviews on the CDSR and the corresponding protocols were retrieved in November 2014 and information on the reported outcomes was recorded. Data was collected at the systematic review level by two reviewers independently. One hundred and fifty two reviews were included. In relation to primary outcomes, 11.2% were downgraded to secondary outcomes, 9.9% were omitted altogether in the final publication and new primary outcomes were identified in 18.4% of publications. For secondary outcomes, 2% were upgraded to primary, 12.5% were omitted and 30.9% were newly introduced in the publication. Overall, 45.4% of reviews had at least one discrepancy when compared to the protocol; these were reported in 14.5% reviews. The number of review updates appears to be associated with discrepancies between final review and protocol (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.77, 5.74, previews, discrepancies between outcomes in pre-published protocols and final reviews continue to be common. Solutions such as the use of standardized outcomes to reduce the prevalence of this issue may need to be explored.

  9. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo John

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome measures that were used in the trials – the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, the Psoriasis Symptom Assessment (PSA Scale, and two itch measures, a Visual Analog Scale (VAS and the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF itch measure. Methods Subjects aged 18 to 70 years with moderate to severe psoriasis for at least 6 months were recruited into the two clinical trials (n = 1095. Internal consistency reliability was evaluated for all patient reported outcomes at baseline and at 12 weeks. Construct validity was evaluated by relations among the different patient reported outcomes and between the patient reported outcomes and the clinical assessments (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index; Overall Lesion Severity Scale; Physician's Global Assessment of Change assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks, as was the change over the course of the 12 week portion of the trial. Results Internal consistency reliability ranged from 0.86 to 0.95 for the patient reported outcome measures. The patient reported outcome measures were all shown to have significant construct validity with respect to each other and with respect to the clinical assessments. The four measures also demonstrated significant responsiveness to change in underlying clinical status of the patients over the course of the trial, as measured by the independently assessed clinical outcomes. Conclusions The DLQI, the PSA, VAS, and the NPF are considered useful tools for the measurement of dermatology

  10. Adherence to guidelines in bleeding oesophageal varices and effects on outcome: comparison between a specialized unit and a community hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Lise; Krag, Aleksander; Malchow-Møller, Axel

    2010-01-01

    is difficult. Our aims were to compare adherence to evidence-based guidelines in BOV between a specialized unit and a community hospital, and to investigate whether differences in adherence affected the outcome. METHODS: Two cohorts hospitalized during 2000-2007 with a first episode of BOV were retrospectively...... enrolled, one in a community hospital comprising 66 patients and one in a specialized unit comprising 111 patients. Data on treatment, rebleeding and mortality were collected from medical records according to the Baveno III/IV Criteria. RESULTS: Treatments in the specialized unit versus the community...... shunt therapy was initiated in 91 vs. 74% (P specialized vs. community). Six-week mortality was 17 vs. 24% (P = 0.25) with 5-day mortality of 6 vs. 3% (P = 0.34) and mortality day 6-42, 12 vs. 22% (P = 0.07) (specialized vs. community). Failure to control bleeding and failure to prevent...

  11. Analyzing clinical trial outcomes based on incomplete daily diary reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neal; Harel, Ofer; Little, Roderick J A

    2016-07-30

    A case study is presented assessing the impact of missing data on the analysis of daily diary data from a study evaluating the effect of a drug for the treatment of insomnia. The primary analysis averaged daily diary values for each patient into a weekly variable. Following the commonly used approach, missing daily values within a week were ignored provided there was a minimum number of diary reports (i.e., at least 4). A longitudinal model was then fit with treatment, time, and patient-specific effects. A treatment effect at a pre-specified landmark time was obtained from the model. Weekly values following dropout were regarded as missing, but intermittent daily missing values were obscured. Graphical summaries and tables are presented to characterize the complex missing data patterns. We use multiple imputation for daily diary data to create completed data sets so that exactly 7 daily diary values contribute to each weekly patient average. Standard analysis methods are then applied for landmark analysis of the completed data sets, and the resulting estimates are combined using the standard multiple imputation approach. The observed data are subject to digit heaping and patterned responses (e.g., identical values for several consecutive days), which makes accurate modeling of the response data difficult. Sensitivity analyses under different modeling assumptions for the data were performed, along with pattern mixture models assessing the sensitivity to the missing at random assumption. The emphasis is on graphical displays and computational methods that can be implemented with general-purpose software. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. And yet they correlate: psychophysiological activation predicts self-report outcomes of exposure therapy in claustrophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Georg W; Sell, Roxane

    2008-10-01

    The study examines whether self-reported fear and physiological activation are concordant when claustrophobic patients are exposed to small spaces, whether the measures change in synchrony for individual patients and whether initial activation of measures can predict the outcome of an exposure treatment. Ten patients with claustrophobia participated in six in-vivo exposure sessions with continuous monitoring of self-reported fear and their EKG. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO(2)), a measure of hyperventilation, was available in a subsample of patients. While evidence for concordance of self-reported fear and heart rate was limited, the measures changed synchronously within subjects. Most importantly, higher heart rate at the beginning of the first exposure session predicted better treatment outcome. Because self-reported fear turned out not to be a reliable predictor of the outcome, this is interpreted as evidence for the incremental validity of physiological measures of fear.

  13. Comparison of Registered and Reported Outcomes in Randomized Clinical Trials Published in Anesthesiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Philip M; Chow, Jeffrey T Y; Arango, Miguel F; Fridfinnson, Jason A; Gai, Nan; Lam, Kevin; Turkstra, Timothy P

    2017-10-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) provide high-quality evidence for clinical decision-making. Trial registration is one of the many tools used to improve the reporting of RCTs by reducing publication bias and selective outcome reporting bias. The purpose of our study is to examine whether RCTs published in the top 6 general anesthesiology journals were adequately registered and whether the reported primary and secondary outcomes corresponded to the originally registered outcomes. Following a prespecified protocol, an electronic database was used to systematically screen and extract data from RCTs published in the top 6 general anesthesiology journals by impact factor (Anaesthesia, Anesthesia & Analgesia, Anesthesiology, British Journal of Anaesthesia, Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, and European Journal of Anaesthesiology) during the years 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2015. A manual search of each journal's Table of Contents was performed (in duplicate) to identify eligible RCTs. An adequately registered trial was defined as being registered in a publicly available trials registry before the first patient being enrolled with an unambiguously defined primary outcome. For adequately registered trials, the outcomes registered in the trial registry were compared with the outcomes reported in the article, with outcome discrepancies documented and analyzed by the type of discrepancy. During the 4 years studied, there were 860 RCTs identified, with 102 RCTs determined to be adequately registered (12%). The proportion of adequately registered trials increased over time, with 38% of RCTs being adequately registered in 2015. The most common reason in 2015 for inadequate registration was registering the RCT after the first patient had already been enrolled. Among adequately registered trials, 92% had at least 1 primary or secondary outcome discrepancy. In 2015, 42% of RCTs had at least 1 primary outcome discrepancy, while 90% of RCTs had at least 1 secondary outcome discrepancy

  14. Labour Movement and Labour Law: Development of Two Introductory Units for Secondary Students. ERIBC Reports. Report No. 79:1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labour Advisory Committee, Terrace (British Columbia).

    Introductory teaching units for secondary students on the history of the Canadian labor movement and labor law are presented in this report. Five units are outlined, addressing the following questions: (1) How do students perceive organized labor, its position in today's society, and its historical development?; (2) What knowledge do students have…

  15. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Glass Fabrication Unit Operation Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Hanford Missions Programs; Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Process Technology Programs; Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Engineering Process Development; Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Engineering Process Development

    2016-07-14

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed campaign prior to transfer from the Tank Operations Contractor to the feed receipt vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. The Waste Feed Qualification Program Plan describes the three components of waste feed qualification: 1. Demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criteria 2. Determine waste processability 3. Test unit operations at laboratory scale. The glass fabrication unit operation is the final step in the process demonstration portion of the waste feed qualification process. This unit operation generally consists of combining each of the waste feed streams (high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW)) with Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs), fabricating glass coupons, performing chemical composition analysis before and after glass fabrication, measuring hydrogen generation rate either before or after glass former addition, measuring rheological properties before and after glass former addition, and visual observation of the resulting glass coupons. Critical aspects of this unit operation are mixing and sampling of the waste and melter feeds to ensure representative samples are obtained as well as ensuring the fabrication process for the glass coupon is adequate. Testing was performed using a range of simulants (LAW and HLW simulants), and these simulants were mixed with high and low bounding amounts of GFCs to evaluate the mixing, sampling, and glass preparation steps in shielded cells using laboratory techniques. The tests were performed with off-the-shelf equipment at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is similar to equipment used in the SRNL work during qualification of waste feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other waste treatment facilities at the

  16. The Promise of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Turning Theory into Reality: A Uniform Approach to Patient-Reported Outcomes Across Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, James P

    2016-05-01

    PROMIS, the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, is opening new possibilities to explore and learn how patient (or proxy) self-report of core symptoms and health-related quality of life can meaningfully advance clinical research and patient care. PROMIS leverages Item Response Theory to agnostically assess, across diseases and conditions or clinical settings, numerous universally applicable core "domains" of health (symptoms and functioning) from the patient perspective. Importantly, PROMIS is enabling the testing and adoption of computerized adaptive testing, which holds great potential to minimize patient burden while maximizing accuracy.

  17. Outcome Reporting Bias in Government-Sponsored Policy Evaluations: A Qualitative Content Analysis of 13 Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaganay, Arnaud

    The reporting of evaluation outcomes can be a point of contention between evaluators and policy-makers when a given reform fails to fulfil its promises. Whereas evaluators are required to report outcomes in full, policy-makers have a vested interest in framing these outcomes in a positive light-especially when they previously expressed a commitment to the reform. The current evidence base is limited to a survey of policy evaluators, a study on reporting bias in education research and several studies investigating the influence of industry sponsorship on the reporting of clinical trials. The objective of this study was twofold. Firstly, it aimed to assess the risk of outcome reporting bias (ORB or 'spin') in pilot evaluation reports, using seven indicators developed by clinicians. Secondly, it sought to examine how the government's commitment to a given reform may affect the level of ORB found in the corresponding evaluation report. To answer these questions, 13 evaluation reports were content-analysed, all of which found a non-significant effect of the intervention on its stated primary outcome. These reports were systematically selected from a dataset of 233 pilot and experimental evaluations spanning three policy areas and 13 years of government-commissioned research in the UK. The results show that the risk of ORB is real. Indeed, all studies reviewed here resorted to at least one of the presentational strategies associated with a risk of spin. This study also found a small, negative association between the seniority of the reform's champion and the risk of ORB in the evaluation of that reform. The publication of protocols and the use of reporting guidelines are recommended.

  18. Blinded Outcome Assessment Was Infrequently Used and Poorly Reported in Open Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan C Kahan

    Full Text Available Unblinded outcome assessment can lead to biased estimates of treatment effect in randomised trials. We reviewed published trials to assess how often blinded assessment is used, and whether its use varies according to the type of outcome or assessor.A review of parallel group, individually randomised phase III trials published in four general medical journals (BMJ, Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine in 2010.Whether assessment of the primary outcome was blinded, and whether this differed according to outcome or assessor type.We identified 258 eligible trials. Of these, 106 (41% were reported as double-blind, and 152 (59% as partially or fully open-label (that is, they included some groups who were unblinded, such as patients, those delivering the intervention, or those in charge of medical care. Of the 152 open trials, 125 required outcome assessment. Of these 125 trials, only 26% stated that outcome assessment was blinded; 51% gave no information on whether assessment was blinded or not. Furthermore, 18% of trials did not state who performed the assessment. The choice of outcome type (e.g. instrument measured, rated, or naturally occurring event did not appear to influence whether blinded assessment was performed (range 24-32% for the most common outcome types. However, the choice of outcome assessor did influence blinding; independent assessors were blinded much more frequently (71% than participant (5% or physician (24% assessors. Despite this, open trials did not use independent assessors any more frequently than double-blind trials (17% vs. 18% respectively.Blinding of outcome assessors is infrequently used and poorly reported. Increased use of independent assessors could increase the frequency of blinded assessment.

  19. SIGAR Quarterly Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-30

    reported expenses . The inspection reports covered: • a USAID-funded hospital in Gardez, Paktiya Province • the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-funded...Organization for Migration to build a 100-bed hospital in Gardez, Paktiya Province. Another examined the construction and furnishing of a 20-bed hospital in...Afghanistan • a Bagram Regional Contracting Center-funded hospital in Salang District of Parwan Province SPECIAL PROJECTS This quarter SIGAR’s Office of

  20. Impact of Neurointensivist Co-management on the Clinical Outcomes of Patients Admitted to a Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jeong Am; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Chung, Chi Ryang; Suh, Gee Young; Hong, Seung Chyul

    2017-06-01

    Limited data are available on improved outcomes after initiation of neurointensivist co-management in neurosurgical intensive care units (NSICUs) in Korea. We evaluated the impact of a newly appointed neurointensivist on the outcomes of neurosurgical patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). This retrospective observational study involved neurosurgical patients admitted to the NSICU at Samsung Medical Center between March 2013 and May 2016. Neurointensivist co-management was initiated in October 1 2014. We compared the outcomes of neurosurgical patients before and after neurointensivist co-management. The primary outcome was ICU mortality. A total of 571 patients were admitted to the NSICU during the study period, 291 prior to the initiation of neurointensivist co-management and 280 thereafter. Intracranial hemorrhage (29.6%) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) (26.6%) were the most frequent reasons for ICU admission. TBI was the most common cause of death (39.0%). There were no significant differences in mortality rates and length of ICU stay before and after co-management. However, the rates of ICU and 30-day mortality among the TBI patients were significantly lower after compared to before initiation of neurointensivist co-management (8.5% vs. 22.9%; P = 0.014 and 11.0% vs. 27.1%; P = 0.010, respectively). Although overall outcomes were not different after neurointensivist co-management, initiation of a strategy of routine involvement of a neurointensivist significantly reduced the ICU and 30-day mortality rates of TBI patients. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  1. Predictors of burnout, work engagement and nurse reported job outcomes and quality of care: a mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Peremans, Lieve; Van Heusden, Danny; Verspuy, Martijn; Kureckova, Veronika; Van de Cruys, Zoë; Franck, Erik

    2017-01-01

    High levels of work-related stress, burnout, job dissatisfaction, and poor health are common within the nursing profession. A comprehensive understanding of nurses' psychosocial work environment is necessary to respond to complex patients' needs. The aims of this study were threefold: (1) To retest and confirm two structural equation models exploring associations between practice environment and work characteristics as predictors of burnout (model 1) and engagement (model 2) as well as nurse-reported job outcome and quality of care; (2) To study staff nurses' and nurse managers' perceptions and experiences of staff nurses' workload; (3) To explain and interpret the two models by using the qualitative study findings. This mixed method study is based on an explanatory sequential study design. We first performed a cross-sectional survey design in two large acute care university hospitals. Secondly, we conducted individual semi-structured interviews with staff nurses and nurse managers assigned to medical or surgical units in one of the study hospitals. Study data was collected between September 2014 and June 2015. Finally, qualitative study results assisted in explaining and interpreting the findings of the two models. The two models with burnout and engagement as mediating outcome variables fitted sufficiently to the data. Nurse-reported job outcomes and quality of care explained variances between 52 and 62%. Nurse management at the unit level and workload had a direct impact on outcome variables with explained variances between 23 and 36% and between 12 and 17%, respectively. Personal accomplishment and depersonalization had an explained variance on job outcomes of 23% and vigor of 20%. Burnout and engagement had a less relevant direct impact on quality of care (≤5%). The qualitative study revealed various themes such as organisation of daily practice and work conditions; interdisciplinary collaboration, communication and teamwork; staff nurse personal

  2. Patient reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials: is 'in-trial' guidance lacking? a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Kyte, DG; Draper, H; Ives, J.; Liles, C; Gheorghe, A.; Calvert, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on 'in-trial' activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting) and the management of 'concerning' PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant) appears to be lacking. The purpose of this revie...

  3. Management of Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO Alerts in Clinical Trials: A Cross Sectional Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Kyte

    Full Text Available Assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PROs provides valuable information to inform patient-centered care, but may also reveal 'PRO alerts': psychological distress or physical symptoms that may require an immediate response. Ad-hoc management of PRO alerts in clinical trials may result in suboptimal patient care or potentially bias trial results. To gain greater understanding of current practice in PRO alert management we conducted a national survey of personnel involved in clinical trials with a PRO endpoint.We conducted a national cross-sectional survey of 767 UK-based research nurses, data managers/coordinators, trial managers and chief/principal investigators involved in clinical trials using PROs. Respondents were self-selected volunteers from a non-randomised sample of eligible individuals recruited via 55 UK Clinical Research Collaboration Registered Clinical Trials Units and 19 Comprehensive Local Research Networks. Questions centred on the proportion of trial personnel encountering alerts, how staff responded to PRO alerts and whether current guidance was deemed sufficient to support research personnel. We undertook descriptive analyses of the quantitative data and directed thematic analysis of free-text comments. 20% of research nurses did not view completed PRO questionnaires and were not in a position to discover alerts, 39-50% of the remaining respondent group participants reported encountering PRO alerts. Of these, 83% of research nurses and 54% of data managers/trial coordinators reported taking action to assist the trial participant, but less than half were able to record the intervention in the trial documentation. Research personnel reported current PRO alert guidance/training was insufficient.Research personnel are intermittently exposed to PRO alerts. Some intervene to help trial participants, but are not able to record this intervention in the trial documentation, risking co-intervention bias. Other staff do not check PRO

  4. COSPAR report to United Nations 2004: satellite dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    The COSPAR Panel on Satellite Dynamics (PSD) is concerned with the determination of the position, velocity and orientation in space of artificial and natural satellites around the Earth or in the outer space. The following report highlighs representative activities of this panel and provides general information on related international aspects.

  5. Association of unit size, resource utilization and occupancy with outcomes of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P S; Mirea, L; Ng, E; Solimano, A; Lee, S K

    2015-07-01

    Assess association of NICU size, and occupancy rate and resource utilization at admission with neonatal outcome. Retrospective cohort study of 9978 infants born at 23-32 weeks gestation and admitted to 23 tertiary-level Canadian NICUs during 2010-2012. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were estimated for a composite outcome of mortality/any major morbidity with respect to NICU size, occupancy rate and intensity of resource utilization at admission. A total of 2889 (29%) infants developed the composite outcome, the odds of which were higher for 16-29, 30-36 and >36-bed NICUs compared with bed NICUs (AOR (95% CI): 1.47 (1.25-1.73); 1.49 (1.25-1.78); 1.55 (1.29-1.87), respectively) and for NICUs with higher resource utilization at admission (AOR: 1.30 (1.08-1.56), Q4 vs Q1) but not different according to NICU occupancy. Larger NICUs and more intense resource utilization at admission are associated with higher odds of a composite adverse outcome in very preterm infants.

  6. Clinical Characteristics and 30-Day Outcomes of Intermittent Hemodialysis for Acute Kidney Injury in an African Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Kwizera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common occurrence in the intensive care unit (ICU. Studies have looked at outcomes of renal replacement therapy using intermittent haemodialysis (IHD in ICUs with varying results. Little is known about the outcomes of using IHD in resource-limited settings where continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT is limited. We sought to determine outcomes of IHD among critically ill patients admitted to a low-income country ICU. Methods. A retrospective review of patient records was conducted. Patients admitted to the ICU who underwent IHD for AKI were included in the study. Patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics, cause of AKI, laboratory parameters, haemodialysis characteristics, and survival were interpreted and analyzed. Primary outcome was mortality. Results. Of 62 patients, 40 had complete records. Median age of patients was 38.5 years. Etiologic diagnoses associated with AKI included sepsis, malaria, and ARDS. Mortality was 52.5%. APACHE II (OR 4.550; 95% CI 1.2–17.5, p=0.028, mechanical ventilation (OR 13.063; 95% CI 2.3–72, p=0.003, and need for vasopressors (OR 16.8; 95% CI 3.4–82.6, p=0.001 had statistically significant association with mortality. Conclusion. IHD may be a feasible alternative for RRT in critically ill haemodynamically stable patients in low resource settings where CRRT may not be available.

  7. Recommendation for standardization of haematology reporting units used in the extended blood count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, M; McCafferty, R; Marsden, K; Kawai, Y; Etzell, J; Ermens, A

    2016-10-01

    It is desirable in the interest of patient safety that the reporting of laboratory results should be standardized where no valid reason for diversity exists. This study considers the reporting units used for the extended blood cell count and makes a new ICSH recommendation to encourage standardization worldwide. This work is based on a literature review that included the original ICSH recommendations and on data gathered from an international survey of current practice completed by 18 countries worldwide. The survey results show that significant diversity in the use of reporting units for the blood count exists worldwide. The use of either non-SI or other units not recommended by the ICSH in the early 1980s has persisted despite the guidance from that time. The diversity in use of reporting units occurs in three areas: the persistence in use of non-SI units for RBC, WBC and platelet counts, the use of three different units for haemoglobin concentration and the manual reporting of WBC differential, reticulocytes and nucleated RBCs when the latter are available from automated analysis or can be expressed as absolute numbers by calculation. A new recommendation with a rationale for each parameter is made for standardization of the reporting units used for the extended blood count. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Intensive care unit admission in patients following rapid response team activation: call factors, patient characteristics and hospital outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, M P; Tobin, A E; Reid, D

    2015-03-01

    Rapid Response Systems (RRSs) have been widely introduced throughout hospital health systems, yet there is limited research on the characteristics and outcomes of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) following RRS activation. Using database extraction, this study examined the factors associated with ICU admission and patient outcome in patients receiving RRS activation in a tertiary level hospital between 2009 and 2013. Of 3004 RRS activations, 392 resulted in ICU admissions. Call factors associated with ICU admission and increased hospital mortality included tachypnoea (P Medical Emergency Team call triggers breached simultaneously (P admission included young age (P admission and hospital mortality post RRS activation. This information may be useful for risk stratification of deteriorating patients and determination of appropriate escalation.

  9. Regional and State Level Water Scarcity Report: Northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, C. K.; Lopez-Morales, C. A.; Hoover, J. H.; Voigt, B. G.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Mohammed, I. N.

    2010-12-01

    There are an abundance of large-scale, coarse resolution global water scarcity studies, but the existing literature fails to address regional and state specific scarcity measures. Moreover, while environmental water requirements are an integral factor in the development and implementation of sustainable water management practices, only recently has this notion been introduced to water scarcity research. In this paper, we argue that developing a preliminary measure of water scarcity, at the regional and state levels, will allow for more informed policy development. The goal of this study is to generate a more comprehensive understanding of water scarcity in the Northeast, by gathering fine scale data, applying a consistent methodology to the calculation of a scarcity index, and analyzing the results to see relative trends in spatio-temporal water scarcity. Public supply, irrigation, rural, industrial and thermo-power withdrawals have been compiled from USGS state water use publications from 1950 to 1985. Using the WBMplus water model runoff data, state specific in-stream environmental water requirements were calculated using the accepted hydro-ecological methodology. Water scarcity was then calculated as a ratio of water withdrawals to total available water minus environmental flow requirements for the system. In so doing, this study generates a spatially explicit and temporally varying water scarcity indicator (WSI) for the Northeastern United States between 1950 and 2000 at the regional and state levels at a five-year time interval. Calculation of a spatial and temporal water scarcity indicator enabled us to identify regions and specific states that were: slightly exploited (WSI 1.0). The minimum environmental water requirements to maintain in-stream aquatic and riparian ecosystems for the Northeastern states ranged between 27.5 to 36.3 percent of the mean annual runoff within Vermont and Maryland, respectively. The regional WSI values ranged between 0.199 in 1950

  10. Automated Outcome Classification of Computed Tomography Imaging Reports for Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Kabir; Sarioglu, Efsun; Choi, Hyeong Ah; Cartwright, Walter B; Hinds, Pamela S; Chamberlain, James M

    2016-02-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated highly reliable automated classification of free-text computed tomography (CT) imaging reports using a hybrid system that pairs linguistic (natural language processing) and statistical (machine learning) techniques. Previously performed for identifying the outcome of orbital fracture in unprocessed radiology reports from a clinical data repository, the performance has not been replicated for more complex outcomes. To validate automated outcome classification performance of a hybrid natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning system for brain CT imaging reports. The hypothesis was that our system has performance characteristics for identifying pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). This was a secondary analysis of a subset of 2,121 CT reports from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) TBI study. For that project, radiologists dictated CT reports as free text, which were then deidentified and scanned as PDF documents. Trained data abstractors manually coded each report for TBI outcome. Text was extracted from the PDF files using optical character recognition. The data set was randomly split evenly for training and testing. Training patient reports were used as input to the Medical Language Extraction and Encoding (MedLEE) NLP tool to create structured output containing standardized medical terms and modifiers for negation, certainty, and temporal status. A random subset stratified by site was analyzed using descriptive quantitative content analysis to confirm identification of TBI findings based on the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Common Data Elements project. Findings were coded for presence or absence, weighted by frequency of mentions, and past/future/indication modifiers were filtered. After combining with the manual reference standard, a decision tree classifier was created using data mining tools WEKA 3.7.5 and Salford Predictive Miner 7

  11. CE: Inside an Ebola Treatment Unit: A Nurse's Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    In December 2013, the first cases of the most recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease (formerly known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever) emerged in the West African nation of Guinea. Within months the disease had spread to the neighboring countries of Liberia and Sierra Leone. The international humanitarian aid organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF; known in English as Doctors Without Borders) soon responded by sending staff to set up treatment centers and outreach triage teams in all three countries. In August 2014, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak an international public health emergency.In September 2014, the author was sent by MSF to work as a nurse in an Ebola treatment unit in Liberia for five weeks. This article describes her experiences there. It provides some background, outlines the practices and teams involved, and aims to convey a sense of what it's like to work during an Ebola outbreak and to put a human face on this devastating epidemic.

  12. Limiting severe outcomes and impact on intensive care units of moderate-intermediate 2009 pandemic influenza: role of infectious diseases units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carbonara

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The rate of severe outcomes of patients with 2009 pandemic (A/H1N1 influenza (2009pI hospitalized in non-intensive care units (ICUs has not been defined thus far. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the management of patients with influenza-like illness (ILI of moderate intermediate severity in an infectious diseases unit (IDU during the first wave of 2009pI and its influence on the burden of ICUs. METHODS: All patients hospitalized from October 27, 2009, to February 5, 2010, with ILI were included in this prospective observational study. The IDU was organized and the staff was trained to provide intermediate care; patients were transferred to the ICU only if they required invasive ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or advanced cardiovascular support. Demographic data, clinical presentation, coexisting medical conditions, and laboratory and radiological findings were recorded and analyzed, as well as treatment and outcome data. RESULTS: Overall, 108 patients (median age 36 years [IQR 27-54], 57.4% males including 66.7% with ≥ 1 risk factor for severe influenza, 47.2% with confirmed 2009pI by RT-PCR and 63.9% with pneumonia, were enrolled in the study. All subjects received intravenous fluids and 83.3% were administered oseltamivir, 96.3% antibacterials, 19.4% oxygen therapy without ventilatory support, and 10.2% non-invasive ventilation. A total of 106 (98.1% subjects were discharged after a 6-day median hospital stay [IQR 4-9]. Two patients (1.9% were transferred to the ICU. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the aggressive treatment of patients with moderate intermediate severity 2009 pandemic ILI in non-ICU wards may result in a low rate of severe outcomes and brief hospitalization. IDUs, if properly organized for intermediate care, may efficiently provide correct disease management, in addition to complying with infection control requirements, thus reducing the burden of the pandemic

  13. Interpreting patient-reported outcomes from clinical trials in COPD: a discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones PW

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul W Jones,1,2 Stephen Rennard,3,4 Maggie Tabberer,5 John H Riley,2 Mitra Vahdati-Bolouri,2 Neil C Barnes2,6 1Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of London, London, 2Global Respiratory Franchise, GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, UK; 3Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Allergy, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 4Clinical Discovery Unit, AstraZeneca, Cambridge, 5Global R&D, GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, 6William Harvey Institute, Bart’s and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK Abstract: One of the challenges faced by the practising physician is the interpretation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs in clinical trials and the relevance of such data to their patients. This is especially true when caring for patients with progressive diseases such as COPD. In an attempt to incorporate the patient perspective, many clinical trials now include assessments of PROs. These are formalized methods of capturing patient-centered information. Given the importance of PROs in evaluating the potential utility of an intervention for a patient with COPD, it is important that physicians are able to critically interpret (and critique the results derived from them. Therefore, in this paper, a series of questions is posed for the practising physician to consider when reviewing the treatment effectiveness as assessed by PROs. The focus is on the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire for worked examples, but the principles apply equally to other symptom-based questionnaires. A number of different ways of presenting PRO data are discussed, including the concept of the minimum clinically important difference, whether there is a ceiling effect to PRO results, and the strengths and weaknesses of responder analyses. Using a worked example, the value of including a placebo arm in a study is illustrated, and the influence of the study on PRO results is considered, in terms of the design, patient withdrawal, and the selection of

  14. Radioactivity: Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (1962), (ICRU) Report 10 c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This handbook presents recommendations agreed upon at the meeting of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) held in Montreux, Switzerland, in April 1962. It is written in a report form with a preface including symbols, abbreviations and definitions of terms used in the report. The report consists of four…

  15. The role of mass media in disease outbreak reporting in the United ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of mass media in disease outbreak reporting in the United Republic of ... with accurate epidemiological reports if correct information is to reach the public. The role of media in outbreak reporting is herein discussed in relation to the ...

  16. Fifty Ninth Annual Report: United States Department of Labor. Fiscal Year 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC.

    This fifty-ninth annual report of the United States Department of Labor for the fiscal year 1971 contains a 6-page report by the Secretary of Labor, 11 separate Federal Department reports, and a variety of appended tables covering such areas as enrollments and funding for various government programs. Detailing the initiation or improvement of a…

  17. The roles of funding source, clinical trial outcome, and quality of reporting in orthopedic surgery literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Safdar N; Mermer, Matthew J; Myers, Elizabeth; Sandhu, Harvinder S

    2008-12-01

    Compared with nonfunded or peer-reviewed funded projects, industry-sponsored clinical trials have traditionally been associated with more positive results. This relationship has been extensively studied in the nonsurgical literature. Although a few authors have addressed specialties, little has been reported on orthopedic clinical trials and their association with funding, study outcome, and efforts to reduce bias after randomization across journals of multiple subspecialties. For the study reported here, we selected 5 major orthopedic subspecialty journals: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume), Spine, Journal of Arthroplasty, Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, and American Journal of Sports Medicine. We chose a 2-year limit for investigation (2002-2004); included all original randomized clinical trials reported in these 5 journals; and examined these trials for their study design, funding source, outcome, bias potential, and conclusion reached. Support for the 100 eligible orthopedic clinical trials was stated as coming from industry (26 trials, 26%), nonprofit sources (19 trials, 19%), and mixed sources (5 trials, 5%); no support was stated in 46 trials (46%), and support was not reported in 4 trials (4%). Of the 26 trials reporting industry support, 22 (85%) were graded as indicating an outcome favorable to the new treatment. The association between industry funding and favorable outcome was strong and significant (PJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery and Spine, measures taken to reduce bias were not documented.

  18. Host society acculturation and health practices and outcomes in the United States: public health policy and research implications worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Valentina A; Unger, Jennifer B

    2014-08-01

    The unprecedented ethnocultural diversity in the United States and other Western countries likely changes the social norms for various health practices in the host populations, thus impacting prevalence of such practices and leading to the need for modification of public health policies. However, application of host acculturation (HA) principles in the public health domain remains underdeveloped. We conducted a narrative review of theoretical and empirical information about the association between HA and health practices or outcomes, drawing on evidence from health-care services, complementary and alternative medicine, diet, smoking, alcohol use, and psychological well-being. Given the experience of different countries with large immigrant populations, future multidisciplinary studies are needed both to supply additional empirical evidence and to identify ubiquitous HA processes, and thus inform public health promotion initiatives in the United States and worldwide.

  19. Impact of malnutrition on pediatric risk of mortality score and outcome in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was done to determine the effect of malnutrition on mortality in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and on the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) scoring. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective study done over 1 year. There were total 400 patients (1 month 14 years), who were divided into cases with weight for age

  20. Accounting for health-care outcomes: implications for intensive care unit practice and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Roslyn; Iedema, Rick

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the environment of health care, and how clinicians and managers respond in terms of performance accountability. A qualitative method was used in a tertiary metropolitan teaching intensive care unit (ICU) in Sydney, Australia, including interviews with 15 clinical managers and focus groups with 29 nurses of differing experience. The study found that a managerial focus on abstract goals, such as budgets detracted from managing the core business of clinical work. Fractures were evident within clinical units, between clinical units and between clinical and managerial domains. These fractures reinforced the status quo where seemingly unconnected patient care activities were undertaken by loosely connected individual clinicians with personalized concepts of accountability. Managers must conceptualize health services as an interconnected entity within which self-directed teams negotiate and agree objectives, collect and review performance data and define collective practice. Organically developing regimens of care within and across specialist clinical units, such as in ICUs, directly impact upon health service performance and accountability.

  1. Meta-analysis on continuous outcomes in minimal important difference units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrier, Ian; Christensen, Robin; Juhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare results from meta-analyses for mean differences in minimal important difference (MID) units (MDMID), when MID is treated as a random variable vs. a constant. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Meta-analyses of published data. We calculated the variance of MDMID as a random variable u...

  2. 17 CFR 270.30e-2 - Reports to shareholders of unit investment trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports to shareholders of... to shareholders of unit investment trusts. (a) At least semiannually every registered unit investment... transmit to each shareholder of record (including record holders of periodic payment plan certificates),...

  3. Definition, reporting, and interpretation of composite outcomes in clinical trials: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina; Schwartz, Lisa; Woloshin, Steven

    2010-01-01

    admission. Other major problems were change in the definition of the composite outcome between the abstract, methods, and results sections (13 trials); missing, ambiguous, or uninterpretable data (9 trials); and post hoc construction of composite outcomes (4 trials). Only 24 trials (60%) provided reliable...... extracted the data using a standardised data sheet, and two other observers, blinded to the results, selected the most important component. RESULTS: Of 40 included trials, 29 (73%) were about cardiovascular topics and 24 (60%) were entirely or partly industry funded. Composite outcomes had a median of three...... also to the most important component. CONCLUSIONS: The use of composite outcomes in trials is problematic. Components are often unreasonably combined, inconsistently defined, and inadequately reported. These problems will leave many readers confused, often with an exaggerated perception of how well...

  4. Unemployment and substance outcomes in the United States 2002-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Wilson M; Gfroerer, Joe; Conway, Kevin P; Finger, Matthew S

    2014-09-01

    The economic shock of 2008-2009 provided an opportunity to study the robustness of observed statistical associations between unemployment and problematic substance use. Data from 405,000 non-institutionalized adult participants in the 2002 to 2010 U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health were used to compare substance outcomes among unemployed and employed persons. Association of unemployment with substance outcomes was examined for the years 2002-2004, 2005-2007, 2008, and 2009-2010, corresponding to periods prior to and after the economic downturn of 2008. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, urban/rural residence, current DSM-IV Major Depression, and local county unemployment rates. Higher rates of past month tobacco and illicit drug use, heavy alcohol use, and past-year drug or alcohol abuse/dependence were found among the unemployed. Markedly increased unemployment in 2009-2010 did not moderate the association between substance outcomes and employment. This association was not confounded by sex, age group, or race/ethnicity for tobacco and illicit drugs, although it varied for alcohol outcomes among 18-25 year-olds. Results based on retrospective data regarding marijuana use in the period prior to unemployment suggest its use was associated with future job loss. Employment status was strongly and robustly associated with problematic use of substances. Prevention and treatment interventions are warranted for a group whose employment and resulting insurance status may impair access to much needed health care. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Design and simulation of latent heat storage units. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

  6. Toxic Hazards Research Unit Annual Report (26th) (1989)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    Manager Manager Staff: Garrett, Daphne L. Staff: Staff: Brade , Donald W., P.E. Bailey, Therlo C., Sr. Brewer, John A. Bennett, Lisa A. Courson, David ...July 1989. CDR David A. Macys, MSC, USN, was the Director of the U.S. Navy portion of this contract during the period of this report. Raymond S...Leahy, Harold F. Carlyle D. Flemming Malcomb, Willie J. Senior Statistician staff.- Miller, Karen S./’CollIi ns, B etty J. Staff. Crank, W. David , Ph

  7. Basewide Groundwater Operable Unit. Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    of chemi- cal amendments will require regulatory approval. "* Water quality problems, such as reduced iron and manganese , methane, fer- mentation...irradiation dose, and water quality. Nickelsen et al. (1992) report that experimental data collected during the irradiation of potable water and wastewater...200- on old map new BW-20 170 392 170 222 170 392 212 Eau ne Building 93 on OMaley Avenue 154 378 154 192 154 346 12 E of the Bas, nea Wa Avene mid

  8. Basewide Groundwater Operable Unit. Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Force has replaced individual water wells with potable supply, thereby removing the threat to the public. In addi- tion, the concentrations are low and...94 LEGEND Ouatmar aluvi dposts agua Frmaion(cosoldatd aluval epoits W iead rdetilnsMhte omtin(neitccnlmeae ansoe9ndkeca F 70 Quvatei-lernayalvu e pk...have reconnected their private wells because of water restrictions during the drought, though none reported using their private wells for potable pur

  9. Minimal Clinically Important Difference of Patient Reported Outcome Measures of Lower Extremity Injuries in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Derya; Çoban, Özge; Kılıçoğlu, Önder

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: MCID scores for outcome measures are frequently used evidence-based guides to gage meaningful changes. To conduct a systematic review of the quality and content of the the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) relating to 16 patient-rated outcome measures (PROM) used in lower extremity. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review on articles reporting MCID in lower extremity outcome measures and orthopedics from January 1, 1980, to May 10, 2016. We evaluated MCID of the 16 patient reported outcome measures (PROM) which were Harris Hip Score (HHS), Oxford Hip Score (OHS), Hip Outcome Score (HOS), Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), The International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC), The Lysholm Scale, The Western Ontario Meniscal Evaluation Tool (WOMET), The Anterior Cruciate Ligament Quality of Life Questionnaire (ACL-QOL), The Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), The Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Knee İnjury And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment Patellar Tendinosis (Jumper’s Knee) (VİSA-P), Tegner Activity Rating Scale, Marx Activity Rating Scale, Foot And Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), The Foot Function Index (FFI), Foot And Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), The Foot And Ankle Disability Index Score and Sports Module, Achill Tendon Total Rupture Score(ATRS), The Victorian İnstitute Of Sports Assesment Achilles Questionnaire(VİSA-A), American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). A search of the PubMed/MEDLINE, PEDro and Cochrane Cen¬tral Register of Controlled Trials and Web of Science databases from the date of inception to May 1, 2016 was conducted. The terms “minimal clinically important difference,” “minimal clinically important change”, “minimal clinically important improvement” “were combined with one of the PROM as mentioned above

  10. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annual report February 1, 2001--January 31, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed)

    2002-07-01

    This report documents the activities of the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) from February 2001 through January 2002. Progress in continuing collaborations and several new collaborations is reviewed.

  11. Patient reported outcomes measures in neurogenic bladder and bowel: A systematic review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darshan P; Elliott, Sean P; Stoffel, John T; Brant, William O; Hotaling, James M; Myers, Jeremy B

    2016-01-01

    To describe existing bladder and bowel specific quality of life (QoL) measurement tools, QoL in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury (SCI), Parkinson's Disease (PD), stroke, or spina bifida (SB) affected by bladder or bowel dysfunction, and the impact of specific bladder and bowel management on QoL. We performed a systematic review in PubMed/Medline databases in accordance with the PRISMA statement for English publications between January 1, 2000 and January 1, 2014. Articles were first screened based on their abstract and select full-text articles were then reviewed for eligibility. Articles with no QoL or PROM assessing urinary or bowel dysfunction were excluded. Risk of bias assessment included randomization, incomplete outcomes data, selective outcomes reporting, and other biases. All articles were graded using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as per the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. The most common QoL measurement tool for urinary and bowel dysfunction was the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36. Twelve (24%) studies used only non-validated QoL questionnaires. Only three urinary or bowel specific QoL measures were found: the Qualiveen questionnaire, the FICQoL, and the QoL-BM. Several studies identified instances were clinical and patient-reported outcomes were inconsistent particularly with indwelling urinary catheter usage and reconstructive surgery. Additionally, certain clinical outcomes surrogates commonly used as primary outcomes measures may not correlate with the patient reported outcomes (PRO). Current PRO measures (PROM) and QoL assessments are heterogeneous and several inconsistencies in clinical and PRO for various management options exist. Standardized PROM will help identify optimal bladder and bowel management for patients with neurologic conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with active tuberculosis followed in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulasli Sevinc

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure. In intensive care units, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of TB is common. Therefore, a description of characteristics of active TB in patients with renal failure followed in intensive care units is important to reduce mortality and transmission of the disease. This study was performed to describe the characteristics of patients with renal failure admitted to the intensive care units and having active TB and evaluate predictive factors for in hospital mortality. The hospital records of 24 patients (11 women, 13 men having ESRD and TB between 2001-2006 were reviewed. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory data on admission were recorded. Possible parameters contributing to in-hospital mortality were obtained from the medical records. In-hospital mortality rate was 66.6%. Factors associated with mortality were decreased partial pressure of oxygen and malnutrition. Fever was reported in 8 patients and hemoptysis was reported in 3 patients. Eight patients had consolidation on chest radiograph, while 4 had normal findings Seventeen patients had pulmonary involvement, and 11 had extra pulmonary involvement. The mortality rate in TB patients followed in intensive care units is high, with 3 factors contributing to in-hospital mortality. Clinicians should consider active TB in renal failure patients being followed in the intensive care unit, even when results of a chest radiograph are normal especially in patients with unexplained poor general health or respiratory failure.

  13. Patient-reported Outcome Measurement for Patients With Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Stephen; Yin, Kaitlyn L

    2017-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a large contributor to Medicare costs. In an effort to lower costs and improve outcomes, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services has implemented the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement model, which incentivizes surgeons to submit both general health and joint-specific patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). However, in addition to using PROMs for reporting purposes, surgeons should also consider incorporating PROMs into clinical practice. Currently, PROMs are not widely implemented in the clinical setting despite their value in measuring factors such as patients' expectations and mental state, which impact outcomes. Furthermore, as technology improves, PROM collection will become faster and more efficient. The information collected by PROMs can inform treatment decisions and facilitate communication between the surgeon and the patient.

  14. Nurse burnout and patient safety outcomes: nurse safety perception versus reporting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R B; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Wakefield, Douglas S; Cooper, Lynn B

    2008-08-01

    This article examines the relationship between nurse burnout and patient safety indicators, including both safety perceptions and reporting behavior. Based on the Conservation of Resources model of stress and burnout, it is predicted that burnout will negatively affect both patient safety perceptions and perceived likelihood of reporting events. Nurses from a Veteran's Administration hospital completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and safety outcomes subset of measures from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Culture measure. After controlling for work-related demographics, multiple regression analysis supported the prediction that burnout was associated with the perception of lower patient safety. Burnout was not associated with event-reporting behavior but was negatively associated with reporting of mistakes that did not lead to adverse events. The findings extend previous research on the relationship between burnout and patient outcomes and offer avenues for future research on how nurse motivation resources are invested in light of their stressful work environment.

  15. Patient-reported outcomes as predictors of 10-year survival in women after acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segadal Leidulf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient-reported outcomes are increasingly seen as complementary to biomedical measures. However, their prognostic importance has yet to be established, particularly in female long-term myocardial infarction (MI survivors. We aimed to determine whether 10-year survival in older women after MI relates to patient-reported outcomes, and to compare their survival with that of the general female population. Methods We included all women aged 60-80 years suffering MI during 1992-1997, and treated at one university hospital in Norway. In 1998, 145 (60% of those alive completed a questionnaire package including socio-demographics, the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-29, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument Abbreviated (WHOQOL-BREF and an item on positive effects of illness. Clinical information was based on self-reports and hospital medical records data. We obtained complete data on vital status. Results The all-cause mortality rate during the 1998-2008 follow-up of all patients was 41%. In adjusted analysis, the conventional predictors s-creatinine (HR 1.26 per 10% increase and left ventricular ejection fraction below 30% (HR 27.38, as well as patient-reported outcomes like living alone (HR 6.24, dissatisfaction with self-rated health (HR 6.26, impaired psychological quality of life (HR 0.60 per 10 points difference, and experience of positive effects of illness (HR 6.30, predicted all-cause death. Major adverse cardiac and cerebral events were also significantly associated with both conventional predictors and patient-reported outcomes. Sense of coherence did not predict adverse events. Finally, 10-year survival was not significantly different from that of the general female population. Conclusion Patient-reported outcomes have long-term prognostic importance, and should be taken into account when planning aftercare of low-risk older female MI patients.

  16. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report Fourth Quarter FY-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H.; Crawford, Winifred C.; Watson, Leela R.; Shafer, Jaclyn

    2014-01-01

    Ms. Crawford completed the final report for the dual-Doppler wind field task. Dr. Bauman completed transitioning the 915-MHz and 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) splicing algorithm developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) into the AMU Upper Winds Tool. Dr. Watson completed work to assimilate data into model configurations for Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) and Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (KSC/CCAFS). Ms. Shafer began evaluating the a local high-resolution model she had set up previously for its ability to forecast weather elements that affect launches at KSC/CCAFS. Dr. Watson began a task to optimize the data-assimilated model she just developed to run in real time.

  17. Applied Meteorology Unit Quarterly Report. First Quarter FY-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The AMU team worked on five tasks for their customers: (1) Ms. Crawford continued work on the objective lightning forecast task for airports in east-central Florida. (2) Ms. Shafer continued work on the task for Vandenberg Air Force Base to create an automated tool that will help forecasters relate pressure gradients to peak wind values. (3) Dr. Huddleston began work to develop a lightning timing forecast tool for the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station area. (3) Dr. Bauman began work on a severe weather forecast tool focused on east-central Florida. (4) Dr. Watson completed testing high-resolution model configurations for Wallops Flight Facility and the Eastern Range, and wrote the final report containing the AMU's recommendations for model configurations at both ranges.

  18. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report - Fourth Quarter FY-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Three AMU tasks were completed in this Quarter, each resulting in a forecast tool now being used in operations and a final report documenting how the work was done. AMU personnel completed the following tasks (1) Phase II of the Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting task by delivering an improved wind forecasting tool to operations and providing training on its use; (2) a graphical user interface (GUI) she updated with new scripts to complete the ADAS Update and Maintainability task, and delivered the scripts to the Spaceflight Meteorology Group on Johnson Space Center, Texas and National Weather Service in Melbourne, Fla.; and (3) the Verify MesoNAM Performance task after we created and delivered a GUI that forecasters will use to determine the performance of the operational MesoNAM weather model forecast.

  19. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with self-reported pruritus symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Bond, T Christopher; Claxton, Ami; Sood, Vipan C; Kootsikas, Maria; Agnese, Wendy; Sibbel, Scott

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common conditions affecting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) is pruritus. Studies report that itchy and dry skin, symptoms of pruritus, affect 40%-90% of ESRD patients. Yet, in clinical practice the condition is often underdiagnosed resulting in inadequate management and an underappreciated impact on patient outcomes. Two retrospective analyses were conducted: a preliminary analysis of ESRD patients with pruritus symptoms (n=73,124) undergoing HD or peritoneal dialysis at a large dialysis provider and a subsequent detailed analysis of a homogenous subset of patients undergoing in-center HD (n=38,315). The goal was to better understand the clinical burden of pruritus as it relates to patient characteristics, quality of life, medication use, and HD compliance. This population is commonly burdened by multiple comorbidities and related polypharmaceutical management; identifying the relationship of pruritus to these ailments can help guide future research and resource allocation. The detailed analysis confirmed trends observed in the preliminary analysis: 30% reported being "moderately" to "extremely bothered" by itchiness. The HD patient population with the highest severity of self-reported pruritus also had a consistent trend in overall increased resource utilization - higher monthly doses of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (53,397.1 to 63,405.4 units) and intravenous (IV) iron (237.2 to 247.6 units) and higher use of IV antibiotics (14.1% to 20.7%), as well as poorer quality-of-life measures (25-point reductions in Burden of Disease Score and Effects on Daily Life subscales of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36 survey). These results highlight the need to better identify and manage ESRD patients impacted by pruritus, as this symptom is associated with negative clinical outcomes and increased resource utilization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the current economic burden of pruritus in ESRD patients and

  20. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Koo John; Thompson Christine; Stone Stephen P; Bresnahan Brian W; Shikiar Richard; Revicki Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome m...

  1. Towards standard setting for patient-reported outcomes in the NHS homeopathic hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, E. A.; Mathie, R. T.; Baitson, E.S.; Barron, S J; Berkovitz, S.R.; Brands, M.; Fisher, P.; Kirby, T.M.; Leckridge, R.W.; Mercer, S.W.; Nielsen, H J; Ratsey, D.H.K.; Reilly, D.; Roniger, H.; Whitmarsh, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    We report findings from a pilot data collection study within a programme of quality assurance, improvement and development across all five homeopathic hospitals in the UK National Health Service (NHS).\\ud \\ud Aims (1) To pilot the collection of clinical data in the homeopathic hospital outpatient setting, recording patient-reported outcome since first appointment; (2) to sample the range of medical complaints that secondary-care doctors treat using homeopathy, and thus identify the nature and...

  2. Combining Clinical Information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, D.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the use of clinical information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for patient evaluation in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. In the first part, we showed that the Dutch version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) is a valid and reliable

  3. Combining Clinical Information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, D.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the use of clinical information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for patient evaluation in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. In the first part, we showed that the Dutch version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) is a valid and reliable instrumen

  4. Factors associated with patient-reported cosmetic outcome in the Young Boost Breast Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, P.J.; Werkhoven, E. van; Bartelink, H.; Fourquet, A.; Lemanski, C.; Loon, J. van; Maduro, J.H.; Russell, N.S.; Scheijmans, L.J.; Schinagl, D.A.X.; Westenberg, A.H.; Poortmans, P.; Boersma, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate which factors are related to patient reported cosmetic outcome (PRCO) after breast conserving therapy. METHODS: From 2004 to 2011, 2421 cT1-2N0-2a breast cancer patients were randomised in the Young Boost Trial between a 16 and a 26Gy boost to the tumour bed. Cosmesis was sco

  5. Factors associated with patient-reported cosmetic outcome in the Young Boost Breast Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Patricia J. A. M.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Bartelink, Harry; Fourquet, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; van Loon, Judith; Maduro, John H.; Russell, Nicola S.; Scheijmans, Luc J. E. E.; Schinagl, Dominic A. X.; Westenberg, Antonia H.; Poortmans, Philip; Boersma, Liesbeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate which factors are related to patient reported cosmetic outcome (PRCO) after breast conserving therapy. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, 2421 cT1-2N0-2a breast cancer patients were randomised in the Young Boost Trial between a 16 and a 26 Gy boost to the tumour bed. Cosmesis was sc

  6. Longitudinal Use of the Teacher's Report Form in Tracking Outcome for Students with SED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Richard E.; Spitznagel, Edward L.

    2001-01-01

    The Teacher's Report Form (TRF) was investigated over 3 years for its practical ability to track outcomes in 89 elementary students with emotional disturbances. The students whose placement changed to less restrictive settings demonstrated significant improvement on consecutive TRF's in academic performance, classroom functioning, and aggressive…

  7. The case for an international patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS®) initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, J.; Bartlett, S.J.; Rose, M.; Aaronson, N.K.; Chaplin, J.; Efficace, F.; Leplège, A.; Aiping, L.U.; Tulsky, D.S.; Raat, H.; Ravens-Sieberer, U.; Revicki, D.; Terwee, C.B.; Valderas, J.M.; Cella, D.; Forrest, C.B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an increasingly important role in clinical practice and research. Modern psychometric methods such as item response theory (IRT) enable the creation of item banks that support fixed-length forms as well as computerized adaptive testing (CAT), often resulting in

  8. The case for an international patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS®) initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Alonso (Jordi); S.J. Bartlett (Susan); M. Rose (Matthias); N.K. Aaronson (Neil); J.E. Chaplin (John); F. Efficace (Fabio); A. Leplège (Alain); A. LU (Aiping); D.S. Tulsky (David); H. Raat (Hein); U. Ravens-Sieberer (Ulrike); D. Revicki (Dennis); C.B. Terwee (Caroline); J.M. Valderas (Jose); D. Cella (David); C.B. Forrest (Christopher)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPatient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an increasingly important role in clinical practice and research. Modern psychometric methods such as item response theory (IRT) enable the creation of item banks that support fixed-length forms as well as computerized adaptive testing (CAT), often r

  9. A proposed set of metrics for standardized outcome reporting in the management of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, R Carter; Welander, Adina; Stowell, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    metrics through a 6-round modified Delphi process. The scope of the outcome set was degenerative lumbar conditions. RESULTS: Patient-reported metrics include numerical pain scales, lumbar-related function using the Oswestry disability index, health-related quality of life using the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire...

  10. Factors associated with patient-reported cosmetic outcome in the Young Boost Breast Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Patricia J. A. M.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Bartelink, Harry; Fourquet, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; van Loon, Judith; Maduro, John H.; Russell, Nicola S.; Scheijmans, Luc J. E. E.; Schinagl, Dominic A. X.; Westenberg, Antonia H.; Poortmans, Philip; Boersma, Liesbeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate which factors are related to patient reported cosmetic outcome (PRCO) after breast conserving therapy. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, 2421 cT1-2N0-2a breast cancer patients were randomised in the Young Boost Trial between a 16 and a 26 Gy boost to the tumour bed. Cosmesis was sc

  11. Patient reported outcomes in chronic skin diseases: eHealth applications for clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cranenburgh, O.D.

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to examine and integrate patient reported outcomes (PROs) in dermatological care. In part I, we specifically examined health-related quality of life (HRQoL), treatment satisfaction, and experiences with care in patients with chronic skin diseases. Our results

  12. Voice-Related Patient-Reported Outcome Measures: A Systematic Review of Instrument Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David O.; Daniero, James J.; Hovis, Kristen L.; Sathe, Nila; Jacobson, Barbara; Penson, David F.; Feurer, Irene D.; McPheeters, Melissa L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive systematic review of the literature on voice-related patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures in adults and to evaluate each instrument for the presence of important measurement properties. Method: MEDLINE, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Health…

  13. Exploring Outcomes and Initial Self-Report of Client Motivation in a College Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Michael L.; Sharp, Julia L.; Ilagan, Jill; Oberman, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the association between college counseling center clients' initial self-report of motivation and counseling outcome. Participants: The sample was composed of 331 student clients who utilized a college counseling center from August 2007 to August 2009. The college is a public, mid-size, urban university in the Southeast.…

  14. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcomes for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten; Lund, Hans; Roos, Ewa M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a prioritised list based on responsiveness for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for performing meta-analyses in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. A systematic search was conducted in 20 highest impact factor general and rheumatology...

  15. Aspergillosis in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients: epidemiology and economic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baddley John W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few data are available regarding the epidemiology of invasive aspergillosis (IA in ICU patients. The aim of this study was to examine epidemiology and economic outcomes (length of stay, hospital costs among ICU patients with IA who lack traditional risk factors for IA, such as cancer, transplants, neutropenia or HIV infection. Methods Retrospective cohort study using Premier Inc. Perspective™ US administrative hospital database (2005–2008. Adults with ICU stays and aspergillosis (ICD-9 117.3 plus 484.6 who received initial antifungal therapy (AF in the ICU were included. Patients with traditional risk factors (cancer, transplant, neutropenia, HIV/AIDS were excluded. The relationship of antifungal therapy and co-morbidities to economic outcomes were examined using Generalized linear models. Results From 6,424 aspergillosis patients in the database, 412 (6.4% ICU patients with IA were identified. Mean age was 63.9 years and 53% were male. Frequent co-morbidities included steroid use (77%, acute respiratory failure (76% and acute renal failure (41%. In-hospital mortality was 46%. The most frequently used AF was voriconazole (71% received at least once. Mean length of stay (LOS was 26.9 days and mean total hospital cost was $76,235. Each 1 day lag before initiating AF therapy was associated with 1.28 days longer hospital stay and 3.5% increase in costs (p  Conclusions Invasive aspergillosis in ICU patients is associated with high mortality and hospital costs. Antifungal timing impacts economic outcomes. These findings underscore the importance of timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and consideration of Aspergillus as a potential etiology in ICU patients.

  16. Projected Outcomes of Nurse-Family Partnership Home Visitation During 1996-2013, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ted R.

    2015-01-01

    Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) targets intensive prenatal and postnatal home visitation by registered nurses to low-income first-time mothers. Through 2013, 177,517 pregnant women enrolled in NFP programs. This article projects how NFP will affect their lives and the lives of their babies. NFP has been evaluated in six randomized trials and several more limited analyses of operational programs. We systematically reviewed evaluation findings on 21 outcomes and calculated effects on 3 more. We added outcome data from the NFP national data system and personal communications that filled outcome data gaps on some trials. We assumed effectiveness in replication declined by 21.8%, proportionally with the decline in mean visits per family from trials to operational programs. By 2031, NFP program enrollments in 1996-2013 will prevent an estimated 500 infant deaths, 10,000 preterm births, 13,000 dangerous closely spaced second births, 4,700 abortions, 42,000 child maltreatment incidents, 36,000 intimate partner violence incidents, 90,000 violent crimes by youth, 594,000 property and public order crimes (e.g., vandalism, loitering) by youth, 36,000 youth arrests, and 41,000 person-years of youth substance abuse. They will reduce smoking during pregnancy, pregnancy complications, childhood injuries, and use of subsidized child care; improve language development, increase breast-feeding, and raise compliance with immunization schedules. They will eliminate the need for 4.8 million person-months of child Medicaid spending and reduce estimated spending on Medicaid, TANF, and food stamps by $3.0 billion (present values in 2010 dollars). By comparison, NFP cost roughly $1.6 billion. Thus, NFP appears to be a sound investment. It saves money while enriching the lives of participating low-income mothers and their offspring and benefiting society more broadly by reducing crime and safety net demand. PMID:26076883

  17. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  18. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  19. Green Power Marketing in the United States. A Status Report (2009 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sumner, Jenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. First, aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States are presented. Next, we summarize data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets; green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of RECs; and renewable energy sold as greenhouse gas offsets in the United States. Finally, this is followed by a discussion of key market trends and issues. The data presented in this report are based primarily on figures provided to NREL by utilities and independent renewable energy marketers.

  20. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (2009 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Sumner, J.

    2010-09-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. First, aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States are presented. Next, we summarize data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets; green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of RECs; and renewable energy sold as greenhouse gas offsets in the United States. Finally, this is followed by a discussion of key market trends and issues. The data presented in this report are based primarily on figures provided to NREL by utilities and independent renewable energy marketers.

  1. Labor market outcomes of immigrant women in the United States: 1970 to 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeni, R F

    1998-01-01

    42% of immigrant workers in the US are women. Data from the 1970, 1980, and 1990 US censuses are analyzed in the study of differences in labor market outcomes between US-born and immigrant women, and among immigrant women born in different countries or regions of the world. There was little difference between US-born and immigrant women as a whole in 1970. However, over the next 20 years, immigrants women's labor force participation rate and weekly earnings relative to natives became lower, and their unemployment rates became higher. By 1990, the wage gap was 14%. At the same time, the share of self-employed women and the amount of time worked among employed women were almost the same for immigrant women and the US-born throughout the period 1970-90. Immigrants born in the UK, Canada, Europe, Japan, Korea, China, the Philippines, and the Middle East have had steady or improved wages and unemployment relative to US-born women. Immigrants from Mexico and Central America have experienced relatively high unemployment and low earnings, with the wage gap reaching 35% in 1990. Disparities in the number of completed years of schooling explains a substantial share of the observed differences in labor market outcomes.

  2. Comparison of management and outcomes of ED patients with acute decompensated heart failure between the Canadian and United States' settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Anita; Tenpenny, Elliott; Nestler, David; Hess, Erik; Stiell, Ian G

    2016-03-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to compare the emergency department (ED) management and rate of admission of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) between two hospitals in Canada and the United States and to compare the outcomes of these patients. This was a health records review of adults presenting with ADHF to two EDs in Canada and the United States between January 1 and April 30, 2010. Outcome measures were admission to the hospital, myocardial infarction (MI), and death or relapse rates to the ED. Data were analysed using descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 394 cases were reviewed and 73 were excluded. Comparing 156 Canadian to 165 U.S. patients, respectively, mean age was 76.0 and 75.8 years; male sex was 54.5% and 52.1%. Canadian and U.S. ED treatments were noninvasive ventilation 7.7% v. 12.8% (p=0.13); IV diuretics 77.6% v. 36.0% (p<0.001); IV nitrates 4.5% v. 6.7% (p=0.39). There were significant differences in rate of admission (50.6% v. 95.2%, p<0.001) and length of stay in ED (6.7 v. 3.0 hours, p<0.001). Proportion of Canadian and U.S. patients who died within 30 days of the ED visit was 5.1% v. 9.7% (p=0.12); relapsed to the ED within 30 days was 20.8% v. 17.5% (p=0.5); and had MI within 30 days was 2.0% v. 1.9% (p=1.0). The U.S. and Canadian centres saw ADHF patients with similar characteristics. Although the U.S. site had almost double the admission rate, the outcomes were similar between the sites, which question the necessity of routine admission for patients with ADHF.

  3. Risk factors, characteristics, and outcomes of candidemia in an adult intensive care unit in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukenmez Tigen, Elif; Bilgin, Huseyin; Perk Gurun, Hande; Dogru, Arzu; Ozben, Beste; Cerikcioglu, Nilgun; Korten, Volkan

    2017-06-01

    Thirty-six patients with candidemia and 37 control patients were included consecutively to determine the characteristics of candidemia episodes. The patients with candidemia had higher mortality with higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores and frequency of use of a central venous catheter, total parenteral nutrition, and broad-spectrum antibiotics; chronic renal failure with replacement therapy; and longer stay in an intensive care unit. Candida albicans was the predominant species followed by Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida parapsilosis. All isolates of C glabrata were itraconazole-resistant. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The United States National Climate Assessment - Alaska Technical Regional Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markon, Carl J.; Trainor, Sarah F.; Chapin, F. Stuart; Markon, Carl J.; Trainor, Sarah F.; Chapin, F. Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The Alaskan landscape is changing, both in terms of effects of human activities as a consequence of increased population, social and economic development and their effects on the local and broad landscape; and those effects that accompany naturally occurring hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and tsunamis. Some of the most prevalent changes, however, are those resulting from a changing climate, with both near term and potential upcoming effects expected to continue into the future. Alaska's average annual statewide temperatures have increased by nearly 4°F from 1949 to 2005, with significant spatial variability due to the large latitudinal and longitudinal expanse of the State. Increases in mean annual temperature have been greatest in the interior region, and smallest in the State's southwest coastal regions. In general, however, trends point toward increases in both minimum temperatures, and in fewer extreme cold days. Trends in precipitation are somewhat similar to those in temperature, but with more variability. On the whole, Alaska saw a 10-percent increase in precipitation from 1949 to 2005, with the greatest increases recorded in winter. The National Climate Assessment has designated two well-established scenarios developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Nakicenovic and others, 2001) as a minimum set that technical and author teams considered as context in preparing portions of this assessment. These two scenarios are referred to as the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A2 and B1 scenarios, which assume either a continuation of recent trends in fossil fuel use (A2) or a vigorous global effort to reduce fossil fuel use (B1). Temperature increases from 4 to 22°F are predicted (to 2070-2099) depending on which emissions scenario (A2 or B1) is used with the least warming in southeast Alaska and the greatest in the northwest. Concomitant with temperature changes, by the end of the 21st century the growing season is expected

  5. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with self-reported pruritus symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan K

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Karthik Ramakrishnan,1 T Christopher Bond,1 Ami Claxton,1 Vipan C Sood,2 Maria Kootsikas,2 Wendy Agnese,2 Scott Sibbel11DaVita Clinical Research, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Jersey City, NJ, USAAbstract: One of the most common conditions affecting end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD is pruritus. Studies report that itchy and dry skin, symptoms of pruritus, affect 40%–90% of ESRD patients. Yet, in clinical practice the condition is often underdiagnosed resulting in inadequate management and an underappreciated impact on patient outcomes. Two retrospective analyses were conducted: a preliminary analysis of ESRD patients with pruritus symptoms (n=73,124 undergoing HD or peritoneal dialysis at a large dialysis provider and a subsequent detailed analysis of a homogenous subset of patients undergoing in-center HD (n=38,315. The goal was to better understand the clinical burden of pruritus as it relates to patient characteristics, quality of life, medication use, and HD compliance. This population is commonly burdened by multiple comorbidities and related polypharmaceutical management; identifying the relationship of pruritus to these ailments can help guide future research and resource allocation. The detailed analysis confirmed trends observed in the preliminary analysis: 30% reported being "moderately" to "extremely bothered" by itchiness. The HD patient population with the highest severity of self-reported pruritus also had a consistent trend in overall increased resource utilization – higher monthly doses of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (53,397.1 to 63,405.4 units and intravenous (IV iron (237.2 to 247.6 units and higher use of IV antibiotics (14.1% to 20.7%, as well as poorer quality-of-life measures (25-point reductions in Burden of Disease Score and Effects on Daily Life subscales of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36 survey. These results highlight the need to better

  6. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew; Liles, Clive; Rushton, Alison; Kyte, Derek G

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review investigated the measurement properties of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic search of key databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL+ and the Cochrane Library from inception to August 2013) to identify relevant studies. A third reviewer mediated in the event of disagreement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the validated COSMIN (Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) tool. Data synthesis across studies determined the level of evidence for each patient-reported outcome measure. The search strategy returned 2177 citations. Following the eligibility review phase, seven studies, evaluating twelve different patient-reported outcome measures, met inclusion criteria. A 'moderate' level of evidence supported the structural validity of several measures: the Flandry Questionnaire, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Functional Index Questionnaire, Eng and Pierrynowski Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales for 'usual' and 'worst' pain. In addition, there was a 'Limited' level of evidence supporting the test-retest reliability and validity (cross-cultural, hypothesis testing) of the Persian version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Other measurement properties were evaluated with poor methodological quality, and many properties were not evaluated in any of the included papers. Current disease-specific outcome measures for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome require further investigation. Future studies should evaluate all important measurement properties, utilising an appropriate framework such as COSMIN to guide study design, to facilitate optimal methodological quality.

  7. Gender differences in self reported long term outcomes following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratcliff Graham

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of research on health outcomes after a traumatic brain injury is focused on male participants. Information examining gender differences in health outcomes post traumatic brain injury is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in symptoms reported after a traumatic brain injury and to examine the degree to which these symptoms are problematic in daily functioning. Methods This is a secondary data analysis of a retrospective cohort study of 306 individuals who sustained a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury 8 to 24 years ago. Data were collected using the Problem Checklist (PCL from the Head Injury Family Interview (HIFI. Using Bonferroni correction, group differences between women and men were explored using Chi-square and Wilcoxon analysis. Results Chi-square analysis by gender revealed that significantly more men reported difficulty setting realistic goals and restlessness whereas significantly more women reported headaches, dizziness and loss of confidence. Wilcoxon analysis by gender revealed that men reported sensitivity to noise and sleep disturbances as significantly more problematic than women, whereas for women, lack of initiative and needing supervision were significantly more problematic in daily functioning. Conclusion This study provides insight into gender differences on outcomes after traumatic brain injury. There are significant differences between problems reported by men compared to women. This insight may facilitate health service planners and clinicians when developing programs for individuals with brain injury.

  8. Heterogeneity in Patient-Reported Outcomes following Low-Intensity Mental Health Interventions: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shehzad; Littlewood, Elizabeth; McMillan, Dean; Delgadillo, Jaime; Miranda, Alfonso; Croudace, Tim; Gilbody, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background Variability in patient-reported outcomes of psychological treatments has been partly attributed to therapists – a phenomenon commonly known as therapist effects. Meta-analytic reviews reveal wide variation in therapist-attributable variability in psychotherapy outcomes, with most studies reporting therapist effects in the region of 5% to 10% and some finding minimal to no therapist effects. However, all except one study to date have been conducted in high-intensity or mixed intervention groups; therefore, there is scarcity of evidence on therapist effects in brief low-intensity psychological interventions. Objective To examine therapist effects in low-intensity interventions for depression and anxiety in a naturalistic setting. Data and Analysis Session-by-session data on patient-reported outcome measures were available for a cohort of 1,376 primary care psychotherapy patients treated by 38 therapists. Outcome measures included PHQ-9 (sensitive to depression) and GAD-7 (sensitive to general anxiety disorder) measures. Three-level hierarchical linear modelling was employed to estimate therapist-attributable proportion of variance in clinical outcomes. Therapist effects were evaluated using the intra-cluster correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bayesian empirical predictions of therapist random effects. Three sensitivity analyses were conducted: 1) using both treatment completers and non-completers; 2) a sub-sample of cases with baseline scores above the conventional clinical thresholds for PHQ-9 and GAD-7; and 3) a two-level model (using patient-level pre- and post-treatment scores nested within therapists). Results The ICC estimates for all outcome measures were very small, ranging between 0% and 1.3%, although most were statistically significant. The Bayesian empirical predictions showed that therapist random effects were not statistically significantly different from each other. Between patient variability explained most of the variance in outcomes

  9. Patient-reported outcomes: state-of-the-art hand surgery and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDermid, Joy C

    2014-08-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PRO) can provide reliable and valid estimates of patient status and response to interventions to complete the final step in an evidence-based patient interaction. A variety of PRO are relevant to upper extremity surgery and rehabilitation outcomes. PRO provide feasible tools for clinical research or practice, although use in clinical decision making lags behind research applications. Recent trends in clinical measurement include better integration of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in content validation, more modern methods of evaluating scaling properties (Rasch analysis), consensus exercise on establishing core measures, electronic data collection, and computer-adaptive testing.

  10. Systematic Review of Radiation Therapy Toxicity Reporting in Randomized Controlled Trials of Rectal Cancer: A Comparison of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Clinician Toxicity Reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Alexandra, E-mail: a.gilbert@leeds.ac.uk [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Ziegler, Lucy; Martland, Maisie [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Davidson, Susan [The Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Efficace, Fabio [Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases, Rome (Italy); Sebag-Montefiore, David; Velikova, Galina [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The use of multimodal treatments for rectal cancer has improved cancer-related outcomes but makes monitoring toxicity challenging. Optimizing future radiation therapy regimens requires collection and publication of detailed toxicity data. This review evaluated the quality of toxicity information provided in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of radiation therapy in rectal cancer and focused on the difference between clinician-reported and patient-reported toxicity. Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched (January 1995-July 2013) for RCTs reporting late toxicity in patients treated with regimens including preoperative (chemo)radiation therapy. Data on toxicity measures and information on toxicity reported were extracted using Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic recommendations. International Society for Quality of Life Research standards on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were used to evaluate the quality of patient-reported toxicity. Twenty-one RCT publications met inclusion criteria out of 4144 articles screened. All PRO studies reported higher rates of toxicity symptoms than clinician-reported studies and reported on a wider range and milder symptoms. No clinician-reported study published data on sexual dysfunction. Of the clinician-reported studies, 55% grouped toxicity data related to an organ system together (eg “Bowel”), and 45% presented data only on more-severe (grade ≥3) toxicity. In comparison, all toxicity grades were reported in 79% of PRO publications, and all studies (100%) presented individual symptom toxicity data (eg bowel urgency). However, PRO reporting quality was variable. Only 43% of PRO studies presented baseline data, 28% did not use any psychometrically validated instruments, and only 29% of studies described statistical methods for managing missing data. Analysis of these trials highlights the lack of reporting standards for adverse events and reveals the differences between clinician and

  11. Associations between Indigenous Australian oral health literacy and self-reported oral health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamieson Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine oral health literacy (REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations, and to calculate if oral health literacy-related outcomes are risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health among rural-dwelling Indigenous Australians. Methods 468 participants (aged 17-72 years, 63% female completed a self-report questionnaire. REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations were determined through bivariate analysis. Multivariate modelling was used to calculate risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health. Results REALD-30 scores were lower among those who believed teeth should be infrequently brushed, believed cordial was good for teeth, did not own a toothbrush or owned a toothbrush but brushed irregularly. Tooth removal risk indicators included being older, problem-based dental attendance and believing cordial was good for teeth. Poor self-rated oral health risk indicators included being older, healthcare card ownership, difficulty paying dental bills, problem-based dental attendance, believing teeth should be brushed infrequently and irregular brushing. Perceived need for dental care risk indicators included being female and problem-based dental attendance. Perceived gum disease risk indicators included being older and irregular brushing. Feeling uncomfortable about oro-facial appearance risk indicators included problem-based dental attendance and irregular brushing. Food avoidance risk indicators were being female, difficulty paying dental bills, problem-based dental attendance and irregular brushing. Poor oral health-related quality of life risk indicators included difficulty paying dental bills and problem-based dental attendance. Conclusions REALD-30 was significantly associated with oral health literacy-related outcomes. Oral health literacy-related outcomes were risk indicators for each of the poor self-reported oral health domains among this marginalised population.

  12. United States Energy Association Final Report International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy Ministerial Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William L. Polen

    2006-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities of the United States Energy Association as it conducted the initial Ministerial Meeting of the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy in Washington, DC on November 18-21, 2003. The report summarizes the results of the meeting and subsequent support to the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in its role as IPHE Secretariat.

  13. The Impact of International Financial Reporting Standards on Accounting Curriculum in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallapragada, RamMohan R.; Toma, Alfred G.; Roe, C. William

    2011-01-01

    According to the time line presently specified by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), business firms in the United States (US) should switch from the existing US accounting reporting guidelines of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) by the year 2014. The US business…

  14. Controlling and Autonomy-Supportive Parenting in the United States and China: Beyond Children's Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cecilia S.; Pomerantz, Eva M.; Wang, Meifang; Qu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Research comparing the predictive power of parents' control and autonomy support in the United States and China has relied almost exclusively on children's reports. Such reports may lead to inaccurate conclusions if they do not reflect parents' practices to the same extent in the two countries. A total of 394 American and Chinese children…

  15. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase I) Remedial Action Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Davison

    2007-07-31

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase I sites at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The 10 sites addressed in this report were defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for these 10 sites have been accomplished and are hereafter considered No Action or No Further Action sites.

  16. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Davison

    2009-06-30

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

  17. Quality Outcomes in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit after Electronic Health Record Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatow, V H; Ibragimova, N; Divino, C M; Eshak, D S A; Twohig, B C; Bassily-Marcus, A M; Kohli-Seth, R

    2015-01-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) is increasingly viewed as a means to provide more coordinated, patient-centered care. Few studies consider the impact of EHRs on quality of care in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. To evaluate key quality measures of a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) following implementation of the Epic EHR system in a tertiary hospital. A retrospective chart review was undertaken to record quality indicators for all patients admitted to the SICU two years before and two years after EHR implementation. Data from the twelve-month period of transition to EHR was excluded. We collected length of stay, mortality, central line associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) rates, Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) colitis rates, readmission rates, and number of coded diagnoses. To control for variation in the patient population over time, the case mix indexes (CMIs) and APACHE II scores were also analyzed. There was no significant difference in length of stay, C. diff. colitis, readmission rates, or case mix index before and after EHR. After EHR implementation, the rate of central line blood stream infection (CLABSI) per 1 000 catheter days was 85% lower (2.16 vs 0.39; RR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.61, p < .005), and SICU mortality was 28% lower (12.2 vs 8.8; RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.71, p < .01). Moreover, after EHR there was a significant increase in the average number of coded diagnoses from 17.8 to 20.8 (p < .000). EHR implementation was statistically associated with reductions in CLABSI rates and SICU mortality. The EHR had an integral role in ongoing quality improvement endeavors which may explain the changes in CLABSI and mortality, and this invites further study of the impact of EHRs on quality of care in the ICU.

  18. Cholera in Pregnancy: Outcomes from a Specialized Cholera Treatment Unit for Pregnant Women in Léogâne, Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciglenecki, Iza; Bichet, Mathieu; Tena, Javier; Mondesir, Erneau; Bastard, Mathieu; Tran, Nguyen-Toan; Antierens, Annick; Staderini, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    Background The association between cholera in pregnancy and negative fetal outcome has been described since the 19th century. However, there is limited published literature on the subject. We describe pregnancy outcomes from a specialized multidisciplinary hospital unit at the onset of a large cholera outbreak in Haiti in 2010 and 2011. Methods Pregnant women with cholera were hospitalized in a specialized unit within the MSF hospital compound in Léogâne and treated using standard cholera treatment guidelines but with earlier, more intense fluid replacement. All women had intravenous access established at admission regardless of their hydration status, and all received antibiotic treatment. Data were collected on patient demographics, pregnancy and cholera status, and pregnancy outcome. In this analysis we calculated risk ratios for fetal death and performed logistic regression analysis to control for confounding factors. Results 263 pregnant women with cholera were hospitalized between December 2010 and July 2011. None died during hospitalization, 226 (86%) were discharged with a preserved pregnancy and 16 (6%) had live fullterm singleton births, of whom 2 died within the first 5 days postpartum. The remaining 21 pregnancies (8%) resulted in intrauterine fetal death. The risk of fetal death was associated with factors reflecting severity of the cholera episode: after adjusting for confounding factors, the strongest risk factor for fetal death was severe maternal dehydration (adjusted risk ratio for severe vs. mild dehydration was 9.4, 95% CI 2.5–35.3, p = 0.005), followed by severe vomiting (adjusted risk ratio 5.1, 95% 1.1–23.8, p = 0.041). Conclusion This is the largest cohort of pregnant women with cholera described to date. The main risk factor identified for fetal death was severity of dehydration. Our experience suggests that establishing specialized multidisciplinary units which facilitate close follow-up of both pregnancy and dehydration

  19. Development of a proxy-reported pulmonary outcome scale for preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laughon Matthew M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop an accurate, proxy-reported bedside measurement tool for assessment of the severity of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (also called chronic lung disease in preterm infants to supplement providers' current biometric measurements of the disease. Methods We adapted Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS methodology to develop the Proxy-Reported Pulmonary Outcomes Scale (PRPOS. A multidisciplinary group of registered nurses, nurse practitioners, neonatologists, developmental specialists, and feeding specialists at five academic medical centers participated in the PRPOS development, which included five phases: (1 identification of domains, items, and responses; (2 item classification and selection using a modified Delphi process; (3 focus group exploration of items and response options; (4 cognitive interviews on a preliminary scale; and (5 final revision before field testing. Results Each phase of the process helped us to identify, classify, review, and revise possible domains, questions, and response options. The final items for field testing include 26 questions or observations that a nurse assesses before, during, and after routine care time and feeding. Conclusions We successfully created a prototype scale using modified PROMIS methodology. This process can serve as a model for the development of proxy-reported outcomes scales in other pediatric populations.

  20. Washing older blood units before transfusion reduces plasma iron and improves outcomes in experimental canine pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Puch, Irene; Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Solomon, Steven B; Remy, Kenneth E; Fernandez, Melinda; Feng, Jing; Kanias, Tamir; Bellavia, Landon; Sinchar, Derek; Perlegas, Andreas; Solomon, Michael A; Kelley, Walter E; Popovsky, Mark A; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Klein, Harvey G; Natanson, Charles

    2014-02-27

    In a randomized controlled blinded trial, 2-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24), with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, were exchanged-transfused with either 7- or 42-day-old washed or unwashed canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Washing red cells (RBC) before transfusion had a significantly different effect on canine survival, multiple organ injury, plasma iron, and cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) levels depending on the age of stored blood (all, P blood improved survival rates, shock score, lung injury, cardiac performance and liver function, and reduced levels of non-transferrin bound iron and plasma labile iron. In contrast, washing fresh blood worsened all these same clinical parameters and increased CFH levels. Our data indicate that transfusion of fresh blood, which results in less hemolysis, CFH, and iron release, is less toxic than transfusion of older blood in critically ill infected subjects. However, washing older blood prevented elevations in plasma circulating iron and improved survival and multiple organ injury in animals with an established pulmonary infection. Our data suggest that fresh blood should not be washed routinely because, in a setting of established infection, washed RBC are prone to release CFH and result in worsened clinical outcomes.

  1. Downstream Procedures and Outcomes After Stress Testing For Suspected Coronary Artery Disease in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrick, Daniel W; Cowper, Patricia A; Shah, Bimal R; Patel, Manesh R; Jensen, Neil C; Drawz, Matthew J; Peterson, Eric D; Douglas, Pamela S

    2013-01-01

    Background Millions of Americans with suspected coronary artery disease undergo non-invasive cardiac stress testing annually. Downstream procedures and subsequent outcomes among symptomatic patients without known coronary disease referred for stress testing are not well characterized in contemporary community practice. Methods We examined administrative insurance billing data from a national insurance provider from November 2004 through June 2007. After excluding patients with prior cardiac disease or chest pain evaluation, we identified 80,676 people age 40–64 years with outpatient cardiac stress testing within 30 days after an office visit for chest pain. We evaluated rates of invasive coronary angiography, coronary revascularization, and cardiovascular events after stress testing. Results Within 60 days, only 8.8% of stress test patients underwent cardiac catheterization and only 2.7% underwent revascularization; within one year only 0.5% suffered death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. There were marked geographic variations in one-year rates of catheterization (3.8–14.8%) and revascularization (1.2–3.0%) across 20 hospital referral regions. Conclusions In this large national cohort of middle-aged patients without previously coded cardiac diagnosis who were referred for stress testing after outpatient chest pain evaluation, few proceeded to invasive angiography or revascularization, and subsequent cardiovascular events were infrequent. PMID:22424017

  2. Self-reported and performance-based outcomes using DEKA Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of the DEKA Arm and associated engineering innovations are easy to observe. What is less clear is how these advances translate into functional benefits for the user with amputation. Study aims were to (1 quantify outcomes including dexterity, performance of daily activities, and prosthetic skill and spontaneity of users of the DEKA Arm and (2 compare outcomes when using the DEKA Arm with scores using the existing prosthesis. This was a quasi-experimental study. Descriptive analyses examined outcomes by DEKA Arm configuration level. Of the 39 subjects fit with a DEKA Arm, 32 were trained in use and completed end-of-study testing. Data from 26 prosthetic users were used to compare outcomes using existing prostheses with outcomes with the DEKA Arm. Dexterity and activity performance with the DEKA Arm varied by amputation level (p < 0.01. Self-reported function and number of activities performed using the prosthesis were similar across levels. Comparisons with existing prostheses showed the effect on dexterity varied by level. Activity performance and spontaneity of prosthetic use improved for users of the shoulder configuration level, while use of the prosthesis to perform activities and perceived difficulty performing self-selected tasks improved for all levels.

  3. Nonshaved cranial surgery in black Africans: technical report and a medium-term prospective outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleye, Amos O

    2016-07-01

    Nonshaved neurosurgery, cranial or spinal, is well reported among Caucasians but hardly among native Africans. The ungroomed scalp hairs of black Africans have unique anthropological characteristics needing special attention for shaveless cranial surgery. A technical report of the execution of this surgical procedure among an indigenous patient population in a sub-Sahara African country is presented, as well as an outcome analysis in a prospective cohort over a 7-year period. A total of 303 patients (211 males, 70 %) fulfilled the criteria for this study. The surgical procedure was primary in 278 (92 %) and redo in 8 %. It was emergency surgery in 153 (51 %). They were trauma craniotomies or decompressive craniectomies in 95 cases (31 %), craniotomies for tumour resections in 86 (28 %), and the surgical dissections for other conditions in 122 (41 %). The duration of surgery ranged from 30 min to 8.5 h, mean 2.5 (SD, 1.6), median 2. In-hospital clinical outcome was good (normal status or moderate deficit on dichotomized Glasgow outcome scale (GOS)) in 273 (90.1 %) cases while surgical site infections occurred in only 10 cases (3.3 %). The type of surgery, redo or primary, did not have any significant association with the in-hospital outcome (p = 0.5), nor with the presence of surgical site infection (SSI) (p = 0.7). The length of follow-up ranged from 2 to 63 months (mean, 7) with no untoward complications reported so far. Medium-term outcome of nonshaved neurosurgery in this indigenous black Africans remains favourable with no attendant significant adverse after-effects.

  4. Menace of childhood non-accidental traumatic brain injuries: A single unit report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI has high rate of mortality and morbidity worldwide. There are dearths of reports from developing countries with large paediatric population on trauma; neurosurgery trauma of nonaccidental origin is not an exemption. This study analysed menace of non-accidental TBI in the paediatric population from our center. Materials and Methods: This is a single unit, retrospective study of the epidemiology of non-accidental TBI in children starting from September, 2008 to March, 2014. The management outcomes of the epidemiology of the non-accidental TBI were analysed. Results: Total of 109 children age range from 0 (intra-natal to 16 years with a mean of 5.8 ± 4.6 years (median, 5 years were enrolled into the study. 34 (31.2% were domestic violence, 26 (23.9% street assaults, 16 (14.7% were due to animal assaults and mishaps, 17 (15.6% fall from heights. Seven (6.4% cases of collapsed buildings were also seen during the period. Four (3.7% industrial accidents and two (1.8% were self-inflicted injuries. There were also three (2.8% cases of iatrogenic TBI out of which two infants (1.8% sustained TBI from cesarean section procedure while one patient (0.9% under general anaesthesia felt from the operation bed resulting to severe TBI. Conclusion: Child abuse, unprotected child labour, parental/care-givers negligence are the main cause of nonaccidental TBI. Human right activists and government agents should be incorporated in curtailing the menace.

  5. Methods for Developing Patient-Reported Outcome-Based Performance Measures (PRO-PMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Spertus, John; Dudley, R Adams; Wu, Albert; Chuahan, Cynthia; Cohen, Perry; Smith, Mary Lou; Black, Nick; Crawford, Amaris; Christensen, Keri; Blake, Kathleen; Goertz, Christine

    2015-06-01

    To recommend methods for assessing quality of care via patient-reported outcome-based performance measures (PRO-PMs) of symptoms, functional status, and quality of life. A Technical Expert Panel was assembled by the American Medical Association-convened Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement. An environmental scan and structured literature review were conducted to identify quality programs that integrate PRO-PMs. Key methodological considerations in the design, implementation, and analysis of these PRO-PM data were systematically identified. Recommended methods for addressing each identified consideration were developed on the basis of published patient-reported outcome (PRO) standards and refined through public comment. Literature review focused on programs using PROs to assess performance and on PRO guidance documents. Thirteen PRO programs and 10 guidance documents were identified. Nine best practices were developed, including the following: provide a rationale for measuring the outcome and for using a PRO-PM; describe the context of use; select a measure that is meaningful to patients with adequate psychometric properties; provide evidence of the measure's sensitivity to differences in care; address missing data and risk adjustment; and provide a framework for implementation, interpretation, dissemination, and continuous refinement. Methods for integrating PROs into performance measurement are available. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient-Reported Outcome questionnaires for hip arthroscopy: a systematic review of the psychometric evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Hip arthroscopies are often used in the treatment of intra-articular hip injuries. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are an important parameter in evaluating treatment. It is unclear which PRO questionnaires are specifically available for hip arthroscopy patients. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate which PRO questionnaires are valid and reliable in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Methods A search was conducted in Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Pedro, EMBASE and Web of Science from 1931 to October 2010. Studies assessing the quality of PRO questionnaires in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy were included. The quality of the questionnaires was evaluated by the psychometric properties of the outcome measures. The quality of the articles investigating the questionnaires was assessed by the COSMIN list. Results Five articles identified three questionnaires; the Modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS), the Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS) and the Hip Outcome Score (HOS). The NAHS scored best on the content validity, whereas the HOS scored best on agreement, internal consistency, reliability and responsiveness. The quality of the articles describing the HOS scored highest. The NAHS is the best quality questionnaire. The articles describing the HOS are the best quality articles. Conclusions This systematic review shows that there is no conclusive evidence for the use of a single patient-reported outcome questionnaire in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Based on available psychometric evidence we recommend using a combination of the NAHS and the HOS for patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. PMID:21619610

  7. Long-term outcomes in adults with leukemia treated with transplantation of two unrelated umbilical cord blood units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yue; LI Yuan; DONG Yu-jun; REN Han-yun; CEN Xin-an; QIU Zhi-xiang; OU Jin-ping; WANG Wen-sheng; WANG Mang-ju; XU Wei-lin; WANG Li-hong

    2011-01-01

    Background Wide application of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) in adult patients is limited by low cell-dose available in one umbilical cord blood (UCB) unit. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and long-term outcomes of UCBT from unrelated donors in adult and adolescent patients with leukemia.Methods Thirteen patients with leukemia received double-unit UCBT with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatched at 0-2 loci. We analyzed the engraftment, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and survival.Results Twelve evaluable patients (92.3%) had neutrophil and platelet engraftment at a median of 21 days (range,16-38 days) and 34 days (range, 25-51 days), respectively. At day 30, engraftment was derived from one donor in 8patients (66.7%, 95% CI40.0%-93.4%), and from both donors in 4 patients (33.3%, 95% CI 6.7%-60.0%) with 1 unit predominated. Unit with larger nucleated cell (NC) dose would predominate in engraftment (P=0.039), whereas CD34+ cell dose or HLA-match failed to demonstrate any relationship with unit predominance. Only one patient developed grade Ⅱ acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was observed in 2 of 11 patients who survived more than 100 days, and both were limited. The median follow-up after transplantation for the 13 patients was 45 months (range 1.5-121.0 months) and 72 months (range 41.0-121.0 months) for the 8 alive and with full donor chimerism. The 5-year cumulative disease free survival (DFS) was (61.5±13.5)%. Of the 13 patients, 5 patients died in 1 year and 1-year transplantation related mortality (TRM) was 23.1% (95% CI 0.2%-46.0%).Conclusion Double-unit UCBT from unrelated donors with HLA-mismatched at 0-2 loci may overcome the cell-dose barrier and be feasible for adults and adolescents with leukemia.

  8. Core Outcome Set–STAndards for Reporting: The COS-STAR Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Jamie J.; Gorst, Sarah; Altman, Douglas G.; Blazeby, Jane M.; Clarke, Mike; Devane, Declan; Moher, David; Schmitt, Jochen; Tugwell, Peter; Tunis, Sean; Williamson, Paula R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Core outcome sets (COS) can enhance the relevance of research by ensuring that outcomes of importance to health service users and other people making choices about health care in a particular topic area are measured routinely. Over 200 COS to date have been developed, but the clarity of these reports is suboptimal. COS studies will not achieve their goal if reports of COS are not complete and transparent. Methods and Findings In recognition of these issues, an international group that included experienced COS developers, methodologists, journal editors, potential users of COS (clinical trialists, systematic reviewers, and clinical guideline developers), and patient representatives developed the Core Outcome Set–STAndards for Reporting (COS-STAR) Statement as a reporting guideline for COS studies. The developmental process consisted of an initial reporting item generation stage and a two-round Delphi survey involving nearly 200 participants representing key stakeholder groups, followed by a consensus meeting. The COS-STAR Statement consists of a checklist of 18 items considered essential for transparent and complete reporting in all COS studies. The checklist items focus on the introduction, methods, results, and discussion section of a manuscript describing the development of a particular COS. A limitation of the COS-STAR Statement is that it was developed without representative views of low- and middle-income countries. COS have equal relevance to studies conducted in these areas, and, subsequently, this guideline may need to evolve over time to encompass any additional challenges from developing COS in these areas. Conclusions With many ongoing COS studies underway, the COS-STAR Statement should be a helpful resource to improve the reporting of COS studies for the benefit of all COS users. PMID:27755541

  9. Impact of malnutrition on pediatric risk of mortality score and outcome in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romi Nangalu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was done to determine the effect of malnutrition on mortality in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU and on the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM scoring. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective study done over 1 year. There were total 400 patients (1 month 14 years, who were divided into cases with weight for age <3 rd centile and controls with ≥3 rd centile of WHO charts. Cases were subdivided into mild/moderate (61-80% of expected weight for age and severe malnutrition (<60%. Results: Out of total, 38.5% patients were underweight, and malnutrition was more in infancy, 61/104, i.e. 58.5% (P - 0.003. There was no significant difference in vitals at admission. Cases needed prolonged mechanical ventilation (P - 0.0063 and hospital stay (P - 0.0332 compared to controls. Mean and median PRISM scores were comparable in both the groups, but mortality was significantly higher in severely malnourished (P value 0.027. Conclusion: Severe malnutrition is independently associated with higher mortality even with similar PRISM score. There is need to give an additional score to children with weight for age <60% of expected.

  10. Evaluating the Reliability of EHR-Generated Clinical Outcomes Reports: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanger, Chatrian; Brown, Lisanne; Mukherjee, Snigdha; Xin, Haichang; Diana, Mark L; Khurshid, Anjum

    2014-01-01

    Quality incentive programs, such as Meaningful Use, operate under the assumption that clinical quality measures can be reliably extracted from EHRs. Safety Net providers, particularly Federally Qualified Health Centers and Look-Alikes, tend to be high adopters of EHRs; however, recent reports have shown that only about 9% of FQHCs and Look-Alikes were demonstrating meaningful use as of 2013. Our experience working with the Crescent City Beacon Community (CCBC) found that many health centers relied on chart audits to report quality measures as opposed to electronically generating reports directly from their EHRs due to distrust in the data. This paper describes a step-by-step process for improving the reliability of data extracted from EHRs to increase reliability of quality measure reports, to support quality improvement, and to achieve alignment with national clinical quality reporting requirements. Lack of standardization in data capture and reporting within EHRs drives distrust in EHR-reported data. Practices or communities attempting to achieve standardization may look to CCBC's experience for guidance on where to start and the level of resources required in order to execute a data standardization project. During the time of this data standardization project, CCBC was launching an HIE. Lack of trust in EHR data was a driver for distrust in the HIE data. We present a case study where a five-step process was used to harmonize measures, reduce data errors, and increase trust in EHR clinical outcomes reports among a community of Safety Net providers using a common EHR. Primary outcomes were the incidence of reporting errors and the potential effect of error types on quality measure percentages. The activities and level of resources required to achieve these results were also documented by the CCBC program. Implementation of a community-wide data reporting project resulted in measure harmonization, reduced reporting burden, and error reduction in EHR

  11. Pulmonary embolism in intensive care unit: Predictive factors, clinical manifestations and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahloul Mabrouk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine predictive factors, clinical and demographics characteristics of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE in ICU, and to identify factors associated with poor outcome in the hospital and in the ICU. Methods : During a four-year prospective study, a medical committee of six ICU physicians prospectively examined all available data for each patient in order to classify patients according to the level of clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism. During the study periods, all patients admitted to our ICU were classified into four groups. The first group includes all patients with confirmed PE; the second group includes some patients without clinical manifestations of PE; the third group includes patients with suspected and not confirmed PE and the fourth group includes all patients with only deep vein thromboses (DVTs without suspicion of PE. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed either by a high-probability ventilation/perfusion (V/Q scan or by a spiral computed tomography (CT scan showing one or more filling defects in the pulmonary artery or in its branches. The diagnosis was also confirmed by echocardiography when a thrombus in the pulmonary artery was observed. Results : During the study periods, 4408 patients were admitted in our ICU. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed in 87 patients (1.9%. The mean delay of development of PE was 7.8 ± 9.5 days. On the day of PE diagnosis, clinical examination showed that 50 patients (57.5% were hypotensive, 63 (72.4% have SIRS, 15 (17.2% have clinical manifestations of DVT and 71 (81.6% have respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation. In our study, intravenous unfractionated heparin was used in 81 cases (93.1% and low molecular weight heparins were used in 4 cases (4.6%. The mean ICU stay was 20.2 ± 25.3 days and the mean hospital stay was 25.5 ± 25 days. The mortality rate in ICU was 47.1% and the in-hospital mortality rate was 52.9%. Multivariate analysis showed that

  12. Epidemiology and survival outcomes of sinonasal verrucous carcinoma in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose E; Han, Albert Y; Kuan, Edward C; Suh, Jeffrey D; John, Maie A St

    2017-09-02

    Verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a rare, variant of squamous cell carcinoma with benign cytohistopathologic features and a generally favorable prognosis. Epidemiologic and clinical outcomes data are lacking as a result of limited cases of sinonasal VC. To describe the incidence and determinants of survival of patients with verrucous carcinoma of the sinonasal tract between the years of 1973 to 2014 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The SEER registry was utilized to calculate survival trends for patients with verrucous carcinoma of the sinonasal tract between 1973 and 2014. Patient data then was analyzed with respect to age, sex, race, and treatment modalities (surgery and radiation therapy). Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were calculated. A total of 86 cases of VC of the sinonasal tract were identified. The cohort was comprised of 69.8% males. The mean age at diagnosis was 67.4 years. The nasal cavity was the most common primary site (51.2%), followed by the maxillary sinus (40.7%) and nasopharynx (5.8%). The median OS was 97.6 months. 89.5% of cases underwent surgery and 20.9% received both surgery and radiation therapy. Overall survival at 2, 5, and 10 years was 73%, 59%, and 36%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, advanced age (P Verrucous carcinoma of the sinonasal tract is associated with a generally favorable prognosis. Age, primary site, and surgical therapy are independent predictors of OS and DSS, respectively. We present the first population-based analysis of sinonasal VC, thus clarifying the prognosis and reinforcing the management of this malignancy. 4. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. Quaterly and Semiannual Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-30

    Electricity Sector engineers, who provided day-to-day technical supervision and implementation management of GRD’s plan to bring Units 5 and 6 online ...telephone, mail, fax, and online contacts from people in Iraq, the United States, and throughout the world. Second quarter Reporting As of June 30, 2007...Investigative Task Force for Iraq Reconstruction SPOC Sector Project and Contracting Office Contractor TAMU Texas A&M University TBI Trade Bank of Iraq

  14. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (11th Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Kreycik, C.; Friedman, B.

    2008-10-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. It presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets and green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. Key market trends and issues are also discussed.

  15. Green Power Marketing in the United States. A Status Report (11th Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kreycik, Claire [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Friedman, Barry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. It presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets and green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. Key market trends and issues are also discussed.

  16. Wellness Coaching Outcomes in a Case Report of a Diabetic Native American Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Medically referred wellness coaching clients may present thinking patterns that generate internal resistance to change, including lack of urgency, inadequate incentives, and uncertainty about what they need to do differently.1 Applying the Wellcoaches (Wellcoaches Corp, Wellesley, Massachusetts) model interventions within a framework of the four domains of learning (cognitive, affective, behavioral, and conative)2 can enhance wellness coaching outcomes. This case report reviews wellness coaching outcomes with a 44-year-old single male tribal member of a Midwest Native American tribe who recently had been diagnosed with diabetes. Challenges presented by resistance to change and a discussion of the four domains of learning applied to wellness coaching are also reported. PMID:24278846

  17. Rationale for Using Social Media to Collect Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kt; Harris, Merissa; Khavari, Nasim; Khosla, Chaitan

    2014-02-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are increasingly interconnected through social media, exchanging patient experiences and health-tracking information between individuals through various web-based platforms. Social media represents potentially unique communication interface between gastroenterologists and active social media users - especially young adults and adolescents with celiac disease-regarding adherence to the strict gluten-free diet, gastrointestinal symptoms, and meaningful discussion about disease management. Yet, various social media platforms may be underutilized for research purposes to collect patient-reported outcomes data. In this commentary, we summarize the scientific rationale and potential for future growth of social media in patient-reported outcomes research, focusing on college freshmen with celiac disease as a case study and provide overview of the methodological approach. Finally, we discuss how social media may impact patient care in the future through increasing mobile technology use.

  18. Clinical outcomes from a foam wedge splinting program for axillary contracture prevention in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godleski, Matthew; Holden, Mary Sullivan; Luby, Darcie; Weitzenkamp, David; Boimbo, Sandra; Lindberg, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Preventing scar contracture after burn injury is a critical goal during recovery. Although the need for intervention is well-understood, data on specific techniques are limited. The study's objective is to provide data for the use of a foam abduction wedge in terms of safety, effectiveness, and patient and caregiver satisfaction through a prospective, single-arm trial. All patients presenting with a burn injury that required grafting in the axillary region and placed them at risk for shoulder joint contracture were offered inclusion. Patient outcomes were recorded for the duration of their burn intensive care unit admission. Ten subjects completed the protocol with a mean duration of wedge use of 41.5 ± 32.5 days. At discharge, the mean shoulder abduction was 132° ± 38° on the left and 118° ± 22° on the right. The mean shoulder flexion was 132° ± 31° on the left and 123° ± 29° on the right. As much as 90% of the subjects had greater than 90° of shoulder abduction and flexion at discharge. There were no observations of worsening burn injury wounds, graft failure, or new pressure-related wounds. One patient was found to have an upper-extremity peripheral nerve injury that was not clearly associated with the splint. Patient and nursing surveys indicated areas of satisfaction as well as areas for potential improvement. This study illustrates the anticipated clinical outcomes and care issues associated with the use of a specific contracture prevention method used in the burn intensive care unit setting as well as identifying areas for future research.

  19. Accounting for Diversity in Suicide Research: Sampling and Sample Reporting Practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Christine B; Tezanos, Katherine M; Peros, Olivia M; Ng, Mei Yi; Ribeiro, Jessica D; Nock, Matthew K; Franklin, Joseph C

    2017-03-09

    Research on suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STB) has identified many risk factors, but whether these findings generalize to diverse populations remains unclear. We review longitudinal studies on STB risk factors over the past 50 years in the United States and evaluate the methodological practices of sampling and reporting sample characteristics. We found that articles frequently reported participant age and sex, less frequently reported participant race and ethnicity, and rarely reported participant veteran status or lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender status. Sample reporting practices modestly and inconsistently improved over time. Finally, articles predominantly featured White, non-Hispanic, young adult samples.

  20. Relationship of patient-reported outcomes with MRI measures in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul;

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed whether MRI measures of synovitis, osteitis and bone erosion were associated with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in a longitudinal clinical trial setting among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: This longitudinal cohort of 291 patients with RA was derived from...... across treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: MRI measures of inflammation and structural damage correlate independently with physical function, pain and patient global assessments. These observations support the validity of MRI biomarkers. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00264537; Post-results....

  1. Training clinicians in how to use patient-reported outcome measures in routine clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Santana, MJ; Haverman, L; Absolom, K; Takeuchi, E.; Feeny, D; Grootenhuis, M; Velikova, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) were originally developed for comparing groups of people in clinical trials and population studies, and the results were used to support treatment recommendations or inform health policy, but there was not direct benefit for the participants providing PROs data. However, as the experience in using those measures increased, it became obvious the clinical value in using individual patient PROs profiles in daily practice to identify/monitor ...

  2. A Fatal Outcome of Rhino-orbito-cerebral Mucormycosis Following Tooth Extraction: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaleb, Hesham Y Abdel; Mohamed, Mostafa S; Mobarak, Fahmy A

    2015-01-01

    Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis is an uncommon aggressive life-threatening opportunistic fungal infection that affects mainly the immunocompromised population with mortality rate up to 50%. Due to its aggressive nature, early detection and prompt management are of great importance for a good prognosis. Our report describes a fatal outcome of a case of rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis following tooth extraction in an uncontrolled non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patient after 14 days of admission.

  3. Phragmites australis management in the United States: 40 years of methods and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Eric L G; Mozdzer, Thomas J; Burdick, David M; Kettenring, Karin M; Whigham, Dennis F

    2014-01-01

    Studies on invasive plant management are often short in duration and limited in the methods tested, and lack an adequate description of plant communities that replace the invader following removal. Here we present a comprehensive review of management studies on a single species, in an effort to elucidate future directions for research in invasive plant management. We reviewed the literature on Phragmites management in North America in an effort to synthesize our understanding of management efforts, identify gaps in knowledge and improve the efficacy of management. Additionally, we assessed recent ecological findings concerning Phragmites mechanisms of invasion and integrated these findings into our recommendations for more effective management. Our overall goal is to examine whether or not current management approaches can be improved and whether they promote reestablishment of native plant communities. We found: (i) little information on community-level recovery of vegetation following removal of Phragmites; and (ii) most management approaches focus on the removal of Phragmites from individual stands or groups of stands over a relatively small area. With a few exceptions, recovery studies did not monitor vegetation for substantial durations, thus limiting adequate evaluation of the recovery trajectory. We also found that none of the recovery studies were conducted in a landscape context, even though it is now well documented that land-use patterns on adjacent habitats influence the structure and function of wetlands, including the expansion of Phragmites. We suggest that Phragmites management needs to shift to watershed-scale efforts in coastal regions, or larger management units inland. In addition, management efforts should focus on restoring native plant communities, rather than simply eradicating Phragmites stands. Wetlands and watersheds should be prioritized to identify ecosystems that would benefit most from Phragmites management and those where the

  4. Incidence, determinants, and outcome of chronic kidney disease after adult heart transplantation in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Helen L; Banner, Nicholas R; Murphy, Cara L; Steenkamp, Retha; Birch, Rhiannon; Fogarty, Damian G; Bonser, And Robert S

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the United Kingdom heart transplant population, identified risk factors for the development of CKD, and assessed the impact of CKD on subsequent survival. Data from the UK Cardiothoracic Transplant Audit and UK Renal Registry were linked for 1732 adult heart transplantations, 1996 to 2007. Factors influencing time to CKD, defined as National Kidney Foundation CKD stage 4 or 5 or preemptive kidney transplantation, were identified using a Cox proportional hazards model. The effects of distinct CKD stages on survival were evaluated using time-dependent covariates. A total of 3% of patients had CKD at transplantation, 11% at 1-year and more than 15% at 6 years posttransplantation and beyond. Earlier transplantations, shorter ischemia times, female, older, hepatitis C virus positive, and diabetic recipients were at increased risk of developing CKD, along with those with impaired renal function pretransplantation or early posttransplantation. Significant differences between transplantation centers were also observed. The risk of death was significantly higher for patients at CKD stage 4, stage 5 (excluding dialysis), or on dialysis, compared with equivalent patients surviving to the same time point with CKD stage 3 or lower (hazard ratios of 1.66, 8.54, and 4.07, respectively). CKD is a common complication of heart transplantation in the UK, and several risk factors identified in other studies are also relevant in this population. By linking national heart transplantation and renal data, we have determined the impact of CKD stage and dialysis treatment on subsequent survival in heart transplant recipients.

  5. Development of the AOSpine Patient Reported Outcome Spine Trauma (AOSpine PROST) : A universal disease-specific outcome instrument for individuals with traumatic spinal column injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadiqi, Said; Lehr, A. Mechteld; Post, Marcel W.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Kandziora, Frank; Rajasekaran, S.; Schnake, Klaus J.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Oner, F. Cumhur

    2017-01-01

    To report on the multi-phase process used in developing the AOSpine Patient Reported Outcome Spine Trauma (AOSpine PROST), as well as the results of its application in a pilot study. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) methodology was used as the basis for th

  6. The German CPU Registry: Dyspnea independently predicts negative short-term outcome in patients admitted to German Chest Pain Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellenkamp, Kristian; Darius, Harald; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Erbel, Raimund; Haude, Michael; Hamm, Christian; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Heusch, Gerd; Mudra, Harald; Münzel, Thomas; Schmitt, Claus; Schumacher, Burghard; Senges, Jochen; Voigtländer, Thomas; Maier, Lars S

    2015-02-15

    While dyspnea is a common symptom in patients admitted to Chest Pain Units (CPUs) little is known about the impact of dyspnea on their outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of dyspnea on the short-term outcome of CPU patients. We analyzed data from a total of 9169 patients admitted to one of the 38 participating CPUs in this registry between December 2008 and January 2013. Only patients who underwent coronary angiography for suspected ACS were included. 2601 patients (28.4%) presented with dyspnea. Patients with dyspnea at admission were older and frequently had a wide range of comorbidities compared to patients without dyspnea. Heart failure symptoms in particular were more common in patients with dyspnea (21.0% vs. 5.3%, pCPU patients. Our data show that dyspnea is associated with a fourfold higher 3month mortality which is underestimated by the established ACS risk scores. To improve their predictive value we therefore propose to add dyspnea as an item to common risk scores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Symptom Monitoring With Patient-Reported Outcomes During Routine Cancer Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Deal, Allison M; Kris, Mark G; Scher, Howard I; Hudis, Clifford A; Sabbatini, Paul; Rogak, Lauren; Bennett, Antonia V; Dueck, Amylou C; Atkinson, Thomas M; Chou, Joanne F; Dulko, Dorothy; Sit, Laura; Barz, Allison; Novotny, Paul; Fruscione, Michael; Sloan, Jeff A; Schrag, Deborah

    2016-02-20

    There is growing interest to enhance symptom monitoring during routine cancer care using patient-reported outcomes, but evidence of impact on clinical outcomes is limited. We randomly assigned patients receiving routine outpatient chemotherapy for advanced solid tumors at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center to report 12 common symptoms via tablet computers or to receive usual care consisting of symptom monitoring at the discretion of clinicians. Those with home computers received weekly e-mail prompts to report between visits. Treating physicians received symptom printouts at visits, and nurses received e-mail alerts when participants reported severe or worsening symptoms. The primary outcome was change in health-related quality of life (HRQL) at 6 months compared with baseline, measured by the EuroQol EQ-5D Index. Secondary endpoints included emergency room (ER) visits, hospitalizations, and survival. Among 766 patients allocated, HRQL improved among more participants in the intervention group than usual care (34% v 18%) and worsened among fewer (38% v 53%; P < .001). Overall, mean HRQL declined by less in the intervention group than usual care (1.4- v 7.1-point drop; P < .001). Patients receiving intervention were less frequently admitted to the ER (34% v 41%; P = .02) or hospitalized (45% v 49%; P = .08) and remained on chemotherapy longer (mean, 8.2 v 6.3 months; P = .002). Although 75% of the intervention group was alive at 1 year, 69% with usual care survived the year (P = .05), with differences also seen in quality-adjusted survival (mean of 8.7 v. 8.0 months; P = .004). Benefits were greater for participants lacking prior computer experience. Most patients receiving intervention (63%) reported severe symptoms during the study. Nurses frequently initiated clinical actions in response to e-mail alerts. Clinical benefits were associated with symptom self-reporting during cancer care. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. A 14-year retrospective maternal report of alcohol consumption in pregnancy predicts pregnancy and teen outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, John H; Chiodo, Lisa M; Sokol, Robert J; Janisse, James; Ager, Joel W; Greenwald, Mark K; Delaney-Black, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Detecting patterns of maternal drinking that place fetuses at risk for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) is critical to diagnosis, treatment, and prevention but is challenging because information on antenatal drinking collected during pregnancy is often insufficient or lacking. Although retrospective assessments have been considered less favored by many researchers due to presumed poor reliability, this perception may be inaccurate because of reduced maternal denial and/or distortion. The present study hypothesized that fetal alcohol exposure, as assessed retrospectively during child adolescence, would be related significantly to prior measures of maternal drinking and would predict alcohol-related behavioral problems in teens better than antenatal measures of maternal alcohol consumption. Drinking was assessed during pregnancy, and retrospectively about the same pregnancy, at a 14-year follow-up in 288 African-American women using well-validated semistructured interviews. Regression analysis examined the predictive validity of both drinking assessments on pregnancy outcomes and on teacher-reported teen behavior outcomes. Retrospective maternal self-reported drinking assessed 14 years postpartum was significantly higher than antenatal reports of consumption. Retrospective report identified 10.8 times more women as risk drinkers (≥ one drink per day) than the antenatal report. Antenatal and retrospective reports were moderately correlated and both were correlated with the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test. Self-reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy based on retrospective report identified significantly more teens exposed prenatally to at-risk alcohol levels than antenatal, in-pregnancy reports. Retrospective report predicted more teen behavior problems (e.g., attention problems and externalizing behaviors) than the antenatal report. Antenatal report predicted younger gestational age at birth and retrospective report predicted smaller birth size

  9. Content validity of patient-reported outcome measures: perspectives from a PROMIS meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magasi, Susan; Ryan, Gery; Revicki, Dennis; Lenderking, William; Hays, Ron D; Brod, Meryl; Snyder, Claire; Boers, Maarten; Cella, David

    2012-06-01

    Content validity of patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) has been a focus of debate since the 2006 publication of the U.S. FDA Draft Guidance for Industry in Patient Reported Outcome Measurement. Under the auspices of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative, a working meeting on content validity was convened with leading PRO measurement experts. Platform presentations and participant discussion highlighted key issues in the content validity debate, including inconsistency in the definition and evaluation of content validity, the need for empirical research to support methodological approaches to the evaluation of content validity, and concerns that continual re-evaluation of content validity slows the pace of science and leads to the proliferation of study-specific PROs. We advocate an approach to the evaluation of content validity, which includes meticulously documented qualitative and advanced quantitative methods. To advance the science of content validity in PROs, we recommend (1) development of a consensus definition of content validity; (2) development of content validity guidelines that delineate the role of qualitative and quantitative methods and the integration of multiple perspectives; (3) empirical evaluation of generalizability of content validity across applications; and (4) use of generic measures as the foundation for PROs assessment.

  10. Introduction of an acute surgical unit: comparison of performance indicators and outcomes for operative management of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancashire, John F; Steele, M; Parker, D; Puhalla, H

    2014-08-01

    The Acute Surgical Unit (ASU) is a recent change in management of acute general surgical patients in hospitals worldwide. In contrast to traditional management of acute surgical presentations by a rotating on-call system, ASUs are shown to deliver improved efficiency and patient outcomes. This study investigated the impact of an ASU on operative management of appendicitis, the most common acute surgical presentation, by comparing performance indicators and patient outcomes prior to and after introduction of an ASU at the Gold Coast Hospital, Queensland, Australia. A retrospective study of patients admitted from the Emergency Department (ED) and who underwent emergency appendectomy from February 2010 to January 2011 (pre-ASU) and after introduction of the ASU from February 2011 to January 2012 (post-ASU). A total of 548 patients underwent appendectomy between February 2010 and January 2012, comprising 247 pre-ASU and 301 post-ASU patients. Significant improvements were demonstrated: reduced time to surgical review, fewer complications arising from operations commencing during ASU in-hours, and more appendectomies performed during the daytime attended by the consultant. There was no significant difference in total cost of admission or total admission length of stay. This study demonstrated that ASUs have potential to significantly improve the outcomes for operative management of acute appendicitis compared to the traditional on-call model. The impact of the ASU was limited by access to theaters and restricted ASU operation hours. Further investigation of site-specific determinants could be beneficial to optimize this new model of acute surgical care.

  11. STUDY OF VENTILATOR ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA IN NEONATAL INTESIVE CARE UNIT: CHARACTERISTICS, RISK FACTORS AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Shalini Tripathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP, the nosocomial pneumonia developing in mechanically ventilated patients after 48 hours of mechanical ventilation, is the second most common nosocomial infection. Therefore, there is a vital need to study the etiology and risk factors associated with VAP in neonates. Neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, over a period of 1 year and who required mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours were enrolled consecutively into the study. Diagnosis of VAP was made by the guidelines given by National Nosocomial infection Surveillance System (NNIS, 1996. Semi-quantitative assay of endotracheal aspirate was used for microbiological diagnoses of VAP. 105CFU/ml was taken as the cut off between evidence of pathological infection and colonization. The risk factors such as birth weight, prematurity (gestational age < 37 weeks, duration of mechanical ventilation, number of reintubations, length of hospital stay, primary diagnosis of neonate, postnatal age and small for gestational age (SGA were studied for the development of VAP. Risk factors found significant on bivariate analysis were subjected to multiple regression analysis to determine the most important predictors of VAP. The study group comprised of 98 neonates out of which, 30 neonates developed VAP (30.6%. VAP rates were 37.2 per 1000 days of mechanical ventilation. Most common bacterial isolated from endotracheal aspirate of VAP patients was Klebsiella spp (32.8%, E.coli (23.2% and Acinetobacter (17.8% being the other two common organisms. Very low birth weight (< 1500 grams, prematurity (gestational age < 37 week, duration of mechanical ventilation, number of reintubations and length of NICU stay were significantly associated with VAP in bivariate analysis. Multiple regression analysis revealed that duration of mechanical ventilation (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02, 1.21; P = 0.021 and very low birth weight (OR 3.88, 95% CI 1.05, 14.34; P = 0.042 were

  12. Distance between residence and the dialysis unit does not impact self-perceived outcomes in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Paulo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients have to travel long distances to undergo hemodialysis (HD in some regions. We aimed to search for an association of the distance between patients’ residence and the dialysis unit with quality of life, depression and coping among end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients undergoing maintenance HD. Methods We studied 161 ESRD patients undergoing HD during April 2009. Quality of life, depression and coping were assessed by the SF-36, the 10-item CES-D and the Jalowiec Coping Scale, respectively. The sample was stratified in three groups: I-patients residing in Sobral (where the dialysis unit is located; II-patients residing in towns up to 100 km from Sobral; and III-patients residing in towns distant greater than 100 km from Sobral. Analysis of variance was used to detect differences in quality of life and coping scores between the groups. Logistic regression was used to test distance as a predictor of depression. Results There were 47 (29.2% patients residing in Sobral, 46 (28.6% up to 100 km away and 68 (42.2% greater than 100 km from Sobral. There were no differences related to quality of life and coping scores between the groups. Distance was not a predictor of depression. Conclusions Social and cultural factors may explain the lack of differences. Studies from other regions are needed to clarify the distance effects on self-perceived outcomes among HD patients.

  13. Patient profile and outcome of pilomatrixoma in district general hospital in United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud AbdelDayem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A pilomatrixoma is a benign appendage tumour related to hair cells matrix. Most of the literature review about pilomatrixoma is in the form of case reports with fewer cohort studies. The objective of this cohort is to study the variable demographic characteristics, presentation and histopathology of this condition among a larger group of patients. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients who had excision of pilomatrixoma between February 1998 and August 2011 in a District General Hospital in UK. Results: The study included 67 patients with histopathologically diagnosed pilomatrixoma. The mean age was 32 years. Male to Female ratio was 35:32. The average diameter of the lesion at presentation was 13 mm (range: 2-30 mm. 66 of 67 (98.5% patients presented with solitary lesion, while 1 patient (1.5% had two lesions. Conclusion: Pilomatrixoma is not an uncommon benign lesion. It is more common in the maxillofacial area.

  14. A proposed set of metrics for standardized outcome reporting in the management of low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, R Carter; Welander, Adina; Stowell, Caleb; Cha, Thomas D; Chen, John L; Davies, Michelle; Fairbank, Jeremy C; Foley, Kevin T; Gehrchen, Martin; Hagg, Olle; Jacobs, Wilco C; Kahler, Richard; Khan, Safdar N; Lieberman, Isador H; Morisson, Beth; Ohnmeiss, Donna D; Peul, Wilco C; Shonnard, Neal H; Smuck, Matthew W; Solberg, Tore K; Stromqvist, Bjorn H; Hooff, Miranda L Van; Wasan, Ajay D; Willems, Paul C; Yeo, William; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Outcome measurement has been shown to improve performance in several fields of healthcare. This understanding has driven a growing interest in value-based healthcare, where value is defined as outcomes achieved per money spent. While low back pain (LBP) constitutes an enormous burden of disease, no universal set of metrics has yet been accepted to measure and compare outcomes. Here, we aim to define such a set. Patients and methods An international group of 22 specialists in several disciplines of spine care was assembled to review literature and select LBP outcome metrics through a 6-round modified Delphi process. The scope of the outcome set was degenerative lumbar conditions. Results Patient-reported metrics include numerical pain scales, lumbar-related function using the Oswestry disability index, health-related quality of life using the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire, and questions assessing work status and analgesic use. Specific common and serious complications are included. Recommended follow-up intervals include 6, 12, and 24 months after initiating treatment, with optional follow-up at 3 months and 5 years. Metrics for risk stratification are selected based on pre-existing tools. Interpretation The outcome measures recommended here are structured around specific etiologies of LBP, span a patient’s entire cycle of care, and allow for risk adjustment. Thus, when implemented, this set can be expected to facilitate meaningful comparisons and ultimately provide a continuous feedback loop, enabling ongoing improvements in quality of care. Much work lies ahead in implementation, revision, and validation of this set, but it is an essential first step toward establishing a community of LBP providers focused on maximizing the value of the care we deliver. PMID:25828191

  15. Outcome reporting in randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses of appendicitis treatments in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nigel J; Kapadia, Mufiza Z; Eaton, Simon; Chan, Winnie W Y; Nickel, Cheri; Pierro, Agostino; Offringa, Martin

    2015-06-17

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in children. Despite this, there is no core outcome set (COS) described for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in children with appendicitis and hence no consensus regarding outcome selection, definition and reporting. We aimed to identify outcomes currently reported in studies of paediatric appendicitis. Using a defined, sensitive search strategy, we identified RCTs and systematic reviews (SRs) of treatment interventions in children with appendicitis. Included studies were all in English and investigated the effect of one or more treatment interventions in children with acute appendicitis or undergoing appendicectomy for presumed acute appendicitis. Studies were reviewed and data extracted by two reviewers. Primary (if defined) and all other outcomes were recorded and assigned to the core areas 'Death', 'Pathophysiological Manifestations', 'Life Impact', 'Resource Use' and 'Adverse Events', using OMERACT Filter 2.0. A total of 63 studies met the inclusion criteria reporting outcomes from 51 RCTs and nine SRs. Only 25 RCTs and four SRs defined a primary outcome. A total of 115 unique and different outcomes were identified. RCTs reported a median of nine outcomes each (range 1 to 14). The most frequently reported outcomes were wound infection (43 RCTs, nine SRs), intra-peritoneal abscess (41 RCTs, seven SRs) and length of stay (35 RCTs, six SRs) yet all three were reported in just 25 RCTs and five SRs. Common outcomes had multiple different definitions or were frequently not defined. Although outcomes were reported within all core areas, just one RCT and no SR reported outcomes for all core areas. Outcomes assigned to the 'Death' and 'Life Impact' core areas were reported least frequently (in six and 15 RCTs respectively). There is a wide heterogeneity in the selection and definition of outcomes in paediatric appendicitis, and little overlap in outcomes used across studies. A paucity of studies report patient

  16. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Tenth Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Dagher, L.; Swezey, B.

    2007-12-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States, focusing on consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied from renewable energy sources and how this choice represents a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. The report presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets, on green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, and green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. It also includes a discussion of key market trends and issues.

  17. Green Power Marketing in the United States. A Status Report (Tenth Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dagher, Leila [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Swezey, Blair [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2007-12-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States, focusing on consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied from renewable energy sources and how this choice represents a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. The report presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets, on green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, and green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. It also includes a discussion of key market trends and issues.

  18. Outcome of Holiday and Nonholiday Admission Patients with Acute Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A Real-World Report from Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Chin Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent findings suggest that patients admitted on the weekend with peptic ulcer bleeding might be at increased risk of adverse outcomes. However, other reports found that there was no “holiday effect.” The purpose of this study was to determine if these findings hold true for a real-life Taiwanese medical gastroenterology practice. Materials and Methods. We reviewed the medical files of hospital admissions for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who received initial endoscopic hemostasis between January 2009 and March 2011. A total of 744 patients were enrolled (nonholiday group, n=615; holiday group, n=129 after applying strict exclusion criteria. Holidays were defined as weekends and national holidays in Taiwan. Results. Our results showed that there was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between the two groups. We also observed that, compared to the nonholiday group, patients in the holiday group received earlier endoscopy treatment (12.20 hours versus 16.68 hours, P=0.005, needed less transfused blood (4.8 units versus 6.6 units, P=0.02, shifted from intravenous to oral proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs more quickly (5.3 days versus 6.9 days, P=0.05, and had shorter hospital stays (13.05 days versus 17.36 days, P=0.005. In the holiday and nonholiday groups, the rebleeding rates were 17.8% and 23.41% (P=0.167, the mortality rates were 11.63% versus 13.66% (P=0.537, and surgery was required in 2.11% versus 4.66% (P=0.093, respectively. Conclusions. Patients who presented with peptic ulcer bleeding on holidays did not experience delayed endoscopy or increased adverse outcomes. In fact, patients who received endoscopic hemostasis on the holiday had shorter waiting times, needed less transfused blood, switched to oral PPIs quicker, and experienced shorter hospital stays.

  19. Preferred reporting items for studies mapping onto preference-based outcome measures: The MAPS statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Stavros; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Dakin, Helen; Longworth, Louise; Oppe, Mark; Froud, Robert; Gray, Alastair

    2015-08-01

    'Mapping' onto generic preference-based outcome measures is increasingly being used as a means of generating health utilities for use within health economic evaluations. Despite publication of technical guides for the conduct of mapping research, guidance for the reporting of mapping studies is currently lacking. The MAPS (MApping onto Preference-based measures reporting Standards) statement is a new checklist, which aims to promote complete and transparent reporting of mapping studies. The primary audiences for the MAPS statement are researchers reporting mapping studies, the funders of the research, and peer reviewers and editors involved in assessing mapping studies for publication.A de novo list of 29 candidate reporting items and accompanying explanations was created by a working group comprised of six health economists and one Delphi methodologist. Following a two-round, modified Delphi survey with representatives from academia, consultancy, health technology assessment agencies and the biomedical journal editorial community, a final set of 23 items deemed essential for transparent reporting, and accompanying explanations, was developed. The items are contained in a user friendly 23 item checklist. They are presented numerically and categorised within six sections, namely: (i) title and abstract; (ii) introduction; (iii) methods; (iv) results; (v) discussion; and (vi) other. The MAPS statement is best applied in conjunction with the accompanying MAPS explanation and elaboration document.It is anticipated that the MAPS statement will improve the clarity, transparency and completeness of reporting of mapping studies. To facilitate dissemination and uptake, the MAPS statement is being co-published by eight health economics and quality of life journals, and broader endorsement is encouraged. The MAPS working group plans to assess the need for an update of the reporting checklist in five years' time.This statement was published jointly in Applied Health Economics

  20. Technical evaluation of RETS-required reports for Fort Calhoun Station Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, E.H.; Young, T.E.

    1985-06-24

    A review of the reports required by federal regulations and the plant-specific Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) for operations conducted during 1983 was performed. The periodic reports reviewed for Fort Calhoun Station Unit 1 were two Semiannual Reports for Technical Specification 5.9.4. The principal review guidelines were the plant's specific RETS, NUREG-0133, ''Preparation of Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Nuclear Power Plants'', and NRC Guidance on the Review of the Process Control Programs. The Licensee's submitted reports were found to be reasonably complete and consistent with the review guidelines. 4 refs.

  1. Culture and health reporting: a comparative content analysis of newspapers in the United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Peng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Health reporting has the potential to educate the public and promote health behaviors. Culture influences the style of such communication. Following the theorization of national cultures by Hofstede and Hofstede (2005) and Wilber (2000), this study compares health reporting in the United States and China through a content analysis of leading newspapers. The authors discover significant differences in health reporting in terms of controllability attribution, temporal orientation, citation of authority sources, and use of statistics. As one of the first comparative content analysis studies of health reporting in Eastern and Western cultures, this study provides a unique cultural lens for health communication scholars to better understand health information in the news media.

  2. The Cervical Dystonia Impact Profile (CDIP-58: Can a Rasch developed patient reported outcome measure satisfy traditional psychometric criteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia Kailash P

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA are currently producing guidelines for the scientific adequacy of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs in clinical trials, which will have implications for the selection of scales used in future clinical trials. In this study, we examine how the Cervical Dystonia Impact Profile (CDIP-58, a rigorous Rasch measurement developed neurologic PROM, stands up to traditional psychometric criteria for three reasons: 1 provide traditional psychometric evidence for the CDIP-58 in line with proposed FDA guidelines; 2 enable researchers and clinicians to compare it with existing dystonia PROMs; and 3 help researchers and clinicians bridge the knowledge gap between old and new methods of reliability and validity testing. Methods We evaluated traditional psychometric properties of data quality, scaling assumptions, targeting, reliability and validity in a group of 391 people with CD. The main outcome measures used were the CDIP-58, Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36, the 28-item General Health Questionnaire, and Hospital and Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results A total of 391 people returned completed questionnaires (corrected response rate 87%. Analyses showed: 1 data quality was high (low missing data ≤ 4%, subscale scores could be computed for > 96% of the sample; 2 item groupings passed tests for scaling assumptions; 3 good targeting (except for the Sleep subscale, ceiling effect = 27%; 4 good reliability (Cronbach's alpha ≥ 0.92, test-retest intraclass correlations ≥ 0.83; and 5 validity was supported. Conclusion This study has shown that new psychometric methods can produce a PROM that stands up to traditional criteria and supports the clinical advantages of Rasch analysis.

  3. "Not just little adults": qualitative methods to support the development of pediatric patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Rob; Abetz-Webb, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) have issued incentives and laws mandating clinical research in pediatrics. While guidances for the development and validation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) or health-related quality of life (HRQL) measures have been issued by these agencies, little attention has focused on pediatric PRO development methods. With reference to the literature, this article provides an overview of specific considerations that should be made with regard to the development of pediatric PRO measures, with a focus on performing qualitative research to ensure content validity. Throughout the questionnaire development process it is critical to use developmentally appropriate language and techniques to ensure outcomes have content validity, and will be reliable and valid within narrow age bands (0-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-11, 12-14, 15-17 years). For qualitative research, sample sizes within those age bands must be adequate to demonstrate saturation while taking into account children's rapid growth and development. Interview methods, interview guides, and length of interview must all take developmental stage into account. Drawings, play-doh, or props can be used to engage the child. Care needs to be taken during cognitive debriefing, where repeated questioning can lead a child to change their answers, due to thinking their answer is incorrect. For the PROs themselves, the greatest challenge is in measuring outcomes in children aged 5-8 years. In this age range, while self-report is generally more valid, parent reports of observable behaviors are generally more reliable. As such, 'team completion' or a parent-administered child report is often the best option for children aged 5-8 years. For infants and very young children (aged 0-4 years), patient rating of observable behaviors is necessary, and, for adolescents and children aged 9 years and older, self-reported outcomes are generally valid and reliable. In conclusion, the development of PRO

  4. Patients With Burns Versus Patients With Complex Skin and Soft-Tissue Disease: An Analysis of Outcomes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximus, Steven; Phelan, Michael; Joe, Victor C

    2016-01-01

    With the incidence of burns decreasing nationally, burn units are caring for more patients with nonburn conditions. The American Burn Association National Burn Repository does not currently report data regarding patients cared for in burn units without a diagnosis of burn. Using the National Inpatient Sample, we examined if there was a difference in characteristics and outcomes of patients admitted for burns compared with those with a primary admitting diagnosis of necrotizing skin infections and soft-tissue infections and exfoliative skin conditions. This is a retrospective study querying the National Inpatient Sample database to identify 56,102 patients from 2007 to 2012 who were admitted with a diagnosis of a burn (burn group). This group was then compared with 375,857 patients who had a primary admitting diagnosis of a necrotizing skin and/or soft-tissue infection or exfoliative skin conditions (nonburn group). Clinical and demographic variables were analyzed to determine characteristics of each patient group including length of stay, disposition, complications, comorbidities, and mortality. The average age of the nonburn group was 63.7 years, whereas the average age of the burn group was 40.1 years. Overall length of stay was higher in the nonburn patients than in burn patients (10.5 vs 8.4 days, P Burn patients were more likely to undergo a major operating room procedure (39.3% vs 28.1%) and routine discharge (68.4% vs 26.3%) compared with the nonburn group. Patients with necrotizing skin and soft-tissue infections and exfoliative skin conditions are older, have more comorbidities, higher complication rates, and higher mortality rates than burn patients. Given these findings, burn units may need to adjust their resource utilization, competencies, and research priorities to improve the quality of care being delivered to these two different populations.

  5. Democratic discussion in newspaper reporting of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Robbie

    2008-10-01

    This article presents a Habermasian analysis of newspaper reporting of the debate surrounding the effect of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement (the FTA) on access to medicines through Australian patent law. Habermas's concept of the public sphere is utilised in determining whether discussion within the print media adequately conveyed complex legal issues to the public and facilitated democratic discussion. It was found that newspaper reporting generally failed to meet this standard.

  6. Engineering report on the Grayburg Cooperative and unit area, Eddy County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, John A.; Soyster, Merwin H.

    1945-01-01

    This report covers the area committed to the Grayburg Cooperative and Unit Agreement (I-Sec. 370) approved by the Assistant Secretary of the Interior on October 5, 1943, hereafter referred to as the "unit area", embracing 4,769.44 acres of public land in T. 17 S., Rs. 29 and 30 E., Eddy County, New Mexico. The area includes portions of the Anderson, Grayburg-Jackson, and Leonard oil fields as defined for proration purposes by the New Mexico Oil Conservation Commission. The unit area is covered by Federal oil and gas leases owned by the Grayburg Oil Company of New Mexico and the Western Production Company, Inc. The Grayburg Unit Association has been formed and designated to conduct and manage all operations in the unit area. As of December 31, 1943, there were forty-six producing oil wells within the unit area. The report has been prepared for the purpose of assisting the Grayburg Unit Association in determining the proper locations of gas-injection wells and the best methods for future operation of the pressure-maintenance system that is being installed for the purpose of retarding the reservoir pressure decline and increasing the ultimate recovery of oil from the Grayburg Zone defined in the above-mentioned agreement as formations not more than 3300 feet below the surface. Data used in the report were obtained from records on file in the Geological Survey office at Roswell, New Mexico, and from the records of the Western Production Company and the Grayburg Oil Company. All data were carefully checked as to accuracy with engineers and field representatives of both companies.

  7. Number of patients needed to discriminate between subgroups in patient reported outcome measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Aksel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patient reported outcome-measures (PROs) are increasingly used in orthopedics. Information on number of patients needed in different settings is warranted. Aim: To assess the number of patients needed for different PROs to discriminate between subgroups of age, gender, and diagnosis...... with sample size calculations or by power calculations and simulated ANOVA F tests, depending on the number of groups. Results: To discriminate between gender, the least number needed to find a statistically significant difference in mean sum score in each group was 298 (OHS) while HOOS QoL required the most....... Methods: 5777 primary THA patients, operated 1‐2, 5‐6, and 10‐11 years ago. SF‐12 Health Survey (SF-12), EQ-5D, Oxford 12‐item Hip Score (OHS), and Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) were included. The different PRO subscales abilities to discriminate between groups were studied using...

  8. Muscle function is associated with future patient-reported outcomes in young adults with ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flosadottir, Vala; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Consequences of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury include worse patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and a decrease in activity level. Muscle function can be improved by targeted exercise. Our aims were to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among lower...... extremity muscle function and PROs after ACL injury. METHODS: Fifty-four participants (15 women, mean 30 years) with ACL injury or reconstruction, from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) trial (ISRCTN84752559), were assessed with hop performance, muscle power...... and postural orientation 3 years (SD 0.85) after ACL injury. PROs at 3 and 5 years after injury included Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales Function in sport and recreation (KOOS Sport/rec) and Knee-related Quality of life (KOOS QoL), KOOS item Q3 (KOOS Q3), Tegner Activity Scale...

  9. Feasibility of 4 patient-reported outcome measures in a registry setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Aksel; Pedersen, Alma B; Overgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Feasibility is an important parameter when choosing which patient-reported outcomes (PRO) to use in a study. We assessed the feasibility of PROs in a hip registry setting. Methods Primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (n = 5,747) who had been operated on 1-2, 5......-6, or 10-11 years previously were randomly selected from the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register and sent 2 PRO questionnaires: 1 generic (EuroQoL-5D or SF-12 health survey) and 1 disease-specific (hip dysfunction and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS) or Oxford 12-item hip score). We compared response rates......, floor and ceiling effects, missing items, and the need for manual validation of forms. Results 4,784 patients (mean age 71 years, 57% females) were included (83%). The response rates ranged from 82-84%. Statistically significantly different floor and ceiling effects ranged from 0% to 0.5% and from 6...

  10. [Accepted Manuscript] Mechanisms and effects of public reporting of surgeon outcomes: A systematic review of the literature.

    OpenAIRE

    Behrendt, K; Groene, O.

    2016-01-01

    Public reporting of surgeon outcomes has become a key strategy in the English NHS to ensure accountability and improve the quality of care. Much of the evidence that supported the design of the strategy originates from the USA. This report aims to assess how the evidence on public reporting could be harnessed for cross-country translation of this health system strategy; in particular, to gauge the expected results of the UK surgeon outcome initiative and to propose criteria that elucidate tha...

  11. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries Report of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Working Group of the International Society of Arthroplasty Registries Part II. Recommendations for selection, administration, and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfson, Ola; Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia;

    2016-01-01

    - The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common...... of a 1-item pain question ("During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?"; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome ("How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement...

  12. CALiPER Application Summary Report 14. LED Downlight Retrofit Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-03-01

    This CALiPER report analyzes the independently tested performance of 11 anonymously purchased LED downlight retrofit units—referred to as the Series 14 products. All the units were tested in a 6-inch insulation contact (IC) rated downlight housing mounted in a 24-inch by 24-inch insulated enclosure.

  13. Teacher Professional Learning in the United States: Case Studies of State Policies and Strategies. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquith, Ann; Mindich, Dan; Wei, Ruth Chung; Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This report is the third of a three-phase research study of teacher professional learning opportunities in the United States. In this third phase of the research, the authors conducted case studies of four professionally active states to get a deeper look at the policy frameworks that support professional development in those states. These…

  14. Trends in Tuberculosis Reported from the Appalachian Region: United States, 1993-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ryan M.; Armstrong, Lori R.; Pratt, Robert H.; Kammerer, J. Steve; Iademarco, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Appalachia has been characterized by its poverty, a factor associated with tuberculosis, yet little is known about the disease in this region. Purpose: To determine whether Appalachian tuberculosis risk factors, trends, and rates differ from the rest of the United States. Methods: Analysis of tuberculosis cases reported to the Centers for…

  15. Acoustic monitoring systems tests at Indian Point Unit 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.R.; Rao, G.V.; Craig, J.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the results of a program to test acoustic monitoring systems on Indian Point Unit No. 1 under actual plant operating conditions, less the reactor core. The two types of systems evaluated were the monitoring of acoustic emissions generated by growing flaws and the monitoring of acoustic signals from leaks.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: COMM ENGINEERING, USA ENVIRONMENTAL VAPOR RECOVERY UNIT (EVRU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the testing of a new technology that recovers and utilizes vapors from crude oil storage tanks employed in the oil production and processing industry. The COMM Engineering, USA Environmental Vapor Recovery Unit (EVRU) is a non-mechanical eductor, or jet pump...

  17. ANIMAL NUTRITION. PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION UNITS, ANIMAL NUTRITION, FEED CHARACTERISTICS, VITAMINS, MINERALS. FINAL REPORT NUMBER 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LONG, GILBERT A.

    PRINCIPLES AND FACTS NECESSARY FOR EFFECTIVE ANIMAL NUTRITION PRACTICES WERE IDENTIFIED BY EXAMINATION OF RECENT SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. UTILIZING THIS INFORMATION, THE AUTHOR INVOLVED 16 VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND EXPERIMENTAL USE OF A UNIT OF PROGRAMED LEARNING MATERIALS. INSTRUCTIONAL RESULTS WERE NOT AVAILABLE AT THE…

  18. Trends in Tuberculosis Reported from the Appalachian Region: United States, 1993-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ryan M.; Armstrong, Lori R.; Pratt, Robert H.; Kammerer, J. Steve; Iademarco, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Appalachia has been characterized by its poverty, a factor associated with tuberculosis, yet little is known about the disease in this region. Purpose: To determine whether Appalachian tuberculosis risk factors, trends, and rates differ from the rest of the United States. Methods: Analysis of tuberculosis cases reported to the Centers for…

  19. Measuring Immigrant Assimilation in the United States. Civic Report No.53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdor, Jacob L.

    2008-01-01

    This report introduces a quantitative index that measures the degree of similarity between native- and foreign-born adults in the United States: the ability to distinguish the latter group from the former is defined as "assimilation." The Index of Immigrant Assimilation relies on Census Bureau data available in some form since 1900 and…

  20. Searching for Housing as a Battered Woman: Does Discrimination Affect Reported Availability of a Rental Unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Paula C.; Stewart, Donna E.

    2010-01-01

    Individual battered women have reported experiencing housing discrimination, but the extent of this problem has not been examined. This research used two experiments and a survey to determine if landlord discrimination could keep women from accessing rental units. In Study 1, a confederate asked 181 landlords about the availability of a rental…

  1. Advanced secondary recovery demonstration for the Sooner Unit. Annual report, October 1992--May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippel, M.; Junkin, J.; Pritchett, R. [and others

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to demonstrate the effectiveness of a multi-diciplinary approach to targeted infill drilling and improved reservoir management. The first phase involves geophysical, geological, and engineering data acquisition and analysis to identify optimum well sites and to develop a reservoir operations plan. This report summarizes activities concerned with phase I of the Sooner Unit Project.

  2. Psychometric properties of carer-reported outcome measures in palliative care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Charlotte T J; Boulton, Mary; Adams, Astrid; Wee, Bee; Peters, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Informal carers face many challenges in caring for patients with palliative care needs. Selecting suitable valid and reliable outcome measures to determine the impact of caring and carers' outcomes is a common problem. To identify outcome measures used for informal carers looking after patients with palliative care needs, and to evaluate the measures' psychometric properties. A systematic review was conducted. The studies identified were evaluated by independent reviewers (C.T.J.M., M.B., M.P.). Data regarding study characteristics and psychometric properties of the measures were extracted and evaluated. Good psychometric properties indicate a high-quality measure. The search was conducted, unrestricted to publication year, in the following electronic databases: Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index and Sociological Abstracts. Our systematic search revealed 4505 potential relevant studies, of which 112 studies met the inclusion criteria using 38 carer measures for informal carers of patients with palliative care needs. Psychometric properties were reported in only 46% (n = 52) of the studies, in relation to 24 measures. Where psychometric data were reported, the focus was mainly on internal consistency (n = 45, 87%), construct validity (n = 27, 52%) and/or reliability (n = 14, 27%). Of these, 24 measures, only four (17%) had been formally validated in informal carers in palliative care. A broad range of outcome measures have been used for informal carers of patients with palliative care needs. Little formal psychometric testing has been undertaken. Furthermore, development and refinement of measures in this field is required. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Improving a newly developed patient-reported outcome for thyroid patients, using cognitive interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Groenvold, Mogens;

    2008-01-01

    was within the set of problems involving attribution. Conclusion The cognitive interview methodology was effective in identifying and reducing problems within the questionnaire responding process. Patients tended to selectively report problems they considered to be caused by their thyroid disease even when......Objective To improve a newly developed patient-reported outcome measure for thyroid patients using cognitive interviewing. Methods Thirty-one interviews using immediate retrospective and expansive probing were conducted among patients with non-toxic goiter (n = 4), nodular toxic goiter (n = 5.......e. whether or not to report only issues considered of thyroid causality. Within each round of interviews, the number of problems declined from an initial average of six per interview to two, mainly due to a reduction in the number of problems associated with comprehension. The least amount of reduction...

  4. Predictive value of SAPS II and APACHE II scoring systems for patient outcome in a medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Godinjak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim is to determine SAPS II and APACHE II scores in medical intensive care unit (MICU patients, to compare them for prediction of patient outcome, and to compare with actual hospital mortality rates for different subgroups of patients. Methods. One hundred and seventy-four patients were included in this analysis over a oneyear period in the MICU, Clinical Center, University of Sarajevo. The following patient data were obtained: demographics, admission diagnosis, SAPS II, APACHE II scores and final outcome. Results. Out of 174 patients, 70 patients (40.2% died. Mean SAPS II and APACHE II scores in all patients were 48.4±17.0 and 21.6±10.3 respectively, and they were significantly different between survivors and non-survivors. SAPS II >50.5 and APACHE II >27.5 can predict the risk of mortality in these patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the clinical values of SAPS II vs APACHE II (p=0.501. A statistically significant positive correlation was established between the values of SAPS II and APACHE II (r=0.708; p=0.001. Patients with an admission diagnosis of sepsis/septic shock had the highest values of both SAPS II and APACHE II scores, and also the highest hospital mortality rate of 55.1%. Conclusion. Both APACHE II and SAPS II had an excellent ability to discriminate between survivors and non-survivors. There was no significant difference in the clinical values of SAPS II and APACHE II. A positive correlation was established between them. Sepsis/septic shock patients had the highest predicted and observed hospital mortality rate.

  5. Clinical Characteristics and Short-Term Outcomes of HIV Patients Admitted to an African Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Kwizera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In high-income countries, improved survival has been documented among intensive care unit (ICU patients infected with human immune deficiency virus (HIV. There are no data from low-income country ICUs. We sought to identify clinical characteristics and survival outcomes among HIV patients in a low-income country ICU. Materials and Methods. A retrospective cohort study of HIV infected patients admitted to a university teaching hospital ICU in Uganda. Medical records were reviewed. Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Statistical significance was predetermined in reference to P<0.05. Results. There were 101 HIV patients. Average length of ICU stay was 4 days and ICU mortality was 57%. Mortality in non-HIV patients was 28%. Commonest admission diagnoses were Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS (58.4%, multiorgan failure (20.8%, and sepsis (20.8%. The mean Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score was 24. At multivariate analysis, APACHE II (OR 1.24 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4, P=0.01, mechanical ventilation (OR 1.14 (95% CI: 0.09–0.76, P=0.01, and ARDS (OR 4.5 (95% CI: 1.07–16.7, P=0.04 had a statistically significant association with mortality. Conclusion. ICU mortality of HIV patients is higher than in higher income settings and the non-HIV population. ARDS, APACHE II, and need for mechanical ventilation are significantly associated with mortality.

  6. Association between heat shock protein 70 gene polymorphisms and clinical outcomes in intensive care unit patients with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the following study is to evaluate the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70 gene, gene expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- and medical intensive care unit (MICU stay and organ failure in sepsis. Materials and Methods: MICU patients with sepsis were genotyped for rs1061581, rs2227956, rs1008438 and rs1043618 polymorphisms in HSP70 gene using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or allele-specific PCR. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA expression of IL-6 and TNF- were quantitated in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Outcomes were recorded. Results: 108 patients (48 male aged 40.7 ± 16.0 (mean ± standard deviation years included H1N1 infection (36, scrub typhus (29 and urosepsis (12. Seventy-one (65.7% had dysfunction of three or more organ systems, 66 patients (61.1% were treated by mechanical ventilation, 21 (19.4% needed dialysis. ICU stay was 9.3 ± 7.3 days. Mortality was 38.9%. One or more SNPs were noted in 101/108 (93.5% and organ failure was noted in only 1/7 patients without a single SNP. The A allelotypes of rs1061581 and rs1008438 were associated with hematological dysfunction (P = 0.03 and 0.07 and longer ICU stay (P = 0.05 and 0.04, whereas IL-6 and TNF- mRNA levels were associated with central nervous system dysfunction. Conclusions: HSP70 genotypes may determine some adverse outcomes in patients with sepsis.

  7. Study of Characteristics, risk factors and outcome for Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Moradi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP, developing in mechanically ventilated patients after 48 hours of mechanical ventilation, is the second most common nosocomial infection. Therefore, there is a vital need to study the etiology and risk factors associated with VAP in neonates.Methods: Neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, over a period of one year and who required mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours were enrolled consecutively into the study. Semi-quantitative assay of endotracheal aspirate was used for microbiological diagnoses of VAP. 105CFU/ml was taken as the cut off between evidence of pathological infection and colonization. The primary outcome measure was the development of VAP. Secondary outcome measures were length of mechanical ventilation, NICU length of stay, hospital cost, and death.Results: Thirty eight patients were enrolled (58% were boys and 42% were girls. 42% of neonates developed VAP. The most common VAP organisms identified were Acinetobacter baumanni (43%. On multiple regression analysis, duration of mechanical ventilation was associated with VAP (P=0.00. Patients with VAP had greater need for mechanical ventilation (18.7 vs 6 median days, longer NICU length of stay (39 vs 21.5 median days and higher total median hospital costs (79.5 vs 52 million rials than those without VAP. The mortality rate was not different between two groups.Conclusion: In mechanically ventilated neonates, those with VAP had a prolonged need for mechanical ventilation, a longer NICU stay, and a higher hospital costs. Longer mechanical ventilation was associated with an increased risk of developing VAP in these patients. Developing of VAP didn’t increase mortality in patients.

  8. Exploitation of resources and cardiovascular outcomes in low-risk patients with chest pain hospitalized in coronary care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Habibollah Saadat¹, Hossein Shiri², Zahra Salarpour², Tahereh Ashktorab² , Hamid Alavi Majd², Zahra Saadat¹, Hosein Vakili¹ 1Cardiovascular Research Center, Modarres Hospital, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran; 2Nursing School, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Background: Most patients who present to medical centers due to chest pain do not suffer from acute coronary syndromes and do not need to be hospitalized in coronary care units (CCUs. This study was done to determine exploitation of resources and cardiovascular outcomes in low-risk patients with chest pain hospitalized in CCUs of educational hospitals affiliated with a major medical university. Methods: Over a 4-month period, 550 patients with chest pain who were hospitalized in the CCUs belonging to six hospitals affiliated to the authors' medical university were recruited by census method. Using Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction risk score, 95 patients (17.27% were categorized as low-risk patients. This group was evaluated with respect to demographics, bed occupancy rate, mean hospitalization period, expenses during admission, and cardiovascular outcomes in the 30-day period postdischarge. Results: Mean (± standard deviation hospitalization duration was 3.04 (±0.71 days. No significant difference was seen between the six surveyed hospitals regarding hospitalization duration (P = 0.602. The highest bed occupancy rate was seen in Taleghani and Shohada Tajrish hospitals and the lowest was in Modarres Hospital. The mean paid treatment expenses by low-risk patients was IRR 2,050,000 (US$205. Mean total hospitalization expenses was US$205. No significant difference was seen between the six surveyed hospitals (P = 0.699. Of the patients studied, 89.5% did not show any cardiovascular complications in 1 month and no deaths occurred. Conclusion: Given the high bed-occupancy rate by low-risk patients, associated high hospitalization

  9. Infectious diseases of Afghan immigrants in the United States: review of published reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilsczek, Florian H

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases of immigrants may differ from patients born and resident in the same country, especially if immigrants from Africa or Asia live in Europe or North America. Because the available information is limited published reports of infections of Afghan immigrants in the United States and other countries were analysed. Four reports from the US and 15 reports from other countries were identified [7, (46.7%) Pakistan, 5 (33.3%) Iran, 1 (6.7%) United Kingdom, 1 (6.7%) Germany, 1 (6.7%) Israel)]. Reports from the US were case reports or case series of infections with gastro-intestinal parasites and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (1, 25%), Echinococcus species (2, 50%), and Plasmodium vivax (1, 25%). Reports from other countries were case reports, case series, or surveys and investigated infections with Echinococcus species (2, 13%), Hepatitis B virus (HBV) (1, 6.7%), M. tuberculosis (6, 40%), P. falciparum (1, 6.7%), Leishmania tropica (3, 20%), Fasciola hepatica (1, 6.7%), and M. leprae (1, 6.7%). The reports suggest that Echinococcus species and L. tropica infections can be encountered in Afghan immigrants in the US, and the frequency of a positive PPD (purified protein derivative) response or HBsAg test was increased. An infectious diseases database specific for the country of residence readily available to clinicians treating Afghan patients outside of Afghanistan may be useful.

  10. Patient-reported outcomes with lanreotide Autogel/Depot for carcinoid syndrome: An international observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszniewski, Philippe; Valle, Juan W; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Perros, Petros; Holubec, Luboš; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Smith, Denis; Niccoli, Patricia; Maisonobe, Pascal; Atlan, Philippe; Caplin, Martyn E

    2016-05-01

    Lanreotide Autogel/Depot effectively controls symptoms in patients with carcinoid syndrome associated with neuroendocrine tumours. Data on patient-reported outcomes are sparse. To evaluate the effect of lanreotide on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) with carcinoid syndrome. This was an international, open-label, observational study of adults with neuroendocrine tumours and history of diarrhoea, receiving lanreotide for >3 months for relief of carcinoid syndrome symptoms. The primary PRO measure was satisfaction with diarrhoea control. Secondary PRO measures included severity, change in symptoms and impact on daily life of diarrhoea; and patient satisfaction with flushing control. Of 273 patients enrolled, 76% were 'completely' or 'rather' satisfied with diarrhoea control; 79% reported improvement in diarrhoea with lanreotide. The proportion of patients with 'mild', 'minimal', or 'no diarrhoea' increased from 33% before treatment to 75% during treatment; 75% were unconcerned about the impact of diarrhoea on daily life. Satisfaction with flushing control amongst patients with significant flushing at treatment initiation was 73%. Lanreotide treatment was associated with improvements in symptoms as well as a range of PROs in patients with neuroendocrine tumours and carcinoid syndrome (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01234168). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Healthcare costs and outcomes of managing β-thalassemia major over 50 years in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Diana; Kefalas, Panos; Guest, Julian F

    2016-05-01

    The objective was to estimate the incidence-based costs of treating β-thalassemia major (BTM) to the United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS) over the first 50 years of a patient's life in terms of healthcare resource use and corresponding costs and the associated health outcomes. This was a modeling study based on information obtained from a systematic review of published literature and clinicians involved in managing BTM in the United Kingdom. A state transition model was constructed depicting the management of BTM over a period of 50 years. The model was used to estimate the incidence-based health economic impact that BTM imposes on the NHS and patients' health status in terms of the number of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over 50 years. The expected probability of survival at 50 years is 0.63. Of patients who survive, 33% are expected to be without any complication and the other 67% are expected to experience at least one complication. Patients' health status over this period was estimated to be a mean of 11.5 discounted QALYs per patient. Total healthcare expenditure attributable to managing BTM was estimated to be £483,454 ($720,201) at 2013/14 prices over 50 years. The cost of managing BTM could be potentially reduced by up to 37% if one in two patients had a bone marrow transplant, with an ensuing improvement in health-related quality of life. This analysis provides the best estimate available of NHS resource use and costs with which to inform policy and budgetary decisions pertaining to this rare disease. © 2016 AABB.

  12. Relationships among NANDA-I diagnoses, nursing outcomes classification, and nursing interventions classification by nursing students for patients in medical-surgical units in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Eunjoo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify NANDA-I, Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC; NNN) linkages used by Korean nursing students during their clinical practice in medical-surgical units. A comparative descriptive research design was used to measure the effects of nursing interventions from 153 nursing students in South Korea. Nursing students selected NNN using a Web-based nursing process documentation system. Data were analyzed by paired t-test. Eighty-two NANDA-I diagnoses, 116 NOC outcomes, and 163 NIC interventions were identified. Statistically significant differences in patients' preintervention and postintervention outcome scores were observed. By determining patient outcomes linked to interventions and how the degree of outcomes change after interventions, the effectiveness of the interventions can be evaluated. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  13. Financial Hardship and Patient-Reported Outcomes after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gregory A; Albelda, Randy; Khera, Nandita; Hahn, Theresa; Salas Coronado, Diana Y; Odejide, Oreofe O; Bona, Kira; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald; Soiffer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Although hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only curative therapy for many advanced hematologic cancers, little is known about the financial hardship experienced by HCT patients nor the association of hardship with patient-reported outcomes. We mailed a 43-item survey to adult patients approximately 180 days after their first autologous or allogeneic HCT at 3 high-volume centers. We assessed decreases in household income; difficulty with HCT-related costs, such as need to relocate or travel; and 2 types of hardship: hardship_1 (reporting 1 or 2 of the following: dissatisfaction with present finances, difficulty meeting monthly bill payments, or not having enough money at the end of the month) and "hardship_2" (reporting all 3). Patient-reported stress was measured with the Perceived Stress Scale-4, and 7-point scales were provided for perceptions of overall quality of life (QOL) and health. In total, 325 of 499 surveys (65.1%) were received. The median days since HCT was 173; 47% underwent an allogeneic HCT, 60% were male, 51% were > 60 years old, and 92% were white. Overall, 46% reported income decline after HCT, 56% reported hardship_1, and 15% reported hardship_2. In multivariable models controlling for income, those reporting difficulty paying for HCT-related costs were more likely to report financial hardship (odds ratio, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 3.8 to 12.3). Hardship_1 was associated with QOL below the median (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 4.9), health status below the median (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 3.6), and stress above the median (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 3.5). In this sizable cohort of HCT patients, financial hardship was prevalent and associated with worse QOL and higher levels of perceived stress. Interventions to address patient financial hardship-especially those that ameliorate HCT-specific costs-are likely to improve patient-reported outcomes.

  14. Transition report, United States Department of Energy: A report to the President-Elect. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report is a description of the Department of Energy transition issues. The topics of the report include: Congressional, Intergovernmental and Public Affairs; Conservation and Renewable Energy; Defense Programs; New Production Reactors; Economic Regulatory Administration; Energy Information Administration; energy research; environment, safety and health; fossil energy; General Counsel; hearings and appeals, Inspector General, international affairs and energy emergencies; management and administration, minority economic impact; nuclear energy; policy, planning and analysis, radioactive waste management; and power marketing administrations: Bonneville Power Administration, Western Area Power Administration, Alaska Power Administration, Southeastern Power Administration, and Southwestern Power Administration.

  15. Evidence-Based Medicine in Otolaryngology, Part 6: Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Thomas L; Lee, Stella E; Lindsay, Robin; Locandro, Drew; Randolph, Gregory W; Shin, Jennifer J

    2017-09-01

    The assessment of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in the outpatient setting is gaining momentum in clinical and research venues. Implementing this data capture into one's practice, however, is not a one-size-fits-all venture, and it is critical to determine when, how, and where to include these patient-centered assessments. This installment of the "Evidence-Based Medicine in Otolaryngology" series provides insight into the implementation process and experiences with successful incorporation of PROMs into clinical practice. Specifically, 4 differing clinical scenarios and collection techniques are described, including data acquisition protocols, formats for clinician data usage, and applications of PROM results in clinical and research scenarios.

  16. Patient-reported outcomes in adult survivors with single-ventricle physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Dorthe; Schrader, Anne-Marie; Lisby, Karen H

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Data on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with single-ventricle physiology (SVP) are scarce. We sought (1) to describe the perceived health status, quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and sense of coherence in adult survivors with SVP, (2) to compare PROs...... across functional classes, and (3) to compare PROs between patients and controls. Methods: A case-control study in two adult congenital heart programmes with 62 adult survivors with SVP were matched to 172 healthy controls. A wide range of PROs were measured using validated questionnaires. The treating...

  17. Patient reported outcomes (PROs in clinical trials: is 'in-trial' guidance lacking? a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G Kyte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcomes (PROs are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on 'in-trial' activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting and the management of 'concerning' PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant appears to be lacking. The purpose of this review was to determine the extent and nature of published guidelines addressing these areas. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Systematic review of 1,362 articles identified 18 eligible papers containing 'in-trial' guidelines. Two independent authors undertook a qualitative content analysis of the selected papers. Guidelines presented in each of the articles were coded according to an a priori defined coding frame, which demonstrated reliability (pooled Kappa 0.86-0.97, and validity (<2% residual category coding. The majority of guidelines present were concerned with 'pre-trial' activities (72%, for example, outcome measure selection and study design issues, or 'post-trial' activities (16% such as data analysis, reporting and interpretation. 'In-trial' guidelines represented 9.2% of all guidance across the papers reviewed, with content primarily focused on compliance, quality control, proxy assessment and reporting of data collection. There were no guidelines surrounding the management of concerning PRO data. CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight there are minimal in-trial guidelines in publication regarding PRO data collection and management in clinical trials. No guidance appears to exist for researchers involved with the handling of concerning PRO data. Guidelines are needed, which support researchers to manage all PRO data appropriately and which facilitate unbiased data collection.

  18. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Trial: Comparison of Clinician- versus Patient-reported Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukesh, M B; Qian, W; Wah Hak, C C; Wilkinson, J S; Barnett, G C; Moody, A M; Wilson, C; Coles, C E

    2016-06-01

    Breast radiotherapy-associated toxicity is often reported using clinical and photographic assessments. The addition of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is becoming more common. This study investigated the concordance between clinician- and patient-reported outcomes. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) trial prospectively collected data on clinician assessment and PROMs at 2 and 5 years after breast radiotherapy. Clinician assessment included physical examination and photographic assessment. PROMs included European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BR23 questionnaire and four breast radiotherapy-specific questions. The correlation between patient and clinician scores were analysed on an independent patient basis using percentage agreement, Cohen's kappa coefficient (k) and Bowker's test of symmetry. The analysis was repeated after stratifying patients based on age, baseline Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) and baseline body image score. At 2 and 5 years, a weak level of concordance was seen between the clinician-based assessment and PROMS for all the five toxicity end points (k = 0.05-0.21), with individual patient-based agreement of 32.9-78.3% and a highly discordant Bowker's test of symmetry (P < 0.001). The most frequently reported moderate-severe toxicity by patients was change in breast appearance (14% at both 2 and 5 years), whereas it was breast induration (36% and 25% at 2 and 5 years, respectively) by the clinicians. The lack of concordance was not affected by patient's age, baseline HADS and baseline body image score. This study found that moderate-severe toxicity reported by patients is low and the overall concordance between clinicians and patients is low. This could be due to methodological limitations or alternatively reflects the subjective nature of PROMs. Incorporation of a patient's perception on treatment-related toxicity will have important implications for treatment

  19. Patient-reported outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia: Where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Sarah A; Kirtane, Kedar; Walter, Roland B; Lee, Stephanie J; Lyman, Gary H

    2017-09-01

    Outcomes for acute myeloid leukemia remain poor, and treatment decisions must consider not just quantity, but also quality of life (QOL). We conducted a systematic review of studies in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome that incorporated patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures. PubMed and PsycINFO were searched for articles published from January 2000 through June 2016. Forty-one were relevant for our review with more published in recent years. There was considerable inter-study heterogeneity in which instruments were used, and many studies employed multiple (often overlapping) instruments. Longitudinal studies in particular suffered from both high attrition rates due to disease-related mortality as well as waning compliance with questionnaire completion. There remain significant challenges to incorporation of PROs into leukemia trials. Despite these limitations, however, well-implemented PROs can provide important information beyond objective response outcomes and highlight areas of focus for clinicians caring for patients and for future research endeavors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures-What Data Do We Really Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Stephen; Hidaka, Chisa

    2016-06-01

    The Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services has recently announced the inclusion of several patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), including the abbreviated Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score for joint replacement (HOOS, JR and KOOS, JR) for the purpose of quality assessment in total hip and total knee replacement (THR and TKR). Historically, Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services and other agencies have used measures of process (eg, % vaccinated) or adverse events (eg, infection rates, readmission rates) for quality assessment. However, the use of PROMs has become a priority based on stated goals by the National Quality Strategy and Institute of Medicine for a more patient-centered approach. Here, we review several general health and joint-specific PROMs, which have been extensively used in research to assess treatment efficacy and discuss their relevance to the new criteria for quality assessment, particularly for THR and TKR. Although we expect HOOS, JR and KOOS, JR to yield much useful information in the near term, these surveys are likely an interim solution. In the future, we anticipate that novel measurement platforms, such as wearable technologies or patient-specific surveys, may open new and exciting avenues of research to discover which types of data-perhaps not previously available-best represent patient quality of life and satisfaction after THR, TKR, or other orthopedic procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of a physician-staffed helicopter on outcome in patients admitted to a stroke unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Rasmussen, Lars S.; Lohse, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    .09, 95% CI 0.79–1.49; p = 0.60). The 30-day mortality was 7.4% with GEMS and 7.9% with HEMS (OR = 1.02, CI 0.53–1.96; p = 0.96). Incidence rate of involuntary early retirement was 6.97 per 100 PYR and 7.58 per 100 PYR in GEMS and HEMS patients, respectively (IRR = 1.19, CI 0.27–5.26; p = 0.81). Work......Background: Transportation by helicopter may reduce time to hospital admission and improve outcome. We aimed to investigate the effect of transport mode on mortality, disability, and labour market affiliation in patients admitted to the stroke unit. Methods: Prospective, observational study with 5...... ability after 2 years and time on social transfer payments did not differ between groups. We found no significant difference in mean modified Rankin Scale score after 3 months (2.21 GEMS vs. 2.09 HEMS; adjusted mean difference = −0.20, CI −0.74–0.33; p = 0.46). Discussion: The possible benefit of HEMS...

  2. Location of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the United States-Variability in Event Rate and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perman, Sarah M; Stanton, Emily; Soar, Jasmeet; Berg, Robert A; Donnino, Michael W; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M; Yang, Lin; Merchant, Raina M

    2016-09-29

    In-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is a major public health problem with significant mortality. A better understanding of where IHCA occurs in hospitals (intensive care unit [ICU] versus monitored ward [telemetry] versus unmonitored ward) could inform strategies for reducing preventable deaths. This is a retrospective study of adult IHCA events in the Get with the Guidelines-Resuscitation database from January 2003 to September 2010. Unadjusted analyses were used to characterize patient, arrest, and hospital-level characteristics by hospital location of arrest (ICU versus inpatient ward). IHCA event rates and outcomes were plotted over time by arrest location. Among 85 201 IHCA events at 445 hospitals, 59% (50 514) occurred in the ICU compared to 41% (34 687) on the inpatient wards. Compared to ward patients, ICU patients were younger (64±16 years versus 69±14; Plocations. Survival rates vary based on location of IHCA. Optimizing patient assignment to unmonitored wards versus telemetry wards may contribute to improved survival after IHCA. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Outcomes in Ovarian Cancer among Hispanic Women Living in the United States: A Population-Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okechukwu A. Ibeanu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer in the United States. There is limited data on presentation and outcomes among Hispanic women with ovarian cancer. Objective. To investigate how ovarian cancer presents among Hispanic women in the USA and to analyze differences in presentation, staging, and survival between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women with ovarian cancer. Methods. Data from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004 were extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database. Results. The study sample comprised 1215 Hispanics (10%, 10 652 non-Hispanic whites (83%, and 905 non-Hispanic blacks (7%. Hispanic women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer at a younger age and earlier stage when compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks; . Similar proportion of Hispanics (33%, non-Hispanic whites (32%, and non-Hispanic blacks (24% underwent lymphadenectomy; . Hispanics with epithelial ovarian cancer histology had longer five-year survival of 30.6 months compared to non-Hispanic whites (22.8 months and non-Hispanic blacks (23.3 months; . Conclusion. Hispanic women with ovarian cancer have a statistically significantly longer median survival compared to whites and blacks. This survival difference was most apparent in patients with epithelial cancers and patients with stage IV disease.

  4. Milan Criteria and UCSF Criteria: A Preliminary Comparative Study of Liver Transplantation Outcomes in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya S. Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT for patients with hepatocellular cancer (HCC necessitates highly selective criteria to maximize survival and to optimize allocation of a scarce resource. The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of OLT for HCC in patients transplanted under Milan and UCSF criteria. The United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS database was queried for patients who had undergone OLT for HCC from 2002 to 2007, and 1,972 patients (Milan criteria, n=1,913; UCSF criteria, n=59 were identified. Patients were stratified by pretransplant criteria (Milan versus UCSF, and clinical and pathologic factors and overall survival were compared. There were no differences in age, gender, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and hepatitis B, or C status between the two groups. Overall survival was similar between the Milan and UCSF cohorts (1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year survival rates: 88%, 81%, 76%, and 72% versus 91%, 80%, 68% and 51%, respectively, P=0.21. Although the number of patients within UCSF criteria was small, our results nevertheless suggest that patients with HCC may have equivalent survival when transplanted under Milan and UCSF criteria. Long-term followup may better determine whether UCSF criteria should be widely adopted.

  5. Empirical Combination Antibiotic Therapy Improves the Outcome of Nosocomial Meningitis or Ventriculitis in Neuro-Critical Care Unit Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqi; Wu, Xing; Yu, Jian; Wu, Xuehai; Du, Zhuoying; Sun, Yirui; Yuan, Qiang; Hu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Nosocomial meningitis and ventriculitis (MEN) are serious complications in neuro-critical care unit (NCCU) patients. Few data are available on the risk factors and mortality rates among NCCU patients with these disorders caused by multi-drug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. Our aim was to identify the risk factors for MEN caused by such pathogens and in-hospital deaths in critically ill neurologic patients and to evaluate the impact of empirical combination antibiotic therapy (ECAT) on the outcomes of these patients. We conducted a retrospective study of critically ill neurologic patients having nosocomial MEN who were admitted to the NCCU in a university teaching hospital from January 2003 to December 2013, with MEN being defined using the modified U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for nosocomial infections. In total, 6,149 consecutive NCCU patients were screened; 132 had MEN. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that MDR MEN was related to infection with gram-negative (GN) bacteria (odds ratio 3.16; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-9.25; p = 0.036), and inadequate initial antibiotic therapy (odds ratio 9.80; 95% CI 3.79-25.32; p nosocomial MEN. Inadequate initial antibiotic therapy and GN infection were associated with MDR MEN.

  6. Patient reported out-come in posttraumatic pituitary deficiency: results from The Danish National Study on Posttraumatic Hypopituitarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Krag, Kirstine Stochholm; Janukonyté, Jurgita

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Posttraumatic pituitary hormone deficiency is often suggested. The impact of these predominantly mild and often irreproducible deficiencies on outcome is less clear. The aim of the present study was to describe patient reported outcome in a national a priori unselected cohort of patien...

  7. Long term rehabilitation management and outcome of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an auto immune-disorder. It is a life threatening condition that typically presents with viral illness, headaches, severe psychiatric symptoms, seizures, behavioural changes, decreasing levels of unconsciousness and progressive unresponsiveness, cognitive impairment, abnormal movements (e.g., dyskinesia), ataxia and hypoventilation. This paper describes the long term outcome and rehabilitation management of patients with NMDAR encephalitis and highlights the diverse outcome of this condition and the unique and individual long term management needs associated with this disorder. This is a case report study of three different patients with NMDAR encephalitis. All three cases are young women, two of whom presented with ovarian teratoma. Patient KH is the most impaired and was resident in a slow stream rehabilitation care home and presented with challenging behaviour. Patients RM and OA both lived in the community and presented with similar anxieties but diverse levels of cognition and motivation. A review of the literature is provided summarizing the disorder, interventions, management and challenges of this varied and complex condition. Standard neuropsychological tests and questionnaires to assess community integration (BICRO-39), quality of life (QOLIBRI-OS) and mood (HADS) were administered. Positive outcomes were achieved for all three patients using a variety of interventions which included behavioural management, family psycho-education and an integrated holistic multi-disciplinary team community approach. Memory and executive deficits were persistent in the long term and severity of impairments showed wide variability between patients. Emotional distress and behavioural difficulties were prominent and persistent and had a pronounced impact on rehabilitation. Continence issues were also a major factor impacting on the rehabilitation. Long term integrated and multi-disciplinary input by a variety of

  8. Association of Velopharyngeal Insufficiency With Quality of Life and Patient-Reported Outcomes After Speech Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuskute, Aditi; Skirko, Jonathan R; Roth, Christina; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Tollefson, Travis T

    2017-09-01

    Patients with cleft palate and other causes of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) suffer adverse effects on social interactions and communication. Measurement of these patient-reported outcomes is needed to help guide surgical and nonsurgical care. To further validate the VPI Effects on Life Outcomes (VELO) instrument, measure the change in quality of life (QOL) after speech surgery, and test the association of change in speech with change in QOL. Prospective descriptive cohort including children and young adults undergoing speech surgery for VPI in a tertiary academic center. Participants completed the validated VELO instrument before and after surgical treatment. The main outcome measures were preoperative and postoperative VELO scores and the perceptual speech assessment of speech intelligibility. The VELO scores are divided into subscale domains. Changes in VELO after surgery were analyzed using linear regression models. VELO scores were analyzed as a function of speech intelligibility adjusting for age and cleft type. The correlation between speech intelligibility rating and VELO scores was estimated using the polyserial correlation. Twenty-nine patients (13 males and 16 females) were included. Mean (SD) age was 7.9 (4.1) years (range, 4-20 years). Pharyngeal flap was used in 14 (48%) cases, Furlow palatoplasty in 12 (41%), and sphincter pharyngoplasty in 1 (3%). The mean (SD) preoperative speech intelligibility rating was 1.71 (1.08), which decreased postoperatively to 0.79 (0.93) in 24 patients who completed protocol (P after surgery (Pafter surgery (P = .36). Speech Intelligibility was correlated with preoperative and postoperative total VELO score (P after surgery was correlated with change in speech intelligibility. Speech surgery improves VPI-specific quality of life. We confirmed validation in a population of untreated patients with VPI and included pharyngeal flap surgery, which had not previously been included in validation studies. The VELO

  9. Transition report, United States Department of Energy: A report to the President-Elect. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report is a description of the Department of Energy organization and projects. The topics of the report include: (1) DOE organization and overview; (2) Headquarters Offices: Congressional, Intergovernmental and Public Affairs; Conservation and Renewable Energy; Contract Appeals; Defense Programs; Economic Regulatory Administration; Energy Information Administration; Energy Research; Environment, Safety and Health; Fossil Energy; General Counsel; Hearings and Appeals; Inspector General; International Affairs and Energy Emergencies; Management and Administration; Minority Economic Impact; New Production Reactors; Nuclear Energy; Policy, Planning and Analysis; Radioactive Waste Management; (3) Operations Offices: Albuquerque Operations Office; Chicago Operations Office; Idaho Operations Office; Nevada Operations Office; Oak Ridge Operations Office; Richland Operations Office; San Francisco Operations Office; Savannah River Operations Office; Laboratories; and (4) Power Administrations: Bonneville Power Administration; Western Area Power Administration.

  10. Psychometric validation of patient-reported outcome measures assessing chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson LM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lauren M Nelson,1 Valerie SL Williams,1 Sheri E Fehnel,1 Robyn T Carson,2 James MacDougall,3 Mollie J Baird,3 Stavros Tourkodimitris,2 Caroline B Kurtz,3 Jeffrey M Johnston31RTI Health Solutions, Durham, NC, USA; 2Forest Research Institute, Jersey City, NJ, USA; 3Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, MA, USABackground: Measures assessing treatment outcomes in previous CC clinical trials have not met the requirements described in the US Food and Drug Administration's guidance on patient-reported outcomes.Aim: Psychometric analyses using data from one Phase IIb study and two Phase III trials of linaclotide for the treatment of chronic constipation (CC were conducted to document the measurement properties of patient-reported CC Symptom Severity Measures.Study methods: Each study had a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design, comparing placebo to four doses of oral linaclotide taken once daily for 4 weeks in the Phase IIb dose-ranging study (n=307 and to two doses of linaclotide taken once daily for 12 weeks in the Phase III trials (n=1,272. The CC Symptom Severity Measures addressing bowel function (Bowel Movement Frequency, Stool Consistency, Straining and abdominal symptoms (Bloating, Abdominal Discomfort, Abdominal Pain were administered daily using interactive voice-response system technology. Intraclass correlations, Pearson correlations, factor analyses, F-tests, and effect sizes were computed.Results: The CC Symptom Severity Measures demonstrated satisfactory test–retest reliability and construct validity. Factor analyses indicated one factor for abdominal symptoms and another for bowel symptoms. Known-groups F-tests substantiated the discriminating ability of the CC Symptom Severity Measures. Responsiveness statistics were moderate to strong, indicating that these measures are capable of detecting change.Conclusion: In large studies of CC patients, linaclotide significantly improved abdominal and

  11. Quality of life as patient-reported outcomes: principles of assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinger, Monika; Quitmann, Julia

    2014-06-01

    Assessing quality of life (QoL) as a patient-reported outcome in adult psychiatry poses challenges in terms of concepts, methods, and applications in research and practice. This review will outline conceptually the construct of QoL, its dimensionality, and its representation across patient groups. Methodological challenges are examined, along with principles of QoL instrument development and testing, as well as across cultures. Application of instruments in epidemiological, clinical health economics, and health services research is reviewed based on pertinent literature. Validated measures for depression, psychosis, and anxiety disorders are available in adult psychiatry, and are increasingly used in research. Still, targeted measures are lacking for many mental health conditions and only rarely are tools applied in the practice context. Progress has been made in the development of instruments that are now ready for implementation. The information to be gained is valuable for identifying patient-reported needs for and benefits of treatment.

  12. Feasibility of the collection of patient-reported outcomes in an ambulatory neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Schwamm, Eli; Moura Junior, Valdery; Seitz, Michael P; Hsu, John; Cole, Andrew J; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-12-06

    To determine whether patients could self-report physical and mental health assessments in the waiting room and whether these assessments would be associated with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-10) scores. We offered iPad-based surveys to consecutive adult neurology patients at check-in to collect patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). We collected demographic and clinical data on 6,075 patients through survey or administrative claims and PROMs from participating patients. We compared demographic characteristics of participants and nonparticipants and tested associations between physical and mental health scores and mRS and QOLIE-10. Of 6,075 patients seen by neurologists during the study period, 2,992 (49.3%) participated in the survey. Compared to nonparticipating patients, participating patients more often were privately insured (53.5% vs 42.7%, p neurology (nonsubspecialty) clinics (53.1% vs 46.6%, p Neurology.

  13. [The preliminary draft of the methodology report by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiemann, Guido

    2012-01-01

    There is a mismatch between results of clinical trials and the needs of patients. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in the US will commission research that supports patients and providers of care to make informed decisions. The preliminary draft of a methodology report presented by PCORI contains methodological standards which researchers will have to take into account when applying for funds from PCORI. An innovative instrument, the "Translation Tool" has been introduced to judge the best match between a specific research question and the corresponding methods. The "Translation Tool" structures the necessary trade-offs (e.g. between validity, patient-centered endpoints, timeliness, and resources) in a transparent manner. This article summarizes the development, structure and content of the methodology report. (As supplied by publisher).

  14. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleine Azar

    Full Text Available Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1 adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2 registration status; and, (3 among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals.Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1 adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2 whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3 adequacy of outcome registration.Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1% adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3% had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7% registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029. The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7% was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709.The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  15. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Marleine; Riehm, Kira E; McKay, Dean; Thombs, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT) results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA) journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1) adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2) registration status; and, (3) among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals. Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1) adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2) whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3) adequacy of outcome registration. Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1%) adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3%) had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7%) registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029). The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7%) was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709). The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  16. Patient-Reported Esthetic and Functional Outcomes of Primary Total Laparoscopic Intestinal Vaginoplasty in Transgender Women With Penoscrotal Hypoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M.B.; Sluis, W.B. van der; Woudenberg Hamstra, L.E. van; Buncamper, M.E.; Kreukels, B.P.; Meijerink, W.J.H.J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Puberty-suppressing hormonal treatment may result in penoscrotal hypoplasia in transgender women, making standard penile inversion vaginoplasty not feasible. For these patients, intestinal vaginoplasty is a surgical alternative, but knowledge on patient-reported postoperative outcomes

  17. Nasogastric Tube Placement Errors and Complications in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Seyedhejazi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nasal ala pressure sores are among complications of nasogastric tube in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU. The severity of the injury is usually minor and easily ignored. However, the complication could be easily avoided. This is a case of nasal ala sore after the place-ment of nasal enteral tube in a pediatric intensive care unit in our center. A 5-month-old female with pulmonary hypertension secondary to bronchiectasis with nasal ala pressure sore were reported. She was hospitalized in pediatric intensive care unit at Tabriz Children Hospital in 2010.After 53 days of PICU hospitalization she had nasal ala sore. Conclusion: We know that nasal ala pressure sores could easily be avoided when preventive procedures were performed during nasogastric tube insertion.

  18. Mortality from Circulatory Diseases and other Non-Cancer Outcomes among Nuclear Workers in France, the United Kingdom and the United States (INWORKS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Michael; Richardson, David B; Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; O'Hagan, Jacqueline A; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2017-09-01

    Positive associations between external radiation dose and non-cancer mortality have been found in a number of published studies, primarily of populations exposed to high-dose, high-dose-rate ionizing radiation. The goal of this study was to determine whether external radiation dose was associated with non-cancer mortality in a large pooled cohort of nuclear workers exposed to low-dose radiation accumulated at low dose rates. The cohort comprised 308,297 workers from France, United Kingdom and United States. The average cumulative equivalent dose at a tissue depth of 10 mm [Hp(10)] was 25.2 mSv. In total, 22% of the cohort were deceased by the end of follow-up, with 46,029 deaths attributed to non-cancer outcomes, including 27,848 deaths attributed to circulatory diseases. Poisson regression was used to investigate the relationship between cumulative radiation dose and non-cancer mortality rates. A statistically significant association between radiation dose and all non-cancer causes of death was observed [excess relative risk per sievert (ERR/Sv) = 0.19; 90% CI: 0.07, 0.30]. This was largely driven by the association between radiation dose and mortality due to circulatory diseases (ERR/Sv = 0.22; 90% CI: 0.08, 0.37), with slightly smaller positive, but nonsignificant, point estimates for mortality due to nonmalignant respiratory disease (ERR/Sv = 0.13; 90% CI: -0.17, 0.47) and digestive disease (ERR/Sv = 0.11; 90% CI: -0.36, 0.69). The point estimate for the association between radiation dose and deaths due to external causes of death was nonsignificantly negative (ERR = -0.12; 90% CI: disease subtypes, associations with dose were observed for mortality due to cerebrovascular disease (ERR/Sv = 0.50; 90% CI: 0.12, 0.94) and mortality due to ischemic heart disease (ERR/Sv = 0.18; 90% CI: 0.004, 0.36). The estimates of associations between radiation dose and non-cancer mortality are generally consistent with those observed in atomic bomb survivor studies. The findings

  19. Impact of Communicating Familial Risk of Diabetes on Illness Perceptions and Self-Reported Behavioral Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijl, Miranda; Timmermans, Danielle R.M.; Claassen, Liesbeth; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Marteau, Theresa M.; Henneman, Lidewij

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the potential effectiveness of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Individuals with a family history of diabetes were randomized to receive risk information based on familial and general risk factors (n = 59) or general risk factors alone (n = 59). Outcomes were assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 1 week, and 3 months. RESULTS Compared with individuals receiving general risk information, those receiving familial risk information perceived heredity to be a more important cause of diabetes (P < 0.01) at 1-week follow-up, perceived greater control over preventing diabetes (P < 0.05), and reported having eaten more healthily (P = 0.01) after 3 months. Behavioral intentions did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS Communicating familial risk increased personal control and, thus, did not result in fatalism. Although the intervention did not influence intentions to change behavior, there was some evidence to suggest it increases healthy behavior. PMID:19131458

  20. A systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures for chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John S; Yung, Matthew W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to systematically appraise the world literature to identify existing patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for the assessment of outcomes in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media, to verify the diversity of the individual questionnaire items, to report the methods employed to evaluate the questionnaires, and to identify areas for development in the future. Embase (January 1980-November 2014), MEDLINE (January 1946-November 2014), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (January 1981-November 2014), and PsycINFO (January 1806-November 2014). A systematic literature search was independently undertaken by the two authors according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Nine original articles were identified, which overall outlined the evaluation of four different questionnaires. This systematic appraisal of the world literature has identified four PROM questionnaires for use in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media. All four questionnaires evaluate reliability and validity using different psychometric methods. The Chronic Ear Survey questionnaire has been most broadly evaluated and disseminated. All four questionnaires assess static health status. There are many advantages to developing a dynamic one-hit questionnaire to assess the health status of patients having undergone an intervention for chronic suppurative otitis media. NA Laryngoscope, 126:1458-1463, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Patient reported outcome measures of quality of end-of-life care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Tara; Cornally, Nicola; Molloy, William

    2017-02-01

    End-of-life (EoL) care(1) is increasingly used as a generic term in preference to palliative care or terminal care, particularly with reference to individuals with chronic disease, who are resident in community and long-term care (LTC) settings. This review evaluates studies based on patient reported outcome measures (PROMS) of quality of EoL care across all health-care settings. From 1041 citations, 12 studies were extracted by searches conducted in EBSCO, Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane, Open Grey and Google Scholar databases. At present, the evidence base for EoL care is founded on cancer care. This review highlights the paucity of studies that evaluate quality of EoL care for patients with chronic disease outside the established cancer-acute care paradigm, particularly in LTC. This review highlights the absence of any PROMs for the estimated 60% of patients in LTC with cognitive impairment. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are critical to understanding how EoL care services and practices affect patients' health and EoL experience. PROMs describe the quality of care from the patient's perspective and add balance to existing clinical or proxy-derived knowledge on the quality of care and services provided.

  2. Association between sensory function and hop performance and self-reported outcomes in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cronström A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anna Cronström,1 Ewa M Roos,2 Eva Ageberg1 1Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 2Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Function and Physiotherapy, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark Background: In patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficiency (ACLD or reconstruction (ACLR, sensory deficits are commonly assessed as knee kinesthesia using time-consuming laboratory equipment. Portable equipment such as that used for evaluation of vibration sense would be preferable. In contrast to kinesthesia, vibration sense is not well studied in these patients. Objectives: 1 To study the association between kinesthesia and vibration sense to investigate if one sensory measurement can replace the other; and 2 to determine the clinical relevance by investigating associations between the sensory measurements and functional performance and patient-reported outcomes in patients with ACLD or ACLR. Methods: Twenty patients with ACLD and 33 patients with ACLR were assessed with knee kinesthesia, vibration sense, the one-leg hop test for distance, as well as the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS and the Tegner Activity Scale. Results: There were no significant correlations between kinesthesia and vibration sense (r= –0.267, p>0.269 or between the sensory measures and hop performance (r= –0.351, p>0.199. In patients with ACLD, worse knee kinesthesia was associated with worse scores on KOOS subscales pain (r= –0.464, p=0.046 and activities of daily living (r= –0.491, p=0.033, and worse vibration sense was associated with worse scores on KOOS subscale quality of life (r= –0.469, p=0.037 and worse knee confidence (item Q3 from subscale quality of life (rs=0.436, p=0.054. In patients with ACLR, worse vibration sense was associated with worse scores on KOOS subscales pain (r= –0.402, p=0.020 and activities of daily living (r= –0.385, p=0

  3. Comparison of clinical outcome of periapical surgery in endodontic and oral surgery units of a teaching dental hospital: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbaran, S; Gilthorpe, M S; Harrison, S D; Gulabivala, K

    2001-06-01

    The aims of this retrospective study were (1) to compare the outcome of periapical surgery performed in endodontic and in oral surgery units of a teaching dental hospital and (2) to evaluate the influence of factors affecting outcome. A total of 176 teeth (endodontic unit, 83; oral surgery unit, 93) surgically treated more than 4 years previously were examined clinically and radiographically by means of strict criteria. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used. The rate of complete healing for patients treated in the endodontic unit (37.4%) was significantly (P = .009) higher than that for patients treated in the oral surgery unit (19.4%). The technical quality of surgery (P < .001), placement of root-end filling (P = .039), absence of a preoperative periapical lesion (P = .042), absence of a post (P = .047), and presence of an adequate coronal restoration (P = .056, odds ratio = 3.71) had significant effects on treatment outcome. The technical quality of periapical surgery, the presence of a periapical lesion, and adequate apical and coronal seal are important prognostic determinants of successful periapical surgery.

  4. Impact of a United Kingdom-wide campaign to tackle antimicrobial resistance on self-reported knowledge and behaviour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaintarli, Katerina; Ingle, Suzanne M; Bhattacharya, Alex; Ashiru-Oredope, Diane; Oliver, Isabel; Gobin, Maya

    2016-05-12

    As part of the 2014 European Antibiotic Awareness Day plans, a new campaign called Antibiotic Guardian (AG) was launched in the United Kingdom, including an online pledge system to increase commitment from healthcare professionals and members of the public to reduce antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The aim of this evaluation was to determine the impact of the campaign on self-reported knowledge and behaviour around AMR. An online survey was sent to 9016 Antibiotic Guardians (AGs) to assess changes in self-reported knowledge and behaviour (outcomes) following the campaign. Logistic regression models, adjusted for variables including age, sex and pledge group (pledging as member of public or as healthcare professional), were used to estimate associations between outcomes and AG characteristics. 2478 AGs responded to the survey (27.5 % response rate) of whom 1696 (68.4 %) pledged as healthcare professionals and 782 (31.6 %) as members of public (similar proportions to the total number of AGs). 96.3 % of all AGs who responded had prior knowledge of AMR. 73.5 % of participants were female and participants were most commonly between 45 and 54 years old. Two thirds (63.4 %) of participants reported always acting according to their pledge. Members of the public were more likely to act in line with their pledge than professionals (Odds Ratio (OR) =3.60, 95 % Confidence Interval (CI): 2.88-4.51). Approximately half of participants (44.5 %) (both healthcare professionals and members of public) reported that they acquired more knowledge about AMR post-campaign. People that were confused about AMR prior to the campaign acquired more knowledge after the campaign (OR = 3.10, 95 % CI: 1.36-7.09). More participants reported a sense of personal responsibility towards tackling AMR post-campaign, increasing from 58.3 % of participants pre-campaign to 70.5 % post-campaign. This study demonstrated that the campaign increased commitment to tackling AMR in both healthcare

  5. 78 FR 37921 - Delegation of Reporting Functions Specified in Section 491 of Title 10, United State Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Specified in Section 491 of Title 10, United States Code Notice of June 20, 2013--Continuation of the... Reporting Functions Specified in Section 491 of Title 10, United State Code Memorandum for the Secretary of... of America, including section 301 of title 3 of the United States Code, I hereby delegate to you...

  6. 78 FR 37923 - Delegation of Reporting Functions Specified in Section 491 of Title 10, United State Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Specified in Section 491 of Title 10, United States Code Notice of June 20, 2013--Continuation of the... Reporting Functions Specified in Section 491 of Title 10, United State Code Memorandum for the Secretary of... of America, including section 301 of title 3 of the United States Code, I hereby delegate to you...

  7. Prospective registration, bias risk and outcome-reporting bias in randomised clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Han, Mei; Li, Xin-Xue;

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications.......Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications....

  8. Calculation method for the seasonal performance of heat pump compact units and validation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemhoener, C.; Dott, R.; Afjei, Th. [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Institute of Energy in Buildings, Muttenz (Switzerland); Huber, H.; Helfenfinger, D.; Keller, P.; Furter, R. [University of Applied Sciences Lucerne (HTA), Test center HLKS, Horw (Switzerland)

    2007-02-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at compact heat pump units that have been developed for the heating of low energy consumption houses built to MINERGIE or MINERGIE-P standards. These units, which combine the functions of space heating, domestic hot water preparation and ventilation in one unit are described. A testing procedure developed at the University of Applied Science in Lucerne, Switzerland, using a test rig for the measurement of the seasonal performance factor (SPF) is described. A calculation method based on temperature classes for the calculation of the SPF of combined heat pump systems for space heating and domestic hot water preparation that was developed by the Institute of Energy in Buildings at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland is examined. Two pilot plants allowing detailed field monitoring of two compact units are described. One pilot plant installed in a single-family house built to MINERGIE standard in Gelterkinden, Switzerland, provided data on a compact unit. These results of measurements made on this and a further installation in a MINERGIE-P ultra-low energy consumption house in Zeiningen, Switzerland, are presented and discussed. Calculation methods, including exergy considerations are reviewed and their validation is discussed.

  9. Risk and outcome analysis of 1832 consecutively excised basal cell carcinomas in a tertiary referral plastic surgery unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, Vinod

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Basal cell carcinomas are the most prevalent of all skin cancers worldwide and form the majority of the surgical workload for most modern cutaneous malignancy centres. Primary surgical removal of basal cell carcinomas remains the gold standard of treatment but, despite almost two centuries of surgical experience, rates of incomplete surgical excision of up to 50% are still reported. The aim of this study was to assess, quantify and perform comparative analysis of the outcomes and predictive factors of consecutive primarily-excised basal cell carcinomas in a tertiary centre over a six-year period. METHODS: Retrospective audit was conducted on all patients who underwent surgical excision of basal cell carcinomas from January 2000 to December 2005. Assessment parameters included patient biographics, tumour management differences and detailed histopathological analysis of tumour margins and subtypes. RESULTS: One thousand eight hundred and thirty two basal cell carcinomas were excised from 1329 patients over the designated time period. Two hundred and fifty one (14%) lesions were incompletely excised with 135 (7.4%) involving the peripheral margin only, 48 (2.6%) the deep margin only and 41 (2.2%) involving both. Nasal location was the most common predictor of incomplete excision. CONCLUSIONS: Overall basal cell carcinomas excision rates compared favourably with international reported standards but attention to a variety of surgical and histological risk factors may improve this further.

  10. Beyond FEV1 in COPD: a review of patient-reported outcomes and their measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul Jones,1 Marc Miravitlles,2 Thys van der Molen,3 Karoly Kulich41Division of Clinical Science, University of London, London, UK; 2Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Hospital Clínic, Ciber de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Primary Care, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; 4Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD present with a variety of symptoms and pathological consequences. Although primarily viewed as a respiratory disease, COPD has both pulmonary and extrapulmonary effects, which have an impact on many aspects of physical, emotional, and mental well-being. Traditional assessment of COPD relies heavily on measuring lung function, specifically forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1. However, the evidence suggests that FEV1 is a relatively poor correlate of symptoms such as breathlessness and the impact of COPD on daily life. Furthermore, many consequences of the disease, including anxiety and depression and the ability to perform daily activities, can only be described and reported reliably by the patient. Thus, in order to provide a comprehensive view of the effects of interventions in clinical trials, it is essential that spirometry is accompanied by assessments using patient-reported outcome (PRO instruments. We provide an overview of patient-reported outcome concepts in COPD, such as breathlessness, physical functioning, and health status, and evaluate the tools used for measuring these concepts. Particular attention is given to the newly developed instruments emerging in response to recent regulatory guidelines for the development and use of PROs in clinical trials. We conclude that although data from the development and validation of these new PRO instruments are emerging, to build the body of evidence that supports the use of a new instrument takes many years. Furthermore, new

  11. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annual report October 1, 1994 - September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.; Harwick, L.A.; Markel, M.J.

    1996-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from October 1994 through September 1995.

  12. Briefing on meetings at & reports by the 65th & 66th United Nations General Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas Gregorio, José Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Briefing on meetings at & reports by the 65th & 66th United Nations General Assembly No relevant differences are observed or identified after perusal of the space-related resolutions and documents issued by the UN System between 2010 and 2011. The most remarkable statements remain virtually unchanged in this time period. For instance, the UN GA recognizes the common interest of all mankind in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, and reaffirms that these shall be ca...

  13. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annual report February 1, 2000--January 31, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

    2001-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 2000 through January 2001.

  14. Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, fifth round groundwater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Kearney (A.T.), Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-01-20

    The data from the chemical analysis of 68 samples from the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit Third Quarter 1993 Groundwater Sampling Investigation and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at the site. Sample analysis included inorganics and general chemical parameters. Fifty three samples were validated for radiochemical parameters.

  15. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Quarterly Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    terminated the contract for convenience . State also funded three capital-improvement projects—a potable-water tower, a commercial power upgrade, and...Million 37 SIGAR OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS I OCTOBER 30, 2014 convenience . INL paid AWCC $18.5 million of the $20.2...Abduzaziz, the owner of Aziz Restaurant and a bazaar, who was allegedly engaging in various criminal schemes on BAF, including vehicle thefts. The TCN

  16. The utility of abbreviated patient-reported outcomes for predicting survival in early stage colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tina; Speers, Caroline H; Kennecke, Hagen F; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-05-15

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly used in clinical settings. Prior research suggests that PROs collected at baseline may be associated with cancer survival, but most of those studies were conducted in patients with breast or lung cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between prospectively collected PROs and cancer-specific outcomes in patients with early stage colorectal cancer. Patients who had newly diagnosed stage II or III colorectal cancer from 2009 to 2010 and had a consultation at the British Columbia Cancer Agency completed the brief Psychosocial Screen for Cancer (PSSCAN) questionnaire, which collects data on patients' perceived social supports, quality of life (QOL), anxiety and depression, and general health. PROs from the PSSCAN were linked with the Gastrointestinal Cancers Outcomes Database, which contains information on patient and tumor characteristics, treatment details, and cancer outcomes. Cox regression models were constructed for overall survival (OS), and Fine and Gray regression models were developed for disease-specific survival (DSS). In total, 692 patients were included. The median patient age was 67 years (range, 26-95 years), and the majority had colon cancer (61%), were diagnosed with stage III disease (54%), and received chemotherapy (58%). In general, patients felt well supported and reported good overall health and QOL. On multivariate analysis, increased fatigue was associated with worse OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.99; P = .00007) and DSS (HR, 1.63; P = .03), as was lack of emotional support (OS: HR, 4.36; P = .0003; DSS: HR, 1.92; P = .02). Although most patients described good overall health and QOL and indicated that they were generally well supported, patients who experienced more pronounced fatigue or lacked emotional support had a higher likelihood of worse OS and DSS. These findings suggest that abbreviated PROs can inform and assist clinicians to identify patients who have a worse

  17. Self-Reported Benefits and Adverse Outcomes of Hot Yoga Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Casey; Eggleston, Brandon

    2016-08-15

    There is little to no scientific data about the health benefits or risks to participating in hot yoga, in particular distinguishing it from the practice of non-hot yoga. This study aims to provide some preliminary evidence about the risks and benefits of participating in hot yoga. Future studies will be able to build off the findings herein. This study utilized online survey software (Qualtrics) and recruited participants through convenience sampling (n = 157) by targeting yoga websites and online forums. As there is currently no known questionnaire that has been developed to assess the risks and benefits of hot yoga participation, an exploratory measure was designed to gain more detailed responses from participants. Descriptive epidemiological analyses we re conducted. Participants of hot yoga had a number of pre-existing health conditions. Both benefits and adverse outcomes were reported. The most frequently reported health benefits of hot yoga in this sample included increased flexibility (63%), improved mood (58%), increased fitness (43%), and improved stamina (42%). Just over half of the participants reported some sort of adverse event during a hot yoga session (n = 82). The most commonly reported adverse events included dizziness (60%), feeling light headed (61%), nausea (35%), and dehydration (34%), amongst others. Further study on the risks and benefits of hot yoga participation is required.

  18. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in ovarian cancer clinical trials-lost opportunities and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, M; Mercieca-Bebber, R L; King, M T

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased recognition of the value of including patient-reported outcomes (PROs) as important end points in phase III clinical trials, there has been a lack of pre-specified PRO hypotheses and shortcomings with the analyses and interpretation of PROs in many ovarian cancer trials. This paper discusses and provides examples of the so-called lost opportunities in ovarian cancer trials. These include: (i) no clear pre-specified PRO hypotheses; (ii) PRO end points not included; (iii) insensitive PRO end point selection; (iv) collection of poor-quality PRO data not suitable for analysis; (v) differences in PROs between treatment arms ignored; and (vi) poor reporting quality. We can learn from the past and with relatively little additional effort, improve the collection and interpretation of PRO data in future ovarian cancer trials. The importance of doing so is underpinned by recent initiatives to improve the standard and usefulness of PRO data in clinical trials. These include the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance for PROs to support labelling claims, the European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO MCBS), the International Society for Quality-of-Life Research PRO reporting guidance and the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Clinical Trials (CONSORT)-PRO-extension statement which includes a checklist of recommended items to include in PRO sections of trial protocols. Promoting the importance of hypothesis-driven PROs in ovarian cancer clinical trials will lead to improvements in the design of these trials and the interpretation of their results.

  19. Practice patterns and outcomes of pediatric partial nephrectomy in the United States: Comparison between pediatric urology and general pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suson, Kristina D; Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Elder, Jack S; Lakshmanan, Yegappan

    2015-08-01

    In the United States, both pediatric urologists (PUROs) and general pediatric surgeons (GPSs) perform nephrectomies in children, with PUROs performing more nephrectomies overall, most commonly for benign causes. GPSs perform more nephrectomies for malignant causes. We questioned whether the same trends persisted for partial nephrectomy. We hypothesized that PUROs performed more partial nephrectomies for all causes, including malignancy. Our primary aim was to characterize the number of partial nephrectomies performed by PUROs and GPSs. We also compared short-term outcomes between subspecialties. We analyzed the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS), a database encompassing data from 44 children's hospitals. Patients were ≤18 years old and had a partial nephrectomy (ICD-9 procedure code 554) carried out by PUROs or GPSs between 1 January, 2004 and June 30, 2013. Queried data points included surgeon subspecialty, age, gender, 3M™ All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups (3M™ APR DRG) code, severity level, mortality risk, length of stay (LOS), and medical/surgical complication flags. Data points were compared in patients on whom PUROs and GPSs had operated. Statistical analysis included the Student t test, chi-square test, analysis of covariance, and logistic regression. Results are presented in the table. While PUROs performed the majority of partial nephrectomies, GPSs operated more commonly for malignancy. For surgeries performed for non-malignant indications, PURO patients had a shorter LOS and lower complication rate after controlling for statistically identified covariates. There was no difference in LOS or complication rate for patients with malignancy. A Pediatric Health Information System study of pediatric nephrectomy demonstrated PUROs performed more nephrectomies overall, but GPSs performed more surgeries for malignancy. The difference was less dramatic for partial nephrectomies (63% GPS, 37% PURO) than for radical nephrectomies (90% GPS, 10

  20. Neonatal Outcomes of Rh-Negative Pregnancies in a Tertiary Level Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Rhesus incompatibility is a preventable cause for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, hydrops fetalis and still births. The prevalence of the Rh-negative blood group among Indian woman varies from 2% - 10%. Despite declining the incidence of Rhesus incompatibility, due to availability of anti-D immunoglobulin, and improved antenatal care of the Rh-negative pregnant woman, it still accounts for a significant proportion of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and neuro-morbidity. The prevalence of Rh-negative women having Rh-positive neonates is 60%. Objectives This study aimed to estimate the incidence of Rh iso-immunization and evaluate the outcomes of Rh iso-immunized neonates. Methods This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary level neonatal intensive care unit, Princess Esra hospital, Deccan college of medical sciences, Hyderabad, Telangana, India. Consecutive intramural and extramural neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit with the Rh-negative mother’s blood group and hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled. Neonates born to Rh+ve mothers were excluded. Neonatal gestational age, birth weight, age at admission, duration of phototherapy, duration of hospitalization, neonatal examination and investigations were recorded in a predesigned, pretested performa. Results A total of 90 neonates were born to Rh-negative mothers, of which 70% (63 had the Rh-positive blood group and 30% had the Rh-negative blood group. Of these 63 neonates, 48 (76.2% had hyperbilirubinemia and 43 neonates (68.3% had significant hyperbilirubinemia (total serum bilirubin > 15mg/dL. Among them, 2%, 75% and 23% were born to primi, multi and grandmutli, respectively. Also, 14.5% of the neonates were large for dates (LFD, 75% appropriate for dates (AFD and 10.5% were small for dates (SFD. Premature and SFD neonates had higher incidence of hyperbilirubinemia. Significantly higher incidence of jaundice occurred within 72 hours of life. The mean

  1. THE USEFULNESS OF CORPORATE FINANCIAL REPORTS: EVIDENCE FROM THE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulkareem Alzarouni; Khaled Aljifri; Chew Ng; Mohammad Iqbal Tahir

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the usefulness of financial reports to users in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It is an attempt to find out whether current practices satisfy users’ needs of information and the extent to which these needs have been satisfied by the current disclosure practices of UAE companies. A survey questionnaire was used to explore whether the financial reports published by UAE firms were relevant to the needs of their users and to identify the disclosure items...

  2. Remedial Action Report for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Wells

    2007-08-15

    This Phase III remedial action report addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility STF-02 Gun Range at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Phase I, consisting of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operble Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory Site-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring, was addressed in a previous report. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance.

  3. GATEWAY Report Brief: Evaluating Tunable LED Lighting in the Swedish Medical Behavioral Health Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-08-23

    Summary of a GATEWAY report evaluation of a tunable LED lighting system installed in the new Swedish Medical Behavioral Health Unit in Seattle that incorporates color-tunable luminaires in common areas, and uses advanced controls for dimming and color tuning, with the goal of providing a better environment for staff and patients. The report reviews the design of the tunable lighting system, summarizes two sets of measurements, and discusses the circadian, energy, and commissioning implications as well as lessons learned from the project.

  4. Self-Reported and FEMA Flood Exposure Assessment after Hurricane Sandy: Association with Mental Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bian; Schneider, Samantha; Schwartz, Rebecca; Taioli, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy caused extensive physical and economic damage; the long-term mental health consequences are unknown. Flooding is a central component of hurricane exposure, influencing mental health through multiple pathways that unfold over months after flooding recedes. Here we assess the concordance in self-reported and Federal Emergency Management (FEMA) flood exposure after Hurricane Sandy and determine the associations between flooding and anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Self-reported flood data and mental health symptoms were obtained through validated questionnaires from New York City and Long Island residents (N = 1231) following Sandy. Self-reported flood data was compared to FEMA data obtained from the FEMA Modeling Task Force Hurricane Sandy Impact Analysis. Multivariable logistic regressions were performed to determine the relationship between flooding exposure and mental health outcomes. There were significant discrepancies between self-reported and FEMA flood exposure data. Self-reported dichotomous flooding was positively associated with anxiety (ORadj: 1.5 [95% CI: 1.1–1.9]), depression (ORadj: 1.7 [1.3–2.2]), and PTSD (ORadj: 2.5 [1.8–3.4]), while self-reported continuous flooding was associated with depression (ORadj: 1.1 [1.01–1.12]) and PTSD (ORadj: 1.2 [1.1–1.2]). Models with FEMA dichotomous flooding (ORadj: 2.1 [1.5–2.8]) or FEMA continuous flooding (ORadj: 1.1 [1.1–1.2]) were only significantly associated with PTSD. Associations between mental health and flooding vary according to type of flood exposure measure utilized. Future hurricane preparedness and recovery efforts must integrate micro and macro-level flood exposures in order to accurately determine flood exposure risk during storms and realize the long-term importance of flooding on these three mental health symptoms. PMID:28129410

  5. Patient-reported outcomes of parenteral somatostatin analogue injections in 195 patients with acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Christian J; Karavitaki, Niki; Störmann, Sylvère; Trainer, Peter J; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Droste, Michael; Korbonits, Márta; Feldmann, Berit; Zopf, Kathrin; Sanderson, Violet Fazal; Schwicker, David; Gelbaum, Dana; Haviv, Asi; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-acting somatostatin analogues delivered parenterally are the most widely used medical treatment in acromegaly. This patient-reported outcomes survey was designed to assess the impact of chronic injections on subjects with acromegaly. Methods The survey was conducted in nine pituitary centres in Germany, UK and The Netherlands. The questionnaire was developed by endocrinologists and covered aspects of acromegaly symptoms, injection-related manifestations, emotional and daily life impact, treatment satisfaction and unmet medical needs. Results In total, 195 patients participated, of which 112 (57%) were on octreotide (Sandostatin LAR) and 83 (43%) on lanreotide (Somatuline Depot). The majority (>70%) of patients reported acromegaly symptoms despite treatment. A total of 52% of patients reported that their symptoms worsen towards the end of the dosing interval. Administration site pain lasting up to a week following injection was the most frequently reported injection-related symptom (70% of patients). Other injection site reactions included nodules (38%), swelling (28%), bruising (16%), scar tissue (8%) and inflammation (7%). Injection burden was similar between octreotide and lanreotide. Only a minority of patients received injections at home (17%) and 5% were self-injecting. Over a third of patients indicated a feeling of loss of independence due to the injections, and 16% reported repeated work loss days. Despite the physical, emotional and daily life impact of injections, patients were satisfied with their treatment, yet reported that modifications that would offer major improvement over current care would be ‘avoiding injections’ and ‘better symptom control’. Conclusion Lifelong injections of long-acting somatostatin analogues have significant burden on the functioning, well-being and daily lives of patients with acromegaly. PMID:26744896

  6. Self-Reported and FEMA Flood Exposure Assessment after Hurricane Sandy: Association with Mental Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman-Cribbin, Wil; Liu, Bian; Schneider, Samantha; Schwartz, Rebecca; Taioli, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy caused extensive physical and economic damage; the long-term mental health consequences are unknown. Flooding is a central component of hurricane exposure, influencing mental health through multiple pathways that unfold over months after flooding recedes. Here we assess the concordance in self-reported and Federal Emergency Management (FEMA) flood exposure after Hurricane Sandy and determine the associations between flooding and anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Self-reported flood data and mental health symptoms were obtained through validated questionnaires from New York City and Long Island residents (N = 1231) following Sandy. Self-reported flood data was compared to FEMA data obtained from the FEMA Modeling Task Force Hurricane Sandy Impact Analysis. Multivariable logistic regressions were performed to determine the relationship between flooding exposure and mental health outcomes. There were significant discrepancies between self-reported and FEMA flood exposure data. Self-reported dichotomous flooding was positively associated with anxiety (ORadj: 1.5 [95% CI: 1.1-1.9]), depression (ORadj: 1.7 [1.3-2.2]), and PTSD (ORadj: 2.5 [1.8-3.4]), while self-reported continuous flooding was associated with depression (ORadj: 1.1 [1.01-1.12]) and PTSD (ORadj: 1.2 [1.1-1.2]). Models with FEMA dichotomous flooding (ORadj: 2.1 [1.5-2.8]) or FEMA continuous flooding (ORadj: 1.1 [1.1-1.2]) were only significantly associated with PTSD. Associations between mental health and flooding vary according to type of flood exposure measure utilized. Future hurricane preparedness and recovery efforts must integrate micro and macro-level flood exposures in order to accurately determine flood exposure risk during storms and realize the long-term importance of flooding on these three mental health symptoms.

  7. Predicting outcome of rethoracotomy for suspected pericardial tamponade following cardio-thoracic surgery in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beishuizen Albertus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Pericardial tamponade after cardiac surgery is difficult to diagnose, thereby rendering timing of rethoracotomy hard. We aimed at identifying factors predicting the outcome of surgery for suspected tamponade after cardio-thoracic surgery, in the intensive care unit (ICU. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients undergoing rethoracotomy for suspected pericardial tamponade in the ICU, admitted after primary cardio-thoracic surgery, were identified for this retrospective study. We compared patients with or without a decrease in severe haemodynamic compromise after rethoracotomy, according to the cardiovascular component of the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score. Results A favourable haemodynamic response to rethoracotomy was observed in 11 (52% of patients and characterized by an increase in cardiac output, and less fluid and norepinephrine requirements. Prior to surgery, the absence of treatment by heparin, a minimum cardiac index 2 and a positive fluid balance (> 4,683 mL were predictive of a beneficial haemodynamic response. During surgery, the evacuation of clots and > 500 mL of pericardial fluid was associated with a beneficial haemodynamic response. Echocardiographic parameters were of limited help in predicting the postoperative course, even though 9 of 13 pericardial clots found at surgery were detected preoperatively. Conclusion Clots and fluids in the pericardial space causing regional tamponade and responding to surgical evacuation after primary cardio-thoracic surgery, are difficult to diagnose preoperatively, by clinical, haemodynamic and even echocardiographic evaluation in the ICU. Only absence of heparin treatment, a large positive fluid balance and low cardiac index predicted a favourable haemodynamic response to rethoracotomy. These data might help in deciding and timing of reinterventions after primary cardio-thoracic surgery.

  8. Infection with multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria in a pediatric oncology intensive care unit: risk factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Patrícia de Oliveira; Atta, Elias Hallack; Silva, André Ricardo Araújo da

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the predictors and outcomes associated with multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacterial (MDR-GNB) infections in an oncology pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Data were collected relating to all episodes of GNB infection that occurred in a PICU between January of 2009 and December of 2012. GNB infections were divided into two groups for comparison: (1) infections attributed to MDR-GNB and (2) infections attributed to non-MDR-GNB. Variables of interest included age, gender, presence of solid tumor or hematologic disease, cancer status, central venous catheter use, previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, healthcare-associated infection, neutropenia in the preceding 7 days, duration of neutropenia, length of hospital stay before ICU admission, length of ICU stay, and the use of any of the following in the previous 30 days: antimicrobial agents, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Other variables included initial appropriate antimicrobial treatment, definitive inadequate antimicrobial treatment, duration of appropriate antibiotic use, time to initiate adequate antibiotic therapy, and the 7- and 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed significant relationships between MDR-GNB and hematologic diseases (odds ratio [OR] 5.262; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.282-21.594; p=0.021) and healthcare-associated infection (OR 18.360; 95% CI 1.778-189.560; p=0.015). There were significant differences between MDR-GNB and non-MDR-GNB patients for the following variables: inadequate initial empirical antibiotic therapy, time to initiate adequate antibiotic treatment, and inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Hematologic malignancy and healthcare-associated infection were significantly associated with MDR-GNB infection in this sample of pediatric oncology patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Does eosinophilic COPD exacerbation have a better patient outcome than non-eosinophilic in the intensive care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltürk, Cüneyt; Karakurt, Zuhal; Adiguzel, Nalan; Kargin, Feyza; Sari, Rabia; Celik, M Emin; Takir, Huriye Berk; Tuncay, Eylem; Sogukpinar, Ozlem; Ciftaslan, Nezihe; Mocin, Ozlem; Gungor, Gokay; Oztas, Selahattin

    2015-01-01

    Background COPD exacerbations requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission have a major impact on morbidity and mortality. Only 10%–25% of COPD exacerbations are eosinophilic. Aim To assess whether eosinophilic COPD exacerbations have better outcomes than non-eosinophilic COPD exacerbations in the ICU. Methods This retrospective observational cohort study was conducted in a thoracic, surgery-level III respiratory ICU of a tertiary teaching hospital for chest diseases from 2013 to 2014. Subjects previously diagnosed with COPD and who were admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure were included. Data were collected electronically from the hospital database. Subjects’ characteristics, complete blood count parameters, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), delta NLR (admission minus discharge), C-reactive protein (CRP) on admission to and discharge from ICU, length of ICU stay, and mortality were recorded. COPD subjects were grouped according to eosinophil levels (>2% or ≤2%) (group 1, eosinophilic; group 2, non-eosinophilic). These groups were compared with the recorded data. Results Over the study period, 647 eligible COPD subjects were enrolled (62 [40.3% female] in group 1 and 585 [33.5% female] in group 2). Group 2 had significantly higher C-reactive protein, neutrophils, NLR, delta NLR, and hemoglobin, but a lower lymphocyte, monocyte, and platelet count than group 1, on admission to and discharge from the ICU. Median (interquartile range) length of ICU stay and mortality in the ICU in groups 1 and 2 were 4 days (2–7 days) vs 6 days (3–9 days) (P2%. NLR and peripheral eosinophilia may be helpful indicators for steroid and antibiotic management. PMID:26392758

  10. Predicting outcome of rethoracotomy for suspected pericardial tamponade following cardio-thoracic surgery in the intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Pericardial tamponade after cardiac surgery is difficult to diagnose, thereby rendering timing of rethoracotomy hard. We aimed at identifying factors predicting the outcome of surgery for suspected tamponade after cardio-thoracic surgery, in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients undergoing rethoracotomy for suspected pericardial tamponade in the ICU, admitted after primary cardio-thoracic surgery, were identified for this retrospective study. We compared patients with or without a decrease in severe haemodynamic compromise after rethoracotomy, according to the cardiovascular component of the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Results A favourable haemodynamic response to rethoracotomy was observed in 11 (52%) of patients and characterized by an increase in cardiac output, and less fluid and norepinephrine requirements. Prior to surgery, the absence of treatment by heparin, a minimum cardiac index 4,683 mL) were predictive of a beneficial haemodynamic response. During surgery, the evacuation of clots and > 500 mL of pericardial fluid was associated with a beneficial haemodynamic response. Echocardiographic parameters were of limited help in predicting the postoperative course, even though 9 of 13 pericardial clots found at surgery were detected preoperatively. Conclusion Clots and fluids in the pericardial space causing regional tamponade and responding to surgical evacuation after primary cardio-thoracic surgery, are difficult to diagnose preoperatively, by clinical, haemodynamic and even echocardiographic evaluation in the ICU. Only absence of heparin treatment, a large positive fluid balance and low cardiac index predicted a favourable haemodynamic response to rethoracotomy. These data might help in deciding and timing of reinterventions after primary cardio-thoracic surgery. PMID:21624108

  11. 77 FR 45379 - Increasing the Supply of Forensic Pathologists in the United States: A Report and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Increasing the Supply of Forensic Pathologists in the United States: A Report... Forensic Pathologists in the United States: A Report and Recommendations.'' The opportunity to provide...

  12. Listeria monocytogenes endophthalmitis - case report and review of risk factors and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajor, Anna; Luhr, Anke; Brockmann, Dorothee; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Framme, Carsten; Sedlacek, Ludwig

    2016-07-16

    The majority of cases of endophthalmitis are caused by exogenous pathogens; only 5-10 % are of endogenous origin. One cause of these rare cases of endogenous endophthalmitis is Listeria monocytogenes. Twenty-six cases of endophthalmitis due to this pathogen have been published over the last twenty years. The aim of this review is to summarize the main risk factors and common clinical findings of endogenous endophthalmitis due to Listeria monocytogenes. We report on a 62-year-old female presenting with a sterile hypopyon iritis with secondary glaucoma and an underlying rheumatoid disease. In microbiological analysis we identified Listeria monocytogenes. Further we searched through all published cases for typical signs, risk factors, details of medical and surgical treatment and outcome of endogenous endophthalmitis due to this rare pathogen. Ocular symptoms in almost all of these published cases included pain, redness of the eye, and decreased vision. Main clinical features included elevated intraocular pressure and fibrinous anterior chamber reaction, as well as a dark hypopyon. While the infection is typically spread endogenously, neither an exogenous nor endogenous source of infection could be identified in most cases. Immunocompromised patients are at higher risk of being infected than immunocompetent patients. The clinical course of endophthalmitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes had different visual outcomes. In some cases, the infection led to enucleation, blindness, or strong visual loss, whereas most patients showed a tendency of visual improvement during therapy. Early diagnosis and treatment initiation are crucial factors in the outcome of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes. This possible differential diagnosis should be kept in mind while treating patients with presumable sterile hypopyon and anterior uveitis having a high intraocular pressure. A bacterial source should be considered with a prompt initiation of systemic

  13. Reporting of unintended events in an intensive care unit: comparison between staff and observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verri Marco

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to identify relevant targets for change, it is essential to know the reliability of incident staff reporting. The aim of this study is to compare the incidence and type of unintended events (UE reported by facilitated Intensive Care Unit (ICU staff with those recorded concurrently by an observer. Methods The study is a prospective data collection performed in two 4-bed multidisciplinary ICUs of a teaching hospital. The format of the UE reporting system was voluntary, facilitated and not necessarily anonymous, and used a structured form with a predetermined list of items. UEs were reported by ICU staff over a period of 4 weeks. The reporting incidence during the first fourteen days was compared with that during the second fourteen. During morning shifts in the second fourteen days, one observer in each ICU recorded any UE seen. The staff was not aware of the observers' study. The incidence of UEs reported by staff was compared with that recorded by the observers. Results The staff reported 36 UEs in the first fourteen days and 31 in the second.. The incidence of UE detection during morning shifts was significantly higher than during afternoon or night shifts (p Conclusion UE incidence is strongly underreported by staff in comparison with observers. Also the types of UEs reported are different. Invaluable information about incidents in ICU can be obtained in a few days by observer monitoring.

  14. Patient-reported outcomes after electron radiation treatment for early-stage palmar and plantar fibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Jessica; Saraiya, Siddharth; Tennyson, Nathan; Nedelka, Michele; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Palmar and plantar fibromatosis (PPF) is a progressive connective tissue disorder of the hand/foot that often leads to debilitating functional impairment. In Europe, orthovoltage radiation therapy (RT) has been demonstrated to prevent local disease progression for up to 80% of patients with early-stage PPF. There are limited data reporting outcomes for populations outside of Europe or using electron RT. Between 2008 and 2013, 44 early-stage PPF cases received RT. RT fields involved clinically defined targets encompassing involved areas (skin changes, cords, nodules) with at least 1.5-cm margins. En face electrons (6-12 MeV) and bolus (0.5-1 cm) were selected individually. Outcomes are reported for patients who participated in an institutional review board-approved standardized questionnaire and chart review. Thirty-three patients received 66 treatments (45 hands/15 feet and 6 reirradiations). Most frequent dose schemes were 21 Gy (3 Gy in 7 fractions) and 30 Gy (3 Gy in 10 fractions with 6- to 8-week breaks after 15 Gy). Median time to follow-up survey was 31 months. Disease progression at any location within or outside the RT treatment field occurred in 20 of 33 patients (61%). Fourteen of 60 sites (23%) developed in-field progression, but 4 sites were successfully reirradiated with final local control in 50 of 60 sites (83%). RT improved pretreatment symptoms of pain with strain at 30 of 37 sites (81%) and itch/burn sensations at 17 of 21 sites (81%). There were no reported grade ≥2 late toxicities even with reirradiation. Patient reported overall success with treatment was 31 of 33 patients (94%). PPF is a progressive disease. En face electron RT is an effective therapy that stabilizes or improves symptoms in the majority of patients. Reirradiation can be considered as a treatment option for in-field progression. Patients report minimal toxicity and a high rate of satisfaction with treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published

  15. The importance of patient-reported outcome measures in reconstructive urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew J; N'Dow, James; Pickard, Rob

    2010-11-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are now recognised as the most appropriate instruments to assess the effectiveness of healthcare interventions from the patient's perspective. The purpose of this review was to identify recent publications describing the use of PROMs following reconstructive urological surgery. A wide systematic search identified only three original articles published in the last 2 years that prospectively assessed effectiveness using a patient-completed condition-specific or generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument. These publications illustrate the need to administer PROMs at a postoperative interval relevant to the anticipated recovery phase of individual procedures. They also highlight the difference in responsiveness of generic HRQoL instruments to symptomatic improvement between straightforward conditions such as pelviureteric junction obstruction and complex multidimensional conditions such as meningomyelocele. PROMs uptake and awareness is increasing in reconstructive urology but more work is required to demonstrate the effectiveness of surgical procedures for patients and healthcare funders alike. Healthcare policy-makers now rely on these measures to determine whether specific treatments are worth financing and to compare outcomes between institutions.

  16. Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma Associated With Congestive Heart Failure: Two Case Reports With Different Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Yibin; Liang, Yun; Lu, Guoyan

    2015-12-01

    Infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma (IHH) is rare which can regress spontaneously. Arteriovenous shunts within hemangiomas, however, may result in pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) and congestive heart failure (CHF).The authors report 2 young infants suffering from multifocal IHH associated with CHF were both treated with glucocorticoid and transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE), but had different outcomes. The PAH decreased immediately and the symptoms of CHF were alleviated after TAE for both of them. For the Tibetan infant, the development was normal with tumor regression by follow-up. For the Han ethnic neonate, PAH increased again in the seventh day with progressive cardiovascular insufficiency. Ultrasound showed a persisting perfusion caused by collateralization around occluded main feeders. Furthermore, a pulmonary infection occurred and ventilation was performed. As a result, the infant died from multiorgan failure caused by CHF and infection.TAE is a treatment of reducing shunting for hemangiomas. Fistula recanalization in multifocal IHH, however, might be an important risk factor affecting the outcome of TAE. TAE should be further evaluated with special attention to anatomy of feeding and draining vessels, and cardiopulmonary conditions. In addition, the patients were susceptible to secondary pulmonary infection because of lung congestion. As well, the infant from the high altitude area showed better adaptability to hypoxia.

  17. Patient Reported Outcome Measure of Spiritual Care as Delivered by Chaplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Austyn; Telfer, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Chaplains are employed by health organizations around the world to support patients in recognizing and addressing their spiritual needs. There is currently no generalizable measure of the impact of these interventions and so the clinical and strategic worth of chaplaincy is difficult to articulate. This article introduces the Scottish PROM, an original five-item patient reported outcome measure constructed specifically to address this gap. It describes the validation process from its conceptual grounding in the spiritual care literature through face and content validity cycles. It shows that the Scottish PROM is internally consistent and unidimensional. Responses to the Scottish PROM show strong convergent validity with responses to the Warwick and Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale, a generic well-being scale often used as a proxy for spiritual well-being. In summary, the Scottish PROM is fit for purpose. It measures the outcomes of spiritual care as delivered by chaplains in this study. This novel project introduces an essential and original breakthrough; the possibility of generalizable international chaplaincy research.

  18. Outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and subsequent self-reported life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivasaari-Pirinen, Paula; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli; Hippeläinen, Maritta; Raatikainen, Kaisa; Heinonen, Seppo

    2014-01-01

    To compare life satisfaction between women with successful or unsuccessful outcome after assisted reproductive treatment (ART) by taking into account the time since the last ART. Cohort study. Tertiary hospital. A total of 987 consecutive women who had undergone ART during 1996-2007 were invited and altogether 505 women participated in the study. A postal enquiry with a life satisfaction scale. Self-reported life satisfaction in respect to the time since the last ART. In general, women who achieved a live birth after ART had a significantly higher life satisfaction than those who had unsuccessful ART, especially when compared in the first three years. The difference disappeared in the time period of 6-9 years after ART. The unsuccessfully treated women who had a child by some other means before or after the unsuccessful ART had comparable life satisfaction with successfully treated women even earlier. Even if unsuccessful ART outcome is associated with subsequent lower level of life satisfaction, it does not seem to threaten the long-term wellbeing.

  19. Measuring and reporting quality of life outcomes in clinical trials in cystic fibrosis: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Anna

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Good quality clinical trials are essential to inform the best cystic fibrosis (CF management and care, by determining and comparing the effectiveness of new and existing therapies and drug delivery systems. The formal inclusion of quality of life (QoL as an outcome measure in CF clinical trials is becoming more common. Both an appropriate QoL measure and sound methodology are required in order to draw valid inferences about treatments and QoL. A review was undertaken of randomised controlled trials in cystic fibrosis where QoL was measured. EMBASE, MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science were searched to locate all full papers in the English language reporting randomised controlled trials in cystic fibrosis, published between January 1991 and December 2004. All Cochrane reviews published before December 2004 were hand searched. Papers were included if the authors had reported that they had measured QoL or well being in the trial. 16 trials were identified. The interventions investigated were: antibiotics (4; home versus hospital administration of antibiotics (1; steroids (1; mucolytic therapies (6; exercise (3 and pancreatic enzymes (1. Not one trial evaluated in this review provided conclusive results concerning QoL. This review highlights many of the pitfalls of QoL measurement in CF clinical trials and provides constructive information concerning the design and reporting of trials measuring QoL.

  20. The effects of living distantly from peritoneal dialysis units on peritonitis risk, microbiology, treatment and outcomes: a multi-centre registry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine whether distance between residence and peritoneal dialysis (PD) unit influenced peritonitis occurrence, microbiology, treatment and outcomes. Methods The study included all patients receiving PD between 1/10/2003 and 31/12/2008, using ANZDATA Registry data. Results 365 (6%) patients lived ≥100 km from their nearest PD unit (distant group), while 6183 (94%) lived peritonitis in distant patients (1.34 years, 95% CI 1.07-1.61) was significantly shorter than in local patients (1.68 years, 95% CI 1.59-1.77, p = 0.001), whilst overall peritonitis rates were higher in distant patients (incidence rate ratio 1.32, 95% CI 1.20-1.46). Living ≥100 km away from a PD unit was independently associated with a higher risk of S. aureus peritonitis (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.64, 95% CI 1.09-2.47). Distant patients with first peritonitis episodes were less likely to be hospitalised (64% vs 73%, p = 0.008) and receive antifungal prophylaxis (4% vs 10%, p = 0.01), but more likely to receive vancomycin-based antibiotic regimens (52% vs 42%, p peritonitis outcomes, distant patients were more likely to be cured with antibiotics alone (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.03-2.24). All other outcomes were comparable between the two groups. Conclusions Living ≥100 km away from a PD unit was associated with increased risk of S. aureus peritonitis, modified approaches to peritonitis treatment and peritonitis outcomes that were comparable to, or better than patients living closer to a PD unit. Staphylococcal decolonisation should receive particular consideration in remote living patients. PMID:22702659

  1. The establishment of endovascular aneurysm coiling at a neurovascular unit: report of experience during early years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, O; Gál, G; Johansson, M; Solander, S; Tovi, M; Persson, L; Ronne-Engström, E; Enblad, P

    2005-02-01

    The treatment of cerebral aneurysms is changing from surgical clipping to endovascular coiling (EVC) in many neurovascular centres. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical results and clinical outcome at 6 months in a consecutive series of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients treated with EVC, in a situation when the EVC had been established very rapidly as the first line of treatment at a neurovascular centre. The patient material comprised 239 SAH patients (155 women and 84 men, mean age 55 years, age range 16-81) allocated to EVC as the first line of treatment in the acute stage (within 3 weeks of rupture) between September 1996 and December 2000. Clinical grade on admission was Hunt & Hess (H&H) I and II in 42%, H&H III in 25% and H&H grade IV and V in 33% of the patients. The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 82% of the cases. EVC was performed on days 0-3 in 77% of the cases. EVC of the target aneurysm was able to be completed in 222 patients (93%). Complete occlusion was achieved in 126 patients (53%). Procedural complications occurred in 39 patients (16%). Favourable clinical outcome was observed in 57%, severe disability in 28% and poor outcome in 14% of the patients. Favourable outcome was achieved in 77% of H&H I and II patients and in 43% of H&H III-V patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that younger age, good neurological grade on admission, absence of intracerebral hematoma and intraventricular hematoma respectively, ICA-PcomA aneurysm location, later treatment and absence of complications were significant predictors of favourable outcome. After interventional training and installation of the X-ray system, the introduction and establishment of EVC at a neurovascular unit can be done in a short period of time and with favourable results. Future studies must concentrate on identifying factors of importance for the choice of interventional or surgical therapy. The results of this study indicate

  2. Operation for recurrent cystocele with anterior colporrhaphy or non-absorbable mesh: patient reported outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüssler, Emil Karl; Greisen, Susanne; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2013-01-01

    Abstract INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to compare patient reported outcomes and complications after repair of recurrent anterior vaginal wall prolapse in routine health care settings using standard anterior colporrhaphy or non-absorbable mesh. METHODS: The study is based...... on prospective data from the Swedish National Register for Gynaecological Surgery. 286 women were operated on for recurrent anterior vaginal wall prolapse in 2008-2010; 157 women had an anterior colporrhaphy and 129 were operated on with a non-absorbable mesh. Pre-, and perioperative data were collected from...... were found more often in the mesh group. However, no differences in serious complications were found. Thus, an organ lesion was found in 2.3 % after mesh implant compared with 2.5 % after anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.58). Two patients in the mesh group (1.2 %) were re-operated compared with 1 patient...

  3. Pregnancy outcome in women with antiphospholipid syndrome and alloimmunity: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serguei Abel Castañeda Ospina

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and alloimmunity have poor pregnancy outcomes. Several diagnostic and therapeutic options exist for these disorders, although there is no consensus as to the best treatment. CASE REPORT: We present here the clinical course and treatment of a woman with a history of two miscarriages who joined our program 10 years ago and has been followed up ever since. After antiphospholipid syndrome and alloimmune failure were diagnosed, she was given preconceptional treatment using unfractionated heparin, aspirin, prednisone and lymphocyte immunizations. She delivered two premature babies in the following two pregnancies. At present both children are healthy and are attending school. The fifth pregnancy was unsuccessful, in spite of having undergone a similar but postconceptional therapeutic scheme. We discuss this case focusing on the pathogenic mechanisms and the therapeutic aspects of these disorders.

  4. The impact of having both cancer and diabetes on patient-reported outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissers, Pauline A J; Falzon, Louise; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This systematic review aims to summarize the current literature regarding potential effects of having both cancer and diabetes on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and to provide directions for future research. METHODS: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched from...... inception to January 2015. All English peer-reviewed studies that included patients with both cancer and diabetes and assessed PROs were included. All included studies were independently assessed on methodological quality by two investigators. RESULTS: Of the 3553 identified studies, 10 studies were...... such as depression, patient empowerment and self-management. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVOR: Having both cancer and diabetes might result in worse PROs, however, more research is needed as current evidence is scarce....

  5. US FDA patient-reported outcome guidance: great expectations and unintended consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehnel, Sheri; DeMuro, Carla; McLeod, Lori; Coon, Cheryl; Gnanasakthy, Ari

    2013-08-01

    Release of the US FDA patient-reported outcome (PRO) guidance raised expectations within the pharmaceutical industry for the use of PRO measures in support of labeling claims. The FDA developed the guidance with admirable intent, and the recommendations within this document are based on sound scientific principles. However, implementation of the guidance has been somewhat inconsistent within the Study Endpoints and Label Development (SEALD) and across the various FDA-reviewing divisions. Industry and regulatory bodies need to work toward gaining common ground to best support registration of treatments that could extend patients' lives, reduce symptoms, and/or improve health-related quality of life. PROs are valuable tools in communicating these messages, and realistic implementation of the FDA PRO Guidance may truly facilitate this process.

  6. Muscle function is associated with future patient-reported outcomes in young adults with ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flosadottir, Vala; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Consequences of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury include worse patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and a decrease in activity level. Muscle function can be improved by targeted exercise. Our aims were to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among lower...... extremity muscle function and PROs after ACL injury. METHODS: Fifty-four participants (15 women, mean 30 years) with ACL injury or reconstruction, from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) trial (ISRCTN84752559), were assessed with hop performance, muscle power...... and Activity Rating Scale (ARS). Partial Spearman's rank-order correlation was used to analyse correlations between muscle function and PROs, controlling for gender and treatment. RESULTS: Numerous cross-sectional correlations were observed between muscle function and PROs (rsp≈0.3-0.5, p≤0.045). Worse hop...

  7. Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme annual report, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Daley, Denise A; Thin Lee, Yung; Pearson, Julie C; Robinson, J Owen; Nimmo, Graeme R; Collignon, Peter; Howden, Benjamin P; Bell, Jan M; Turnidge, John D

    2016-06-30

    From 1 January to 31 December 2014, 27 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Staphylococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP). The aim of ASSOP 2014 was to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to methicillin and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the isolates. Overall, 18.8% of the 2,206 SAB episodes were methicillin resistant, which was significantly higher than that reported in most European countries. The 30-day all-cause mortality associated with methicillin-resistant SAB was 23.4%, which was significantly higher than the 14.4% mortality associated with methicillin-sensitive SAB (P important that antimicrobial resistance patterns in community and healthcare-associated SAB is monitored as this information will guide therapeutic practices in treating S. aureus sepsis.

  8. An introduction to patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, D G; Calvert, M; van der Wees, P J; ten Hove, R; Tolan, S; Hill, J C

    2015-06-01

    The use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is set to rise in physiotherapy. PROMs provide additional 'patient-centred' data which is unique in capturing the patient's own opinion on the impact of their disease or disorder, and its treatment, on their life. Thus, PROMs are increasingly used by clinicians to guide routine patient care, or for the purposes of audit, and are already firmly embedded in clinical research. This article seeks to summarise the key aspects of PROM use for physiotherapists, both in routine clinical practice and in the research setting, and highlights recent developments in the field. Generic and condition-specific PROMs are defined and examples of commonly used measures are provided. The selection of appropriate PROMs, and their effective use in the clinical and research settings is discussed. Finally, existing barriers to PROM use in practice are identified and recent physiotherapy PROM initiatives, led by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy are explored.

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of Etanercept and Adalimumab in Patient Reported Outcomes and Injection-Related Tolerability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Navarro-Millán

    Full Text Available To describe patient preferences in selecting specific biologics and compare clinical response using patient reported outcomes (PROs among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA started on different anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF therapies.Participants were enrollees in Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Patients with RA who had at least two provider visits and started a new anti-TNF therapy from 10/2010-8/2011, were eligible for participation in this longitudinal study. Using a telephone survey, patient preferences in biologic selection and RAPID3, MDHAQ, and SF-12 scores were collected at baseline and at 6 months. Patient scores rating injection/infusion-site burning and stinging (ISBS were collected at 6 months.In all, 267 patients with RA responded to the baseline survey, of whom 57% preferred an injectable biologic, 22% preferred an infused biologic, and 21% had no preference. Motivation for injectable biologics was convenience (92% and for infusion therapy was dislike or lack of self-efficacy for self-injection (16%. After 6 months of treatment with anti-TNF, 70% of the 177 patients who answered the ISBS question reported ISBS with the last dose; on a scale of 1 (none to 10 (worst, 41% of these reported a score of 2-5; and 29% reported a score of 6-10. Adalimumab users experienced 3.2 times (95% confidence interval 1.2-8.6 the level of ISBS that etanercept users experienced. There were no significant differences in RAPID3, MDHAQ, or SF-12 scores between etanercept or adalimumab initiators.Convenience and fear of self-injection were important considerations to patients selecting a biologic drug. Although more convenient, adalimumab associated with more ISBS than did etanercept, and this rate was higher than reported in clinical trials. At 6 months, PROs did not differ between etanercept and adalimumab users.

  10. Bariatric surgery results: reporting clinical characteristics and adverse outcomes from an integrated healthcare delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Robert A; Fisher, David P; Dutta, Sanjoy; O'Brien, Rebecca M; Ackerson, Lynn M; Sorel, Michael E; Sidney, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Limited data have been reported on bariatric surgery within a large, high-volume regional multicenter integrated healthcare delivery system. Review clinical characteristics and short- and intermediate-term outcomes and adverse events from a bariatric surgery program within an integrated healthcare delivery system. Single high-volume, multicenter regional integrated healthcare delivery system. Adult patients who underwent primary bariatric surgery during 2010-2011 were reviewed. Clinical characteristics, outcomes, and weight loss results were extracted from the electronic medical record. A total of 2399 patients were identified within the study period. The 30-day rates of clinical outcomes for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB; n = 1313) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG; n = 1018) were 2.9% for readmission, 3.0% for major complications, .8% for reoperation, and 0% for mortality. One-year and 2-year weight loss results were as follows: percent weight loss (%WL) was 31.4 (±SD 8.5) and 34.2±12.0% for SG and 34.1±9.3 and 39.1±11.9 for RYGB; percent excess weight loss (%EBWL) was 64.2±18.0 and 69.8±23.7 for SG and 68.0±19.3 and 77.8±23.7 for RYGB; percent excess body mass index loss (%EBMIL) was 72.9±21.0 and 77.7±22.4 for SG and 76.6±22.1% and 85.6±21.6 for RYGB. Follow-up for each procedure at 1 year was 76% for SG (n = 778) and 80% for RYGB (n = 1052) and at 2 years was 65% for SG (n = 659) and 67% for RYGB (n = 875). A large regional high-volume multicenter bariatric program within an integrated healthcare delivery system can produce excellent short-term results with low rates of short- and intermediate-term adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimated winter 1980-1981 electric demand and supply, contiguous United States. Staff report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the most recent data available concerning projected electrical peak demands and available power resouces for the 1980-1981 winter peak period, as reported by electric utilities in the contiguous United States. The data, grouped by Regional Reliability Council areas and by Electrical Regions within the Council areas, was obtained from the Form 12E-2 reports filed by utilities with the Department of Energy on October 15, 1980 (data as of September 30). In some instances the data were revised or verified by telephone. Considerations affecting reliability, arising from Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions based on lessons learned from the forced outage of Three Mile Island Nuclear Unit No. 2, were factored into the report. No widespread large-scale reliability problems are foreseen for electric power supply this winter, on the basis of the supply and demand projections furnished by the electric utilities. Reserve margins could drop in some electric regions to levels considered inadequate for reliable service, if historical forced-outage magnitudes recur.

  12. Patient-Reported Outcome and Quality of Life Instruments Database (PROQOLID: Frequently asked questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrier Laure-Lou

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The exponential development of Patient-Reported Outcomes (PRO measures in clinical research has led to the creation of the Patient-Reported Outcome and Quality of Life Instruments Database (PROQOLID to facilitate the selection process of PRO measures in clinical research. The project was initiated by Mapi Research Trust in Lyon, France. Initially called QOLID (Quality of Life Instruments Database, the project's purpose was to provide all those involved in health care evaluation with a comprehensive and unique source of information on PRO and HRQOL measures available through the Internet. PROQOLID currently describes more than 470 PRO instruments in a structured format. It is available in two levels, non-subscribers and subscribers, at http://www.proqolid.org. The first level is free of charge and contains 14 categories of basic useful information on the instruments (e.g. author, objective, original language, list of existing translations, etc.. The second level provides significantly more information about the instruments. It includes review copies of over 350 original instruments, 120 user manuals and 350 translations. Most are available in PDF format. This level is only accessible to annual subscribers. PROQOLID is updated in close collaboration with the instruments' authors on a regular basis. Fifty or more new instruments are added to the database annually. Today, all of the major pharmaceutical companies, prestigious institutions (such as the FDA, the NIH's National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Veterans Administration, dozens of universities, public institutions and researchers subscribe to PROQOLID on a yearly basis. More than 800 users per day routinely visit the database.

  13. Denmark's National Inventory Report - Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, 1990-2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, J. B.; Lyck, E.; Nielsen, M.

    This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report reported to the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) due by 15 April 2003. The report contains information on Denmark's in-ventories for all years' from 1990 to 2001 for CO2, CH4, N2O...

  14. Denmark's National Inventory Report - Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, 1990-2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, J. B.; Lyck, E.; Nielsen, M.

    This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report reported to the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) due by 15 April 2003. The report contains information on Denmark's in-ventories for all years' from 1990 to 2001 for CO2, CH4, N2O...

  15. Fatigue, patient reported outcomes, and objective measurement of physical activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, M A; Ahn, G E; Chmiel, J S; Dunlop, D D; Helenowski, I B; Semanik, P; Song, J; Yount, S; Chang, R W; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2016-10-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and engaging in physical activity may reduce fatigue. We aimed to characterize relationships between fatigue, other health status measures assessed with the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) instruments, and accelerometer-based physical activity measurements in patients with SLE. The internal consistency of each PROMIS measure in our SLE sample was also evaluated. This cross-sectional study analyzed 123 adults with SLE. The primary fatigue outcome was Fatigue Severity Scale score. Secondary outcomes were PROMIS standardized T-scores in seven health status domains. Accelerometers were worn for seven days, and mean daily minutes of light, moderate/vigorous, and bouted (10 minutes) moderate/vigorous physical activity were estimated. Cronbach's alpha was determined for each PROMIS measure to assess internal consistency. Relationships between Fatigue Severity Scale, PROMIS, and physical activity were summarized with Spearman partial correlation coefficients (r), adjusted for average daily accelerometer wear time. Mean Fatigue Severity Scale score (4.3, SD 1.6) was consistent with clinically relevant levels of fatigue. Greater daily and bouted moderate/vigorous physical activity minutes correlated with lower Mean Fatigue Severity Scale score (r = -0.20, p = 0.03 and r = -0.30, p = 0.0007, respectively). For PROMIS, bouted moderate/vigorous physical activity minutes correlated with less fatigue (r = -0.20, p = 0.03). PROMIS internal consistency was excellent, with Cronbach's alpha > 0.90 for each domain. Mean PROMIS T-scores for fatigue, pain interference, anxiety, sleep disturbance, sleep-related impairment, and physical function were worse than reported for the general US population. More moderate/vigorous physical activity minutes were associated with less pain interference (r = -0.22, p = 0.01). Both light physical activity and

  16. Systematic review: patient-reported outcome measures in coeliac disease for regulatory submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestaro, W J; Edwards, T C; Patrick, D L

    2016-08-01

    New therapeutics are moving into phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of coeliac disease, a condition with no established therapies other than gluten-free diet. These trials will require a meaningful, validated and fit for purpose patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) to quantify the symptomatic improvement of patients. To evaluate existing PROMs for suitability in a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval trial for a coeliac disease therapeutic. We performed a systematic search in five online databases (MedLine, EmBase, Web of Science, CENTRAL, CINAHL) for studies that enrolled patients with coeliac disease and used PROMs. Studies included in this review had to measure some PROM concept, be patient administered and based upon a previously validated instrument with published measurement properties. Our literature search identified 2706 unique records of which 199 ultimately qualified for abstraction. The majority of PROMs used in studies of coeliac disease was generic and did not measure numerous symptoms or concerns of interest to patients. Four PROMs were found to contain appropriate content for use in an FDA trial: the coeliac disease-specific modification of the Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale (CeD-GSRS), Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB), the Celiac Disease Symptom Diary (CDSD) and the Celiac Disease Patient Reported Outcome (CeD-PRO). The GSRS and PGWB are most often used together and are two of the most extensively used measures in coeliac disease. The CDSD and CeD-PRO were developed exclusively for trials in coeliac disease but have much less published information on their measurement properties. While we did not find PROMs that currently meet the stated expectations of the FDA for regulatory purposes, four PROMs (CeD-GSRS, PGWB, CDSD and CeD-PRO) appear to contain appropriate content and with modest additional validation work could meet scientific standards for valid and sensitive measures of disease and treatment outcome

  17. Patient-reported outcome 2 years after lung transplantation: does the underlying diagnosis matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Jose Santana,1 David Feeny,2 Sunita Ghosh,3 Dale C Lien41Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, OR, USA; 3Cross Cancer Center, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 4University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaPurpose: Transplantation has the potential to produce profound effects on survival and health-related quality of life (HRQL. The inclusion of the patient’s perspective may play an important role in the assessment of the effectiveness of lung transplantation. Patient perspectives are assessed by patient-reported outcome measures, including HRQL measures. We describe how patients’ HRQL among different diagnosis groups can be used by clinicians to monitor and evaluate the outcomes associated with transplantation.Methods: Consecutive lung transplant recipients attending the lung transplant outpatient clinic in a tertiary institution completed the 15-item Health Utilities Index (HUI questionnaire on a touchscreen computer. The results were available to clinicians at every patient visit. The HUI3 covers a range of severity and comorbidities in eight dimensions of health status. Overall HUI3 scores are on a scale in which dead = 0.00 and perfect health = 1.00; disability categories range from no disability = 1 to severe disability <0.70. Single-attribute and overall HUI3 scores were used to compare patients’ HRQL among different diagnosis groups. Random-effect models with time since transplant as a random variable and age, gender, underlying diagnoses, infections, and broncholitis obliterans syndrome as fixed variables were built to identify determinants of health status at 2-years posttransplantation.Results: Two hundred and fourteen lung transplant recipients of whom 61% were male with a mean age of 52 (19–75 years were included in the study. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis patients displayed

  18. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Individuals With Chronic Ankle Instability: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Megan N; Hoch, Johanna M; Hoch, Matthew C

    2015-10-01

    A comprehensive systematic literature review of the health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) differences among individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI), ankle-sprain copers, and healthy control participants has not been conducted. It could provide a better indication of the self-reported deficits that may be present in individuals with CAI. To systematically summarize the extent to which HRQOL deficits are present in individuals with CAI. We searched for articles in the electronic databases of EBSCO Host and PubMed Central using key words chronic, functional, mechanical, coper, instability, sprains, and patient-assessed. We also performed a hand search of reference lists, authors, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of the articles screened for inclusion. Studies were included if they (1) incorporated a PRO as a participant descriptor or as a study outcome to compare adults with CAI to ankle-sprain copers or healthy controls, (2) were written in English, and (3) were published in peer-reviewed journals. Two authors independently assessed methodologic quality using the modified Downs and Black Index. Articles were filtered into 3 categories based on between-groups comparisons: CAI and copers, CAI and healthy control participants, copers and healthy participants. We calculated Hedges g effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals to examine PRO group differences. Of the 124 studies assessed for eligibility, 27 were included. A total of 24 articles compared PROs in individuals with CAI and healthy controls, 7 compared individuals with CAI and copers, and 4 compared copers and healthy controls. Quality scores on the modified Downs and Black Index ranged from 52.9% to 88.2%, with 8 high-, 16 moderate-, and 3 low-quality studies. Overall, we observed moderate to strong evidence that individuals with CAI displayed deficits on generic and region-specific PROs compared with copers and healthy controls. However, evidence that differences exist between copers and healthy

  19. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA) (WHC 1993a), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. A LFI Report is required, in accordance with the HPPS, when waste sites are to be considered for IRMs. The LFI is an integral part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) and process and functions as a focused RI or RFI for selection of IRMs. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRMs, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARA), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose an unacceptable risk that warrants action through IRMs. The 100-HR-1 unit encompasses approximately 100 acres adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. It contains waste units associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support the H Reactor. The area also contains evaporation basins which received liquid process wastes and nonroutine deposits of chemical wastes from the 300 Area, where fuel elements for the N Reactor were produced.

  20. Overview of Student Characteristics and Program Outcomes. HEP/CAMP National Evaluation Project. Research Report No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gary L.; And Others

    This research report is a detailed summary of student backgrounds, family characteristics, and educational and career outcomes of the respondents in the 1984-85 High School Equivalency Programs (HEP) and College Assistance for Migrants Programs (CAMP) National Evaluation Project. The report indicates that approximately half the HEP/CAMP…

  1. Patterns in the Identification of and Outcomes for Children and Youth with Disabilities. Final Report. NCEE 2010-4005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackorby, Jose; Schiller, Ellen; Mallik, Sangeeta; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Huang, Tracy; Javitz, Harold; Marder, Camille; Nagle, Katherine; Shaver, Debra; Wagner, Mary; Williamson, Cyndi

    2010-01-01

    Reported here are the results of analyses to describe the patterns of identification and academic and developmental outcomes for children with disabilities, conducted as part of the 2004 National Assessment of the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This report provides background context for National…

  2. 2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-03-01

    This report presents the 2008 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 447 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended February 2008) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes proof of concept monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes investigation activities associated with CAU 447 that were conducted at the site during 2008. This is the second groundwater monitoring report prepared by LM for the PSA

  3. Participant report for National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom) Hole Plate No. 137

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Morace, Renate Erica

    International pour l’Etude Scientifique des Techniques de Production Mécanique (CIRP). In the project, 15 research laboratories have been involved from 9 countries: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA. A total of 24 CMMs were used to measure an optomechanical hole...... procedure of own choice. In this report, the results of a single participant are analysed and compared with the reference values provided by DTU. The purpose of the report is to collect information from the participant and present the result of the data analysis. Furthermore, comments from the participant...... are expected by the organizer and the information will be used in the preparation of the final report....

  4. 2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report Central Nevada Test Area, Corrective Action Unit 443

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-03-01

    This report presents the 2008 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the CNTA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to DOE-LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 443 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 2005) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes proof-of-concept monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes investigation activities associated with CAU 443 that were conducted at the site during fiscal year 2008. This is the second groundwater monitoring report prepared by DOE-LM for the CNTA.

  5. Self-reported non-adherence to ART and virological outcome in a multiclinic UK study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherr, L; Lampe, F C; Clucas, C; Johnson, M; Fisher, M; Leake Date, H; Anderson, J; Edwards, S; Smith, C J; Hill, T; Harding, R

    2010-08-01

    Adherence is of fundamental importance to ART success. We examined the association of self-reported non-adherence with demographic factors, health and behaviour issues, and virological outcome, in a multi-clinic study. Seven hundred and seventy-eight HIV patients in five clinics in London and Brighton completed a questionnaire on adherence and HIV/health issues at baseline in 2005/6. For 486 subjects taking ART, non-adherence in the past week was defined as: (A)>or=1 dose missed or taken incorrectly (wrong time/circumstances); (B)>or=1 dose missed; (C)>or=2 doses missed. Questionnaire data were matched with routine treatment and virology data for consenting subjects (61.4%). We assessed four virological outcomes in 307 of 486 patients: (i) VL>50c/mL using latest VL at the questionnaire and excluding patients starting HAART50c/mL using the first VL from 6 to 12 months post-questionnaire; (iii) any VL>50c/mL from 6 to 12 months post-questionnaire; (iv) among patients with VL50c/mL over two years follow up. Non-adherence was reported by 278 (57.2%), 102 (21.0%) and 49 (10.1%) of 486 patients, for definitions A, B and C, respectively. Non-adherence declined markedly with older age, and tended to be more commonly reported by Black patients, those born outside the UK, those with greater psychological symptoms and those with suicidal thoughts. There was a weaker association with physical symptoms and no association with gender/sexuality, education, unemployment, or risk behaviour (p>0.1). In logistic regression analyses, younger age, non-UK birth and psychological variables were independent predictors of non-adherence [e.g., for non-adherence B: odds ratios (95% CI) were 0.95 (0.92, 0.98) for every year older age; 1.6 (1.0, 2.5) for non-UK born; 2.3 (1.5, 3.7) for suicidal thoughts]. Non-adherence was associated with poorer virological outcome; the most consistent association was for definition C. Among 255 patients with VLdefinition C was independently associated with

  6. Nuclear Facility Accident (NFAC) Unit Test Report For HPAC Version 6.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ronald W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computational Sciences and Engineering Division; Morris, Robert W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computational Sciences and Engineering Division; Sulfredge, Charles David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computational Sciences and Engineering Division

    2015-12-01

    This is a unit test report for the Nuclear Facility Accident (NFAC) model for the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) version 6.3. NFAC’s responsibility as an HPAC component is three-fold. First, it must present an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) by which users can view and edit the definition of an NFAC incident. Second, for each incident defined, NFAC must interact with RTH to create activity table inputs and associate them with pseudo materials to be transported via SCIPUFF. Third, NFAC must create SCIPUFF releases with the associated pseudo materials for transport and dispersion. The goal of NFAC unit testing is to verify that the inputs it produces are correct for the source term or model definition as specified by the user via the GUI.

  7. FFUSION yearbook 1997. Annual report of the Finnish fusion research unit. Association EURATOM-TEKES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, S.; Paettikangas, T. [eds.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-02-01

    Finnish fusion programme (FFUSION) is one of the eleven national energy research programmes funded by the Technological Development Centre of Finland (TEKES). The FFUSION programme was fully integrated into European Fusion Programme just after Finland joined the European Union. The contract of Association Euratom and Tekes was signed in 1995 and extends to the end of 1999. Finland became a member of JET Joint Undertaking in 1996, other contracts with Euratom include NET agreement and the Staff Mobility Agreement. FFUSION programme with participating research institutes and universities forms the Fusion Research Unit of the Association Euratom-Tekes. This annual report summarises the research activities of the Finnish Research Unit in 1997. The programme consists of two parts: Physics and Technology. The research areas of the physics are: Fusion plasma engineering, and Radio-frequency heating and Plasma diagnostics. The technology is focused into three areas: Fusion reactor materials (first wall components and joining techniques), Remote handling and viewing systems, and Superconductors

  8. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Ansa Maer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Scherwath, Angela [Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ernst, Gundula [Department of Medical Psychology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Lanfermann, Heinrich [Institute for Neuroradiology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Steinmann, Diana, E-mail: steinmann.diana@mh-hannover.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in

  9. Bariatric Surgery in the United Kingdom: A Cohort Study of Weight Loss and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Clinical Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J Douglas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is becoming a more widespread treatment for obesity. Comprehensive evidence of the long-term effects of contemporary surgery on a broad range of clinical outcomes in large populations treated in routine clinical practice is lacking. The objective of this study was to measure the association between bariatric surgery, weight, body mass index, and obesity-related co-morbidities.This was an observational retrospective cohort study using data from the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. All 3,882 patients registered in the database and with bariatric surgery on or before 31 December 2014 were included and matched by propensity score to 3,882 obese patients without surgery. The main outcome measures were change in weight and body mass index over 4 y; incident diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, fractures, obstructive sleep apnoea, and cancer; mortality; and resolution of hypertension and T2DM. Weight measures were available for 3,847 patients between 1 and 4 mo, 2,884 patients between 5 and 12 mo, and 2,258 patients between 13 and 48 mo post-procedure. Bariatric surgery patients exhibited rapid weight loss for the first four postoperative months, at a rate of 4.98 kg/mo (95% CI 4.88-5.08. Slower weight loss was sustained to the end of 4 y. Gastric bypass (6.56 kg/mo and sleeve gastrectomy (6.29 kg/mo were associated with greater initial weight reduction than gastric banding (2.77 kg/mo. Protective hazard ratios (HRs were detected for bariatric surgery for incident T2DM, 0.68 (95% CI 0.55-0.83; hypertension, 0.35 (95% CI 0.27-0.45; angina, 0.59 (95% CI 0.40-0.87;MI, 0.28 (95% CI 0.10-0.74; and obstructive sleep apnoea, 0.55 (95% CI 0.40-0.87. Strong associations were found between bariatric surgery and the resolution of T2DM, with a HR of 9.29 (95% CI 6.84-12.62, and between bariatric surgery and the resolution of hypertension, with a HR of 5.64 (95% CI

  10. Bariatric Surgery in the United Kingdom: A Cohort Study of Weight Loss and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Clinical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Ian J.; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Batterham, Rachel L.; Smeeth, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is becoming a more widespread treatment for obesity. Comprehensive evidence of the long-term effects of contemporary surgery on a broad range of clinical outcomes in large populations treated in routine clinical practice is lacking. The objective of this study was to measure the association between bariatric surgery, weight, body mass index, and obesity-related co-morbidities. Methods and Findings This was an observational retrospective cohort study using data from the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. All 3,882 patients registered in the database and with bariatric surgery on or before 31 December 2014 were included and matched by propensity score to 3,882 obese patients without surgery. The main outcome measures were change in weight and body mass index over 4 y; incident diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, fractures, obstructive sleep apnoea, and cancer; mortality; and resolution of hypertension and T2DM. Weight measures were available for 3,847 patients between 1 and 4 mo, 2,884 patients between 5 and 12 mo, and 2,258 patients between 13 and 48 mo post-procedure. Bariatric surgery patients exhibited rapid weight loss for the first four postoperative months, at a rate of 4.98 kg/mo (95% CI 4.88–5.08). Slower weight loss was sustained to the end of 4 y. Gastric bypass (6.56 kg/mo) and sleeve gastrectomy (6.29 kg/mo) were associated with greater initial weight reduction than gastric banding (2.77 kg/mo). Protective hazard ratios (HRs) were detected for bariatric surgery for incident T2DM, 0.68 (95% CI 0.55–0.83); hypertension, 0.35 (95% CI 0.27–0.45); angina, 0.59 (95% CI 0.40–0.87);MI, 0.28 (95% CI 0.10–0.74); and obstructive sleep apnoea, 0.55 (95% CI 0.40–0.87). Strong associations were found between bariatric surgery and the resolution of T2DM, with a HR of 9.29 (95% CI 6.84–12.62), and between bariatric surgery and the resolution of

  11. Outcome of Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants Who Require Intensive Care Unit Support: A Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Becerra, Samantha; Labastida-Mercado, Nancy; Rosales-Padrón, Jaime; García-Chavez, Jessica; Soto-Vega, Elena; Rivadeneyra-Espinoza, Liliana; León-Peña, Andres A; Fernández-Lara, Danitza; Dominguez-Cid, Monica; Anthon-Méndez, Javier; Arizpe-Bravo, Daniel; Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2015-01-01

    Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a patient who has been grafted with hematopoietic stem cells is a serious event, but the role of the ICU in this setting remains controversial. Data were analyzed from patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation at the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla, México, between May 1993 and October 2014. In total, 339 patients were grafted: 150 autografts and 189 allografts; 68 of the grafted patients (20%) were admitted to the ICU after transplantation: 27% of the allografted and 11% of the autografted patients (p = 0.2). Two of 17 autografted patients (12%) and 5 of 51 allografted patients (10%) survived. All patients who required insertion of an endotracheal tube died, whereas 7 of 11 patients without invasive mechanical ventilation survived (p = 0.001). Only 10% of the grafted patients survived their stay in the ICU; this figure is lower than those reported from other centers and may reflect several facts, varying from the quality of the ICU support to ICU admission criteria to the initial management of all the grafts in an outpatient setting, which could somehow delay the arrival of patients to the hospital. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Informative value of Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) in Health Technology Assessment (HTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettschneider, Christian; Lühmann, Dagmar; Raspe, Heiner

    2011-02-02

    "Patient-Reported Outcome" (PRO) is used as an umbrella term for different concepts for measuring subjectively perceived health status e. g. as treatment effects. Their common characteristic is, that the appraisal of the health status is reported by the patient himself. In order to describe the informative value of PRO in Health Technology Assessment (HTA) first an overview of concepts, classifications and methods of measurement is given. The overview is complemented by an empirical analysis of clinical trials and HTA-reports on rheumatoid arthritis and breast cancer in order to report on type, frequency and consequences of PRO used in these documents. For both issues systematic reviews of the literature have been performed. The search for methodological literature covers the publication period from 1990 to 2009, the search for clinical trials of rheumatoid arthritis and breast cancer covers the period 2005 to 2009. Both searches were performed in the medical databases of the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI). The search for HTA-reports and methodological papers of HTA-agencies was performed in the CRD-Databases (CRD = Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) and by handsearching the websites of INAHTA member agencies (INAHTA = International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment). For all issues specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCT) was assessed by a modified version of the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. For the methodological part information extraction from the literature is structured by the report's chapters, for the empirical part data extraction sheets were constructed. All information is summarized in a qualitative manner. Concerning the methodological issues the literature search retrieved 158 documents (87 documents related to definition or classification, 125 documents related to operationalisation of PRO). For the empirical analyses

  13. School Improvement Change Grant Community Survey, Final Report. A Report to Toluca Community Unit School District #2, El Paso Community Unit School District #375, Lowpoint-Washburn Community Unit School District #21, Minonk-Dana-Rutland Community Unit School District #108, and Roanoke-Benson Community Unit School District #60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Patricia A.; And Others

    This report presents the results of a collaborative study undertaken by five rural, unit school districts in Illinois to provide data to be used in planning for school improvement. Information was gathered from on-site visits by teams of constituents from other districts and through a survey of perceptions of local community persons regarding…

  14. Resistance in gram-negative bacilli in a cardiac intensive care unit in India: Risk factors and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Mandakini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the risk factors and outcome of patients with preexisting resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB with those who develop sensitive GNB in the cardiac intensive care unit (ICU. Of the 3161 patients ( n = 3,161 admitted to the ICU during the study period, 130 (4.11% developed health care-associated infections (HAIs with GNB and were included in the cohort study. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (37.8% was the most common organism isolated followed by Klebsiella species (24.2%, E. coli (22.0%, Enterobacter species (6.1%, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (5.7%, Acinetobacter species (1.3%, Serratia marcescens (0.8%, Weeksella virosa (0.4% and Burkholderia cepacia (0.4%. Univariate analysis revealed that the following variables were significantly associated with the antibiotic-resistant GNB: females ( P = 0.018, re-exploration ( P = 0.004, valve surgery ( P = 0.003, duration of central venous catheter ( P < 0.001, duration of mechanical ventilation ( P < 0.001, duration of intra-aortic balloon counter-pulsation ( P = 0.018, duration of urinary catheter ( P < 0.001, total number of antibiotic exposures prior to the development of resistance ( P < 0.001, duration of antibiotic use prior to the development of resistance ( P = 0.014, acute physiology and age chronic health evaluation score (APACHE II, receipt of anti-pseudomonal penicillins (piperacillin-tazobactam ( P = 0.002 and carbapenems ( P < 0.001. On multivariate analysis, valve surgery (adjusted OR = 2.033; 95% CI = 1.052-3.928; P = 0.035, duration of mechanical ventilation (adjusted OR = 1.265; 95% CI = 1.055-1.517; P = 0.011 and total number of antibiotic exposure prior to the development of resistance (adjusted OR = 1.381; 95% CI = 1.030-1.853; P = 0.031 were identified as independent risk factors for HAIs in resistant GNB. The mortality rate in patients with resistant GNB was significantly higher than those with sensitive GNB (13.9% vs. 1.8%; P = 0.03. HAI with

  15. Use of scoring systems for assessing and reporting the outcome results from shoulder surgery and arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Booker, Simon; Alfahad, Nawaf; Scott, Martin; Gooding, Ben; Wallace, W. Angus

    2015-01-01

    To investigate shoulder scoring systems used in Europe and North America and how outcomes might be classified after shoulder joint replacement. All research papers published in four major journals in 2012 and 2013 were reviewed for the shoulder scoring systems used in their published papers. A method of identifying how outcomes after shoulder arthroplasty might be used to categorize patients into fair, good, very good and excellent outcomes was explored using the outcome evaluations from pati...

  16. Advantages and Psychometric Validation of Proximal Intensive Assessments of Patient Reported Outcomes Collected in Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Eve B.; Field, Nigel P.; Ruzek, Josef I.; Bryant, Richard A.; Dalenberg, Constance J.; Keane, Terence M.; Spain, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Ambulatory assessment data collection methods are increasingly used to study behavior, experiences, and patient reported outcomes (PROs) such as emotions, cognitions, and symptoms in clinical samples. Data collected close in time at frequent and fixed intervals can assess PROs that are discrete or changing rapidly and provide information about temporal dynamics or mechanisms of change in clinical samples and individuals, but clinical researchers have not yet routinely and systematically investigated the reliability and validity of such measures or their potential added value over conventional measures. The present study provides a comprehensive, systematic evaluation of the psychometrics of several Proximal Intensive Assessment (PIA) measures in a clinical sample and investigates whether PIA appears to assess meaningful differences in phenomena over time. Methods Data was collected on a variety of psychopathology constructs on handheld devices every 4 hours for 7 days from 62 adults recently exposed to traumatic injury of themselves or a family member. Data was also collected on standard self-report measures of the same constructs at the time of enrollment, one week after enrollment, and two months after injury. Results For all measure scores, results showed good internal consistency across items and within persons over time, provided evidence of convergent, divergent, and construct validity, and showed significant between and within-subject variability. Conclusions Results indicate that PIA measures can provide valid measurement of psychopathology in a clinical sample. PIA may be useful to study mechanisms of change in clinical contexts, identify targets for change, and gauge treatment progress. PMID:26567018

  17. The Psoriasis Symptom Diary: development and content validity of a novel patient-reported outcome instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Mark; Swensen, Andrine R; Nyirady, Judit; Kim, Edward; Gwaltney, Chad J; Strober, Bruce E

    2014-06-01

    Chronic plaque psoriasis has a profound impact on a patient's daily life. To understand the effects of psoriasis treatments, it is essential to assess the patient's experience of symptoms and how they impact their daily life. The goal of this study was to develop and establish the content validity of a new patient reported outcome (PRO) psoriasis measure. The Psoriasis Symptom Diary was developed by (i) identifying key plaque psoriasis-related symptoms and impacts through qualitative patient interviews (n = 29); (ii) developing an initial set of items that captured the key patient experiences; and (iii) conducting cognitive interviews to test patient understanding of items selected for inclusion in the new psoriasis symptom measure (n = 16). Patients noted a variety of symptoms, with plaque-related pain (including related concepts of burning and stinging), changes in skin appearance, and itching reported by all patients. Patients also expressed notable embarrassment and avoidance of social situations, due to the appearance of plaques, and limited mobility. The Psoriasis Symptom Diary assesses the severity and impact of symptoms using a 24-hour recall period to reduce recall bias and error. The Psoriasis Symptom Diary was developed to assess important symptoms and disease-related impacts in a manner consistent with guidelines for establishing the content validity of new PRO instruments. Following quantitative psychometric testing, the Psoriasis Symptom Diary may support efficacy endpoints in clinical trials. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  18. Usefulness of Patients-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Focus Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs have become an essential part of the assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We aimed to evaluate the agreement and correlation between PROs and the physician's measurements. Methods. This was a cross-sectional analytical study in which 135 patients with RA were clinically evaluated during two different sessions of focus group interviews. Rheumatologist recorded 28 swollen (SJCs and tender joint counts (TJCs. The patients filled out the PROs instruments (MDHAQ, RADAI, RAPID3, 4, and 5 and self-report articular index (SAI diagram for pain and joint swelling. DAS28 was calculated (C-reactive protein. An adjusted multiple lineal regression model was done (DAS28 as dependent variable. Results. Highly significant agreements were found between SJC and TJC registered by the physician and patient. There was moderate correlation between DAS28 with patient SJC (r=0.52, patient TJC (r=0.55, RADAI (r=0.56, RAPID3 (r=0.52, RAPID4 (r=0.56, RAPID5 (r=0.66, and VAS-Global (r=0.51. Likewise, we found moderate to high correlations between CDAI and SDAI with all variable measurements done by the patients. The resulting predictive equation was DAS28(CRP=2.02+0.037×RAPID4+0.042× patient SJC. Conclusion. PROs applied in focus groups interview are a useful tool for managing patients with RA regardless of gender, educational level, and duration of disease.

  19. Usefulness of Patients-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Focus Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Botello-Corzo, Diana; Calixto, Omar-Javier; Calderón-Rojas, Rolando; Domínguez, Aura-Maria; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis; Mantilla, Ruben-Dario; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have become an essential part of the assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We aimed to evaluate the agreement and correlation between PROs and the physician's measurements. Methods. This was a cross-sectional analytical study in which 135 patients with RA were clinically evaluated during two different sessions of focus group interviews. Rheumatologist recorded 28 swollen (SJCs) and tender joint counts (TJCs). The patients filled out the PROs instruments (MDHAQ, RADAI, RAPID3, 4, and 5 and self-report articular index (SAI) diagram for pain and joint swelling). DAS28 was calculated (C-reactive protein). An adjusted multiple lineal regression model was done (DAS28 as dependent variable). Results. Highly significant agreements were found between SJC and TJC registered by the physician and patient. There was moderate correlation between DAS28 with patient SJC (r = 0.52), patient TJC (r = 0.55), RADAI (r = 0.56), RAPID3 (r = 0.52), RAPID4 (r = 0.56), RAPID5 (r = 0.66), and VAS-Global (r = 0.51). Likewise, we found moderate to high correlations between CDAI and SDAI with all variable measurements done by the patients. The resulting predictive equation was DAS28(CRP) = 2.02 + 0.037 × RAPID4 + 0.042× patient SJC. Conclusion. PROs applied in focus groups interview are a useful tool for managing patients with RA regardless of gender, educational level, and duration of disease. PMID:23097701

  20. Favorable Pregnancy Outcomes in a Patient with Takayasu’s Arteritis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Kadkhodayan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Takayasu’s arteritis is a rare, chronic vasculitis, affecting women of reproductive age. With disease progression, evidence of vascular involvement and insufficiency becomes clinically apparent due to the narrowing or occlusion of the proximal or distal branches of the aorta. Therefore, pregnancy-related complications, such as superimposed preeclampsia, renal failure, and congestive heart failure, may be encountered in these patients. Case report: In this report, we present the case of a 23-year-old, Iranian, primigravida woman with a prior history of Takayasu’s arteritis, which was diagnosed two years before her pregnancy. The patient’s primary presentations were thrombocytosis (more than one million per milliliter, weight loss, and weakness in the shoulders and arms, appearing two years before her pregnancy. Following spontaneous pregnancy, the patient received regular perinatal care by a medical team, consisting of an obstetrician, a rheumatologist, a radiologist, and a nephrologist. Pregnancy termination was planned due to the preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM at 36 weeks of gestation. A normal live male neonate (weight= 3100 g was born with a normal Apgar score (8-8. Conclusion: Based on the findings, a multidisciplinary collaboration between rheumatologists, nephrologists, and obstetricians is required to achieve optimal maternal and neonatal outcomes.

  1. Dual bronchodilation in COPD: lung function and patient-reported outcomes – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price D

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available David Price,1,2 Anders Østrem,3 Mike Thomas,4 Tobias Welte5 1Department of Primary Care Respiratory Medicine, Division of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; 2Observational and Pragmatic Research Institute, Singapore; 3Gransdalen Legesenter, Oslo, Norway; 4Department of Primary Care Research, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; 5Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Abstract: Several fixed-dose combinations (FDCs of long-acting bronchodilators (a long-acting muscarinic antagonist [LAMA] plus a long-acting β2-agonist [LABA] are available for the treatment of COPD. Studies of these FDCs have demonstrated substantial improvements in lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second in comparison with their respective constituent monocomponents. Improvements in patient-reported outcomes (PROs, such as symptoms and health status, as well as exacerbation rates, have been reported compared with a LABA or LAMA alone, but results are less consistent. The inconsistencies may in part be owing to differences in study design, methods used to assess study end points, and patient populations. Nevertheless, these observations tend to support an association between improvements in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and improvements in symptom-based outcomes. In order to assess the effects of FDCs on PROs and evaluate relationships between PROs and changes in lung function, we performed a systematic literature search of publications reporting randomized controlled trials of FDCs. Results of this literature search were independently assessed by two reviewers, with a third reviewer resolving any conflicting results. In total, 22 Phase III randomized controlled trials of FDC bronchodilators in COPD were identified, with an additional study including a post-literature search (ten for indacaterol–glycopyrronium once daily, eight for umeclidinium–vilanterol once daily, three for

  2. Impact of Certolizumab Pegol on Patient‐Reported Outcomes in Patients With Axial Spondyloarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivitz, A.; van Tubergen, A.; Deodhar, A.; Coteur, G.; Woltering, F.; Landewé, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patient‐reported outcomes (PROs) provide an opportunity to collect important information relating to patient well‐being, which is often difficult for physicians to measure (e.g., quality of life, pain, fatigue, and sleep). Here we evaluate the effects of certolizumab pegol (CZP) on PROs during the 24‐week, double‐blind phase of the RAPID axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) trial, a phase 3 trial of axial SpA patients, including both ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and nonradiographic axial SpA patients. Methods A total of 325 patients with active axial SpA were randomized 1:1:1 to placebo, CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks, or CZP 400 mg every 4 weeks. The primary end point was the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria for 20% improvement in disease activity response at week 12, and has been reported previously. PROs included total back pain, nocturnal back pain, a daily pain diary, the Sleep Problems Index II (SPI) domain of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Sleep Scale, fatigue, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQOL) measure, and the Short Form 36‐item (SF‐36) health survey physical component summary (PCS), mental component summary (MCS), and domains. Results Patients treated with CZP reported significant improvements from week 1 for nocturnal back pain (placebo −0.6, CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks −1.9, and CZP 400 mg every 4 weeks −1.6; P < 0.001) and ASQOL (placebo −1.0, CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks −2.3, and CZP 400 mg every 4 weeks −1.9; P < 0.05) compared with placebo, while significant improvements in total back pain were seen from day 2. Patients treated with both CZP dosing regimens also had significantly greater improvements in fatigue, MOS‐SPI, SF‐36 PCS, MCS, and domains compared with placebo. Improvements were similar in both AS and nonradiographic axial SpA patients. Conclusion Both CZP dosing schedules rapidly improved patient well‐being, as measured by PROs, including pain, fatigue, sleep, SF‐36

  3. Physical functional outcome assessment of patients with major burns admitted to a UK Burn Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailes, Sarah T; Engelsman, Kayleen; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Determining the discharge outcome of burn patients can be challenging and therefore a validated objective measure of functional independence would assist with this process. We developed the Functional Assessment for Burns (FAB) score to measure burn patients' functional independence. FAB scores were taken on discharge from ICU (FAB 1) and on discharge from inpatient burn care (FAB 2) in 56 patients meeting the American Burn Association criteria for major burn. We retrospectively analysed prospectively collected data to measure the progress of patients' physical functional outcomes and to evaluate the predictive validity of the FAB score for discharge outcome. Mean age was 38.6 years and median burn size 35%. Significant improvements were made in the physical functional outcomes between FAB 1 and FAB 2 scores (ppatients were discharged home, 8 of these with social care. 8 patients were transferred to another hospital for further inpatient rehabilitation. FAB 1 score (≤ 9) is strongly associated with discharge outcome (pburn patients.

  4. Nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit: Incidence, risk factors, outcome and associated pathogens in a public tertiary teaching hospital of Eastern India

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: The increased morbidity and mortality associated with nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) is a matter of serious concern today. Aims: To determine the incidence of nosocomial infections acquired in the ICU, their risk factors, the causative pathogens and the outcome in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 12 bedded combined medical and surgical ICU of a medical college hospital. The s...

  5. Cosmetic Outcomes and Complications Reported by Patients Having Undergone Breast-Conserving Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E., E-mail: hill@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vachani, Carolyn; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Di Lullo, Gloria A. [Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years, much work in treatment of breast cancer has contributed to improvement of cosmetic and functional outcomes. The goal of breast-conservation treatment (BCT) is avoidance of mastectomy through use of lumpectomy and adjuvant radiation. Modern data demonstrate 'excellent' or 'good' cosmesis in >90% of patients treated with BCT. Methods and Materials: Patient-reported data were gathered via a convenience sample frame from breast cancer survivors using a publically available, free, Internet-based tool for creation of survivorship care plans. During use of the tool, breast cancer survivors are queried as to the cosmetic appearance of the treated breast, as well as perceived late effects. All data have been maintained anonymously with internal review board approval. Results: Three hundred fifty-four breast cancer survivors having undergone BCT and voluntarily using this tool were queried with regard to breast cosmesis and perceived late effects. Median diagnosis age was 48 years, and median current age 52 years. 'Excellent' cosmesis was reported by 27% (n = 88), 'Good' by 44% (n = 144), 'Fair' by 24% (n = 81), and 'Poor' by 5% (n = 18). Of the queries posted to survivors after BCT, late effects most commonly reported were cognitive changes (62%); sexual concerns (52%); changes in texture and color of irradiated skin (48%); chronic pain, numbness, or tingling (35%); and loss of flexibility in the irradiated area (30%). Survivors also described osteopenia/osteoporosis (35%), cardiopulmonary problems (12%), and lymphedema (19%). Conclusions: This anonymous tool uses a convenience sample frame to gather patient reported assessments of cosmesis and complications after breast cancer. Among the BCT population, cosmetic assessment by survivors appears less likely to be 'excellent' or 'good' than would be expected, with 30% of BCT survivors reporting 'fair' or

  6. Report on residual radioactive materials on public or acquired lands of the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    This report identifies sites located on public or acquired lands of the United States containing residual radioactive materials and other radioactive waste (excluding waste resulting from the production of electric energy) and was developed in accordance with the provisions of Section 114(b) of Public Law 95-604, "Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978," enacted on November 8, 1978. Additionally, the report specifies which Federal agency has jurisdiction over such sites and, where appropriate data were available, provides a description of the radiological status of each of the sites reported. For purpose of providing a timely report t o t h e Congress, a termination date of May 31, 1979 was established for the receipt, correlation, and analysis of the input data. As of this date, residual radioactive materials and other radioactive waste have been identified by six Federal agencies at 48 sites throughout the United States. Table 1 on page vi provides a summary listing of the number of sites under the jurisdiction of each of these reporting agencies. A cross listing in tabular form by affected state is presented in Table 2 on page viii. Of the 48 sites reported, 36 are located i n three western states - Colorado (27 sites), Wyoming (5 sites), and Utah (4 sites). Based upon t h e data submitted, the sites were categorized into three broad radiological status categories -- controlled, unstabilized, and risk to the public. At controlled sites, the residue is stabilized, access t o t h e site is controlled, the s i t e is well monitored, and does not currently constitute a risk to the public. At sites in the unstabilized category, a probability exists for the spread of contamination. Sites in the risk category contain residue which represents a long-term risk to the public under present conditions. Of the 48 reported sites,. 9 (approximately 19%) could be classified in the controlled category; 38 (approximately 79%) were in the unstabilized category and

  7. Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narolski, Steven W.

    1996-12-01

    The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

  8. United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum Progress Report. Data Studies during 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, N.P. (ed.) [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) meets twice a year to discuss issues relating to the measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. Topics cover a wide range of applications in the UK nuclear industry. Links between members are maintained throughout the year, mainly through e-mail and the UKNSF website (www.uknsf.ofg.uk). Work of primary interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g. half-lives and gamma ray emission probabilities), fission yields, and neutron cross sections for fission and fusion. All known studies within the UK are summarised in this report. Specific applications and international links of relevance are also described. (author)

  9. Brief Report: Increasing Acceptance of Homosexuality in the United States Across Racial and Ethnic Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Sara Nelson; Cleary, Sean D; Golden, Matthew R

    2015-11-01

    After recent civil rights expansions for sexual minorities in the United States, we updated previous findings on population-level attitudes toward homosexuality measured in the General Social Survey. In 2014, 40.1% of respondents reported that homosexuality was "always wrong" compared with 54.8% in 2008 (P homosexuality than white respondents throughout 2008 to 2014, the percentage declined among all racial/ethnic groups. Among MSM, more positive attitudes were associated with HIV testing. Research shows a potential association between homophobia and HIV risk; thus, these population-level changes may promote better health among MSM.

  10. Assessment of patient-reported outcome measures in the surgical treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straatman, Jennifer; van der Wielen, Nicole; Joosten, Pieter J; Terwee, Caroline B; Cuesta, Miguel A; Jansma, Elise P; van der Peet, Donald L

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer is responsible for 10 % of all cancer-related deaths worldwide. With improved operative techniques and neo-adjuvant therapy, survival rates are increasing. Outcomes of interest are shifting to quality of life (QOL), with many different tools available. The aim of this study was to assess which patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are used to measure QOL after a gastrectomy for cancer. A comprehensive search was conducted for original articles investigating QOL after gastrectomy. Two authors independently selected relevant articles, conducted clinical appraisal and extracted data (P.J. and J.S.). Out of 3414 articles, 26 studies were included, including a total of 4690 patients. These studies included ten different PROMs, which could be divided into generic, symptom-specific and disease-specific questionnaires. The EORTC and the FACT questionnaires use an oncological overall QOL module and an organ-specific module. Only one validation study regarding the use of the EORTC after surgery for gastric cancer was available, demonstrating good psychometric properties and clinical validity. A great variety of PROMs are being used in the measurement of QOL after surgery for gastric cancer. A questionnaire with a general module along with a disease-specific module for the assessment of QOL seems most desirable, such as the EORTC and the FACT with their specific modules. Both are developed in different treatment modalities, such as in surgical patients. EORTC is the most widely used questionnaire and therefore allows for comparison of new studies to existing data. Future studies are needed to assess content validity in surgical gastric cancer patients.

  11. PRISM, a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument, Accurately Measures Symptom Change in Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Garth; Bolus, Roger; Whitman, Cynthia; Talley, Jennifer; Erder, M Haim; Joseph, Alain; Silberg, Debra G; Spiegel, Brennan

    2017-03-01

    Most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) experience relief following treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (Vakil et al. in Am J Gastroenterol 101:1900-1920, 2006; Everhart and Ruhl in Gastroenterology 136:376-386, 2009). As many as 17-44% of patients, however, exhibit only partial response to therapy. Most extant GERD patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments fail to meet development best practices as described by the FDA (Talley and Wiklund in Qual Life Res 14:21-33, 2005; Van Pinxteren et al. in Cochrane Database Syst Rev 18:CD002095, 2004; El-Serag et al. in Aliment Pharmacol Ther 32:720-737, 2010). To develop and validate a PRO instrument for clinical trials involving patients with GERD who are PPI partial responders. We prepared a systematic literature review, held patient focus groups, convened an expert panel, and conducted cognitive interviews to establish content validity. Eligible participants took PPI therapy for at least 8 weeks, had undergone an upper endoscopy, and scored at least 8 points on the GerdQ [6]. Qualitative data guided development of 26 draft items. Items were reviewed by expert panels and debriefed with patients. The resulting 21-item instrument underwent psychometric evaluation during a Phase IIB trial. During the trial, confirmatory factor analysis (n = 220) resulted in a four-factor model displaying the highest goodness of fit. All domains had a high inter-item correlation (Cronbach's α > 0.8). Test-retest reliability and convergent validity were strong, with highly significant (p PRISM scores and severity anchors and significant (p PRISM. Developed in line with FDA guidance on PROs, PRISM represents an important new outcome measure for patients with GERD with a partial response to PPI therapy.

  12. Effect of an Immersive Preoperative Virtual Reality Experience on Patient Reported Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Calnan, Daniel; Simmons, Nathan; MacKenzie, Todd A; Kakoulides, George

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to a virtual reality (VR) environment preoperatively on patient-reported outcomes for surgical operations. There is a scarcity of well-developed quality improvement initiatives targeting patient satisfaction. We performed a randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing cranial and spinal operations in a tertiary referral center. Patients underwent a 1:1 randomization to an immersive preoperative VR experience or standard preoperative experience stratified on type of operation. The primary outcome measures were the Evaluation du Vecu de l'Anesthesie Generale (EVAN-G) score and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information (APAIS) score, as markers of the patient's experience during the surgical encounter. During the study period, a total of 127 patients (mean age 55.3 years, 41.9% females) underwent randomization. The average EVAN-G score was 84.3 (standard deviation, SD, 6.4) after VR, and 64.3 (SD, 11.7) after standard preoperative experience (difference, 20.0; 95% confidence interval, CI, 16.6-23.3). Exposure to an immersive VR experience also led to higher APAIS score (difference, 29.9; 95% CI, 24.5-35.2). In addition, VR led to lower preoperative VAS stress score (difference, -41.7; 95% CI, -33.1 to -50.2), and higher preoperative VAS preparedness (difference, 32.4; 95% CI, 24.9-39.8), and VAS satisfaction (difference, 33.2; 95% CI, 25.4-41.0) scores. No association was identified with VAS stress score (difference, -1.6; 95% CI, -13.4 to 10.2). In a randomized controlled trial, we demonstrated that patients exposed to preoperative VR had increased satisfaction during the surgical encounter. Harnessing the power of this technology, hospitals can create an immersive environment that minimizes stress, and enhances the perioperative experience.

  13. A Review of HIV-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Kim; Lessard, David; Lebouché, Bertrand

    2016-09-16

    The use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to provide added feedback to health providers is receiving interest as a means of improving clinical care and patient outcomes, and contributing to more patient-centered care. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), while PROs are used in research, their application in clinical practice has been limited despite their potential utility. PRO selection is an important consideration when contemplating their use. As past reviews of PROs in HIV have focused on particular areas (e.g. disability, satisfaction with care), a more comprehensive review could better inform on the available instruments and their scope. This article reviews HIV-specific PROs to produce an inventory and to identify the central concepts targeted over time. Seven databases were searched (HAPI, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Google Scholar), generating 14,794 records for evaluation. From these records, 117 HIV-specific PROs were identified and categorized based on a content analysis of their targeted concept: Health-Related Quality of Life (23; 20 %), ART and Adherence-Related Views and Experiences (19; 16 %), Healthcare-Related Views and Experiences (15; 13 %), Psychological Challenges (12; 10 %), Symptoms (12; 10 %), Psychological Resources (10; 9 %), HIV Self-Management and Self-Care (8; 7 %), HIV-Related Stigma (8; 7 %), Body and Facial Appearance (4; 3 %), Social Support (3; 3 %), Sexual and Reproductive Health (2; 2 %), and Disability (1; 1 %). This review highlights the variety and evolution of HIV-specific PROs, with the arrival of seven categories of PROs only after the advent of highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Our inventory also offers a useful resource. However, the interest of further HIV-specific PRO development should be explored in sexual health, which received little independent attention.

  14. Muscle function is associated with future patient-reported outcomes in young adults with ACL injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flosadottir, Vala; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim Consequences of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury include worse patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and a decrease in activity level. Muscle function can be improved by targeted exercise. Our aims were to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among lower extremity muscle function and PROs after ACL injury. Methods Fifty-four participants (15 women, mean 30 years) with ACL in