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Sample records for unit mcu simulant

  1. Clock-Frequency Switching Technique for Energy Saving of Microcontroller Unit (MCU-Based Sensor Node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pumin Duangmanee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper; a technique is proposed for reducing the energy consumption of microcontroller-based sensor nodes by switching the operating clock between low and high frequencies. The proposed concept is motivated by the fact that if the application codes of the microcontroller unit (MCU consist of no-wait state instruction sets, it consumes less energy when it operates with a higher frequency. When the application code of the MCU consists of wait instruction sets; e.g., a wait acknowledge signal, it switches to low clock frequency. The experimental results confirm that the proposed technique can reduce the MCU energy consumption up to 66.9%.

  2. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, V

    2005-12-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified

  3. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casella, V

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified interface for controlling

  4. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MCU SALTSTONE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-01-01

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone., Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement or lime to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of MCU (Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit) saltstone relative to two permeating fluids. These fluids included simulated groundwater equilibrated with vault concrete and simulated saltstone pore fluid. Samples of the MCU saltstone were prepared by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and allowed to cure for twenty eight days prior to testing. These samples included two three-inch diameter by six inch long mold samples and three one-inch diameter by twelve inch long mold samples

  5. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MCU SALTSTONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-03-19

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone., Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement or lime to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of MCU (Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit) saltstone relative to two permeating fluids. These fluids included simulated groundwater equilibrated with vault concrete and simulated saltstone pore fluid. Samples of the MCU saltstone were prepared by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and allowed to cure for twenty eight days prior to testing. These samples included two three-inch diameter by six inch long mold samples and three one-inch diameter by twelve inch long mold samples.

  6. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In February 2015, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a Strip Effluent (SE) coalescer (FLT-304) from MCU. That coalescer was first installed at MCU in July 2014 and removed in October 2014. While processing approximately 31,400 gallons of strip solution, the pressure drop steadily increased from 1 psi to beyond the administrative limit of 20 psi. The physical and chemical analysis was conducted on this coalescer to determine the mechanism that led to the plugging of this coalescer. Characterization of this coalescer revealed the adsorption of organic containing amines as well as MCU modifier. The amines are probably from the decomposition of the suppressor (TiDG) as well as from bacteria. This adsorption may have changed the surface energetics (characteristics) of the coalescer fibers and therefore, their wetting behavior. A very small amount of inorganic solids were found to have deposited on this coalescer (possibly an artifact of cleaning the coalescer with Boric acid. However, we believe that inorganic precipitation, as has been seen in the past, did not play a role in the high pressure drop rise of this coalescer. With regards to the current practice of reducing the radioactive content of the SE coalescer, it is recommended that future SE coalescer should be flushed with 10 mM boric acid which is currently used at MCU. Plugging of the SE coalescer was most likely due to the formation and accumulation of a water-in-oil emulsion that reduced the overall porosity of the coalescer. There is also evidence that a bimodal oil particle distribution may have entered and deposited in the coalescer and caused the initial increase in pressure drop.

  7. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in May and October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    During routine maintenance, the coalescers utilized in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing of Salt Batch 6 and a portion of Salt Batch 7 were sampled and submitted to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization, for the purpose of identifying solid phase constituents that may be accumulating in these coalescers. Specifically, two samples were received and characterized: A decontaminated salt solution (DSS) coalescer sample and a strip effluent (SE) coalescer sample. Aliquots of the samples were analyzed by XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, SEM, and EDS. Other aliquots of the samples were leached in acid solution, and the leachates were analyzed by ICP-AES. In addition, modeling was performed to provide a basis for comparison of the analytical results.

  8. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-10-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

  9. DWPF Flowsheet Studies with Simulants to Determine Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit Solvent Partitioning and Verify Actinide Removal Process Incorporation Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, C

    2006-01-01

    The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) facility and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) are scheduled to begin processing salt waste in fiscal year 2007. A portion of the streams generated in the salt processing facilities will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to be incorporated in the glass matrix. Before the streams are introduced, a combination of impact analyses and research and development studies must be performed to quantify the impacts on DWPF processing. The Process Science and Engineering (PS and E) section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 to evaluate the impacts on DWPF processing. Simulant Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet studies have been performed using previous composition and projected volume estimates for the ARP sludge/monosodium titanate (MST) stream. Due to changes in the flammability control strategy for DWPF for salt processing, the incorporation strategy for ARP has changed and additional ARP flowsheet tests were necessary to validate the new processing strategy. The last round of ARP testing included the incorporation of the MCU stream and identified potential processing issues with the MCU solvent. The identified issues included the potential carry-over and accumulation of the MCU solvent components in the CPC condensers and in the recycle stream to the Tank Farm. Therefore, DWPF requested SRNL to perform additional MCU flowsheet studies to better quantify the organic distribution in the CPC vessels. The previous MCU testing used a Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) simulant since it was anticipated that both of these facilities would begin salt processing during SB4 processing. The same sludge simulant recipe was used in this round of ARP and MCU testing to minimize the number of changes between the two phases of testing so a better comparison could be made. ARP and MCU stream simulants were made for this phase of

  10. Evaluation of structural deformations of a mechanical connecting unit oxidizer supplies by thermo-mechanical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    A Mechanical connecting unit (MCU) used in ground facilities for a Liquid propellant rocket (LPR) acts as a bridge between the onboard system and the ground oxidizer filling system. It should be resistant to structural deformations in order to guarantee successful supply of a cryogenic oxidizer and high pressure gases without reduction of sealing capability. The MCU consists of many components and linkages and operates under harsh conditions induced by a cryogenic oxidizer, high pressure gases and other mechanical forces. Thus, the evaluation of structural deformation of the MCU considering complex conditions is expensive and time consuming. The present study efficiently evaluates the structural deformations of the key components of the MCU by Thermo-mechanical simulation (TMS) based on the superposition principle. Deformations due to the mechanical loadings including weights, pressures, and spring forces are firstly evaluated by using a non-linear flexible body simulation module (FFlex) of Multi-body dynamics (MBD) software, RecurDyn. Then, thermal deformations for the deformed geometries obtained by RecurDyn were subsequently calculated. It was conducted by using a Finite element (FE) analysis software, ANSYS. The total deformations for the onboard plate and multi-channel plate in the connecting section due to the mechanical and thermal loadings were successfully evaluated. Moreover, the outer gaps at six points between two plates were calculated and verified by comparison to the measured data. Their values and tendencies showed a good agreement. The author concluded that the TMS using MBD software considering flexible bodies and an FE simulator can efficiently evaluate structural deformations of the MCU operating under the complex load and boundary conditions

  11. Evaluation of structural deformations of a mechanical connecting unit oxidizer supplies by thermo-mechanical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Woo [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Machine Convergence Technology, Hankyong National University, Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A Mechanical connecting unit (MCU) used in ground facilities for a Liquid propellant rocket (LPR) acts as a bridge between the onboard system and the ground oxidizer filling system. It should be resistant to structural deformations in order to guarantee successful supply of a cryogenic oxidizer and high pressure gases without reduction of sealing capability. The MCU consists of many components and linkages and operates under harsh conditions induced by a cryogenic oxidizer, high pressure gases and other mechanical forces. Thus, the evaluation of structural deformation of the MCU considering complex conditions is expensive and time consuming. The present study efficiently evaluates the structural deformations of the key components of the MCU by Thermo-mechanical simulation (TMS) based on the superposition principle. Deformations due to the mechanical loadings including weights, pressures, and spring forces are firstly evaluated by using a non-linear flexible body simulation module (FFlex) of Multi-body dynamics (MBD) software, RecurDyn. Then, thermal deformations for the deformed geometries obtained by RecurDyn were subsequently calculated. It was conducted by using a Finite element (FE) analysis software, ANSYS. The total deformations for the onboard plate and multi-channel plate in the connecting section due to the mechanical and thermal loadings were successfully evaluated. Moreover, the outer gaps at six points between two plates were calculated and verified by comparison to the measured data. Their values and tendencies showed a good agreement. The author concluded that the TMS using MBD software considering flexible bodies and an FE simulator can efficiently evaluate structural deformations of the MCU operating under the complex load and boundary conditions.

  12. SOLIDS PRECIPITATION EVENT IN MCU CAUSAL ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM SOLIDS RECOVERY TEAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, A.; Aponte, C.

    2014-08-15

    A process upset occurred in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility on April 6th, 2014. During recovery efforts, a significant amount of solids were found in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Salt Solution Receipt Tanks (SSRTs), two extraction contactors, and scrub contactors. The solids were identified by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as primarily sodium oxalate and sodium alumina silicate (NAS) with the presence of some aluminum hydroxide. NAS solids have been present in the SSFT since simulant runs during cold chemical startup of MCU in 2007, and have not hindered operations since that time. During the process upset in April 2014, the oxalate solids partially blocked the aqueous outlet of the extraction contactors, causing salt solution to exit through the contactor organic outlet to the scrub contactors with the organic phase. This salt solution overwhelmed the scrub contactors and passed with the organic phase to the strip section of MCU. The partially reversed flow of salt solution resulted in a Strip Effluent (SE) stream that was high in Isopar™ L, pH and sodium. The primary cause of the excessive solids accumulation in the SSRTs and SSFT at MCU is attributed to an increase in the frequency of oxalic acid cleaning of the 512-S primary filter. Agitation in the SSRTs at MCU in response to cold weather likely provided the primary mechanism to transfer the solids to the contactors. Sources of the sodium oxalate solids are attributed to the oxalic acid cleaning solution used to clean the primary filter at the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) filtration at 512-S, as well as precipitation from the salt batch feed, which is at or near oxalate saturation. The Solids Recovery Team was formed to determine the cause of the solids formation and develop recommendations to prevent or mitigate this event in the future. A total of 53 recommendations were generated. These recommendations were organized into 4 focus areas: • Improve

  13. Characterization of Solids Deposited on the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent (SE) Coalescer Media Removed in April 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-13

    On June 2015, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a Strip Effluent (SE) coalescer (FLT-304) from MCU. That coalescer was first installed at MCU in late October 2014 and removed in April 2015. While processing approximately 48,700 gallons of strip solution, the pressure drop steadily increased linearly from 1 psi to near 16 psi (the administrative limit is 17 psi) with the total filtrate volume (2.1E-4 psi/gal of filtrate). The linear behavior is due to the combined effect of a constant deposition of material that starts from the closed-end to the mid-section of the coalescer reducing the available surface area of the coalescer for fluid passage (linearly with filtrate volume) and the formation of a secondary emulsion (water in NG-CSSX) on the fibers of the coalescer media. Both effects reduced the coalescer porosity by at least 13% (after processing 48,700 gallons). Before the coalescer was removed, it was flushed with a 10 mM boric acid solution to reduce the dose level. To determine the nature of the deposited material, a physical and chemical analysis of the coalescer was conducted. Characterization of this coalescer revealed the adsorption of organic containing amines (secondary amides and primary amines), TiDG, degraded modifier (with no hydroxyl group), MaxCalix, and oxidized hydrocarbon (possibly from Isopar™L or from lubricant used at MCU) onto the coalescer media. The amide and amines are possibly from the decomposition of the suppressor (TiDG). The modifier and MaxCalix were the largest components of the deposited organic material, as determined from leaching the coalescer with dichloromethane. Both the Fourier-Transformed Infrared (FTIR) and Fourier-Transformed Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FT-HNMR) results indicated that some of the modifier was degraded (missing their OH groups). The modifier was observed everywhere in the examined coalescer pieces (FTIR), while the TiDG and its decomposition products were observed at the

  14. Cesium Concentration in MCU Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D

    2006-01-01

    During Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) operations, Cs-137 concentrations in product streams will vary depending on the location in the process and on the recent process conditions. Calculations of cesium concentrations under a variety of operating conditions reveal the following: (1) Under nominal operations with salt solution feed containing 1.1 Ci Cs-137 per gallon, the maximum Cs-137 concentration in the process will occur in the strip effluent (SE) and equal 15-16.5 Ci/gal. (2) Under these conditions, the majority of the solvent will contain 0.005 to 0.01 Ci/gal, with a limited portion of the solvent in the contactor stages containing ∼4 Ci/gal. (3) When operating conditions yield product near 0.1 Ci Cs-137/gal in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS), the SE cesium concentration will be the same or lower than in nominal operations, but majority of the stripped solvent will increase to ∼2-3 Ci/gal. (4) Deviations in strip and waste stream flow rates cause the largest variations in cesium content: (a) If strip flow rates deviate by -30% of nominal, the SE will contain ∼23 Ci/gal, although the cesium content of the solvent will increase to only 0.03 Ci/gal; (b) If strip flow rate deviates by -77% (i.e., 23% of nominal), the SE will contain 54 Ci/gal and solvent will contain 1.65 Ci/gal. At this point, the product DSS will just reach the limit of 0.1 Ci/gal, causing the DSS gamma monitors to alarm; and (c) Moderate (+10 to +30%) deviations in waste flow rate cause approximately proportional increases in the SE and solvent cesium concentrations. Recovery from a process failure due to poor cesium stripping can achieve any low cesium concentration required. Passing the solvent back through the contactors while recycling DSS product will produce a ∼70% reduction during one pass through the contactors (assuming the stripping D value is no worse than 0.36). If the solvent is returned to the solvent hold tank (containing additional

  15. Overview of the MCU Monte Carlo software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalugin, M.A.; Oleynik, D.S.; Shkarovsky, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    MCU (Monte Carlo Universal) is a project on development and practical use of a universal computer code for simulation of particle transport (neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons) in three-dimensional systems by means of the Monte Carlo method. This paper provides the information on the current state of the project. The developed libraries of constants are briefly described, and the potentialities of the MCU-5 package modules and the executable codes compiled from them are characterized. Examples of important problems of reactor physics solved with the code are presented. It is shown that the MCU constructor tool is able to assemble a full-scale 3D model from templates describing single components using simple and intuitive graphic user interface. The templates are prepared by a skilled user and stored in constructor's templates library. Ordinary user works with the graphic user interface and does not deal with MCU input data directly. At the present moment there are template libraries for several types of reactors

  16. Analysis of an MCU HEPA filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-01

    A series of direct analyses on three portions (inlet, center, and outlet) of the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter material from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) have been performed; this includes x-ray methods such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Contained Scanning Electron Microscopy (CSEM) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), as well as Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (FTIR). Additionally, two leaching studies (one with water, one with dichloromethane) have been performed on three portions (inlet, center, and outlet) of the HEPA filter material, with the leachates being analyzed by Inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES), Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA) and gammascan. From the results of the analyses, SRNL feels that cesium-depleted solvent is being introduced into the HEPA filter. The most likely avenue for this is mechanical aerosolization of solvent, where the aerosol is then carried along an airstream into the HEPA filter. Once introduced into the HEPA filter media, the solvent wicks throughout the material, and migrates towards the outlet end. Once on the outlet end, continual drying could cause particulate flakes to exit the filter and travel farther down the airstream path.

  17. INVESTIGATION INTO THE RATE OF TRIOCTYLAMINE PARTITIONING INTO THE MCU AQUEOUS PHASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.; Couture, A.

    2013-07-16

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has examined the issue of trioctylamine (TOA) losses at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) solvent. For this study, SRNL used partitioning and radiolysis data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as well as actual MCU operational data. From the radiolysis data, SRNL prepared a model on the rate of TOA degradation. From the combined sets of data, SRNL has calculated the largest possible value of TOA (although this value is not credible) in the Strip Effluent (SE) and also calculated two different conservative, more realistic values for TOA in the SE. Even under conservative assumptions, such as all of the TOA losses partitioning solely into the Strip Effluent (SE), the MCU operational data suggests that the maximum realistic TOA concentration in the SE is < 0.6 mg/L. Furthermore, from understanding the chemical differences between the old and new strip solutions, SRNL does not believe that the TOA will deplete from the blended BOBCalixC6 – Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) at a rate higher than previously experienced. Finally, SRNL recommends pursuing analytical development of a method for TOA with a superior precision compared to the current method. However, as the TOA in the blended solvent will continuously decline during MCU operations, further improvements in the development of the understanding of TOA losses may not be cost effective.

  18. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-16-991-992-993: July 2016 Monthly sample and MCU-16-1033-1034-1035: July 2016 Superwashed Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-25

    SRNL received one set of SHT samples (MCU-16-991, MCU-16-992 and MCU-16-993), pulled on 07/13/2016 and another set of SHT samples (MCU-16-1033, MCU-16-1034, and MCU-16-1035) that were pulled on 07/24/2016 after the solvent was superwashed with 300 mM sodium hydroxide for analysis. Samples MCU-16-991, MCU-16-992, and MCU-16-993 were combined into one sample (MCU-16-991-992-993) and samples MCU-16-1033, MCU-16-1034, and MCU-16-1035 were combined into one sample (MCU-16-1033-1034-1035). Of the two composite samples MCU-16-1033-1034-1035 represents the current chemical state of the solvent at MCU. All analytical conclusions are based on the chemical analysis of MCU-16-1033-1034-1035. There were no chemical differences between MCU-16- 991-992-993 and superwashed MCU-16-1033-1034-1035.

  19. Determination of the Impact of Glycolate on ARP and MCU Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Peters, T.; Shehee, T.

    2012-01-01

    of affinity of mMST for U. Pre-contacting the MST or mMST with glycolate did not have a significant effect on the performance of the materials when compared to tests having the same concentration of glycolate present in the simulant. These findings suggest that the glycolate is likely influencing removal by sorbate complexation and not by depositing onto or forming a film on the surface of the MST solids. Since the DF values are salt batch dependent, it is not possible to a priori quantify the impacts of glycolate on future processing campaigns. However, we recommend that the impacts of glycolate be evaluated during each salt batch qualification when a final processing concentration is defined, and recommendations can then be made on how to mitigate negative impacts, if needed. Impacts to the performance of the MST or mMST could be mitigated by increasing contact time or increasing sorbent concentrations. In addition to the MST and mMST testing, testing was performed to determine if there is an impact to the cesium removal at Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU). An Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) test routine was used to simulate cesium removal at the MCU. For this, SRNL performed three ESS tests, using the same basic aqueous waste simulant and solvent. For one test, SRNL added 5,000 ppm (mass basis) of glycolate and added 10,000 ppm of glycolate to a second test. A control test contained no glycolate. The results of all three tests were virtually identical for all the extraction, scrub and strip tests. (A single data point in the 5,000 ppm test is physically impossible and SRNL is currently resolving this obvious error.) At this time, SRNL concludes that the presence of up to 10,000 ppm of glycolate does not affect cesium removal by the current solvent system used in the MCU. Although not tested, the impact of glycolate for the Next Generation Solvent - that replaces BOBCalixC6 with MaxCalix - is expected to be very similar to that for the

  20. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-17-150-152 (July 2017) and MCU-17-153-155 (August 2017): Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-20

    A trend summary that includes the last two Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) monthly samples is shown; MCU- 17-150-152 (July SHT) and MCU-17-153-155 (August SHT). Since the last SHT sample sent for analysis was the August sample the chemical state of the solvent is best approximated by the chemical analysis of the August SHT sample (MCU-17-153-155). This report mainly focused on the chemical analysis of the August SHT sample. The analysis data from the July SHT sample are presented in the “trend” plots of this report. Analysis of the August SHT sample (MCU-17-153-155) indicated that the modifier (CS-7SB) was 2% below but the extractant (MaxCalix) concentration was at its nominal recommended level (169,000 mg/L and 46,400 mg/L respectively). The suppressor (TiDG) level has decreased since the last measurement taken while the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction unit (MCU) was operating in January 2017, but has remained steady in the range of 666 (observed in April) to 715 mg/L (observed in the August 2017 sample) since February 2017, well above the minimum recommended level (479 mg/L), but below the nominal level. The “flat” trends observed in the TiDG, MaxCalix, modifier, and Gamma measurement are consistent with the solvent being idle since January 10, 2017. A strong correlation between density and modifier concentration in the solvent continues to be observed in the SHT samples. This analysis confirms the Isopar™L addition to the solvent in January 2017. This analysis also indicates the solvent did not require further additions. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time if the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) returns to processing radioactive liquid waste. Otherwise, the levels of these components will remain steady. A future Isopar™L trimming addition to the solvent is recommended when MCU resumes processing

  1. Sample Results from MCU Solids Outage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Oji, L.; Coleman, C.; Poirier, M.

    2014-09-22

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has received several solid and liquid samples from MCU in an effort to understand and recover from the system outage starting on April 6, 2014. SRNL concludes that the presence of solids in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) is the likely root cause for the outage, based upon the following discoveries: A solids sample from the extraction contactor #1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate; A solids sample from the scrub contactor#1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate; A solids sample from the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) proved to be mostly sodium oxalate; An archived sample from Tank 49H taken last year was shown to contain a fine precipitate of sodium oxalate; A solids sample from ; A liquid sample from the SSFT was shown to have elevated levels of oxalate anion compared to the expected concentration in the feed. Visual inspection of the SSFT indicated the presence of precipitated or transferred solids, which were likely also in the Salt Solution Receipt Tank (SSRT). The presence of the solids coupled with agitation performed to maintain feed temperature resulted in oxalate solids migration through the MCU system and caused hydraulic issues that resulted in unplanned phase carryover from the extraction into the scrub, and ultimately the strip contactors. Not only did this carryover result in the Strip Effluent (SE) being pushed out of waste acceptance specification, but it resulted in the deposition of solids into several of the contactors. At the same time, extensive deposits of aluminosilicates were found in the drain tube in the extraction contactor #1. However it is not known at this time how the aluminosilicate solids are related to the oxalate solids. The solids were successfully cleaned out of the MCU system. However, future consideration must be given to the exclusion of oxalate solids into the MCU system. There were 53 recommendations for improving operations recently identified. Some additional considerations or

  2. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-16-701-702-703: May 2016 Monthly Sample and MCU-16-710-711-712: May 2016 Superwashed Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-701, MCU-16-702 and MCU-16-703), pulled on 05/23/2016, and another set of SHT samples (MCU-16-710, MCU-16-711, and MCU-16-712) were pulled on 05/28/2016 after the solvent was superwashed with 300 mM sodium hydroxide for analysis. Samples MCU-16-701, MCU-16-702, and MCU-16-703 were combined into one sample (MCU-16-701-702-703) and samples MCU-16-710, MCU- 16-711, and MCU-16-712 were combined into one sample (MCU-16-710-711-712). Of the two composite samples MCU-16-710-711-712 represents the current chemical state of the solvent at MCU. All analytical conclusions are based on the chemical analysis of MCU-16-710-711-712. There were no chemical differences between MCU-16-701-702-703 and superwashed MCU-16-710-711-712. Analysis of the composited sample MCU-16-710-712-713 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is above its nominal level (102%). The modifier (CS-7SB) is 16% below its nominal concentration, while the TiDG and MaxCalix concentrations are at and above their nominal concentrations, respectively. The TiDG level has begun to decrease, and it is 7% below its nominal level as of May 28, 2016. Based on this current analysis, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time. Periodic characterization and trimming additions to the solvent are recommended.

  3. 1/6TH SCALE STRIP EFFLUENT FEED TANK-MIXING RESULTS USING MCU SOLVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, blended easily with the MCU solvent, and provided an excellent visual aid.

  4. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-17-122-124 (March 2017), MCU-17-130-132 (April 2017), MCU-17-133-135 (May 2017), and MCU-17-141-149 (June 2017): Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-13

    A trend summary of four Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) monthly samples; MCU-16-122-124 (March 2017), MCU-17-130-132 (April 2017), MCU-17-133-135 (May 2017), and MCU-17-141-149 (June 2017) are reported. Analyses of the June SHT sample (MCU-17-141-149) indicated that the modifier (CS-7SB) and the extractant (MaxCalix) concentrations were slightly below (4% each) their nominal recommended levels (169,000 mg/L and 46,400 mg/L respectively). The suppressor (TiDG) level has decreased since the January 2017 measurement but has remained steady in the range of 666 to 705 mg/L, well above the minimum recommended level (479 mg/L), but below the nominal level. The “flat” trends observed in the TiDG, MaxCalix, modifier, and Gamma measurement are consistent with the solvent being idle since January 10, 2017.

  5. Program MCU for Monte-Carlo calculations of neutron-physical characteristics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagyan, L.P.; Alekseev, N.I.; Bryzgalov, V.I.; Glushkov, A.E.; Gomin, E.A.; Gurevich, M.I.; Kalugin, M.A.; Majorov, L.V.; Marin, S.V.; Yhdkevich, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    A description of the MCU data modification is presented. The calculation results by the MCU-2 and MCU-3 codes are compared for the critical assemblies of a different reactor types. The full list of the critical assemblies calculation results obtained by all MCU code versions is given. 32 refs.; 32 tabs

  6. Research on simulated devices for Solar photovoltaic grid-connected generation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    quan-zhu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the standpoint of energy conservation and emission reduction, one device simulated photovoltaic grid-connected generation system based on SPWM was designed in the paper. And DC/AC inverter could transduce efficiently direct current to alternating current. The MCU(Micro-Control-Unit, in this system could achieve the control method for maximum-power-point and tracking for frequency and phase. Moreover, the MCU could implement PWM (Plus-Width Modulating through programming. The system showed clearly the whole photovoltaic grid-connected generation system using simulated methods and ways.

  7. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results For MCU-11-1452, MCU-11-1453, MCU-11-1454, MCU-11-1455, MCU-11-1456 And MCU-11-1457

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-01

    Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples are sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to examine solvent composition changes over time. On December 5, 2011, Operations personnel delivered six samples from the SHT (MCU-11-1452 through -1457) for analysis. These samples are intended to verify that the solvent is within the specified composition range. The results from the analyses are presented in this document. Samples were received in p-nut vials containing ∼10 mL each. Once taken into the Shielded Cells, the samples were combined. Samples were removed for analysis by density, semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and Fourier-Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR). Details for the work are contained in a controlled laboratory notebook. Each of the six p-nut vials contained a single phase, with no apparent solids contamination or cloudiness. Table 1 contains the results of the analyses for the combined samples. A duplicate density measurement of the organic phase gave a result of 0.844 g/mL (1.2% residual standard deviation - RSD). Using the density as a starting point, we know that the Isopar(reg s ign) L should be slightly higher than nominal and the other components should be slightly lower than nominal. The results as a whole are internally consistent. All measurements indicate Isopar(reg s ign) L higher than nominal, and Modifier lower than nominal. The extractant result is higher than expected - given the other results, the extractant concentration should be under nominal values. Using the measured density as well as the Isopar(reg s ign) L and Modifier concentrations from the FTIR results, we calculate an extractant concentration of 6888 mg/L. This value is outside the analytical uncertainty of the reported HPLC value. Given the other results, this most likely indicates that the HPLC extractant result was biased high. When compared to the MCU density target of 0.845 g/mL, there is no need to add an Isopar

  8. Motion simulator with exchangeable unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.A.; Beukers, A.; Baarspul, M.; Van Tooren, M.J.; De Winter, S.E.E.

    2001-01-01

    A motion simulator provided with a movable housing, preferably carried by a number of length-adjustable legs, in which housing projection means are arranged for visual information supply, while in the housing a control environment of a motion apparatus to be simulated is situated, the control

  9. Determination of the impact of glycolate on ARP and MCU operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shehee, T. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, A. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-17

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating an alternate flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using glycolic acid as a reductant. An important aspect of the development of the glycolic acid flowsheet is determining if glycolate has any detrimental downstream impacts. Testing was performed to determine if there is any impact to the strontium and actinide sorption by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) or if there is an impact to the cesium removal, phase separation, or coalescer performance at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU).

  10. Systematic Identification of MCU Modulators by Orthogonal Interspecies Chemical Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Daniela M; Wettmarshausen, Jennifer; Vais, Horia; Navas-Navarro, Paloma; Cheng, Yiming; Leimpek, Anja; Ma, Zhongming; Delrio-Lorenzo, Alba; Giordano, Andrea; Garcia-Perez, Cecilia; Médard, Guillaume; Kuster, Bernhard; García-Sancho, Javier; Mokranjac, Dejana; Foskett, J Kevin; Alonso, M Teresa; Perocchi, Fabiana

    2017-08-17

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex is essential for calcium (Ca 2+ ) uptake into mitochondria of all mammalian tissues, where it regulates bioenergetics, cell death, and Ca 2+ signal transduction. Despite its involvement in several human diseases, we currently lack pharmacological agents for targeting uniporter activity. Here we introduce a high-throughput assay that selects for human MCU-specific small-molecule modulators in primary drug screens. Using isolated yeast mitochondria, reconstituted with human MCU, its essential regulator EMRE, and aequorin, and exploiting a D-lactate- and mannitol/sucrose-based bioenergetic shunt that greatly minimizes false-positive hits, we identify mitoxantrone out of more than 600 clinically approved drugs as a direct selective inhibitor of human MCU. We validate mitoxantrone in orthogonal mammalian cell-based assays, demonstrating that our screening approach is an effective and robust tool for MCU-specific drug discovery and, more generally, for the identification of compounds that target mitochondrial functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MCUR1 Is a Scaffold Factor for the MCU Complex Function and Promotes Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanendra Tomar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uniporter (MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is the primary mechanism for increasing matrix Ca2+ in most cell types. However, a limited understanding of the MCU complex assembly impedes the comprehension of the precise mechanisms underlying MCU activity. Here, we report that mouse cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells lacking MCU regulator 1 (MCUR1 have severely impaired [Ca2+]m uptake and IMCU current. MCUR1 binds to MCU and EMRE and function as a scaffold factor. Our protein binding analyses identified the minimal, highly conserved regions of coiled-coil domain of both MCU and MCUR1 that are necessary for heterooligomeric complex formation. Loss of MCUR1 perturbed MCU heterooligomeric complex and functions as a scaffold factor for the assembly of MCU complex. Vascular endothelial deletion of MCU and MCUR1 impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and migration but elicited autophagy. These studies establish the existence of a MCU complex that assembles at the mitochondrial integral membrane and regulates Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial metabolism.

  12. Tank 49H salt batch supernate qualification for ARP/MCU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peters, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fink, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Foster, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2008-08-25

    This report covers the laboratory testing and analyses of Tank 49H Qualification Sample Sets A and C, performed in support of initial radioactive operations of Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Major goals of this work include checking that Tank 49H was well mixed after the last receipt of Tank 23H, characterizing Tank 49H supernate after solids are settled so that its composition can be compared to waste acceptance and hazard criteria, verifying actinide and strontium adsorption with a small scale test using monosodium titanate (MST) and filtration, checking MCU solvent performance when applied to the liquid produced from MST contact, and verifying that in-tank settling after a minimum of 30 days was at least as good or better at reducing solids content after a Tank 49H to Tank 50H transfer occurred than what was observed in less time in the lab. The first four items were covered by Sample Set A. The fifth item was covered by Sample Set C, which had several analyses after compositing as required in the nuclear criticality safety evaluation (NCSE).

  13. 0.45 v and 18 μA/MHz MCU SOC with Advanced Adaptive Dynamic Voltage Control (ADVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzi Zangi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An ultra-low-power MicroController Unit System-on-Chip (MCU SOC is described with integrated DC to DC power management and Adaptive Dynamic Voltage Control (ADVC mechanism. The SOC, designed and fabricated in a 40 nm ULP standard CMOS technology, includes the complete Synopsys ARC EM5D core MCU, featuring a full set of DSP instructions and minimizing energy consumption at a wide range of frequencies: 312 K–80 MHz. A number of unique low voltage digital libraries, comprising of approximately 300 logic cells and sequential elements, were used for the MCU SOC design. On-die silicon sensors were utilized to continuously change the operating voltage to optimize power/performance for a given frequency and environmental conditions, and also to resolve yield and life time problems, while operating at low voltages. A First Fail (FFail mechanism, which can be digitally and linearly controlled with up to 8 bits, detects the failing SOC voltage at a given frequency. The core operates between 0.45–1.1 V volts with a direct battery connection for an input voltage of 1.6–3.6 V. Measurement results show that the peak energy efficiency is 18μW/MHz. A comparison to state-of-the-art commercial SOCs is presented, showing a 3–5× improved current/DMIPS (Dhrystone Million Instructions per second compared to the next best chip.

  14. Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil® (flexible graphite), Tefzel®, Isolast®, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case

  15. Dynamic simulation of hydrogen isotope distillation unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Lann, J.M.; Latge, C.; Joulia, X.; Sere-Peyrigain, P.

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic simulation of hydrogen isotope distillation unit involved in the complex environment of a fusion power plant can be a powerful technique in view to analyze the tritium hazard potential. In this paper, issues related to the development of such a dynamic simulator with model formulation and the numerical treatment of the resulting Differential-Algebraic equation (DAE) system are properly adressed. The typical dynamic characteristics of such columns are quantitatively and qualitatively enlighted on case study with very large disturbances. The developed system has proven to be beneficial for understanding the dynamic behaviour and further for developing control schemes. (orig.)

  16. Dynamic simulation of hydrogen isotope distillation unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Lann, J.M.; Joulia, X.; Sere-Peyrigain, P.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic simulation of hydrogen isotope distillation unit involved in the complex environment of a fusion power plant can be a powerful technique in view to analyze the tritium hazard potential. Issues related to the development of such a dynamic simulator with model formulation and the numerical treatment of the resulting Differential-Algebraic equation (DAE) system are properly addressed. The typical dynamic characteristics of such columns are quantitatively and qualitatively enlightened on case study with very large disturbances. The developed system has proven to be beneficial for understanding the dynamic behaviour and further for developing control schemes. (author) 12 refs.; 4 figs

  17. Micromagnetic simulations using Graphics Processing Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Diaz, L; Aurelio, D; Torres, L; Martinez, E; Hernandez-Lopez, M A; Gomez, J; Alejos, O; Carpentieri, M; Finocchio, G; Consolo, G

    2012-01-01

    The methodology for adapting a standard micromagnetic code to run on graphics processing units (GPUs) and exploit the potential for parallel calculations of this platform is discussed. GPMagnet, a general purpose finite-difference GPU-based micromagnetic tool, is used as an example. Speed-up factors of two orders of magnitude can be achieved with GPMagnet with respect to a serial code. This allows for running extensive simulations, nearly inaccessible with a standard micromagnetic solver, at reasonable computational times. (topical review)

  18. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF A HYDROCRACKING UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASSAN A. FARAG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocracking is used in the petroleum industry to convert low quality feed stocks into high valued transportation fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. The aim of the present work is to develop a rigorous steady state two-dimensional mathematical model which includes conservation equations of mass and energy for simulating the operation of a hydrocracking unit. Both the catalyst bed and quench zone have been included in this integrated model. The model equations were numerically solved in both axial and radial directions using Matlab software. The presented model was tested against a real plant data in Egypt. The results indicated that a very good agreement between the model predictions and industrial values have been reported for temperature profiles, concentration profiles, and conversion in both radial and axial directions at the hydrocracking unit. Simulation of the quench zone conversion and temperature profiles in the quench zone was also included and gave a low deviation from the actual ones. In concentration profiles, the percentage deviation in the first reactor was found to be 9.28 % and 9.6% for the second reactor. The effect of several parameters such as: Pellet Heat Transfer Coefficient, Effective Radial Thermal Conductivity, Wall Heat Transfer Coefficient, Effective Radial Diffusivity, and Cooling medium (quench zone has been included in this study. The variation of Wall Heat Transfer Coefficient, Effective Radial Diffusivity for the near-wall region, gave no remarkable changes in the temperature profiles. On the other hand, even small variations of Effective Radial Thermal Conductivity, affected the simulated temperature profiles significantly, and this effect could not be compensated by the variations of the other parameters of the model.

  19. Investigation on MCU Clustering Methodologies for Cross-Section Estimation of RAMs

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, A; Tsiligiannis, G; Javanainen, A; Kettunen, H; Puchner, H; Saigne, F; Virtanen, A; Wrobel, F; Dilillo, L

    2015-01-01

    During irradiation testing of RAMs, various failure scenarios may occur which may generate different characteristic Multiple Cell Upset (MCU) error patterns. This work proposes a method based on spatial and temporal criteria to identify them.

  20. Proposal of low-cost COTS safety MCU for radiation tolerant controls in CBM detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Kebschull, Udo [Infrastructure and Computer Systems in Data Processing, Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Amid general necessity of a robust slow control system for detectors, a DCS board with a cheap COTS MCU conceived for safety critical applications, and that supports conventional RTEMS+EPICS, is being designed for hostile environments. E.g. To operate inside detectors. For this purpose such MCU, which has redundancy features like lockstep run and ECC-SECDED error correction on flash and SRAM internal memories, was tested under radiation condition at the SPS beamtime parasitically to a detector test in CERN. In this preliminary beam-test, RTEMS+EPICS simplifies controls management and in this case supported data acquisition by monitoring the fault registers of the MCU and transmitting them with the ethernet interface, as a backup method the JTAG was used to inspect such registers to confirm the register reads. The results suggest that this is a reliable MCU for hostile conditions.

  1. The use of the codes from MCU family for calculations of WWER type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagijan, L.P.; Alexeyev, N.I.; Bryzgalov, V.I.; Gomin, E.A.; Glushkov, A.E.; Gorodkov, S.S.; Gurevich, M.I.; Kalugin, M.A.; Marin, S.V.; Shkarovsky, D.A.; Yudkevich, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    The MCU-RFFI/A and MCU-REA codes developed within the framework of the long term MCU project are widely used for calculations of neutron physic characteristics of WWER type reactors. Complete descriptions of the codes are available in both Russian and English. The codes are verified and validated by means of the comparison of calculated results with experimental data and mathematical benchmarks. The codes are licensed by Russian Nuclear and Criticality Safety Regulatory Body (Gosatomnadzor RF) (Code Passports: N 61 of 17.10.1966 and N 115 of 02.03.2000 accordingly)). The report gives examples of WWER reactor physic tasks important for practice solved using the codes from the MCU family. Some calculational results are given too. (Authors)

  2. Application of MCU to intelligent interface of high precision magnet power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ruinian; Li Deming

    2004-01-01

    Application of the high-capability MCU in the intelligent interface is introduced in this paper. A prototype of intelligent interface for high precision huge magnet power supply was developed successfully. This intelligent interface was composed of two parts: operation panel and main board, both of which adopt a MCU of PIC16F877 respectively. The interface has many advantages, such as small size, low cost and good interference immunity. (authors)

  3. Mobile contingency unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sergio O. da; Magalhaes, Milton P. de [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Junqueira, Rodrigo A.; Torres, Carlos A.R. [PETROBRAS Transporte S/A (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting what is already a reality in TRANSPETRO in the area covered by OSBRA, a pipeline that carries by-products to the Mid-West region of Brazil. In order to meet the needs of covering occasional accidents, TRANSPETRO counts on a standardized system of emergency management. It is a great challenge to secure an efficient communication along the 964 km of extension, considering that there are shadow zones where it is not possible to use conventional means of communication such as mobile telephony and internet. It was in this context that the Mobile Contingency Unit Via Satellite - MCU was developed, to extend the communication facilities existing in fixed installations to remote places, mainly the pipeline right of ways. In case of emergency, simulation and work in the pipeline right of way, MCU is fully able to provide the same data, voice, closed-circuit TV and satellite video conference facilities that are available in any internal area of the PETROBRAS system. (author)

  4. Tris (isodecyl) guanidine degradation in the MCU system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-01

    The current solvent blend consists of four components; an extractant, the modifier, a suppressor, and the diluent. Of the four components, only the suppressor – tris(isodecyl)guanidine (TiDG) has exhibited an appreciable depletion rate during facility operations.∇ Using data derived from MCU process samples, SRNL derived a method to predict the TiDG depletion based upon time and volume of feed processed. With the current data set, the following formula can estimate the TiDG concentrations after processing: At = [A0×exp(-0.000900×t)] – [5.39E-06×volume] where At is the TiDG concentration (mM) at time t (days), A0 is the TiDG concentration (mM) at time = 0, and volume is the amount of salt solution processed in gallons from time 0 to time t. The ability to use this formula as a predictive tool is limited due to the number of data points obtained for this scope of work. As such, this formula should not be used to precisely predict future TiDG concentrations.

  5. Real time hardware-in-loop simulation of ESMO satellite attitude control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Finnset

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies attitude control of the ESMO satellite using six reaction thrusters. Bang-bang control with dead-zone and Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM for the modulation of the on-time of the thrusters are treated. Closed loop hardware-in-loop simulations, using themicrocontroller unit (MCU Microchip PIC18F452 for implementation of attitude control and MatLab in a standard PC for simulating satellite dynamics, are carried out. Results for real time simulation are compared with autonomous simulations. The controller gives a satisfactory performance in the real time environment.

  6. Rancang Bangun Prototype Media Pembelajaran Fisika Berbasis Micro Controller NodeMCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayakun Muchlis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan menghasilkan prototype media pembelajaran fisika berbasis micro controller NodeMCU. Prototype media pembelajaran fisika tentang Hukum II Newton telah dikembangkan dengan mengkombinasikan sensor IR obstacle, NodeMCU, dan sketch program Arduino IDE sebagai counter waktu dan papan track, kubus berlubang, katrol, benang, dan kepingan logam sebagai perangkat pendukung. Hasil eksperimen telah memperlihatkan nilai percepatan benda pada bidang licin lebih besar daripada bidang kasar. Hasil analisis grafik hubungan percepatan vs resultan gaya eksternal menunjukkkan berbanding lurus dan grafik hubungan percepatan vs massa benda menunjukkan berbanding terbalik. Dengan demikian dapat disimpulkan media pembelajaran fisika berbasis NodeMCU mampu memvisualisasikan, menjelaskan dan membuktikan Hukum II Newton. This research is aimed to develop a prototype of physics instructional media based on micro controller. Physics learning media about Newton’s second law prototype has been developed by combining IR sensor obstacle, NodeMCU, and sketch program the Arduino IDE as counter time, and tracking, block, pulley, rope and metal strip as support device. The experimental results show that the value of acceleration of the object on a slippery plane is larger than the rough plane. The results of the analysis of the acceleration and the resultant graph shows that the external force is directly proportional and a graph showing the acceleration vs the object's mass is inversely proportional. Thus we can conclude that Physics learning media based on NodeMCU is valid in explaining and proving Newton's II.

  7. The I-V Measurement System for Solar Cells Based on MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fengxiang; Ai Yu; Wang Jiafu; Wang Lisheng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an I-V measurement system for solar cells based on Single-chip Microcomputer (MCU) is presented. According to the test principles of solar cells, this measurement system mainly comprises of two parts-data collecting, data processing and displaying. The MCU mainly used as to acquire data, then the collecting results is sent to the computer by serial port. The I-V measurement results of our test system are shown in the human-computer interaction interface based on our hardware circuit. By comparing the test results of our I-V tester and the results of other commercial I-V tester, we found errors for most parameters are less than 5%, which shows our I-V test result is reliable. Because the MCU can be applied in many fields, this I-V measurement system offers a simple prototype for portable I-V tester for solar cells.

  8. The I-V Measurement System for Solar Cells Based on MCU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Fengxiang; Ai Yu; Wang Jiafu; Wang Lisheng, E-mail: phonixchen79@yahoo.com.cn [Department of physics science and technology, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan city, Hubei Province, 430070 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, an I-V measurement system for solar cells based on Single-chip Microcomputer (MCU) is presented. According to the test principles of solar cells, this measurement system mainly comprises of two parts-data collecting, data processing and displaying. The MCU mainly used as to acquire data, then the collecting results is sent to the computer by serial port. The I-V measurement results of our test system are shown in the human-computer interaction interface based on our hardware circuit. By comparing the test results of our I-V tester and the results of other commercial I-V tester, we found errors for most parameters are less than 5%, which shows our I-V test result is reliable. Because the MCU can be applied in many fields, this I-V measurement system offers a simple prototype for portable I-V tester for solar cells.

  9. Implementación de WPS en el firmware NodeMCU para el ESP8266

    OpenAIRE

    Candelario Elías, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Este trabajo se centra en el system on chip ESP8266, más en concreto en añadir el estándar WPS al firmware de NodeMCU. Para llevar a cabo este trabajo se han estudiado las características de este SOC y su funcionamiento, así como el estándar WPS y sus distintos modos de funcionamiento. Se ha creado un módulo nuevo en el NodeMCU que permite el uso de las funciones de la librería “libwps.a” proporcionada por la compañía Espressif en su sdk, las cuáles permitirán al NodeMCU hacer ...

  10. Design of hygrothermal detection and control intelligent system based on AVR-MCU in radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongming; Fang Fang; Zhou Wei; Zheng Meiyang; Xu Jianyi

    2006-01-01

    The design of a new hygrothermal detection and control system based on AVR-MCU, which is used in minitype and medium-sized radon chamber, is introduced. The kernel of the interface among ATmega128 MCU, hygrothermal sensor, refrigeration and desiccation components is described. In addition, with the calculation of the control capability in theory, it comes to the conclusion that the design is feasible, and this control system not only can work in independence, but also can cooperate with PC by RS232 communication. (authors)

  11. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-16-1363-1364-1365: November 2016 monthly sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-16

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of three Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-1363-1364-1365), pulled on 11/15/2016 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-16-1363-1364-1365 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is at its nominal level (100%). The extractant (MaxCalix) and the modifier (CS- 7SB) are 8% and 2 % below their nominal concentrations. The suppressor (TiDG) is 7% below its nominal concentration. A summary of the concentration of the relevant solvent components is shown below.

  12. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-16-1317-1318-1319: September 2016 monthly sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-16

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of three Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-1317-1318-1319), pulled on 09/12/2016 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-16-1317-1318-1319 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is above its nominal level (102%). The extractant (MaxCalix) and the modifier (CS-7SB) are 5% and 9% below their nominal concentrations. The suppressor (TiDG) is 76% below its nominal concentration. A summary of the concentration of the relevant solvent components is shown below.

  13. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-16-1247-1248-1249: August 2016 monthly sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-16

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-1247-1248-1249), pulled on 08/22/2016 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-16-1247-1248-1249 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is above its nominal level (101%). The extractant (MaxCalix) and the modifier (CS-7SB) are 7% and 9 % below their nominal concentrations. The suppressor (TiDG) is 63% below its nominal concentration. A summary of the concentration of the relevant solvent components is shown below.

  14. Simulator of nuclear power plant with WWER-440 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcek, V.

    1985-01-01

    The use is discussed of simulators in the training of qualified personnel for the construction and operation of nuclear power plants. Simulators are used for training all activities and thinking processes related to the control of a nuclear reactor in the course of quasi-steady and non-steady states. The development and implementation is summed up of the construction of such a simulator for WWER-440 nuclear power plants. The main parts of the simulator include the unit control room, the computer system, the teacher's workplace and the interface system. The possibility of simulating the functions of the unit for personnel training is based on the description of the behaviour of the simulated object in form of mathematical models of its basic technological subsystems and their interrelations within the range of operating patterns. (J.C.)

  15. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of

  16. Preliminary Evaluation Of DWPF Impacts Of Boric Acid Use In Cesium Strip FOR SWPF And MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, M.

    2010-01-01

    A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system includes the option to replace the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with boric acid. To support this effort, the impact of using 0.01M, 0.1M, 0.25M and 0.5M boric acid in place of 0.001M nitric acid was evaluated for impacts on the DWPF facility. The evaluation only covered the impacts of boric acid in the strip effluent and does not address the other changes in solvents (i.e., the new extractant, called MaxCalix, or the new suppressor, guanidine). Boric acid additions may lead to increased hydrogen generation during the SRAT and SME cycles as well as change the rheological properties of the feed. The boron in the strip effluent will impact glass composition and could require each SME batch to be trimmed with boric acid to account for any changes in the boron from strip effluent additions. Addition of boron with the strip effluent will require changes in the frit composition and could lead to changes in melt behavior. The severity of the impacts from the boric acid additions is dependent on the amount of boric acid added by the strip effluent. The use of 0.1M or higher concentrations of boric acid in the strip effluent was found to significantly impact DWPF operations while the impact of 0.01M boric acid is expected to be relatively minor. Experimental testing is required to resolve the issues identified during the preliminary evaluation. The issues to be addressed by the testing are: (1) Impact on SRAT acid addition and hydrogen generation; (2) Impact on melter feed rheology; (3) Impact on glass composition control; (4) Impact on frit production; and (5) Impact on melter offgas. A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system includes the option to replace the

  17. The m-AAA Protease Associated with Neurodegeneration Limits MCU Activity in Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Tim; Tröder, Simon E; Bakka, Kavya; Korwitz, Anne; Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Lampe, Philipp A; Patron, Maria; Mühlmeister, Mareike; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Brandt, Ulrich; Decker, Thorsten; Lauria, Ines; Paggio, Angela; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rugarli, Elena I; De Stefani, Diego; Langer, Thomas

    2016-10-06

    Mutations in subunits of mitochondrial m-AAA proteases in the inner membrane cause neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA28) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP7). m-AAA proteases preserve mitochondrial proteostasis, mitochondrial morphology, and efficient OXPHOS activity, but the cause for neuronal loss in disease is unknown. We have determined the neuronal interactome of m-AAA proteases in mice and identified a complex with C2ORF47 (termed MAIP1), which counteracts cell death by regulating the assembly of the mitochondrial Ca 2+ uniporter MCU. While MAIP1 assists biogenesis of the MCU subunit EMRE, the m-AAA protease degrades non-assembled EMRE and ensures efficient assembly of gatekeeper subunits with MCU. Loss of the m-AAA protease results in accumulation of constitutively active MCU-EMRE channels lacking gatekeeper subunits in neuronal mitochondria and facilitates mitochondrial Ca 2+ overload, mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, and neuronal death. Together, our results explain neuronal loss in m-AAA protease deficiency by deregulated mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulation and optimization of an industrial PSA unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barg C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA units have been used as a low cost alternative to the usual gas separation processes. Its largest commercial application is for hydrogen purification systems. Several studies have been made about the simulation of pressure swing adsorption units, but there are only few reports on the optimization of such processes. The objective of this study is to simulate and optimize an industrial PSA unit for hydrogen purification. This unit consists of six beds, each of them have three layers of different kinds of adsorbents. The main impurities are methane, carbon monoxide and sulfidric gas. The product stream has 99.99% purity in hydrogen, and the recovery is around 90%. A mathematical model for a commercial PSA unit is developed. The cycle time and the pressure swing steps are optimized. All the features concerning with complex commercial processes are considered.

  19. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Gopal P; Jacobs, Travis W; Watts, Mark D; Ghayoomie, S Vahid; Larson, Stephen D; Gerkin, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models.

  20. Simulation of SONGS unit 2/3 NSSS with RETACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakory, M.R.; Olmos, J.

    1991-01-01

    RETACT Code which is a major code for real time simulation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena has been enhanced and configured for the first time for Simulation of the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) of C-E designed PWRs at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. SONGS Unit 2/3 Simulator was upgraded for thermal-hydraulic and containment models as well as the instructor station. In this paper the simulator results for various transients and accidents were benchmarked against plant data, the comparison for some of the benchmarkings including steam generator level swell/shrink, and loss-of-coolant accident are presented

  1. DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed

  2. Simulation of motor unit recruitment and microvascular unit perfusion: spatial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglevand, A J; Segal, S S

    1997-10-01

    Muscle fiber activity is the principal stimulus for increasing capillary perfusion during exercise. The control elements of perfusion, i.e., microvascular units (MVUs), supply clusters of muscle fibers, whereas the control elements of contraction, i.e., motor units, are composed of fibers widely scattered throughout muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine how the discordant spatial domains of MVUs and motor units could influence the proportion of open capillaries (designated as perfusion) throughout a muscle cross section. A computer model simulated the locations of perfused MVUs in response to the activation of up to 100 motor units in a muscle with 40,000 fibers and a cross-sectional area of 100 mm2. The simulation increased contraction intensity by progressive recruitment of motor units. For each step of motor unit recruitment, the percentage of active fibers and the number of perfused MVUs were determined for several conditions: 1) motor unit fibers widely dispersed and motor unit territories randomly located (which approximates healthy human muscle), 2) regionalized motor unit territories, 3) reversed recruitment order of motor units, 4) densely clustered motor unit fibers, and 5) increased size but decreased number of motor units. The simulations indicated that the widespread dispersion of motor unit fibers facilitates complete capillary (MVU) perfusion of muscle at low levels of activity. The efficacy by which muscle fiber activity induced perfusion was reduced 7- to 14-fold under conditions that decreased the dispersion of active fibers, increased the size of motor units, or reversed the sequence of motor unit recruitment. Such conditions are similar to those that arise in neuromuscular disorders, with aging, or during electrical stimulation of muscle, respectively.

  3. Thermal unit availability modeling in a regional simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamayee, Z.A.; Port, J.; Robinett, W.

    1983-01-01

    The System Analysis Model (SAM) developed under the umbrella of PNUCC's System Analysis Committee is capable of simulating the operation of a given load/resource scenario. This model employs a Monte-Carlo simulation to incorporate uncertainties. Among uncertainties modeled is thermal unit availability both for energy simulation (seasonal) and capacity simulations (hourly). This paper presents the availability modeling in the capacity and energy models. The use of regional and national data in deriving the two availability models, the interaction between the two and modifications made to the capacity model in order to reflect regional practices is presented. A sample problem is presented to show the modification process. Results for modeling a nuclear unit using NERC-GADS is presented

  4. COTRANSA simulation of Chinshan unit one generator load rejection test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    A simulation of the plant behavior during a BWR generator load rejection transient using Exxon Nuclear Company's COTRANSA code is presented in this paper. The results are compared to measurements obtained by Taiwan Power Company during a generator load rejection transient, initiated at full power condition, which was one of the Chinshan Unit 1 initial cycle startup tests. Good agreement between the COTRANSA predicted and the measured values, indicates that the COTRANSA code can simulate this transient satisfactorily

  5. Modelling and simulation of containment on full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Tingyun

    1996-01-01

    A multi-node containment thermal-hydraulic model has been developed and adapted in Full Scope Simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit with good realtime simulation effects. Containment pressure for LBLOCA calculated by the model is well agreed with those of CONTEMPT-4/MOD3

  6. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-16-596-597-598: April 2016 Monthly Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Advanced Characterization and Processing; Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Research Support

    2016-07-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-596-597-598), pulled on 04/30/2016 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-16-596-597-598 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is above its nominal level (102%). The modifier (CS-7SB) is 14% below its nominal concentration, while the TiDG and MaxCalix concentrations are at and above their nominal concentrations, respectively. This analysis confirms the solvent may require the addition of modifier. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time. Periodic characterization and trimming additions to the solvent are recommended.

  7. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-16-1317-1318-1319. September 2016 monthly sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-1317-1318-1319), pulled on 09/12/2016 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-16-1317-1318-1319 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is above its nominal level (102%). The extractant (MaxCalix) and the modifier (CS-7SB) are 5% and 10 % below their nominal concentrations. The suppressor (TiDG) is 77% below its nominal concentration. A summary of the concentration of the relevant solvent components is shown below. This analysis confirms the Isopar™ addition to the solvent in August. This analysis also indicates the solvent may require the addition of TiDG, and possibly of modifier to restore them to nominal levels.

  8. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-16-1363-1365. November 2016 monthly sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-03-22

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of three Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-1363-1364-1365), pulled on 11/15/2016 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-16-1363-1364-1365 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is at its nominal level (100%). The extractant (MaxCalix) and the modifier (CS- 7SB) are 8% and 2 % below their nominal concentrations. The suppressor (TiDG) is 7% below its nominal concentration. This analysis confirms the trim and Isopar™ additions to the solvent in November. This analysis also indicates the solvent did not require further additions. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time. Periodic characterization and trimming additions to the solvent are recommended.

  9. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-16-1488-1493 (December 2016), MCU-17-86-88 (January 2017), and MCU-17-119-121 (February 2017): Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-30

    A trend summary of three Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) monthly samples; MCU-16-1488-1493 (December 2016), MCU-17-86-88 (January 2017), and MCU-17-119-121 (February 2017) are reported. Analyses indicate that the modifier (CS-7SB) and the extractant (MaxCalix) concentrations are at their nominal recommended levels (169,000 mg/L and 46,300 mg/L respectively). The suppressor (TiDG) level has decreased to a steady state level of 673 mg/L well above the minimum recommended level (479 mg/L). This analysis confirms the Isopar™ addition to the solvent in January 18, 2017. This analysis also indicates the solvent did not require further additions. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time. Periodic characterization and trimming additions to the solvent are recommended. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). No impurities were observed in the Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HNMR). Another impurity observed in the samples was mercury. Up to 38 ± 8 micrograms of mercury per mL of solvent was detected in these samples (the average of the CV-AA and XRF methods). The higher mercury concentration in the solvent (as determined in the last three monthly samples) is possibly due to the higher mercury concentration in Salt Batches 8 and 9 (Tank 49H) or mixing of previously undisturbed areas of high mercury concentration in Tank 49H. The gamma level (0.21E5 dpm/mL) measured in the February SHT sample was one order of magnitude lower than the gamma levels observed in the December and January SHT samples. The February gamma level is consistent with the solvent being idle (since January 10, 2017). The gamma levels observed in the December and January SHT samples were consistent with previous monthly measurements where the process operated normally. The laboratory will continue to monitor

  10. The MCU-RFFI Monte Carlo code for reactor design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomin, E.A.; Maiorov, L.V.

    1995-01-01

    MCU-RFFI is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, general geometry Monte Carlo code for solving external source or criticality problems for neutron transport in the energy range of 20 MeV to 10 -5 eV. The main fields of MCU-RFFI applications are as follows: (a) nuclear data validation; (b) design calculations (space reactors and other); (c) verification of design codes. MCU-RFFI is also supplied with tools to check the accuracy of design codes. These tools permit the user to calculate: the few group parameters of reactor cells, including the diffusion coefficients defined in a variety of ways, reaction rates for various nuclei, energy and space bins, and the kinetic parameters of systems, taking into account delayed neutrons. Boundary conditions include vacuum, white and specular reflection, and the condition of translational symmetry. The criticals with the neutron leakage given by the buckling vector may be calculated by solving Benoist's problem. The curve of criticality coefficient dependence on buckling may be determined during the single code run and critical buckling may be determined. Double heterogeneous systems with fuel elements containing many thousands of spherical microcells can be solved

  11. The impact of the MCU life extension solvent on sludge batch 8 projected operating windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D.K.; Edwards, T.B.

    2013-01-01

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01 M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B203 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 flowsheet to additions of B203 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of

  12. Smoldyn on graphics processing units: massively parallel Brownian dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematté, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Space is a very important aspect in the simulation of biochemical systems; recently, the need for simulation algorithms able to cope with space is becoming more and more compelling. Complex and detailed models of biochemical systems need to deal with the movement of single molecules and particles, taking into consideration localized fluctuations, transportation phenomena, and diffusion. A common drawback of spatial models lies in their complexity: models can become very large, and their simulation could be time consuming, especially if we want to capture the systems behavior in a reliable way using stochastic methods in conjunction with a high spatial resolution. In order to deliver the promise done by systems biology to be able to understand a system as whole, we need to scale up the size of models we are able to simulate, moving from sequential to parallel simulation algorithms. In this paper, we analyze Smoldyn, a widely diffused algorithm for stochastic simulation of chemical reactions with spatial resolution and single molecule detail, and we propose an alternative, innovative implementation that exploits the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The implementation executes the most computational demanding steps (computation of diffusion, unimolecular, and bimolecular reaction, as well as the most common cases of molecule-surface interaction) on the GPU, computing them in parallel on each molecule of the system. The implementation offers good speed-ups and real time, high quality graphics output

  13. Dynamic simulation of the NET In-Vessel Handling Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reim, J.

    1991-01-01

    During the conceptual design phase of the Next European Torus (NET) a large remote maintenance transporter system, the In-Vessel Handling Unit (IVHU), is being developed. It consists of an articulated boom with four rotational joints, which is mounted on a carrier outside the vessel. This boom will be able to carry master-slave manipulators or special work units. The engineering design is supported by dynamic computations. Main topics of the dynamic simulation are the evaluation of IVHU performance, selection and optimisation of the actuator design and of the control algorithms. This simulation task requires full three-dimensional modelling regarding structural elasticity and non-linear actuator dynamics. The Multibody dynamics of the transporter system are modelled with a commerical analysis package. Elastic links and a precise dynamic actuator model are introduced by applied forces, spring elements and differential equations. The actuator model comprises electric motors, gears and linear control algorithms. Non-linear effects which have an influence on control stability and accuracy are taken into account. Most important effects are backlash and static friction. The simulations concentrate on test and optimisation of the control layout and performance studies for critical remote handling tasks. Simulations for control layout and critical remote maintenance tasks correspond to the design objectives of the transporter system. (orig.)

  14. Accelerating cardiac bidomain simulations using graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neic, A; Liebmann, M; Hoetzl, E; Mitchell, L; Vigmond, E J; Haase, G; Plank, G

    2012-08-01

    Anatomically realistic and biophysically detailed multiscale computer models of the heart are playing an increasingly important role in advancing our understanding of integrated cardiac function in health and disease. Such detailed simulations, however, are computationally vastly demanding, which is a limiting factor for a wider adoption of in-silico modeling. While current trends in high-performance computing (HPC) hardware promise to alleviate this problem, exploiting the potential of such architectures remains challenging since strongly scalable algorithms are necessitated to reduce execution times. Alternatively, acceleration technologies such as graphics processing units (GPUs) are being considered. While the potential of GPUs has been demonstrated in various applications, benefits in the context of bidomain simulations where large sparse linear systems have to be solved in parallel with advanced numerical techniques are less clear. In this study, the feasibility of multi-GPU bidomain simulations is demonstrated by running strong scalability benchmarks using a state-of-the-art model of rabbit ventricles. The model is spatially discretized using the finite element methods (FEM) on fully unstructured grids. The GPU code is directly derived from a large pre-existing code, the Cardiac Arrhythmia Research Package (CARP), with very minor perturbation of the code base. Overall, bidomain simulations were sped up by a factor of 11.8 to 16.3 in benchmarks running on 6-20 GPUs compared to the same number of CPU cores. To match the fastest GPU simulation which engaged 20 GPUs, 476 CPU cores were required on a national supercomputing facility.

  15. Discrete Event Simulation of Patient Admissions to a Neurovascular Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hahn-Goldberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence exists that clinical outcomes improve for stroke patients admitted to specialized Stroke Units. The Toronto Western Hospital created a Neurovascular Unit (NVU using beds from general internal medicine, Neurology and Neurosurgery to care for patients with stroke and acute neurovascular conditions. Using patient-level data for NVU-eligible patients, a discrete event simulation was created to study changes in patient flow and length of stay pre- and post-NVU implementation. Varying patient volumes and resources were tested to determine the ideal number of beds under various conditions. In the first year of operation, the NVU admitted 507 patients, over 66% of NVU-eligible patient volumes. With the introduction of the NVU, length of stay decreased by around 8%. Scenario testing showed that the current level of 20 beds is sufficient for accommodating the current demand and would continue to be sufficient with an increase in demand of up to 20%.

  16. MCNP simulation of a Theratron 780 radiotherapy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, R; Soler, J; Gallardo, S; Campayo, J M; Díez, S; Verdú, G

    2005-01-01

    A Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60Co radiotherapy unit has been simulated with the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The unit has been realistically modelled: the cylindrical source capsule and its housing, the rectangular collimator system, both the primary and secondary jaws and the air gaps between the components. Different collimator openings, ranging from 5 x 5 cm2 to 20 x 20 cm2 (narrow and broad beams) at a source-surface distance equal to 80 cm have been used during the study. In the present work, we have calculated spectra as a function of field size. A study of the variation of the electron contamination of the 60Co beam has also been performed.

  17. PORFLOW Simulations Supporting Saltstone Disposal Unit Design Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hang, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Taylor, G. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-10

    SRNL was requested by SRR to perform PORFLOW simulations to support potential cost-saving design modifications to future Saltstone Disposal Units in Z-Area (SRR-CWDA-2015-00120). The design sensitivity cases are defined in a modeling input specification document SRR-CWDA-2015-00133 Rev. 1. A high-level description of PORFLOW modeling and interpretation of results are provided in SRR-CWDA-2015-00169. The present report focuses on underlying technical issues and details of PORFLOW modeling not addressed by the input specification and results interpretation documents. Design checking of PORFLOW modeling is documented in SRNL-L3200-2015-00146.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Claus Unit Reaction Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Pahlavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reaction furnace is the most important part of the Claus sulfur recovery unit and its performance has a significant impact on the process efficiency. Too many reactions happen in the furnace and their kinetics and mechanisms are not completely understood; therefore, modeling reaction furnace is difficult and several works have been carried out on in this regard so far. Equilibrium models are commonly used to simulate the furnace, but the related literature states that the outlet of furnace is not in equilibrium and the furnace reactions are controlled by kinetic laws; therefore, in this study, the reaction furnace is simulated by a kinetic model. The predicted outlet temperature and concentrations by this model are compared with experimental data published in the literature and the data obtained by PROMAX V2.0 simulator. The results show that the accuracy of the proposed kinetic model and PROMAX simulator is almost similar, but the kinetic model used in this paper has two importance abilities. Firstly, it is a distributed model and can be used to obtain the temperature and concentration profiles along the furnace. Secondly, it is a dynamic model and can be used for analyzing the transient behavior and designing the control system.

  19. The design of a simple radon-detecting instrument based on MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Genyuan; Qiu Yingyu; Zhang Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Introduction are given on the internal composition of the radon-detecting instrument based on MCU and the working of the real electric circuit. The single-chip microcomputer P89C58 of PHILIPS is adopted as the micro-controller of the instrument, realizing such functions as counting input pulses within fixed time, data processing, liquid crystal display, keyboard interface, serial communication, etc. The instrument turns out to be low in work consumption, with relatively high degree of concentration and computerization, and is recommended for field operations. (authors)

  20. The design of a simple radon-detecting instrument based on MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Genyuan; Chen Jianjun; Zhang Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Introduction are given on the internal composition of the radon-detecting instrument based on MCU and the working of the real electric circuit. The single-chip microcomputer P89C58 of PHILIPS is adopted as the micro-controller of the instrument, realizing such functions as counting input pulses within fixed time, data processing, liquid crystal display, keyboard interface, serial communication, etc. The instrument turns out to be low in work consumption, with relatively high degree of concentration and computerization, and is recommended for field operations. (authors)

  1. The design of a simple portable γ ray detecting instrument based on MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunmei; Cao Wen; Zhang Jiang

    2008-01-01

    The internal composition of the γ ray detecting instrument based on MCU and the working of the real electric circuit are introduced. The single-chip microcomputer of PHILIPS is adopted as the micro-controller of the instrument, realizing such functions as counting input pulses within fixed time, data processing, liquid crystal display, keyboard interface, serial communication, etc. The instrument turns out to be low in work consumption, with relatively high degree of concentration and computerization, and is recommended for field operations. (authors)

  2. The Impact Of The Mcu Life Extension Solvent On Dwpf Glass Formulation Efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NG-CSSX), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S operations as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass formulation activities, and melter operations at DWPF. To support programmatic objectives, the downstream impacts of the boric acid strip effluent (SE) to the glass formulation activities and melter operations are considered in this study. More specifically, the impacts of boric acid additions to the projected SB7b operating windows, potential impacts to frit production temperatures, and the potential impact of boron volatility are evaluated. Although various boric acid molarities have been reported and discussed, the baseline flowsheet used to support this assessment was 0.01M boric acid. The results of the paper study assessment indicate that Frit 418 and Frit 418-7D are robust to the implementation of the 0.01M boric acid SE into the SB7b flowsheet (sludge-only or ARP-added). More specifically, the projected operating windows for the nominal SB7b projections remain essentially constant (i.e., 25-43 or 25-44% waste loading (WL)) regardless of the flowsheet options (sludge-only, ARP added, and/or the presence of the new SE). These results indicate that even if SE is not transferred to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), there would be no need to add boric acid (from a trim tank) to compositionally compensate for the absence of the boric acid SE in either a sludge-only or ARP-added SB7b flowsheet. With respect to boron volatility, the Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) assessments also

  3. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-16-934-935-936: June 2016 Monthly Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-934-935-936), pulled on 07/01/2016 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-16-934-935-936 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is above its nominal level (101%). The modifier (CS-7SB) and the TiDG concentrations are 8% and 29 % below their nominal concentrations. This analysis confirms the solvent may require the addition of TiDG, and possibly of modifier. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time. Periodic characterization and trimming additions to the solvent are recommended. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). No impurities were observed in the Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HNMR). However, up to 21.1 ± 4 micrograms of mercury per gram of solvent (or 17.5 μg/mL) was detected in this sample (as determined by the XRF method of undigested sample). The current gamma level (1.41E5 dpm/mL) confirmed that the gamma concentration has returned to previous levels (as observed in the late 2015 samples) where the process operated normally and as expected.

  4. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-16-1247-1248-1249: August 2016 Monthly Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-16-1247-1248-1249), pulled on 08/22/2016 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-16-1247-1248-1249 indicated the Isopar™L concentration is above its nominal level (101%). The extractant (MaxCalix) and the modifier (CS-7SB) are 7% and 9 % below their nominal concentrations. The suppressor (TiDG) is 63% below its nominal concentration. This analysis confirms the solvent may require the addition of TiDG, and possibly of modifier and MaxCalix to restore then to nominal levels. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time. Periodic characterization and trimming additions to the solvent are recommended. At the time of writing this report, A solvent trim batch containing TiDG, modifier and MaxCalix, was added to the SHT (October 2016) and expect the concentration of these components to be at their nominal values.

  5. ESTIMATION OF THE TEMPERATURE RISE OF A MCU ACID STREAM PIPE IN NEAR PROXIMITY TO A SLUDGE STREAM PIPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondeur, F; Michael Poirier, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-01-01

    Effluent streams from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) will transfer to the tank farms and to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These streams will contain entrained solvent. A significant portion of the Strip Effluent (SE) pipeline (i.e., acid stream containing Isopar(reg s ign) L residues) length is within one inch of a sludge stream. Personnel envisioned the sludge stream temperature may reach 100 C during operation. The nearby SE stream may receive heat from the sludge stream and reach temperatures that may lead to flammability issues once the contents of the SE stream discharge into a larger reservoir. To this end, personnel used correlations from the literature to estimate the maximum temperature rise the SE stream may experience if the nearby sludge stream reaches boiling temperature. Several calculation methods were used to determine the temperature rise of the SE stream. One method considered a heat balance equation under steady state that employed correlation functions to estimate heat transfer rate. This method showed the maximum temperature of the acid stream (SE) may exceed 45 C when the nearby sludge stream is 80 C or higher. A second method used an effectiveness calculation used to predict the heat transfer rate in single pass heat exchanger. By envisioning the acid and sludge pipes as a parallel flow pipe-to-pipe heat exchanger, this method provides a conservative estimation of the maximum temperature rise. Assuming the contact area (i.e., the area over which the heat transfer occurs) is the whole pipe area, the results found by this method nearly matched the results found with the previous calculation method. It is recommended that the sludge stream be maintained below 80 C to minimize a flammable vapor hazard from occurring

  6. Gene expression changes of single skeletal muscle fibers in response to modulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chemello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU gene codifies for the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients are involved in sarcomere contraction through cycles of release and storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition cytosolic Ca2+ regulates various signaling cascades that eventually lead to gene expression reprogramming. Mitochondria are strategically placed in close contact with the ER/SR, thus cytosolic Ca2+ transients elicit large increases in the [Ca2+] of the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca2+]mt. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake regulates energy production and cell survival. In addition, we recently showed that MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls skeletal muscle trophism. In the same report, we dissected the effects of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on gene expression through microarray gene expression analysis upon modulation of MCU expression by in vivo AAV infection. Analyses were performed on single skeletal muscle fibers at two time points (7 and 14 days post-AAV injection. Raw and normalized data are available on the GEO database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GSE60931.

  7. Key Factors That Influence The Performance Properties Of ARP/MCU Saltstone Mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-01-01

    At the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF), decontaminated salt solution (DSS) is combined with premix (a cementitious mixture of portland cement (PC), blast furnace slag (BFS) and Class F fly ash (FA)) in a Readco mixer to produce fresh (uncured) Saltstone. After transfer to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) the hydration reactions initiated during the contact of the premix and salt solution continue during the curing period to produce the hardened waste form product. The amount of heat generated from hydration and the resultant temperature increase in the vaults depend on the composition of the decontaminated salt solution being dispositioned as well as the grout formulation (mix design). This report details the results from Task 3 of the Saltstone Variability Study for FY09 which was performed to identify, and quantify when possible, those factors that drive the performance properties of the projected ARP/MCU Batches. A baseline ARP/MCU mix (at 0.60 water to cementitious materials (w/cm) ratio) was established and consisted of the normal premix composition and a salt solution that was an average of the projected compositions of the last three ARP/MCU batches developed by T. A. Le. This task introduced significant variation in (1) wt % slag, w/cm ratio, and wt % portland cement about the baseline mix and (2) the temperature of curing in order to better assess the dependence of the performance properties on these factors. Two separate campaigns, designated Phase 10 and Phase 11, were carried out under Task 3. Experimental designs and statistical analyses were used to search for correlation among properties and to develop linear models to predict property values based on factors such as w/cm ratio, slag concentration, and portland cement concentration. It turns out that the projected salt compositions contained relatively high amounts of aluminate (0.22 M) even though no aluminate was introduced due to caustic aluminate removal from High Level Waste. Previous

  8. Conception and simulation of an improved solar refrigeration unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouachi, B.; Gabsi, S.

    2006-01-01

    If the solar energy possesses the advantage to be c lean , free and new able, this last is probably, considered like an adapted potential solution, that answers in even time at a economic preoccupation and ecological problems. Among the main done currently research is the use of free source to make operate system of refrigeration. following a bibliographic study on the absorption cycles, the utilized couples absorbents-refrigerating fluids and the capture of the solar energy, an unit refrigeration using an improved solar absorption cycle of ammonia has been conceived and studied. The simulation results in permanent regime concerned the determination of the variation of the performance criteria mainly according to the operatives kept for this study. The obtained results showed, that the improved mono pressure absorption cycle of ammonia is suitable well for the cold production by means of the solar energy and that with a simple plate collector we can reach a power, of the order of 900 watts sufficient for domestic use.(Author)

  9. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  10. Recommendations for the establishment of a clinical simulation unit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simulation-enhanced medical education involves training ... Simulation techniques include the .... What lessons did you learn regarding the planning and implementation of a ..... radiological technology students in patient interactions. J Allied ...

  11. A simulation of probabilistic wildfire risk components for the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Charles W. McHugh; Isaac C. Grenfell; Karin L. Riley; Karen C. Short

    2011-01-01

    This simulation research was conducted in order to develop a large-fire risk assessment system for the contiguous land area of the United States. The modeling system was applied to each of 134 Fire Planning Units (FPUs) to estimate burn probabilities and fire size distributions. To obtain stable estimates of these quantities, fire ignition and growth was simulated for...

  12. Efficient Synthesis of MCu (M = Pd, Pt, and Au) Aerogels with Accelerated Gelation Kinetics and their High Electrocatalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Shi, Qiurong; Fu, Shaofang; Song, Junhua; Xia, Haibing; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-10-01

    To accelerate hydrogel formation and further simplify the synthetic procedure, a series of MCu (M = Pd, Pt, and Au) bimetallic aerogels is synthesized from the in situ reduction of metal precursors through enhancement of the gelation kinetics at elevated temperature. Moreover, the resultant PdCu aerogel with ultrathin nanowire networks exhibits excellent electrocatalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation, holding promise in fuel-cell applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. First urology simulation boot camp in the United Kingdom | Biyani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    top models and virtual reality simulators. Post-course assessment and feedback on the course structure and utility of knowledge gained together with a global outcome score was collected. Results: Overall all the sections of feedback received ...

  14. First urology simulation boot camp in the United Kingdom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C.S. Biyani

    2017-08-12

    Aug 12, 2017 ... on training using animal models, bench-top models and virtual reality simulators. ..... on medico-legal aspects delivered by a barrister, an interactive talk .... rating synthetic and animal models, innovative models for urinary.

  15. Non-Aqueous Titration Method for Determining Suppressor Concentration in the MCU Next Generation Solvent (NGS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, Daniel H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-23

    A non-aqueous titration method has been used for quantifying the suppressor concentration in the MCU solvent hold tank (SHT) monthly samples since the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) was implemented in 2013. The titration method measures the concentration of the NGS suppressor (TiDG) as well as the residual tri-n-octylamine (TOA) that is a carryover from the previous solvent. As the TOA concentration has decreased over time, it has become difficult to resolve the TiDG equivalence point as the TOA equivalence point has moved closer. In recent samples, the TiDG equivalence point could not be resolved, and therefore, the TiDG concentration was determined by subtracting the TOA concentration as measured by semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA) from the total base concentration as measured by titration. In order to improve the titration method so that the TiDG concentration can be measured directly, without the need for the SVOA data, a new method has been developed that involves spiking of the sample with additional TOA to further separate the two equivalence points in the titration. This method has been demonstrated on four recent SHT samples and comparison to results obtained using the SVOA TOA subtraction method shows good agreement. Therefore, it is recommended that the titration procedure be revised to include the TOA spike addition, and this to become the primary method for quantifying the TiDG.

  16. Non-Aqueous Titration Method for Determining Suppressor Concentration in the MCU Next Generation Solvent (NGS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L.; Jones, Daniel H.

    2017-01-01

    A non-aqueous titration method has been used for quantifying the suppressor concentration in the MCU solvent hold tank (SHT) monthly samples since the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) was implemented in 2013. The titration method measures the concentration of the NGS suppressor (TiDG) as well as the residual tri-n-octylamine (TOA) that is a carryover from the previous solvent. As the TOA concentration has decreased over time, it has become difficult to resolve the TiDG equivalence point as the TOA equivalence point has moved closer. In recent samples, the TiDG equivalence point could not be resolved, and therefore, the TiDG concentration was determined by subtracting the TOA concentration as measured by semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA) from the total base concentration as measured by titration. In order to improve the titration method so that the TiDG concentration can be measured directly, without the need for the SVOA data, a new method has been developed that involves spiking of the sample with additional TOA to further separate the two equivalence points in the titration. This method has been demonstrated on four recent SHT samples and comparison to results obtained using the SVOA TOA subtraction method shows good agreement. Therefore, it is recommended that the titration procedure be revised to include the TOA spike addition, and this to become the primary method for quantifying the TiDG.

  17. Accuracy of WWR-M criticality calculations with code MCU-RFFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Yu.V.; Erykalov, A.N.; Onegin, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    The scattering and deviation of fuel element parameters by manufacturing, approximations of the reactor structure in the computer model, the partly inadequate neutron cross sections in the computer codes etc. lead to a discrepancy between the reactivity computations and data. We have compared reactivity calculations using the MCU-RRFI Monte Carlo code of critical assemblies containing WWR-M2 (36 enriched) an WWR-M5 (90%) fuel elements with benchmark experiments. The agreement was about Δρ≅±0.3%. A strong influence of the water ratio on reactivity was shown and a significant heterogeneous effect was found. We have also investigated, by full scale reactor calculations for the RETR program, the contribution to the reactivity of the main reactor structure elements: beryllium reflector, experimental channels irradiation devices inside the core, etc. Calculations show the importance of a more thorough study of the contributions of products of the (n, α) reaction in the Be reflector to the reactivity. Ways of improving the accuracy of the calculations are discussed. (author)

  18. Accuracy of WWR-M criticality calculations with code MCU-RFFI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Yu V [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute RAS, 188350 Gatchina, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Erykalov, A N; Onegin, M S [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute RAS, 188350 Gatchina, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1999-10-01

    The scattering and deviation of fuel element parameters by manufacturing, approximations of the reactor structure in the computer model, the partly inadequate neutron cross sections in the computer codes etc. lead to a discrepancy between the reactivity computations and data. We have compared reactivity calculations using the MCU-RRFI Monte Carlo code of critical assemblies containing WWR-M2 (36 enriched) an WWR-M5 (90%) fuel elements with benchmark experiments. The agreement was about {delta}{rho}{approx_equal}{+-}0.3%. A strong influence of the water ratio on reactivity was shown and a significant heterogeneous effect was found. We have also investigated, by full scale reactor calculations for the RETR program, the contribution to the reactivity of the main reactor structure elements: beryllium reflector, experimental channels irradiation devices inside the core, etc. Calculations show the importance of a more thorough study of the contributions of products of the (n, {alpha}) reaction in the Be reflector to the reactivity. Ways of improving the accuracy of the calculations are discussed. (author)

  19. First urology simulation boot camp in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Biyani

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This first UK Urology Simulation Boot Camp has demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness in enhancing trainee’s experience. Given these positive feedbacks there is a good reason to expect that future courses will improve the overall skills of a new urology trainee.

  20. Reactor control and protection of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jinping; Sun Jiliang

    1996-01-01

    The control and protection simulation of Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit, including the nuclear control, the pressurizer pressure control, the pressurizer level control, the rod control, the reactor shutdown protection and engineered safety feature etc are briefly introduced

  1. Accelerating Molecular Dynamic Simulation on Graphics Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs, Mark S.; Eastman, Peter; Vaidyanathan, Vishal; Houston, Mike; Legrand, Scott; Beberg, Adam L.; Ensign, Daniel L.; Bruns, Christopher M.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a complete implementation of all-atom protein molecular dynamics running entirely on a graphics processing unit (GPU), including all standard force field terms, integration, constraints, and implicit solvent. We discuss the design of our algorithms and important optimizations needed to fully take advantage of a GPU. We evaluate its performance, and show that it can be more than 700 times faster than a conventional implementation running on a single CPU core. PMID:19191337

  2. Just Running Around: Some Reminiscences of Early Simulation/Gaming in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ments, Morry

    2011-01-01

    The article begins with an abbreviated CV of the author and then recounts the formation of Society for the Advancement of Games and Simulation in Education and Training (SAGSET) and the early days of simulation and gaming in the United Kingdom. Four strands of elements of development are described together with the key events of the 1970s and…

  3. Using the Large Fire Simulator System to map wildland fire potential for the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaWen Hollingsworth; James Menakis

    2010-01-01

    This project mapped wildland fire potential (WFP) for the conterminous United States by using the large fire simulation system developed for Fire Program Analysis (FPA) System. The large fire simulation system, referred to here as LFSim, consists of modules for weather generation, fire occurrence, fire suppression, and fire growth modeling. Weather was generated with...

  4. Simulation-based patient flow analysis in an endoscopy unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koo, Pyung-Hoi; Nielsen, Karl Brian; Jang, Jaejin

    2010-01-01

    One of the major elements in improving efficiency of healthcare services is patient flow. Patients require a variety of healthcare resources as they receive healthcare services. Poor management of patient flow results in long waiting time of patients, under/over utilization of medical resources......, low quality of care and high healthcare cost. This article addresses patient flow problems at a Gastrointestinal endoscopy unit. We attempt to analyze the main factors that contribute to the inefficient patient flow and process bottlenecks and to propose efficient patient scheduling and staff...

  5. Power systems simulations of the western United States region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Poch, L.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents a part of a broad assessment of energy-water-related issues in the western United States. The full analysis involved three Department of Energy national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. Argonne's objective in the overall project was to develop a regional power sector expansion forecast and a detailed unit-level operational (dispatch) analysis. With these two major analysis components, Argonne estimated current and future freshwater withdrawals and consumption related to the operation of U.S. thermal-electric power plants in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region for the period 2005-2025. Water is withdrawn and used primarily for cooling but also for environmental control, such as sulfur scrubbers. The current scope of the analysis included three scenarios: (1) Baseline scenario as a benchmark for assessing the adequacy and cost-effectiveness of water conservation options and strategies, (2) High nuclear scenario, and (3) High renewables scenario. Baseline projections are consistent with forecasts made by the WECC and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (EIA 2006a). Water conservation scenarios are currently limited to two development alternatives that focus heavily on constructing new generating facilities with zero water consumption. These technologies include wind farms and nuclear power plants with dry cooling. Additional water conservation scenarios and estimates of water use associated with fuel or resource extraction and processing will be developed in follow-on analyses.

  6. Numerical simulation of the flow around a steerable propulsion unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacuraru, F; Lungu, A; Ungureanu, C; Marcu, O

    2010-01-01

    Azimuth propulsion units have become during the last decade a more and more popular solution for all kinds of vessels. Azimuth thruster system, combining the propulsion and steering units of conventional ships replaces traditional propellers and lengthy drive shafts and rudders ensuring an excellent vessel steering. In many cases the interaction between the propeller and other components of the propulsion system strongly affects the inflow to the propeller and therefore its performance. The correct estimation of this influence is important for propulsion systems which consist of more than one element, such as pods (shaft, gondola and propeller), ducted propellers (duct, struts and propeller) or bow thrusters (ship form, tunnel, gondola and propeller). The paper proposes a numerical investigation based on RANS computation for solving the viscous flow around an azimuth thruster system to provide a detailed insight into the critical flow regions for determining the optimum inclination angle for struts, for studying the hydrodynamic interactions between various components of the system, for predicting the hydrodynamic performance of the propulsion system and to investigate regions with possible flow separations.

  7. Design of music player based on MCU STC12C5A60S2%一种基于51单片机的音乐播放器的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何谐; 唐大权; 张淑廷; 陈雪

    2014-01-01

    The hardware design method of the music player based on MCU STC12C5A60S2 is introduced in this paper. The program design of the music player based on principle of FAT32 file system is studied. In the music player, MCU STC12C5A60S2 is taken as a main controller,SD card as a memory medium of music files and VS1003 chip as a decoder unit. When the player is running,MCU STC12C5A60S2 reads the music file from the SD card and continuously transfers data flow to VS1003 for decoding. In the meantime,the OLED liquid crystal display shows the message of the music in real time. The tested results from experiments show the music player can play the music files in multiple formats fluently if the player is connected with ear phone.%主要介绍一种基于51单片机的音乐播放器的硬件设计方法,并研究在FAT32文件系统下音乐播放器的程序设计。该音乐播放器采用STC12C5A60S2单片机为主控制器,SD卡作为音乐文件的存储介质,VS1003芯片作为解码器。STC12C5A60S2单片机从 SD卡中读取音乐文件,并不断将数据流传送至VS1003解码,最后连接耳机播放,同时STC12C5A60S2连接OLED液晶显示屏实时显示音乐播放信息。实验表明,该音乐播放器连接耳机能流畅播放多种格式的音乐文件。

  8. Fat Tail Model for Simulating Test Systems in Multiperiod Unit Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Marmolejo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of Chambers-Mallows-Stuck method for simulating stable random variables in the generation of test systems for economic analysis in power systems. A study that focused on generating test electrical systems through fat tail model for unit commitment problem in electrical power systems is presented. Usually, the instances of test systems in Unit Commitment are generated using normal distribution, but in this work, simulations data are based on a new method. For simulating, we used three original systems to obtain the demand behavior and thermal production costs. The estimation of stable parameters for the simulation of stable random variables was based on three generally accepted methods: (a regression, (b quantiles, and (c maximum likelihood, choosing one that has the best fit of the tails of the distribution. Numerical results illustrate the applicability of the proposed method by solving several unit commitment problems.

  9. The chemical energy unit partial oxidation reactor operation simulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrakin, A. N.; Selivanov, A. A.; Batrakov, P. A.; Sotnikov, D. G.

    2018-01-01

    The chemical energy unit scheme for synthesis gas, electric and heat energy production which is possible to be used both for the chemical industry on-site facilities and under field conditions is represented in the paper. The partial oxidation reactor gasification process mathematical model is described and reaction products composition and temperature determining algorithm flow diagram is shown. The developed software product verification showed good convergence of the experimental values and calculations according to the other programmes: the temperature determining relative discrepancy amounted from 4 to 5 %, while the absolute composition discrepancy ranged from 1 to 3%. The synthesis gas composition was found out practically not to depend on the supplied into the partial oxidation reactor (POR) water vapour enthalpy and compressor air pressure increase ratio. Moreover, air consumption coefficient α increase from 0.7 to 0.9 was found out to decrease synthesis gas target components (carbon and hydrogen oxides) specific yield by nearly 2 times and synthesis gas target components required ratio was revealed to be seen in the water vapour specific consumption area (from 5 to 6 kg/kg of fuel).

  10. Simulation of an industrial pyrolysis gasoline hydrogenation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostoufi, N.; Sotudeh-Gharebagh, R.; Ahmadpour, M.; Eyvani, J. [Process Design and Simulation Research Centre, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11365/4563, Tehran (Iran)

    2005-02-01

    A model is developed based on a two-stage hydrogenation of pyrolysis gasoline to obtain a C{sub 6}-C{sub 8} cut suitable for extraction of aromatics. In order to model the hydrogenation reactors, suitable hydrodynamic and reaction submodels should be solved simultaneously. The first stage hydrogenation takes place in a trickle bed reactor. The reaction rates of different di-olefines as well as hydrodynamic parameters of the trickle bed (i.e., catalyst wetting efficiency, pressure drop, mass transfer coefficient and liquid hold-up) have been combined to derive the equations to model this reactor. The second stage hydrogenation takes place in a two compartment fixed bed reactor. Hydrogenation of olefines takes place in the first compartment while sulfur is eliminated from the flow in the second compartment. These reactions occur at relatively higher temperature and pressure compared to the first stage. The key component in this stage is considered to be cyclohexene, of which the hydrogenation was found to be the most difficult of the olefines present in the feed. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic expression was adopted for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene and its kinetic parameters were determined experimentally in a micro-reactor in the presence of the industrial catalyst. The model was solved for the whole process of hydrogenation, including hydro-desulfurization. The predictions of the model were compared with actual plant data from an industrial scale pyrolysis gasoline hydrogenation unit and satisfactory agreement was found between the model and plant data. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Dynamic simulation of a 1.8K refrigeration unit for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bradu, B; Niculescu, S I

    2009-01-01

    A new simulation toolkit has been successfully developed at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and applied to existing cryogenic installations as, for example, the 1.3kW @ 4.5K cold-box of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the central CERN helium liquefier. The simulator is based on different interconnected simulation tools and provides simulations of cryogenic systems with their control and supervision. In this paper, we present an application to a complete 2.4kW @ 1.8K refrigeration unit for the LHC. It includes the cryogenic centrifugal compressors coupled to the warm compression station.

  12. Integration of virtual control units in the total vehicle simulation; Integration virtueller Steuergeraete in die Gesamtfahrzeugsimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soppa, Andreas; Lund, Christoph [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    In this article the simulation of information and energetics of vehicles with model-integration of electronic control units (ECU) in a simulation, based on the coupling of physical and control components of the total vehicle are investigated. For that simplified models of ECU's, simulating the functionally of the real ECU's, were used. The integration of virtual EUC's in models of full vehicles makes it possible to simulate the energetics for different driving cycles in a realistic way. By better simulation results an evaluation of physical components and the amount of functions are possible. In the area of the thermal management of vehicles by this analyses and optimizations of functions become possible. This article shows the advantages of embedding virtual ECU's in simulations of full vehicles. (orig.)

  13. Part-task simulator of a WWER-440 type nuclear power plant unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palecek, P.

    1990-01-01

    In the present paper the design of a part-task simulator for WWER-440 type nuclear power plant units by the CEZ (Czech Power Works) Concern is reported. This part-task simulator has been designed for the training of NPP operating personnel. It includes a central computer that is coupled with the training work places and the trainer place. Interchange of information is performed by functional keyboards and semigraphical colour displays. The process is simulated, also in real time scale, on the basis of dynamic models. In addition to the precision of the models used, great importance has primarily been attached to plasticity of information presentation. The part-task simulator may be applied to simulation and demonstration as well as to teaching purposes. The paper presents the achieved state of implementation of the part-task simulator and points out some further stage of evolution. (author)

  14. Test Results from a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Component level testing of power conversion units proposed for use in fission surface power systems has typically been done using relatively simple electric heaters for thermal input. These heaters do not adequately represent the geometry or response of proposed reactors. As testing of fission surface power systems transitions from the component level to the system level it becomes necessary to more accurately replicate these reactors using reactor simulators. The Direct Drive Gas-Brayton Power Conversion Unit test activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates a reactor simulator with an existing Brayton test rig. The response of the reactor simulator to a change in Brayton shaft speed is shown as well as the response of the Brayton to an insertion of reactivity, corresponding to a drum reconfiguration. The lessons learned from these tests can be used to improve the design of future reactor simulators which can be used in system level fission surface power tests.

  15. Intensive care unit nurses' evaluation of simulation used for team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangrud, Randi; Hall-Lord, Marie Louise; Hedelin, Birgitta; Persenius, Mona

    2014-07-01

    To implement a simulation-based team training programme and to investigate intensive care nurses' evaluations of simulation used for team training. Simulation-based training is recommended to make health care professionals aware of and understand the importance of teamwork related to patient safety. The study was based on a questionnaire evaluation design. A total of 63 registered nurses were recruited: 53 from seven intensive care units in four hospitals in one hospital trust and 10 from an intensive care postgraduate education programme. After conducting a simulation-based team training programme with two scenarios related to emergency situations in the intensive care, the participants evaluated each simulation activity with regard to: (i) outcome of satisfaction and self-confidence in learning, (ii) implementation of educational practice and (iii) simulation design/development. Intensive care nurses were highly satisfied with their simulation-based learning, and they were mostly in agreement with the statements about self-confidence in learning. They were generally positive in their evaluation of the implementation of the educational practice and the simulation design/development. Significant differences were found with regard to scenario roles, prior simulation experience and area of intensive care practice. The study indicates a positive reception of a simulation-based programme with regard to team training in emergency situations in an intensive care unit. The findings may motivate and facilitate the use of simulation for team training to promote patient safety in intensive care and provide educators with support to develop and improve simulation-based training programmes. © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  16. Upgrade of KNPEC no.2 Simulator for Kori Unit 3 Power Uprating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin-Hyuk; Lee, Seung-Ho [KEPRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Kori-Unit 3 and 4 is preparing the operation of the power-uprating (2900MWt), and therefore the Korea regulatory body(KINS) requested the operator training with the simulator reflecting the power-uprating. As a result of the intensive research and expertise of KEPRI on the simulators, KEPRI accomplished the upgrade project of KNPEC no.2 simulator for Kori-Unit 3 power-uprating. This project includes various high-tech methods incorporating - realtime neutronics model based on MASTER (Multi-purpose Analyzer for Static and Transient Effects of Reactors) code, best-estimate neutronics code by the KINS, (By using the RMASTER, the precision of the simulation of the neutron behaviors in the core is highly improved.) - betterment of the reactor coolant system and the balance-of-plant system - modification of the corresponding setpoints due to the power-uprating And the acceptance test procedure (ATP) was successfully carried out through the integration of system models and its performance tests. Through the success of this project, the operator training for the power uprating of the Kori-Unit 3 will be accomplished before its power operation and, after all, this simulator will contribute to the safe operation for the power-uprating of the Kori-Unit 3 and 4.

  17. PyMUS: Python-Based Simulation Software for Virtual Experiments on Motor Unit System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojeong Kim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a physiologically plausible computationally efficient model of a motor unit and developed simulation software that allows for integrative investigations of the input–output processing in the motor unit system. The model motor unit was first built by coupling the motoneuron model and muscle unit model to a simplified axon model. To build the motoneuron model, we used a recently reported two-compartment modeling approach that accurately captures the key cell-type-related electrical properties under both passive conditions (somatic input resistance, membrane time constant, and signal attenuation properties between the soma and the dendrites and active conditions (rheobase current and afterhyperpolarization duration at the soma and plateau behavior at the dendrites. To construct the muscle unit, we used a recently developed muscle modeling approach that reflects the experimentally identified dependencies of muscle activation dynamics on isometric, isokinetic and dynamic variation in muscle length over a full range of stimulation frequencies. Then, we designed the simulation software based on the object-oriented programing paradigm and developed the software using open-source Python language to be fully operational using graphical user interfaces. Using the developed software, separate simulations could be performed for a single motoneuron, muscle unit and motor unit under a wide range of experimental input protocols, and a hierarchical analysis could be performed from a single channel to the entire system behavior. Our model motor unit and simulation software may represent efficient tools not only for researchers studying the neural control of force production from a cellular perspective but also for instructors and students in motor physiology classroom settings.

  18. PyMUS: Python-Based Simulation Software for Virtual Experiments on Motor Unit System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojeong; Kim, Minjung

    2018-01-01

    We constructed a physiologically plausible computationally efficient model of a motor unit and developed simulation software that allows for integrative investigations of the input-output processing in the motor unit system. The model motor unit was first built by coupling the motoneuron model and muscle unit model to a simplified axon model. To build the motoneuron model, we used a recently reported two-compartment modeling approach that accurately captures the key cell-type-related electrical properties under both passive conditions (somatic input resistance, membrane time constant, and signal attenuation properties between the soma and the dendrites) and active conditions (rheobase current and afterhyperpolarization duration at the soma and plateau behavior at the dendrites). To construct the muscle unit, we used a recently developed muscle modeling approach that reflects the experimentally identified dependencies of muscle activation dynamics on isometric, isokinetic and dynamic variation in muscle length over a full range of stimulation frequencies. Then, we designed the simulation software based on the object-oriented programing paradigm and developed the software using open-source Python language to be fully operational using graphical user interfaces. Using the developed software, separate simulations could be performed for a single motoneuron, muscle unit and motor unit under a wide range of experimental input protocols, and a hierarchical analysis could be performed from a single channel to the entire system behavior. Our model motor unit and simulation software may represent efficient tools not only for researchers studying the neural control of force production from a cellular perspective but also for instructors and students in motor physiology classroom settings.

  19. Nonlinear dynamic simulation of optimal depletion of crude oil in the lower 48 United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, M.; Cleveland, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    This study combines the economic theory of optimal resource use with econometric estimates of demand and supply parameters to develop a nonlinear dynamic model of crude oil exploration, development, and production in the lower 48 United States. The model is simulated with the graphical programming language STELLA, for the years 1985 to 2020. The procedure encourages use of economic theory and econometrics in combination with nonlinear dynamic simulation to enhance our understanding of complex interactions present in models of optimal resource use. (author)

  20. An evolutionary programming based simulated annealing method for solving the unit commitment problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christober Asir Rajan, C. [Department of EEE, Pondicherry Engineering College, Pondicherry 605014 (India); Mohan, M.R. [Department of EEE, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents a new approach to solve the short-term unit commitment problem using an evolutionary programming based simulated annealing method. The objective of this paper is to find the generation scheduling such that the total operating cost can be minimized, when subjected to a variety of constraints. This also means that it is desirable to find the optimal generating unit commitment in the power system for the next H hours. Evolutionary programming, which happens to be a global optimisation technique for solving unit commitment Problem, operates on a system, which is designed to encode each unit's operating schedule with regard to its minimum up/down time. In this, the unit commitment schedule is coded as a string of symbols. An initial population of parent solutions is generated at random. Here, each schedule is formed by committing all the units according to their initial status (''flat start''). Here the parents are obtained from a pre-defined set of solution's, i.e. each and every solution is adjusted to meet the requirements. Then, a random recommitment is carried out with respect to the unit's minimum down times. And SA improves the status. The best population is selected by evolutionary strategy. The Neyveli Thermal Power Station (NTPS) Unit-II in India demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach; extensive studies have also been performed for different power systems consists of 10, 26, 34 generating units. Numerical results are shown comparing the cost solutions and computation time obtained by using the Evolutionary Programming method and other conventional methods like Dynamic Programming, Lagrangian Relaxation and Simulated Annealing and Tabu Search in reaching proper unit commitment. (author)

  1. Test of four stand growth simulators for the northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Schuler; David A. Marquis; Richard L. Ernst; Brian T. Simpson; Brian T. Simpson

    1993-01-01

    Evaluates SILVAH, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and OAKSIM, simulators commonly used in the northeastern United States, by comparing predicted stand development with actual stand development records for periods ranging from 15 to 50 years. Results varied with stand parameter, forest type, projection length, and geographic area. Except in the spruce-fir forest type where FIBER...

  2. Dynamic Evaluation of Two Decades of CMAQ Simulations over the Continental United States (book chapter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper focuses on dynamic evaluation of the CMAQ model over the continental United States using multi-decadal simulations for the period from 1990 to 2010 to examine how well the changes in observed ozone air quality induced by variations in meteorology and/or emissions are s...

  3. Brief introduction to project management of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie

    1996-01-01

    The key points in development and engineering project management of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit are briefly introduced. The Gantt chart, some project management methods and experience are presented. The key points analysis along with the project procedure will be useful to the similar project

  4. Calculations of 3D full-scale VVER fuel assembly and core models using MCU and BIPR-7A codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshin, Sergey S.; Bikeev, Artem S.; Bolshagin, Sergey N.; Kalugin, Mikhail A.; Kosourov, Evgeniy K.; Pavlovichev, Aleksandr M.; Pryanichnikov, Aleksandr V.; Sukhino-Khomenko, Evgenia A.; Shcherenko, Anna I.; Shcherenko, Anastasia I.; Shkarovskiy, Denis A. [Nuclear Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Two types of calculations were made to compare BIPR-7A and MCU results for 3D full-scale models. First EPS (emergency protection system) efficiency and in-core power distributions were analyzed for an equilibrium fuel load of VVER-1000 assuming its operation within an 18-month cycle. Computations were performed without feedbacks and with fuel burnup distributed over the core. After 3D infinite lattices of full-scale VVER-1000 fuel assemblies (A's) with uranium fuel 4.4% enrichment and uranium-erbium fuel 4.4% enrichment and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} 1 % wt were considered. Computations were performed with feedbacks and fuel burnup at the constant power level. For different time moments effective multiplication factor and power distribution were obtained. EPS efficiency and reactivity effects at chosen time moments were analyzed.

  5. Development of the NSSS thermal-hydraulic program for YGN unit 1 simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Doo; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae; Chung, Bub Dong; Ha, Kwi Seok; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2000-09-01

    The NSSS thermal-hydraulic programs installed in the domestic full-scope power plant simulators were provided in early 1980s by foreign vendors. Because of limited computational capability at that time, they usually adopt very simplified physical models for a real-time simulation of NSSS thermal-hydraulic phenomena, which entails inaccurate results and the possibility of so-called 'negative training', especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, we developed a realistic NSSS T/H program (named 'ARTS' code) for use in YongGwang Nuclear Unit 1 full-scope simulator. The best-estimate code RETRAN03, developed by EPRI and approved by USNRC, was selected as a reference code of ARTS. For the development of ARTS, the followings have been performed: -Improvement of the robustness of RETRAN - Improvement of the real-time simulation capability of RETRAN - Optimum input data generation for the NSSS simulation - New model development that cannot be efficiently modeled by RETRAN - Assessment of the ARTS code. The systematic assessment of ARTS has been conducted in both personal computers (Windows 98, Visual fortran) and the simulator development environment (Windows NT, GSE simulator development tool). The results were resonable in terms of accuracy, real-time simulation and robustness.

  6. Development of the NSSS thermal-hydraulic program for YGN unit 1 simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Doo; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae; Chung, Bub Dong; Ha, Kwi Seok; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2000-09-01

    The NSSS thermal-hydraulic programs installed in the domestic full-scope power plant simulators were provided in early 1980s by foreign vendors. Because of limited computational capability at that time, they usually adopt very simplified physical models for a real-time simulation of NSSS thermal-hydraulic phenomena, which entails inaccurate results and the possibility of so-called 'negative training', especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, we developed a realistic NSSS T/H program (named 'ARTS' code) for use in YongGwang Nuclear Unit 1 full-scope simulator. The best-estimate code RETRAN03, developed by EPRI and approved by USNRC, was selected as a reference code of ARTS. For the development of ARTS, the followings have been performed: -Improvement of the robustness of RETRAN - Improvement of the real-time simulation capability of RETRAN - Optimum input data generation for the NSSS simulation - New model development that cannot be efficiently modeled by RETRAN - Assessment of the ARTS code. The systematic assessment of ARTS has been conducted in both personal computers (Windows 98, Visual fortran) and the simulator development environment (Windows NT, GSE simulator development tool). The results were resonable in terms of accuracy, real-time simulation and robustness

  7. [Design of modulating intermediate frequency electrotherapy system based on microcontroller unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuefei; Liu, Xianfeng; Peng, Daming

    2010-12-01

    This article is devoted to the design of a system for modulating intermediate frequency electrotherapy waveform output. Prescriptions with different output waveform combinations were produced using microcontroller unit (MCU). The rich output waveforms effectively improve tolerance of human adaptability and achieve a therapeutic effect.

  8. Simulation of operational processes in hospital emergency units as lean healthcare tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Macedo Gomes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Lean philosophy is gaining importance due to a competitive environment, which increases the need to reduce costs. Lean practices and tools have been applied to manufacturing, services, supply chain, startups and, the next frontier is healthcare. Most lean techniques can be easily adapted to health organizations. Therefore, this paper intends to summarize Lean practices and tools that are already being applied in health organizations. Among the numerous techniques and lean tools used, this research highlights the Simulation. Therefore, in order to understand the use of Simulation as a Lean Healthcare tool, this research aims to analyze, through the simulation technique, the operational dynamics of the service process of a fictitious hospital emergency unit. Initially a systematic review of the literature on the practices and tools of Lean Healthcare was carried out, in order to identify the main techniques practiced. The research highlighted Simulation as the sixth most cited tool in the literature. Subsequently, a simulation of a service model of an emergency unit was performed through the Arena software. As a main result, it can be highlighted that the attendants of the built model presented a degree of idleness, thus, they are able to atend a greater demand. As a last conclusion, it was verified that the emergency room is the process with longer service time and greater overload.

  9. Data collection on the unit control room simulator as a method of operator reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, J.

    1998-01-01

    The report consists of the following chapters: (1) Probabilistic assessment of nuclear power plant operation safety and human factor reliability analysis; (2) Simulators and simulations as human reliability analysis tools; (3) DOE project for using the collection and analysis of data from the unit control room simulator in human factor reliability analysis at the Paks nuclear power plant; (4) General requirements for the organization of the simulator data collection project; (5) Full-scale simulator at the Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute in Trnava, Slovakia, used as a training means for operators of the Dukovany NPP; (6) Assessment of the feasibility of quantification of important human actions modelled within a PSA study by employing simulator data analysis; (7) Assessment of the feasibility of using the various exercise topics for the quantification of the PSA model; (8) Assessment of the feasibility of employing the simulator in the analysis of the individual factors affecting the operator's activity; and (9) Examples of application of statistical methods in the analysis of the human reliability factor. (P.A.)

  10. 77 FR 31026 - Use of Computer Simulation of the United States Blood Supply in Support of Planning for Emergency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ...] Use of Computer Simulation of the United States Blood Supply in Support of Planning for Emergency... entitled: ``Use of Computer Simulation of the United States Blood Supply in Support of Planning for... and panel discussions with experts from academia, regulated industry, government, and other...

  11. Pseudo-random number generators for Monte Carlo simulations on ATI Graphics Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchik, Vadim

    2011-03-01

    Basic uniform pseudo-random number generators are implemented on ATI Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The performance results of the realized generators (multiplicative linear congruential (GGL), XOR-shift (XOR128), RANECU, RANMAR, RANLUX and Mersenne Twister (MT19937)) on CPU and GPU are discussed. The obtained speed up factor is hundreds of times in comparison with CPU. RANLUX generator is found to be the most appropriate for using on GPU in Monte Carlo simulations. The brief review of the pseudo-random number generators used in modern software packages for Monte Carlo simulations in high-energy physics is presented.

  12. Instructor station of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Fanghui

    1996-01-01

    The instructor station of Full Scope Simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit is based on SGI graphic workstation. The operation system is real time UNIX, and the development of man-machine interface, mainly depends on standard X window system, special for X TOOLKITS and MOTIF. The instructor station has been designed to increase training effectiveness and provide the most flexible environment possible to enhance its usefulness. Based on experiences in the development of the instructor station, many new features have been added including I/O panel diagrams, simulation diagrams, graphic operation of malfunction, remote function and I/O overrides etc

  13. Continental-scale simulation of burn probabilities, flame lengths, and fire size distribution for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Charles W. McHugh; Isaac Grenfell; Karin L. Riley

    2010-01-01

    Components of a quantitative risk assessment were produced by simulation of burn probabilities and fire behavior variation for 134 fire planning units (FPUs) across the continental U.S. The system uses fire growth simulation of ignitions modeled from relationships between large fire occurrence and the fire danger index Energy Release Component (ERC). Simulations of 10,...

  14. Turbine and its turbine control system of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongwei; Zhu Jinping

    1996-01-01

    The simulation for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit turbine and turbine control system is briefly introduced. The simulation system includes lube oil system, jacking oil pump system, turning gear system, turbine supervisor system and turbine control system. It not only correctly simulates the process of turbine normal start up, operation, and shut down, but also the response of turbine under the malfunction conditions

  15. Improved simulation design factors for unconventional crude vacuum units : cracked gas make and stripping section performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remesat, D. [Koch-Glitsch Canada LP, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Operating data for unconventional heavy oil vacuum crude units were reviewed in order to optimize the design of vacuum columns. Operational data from heavy crude vacuum units operating with stripping and velocity were used to investigate the application of a proven vacuum distillation tower simulation topology designed for use with heavy oil and bitumen upgrader feeds. Design factors included a characterization of the crude oils or bitumens processed in the facility; the selection of thermodynamic models; and the non-equilibrium simulation topology. Amounts of generated cracked gas were calculated, and entrainment and stripping section performance was evaluated. Heater designs for ensuring the even distribution of heat flux were discussed. Data sets from vacuum units processing crude oils demonstrated that the amount of offgas flow increased as the transfer line temperature increased. The resulting instability caused increased coke generation and light hydrocarbon formation. Results also indicated that overhead vacuum ejector design and size as well as heat transfer capabilities of quench and pumparound zones must be considered when designing vacuum column units. Steam stripping lowered hydrocarbon partial pressure to allow materials to boil at lower temperatures. It was concluded that setting appropriate entrainment values will ensure the accuracy of sensitivity analyses for transfer line designs, inlet feed devices, and wash bed configurations. 9 refs., figs.

  16. Saltstone Matrix Characterization And Stadium Simulation Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.

    2009-01-01

    is less than that expected for saltstone containing the reference amount of slag (45 wt.% of the total cementitious mixture versus 21 wt.% used in the SIMCO samples). Consequently the SIMCO saltstone samples are expected to have lower strengths, and tortuosity and higher porosity, water diffusivity, and intrinsic permeability compared to the reference case MCU saltstone. MCU reference saltstone contains nonradioactive salt solution with a composition designed to simulate the product of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Unit (Harbour, 2009). The SIMCO saltstone samples were cast in molds and cured for three days under plastic with a source of water to prevent drying. Details of the sample preparation process are presented in Attachment 2. The molds were then removed and the samples were cured at a constant temperature (76 F, 24 C) and 100 percent relative humidity for up to one year. Selected samples were periodically removed and characterized the evolution of the matrix as a function of age. In order to preserve the age dependent microstructure at the specified curing times it is necessary to stop hydration. This was accomplished by immersing the samples in isopropanol for 5 days to replace water with alcohol. The microstructure of the matrix material was also characterized as a function of aging. This information was used as a base line for comparison with leached microstructures. After curing for 137 days, specimens were cut into 20 mm disks and exposed to deionized water with a pH maintained at 10.5. Microstructure and calcium sulfur leaching results for samples leached for 31 days are presented in this report. Insufficient leached material was generated during the testing to date to obtain physical and mineralogical properties for leached saltstone. Longer term experiments are required because the matrix alteration rate due to immersion in deionized water is slow

  17. Crop Yield Simulations Using Multiple Regional Climate Models in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, D.; Kafatos, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, J.; Walko, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural productivity (described by crop yield) is strongly dependent on climate conditions determined by meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, rainfall, and solar radiation). California is the largest producer of agricultural products in the United States, but crops in associated arid and semi-arid regions live near their physiological limits (e.g., in hot summer conditions with little precipitation). Thus, accurate climate data are essential in assessing the impact of climate variability on agricultural productivity in the Southwestern United States and other arid regions. To address this issue, we produced simulated climate datasets and used them as input for the crop production model. For climate data, we employed two different regional climate models (WRF and OLAM) using a fine-resolution (8km) grid. Performances of the two different models are evaluated in a fine-resolution regional climate hindcast experiment for 10 years from 2001 to 2010 by comparing them to the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset. Based on this comparison, multi-model ensembles with variable weighting are used to alleviate model bias and improve the accuracy of crop model productivity over large geographic regions (county and state). Finally, by using a specific crop-yield simulation model (APSIM) in conjunction with meteorological forcings from the multi-regional climate model ensemble, we demonstrate the degree to which maize yields are sensitive to the regional climate in the Southwestern United States.

  18. Enhanced teaching and student learning through a simulator-based course in chemical unit operations design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasem, Nayef

    2016-07-01

    This paper illustrates a teaching technique used in computer applications in chemical engineering employed for designing various unit operation processes, where the students learn about unit operations by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of unit operation processes through simulators. A case study presenting the teaching method was evaluated using student surveys and faculty assessments, which were designed to measure the quality and effectiveness of the teaching method. The results of the questionnaire conclusively demonstrate that this method is an extremely efficient way of teaching a simulator-based course. In addition to that, this teaching method can easily be generalised and used in other courses. A student's final mark is determined by a combination of in-class assessments conducted based on cooperative and peer learning, progress tests and a final exam. Results revealed that peer learning can improve the overall quality of student learning and enhance student understanding.

  19. Assessment of availability of a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit through simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thangamani, G.; Narendran, T.T.; Subramanian, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to estimate the availability of process plants. The study includes a live problem at a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU) of a refinery requiring high levels of availability for cost-effective operation. The system is modelled as a fault tree which is often used in the analysis of chemical process industries. A numerical evaluation of the fault tree assesses the characteristic safety parameters such as reliability and availability of the system. However, for large and complex systems, such analysis will normally require enormous computational effort, involving the breakdown of the fault tree into minimal cut sets. An alternative approach is to simulate the system using the Monte Carlo method. This paper presents an availability analysis of the Reactor/Regenerator system of the Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit using the Monte Carlo simulation. The results of the simulation are validated by a comparison with the actual system. The method promises to be a useful tool for assessing the availability of complex systems with alternative configurations

  20. Sensitivity of simulated maize crop yields to regional climate in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Myoung, B.; Stack, D.; Kim, J.; Hatzopoulos, N.; Kafatos, M.

    2013-12-01

    The sensitivity of maize yield to the regional climate in the Southwestern United States (SW US) has been investigated by using a crop-yield simulation model (APSIM) in conjunction with meteorological forcings (daily minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation, and radiation) from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset. The primary focus of this study is to look at the effects of interannual variations of atmospheric components on the crop productivity in the SW US over the 21-year period (1991 to 2011). First of all, characteristics and performance of APSIM was examined by comparing simulated maize yields with observed yields from United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the leaf-area index (LAI) from MODIS satellite data. Comparisons of the simulated maize yield with the available observations show that the crop model can reasonably reproduce observed maize yields. Sensitivity tests were performed to assess the relative contribution of each climate driver to regional crop yield. Sensitivity experiments show that potential crop production responds nonlinearly to climate drivers and the yield sensitivity varied among geographical locations depending on their mean climates. Lastly, a detailed analysis of both the spatial and temporal variations of each climate driver in the regions where maize is actually grown in three states (CA, AZ, and NV) in the SW US was performed.

  1. Development of Neutronics Model for ShinKori Unit 1 Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, JinHyuk; Lee, MyeongSoo; Lee, SeungHo; Suh, JungKwan; Hwang, DoHyun [KEPRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    ShinKori-Unit 1 and 2 is being built in the Kori site which will be operated at 2815 MWt of thermal core power. The purpose of this paper is to report on the performance of the developed neutronics model of ShinKori Unit 1 and 2. Also this report includes the convenient tool (XS2R5) for processing the large quantity of information received from the DIT/ROCS model and generating cross-sections. The neutronics model is based on the NESTLE code inserted to RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulics analysis code which was funded as FY-93 LDRD Project 7201 and is running on the commercial simulator environment tool (the 3KeyMaster{sup TM} of the WSC). As some examples for the verification of the developed neutronics model, some figures are provided. The output of the developed neutronics model is in accord with the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) of the reference plant.

  2. SORO post-simulations of Bruce A Unit 4 in-core flux detector verification tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, E.; Nainer, O. [Bruce Power, Nuclear Safety Analysis and Support Dept., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Evgeny.Braverman@brucepower.com; Ovidiu.Nainer@brucepower.com

    2004-07-01

    During the plant equipment assessment prior to requesting approval for restart of Bruce A Units 3 and 4 it was determined that all in-core flux detectors needed to be replaced. Flux detector verification tests were performed to confirm that the newly installed detectors had been positioned according to design specifications and that their response closely follows the calculated flux shape changes caused by selected reactivity mechanism movements. By comparing the measured and post-simulated RRS and NOP detector responses to various perturbations, it was confirmed that the new detectors are wired and positioned correctly. (author)

  3. Numerical Simulation of Measurements during the Reactor Physical Startup at Unit 3 of Rostov NPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshonok, V. A.; Kryakvin, L. V.; Pitilimov, V. A.; Karpov, S. A.; Kulikov, V. I.; Zhylmaganbetov, N. M.; Kavun, O. Yu.; Popykin, A. I.; Shevchenko, R. A.; Shevchenko, S. A.; Semenova, T. V.

    2017-12-01

    The results of numerical calculations and measurements of some reactor parameters during the physical startup tests at unit 3 of Rostov NPP are presented. The following parameters are considered: the critical boron acid concentration and the currents from ionization chambers (IC) during the scram system efficiency evaluation. The scram system efficiency was determined using the inverse point kinetics equation with the measured and simulated IC currents. The results of steady-state calculations of relative power distribution and efficiency of the scram system and separate groups of control rods of the control and protection system are also presented. The calculations are performed using several codes, including precision ones.

  4. Three Dimensional Simulation of Ion Thruster Plume-Spacecraft Interaction Based on a Graphic Processor Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Junxue; Xie Kan; Qiu Qian; Tang Haibin; Li Juan; Tian Huabing

    2013-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) method and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a parallel particle simulation code combined with a graphic processor unit (GPU) has been developed for the simulation of charge-exchange (CEX) xenon ions in the plume of an ion thruster. Using the proposed technique, the potential and CEX plasma distribution are calculated for the ion thruster plume surrounding the DS1 spacecraft at different thrust levels. The simulation results are in good agreement with measured CEX ion parameters reported in literature, and the GPU's results are equal to a CPU's. Compared with a single CPU Intel Core 2 E6300, 16-processor GPU NVIDIA GeForce 9400 GT indicates a speedup factor of 3.6 when the total macro particle number is 1.1×10 6 . The simulation results also reveal how the back flow CEX plasma affects the spacecraft floating potential, which indicates that the plume of the ion thruster is indeed able to alleviate the extreme negative floating potentials of spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit

  5. Monte Carlo Simulation of stepping source in afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy for GZP6 unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toossi, M.T.B.; Abdollahi, M.; Ghorbani, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Stepping source in brachytherapy systems is used to treat a target lesion longer than the effective treatment length of the source. Dose calculation accuracy plays a vital role in the outcome of brachytherapy treatment. In this study, the stepping source (channel 6) of GZP6 brachytherapy unit was simulated by Monte Carlo simulation and matrix shift method. The stepping source of GZP6 was simulated by Monte Carlo MCNPX code. The Mesh tally (type I) was employed for absorbed dose calculation in a cylindrical water phantom. 5 x 108 photon histories were scored and a 0.2% statistical uncertainty was obtained by Monte Carlo calculations. Dose distributions were obtained by our matrix shift method for esophageal cancer tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm. Isodose curves produced by simulation and TPS were superimposed to estimate the differences. Results Comparison of Monte Carlo and TPS dose distributions show that in longitudinal direction (source movement direction) Monte Carlo and TPS dose distributions are comparable. [n transverse direction, the dose differences of 7 and 5% were observed for esophageal tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm respectively. Conclusions Although, the results show that the maximum difference between Monte Carlo and TPS calculations is about 7%, but considering that the certified activity is given with ± I 0%, uncertainty, then an error of the order of 20% for Monte Carlo calculation would be reasonable. It can be suggested that accuracy of the dose distribution produced by TPS is acceptable for clinical applications. (author)

  6. Simulating the Water Use of Thermoelectric Power Plants in the United States: Model Development and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrie, G.; Yan, E.; Clark, C.

    2016-12-01

    Thermoelectric power plants use the highest amount of freshwater second to the agriculture sector. However, there is scarcity of information that characterizes the freshwater use of these plants in the United States. This could be attributed to the lack of model and data that are required to conduct analysis and gain insights. The competition for freshwater among sectors will increase in the future as the amount of freshwater gets limited due climate change and population growth. A model that makes use of less data is urgently needed to conduct analysis and identify adaptation strategies. The objectives of this study are to develop a model and simulate the water use of thermoelectric power plants in the United States. The developed model has heat-balance, climate, cooling system, and optimization modules. It computes the amount of heat rejected to the environment, estimates the quantity of heat exchanged through latent and sensible heat to the environment, and computes the amount of water required per unit generation of electricity. To verify the model, we simulated a total of 876 fossil-fired, nuclear and gas-turbine power plants with different cooling systems (CS) using 2010-2014 data obtained from Energy Information Administration. The CS includes once-through with cooling pond, once-through without cooling ponds, recirculating with induced draft and recirculating with induced draft natural draft. The results show that the model reproduced the observed water use per unit generation of electricity for the most of the power plants. It is also noticed that the model slightly overestimates the water use during the summer period when the input water temperatures are higher. We are investigating the possible reasons for the overestimation and address it in the future work. The model could be used individually or coupled to regional models to analyze various adaptation strategies and improve the water use efficiency of thermoelectric power plants.

  7. Analyzing the behavior and reliability of voting systems comprising tri-state units using enumerated simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacoub, Sherif

    2003-01-01

    Voting is a common technique used in combining results from peer experts, for multiple purposes, and in a variety of domains. In distributed decision making systems, voting mechanisms are used to obtain a decision by incorporating the opinion of multiple units. Voting systems have many applications in fault tolerant systems, mutual exclusion in distributed systems, and replicated databases. We are specifically interested in voting systems as used in decision-making applications. In this paper, we describe a synthetic experimental procedure to study the behavior of a variety of voting system configurations using a simulator to: analyze the state of each expert, apply a voting mechanism, and analyze the voting results. We introduce an enumerated-simulation approach and compare it to existing mathematical approaches. The paper studies the following behaviors of a voting system: (1) the reliability of the voting system, R; (2) the probability of reaching a consensus, P c ; (3) certainty index, T; and (4) the confidence index, C. The configuration parameters controlling the analysis are: (1) the number of participating experts, N, (2) the possible output states of an expert, and (3) the probability distribution of each expert states. We illustrate the application of this approach to a voting system that consists of N units, each has three states: correct (success), wrong (failed), and abstain (did not produce an output). The final output of the decision-making (voting) system is correct if a consensus is reached on a correct unit output, abstain if all units abstain from voting, and wrong otherwise. We will show that using the proposed approach, we can easily conduct studies to unleash several behaviors of a decision-making system with tri-state experts

  8. Multidisciplinary Simulation Acceleration using Multiple Shared-Memory Graphical Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemal, Jonathan Yashar

    For purposes of optimizing and analyzing turbomachinery and other designs, the unsteady Favre-averaged flow-field differential equations for an ideal compressible gas can be solved in conjunction with the heat conduction equation. We solve all equations using the finite-volume multiple-grid numerical technique, with the dual time-step scheme used for unsteady simulations. Our numerical solver code targets CUDA-capable Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) produced by NVIDIA. Making use of MPI, our solver can run across networked compute notes, where each MPI process can use either a GPU or a Central Processing Unit (CPU) core for primary solver calculations. We use NVIDIA Tesla C2050/C2070 GPUs based on the Fermi architecture, and compare our resulting performance against Intel Zeon X5690 CPUs. Solver routines converted to CUDA typically run about 10 times faster on a GPU for sufficiently dense computational grids. We used a conjugate cylinder computational grid and ran a turbulent steady flow simulation using 4 increasingly dense computational grids. Our densest computational grid is divided into 13 blocks each containing 1033x1033 grid points, for a total of 13.87 million grid points or 1.07 million grid points per domain block. To obtain overall speedups, we compare the execution time of the solver's iteration loop, including all resource intensive GPU-related memory copies. Comparing the performance of 8 GPUs to that of 8 CPUs, we obtain an overall speedup of about 6.0 when using our densest computational grid. This amounts to an 8-GPU simulation running about 39.5 times faster than running than a single-CPU simulation.

  9. Spin wave relaxation and magnetic properties in [M/Cu] super-lattices; M=Fe, Co and Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmi, A.; Qachaou, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study the elementary excitations and magnetic properties of the [M/Cu] super-lattices with: M=Fe, Co and Ni, represented by a Heisenberg ferromagnetic system with N atomic planes. The nearest neighbour (NN), next nearest neighbour (NNN) exchange, dipolar interactions and surface anisotropy effects are taken into account and the Hamiltonian is studied in the framework of the linear spin wave theory. In the presence of the exchange alone, the excitation spectrum E(k) and the magnetization z >/S analytical expressions are obtained using the Green's function formalism. The obtained relaxation time of the magnon populations is nearly the same in the Fe and Co-based super-lattices, while these magnetic excitations would last much longer in the Ni-based super lattice. A numerical study of the surface anisotropy and long-ranged dipolar interaction combined effects are also reported. The exchange integral values deduced from a comparison with experience for the three super-lattices are coherent.

  10. Improving Smart Home Concept with the Internet of Things Concept Using RaspberryPi and NodeMCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Yasirli; Andri Setiawan, Mukhammad

    2018-03-01

    The Internet of things (IoT) is getting more tractions in recent years. One of the usage scenario of IoT is smart home. Smart home basically provides home automation for installed devices at home such as thermostat, lighting, air conditioning, etc and allows devices connected to the Internet to be monitored and controlled remotely by user. However many studies on smart home concept focusing only on few main features. They still lack of important usage of IoT i.e. providing energy efficiency, energy monitoring, dealing with security, and managing privacy. This paper proposes a smart home system with RaspberryPi and NodeMCU as the backend that not only serves as home automation and merely a switch replacement, but to also record and report important things to the owner of the house e.g. when someone trespasses the house (security perimeter), or to report the calculation of how much money has been spent in consuming the electrical appliances. We successfully examine our proposed system in a real life working scenario. The communication between user and the system is done using Telegram Bot.

  11. Simulations and field tests of a reactor coolant pump emergency start-up by means of remote gas units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omahen, P.; Gubina, F.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of the reactor coolant pump start-up in case of emergency by means of remote gas power plant units was analyzed. In this paper a simulation model is developed which enabled a detailed simulation of the transient process occurring at the start-up. The start-up of the RCP motor set was simulated in case of available one and two gas units. The field tests were performed and the measured variable values complied well with the simulation results. Two gas units have been determined as a safe start-up scheme of the RCP motor set considering for safety reasons accepted busbars and motor protection settings. A derived model for deep rotor bars was experimentally confirmed as effective means for the RCP motor set start-up transient simulation. Start-up procedures have been designed and adopted to the safety procedures of the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko

  12. Simulating three dimensional wave run-up over breakwaters covered by antifer units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Jilani, A.; Niri, M. Zakiri; Naderi, Nader

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents the numerical analysis of wave run-up over rubble-mound breakwaters covered by antifer units using a technique integrating Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. Direct application of Navier-Stokes equations within armour blocks, is used to provide a more reliable approach to simulate wave run-up over breakwaters. A well-tested Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Volume of Fluid (VOF) code (Flow-3D) was adopted for CFD computations. The computed results were compared with experimental data to check the validity of the model. Numerical results showed that the direct three dimensional (3D) simulation method can deliver accurate results for wave run-up over rubble mound breakwaters. The results showed that the placement pattern of antifer units had a great impact on values of wave run-up so that by changing the placement pattern from regular to double pyramid can reduce the wave run-up by approximately 30%. Analysis was done to investigate the influences of surface roughness, energy dissipation in the pores of the armour layer and reduced wave run-up due to inflow into the armour and stone layer.

  13. Simulating Groundwater Dynamics across the Contiguous United States Using MODFLOW-OWHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alattar, M.; Troy, T. J.; Russo, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater is a critical water resource for irrigation, industry, and domestic water supply. Because of the importance of groundwater, especially for agriculture water supply, many regional studies have been implemented to understand groundwater dynamics, to protect groundwater resources, and to support more efficient management of surface and groundwater supplies to meet the water demands. While these regional studies provide invaluable insights into local problems, it is difficult to understand the state of America's water supplies holistically to understand how irrigation, pumping, and climate determine groundwater availability. To fill this gap, we use MODFLOW-OWHM to simulate and analyze groundwater flow across the United States from 1950 through 2010 at a monthly resolution. The model estimates the irrigation demand by crop type, pumping rates from groundwater wells, and groundwater availability and water levels. This allows us to analyze the impact of crop choices and on groundwater pumping as well as surface water withdrawals. The model is calibrated and validated across the contiguous United States with parameter sensitivity analysis. Because of the study region size, climate conditions vary temporally and spatially based on the mean climate and phenomena such as El Niño and La Niña. We do model experiments to analyze how this climate variability can affect recharge and water table depths and how irrigated crop choices impact surface and ground water sustainability. These model simulations have the potential to inform water resources management at a range of spatial scales.

  14. Simulating three dimensional wave run-up over breakwaters covered by antifer units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Najafi-Jilani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the numerical analysis of wave run-up over rubble-mound breakwaters covered by antifer units using a technique integrating Computer-Aided Design (CAD and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Direct application of Navier-Stokes equations within armour blocks, is used to provide a more reliable approach to simulate wave run-up over breakwaters. A well-tested Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS Volume of Fluid (VOF code (Flow-3D was adopted for CFD computations. The computed results were compared with experimental data to check the validity of the model. Numerical results showed that the direct three dimensional (3D simulation method can deliver accurate results for wave run-up over rubble mound breakwaters. The results showed that the placement pattern of antifer units had a great impact on values of wave run-up so that by changing the placement pattern from regular to double pyramid can reduce the wave run-up by approximately 30%. Analysis was done to investigate the influences of surface roughness, energy dissipation in the pores of the armour layer and reduced wave run-up due to inflow into the armour and stone layer.

  15. Simulation Analysis as a Way to Assess the Performance of Important Unit Root and Change in Persistence Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, Raúl O.; Vera-Valdés, J. Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This chapter shows a way to, using simulation analysis, assess the performance of some of the most popular unit root and change in persistence tests. The authors do this by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The findings suggest that these tests show a lower than expected performance when dealing ...

  16. Design and simulation of an activated sludge unit associated to a continuous reactor to remove heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Avila, J.S.; Nascimento, R.R. [Ambientec Consultoria Ltda., Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    A software was developed to design and simulate an activated sludge unit associated to a new technology to remove heavy metals from wastewater. In this process, a continuous high efficiency biphasic reactor operates by using particles of activated peat in conjugation with the sludge unit. The results obtained may be useful to increase the efficiency or to reduce the design and operational costs involved in a activated sludge unit. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Design and simulation of an activated sludge unit associated to a continuous reactor to remove heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D` Avila, J S; Nascimento, R R [Ambientec Consultoria Ltda., Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    A software was developed to design and simulate an activated sludge unit associated to a new technology to remove heavy metals from wastewater. In this process, a continuous high efficiency biphasic reactor operates by using particles of activated peat in conjugation with the sludge unit. The results obtained may be useful to increase the efficiency or to reduce the design and operational costs involved in a activated sludge unit. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Computer simulation with TRNSYS for a mobile refrigeration system incorporating a phase change thermal storage unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ming; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A mobile refrigeration system incorporating phase change thermal storage was simulated using TRNSYS. • A TRNSYS component of a phase change thermal storage unit was created and linked to other components from TRNSYS library. • The temperature in the refrigerated space can be predicted using this TRNSYS model under various conditions. • A mobile refrigeration system incorporating PCM and an off-peak electric driven refrigeration unit is feasible. • The phase change material with the lowest melting temperature should be selected. - Abstract: This paper presents a new TRNSYS model of a refrigeration system incorporating phase change material (PCM) for mobile transport. The PCTSU is charged by an off-vehicle refrigeration unit and the PCM provides cooling when discharging and the cooling released is utilized to cool down the refrigerated space. The advantage of this refrigeration system compared to a conventional system is that it consumes less energy and produces significantly lower greenhouse gas emissions. A refrigeration system for a typical refrigerated van is modelled and simulations are performed with climatic data from four different locations. The main components of the TRNSYS model are Type 88 (cooling load estimation) and Type 300 (new PCTSU component), accompanied by other additional components. The results show that in order to maintain the temperature of the products at −18 °C for 10 h, a total of 250 kg and 390 kg of PCM are required for no door opening and 20 door openings during the transportation, respectively. In addition, a parametric study is carried out to evaluate the effects of location, size of the refrigerated space, number of door openings and melting temperature of the PCM on the thermal performance

  19. Simulation analysis on accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 by SAMPSON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Atsuo; Pellegrini, Marco; Mizouchi, Hideo; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Naitoh, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    The accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 has been investigated by the severe accident analysis code, SAMPSON with more realistic boundary conditions and newly introduced models. In Unit 2, the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling system (RCIC) is thought to have worked for unexpectedly long time (about 70 hours) without batteries. It is thought to be due to balance between injected water from the RCIC pump and supplied mixture of steam and water to the RCIC turbine. To confirm the RCIC working condition and reproduce the measured plant properties, such as pressure and water level in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), we introduced two-phase turbine driven pump model into SAMPSON. In the model, mass flow rate of water injected by RCIC was calculated through mass flow rate of steam included in extracted two-phase flow, steam generated from flashing of water included in extracted two-phase flow, and turbine efficiency degradation originated by the mixture of steam and water flowing to the RCIC turbine. To reproduce the dry well (DW) pressure, we assumed that torus room was flooded by the tsunami and heat was removed from the suppression chamber to the sea water. Simulation results by SAMPSON basically agree with the measured values such as pressure in the RPV and in the DW until several days after the scram. However, some contradictions between the simulation results and the measured values, such as that inversion of the RPV pressure at 10 hours after scram in the measurement happened at 14 hours in the simulation and that the DW pressure showed different behavior between simulation and measurement when SRV started periodic operation at 71 hours, are still remain and are under consideration. In the current calculation, model for falling core to the lower plenum was modified so that debris is not retained at the core plate based on observation of the XR2-1 experiment. Additionally, model of the RPV failure by melting of the penetrating pipe

  20. Conversion from Engineering Units to Telemetry Counts on Dryden Flight Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Jay A.

    1998-01-01

    Dryden real-time flight simulators encompass the simulation of pulse code modulation (PCM) telemetry signals. This paper presents a new method whereby the calibration polynomial (from first to sixth order), representing the conversion from counts to engineering units (EU), is numerically inverted in real time. The result is less than one-count error for valid EU inputs. The Newton-Raphson method is used to numerically invert the polynomial. A reverse linear interpolation between the EU limits is used to obtain an initial value for the desired telemetry count. The method presented here is not new. What is new is how classical numerical techniques are optimized to take advantage of modem computer power to perform the desired calculations in real time. This technique makes the method simple to understand and implement. There are no interpolation tables to store in memory as in traditional methods. The NASA F-15 simulation converts and transmits over 1000 parameters at 80 times/sec. This paper presents algorithm development, FORTRAN code, and performance results.

  1. Motor unit firing rate patterns during voluntary muscle force generation: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaogang; Rymer, William Z.; Suresh, Nina L.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Muscle force is generated by a combination of motor unit (MU) recruitment and changes in the discharge rate of active MUs. There have been two basic MU recruitment and firing rate paradigms reported in the literature, which describe the control of the MUs during force generation. The first (termed the reverse ‘onion skin’ profile), exhibits lower firing rates for lower threshold units, with higher firing rates occurring in higher threshold units. The second (termed the ‘onion skin’ profile), exhibits an inverse arrangement, with lower threshold units reaching higher firing rates. Approach. Using a simulation of the MU activity in a hand muscle, this study examined the force generation capacity and the variability of the muscle force magnitude at different excitation levels of the MU pool under these two different MU control paradigms. We sought to determine which rate/recruitment scheme was more efficient for force generation, and which scheme gave rise to the lowest force variability. Main results. We found that the force output of both firing patterns leads to graded force output at low excitation levels, and that the force generation capacity of the two different paradigms diverged around 50% excitation. In the reverse ‘onion skin’ pattern, at 100% excitation, the force output reached up to 88% of maximum force, whereas for the ‘onion skin’ pattern, the force output only reached up to 54% of maximum force at 100% excitation. The force variability was lower at the low to moderate force levels under the ‘onion skin’ paradigm than with the reverse ‘onion skin’ firing patterns, but this effect was reversed at high force levels. Significance. This study captures the influence of MU recruitment and firing rate organization on muscle force properties, and our results suggest that the different firing organizations can be beneficial at different levels of voluntary muscle force generation and perhaps for different tasks.

  2. High-resolution, regional-scale crop yield simulations for the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, D. H.; Kafatos, M.; Medvigy, D.; El-Askary, H. M.; Hatzopoulos, N.; Kim, J.; Kim, S.; Prasad, A. K.; Tremback, C.; Walko, R. L.; Asrar, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades, there have been many process-based crop models developed with the goal of better understanding the impacts of climate, soils, and management decisions on crop yields. These models simulate the growth and development of crops in response to environmental drivers. Traditionally, process-based crop models have been run at the individual farm level for yield optimization and management scenario testing. Few previous studies have used these models over broader geographic regions, largely due to the lack of gridded high-resolution meteorological and soil datasets required as inputs for these data intensive process-based models. In particular, assessment of regional-scale yield variability due to climate change requires high-resolution, regional-scale, climate projections, and such projections have been unavailable until recently. The goal of this study was to create a framework for extending the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) crop model for use at regional scales and analyze spatial and temporal yield changes in the Southwestern United States (CA, AZ, and NV). Using the scripting language Python, an automated pipeline was developed to link Regional Climate Model (RCM) output with the APSIM crop model, thus creating a one-way nested modeling framework. This framework was used to combine climate, soil, land use, and agricultural management datasets in order to better understand the relationship between climate variability and crop yield at the regional-scale. Three different RCMs were used to drive APSIM: OLAM, RAMS, and WRF. Preliminary results suggest that, depending on the model inputs, there is some variability between simulated RCM driven maize yields and historical yields obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Furthermore, these simulations showed strong non-linear correlations between yield and meteorological drivers, with critical threshold values for some of the inputs (e.g. minimum and

  3. Approval of multiple unit trains by means of the simulation of contact wire/pantograph; Triebfahrzeugzulassung mithilfe der Simulation Fahrdraht/Stromabnehmer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichmann, Thomas; Raubold, Johannes [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Industry Sector, Mobility Div.

    2011-04-15

    The simulation program employed at Siemens adopting the finite element method delivers reliable findings about the dynamic interaction between pantographs and overhead contact lines and was verified by a validation according to EN 50318. In particular, a considerable reduction of measurement expenses for approval procedures of multiple unit trains with a lot of combination options for pantograph arrangements can be achieved by means of these simulations. (orig.)

  4. Phasor Measurement Unit and Phasor Data Concentrator test with Real Time Digital Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diakos, Konstantinos; Wu, Qiuwei; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2014-01-01

    that is able to derive and communicate synchrophasor measurements of different parts of the power network and the development of tests, according to IEEE standards, that evaluate the performance of PMUs and PDCs. The tests are created by using a Real Time Digital Simulation (RTDS) system. The results obtained......The main focus of the electrical engineers nowadays, is to develop a smart grid that is able to monitor, evaluate and control the power system operation. The integration of Intelligent Electronic Devices (IED s) to the power network, is a strong indication of the inclination to lead the power...... network to a more reliable, secure and economic operation. The implementation of these devices though, demands the warranty of a secure operation and high-accuracy performance. This paper describes the procedure of establishing a PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit)–PDC (Phasor Data Concentrator) platform...

  5. Combining Latin Hypercube Designs and Discrete Event Simulation in a Study of a Surgical Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Kulahci, Murat

    Summary form given only:In this article experiments on a discrete event simulation model for an orthopedic surgery are considered. The model is developed as part of a larger project in co-operation with Copenhagen University Hospital in Gentofte. Experiments on the model are performed by using...... Latin hypercube designs. The parameter set consists of system settings such as use of preparation room for sedation and the number of operating rooms, as well as management decisions such as staffing, size of the recovery room and the number of simultaneously active operating rooms. Sensitivity analysis...... and optimization combined with meta-modeling are employed in search for optimal setups. The primary objective in this article is to minimize time spent by the patients in the system. The overall long-term objective for the orthopedic surgery unit is to minimize time lost during the pre- and post operation...

  6. AN APPROACH TO EFFICIENT FEM SIMULATIONS ON GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNITS USING CUDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Nutti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a highly efficient way of simulating the dynamic behavior of deformable objects by means of the finite element method (FEM with computations performed on Graphics Processing Units (GPU. The presented implementation reduces bottlenecks related to memory accesses by grouping the necessary data per node pairs, in contrast to the classical way done per element. This strategy reduces the memory access patterns that are not suitable for the GPU memory architecture. Furthermore, the presented implementation takes advantage of the underlying sparse-block-matrix structure, and it has been demonstrated how to avoid potential bottlenecks in the algorithm. To achieve plausible deformational behavior for large local rotations, the objects are modeled by means of a simplified co-rotational FEM formulation.

  7. Check and visualization of input geometry data using the geometrical module of the Monte Carlo code MCU: WWER-440 pressure vessel dosimetry benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, M.; Zaritsky, S.; Osmera, B.; Mikus, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method gives the opportunity to conduct the calculations of neutron and photon flux without any simplifications of the 3-D geometry of the nuclear power and experimental devices. So, each graduated Monte Carlo code includes the combinatorial geometry module and tools for the geometry description giving a possibility to describe very complex systems with a number of hierarchy levels of the geometrical objects. Such codes as usual have special modules for the visual checking of geometry input information. These geometry opportunities could be used for all cases when the accurate 3-D description of the complex geometry becomes a necessity. The description (specification) of benchmark experiments is one of the such cases. Such accurate and uniform description detects all mistakes and ambiguities in the starting information of various kinds (drawings, reports etc.). Usually the quality of different parts of the starting information (generally produced by different persons during the different stages of the device elaboration and operation) is different. After using the above mentioned modules and tools, the resultant geometry description can be used as a standard for this device. One can automatically produce any type of the device figure. The detail geometry description can be used as input for different calculation models carrying out (not only for Monte Carlo). The application of that method to the description of the WWER-440 mock-ups is represented in the report. The mock-ups were created on the reactor LR-O (NRI) and the reactor vessel dosimetry benchmarks were developed on the basis of these mock-up experiments. The NCG-8 module of the Russian Monte Carlo code MCU was used. It is the combinatorial multilingual universal geometrical module. The MCU code was certified by Russian Nuclear Regulatory Body. Almost all figures for mentioned benchmarks specifications were made by the MCU visualization code. The problem of the automatic generation of the

  8. Efficient molecular dynamics simulations with many-body potentials on graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zheyong; Chen, Wei; Vierimaa, Ville; Harju, Ari

    2017-09-01

    Graphics processing units have been extensively used to accelerate classical molecular dynamics simulations. However, there is much less progress on the acceleration of force evaluations for many-body potentials compared to pairwise ones. In the conventional force evaluation algorithm for many-body potentials, the force, virial stress, and heat current for a given atom are accumulated within different loops, which could result in write conflict between different threads in a CUDA kernel. In this work, we provide a new force evaluation algorithm, which is based on an explicit pairwise force expression for many-body potentials derived recently (Fan et al., 2015). In our algorithm, the force, virial stress, and heat current for a given atom can be accumulated within a single thread and is free of write conflicts. We discuss the formulations and algorithms and evaluate their performance. A new open-source code, GPUMD, is developed based on the proposed formulations. For the Tersoff many-body potential, the double precision performance of GPUMD using a Tesla K40 card is equivalent to that of the LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) molecular dynamics code running with about 100 CPU cores (Intel Xeon CPU X5670 @ 2.93 GHz).

  9. Molecular Monte Carlo Simulations Using Graphics Processing Units: To Waste Recycle or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihan; Rodgers, Jocelyn M; Athènes, Manuel; Smit, Berend

    2011-10-11

    In the waste recycling Monte Carlo (WRMC) algorithm, (1) multiple trial states may be simultaneously generated and utilized during Monte Carlo moves to improve the statistical accuracy of the simulations, suggesting that such an algorithm may be well posed for implementation in parallel on graphics processing units (GPUs). In this paper, we implement two waste recycling Monte Carlo algorithms in CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) using uniformly distributed random trial states and trial states based on displacement random-walk steps, and we test the methods on a methane-zeolite MFI framework system to evaluate their utility. We discuss the specific implementation details of the waste recycling GPU algorithm and compare the methods to other parallel algorithms optimized for the framework system. We analyze the relationship between the statistical accuracy of our simulations and the CUDA block size to determine the efficient allocation of the GPU hardware resources. We make comparisons between the GPU and the serial CPU Monte Carlo implementations to assess speedup over conventional microprocessors. Finally, we apply our optimized GPU algorithms to the important problem of determining free energy landscapes, in this case for molecular motion through the zeolite LTA.

  10. Relative contribution of different altered motor unit control to muscle weakness in stroke: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Henry; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William; Hu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Chronic muscle weakness impacts the majority of individuals after a stroke. The origins of this hemiparesis is multifaceted, and an altered spinal control of the motor unit (MU) pool can lead to muscle weakness. However, the relative contribution of different MU recruitment and discharge organization is not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine these different effects by utilizing a MU simulation with variations set to mimic the changes of MU control in stroke. Approach. Using a well-established model of the MU pool, this study quantified the changes in force output caused by changes in MU recruitment range and recruitment order, as well as MU firing rate organization at the population level. We additionally expanded the original model to include a fatigue component, which variably decreased the output force with increasing length of contraction. Differences in the force output at both the peak and fatigued time points across different excitation levels were quantified and compared across different sets of MU parameters. Main results. Across the different simulation parameters, we found that the main driving factor of the reduced force output was due to the compressed range of MU recruitment. Recruitment compression caused a decrease in total force across all excitation levels. Additionally, a compression of the range of MU firing rates also demonstrated a decrease in the force output mainly at the higher excitation levels. Lastly, changes to the recruitment order of MUs appeared to minimally impact the force output. Significance. We found that altered control of MUs alone, as simulated in this study, can lead to a substantial reduction in muscle force generation in stroke survivors. These findings may provide valuable insight for both clinicians and researchers in prescribing and developing different types of therapies for the rehabilitation and restoration of lost strength after stroke.

  11. A Simulation Based Analysis of Motor Unit Number Index (MUNIX) Technique Using Motoneuron Pool and Surface Electromyogram Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Rymer, William Zev; Zhou, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Motor unit number index (MUNIX) measurement has recently achieved increasing attention as a tool to evaluate the progression of motoneuron diseases. In our current study, the sensitivity of the MUNIX technique to changes in motoneuron and muscle properties was explored by a simulation approach utilizing variations on published motoneuron pool and surface electromyogram (EMG) models. Our simulation results indicate that, when keeping motoneuron pool and muscle parameters unchanged and varying the input motor unit numbers to the model, then MUNIX estimates can appropriately characterize changes in motor unit numbers. Such MUNIX estimates are not sensitive to different motor unit recruitment and rate coding strategies used in the model. Furthermore, alterations in motor unit control properties do not have a significant effect on the MUNIX estimates. Neither adjustment of the motor unit recruitment range nor reduction of the motor unit firing rates jeopardizes the MUNIX estimates. The MUNIX estimates closely correlate with the maximum M wave amplitude. However, if we reduce the amplitude of each motor unit action potential rather than simply reduce motor unit number, then MUNIX estimates substantially underestimate the motor unit numbers in the muscle. These findings suggest that the current MUNIX definition is most suitable for motoneuron diseases that demonstrate secondary evidence of muscle fiber reinnervation. In this regard, when MUNIX is applied, it is of much importance to examine a parallel measurement of motor unit size index (MUSIX), defined as the ratio of the maximum M wave amplitude to the MUNIX. However, there are potential limitations in the application of the MUNIX methods in atrophied muscle, where it is unclear whether the atrophy is accompanied by loss of motor units or loss of muscle fiber size. PMID:22514208

  12. Improving Nursing Communication Skills in an Intensive Care Unit Using Simulation and Nursing Crew Resource Management Strategies: An Implementation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkelson, Carman; Aebersold, Michelle; Redman, Richard; Tschannen, Dana

    Effective interprofessional communication is critical to patient safety. This pre-/postimplementation project used a multifaceted educational strategy with high-fidelity simulation to introduce evidence-based communication tools, adapted from Nursing Crew Resource Management, to intensive care unit nurses. Results indicated that participants were satisfied with the education, and their perceptions of interprofessional communication and knowledge improved. Teams (n = 16) that used the communication tools during simulation were more likely to identify the problem, initiate key interventions, and have positive outcomes.

  13. Numerical simulation of aerodynamic performance of a couple multiple units high-speed train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ji-qiang; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Tang-hong; Liang, Xi-feng

    2017-05-01

    In order to determine the effect of the coupling region on train aerodynamic performance, and how the coupling region affects aerodynamic performance of the couple multiple units trains when they both run and pass each other in open air, the entrance of two such trains into a tunnel and their passing each other in the tunnel was simulated in Fluent 14.0. The numerical algorithm employed in this study was verified by the data of scaled and full-scale train tests, and the difference lies within an acceptable range. The results demonstrate that the distribution of aerodynamic forces on the train cars is altered by the coupling region; however, the coupling region has marginal effect on the drag and lateral force on the whole train under crosswind, and the lateral force on the train cars is more sensitive to couple multiple units compared to the other two force coefficients. It is also determined that the component of the coupling region increases the fluctuation of aerodynamic coefficients for each train car under crosswind. Affected by the coupling region, a positive pressure pulse was introduced in the alternating pressure produced by trains passing by each other in the open air, and the amplitude of the alternating pressure was decreased by the coupling region. The amplitude of the alternating pressure on the train or on the tunnel was significantly decreased by the coupling region of the train. This phenomenon did not alter the distribution law of pressure on the train and tunnel; moreover, the effect of the coupling region on trains passing by each other in the tunnel is stronger than that on a single train passing through the tunnel.

  14. Simulation and Optimization of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity levels in a spacesuit is critical to ensuring both the safety and comfort of an astronaut during extra-vehicular activity (EVA). Traditionally, this has been accomplished utilizing either non-regenerative lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or regenerative but heavy metal oxide (MetOx) canisters which pose a significant weight burden. Although such technology enables air revitalization, the volume requirements to store the waste canisters as well as the mass to transport multiple units become prohibitive as mission durations increase. Consequently, motivation exists toward developing a fully regenerative technology for spacesuit environmental control. The application of solid amine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to control CO2 while concomitantly managing humidity levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating constraints imposed with the traditional technologies. Prototype air revitalization units employing this technology have been fabricated in both a rectangular and cylindrical geometry. Experimental results for these test articles have been collected and are described herein. In order to accelerate the developmental efforts, an axially-dispersed plug flow model with an accompanying energy balance has been established and correlated with the experimental data. The experimental and simulation results display good agreement for a variety of flow rates (110-170 ALM), replicated metabolic challenges (100-590 Watts), and atmosphere pressures under consideration for the spacesuit (248 and 760 mm Hg). The testing and model results lend insight into the operational capabilities of these devices as well as the influence the geometry of the device has on performance. In addition, variable metabolic profiles were imposed on the test articles in order to assess the ability of the technology to transition to new metabolic conditions. The advent of the model provides the capacity to apply

  15. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of wind-driven inter-unit dispersion around multi-storey buildings: Upstream building effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ai, Zhengtao; Mak, C.M.; Dai, Y.W.

    2017-01-01

    of such changed airflow patterns on inter-unit dispersion characteristics around a multi-storey building due to wind effect. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method in the framework of Reynolds-averaged Navier-stokes modelling was employed to predict the coupled outdoor and indoor airflow field, and the tracer...... gas technique was used to simulate the dispersion of infectious agents between units. Based on the predicted concentration field, a mass conservation based parameter, namely re-entry ratio, was used to evaluate quantitatively the inter-unit dispersion possibilities and thus assess risks along...

  16. On the development of a comprehensive MC simulation model for the Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, E. P.; Moutsatsos, A.; Pantelis, E.; Zoros, E.; Georgiou, E.; Torrens, M.; Karaiskos, P.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model for the Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) radiosurgery unit. Model-based dosimetry calculations were benchmarked in terms of relative dose profiles (RDPs) and output factors (OFs), against corresponding EBT2 measurements. To reduce the rather prolonged computational time associated with the comprehensive PFX model MC simulations, two approximations were explored and evaluated on the grounds of dosimetric accuracy. The first consists in directional biasing of the 60Co photon emission while the second refers to the implementation of simplified source geometric models. The effect of the dose scoring volume dimensions in OF calculations accuracy was also explored. RDP calculations for the comprehensive PFX model were found to be in agreement with corresponding EBT2 measurements. Output factors of 0.819  ±  0.004 and 0.8941  ±  0.0013 were calculated for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimator, respectively, which agree, within uncertainties, with corresponding EBT2 measurements and published experimental data. Volume averaging was found to affect OF results by more than 0.3% for scoring volume radii greater than 0.5 mm and 1.4 mm for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators, respectively. Directional biasing of photon emission resulted in a time efficiency gain factor of up to 210 with respect to the isotropic photon emission. Although no considerable effect on relative dose profiles was detected, directional biasing led to OF overestimations which were more pronounced for the 4 mm collimator and increased with decreasing emission cone half-angle, reaching up to 6% for a 5° angle. Implementation of simplified source models revealed that omitting the sources’ stainless steel capsule significantly affects both OF results and relative dose profiles, while the aluminum-based bushing did not exhibit considerable dosimetric effect. In conclusion, the results of this work suggest that any PFX

  17. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Mass Transfer in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells under Operation Mode Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional, single-phase, isothermal, multicomponent, transient model is built to investigate the transport phenomena in unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs under the condition of switching from the fuel cell (FC mode to the water electrolysis (WE mode. The model is coupled with an electrochemical reaction. The proton exchange membrane (PEM is selected as the solid electrolyte of the URFC. The work is motivated by the need to elucidate the complex mass transfer and electrochemical process under operation mode switching in order to improve the performance of PEM URFC. A set of governing equations, including conservation of mass, momentum, species, and charge, are considered. These equations are solved by the finite element method. The simulation results indicate the distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, water mass fraction, and electrolyte potential response to the transient phenomena via saltation under operation mode switching. The hydrogen mass fraction gradients are smaller than the oxygen mass fraction gradients. The average mass fractions of the reactants (oxygen and hydrogen and product (water exhibit evident differences between each layer in the steady state of the FC mode. By contrast, the average mass fractions of the reactant (water and products (oxygen and hydrogen exhibit only slight differences between each layer in the steady state of the WE mode. Under either the FC mode or the WE mode, the duration of the transient state is only approximately 0.2 s.

  18. Dynamic simulation of industrial Fluidized-bed Catalytic Cracking - FCC unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, Argimiro R.; Neumann, Gustavo A.; Trierweiler, Jorge O. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: arge@enq.ufrgs.br; gneumann@enq.ufrgs.br; jorge@enq.ufrgs.br; Santos, Marlova G. [PETROBRAS S.A., Canoas, RS (Brazil). Refinaria Alberto Pasqualini]. E-mail: marlova@petrobras.com.br

    2000-07-01

    In this work a mathematical model for the dynamic simulation of the Fluidized-bed Catalytic Cracking (FCC) Reactor, to be used in the analysis, control, and optimization of this system is developed. Based on the full range of published data in FCC performance and kinetic rates, and adapted to the industrial unit of the PETROBRAS' Alberto Pasqualini Refinery (REFAP), an integrated dynamic model is build up. The model is sufficiently complex to capture the major dynamics effects that occur in this system. The regenerator is modeled as emulsion and bubble phases that exchange mass and heat. The riser is modeled as an adiabatic plug flow reactor. The fluid dynamic is taking into account for the catalyst circulation, and the dynamics of the gas phase and the riser are also considered into the model. The model, represented by a non-linear system of differential-algebraic equations, was written in language C and implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK. The results are compared with the data obtained from the industrial plant of REFAP. (author)

  19. Simulation team training for improved teamwork in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Christer; Gustafsson, Helena; Wallin, Carl-Johan; Meurling, Lisbet; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats; Hansson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to describe implementation of simulator-based medical team training and the effect of this programme on inter-professional working in an intensive care unit (ICU). Over a period of two years, 90 percent (n = 152) of the staff of the general ICU at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden, received inter-professional team training in a fully equipped patient room in their own workplace. A case study method was used to describe and explain the planning, formation, and results of the training programme. In interviews, the participants reported that the training had increased their awareness of the importance of effective communication for patient safety. The intervention had even had an indirect impact by creating a need to talk, not only about how to communicate efficaciously, but also concerning difficult care situations in general. This, in turn, had led to regular reflection meetings for nurses held three times a week. Examples of better communication in acute situations were also reported. However, the findings indicate that the observed improvements will not last, unless organisational features such as staffing rotas and scheduling of rounds and meetings can be changed to enable use of the learned behaviours in everyday work. Other threats to sustainability include shortage of staff, overtime for staff, demands for hospital beds, budget cuts, and poor staff communication due to separate meetings for nurses and physicians. The present results broaden our understanding of how to create and sustain an organizational system that supports medical team training.

  20. Simulation of main steam and feedwater system of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaoyu

    1996-01-01

    The simulation of main steam and feedwater system is the most important and maximal part in secondary circuit model, including all of main steam and feedwater's thermal-hydraulic properties, except heat-exchange of secondary side of steam generator. It simulates main steam header, steam power in each stage of turbine, moisture separator-reheater, deaerator, condenser, high pressure and low pressure heater, auxiliary feedwater and main steam bypass in full scope

  1. Development of a mathematical model simulating the multiply connected automatic control system of a coal-fired power unit equipped with a direct-injection dust feed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.A. Shorokhov; A.P. Smol' nikov; D.A. Kurochkin; N.N. Komarova; A.S. Mar' yasov; A.R. Gudovich; S.N. Bartosh [ZAO SibKOTES, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    Matters relating to development and identification of a mathematical model for simulating a power unit and its individual systems are discussed. Results obtained from a large series of the active experiments on an operating power unit are presented.

  2. Simulated water budget of a small forested watershed in the continental/maritime hydroclimatic region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang Wei; Timothy E. Link; Andrew T. Hudak; John D. Marshall; Kathleen L. Kavanagh; John T. Abatzoglou; Hang Zhou; Robert E. Pangle; Gerald N. Flerchinger

    2016-01-01

    Annual streamflows have decreased across mountain watersheds in the Pacific Northwest of the United States over the last ~70 years; however, in some watersheds, observed annual flows have increased. Physically based models are useful tools to reveal the combined effects of climate and vegetation on long-term water balances by explicitly simulating the internal...

  3. High performance direct gravitational N-body simulations on graphics processing units II: An implementation in CUDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belleman, R.G.; Bédorf, J.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of gravitational direct N-body simulations using the graphics processing unit (GPU) on a commercial NVIDIA GeForce 8800GTX designed for gaming computers. The force evaluation of the N-body problem is implemented in "Compute Unified Device Architecture" (CUDA) using the GPU to

  4. Impact of the Gulf of California SST on simulating precipitation and crop productivity in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Kim, J.; Prasad, A. K.; Stack, D. H.; El-Askary, H. M.; Kafatos, M.

    2012-12-01

    Like other ecosystems, agricultural productivity is substantially affected by climate factors. Therefore, accurate climatic data (i.e. precipitation, temperature, and radiation) is crucial to simulating crop yields. In order to understand and anticipate climate change and its impacts on agricultural productivity in the Southwestern United States, the WRF regional climate model (RCM) and the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) were employed for simulating crop production. 19 years of WRF RCM output show that there is a strong dry bias during the warm season, especially in Arizona. Consequently, the APSIM crop model indicates very low crop yields in this region. We suspect that the coarse resolution of reanalysis data could not resolve the relatively warm Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the Gulf of California (GC), causing the SST to be up to 10 degrees lower than the climatology. In the Southwestern United States, a significant amount of precipitation is associated with North American Monsoon (NAM). During the monsoon season, the low-level moisture is advected to the Southwestern United States via the GC, which is known to be the dominant moisture source. Thus, high-resolution SST data in the GC is required for RCM simulations to accurately represent a reasonable amount of precipitation in the region, allowing reliable evaluation of the impacts on regional ecosystems.and evaluate impacts on regional ecosystems. To evaluate the influence of SST on agriculture in the Southwestern U.S., two sets of numerical simulations were constructed: a control, using unresolved SST of GC, and daily updated SST data from the MODIS satellite sensor. The meteorological drivers from each of the 6 year RCM runs were provided as input to the APSIM model to determine the crop yield. Analyses of the simulated crop production, and the interannual variation of the meteorological drivers, demonstrate the influence of SST on crop yields in the Southwestern United States.

  5. CZCSL3MCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Coastal Zone Color Scanner Experiment (CZCS) was the first instrument devoted to the measurement of ocean color and flown on a spacecraft. Although other...

  6. Planning intensive care unit design using computer simulation modeling: optimizing integration of clinical, operational, and architectural requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼHara, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Nurses have increasingly been regarded as critical members of the planning team as architects recognize their knowledge and value. But the nurses' role as knowledge experts can be expanded to leading efforts to integrate the clinical, operational, and architectural expertise through simulation modeling. Simulation modeling allows for the optimal merge of multifactorial data to understand the current state of the intensive care unit and predict future states. Nurses can champion the simulation modeling process and reap the benefits of a cost-effective way to test new designs, processes, staffing models, and future programming trends prior to implementation. Simulation modeling is an evidence-based planning approach, a standard, for integrating the sciences with real client data, to offer solutions for improving patient care.

  7. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). Methods: A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDA programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). Results: An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. Conclusions: The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  8. Catalyst volumetric fraction simulation in a riser of a cold flow pilot unit with aid of transmission gamma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Kamylla A.L. dos; Lima Filho, Hilario J.B. de; Benachour, Mohand; Dantas, Carlos C.; Santos, Valdemir A. dos

    2013-01-01

    Was obtained the radial profile of the catalyst volume fraction in a riser of the cold flow pilot unit of the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) unit, which was used for adjustment of the entrance conditions of the catalyst in a simulation program by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The height of the riser of the Cold Flow Pilot Unity (CFPU) utilized is 6.0m and its inner diameter is 0.097 m. A radiation-γ source of Am-241 and a NaI (Tl) detector, with shielding made of lead, have been installed on a steel backing that maintains the geometry of the source-detector-riser and allows to vary the distance from the source to the detector and the radial position in a given cross section of the riser. The data associated with the simulation of volume fraction radial profile of the catalyst were: Fluent software, version 12.0; preprocessor GAMBIT, version 2.3.16; Eulerian approach; structured mesh, cell number of 60000; turbulence model used was k-ε and kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF) was implemented to describe the solid phase. Comparison of radial profiles simulated and experimental of the catalyst volumetric fraction in the CFPU riser allowed the identification of needs adjustments in the simulation for the input of catalyst, with consequent validation for the proposed model simulation. (author)

  9. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo [Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics, OSEL, CDRH, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993-0002 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). Methods: A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDA programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). Results: An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. Conclusions: The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  10. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2009-11-01

    It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDATM programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  11. Severe Accident Sequence Analysis Program: Anticipated transient without scram simulations for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallman, R.J.; Gottula, R.C.; Holcomb, E.E.; Jouse, W.C.; Wagoner, S.R.; Wheatley, P.D.

    1987-05-01

    An analysis of five anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The five detailed deterministic simulations of postulated ATWS sequences were initiated from a main steamline isolation valve (MSIV) closure. The subject of the analysis was the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1, a boiling water reactor (BWR) of the BWR/4 product line with a Mark I containment. The simulations yielded insights to the possible consequences resulting from a MSIV closure ATWS. An evaluation of the effects of plant safety systems and operator actions on accident progression and mitigation is presented

  12. 3D modeling of stratigraphic units and simulation of seismic facies in the Lion gulf margin; Modelisation 3D des unites stratigraphiques et simulation des facies sismiques dans la marge du golfe du Lion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chihi, H.

    1997-05-12

    This work aims at providing a contribution to the studies carried out on reservoir characterization by use of seismic data. The study mainly consisted in the use of geostatistical methods in order to model the geometry of stratigraphic units of the Golfe du Lion margin and to simulate the seismic facies from high resolution seismic data. We propose, for the geometric modelling, a methodology based on the estimation of the surfaces and calculation afterwards of the thicknesses, if the modelling of the depth is possible. On the other hand the method consists in estimating the thickness variable directly and in deducing the boundary surfaces afterwards. In order to simulate the distribution of seismic facies within the units of the western domain, we used the truncated Gaussian method. The used approach gave a satisfactory results, when the seismic facies present slightly dipping reflectors with respect to the reference level. Otherwise the method reaches its limits because of the problems of definition of a reference level which allows to follow the clino-forms. In spite of these difficulties, this simulation allows us to estimate the distribution of seismic facies within the units and then to deduce their probable extension. (author) 150 refs.

  13. Development of field simulator to test and qualify the gyrotron local control unit for ITER-India Gyrotron Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Ronak; Mandge, Deepak; Rathod, Vipal; Parmar, Rajvi; Dilip, E. Sharan; Yadav, Amit; Sharma, Anjali; Rao, S.L.

    2017-01-01

    High power RF sources such as a Gyrotron system are operated at required output parameter by using various auxiliary power supplies, High voltage power supplies, auxiliary services and a dedicated Local Control Unit (LCU). These sub-systems must be operated in synchronous and safe way to control the gyrotron output parameters. The LCU performs remote, synchronous and safe operation of the all the gyrotron sub-systems. Broadly the LCU functions are operational control, data acquisition, protection and safety of the gyrotron system. At ITER-India gyrotron Test Facility (IIGTF) a local control unit (LCU) is being developed to operate the complete gyrotron system. This paper presents the design, development and various features of the field simulator. It also discuss LCU functionality test cases and results obtained using field simulator

  14. Evaluation of SPACE code for simulation of inadvertent opening of spray valve in Shin Kori unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seyun; Youn, Bumsoo

    2013-01-01

    SPACE code is expected to be applied to the safety analysis for LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) and Non-LOCA scenarios. SPACE code solves two-fluid, three-field governing equations and programmed with C++ computer language using object-oriented concepts. To evaluate the analysis capability for the transient phenomena in the actual nuclear power plant, an inadvertent opening of spray valve in startup test phase of Shin Kori unit 1 was simulated with SPACE code. To evaluate the analysis capability for the transient phenomena in the actual nuclear power plant, an inadvertent opening of spray valve in startup test phase of Shin Kori unit 1 was simulated with SPACE code

  15. Simulation studies of a new 'OpenPET' geometry based on a quad unit of detector rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Shibuya, Kengo; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Inaniwa, Taku [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: taiga@nirs.go.jp

    2009-03-07

    We have proposed an 'OpenPET' geometry which consists of two detector rings of axial length W each axially separated by a gap G. In order to obtain an axially continuous field-of-view (FOV) of 2W+G, the maximum limit for G must be W. However, two valleys of sensitivity appear, one on each side of the gap. In practice, the gap should be Gunits of detector rings obtained by dividing each right and left unit of detector rings into two units. The inner two units formed the main gap, and the outer two units were appropriately placed to improve the uniformity of sensitivity. The geometry was optimized to minimize the standard deviation of the sensitivity distribution. Numerical simulation results supported the effectiveness of the proposed method. The outer units compensated for the sensitivity valleys on both sides of the main gap. A more appropriate geometry should be designed for the desired application, such as a long axial FOV PET and in-beam PET.

  16. Intercultural Simulation Games: A Review (of the United States and beyond)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Sandra M.; Pusch, Margaret D.

    2010-01-01

    Intercultural simulations are instructional activities that engage and challenge participants with experiences integral to encounters between people of more than one cultural group. Simulations designed specifically to support intercultural encounters have been in use since the 1970s. This article examines the conceptual bases for intercultural…

  17. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, Narcisse

    2015-06-15

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  18. Simulation of the turbine trip of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant using the code Simulate-3K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alegria A, A.; Filio L, C.; Ortiz V, J.

    2017-09-01

    In order to compare the results obtained from the model developed in the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) with the code Simulate-3K (S3K) with respect to those reported by the process computer of the Central (SIIP), the simulation of the turbine trip transient was carried out, caused by the firing of the main generator, the low differential pressure of oil of its seals and the automatic Scram of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, at 87% of power nominal during the operation cycle 16. Since the reactor was brought to a safe stop due to Scram, was enough to simulate 20 seconds to observe the maximum increase in pressure with S3K. In this work, the following parameters are shown and compared: the neutron flux, the thermal power, the pressure in the dome, the flow at the entrance to the core, the steam flow that leaves the vessel and the minimal critical power ratio (MCPR). The neutron flux of the average power range monitors of the nuclear power plant was compared with the S3K detectors model. Finally, the MCPR was calculated with a different correlation to that of the fuel supplier and its deviation from its safety limit was determined. In conclusion, the results obtained show the current state of the model for the simulation of reactivity transients and the opportunity areas to consolidate this tool in support of the process of licensing refueling in the CNSNS. (Author)

  19. Simulation based assembly and alignment process ability analysis for line replaceable units of the high power solid state laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Lu, Cong; Li, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Discrete event simulation is applied to analyze the assembly and alignment process ability of LRUs in SG-III facility. • The overall assembly and alignment process of LRUs with specific characteristics is described. • An extended-directed graph is proposed to express the assembly and alignment process of LRUs. • Different scenarios have been simulated to evaluate assembling process ability of LRUs and decision making is supported to ensure the construction millstone. - Abstract: Line replaceable units (LRUs) are important components of the very large high power solid state laser facilities. The assembly and alignment process ability of LRUs will impact the construction milestone of facilities. This paper describes the use of discrete event simulation method for assembly and alignment process analysis of LRUs in such facilities. The overall assembly and alignment process for LRUs is presented based on the layout of the optics assembly laboratory and the process characteristics are analyzed. An extended-directed graph is proposed to express the assembly and alignment process of LRUs. Taking the LRUs of disk amplifier system in Shen Guang-III (SG-III) facility as the example, some process simulation models are built based on the Quest simulation platform. The constraints, such as duration, equipment, technician and part supply, are considered in the simulation models. Different simulation scenarios have been carried out to evaluate the assembling process ability of LRUs. The simulation method can provide a valuable decision making and process optimization tool for the optics assembly laboratory layout and the process working out of such facilities.

  20. Simulation based assembly and alignment process ability analysis for line replaceable units of the high power solid state laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junfeng; Lu, Cong; Li, Shiqi, E-mail: sqli@hust.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Discrete event simulation is applied to analyze the assembly and alignment process ability of LRUs in SG-III facility. • The overall assembly and alignment process of LRUs with specific characteristics is described. • An extended-directed graph is proposed to express the assembly and alignment process of LRUs. • Different scenarios have been simulated to evaluate assembling process ability of LRUs and decision making is supported to ensure the construction millstone. - Abstract: Line replaceable units (LRUs) are important components of the very large high power solid state laser facilities. The assembly and alignment process ability of LRUs will impact the construction milestone of facilities. This paper describes the use of discrete event simulation method for assembly and alignment process analysis of LRUs in such facilities. The overall assembly and alignment process for LRUs is presented based on the layout of the optics assembly laboratory and the process characteristics are analyzed. An extended-directed graph is proposed to express the assembly and alignment process of LRUs. Taking the LRUs of disk amplifier system in Shen Guang-III (SG-III) facility as the example, some process simulation models are built based on the Quest simulation platform. The constraints, such as duration, equipment, technician and part supply, are considered in the simulation models. Different simulation scenarios have been carried out to evaluate the assembling process ability of LRUs. The simulation method can provide a valuable decision making and process optimization tool for the optics assembly laboratory layout and the process working out of such facilities.

  1. On geometric simulating in nuclear reactor calculations by the Monte-Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostashenko, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of existing geometric modules makes it possible to reveal their disadvantages and to formulate requirements list, which should be satisfied by any usefull geometry system. Short description of GDL language used for complex reactor systems simulating is given. GDL language applies hierarchical representation scheme to assemblies, which aids to reduce significantly amount of input data. The language is part of GDL geometry system designed for MCU package and implemented on ES computers

  2. On-Demand Interactive Simulation-Centered Training for Small Unit Tactics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Munro, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Training on small unit infantry tactics in both the context of present-day infantry operations and in Objective Force Warrior contexts may benefit from the use of interactive graphics with behavioral...

  3. Massive Parallelism of Monte-Carlo Simulation on Low-End Hardware using Graphic Processing Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mburu, Joe Mwangi; Hah, Chang Joo Hah [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Within the past decade, research has been done on utilizing GPU massive parallelization in core simulation with impressive results but unfortunately, not much commercial application has been done in the nuclear field especially in reactor core simulation. The purpose of this paper is to give an introductory concept on the topic and illustrate the potential of exploiting the massive parallel nature of GPU computing on a simple monte-carlo simulation with very minimal hardware specifications. To do a comparative analysis, a simple two dimension monte-carlo simulation is implemented for both the CPU and GPU in order to evaluate performance gain based on the computing devices. The heterogeneous platform utilized in this analysis is done on a slow notebook with only 1GHz processor. The end results are quite surprising whereby high speedups obtained are almost a factor of 10. In this work, we have utilized heterogeneous computing in a GPU-based approach in applying potential high arithmetic intensive calculation. By applying a complex monte-carlo simulation on GPU platform, we have speed up the computational process by almost a factor of 10 based on one million neutrons. This shows how easy, cheap and efficient it is in using GPU in accelerating scientific computing and the results should encourage in exploring further this avenue especially in nuclear reactor physics simulation where deterministic and stochastic calculations are quite favourable in parallelization.

  4. Massive Parallelism of Monte-Carlo Simulation on Low-End Hardware using Graphic Processing Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mburu, Joe Mwangi; Hah, Chang Joo Hah

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, research has been done on utilizing GPU massive parallelization in core simulation with impressive results but unfortunately, not much commercial application has been done in the nuclear field especially in reactor core simulation. The purpose of this paper is to give an introductory concept on the topic and illustrate the potential of exploiting the massive parallel nature of GPU computing on a simple monte-carlo simulation with very minimal hardware specifications. To do a comparative analysis, a simple two dimension monte-carlo simulation is implemented for both the CPU and GPU in order to evaluate performance gain based on the computing devices. The heterogeneous platform utilized in this analysis is done on a slow notebook with only 1GHz processor. The end results are quite surprising whereby high speedups obtained are almost a factor of 10. In this work, we have utilized heterogeneous computing in a GPU-based approach in applying potential high arithmetic intensive calculation. By applying a complex monte-carlo simulation on GPU platform, we have speed up the computational process by almost a factor of 10 based on one million neutrons. This shows how easy, cheap and efficient it is in using GPU in accelerating scientific computing and the results should encourage in exploring further this avenue especially in nuclear reactor physics simulation where deterministic and stochastic calculations are quite favourable in parallelization

  5. Modeling and simulation of a New Design of the SMCEC Desalination Unit Using Solar Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhani, K.; Ben Bacha, H.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this research is to parametrically study a new process working design with Humidification/Dehumidification (HD) technique using solar energy which is developed to ameliorate the production of the SMCEC unit (Solar Multiple Condensation Evaporation Cycle). The SMCEC unit is currently operating at Sfax's national engineering school in Tunisia. The improvement of the production consists in increasing the capacity of air to load water vapor with heating and subsequent humidification of air at the exit of the condensation tower instead of rejecting or recycling it. So, to attend our objective, we need to integrate into the SMCEC unit a flat plate solar air collector for heating air and a humidifier for its humidification. Then, the newly designed system is basically composed of a flat plate solar air collector, a flat plate solar water collector, a humidifier, an evaporation tower and a condensation tower. A general model based on heat and mass transfers in each component of the unit is developed in a steady state regime. The obtained set of ordinary differential equations is converted to a set of algebraic system of equations by the functional approximation method of orthogonal collocation. The developed model is used to investigate both the effect of different operating modes on the water condensation rate and the steady state behavior of each component of the unit and the entire system exposed to a variation of the entrance parameters and meteorological conditions.

  6. Simulations of hydrologic response in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFontaine, Jacob H.; Jones, L. Elliott; Painter, Jaime A.

    2017-12-29

    A suite of hydrologic models has been developed for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACFB) as part of the National Water Census, a U.S. Geological Survey research program that focuses on developing new water accounting tools and assessing water availability and use at the regional and national scales. Seven hydrologic models were developed using the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), a deterministic, distributed-parameter, process-based system that simulates the effects of precipitation, temperature, land cover, and water use on basin hydrology. A coarse-resolution PRMS model was developed for the entire ACFB, and six fine-resolution PRMS models were developed for six subbasins of the ACFB. The coarse-resolution model was loosely coupled with a groundwater model to better assess the effects of water use on streamflow in the lower ACFB, a complex geologic setting with karst features. The PRMS coarse-resolution model was used to provide inputs of recharge to the groundwater model, which in turn provide simulations of groundwater flow that were aggregated with PRMS-based simulations of surface runoff and shallow-subsurface flow. Simulations without the effects of water use were developed for each model for at least the calendar years 1982–2012 with longer periods for the Potato Creek subbasin (1942–2012) and the Spring Creek subbasin (1952–2012). Water-use-affected flows were simulated for 2008–12. Water budget simulations showed heterogeneous distributions of precipitation, actual evapotranspiration, recharge, runoff, and storage change across the ACFB. Streamflow volume differences between no-water-use and water-use simulations were largest along the main stem of the Apalachicola and Chattahoochee River Basins, with streamflow percentage differences largest in the upper Chattahoochee and Flint River Basins and Spring Creek in the lower Flint River Basin. Water-use information at a shorter time step and a fully coupled simulation in

  7. The Building Blocks for JWST I and T (Integrations and Test) to Operations - From Simulator to Flight Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatig, Curtis; Ochs, William; Johns, Alan; Seaton, Bonita; Adams, Cynthia; Wasiak, Francis; Jones, Ronald; Jackson, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project has an extended integration and test (I&T) phase due to long procurement and development times of various components as well as recent launch delays. The JWST Ground Segment and Operations group has developed a roadmap of the various ground and flight elements and their use in the various JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project s building block approach to the eventual operational systems, while not new, is complex and challenging; a large-scale mission like JWST involves international partners, many vendors across the United States, and competing needs for the same systems. One of the challenges is resource balancing so simulators and flight products for various elements congeal into integrated systems used for I&T and flight operations activities. This building block approach to an incremental buildup provides for early problem identification with simulators and exercises the flight operations systems, products, and interfaces during the JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project has completed some early I&T with the simulators, engineering models and some components of the operational ground system. The JWST Project is testing the various flight units as they are delivered and will continue to do so for the entire flight and operational system. The JWST Project has already and will continue to reap the value of the building block approach on the road to launch and flight operations.

  8. Efficient particle-in-cell simulation of auroral plasma phenomena using a CUDA enabled graphics processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Stephen

    This thesis introduces a software framework that effectively utilizes low-cost commercially available Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) to simulate complex scientific plasma phenomena that are modeled using the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) paradigm. The software framework that was developed conforms to the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a standard for general purpose graphic processing that was introduced by NVIDIA Corporation. This framework has been verified for correctness and applied to advance the state of understanding of the electromagnetic aspects of the development of the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis. For each phase of the PIC methodology, this research has identified one or more methods to exploit the problem's natural parallelism and effectively map it for execution on the graphic processing unit and its host processor. The sources of overhead that can reduce the effectiveness of parallelization for each of these methods have also been identified. One of the novel aspects of this research was the utilization of particle sorting during the grid interpolation phase. The final representation resulted in simulations that executed about 38 times faster than simulations that were run on a single-core general-purpose processing system. The scalability of this framework to larger problem sizes and future generation systems has also been investigated.

  9. Averaged cross sections for the reactions {sup 68}Zn(n,p){sup 68g}Cu and {sup 68}Zn(n,p){sup 68m}Cu for a {sup 235}U fission neutron spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kestelman, A.J. [Laboratorio de Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica y Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)]. E-mail: kestelma@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Ribeiro Guevara, S. [Laboratorio de Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica y Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Arribere, M.A. [Laboratorio de Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica y Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Cohen, I.M. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Medrano 951 (C1179AAQ) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-07-15

    Making use of the method developed in our laboratory for the simultaneous determination of cross sections leading to both the ground and metastable states, we have measured the {sup 68}Zn(n,p){sup 68g}Cu and {sup 68}Zn(n,p){sup 68m}Cu reactions, using Zn enriched to 99.4% in its isotope {sup 68}Zn. The measured cross sections are (15.04{+-}0.35) and (3.69{+-}0.30) {mu}b for the ground and metastable state, respectively. However, a direct determination of the cross section leading to the metastable state gives a value of (4.75{+-}0.38) {mu}b. A possible reason for this discrepancy-which is outside experimental uncertainties-is that some tabulated values used in our calculations for the decay parameters of {sup 68g}Cu and {sup 68m}Cu, have either larger than quoted, or unknown systematic, uncertainties.

  10. Simulated Local and Remote Biophysical Effects of Afforestation over the Southeast United States in Boreal Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang-Shan Chen; Michael Notaro; Zhengyu Liu; Yongqiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Afforestation has been proposed as a climate change mitigation strategy by sequestrating atmospheric carbon dioxide. With the goal of increasing carbon sequestration, a Congressional project has been planned to afforest about 18 million acres by 2020 in the Southeast United States (SEUS), the Great Lake states, and the Corn Belt states. However, biophysical feedbacks...

  11. Animated Simulation: Determining Cost Effective Nurse Staffing for an Acute Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-19

    Rate - Unscheduled Physician Visits Post- - Decubitus Ulcer Rate Discharge - Nosocomial Infection Rate (total) - Patient Knowledge of Disease...Condition - Nosocomial Urinary Tract Infection Rate and Care Requirements - Nosocomial Pneumonia Rate - Nosocomial Surgical Wound Infection Rate PROCESS...Nagaprasanna, 1988). A maternity unit at Bristol Hospital displayed dissatisfaction with their patient classification system. They found the patient

  12. Simulation of a passive house coupled with a heat pump/organic Rankine cycle reversible unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumont, Olivier; Carmo, Carolina; Randaxhe, François

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic model of a passive house located in Denmark with a large solar absorber, a horizontal ground heat exchanger coupled with a HP/ORC unit. The HP/ORC reversible unit is a module able to work as an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) or as a heat pump (HP). There are 3 possible ...... presents a higher global COP because the heat produced on the roof can heat the storage directly.......This paper presents a dynamic model of a passive house located in Denmark with a large solar absorber, a horizontal ground heat exchanger coupled with a HP/ORC unit. The HP/ORC reversible unit is a module able to work as an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) or as a heat pump (HP). There are 3 possible...... modes that need to be chosen optimally depending on the weather conditions, the heat demand and the temperature level of the storage. The ORC mode is activated, as long as the heat demand of the house is covered by the storage to produce electricity based upon the heat generated by the solar roof...

  13. Catalog of Simulation Models and Wargames Used for Unit and Leader Training. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    149 SAS 155 -. I TAC SUPPRESSOR 181 xiv 77- TABLE 5 (continued) N’ NAME PAGE - TAM 187 TWX 205 WASGRAM 213 Other: Economi -l DROMEDARY 79 LOGISTICS...be an upgrade of WACE and BABAS as a computer-assisted mixed land and sea training simulation. DATE IMPLEMENTED: Prototype to be field tested, end of

  14. How well do terrestrial biosphere models simulate coarse-scale runoff in the contiguous United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.R. Schwalm; D.N. Huntzinger; R.B. Cook; Y. Wei; I.T. Baker; R.P. Neilson; B. Poulter; Peter Caldwell; G. Sun; H.Q. Tian; N. Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Significant changes in the water cycle are expected under current global environmental change. Robust assessment of present-day water cycle dynamics at continental to global scales is confounded by shortcomings in the observed record. Modeled assessments also yield conflicting results which are linked to differences in model structure and simulation protocol. Here we...

  15. Design Analysis of Power Extracting Unit of an Onshore OWC Based Wave Energy Power Plant using Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Suleman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This research paper describes design and analysis of power extracting unit of an onshore OWC (Oscillating Water Column based wave energy power plant of capacity about 100 kilowatts. The OWC is modeled as solid piston of a reciprocating pump. The power extracting unit is designed analytically by using the theory of reciprocating pumps and principles of fluid mechanics. Pro-E and ANSYS workbench softwares are used to verify the analytical design. The analytical results of the flow velocity in the turbine duct are compared with the simulation results. The results are found to be in good agreement with each other. The results achieved by this research would finally assist in the overall design of the power plant which is the ultimate goal of this research work.

  16. Modelling, experimentation and simulation of a reversible HP/ORC unit to get a Positive Energy Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumont, Olivier; Carmo, Carolina; Quoilin, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative building comprising a heat pump connected to a solar roof and a geothermal heat exchanger. This unit is able to invert its cycle and operate as an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). The solar roof is producing large amount of heat throughout the year. This allows...... and fluid R134a shows promising performance with a net electrical energy produced over one year reaching 4030 kWh. Following that, a prototype has been built and has proven the feasibility of the technology. Finally, a simulation code including the building, the ground heat exchanger, the thermal energy...... storage, the solar roof and the reversible HP/ORC unit is developed and allows to perform a sensivity analysis. Annual results show that this technology leads to a Positive Energy Building....

  17. Design and simulation of fast pulsed kicker/bumper units for the positron accumulator ring at APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ju; Volk, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    In the design of fast pulsed kicker/burner units for a positron accumulator ring (PAR) at APS, different pulse forming networks (PFN) are considered and different structures for the magnet are studied and simulated. Three fast pulsed kicker/bumper magnets are required in PAR for the beam injection and/or extraction at 450 MeV. These magnets have the same design because they have identical specifications and are expected to produce identical magnetic fields. Each kicker/bumper magnet is required to generate a magnetic field of 0.06 T with rise-time of 80 ns, a flat-top of 80 ns and a fall-time of 80 ns. This paper describes some design considerations and computer simulation results of different designs

  18. Design and Construction of a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Unit and Medical Applications with GEANT Detector Simulation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagoz, Muge [Bogazici Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of the construction of a sample PET coincidence unit in our HEP laboratory, a setup with two face to face PMTs and two 2x8 Csi(Tl) scintillator matrices has been constructed. In this setup, 1-D projections of a pointlike 22 Na positron source at different angles have been measured. Using these projections a 2-D image has been formed. Monte Carlo studies of this setup have been implemented using the detector simulation tool in CERN program library, GEANT. Again with GEANT a sample human body is created to study the effects of proton therapy. Utilization of the simulation as a pretherapy tool is also investigated.

  19. Simulation of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack using AspenPlusTM unit operation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Croiset, E.; Douglas, P.L.; Fowler, M.W.; Entchev, E.

    2005-01-01

    The design of a fuel cell system involves both optimization of the fuel cell stack and the balance of plant with respect to efficiency and economics. Many commercially available process simulators, such as AspenPlus TM , can facilitate the analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. A SOFC system may include fuel pre-processors, heat exchangers, turbines, bottoming cycles, etc., all of which can be very effectively modelled in process simulation software. The current challenge is that AspenPlus TM or any other commercial process simulators do not have a model of a basic SOFC stack. Therefore, to enable performing SOFC system simulation using one of these simulators, one must construct an SOFC stack model that can be implemented in them. The most common approach is to develop a complete SOFC model in a programming language, such as Fortran, Visual Basic or C++, first and then link it to a commercial process simulator as a user defined model or subroutine. This paper introduces a different approach to the development of a SOFC model by utilizing existing AspenPlus TM functions and existing unit operation modules. The developed ''AspenPlus TM SOFC'' model is able to provide detailed thermodynamic and parametric analyses of the SOFC operation and can easily be extended to study the entire power plant consisting of the SOFC and the balance of plant without the requirement for linking with other software. Validation of this model is performed by comparison to a Siemens-Westinghouse 100 kW class tubular SOFC stack. Sensitivity analyses of major operating parameters, such as utilization factor (U f ), current density (I c ) and steam-carbon ratio (S/C), were performed using the developed model, and the results are discussed in this paper

  20. Simulation of the behaviour of a set of Cu/sub 2/S-CdS unit photocells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemin, J L; Bordure, G

    1982-03-01

    With the help of a general simulation program (the Spice II program from the University of California, Berkeley), adapted to photocell modelling, we studied the behaviour of a large solar photocell consisting of smaller Cu/sub 2/S-CdS unit solar cells in parallel. In particular we examined a theoretical set of photocells identical with the best cell made in the laboratory, a set of 30 real photocells characterized individually and the effect of introducing low efficiency cells. We indicate the role of each parameter characterizing the photocells in order to improve the behaviour of photovoltaic panels of larger dimensions.

  1. Graphics processing unit accelerated three-dimensional model for the simulation of pulsed low-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.fierro@ttu.edu; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A 3-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision simulation that is fully implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU) is described and used to determine low-temperature plasma characteristics at high reduced electric field, E/n, in nitrogen gas. Details of implementation on the GPU using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture framework are discussed with respect to efficient code execution. The software is capable of tracking around 10 × 10{sup 6} particles with dynamic weighting and a total mesh size larger than 10{sup 8} cells. Verification of the simulation is performed by comparing the electron energy distribution function and plasma transport parameters to known Boltzmann Equation (BE) solvers. Under the assumption of a uniform electric field and neglecting the build-up of positive ion space charge, the simulation agrees well with the BE solvers. The model is utilized to calculate plasma characteristics of a pulsed, parallel plate discharge. A photoionization model provides the simulation with additional electrons after the initial seeded electron density has drifted towards the anode. Comparison of the performance benefits between the GPU-implementation versus a CPU-implementation is considered, and a speed-up factor of 13 for a 3D relaxation Poisson solver is obtained. Furthermore, a factor 60 speed-up is realized for parallelization of the electron processes.

  2. Simulation of the Stabilization Unit Refinery “Hermanos Díaz” Using Aspen Hysys 8.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayset Mariño-Peacok

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a study of the production of liquefied petroleum gas is carried out in the Stabilization Unit refinery “Hermanos Díaz”. Implementation of this process was conducted in the simulator Aspen Hysys 8.0 with the aim of developing a simulation that would increase the efficiency of this plant. Different alternatives are evaluated using the simulator tool Databook, as were the analysis of the temperature and pressure and its influence on the flow of the compounds of interest in the separators; the number of trays and the feed tray to the distillation column and its influence on the energy of the condenser and reboiler. It was determined that at 44°C and 160 kPa in the separator D-120 and at 34,5 °C and 738.8 kPa in the separator D-109 ensures good performance of the process. In addition it was found that with 50 trays and a feed tray 27 in the distillation tower T-104 guarantee lower consumption of energy (1,4*10 7 kJ/kmol and 1,5*107 kJ/kmol for the condenser and reboiler respectively. It was shown that an increased flow of unstabilized light naphtha fed to the plant, leads to increased efficiency of the unit. The simulation of the process led to raise the efficiency of the plant because the flow of liquefied petroleum gas increased in 11.79% to quality established.

  3. The More Extreme Nature of North American Monsoon Precipitation in the Southwestern United States as Revealed by a Historical Climatology of Simulated Severe Weather Events

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Thang M.; Castro, Christopher L.; Chang, Hsin-I; Lahmers, Timothy; Adams, David K.; Ochoa-Moya, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Long-term changes in North American monsoon (NAM) precipitation intensity in the southwestern United States are evaluated through the use of convective-permitting model simulations of objectively identified severe weather events during

  4. The More Extreme Nature of North American Monsoon Precipitation in the Southwestern United States as Revealed by a Historical Climatology of Simulated Severe Weather Events

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Thang M.

    2017-07-03

    Long-term changes in North American monsoon (NAM) precipitation intensity in the southwestern United States are evaluated through the use of convective-permitting model simulations of objectively identified severe weather events during

  5. Evaluation of the APEX Model to Simulate Runoff Quality from Agricultural Fields in the Southern Region of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Avila, John J; Radcliffe, David E; Osmond, Deanna; Bolster, Carl; Sharpley, Andrew; Ortega-Achury, Sandra L; Forsberg, Adam; Oldham, J Larry

    2017-11-01

    The Agricultural Policy Environmental eXtender (APEX) model has been widely applied to assess phosphorus (P) loss in runoff water and has been proposed as a model to support practical decisions regarding agricultural P management, as well as a model to evaluate tools such as the P Index. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of APEX to simulate P losses from agricultural systems to determine its potential use for refinement or replacement of the P Index in the southern region of the United States. Uncalibrated and calibrated APEX model predictions were compared against measured water quality data from row crop fields in North Carolina and Mississippi and pasture fields in Arkansas and Georgia. Calibrated models satisfactorily predicted event-based surface runoff volumes at all sites (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency [NSE] > 0.47, |percent bias [PBIAS]| < 34) except Arkansas (NSE < 0.11, |PBIAS| < 50) but did not satisfactory simulate sediment, dissolved P, or total P losses in runoff water. The APEX model tended to underestimate dissolved and total P losses from fields where manure was surface applied. The model also overestimated sediments and total P loads during irrigation events. We conclude that the capability of APEX to predict sediment and P losses is limited, and consequently so is the potential for using APEX to make P management recommendations to improve P Indices in the southern United States. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Numerical Procedure to Forecast the Tsunami Parameters from a Database of Pre-Simulated Seismic Unit Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, César; Carbonel, Carlos; Rojas, Joel

    2018-04-01

    We have implemented a numerical procedure to forecast the parameters of a tsunami, such as the arrival time of the front of the first wave and the maximum wave height in real and virtual tidal stations along the Peruvian coast, with this purpose a database of pre-computed synthetic tsunami waveforms (or Green functions) was obtained from numerical simulation of seismic unit sources (dimension: 50 × 50 km2) for subduction zones from southern Chile to northern Mexico. A bathymetry resolution of 30 arc-sec (approximately 927 m) was used. The resulting tsunami waveform is obtained from the superposition of synthetic waveforms corresponding to several seismic unit sources contained within the tsunami source geometry. The numerical procedure was applied to the Chilean tsunami of April 1, 2014. The results show a very good correlation for stations with wave amplitude greater than 1 m, in the case of the Arica tide station an error (from the maximum height of the observed and simulated waveform) of 3.5% was obtained, for Callao station the error was 12% and the largest error was in Chimbote with 53.5%, however, due to the low amplitude of the Chimbote wave (<1 m), the overestimated error, in this case, is not important for evacuation purposes. The aim of the present research is tsunami early warning, where speed is required rather than accuracy, so the results should be taken as preliminary.

  7. Accumulation and transport of microbial-size particles in a pressure protected model burn unit: CFD simulations and experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimoun Maurice

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling airborne contamination is of major importance in burn units because of the high susceptibility of burned patients to infections and the unique environmental conditions that can accentuate the infection risk. In particular the required elevated temperatures in the patient room can create thermal convection flows which can transport airborne contaminates throughout the unit. In order to estimate this risk and optimize the design of an intensive care room intended to host severely burned patients, we have relied on a computational fluid dynamic methodology (CFD. Methods The study was carried out in 4 steps: i patient room design, ii CFD simulations of patient room design to model air flows throughout the patient room, adjacent anterooms and the corridor, iii construction of a prototype room and subsequent experimental studies to characterize its performance iv qualitative comparison of the tendencies between CFD prediction and experimental results. The Electricité De France (EDF open-source software Code_Saturne® (http://www.code-saturne.org was used and CFD simulations were conducted with an hexahedral mesh containing about 300 000 computational cells. The computational domain included the treatment room and two anterooms including equipment, staff and patient. Experiments with inert aerosol particles followed by time-resolved particle counting were conducted in the prototype room for comparison with the CFD observations. Results We found that thermal convection can create contaminated zones near the ceiling of the room, which can subsequently lead to contaminate transfer in adjacent rooms. Experimental confirmation of these phenomena agreed well with CFD predictions and showed that particles greater than one micron (i.e. bacterial or fungal spore sizes can be influenced by these thermally induced flows. When the temperature difference between rooms was 7°C, a significant contamination transfer was observed to

  8. Simulating fuel treatment effects in dry forests of the western United States: testing the principles of a fire-safe forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris C. Johnson; Maureen C Kennedy; David L. Peterson

    2011-01-01

    We used the Fire and Fuels Extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FFE-FVS) to simulate fuel treatment effects on stands in low- to midelevation dry forests (e.g., ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex. P. & C. Laws.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) of the western United States. We...

  9. Mechanisms of Diurnal Precipitation over the United States Great Plains: A Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.-I.; Choi, I.; Tao, W.-K.; Schubert, S. D.; Kang, I.-K.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of summertime diurnal precipitation in the US Great Plains were examined with the two-dimensional (2D) Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud-resolving model (CRM). The model was constrained by the observed large-scale background state and surface flux derived from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program s Intensive Observing Period (IOP) data at the Southern Great Plains (SGP). The model, when continuously-forced by realistic surface flux and large-scale advection, simulates reasonably well the temporal evolution of the observed rainfall episodes, particularly for the strongly forced precipitation events. However, the model exhibits a deficiency for the weakly forced events driven by diurnal convection. Additional tests were run with the GCE model in order to discriminate between the mechanisms that determine daytime and nighttime convection. In these tests, the model was constrained with the same repeating diurnal variation in the large-scale advection and/or surface flux. The results indicate that it is primarily the surface heat and moisture flux that is responsible for the development of deep convection in the afternoon, whereas the large-scale upward motion and associated moisture advection play an important role in preconditioning nocturnal convection. In the nighttime, high clouds are continuously built up through their interaction and feedback with long-wave radiation, eventually initiating deep convection from the boundary layer. Without these upper-level destabilization processes, the model tends to produce only daytime convection in response to boundary layer heating. This study suggests that the correct simulation of the diurnal variation in precipitation requires that the free-atmospheric destabilization mechanisms resolved in the CRM simulation must be adequately parameterized in current general circulation models (GCMs) many of which are overly sensitive to the parameterized boundary layer heating.

  10. Simulation model of a single-stage lithium bromide-water absorption cooling unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, D.

    1978-01-01

    A computer model of a LiBr-H2O single-stage absorption machine was developed. The model, utilizing a given set of design data such as water-flow rates and inlet or outlet temperatures of these flow rates but without knowing the interior characteristics of the machine (heat transfer rates and surface areas), can be used to predict or simulate off-design performance. Results from 130 off-design cases for a given commercial machine agree with the published data within 2 percent.

  11. Effect of just-in-time simulation training on tracheal intubation procedure safety in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishisaki, Akira; Donoghue, Aaron J; Colborn, Shawn; Watson, Christine; Meyer, Andrew; Brown, Calvin A; Helfaer, Mark A; Walls, Ron M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2010-07-01

    Tracheal intubation-associated events (TIAEs) are common (20%) and life threatening (4%) in pediatric intensive care units. Physician trainees are required to learn tracheal intubation during intensive care unit rotations. The authors hypothesized that "just-in-time" simulation-based intubation refresher training would improve resident participation, success, and decrease TIAEs. For 14 months, one of two on-call residents, nurses, and respiratory therapists received 20-min multidisciplinary simulation-based tracheal intubation training and 10-min resident skill refresher training at the beginning of their on-call period in addition to routine residency education. The rate of first attempt and overall success between refresher-trained and concurrent non-refresher-trained residents (controls) during the intervention phase was compared. The incidence of TIAEs between preintervention and intervention phase was also compared. Four hundred one consecutive primary orotracheal intubations were evaluated: 220 preintervention and 181 intervention. During intervention phase, neither first-attempt success nor overall success rate differed between refresher-trained residents versus concurrent non-refresher-trained residents: 20 of 40 (50%) versus 15 of 24 (62.5%), P = 0.44 and 23 of 40 (57.5%) versus 18 of 24 (75.0%), P = 0.19, respectively. The resident's first attempt and overall success rate did not differ between preintervention and intervention phases. The incidence of TIAE during preintervention and intervention phases was similar: 22.0% preintervention versus 19.9% intervention, P = 0.62, whereas resident participation increased from 20.9% preintervention to 35.4% intervention, P = 0.002. Resident participation continued to be associated with TIAE even after adjusting for the phase and difficult airway condition: odds ratio 2.22 (95% CI 1.28-3.87, P = 0.005). Brief just-in-time multidisciplinary simulation-based intubation refresher training did not improve the resident

  12. Characterization and electrocatalytic activity of Pt–M (M=Cu, Ag, and Pd) bimetallic nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed plasma discharge in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Cho, Ah-Rong; Lee, Sang-Yul, E-mail: sylee@kau.ac.kr [Korea Aerospace University, Department of Materials Engineering, Center for Surface Technology and Applications (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The synthetic approach for electrocatalysts is one of the most important methods of determining electrocatalytic performance. In this work, we synthesized Pt and Pt–M (M=Cu, Ag, and Pd) bimetallic nanoparticles using a pulsed plasma discharge in water. A morphological investigation revealed that the as-synthesized Pt and Pt–M bimetallic nanoparticles constituted a nanochain network structure interconnected with primary nanoparticles of 4–6 nm in size, and the nanochains grew from the primary nanoparticles via the oriented attachment. The Z-contrast, EDX line scanning, and XRD analysis confirmed that the Pt was alloyed with M without elemental segregation or phase segregation. Furthermore, it was found that the composition difference was dependent on the electrode temperature determined by the power density and thermal parameters. The electrochemical results revealed that the electrocatalytic activity, stability, and durability of the Pt–Ag bimetallic nanoparticles were superior with respect to the methanol oxidation reaction, which could be attributed to the downshift of the d-band center via electronic modification.

  13. Diatomite-supported Pd-M (M=Cu, Co, Ni) bimetal nanocatalysts for selective hydrogenation of long-chain aliphatic esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changliang; Zhang, Hongye; Zhao, Yanfei; Chen, Sha; Liu, Zhimin

    2012-11-15

    Diatomite supported Pd-M (M=Cu, Co, Ni) bimetal nanocatalysts with various metal compositions were prepared and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was demonstrated that the metal nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on the support, and their size was centered around 8 nm with a relatively narrow size distribution. The catalysts were used to catalyze hydrogenation of long-chain aliphatic esters, including methyl palmitate, methyl stearate, and methyl laurate. It was indicated that the all diatomite-supported Pd-based bimetal catalysts were active to the selective hydrogenation of long-chain esters to corresponding alcohols at 270°C, originated from the synergistic effect between the metal particles and the diatomite support. For the selective hydrogenation of methyl palmitate, Pd-Cu/diatomite with metal loading of 1% and Pd/Cu=3 displayed the highest performance, giving a 1-hexadecanol yield of 82.9% at the substrate conversion of 98.8%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Disease properties, geography, and mitigation strategies in a simulation spread of rinderpest across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manore Carrie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For the past decade, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has been working toward eradicating rinderpest through vaccination and intense surveillance by 2012. Because of the potential severity of a rinderpest epidemic, it is prudent to prepare for an unexpected outbreak in animal populations. There is no immunity to the disease among the livestock or wildlife in the United States (US. If rinderpest were to emerge in the US, the loss in livestock could be devastating. We predict the potential spread of rinderpest using a two-stage model for the spread of a multi-host infectious disease among agricultural animals in the US. The model incorporates large-scale interactions among US counties and the small-scale dynamics of disease spread within a county. The model epidemic was seeded in 16 locations and there was a strong dependence of the overall epidemic size on the starting location. The epidemics were classified according to overall size into small epidemics of 100 to 300 animals (failed epidemics, epidemics infecting 3 000 to 30 000 animals (medium epidemics, and the large epidemics infecting around one million beef cattle. The size of the rinderpest epidemics were directly related to the origin of the disease and whether or not the disease moved into certain key counties in high-livestock-density areas of the US. The epidemic size also depended upon response time and effectiveness of movement controls.

  15. Closure simulation of the MSIV of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant using the Simulate 3K code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alegria A, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the simulation of closure transient of all main steam isolation valves (MSIV) was performed with the Simulate-3K (S-3K) code for the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (NPP-LV), which operates to thermal power of 2317 MWt, corresponding to the cycle 15 of operation. The set points for the performance of systems correspond to those set out in transient analysis: 3 seconds for the closure of all MSIV; the start of Scram when 121% of the neutron flux is reached, respect from baseline before the transient; the opening by peer of safety relief valves (SRV) in relief mode when the set point of the pressure is reached, the shoot of the feedwater flow seconds after the start of closing of the MSIV and the shoot of the recirculation water pumps when the pressure is reached in the dome of 1048 psig. The simulation time was of 57 seconds, with the top 50 to reach the steady state, from which the closure of all MSIV starts. In this paper the behavior of the pressure in the dome are analyzed, thermal power, neutron flux, the collapsed water level, the flow at the entrance of core, the steam flow coming out of vessel and the flow through of the SRV; the fuel temperature, the minimal critical power ratio, the readings in the instrumentation systems and reactivities. Instrumentation systems were implemented to analyze the neutron flux, these consist of 96 local power range monitors (LPRM) located in different radial and axial positions of the core and 4 channels of average power range monitors, which grouped at 24 LPRM each one. LPRM response to the change of neutron flux in the center of the core, at different axial positions is also shown. Finally, the results show that the safety limit MCPR is not exceeded. (Author)

  16. Cycles in competitive electricity markets: a simulation study of the western United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the potential for power plant construction to appear in waves causing alternating periods of over and under supply of electricity. The end result would be major swings in market prices as the industry moves through the phases of a construction cycle. This paper begins with some background on why these cycles should be taken seriously as we write the rules for a restructured electricity industry. It uses computer simulation to learn that cycles could emerge if the western states adopt the market rules used in California. Construction cycles are a potentially serious problem, but they are not inevitable. This paper uses computer simulation to show that cycles could be dampened substantially by introducing a constant capacity payment along side of the market clearing price for energy. The paper concludes with an examination of the consumer impacts of a constant capacity payment. Wholesale consumers would experience higher costs in the short run, but lower energy prices would nullify the impact of capacity payments in the long run. Retail consumers would not necessarily face higher costs in the short run because of a reduction in charges for recovery of stranded costs. (author)

  17. An Approach for Simulation of the Muscle Force Modeling It by Summation of Motor Unit Contraction Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rositsa Raikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle force is due to the cumulative effect of repetitively contracting motor units (MUs. To simulate the contribution of each MU to whole muscle force, an approach implemented in a novel computer program is proposed. The individual contraction of an MU (the twitch is modeled by a 6-parameter analytical function previously proposed; the force of one MU is a sum of its contractions due to an applied stimulation pattern, and the muscle force is the sum of the active MUs. The number of MUs, the number of slow, fast-fatigue-resistant, and fast-fatigable MUs, and their six parameters as well as a file with stimulation patterns for each MU are inputs for the developed software. Different muscles and different firing patterns can be simulated changing the input data. The functionality of the program is illustrated with a model consisting of 30 MUs of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The twitches of these MUs were experimentally measured and modeled. The forces of the MUs and of the whole muscle were simulated using different stimulation patterns that included different regular, irregular, synchronous, and asynchronous firing patterns of MUs. The size principle of MUs for recruitment and derecruitment was also demonstrated using different stimulation paradigms.

  18. Determination of photon fluence spectra from a 60Co therapy unit based on PENELOPE and MCNP simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, Andreas; Hranitzky, Christian; Stadtmann, Hannes; Maringer, Franz Josef

    2011-01-01

    Photon fluence spectra of the Seibersdorf Labor/BEV Picker 60 Co therapy unit were calculated using two generally recognised Monte Carlo codes, PENELOPE-2006 and MCNP5. The complexity of the simulation model was increased in three steps (from a pure source capsule and a simplified model using rotational symmetry to a realistic model of the facility). Photon fluence spectra of both codes generally agree within their statistical standard uncertainties for the case of identical geometry set-up and particle transport parameter settings. Resulting total fluence values were about 0.3% higher for MCNP as compared to PENELOPE. The verification of the simulated photon fluence spectra was based upon depth-dose measurements in water performed with a PTW 31003 ionisation chamber and a thick-walled chamber type CC01. The depth-dose curve calculated with PENELOPE agreed with the curve obtained from measurements within 0.4% across the available depth region in the 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom. The comparison of measured and simulated beam quality indices (TPR 20,10 ) revealed deviations of less than 0.2%.

  19. Simulation and design of distillation units for treatment of sulfite pulping condensates to recover methanol and furfural. Part I. Incorporation with an evaporation unit and use of secondary steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacchi, G.; Aly, G.

    1979-06-01

    A distillation unit was simulated using DESTLA, a computer program for steady-state calculations of general multicomponent distillation units. Vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria were both computed by EQUIL, a computer program for computation and plotting of such equilibria. The simulations resulted in a distillation unit consisting of three columns. Energy consumed in the first column dominates the operating costs of the unit. The first of the three different alternatives studied for satisfying the energy requirements of the first column is presented. Incorporating the first column into an evaporation unit yields low steam consumption. However, a decrease in evaporation capacity due to the temperature drop in the first column and complex control design are the disadvantages associated with this alternative.

  20. Use of simulation-based education to improve resident learning and patient care in the medical intensive care unit: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroedl, Clara J; Corbridge, Thomas C; Cohen, Elaine R; Fakhran, Sherene S; Schimmel, Daniel; McGaghie, William C; Wayne, Diane B

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of simulation-based education on the knowledge and skills of internal medicine residents in the medical intensive care unit (MICU). From January 2009 to January 2010, 60 first-year residents at a tertiary care teaching hospital were randomized by month of rotation to an intervention group (simulator-trained, n = 26) and a control group (traditionally trained, n = 34). Simulator-trained residents completed 4 hours of simulation-based education before their medical intensive care unit (MICU) rotation. Topics included circulatory shock, respiratory failure, and mechanical ventilation. After their rotation, residents completed a standardized bedside skills assessment using a 14-item checklist regarding respiratory mechanics, ventilator settings, and circulatory parameters. Performance of simulator-trained and traditionally trained residents was compared using a 2-tailed independent-samples t test. Simulator-trained residents scored significantly higher on the bedside skills assessment compared with traditionally trained residents (82.5% ± 10.6% vs 74.8% ± 14.1%, P = .027). Simulator-trained residents were highly satisfied with the simulation curriculum. Simulation-based education significantly improved resident knowledge and skill in the MICU. Knowledge acquired in the simulated environment was transferred to improved bedside skills caring for MICU patients. Simulation-based education is a valuable adjunct to standard clinical training for residents in the MICU. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Practical Testing and Performance Analysis of Phasor Measurement Unit Using Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Leo; Rather, Zakir Hussain; Stearn, Nathen

    2012-01-01

    Wide Area Measurement Systems (WAMS) and Wide Area Monitoring, Protection and Control Systems (WAMPACS) have evolved rapidly over the last two decades [1]. This fast emerging technology enables real time synchronized monitoring of power systems. Presently, WAMS are mainly used for real time...... visualisation and post event analysis of power systems. It is expected however, that through integration with traditional Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, closed loop control applications will be possible. Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) are fundamental components of WAMS. Large WAMS...... proposed to realize highly precise phasoreasurements. Further a comparative study based on features of PMUs from different major manufacturers is presented. The selection of optimal parameters, such as phasor format and filter length is also discussed for various applications....

  2. Optimum placement of condensing units of split-type air-conditioners by numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avara, Abdollah; Daneshgar, Ehsan [Mechanical Engineering Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Split-type air-conditioners used in residential or office buildings often have the outdoor condensing units installed at the sidewalls or on the roofs. Installation distance from the supporting wall for the first group and the height of installation for the second group are two factors that affect the condenser efficiency. In this study, a CFD code is used to calculate the effect of distance from the supporting wall on the entrance air temperature and on the on-coil temperature of condenser installed between two walls. In the case of condenser installed on the roof, the effect of installation height of the condenser from the finished roof on on-coil temperature is investigated and the minimum recommended height of installation is determined. (author)

  3. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Turbulent Couette Minimal Flow Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward

    2016-11-01

    What happens to turbulent motions below the Kolmogorov length scale? In order to explore this question, a 300 million molecule Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation is presented for the minimal Couette channel in which turbulence can be sustained. The regeneration cycle and turbulent statistics show excellent agreement to continuum based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) at Re=400. As MD requires only Newton's laws and a form of inter-molecular potential, it captures a much greater range of phenomena without requiring the assumptions of Newton's law of viscosity, thermodynamic equilibrium, fluid isotropy or the limitation of grid resolution. The fundamental nature of MD means it is uniquely placed to explore the nature of turbulent transport. A number of unique insights from MD are presented, including energy budgets, sub-grid turbulent energy spectra, probability density functions, Lagrangian statistics and fluid wall interactions. EPSRC Post Doctoral Prize Fellowship.

  4. Trickle bed reactor model to simulate the performance of commercial diesel hydrotreating unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Murali; R.K. Voolapalli; N. Ravichander; D.T. Gokak; N.V. Choudary [Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd., Udyog Kendra (India). Corporate R& amp; D Centre

    2007-05-15

    A two phase mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of bench scale and commercial hydrotreating reactors. Major hydrotreating reactions, namely, hydrodesulphurization, hydrodearomatization and olefins saturation were modeled. Experiments were carried out in a fixed bed reactor to study the effect of different process variables and these results were used for estimating kinetic parameters. Significant amount of feed vaporization (20-50%) was estimated under normal operating conditions of DHDS suggesting the importance of considering feed vaporization in DHDS modeling. The model was validated with plant operating data, under close to ultra low sulphur levels by correctly accounting for feed vaporization in heat balance relations and appropriate use of hydrodynamic correlations. The model could predict the product quality, reactor bed temperature profiles and chemical hydrogen consumption in commercial plant adequately. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Desain dan Implementasi Remote Terminal Unit (RTU Berbasis Arm Cortex pada Simulator Distribusi Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murie Dwiyaniti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In industry, the control apparatus and instruments at the field level use a PLC in general. Unfortunately, PLC is a proprietary or copyright of a multinational corporation, which make their costs relatively expensive. Alternative controllers can be implemented based on RTU microcontrollers which are of low costs, low power consumption but have high reliability and can be applied in a variety of plants. In this research, RTU based on a microcontroller, 32-bit ARM Cortex XMC 4500, has been developed and applied as a controller of water distribution simulator. This RTU has 8 inputs and 6 outputs digital, 3 inputs and 2 outputs analog. The result shows that the RTU works properly in accordance to the specifications that had been predetermined. This has been proven by the proper functioning of all digital and analog IO modules, serial communication modules and power supply modules.

  6. Interaction of an iridium-clad RTG heat source unit with a simulated terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.H.; Herrera, B.; Nelson, G.B.; Matlack, G.M.; Waterbury, G.R.

    1976-02-01

    An iridium-clad, 100-W 238 PuO 2 sphere, a prototype for the multihundred-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator, was exposed for 1 y to a simulated temperate humid climate in an environmental test chamber containing sandy soil. The hot sphere sank into the soil after the first rain, then gradually acquired a hard crust around it as a result of the rainwater reacting with the hot soil during successive rains. Time and temperature profiles of the sphere were recorded during the weekly rains, and the air and rainwater that percolated through the soil were monitored for plutonium. No plutonium was released from the sphere. Aside from the crust formation, very little reaction occurred between the hot iridium shell and the soil

  7. Numerical methods for the simulation of continuous sedimentation in ideal clarifier-thickener units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, R.; Karlsen, K.H.; Risebro, N.H.; Towers, J.D.

    2001-10-01

    We consider a model of continuous sedimentation. Under idealizing assumptions, the settling of the solid particles under the influence of gravity can be described by the initial value problem for a nonlinear hyperbolic partial differential equation with a flux function that depends discontinuously on height. The purpose of this contribution is to present and demonstrate two numerical methods for simulating continuous sedimentation: a front tracking method and a finite finite difference method. The basic building blocks in the front tracking method are the solutions of a finite number of certain Riemann problems and a procedure for tracking local collisions of shocks. The solutions of the Riemann problems are recalled herein and the front tracking algorithm is described. As an alternative to the front tracking method, a simple scalar finite difference algorithm is proposed. This method is based on discretizing the spatially varying flux parameters on a mesh that is staggered with respect to that of the conserved variable, resulting in a straightforward generalization of the well-known Engquist-Osher upwind finite difference method. The result is an easily implemented upwind shock capturing method. Numerical examples demonstrate that the front tracking and finite difference methods can be used as efficient and accurate simulation tools for continuous sedimentation. The numerical results for the finite difference method indicate that discontinuities in the local solids concentration are resolved sharply and agree with those produced by the front tracking method. The latter is free of numerical dissipation, which leads to sharply resolved concentration discontinuities, but is more complicated to implement than the former. Available mathematical results for the proposed numerical methods are also briefly reviewed. (author)

  8. Using simulated historical time series to prioritize fuel treatments on landscapes across the United States: The LANDFIRE prototype project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Robert E.; Rollins, Matthew; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    2007-01-01

    Canopy and surface fuels in many fire-prone forests of the United States have increased over the last 70 years as a result of modern fire exclusion policies, grazing, and other land management activities. The Healthy Forest Restoration Act and National Fire Plan establish a national commitment to reduce fire hazard and restore fire-adapted ecosystems across the USA. The primary index used to prioritize treatment areas across the nation is Fire Regime Condition Class (FRCC) computed as departures of current conditions from the historical fire and landscape conditions. This paper describes a process that uses an extensive set of ecological models to map FRCC from a departure statistic computed from simulated time series of historical landscape composition. This mapping process uses a data-driven, biophysical approach where georeferenced field data, biogeochemical simulation models, and spatial data libraries are integrated using spatial statistical modeling to map environmental gradients that are then used to predict vegetation and fuels characteristics over space. These characteristics are then fed into a landscape fire and succession simulation model to simulate a time series of historical landscape compositions that are then compared to the composition of current landscapes to compute departure, and the FRCC values. Intermediate products from this process are then used to create ancillary vegetation, fuels, and fire regime layers that are useful in the eventual planning and implementation of fuel and restoration treatments at local scales. The complex integration of varied ecological models at different scales is described and problems encountered during the implementation of this process in the LANDFIRE prototype project are addressed.

  9. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal P. Sarma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models.

  10. Performance Characterization and Simulation of Amine-Based Vacuum Swing Sorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Watts, Carly; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig; Colunga, Aaron; Vogel, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) vapor concentrations in a space suit is critical to ensuring an astronauts safety, comfort, and capability to perform extra-vehicular activity (EVA) tasks. Historically, this has been accomplished using lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and metal oxide (MetOx) canisters. Lithium hydroxide is a consumable material that requires priming with water before it becomes effective at removing carbon dioxide. MetOx is regenerable through a power-intensive thermal cycle but is significantly heavier on a volume basis than LiOH. As an alternative, amine-based vacuum swing beds are under aggressive development for EVA applications. The vacuum swing units control atmospheric concentrations of both CO2 and H2O through fully-regenerative process. The current concept, referred to as the rapid cycle amine (RCA), has resulted in numerous laboratory prototypes. Performance of these prototypes have been assessed experimentally and documented in previous reports. To support developmental e orts, a first principles model has also been established for the vacuum swing sorption technology. For the first time in several decades, a major re-design of Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for the extra-vehicular mobility unit (EMU) is underway. NASA at Johnson Space Center built and tested an integrated PLSS test bed of all subsystems under a variety of simulated EVA conditions of which the RCA prototype played a significant role. The efforts documented herein summarize RCA test performance and simulation results for single and variable metabolic rate experiments in an integrated context. In addition, a variety of off-nominal tests were performed to assess the capability of the RCA to function under challenging circumstances. Tests included high water production experiments, degraded vacuum regeneration, and deliberate valve/power failure and recovery.

  11. Unit-cell design for two-dimensional phase-field simulation of microstructure evolution in single-crystal Ni-based superalloys during solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongjia Cao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phase-field simulation serves as an effective tool for quantitative characterization of microstructure evolution in single-crystal Ni-based superalloys during solidification nowadays. The classic unit cell is either limited to γ dendrites along crystal orientation or too ideal to cover complex morphologies for γ dendrites. An attempt to design the unit cell for two-dimensional (2-D phase-field simulations of microstructure evolution in single-crystal Ni-based superalloys during solidification was thus performed by using the MICRESS (MICRostructure Evolution Simulation Software in the framework of the multi-phase-field (MPF model, and demonstrated in a commercial TMS-113 superalloy. The coupling to CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram thermodynamic database was realized via the TQ interface and the experimental diffusion coefficients were utilized in the simulation. Firstly, the classic unit cell with a single γ dendrite along crystal orientation was employed for the phase-field simulation in order to reproduce the microstructure features. Then, such simple unit cell was extended into the cases with two other different crystal orientations, i.e., and . Thirdly, for crystal orientations, the effect of γ dendritic orientations and unit cell sizes on microstructure and microsegregation was comprehensively studied, from which a new unit cell with multiple γ dendrites was proposed. The phase-field simulation with the newly proposed unit cell was further performed in the TMS-113 superalloy, and the microstructure features including the competitive growth of γ dendrites, microsegregation of different solutes and distribution of γ′ grains, can be nicely reproduced.

  12. Modeling, simulation, parametric study and economic assessment of reciprocating internal combustion engine integrated with multi-effect desalination unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, Mohsen; Amidpour, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Integration of small MED unit with gas engine power cycle is studied in this paper. • Modeling, simulation, parametric study and sensitivity analysis were performed. • A thermodynamic model for heat recovery and power generation of the gas engine has been presented. • Annualized Cost of System (ACS) has been employed for economic assessment. • Economic feasibilty dependence of integrated system on natural gas and water prices has been investigated. - Abstract: Due to thermal nature of multi-effect desalination (MED), its integration with a suitable power cycle is highly desirable for waste heat recovery. One of the proper power cycle for proposed integration is internal combustion engine (ICE). The exhaust gas heat of ICE is used to produce motive steam for the required heat for the first effect of MED system. Also, the water jacket heat is utilized in a heat exchanger to pre-heat the seawater. This paper studies a thermodynamic model for a tri-generation system composed of ICE integrated with MED. The ICE thermodynamic model has been used in place of different empirical efficiency relations to estimate performance – load curves reasonably. The entire system performance has been coded in MATLAB, and the results of proposed thermodynamic model for the engine have been verified by manufacturer catalogue. By increasing the engine load from 40% to 100%, the water production of MED unit will increase from 4.38 cubic meters per day to 26.78 cubic meters per day and the tri-generation efficiency from 31% to 56%. Economic analyses of the MED unit integrated with ICE was performed based on Annualized Cost of System method. This integration makes the system more economical. It has been determined that in higher market prices for fresh water (more than 7 US$ per cubic meter), the increase in effects number is more significant to the period of return decrement.

  13. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable p...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used....

  14. Study on efficiency of time computation in x-ray imaging simulation base on Monte Carlo algorithm using graphics processing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiani, Tia Dwi; Suprijadi; Haryanto, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) is one of the powerful techniques for simulation in x-ray imaging. MC method can simulate the radiation transport within matter with high accuracy and provides a natural way to simulate radiation transport in complex systems. One of the codes based on MC algorithm that are widely used for radiographic images simulation is MC-GPU, a codes developed by Andrea Basal. This study was aimed to investigate the time computation of x-ray imaging simulation in GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) compared to a standard CPU (Central Processing Unit). Furthermore, the effect of physical parameters to the quality of radiographic images and the comparison of image quality resulted from simulation in the GPU and CPU are evaluated in this paper. The simulations were run in CPU which was simulated in serial condition, and in two GPU with 384 cores and 2304 cores. In simulation using GPU, each cores calculates one photon, so, a large number of photon were calculated simultaneously. Results show that the time simulations on GPU were significantly accelerated compared to CPU. The simulations on the 2304 core of GPU were performed about 64 -114 times faster than on CPU, while the simulation on the 384 core of GPU were performed about 20 – 31 times faster than in a single core of CPU. Another result shows that optimum quality of images from the simulation was gained at the history start from 10"8 and the energy from 60 Kev to 90 Kev. Analyzed by statistical approach, the quality of GPU and CPU images are relatively the same.

  15. Study on efficiency of time computation in x-ray imaging simulation base on Monte Carlo algorithm using graphics processing unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setiani, Tia Dwi, E-mail: tiadwisetiani@gmail.com [Computational Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Suprijadi [Computational Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Reaserch Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Reaserch Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Monte Carlo (MC) is one of the powerful techniques for simulation in x-ray imaging. MC method can simulate the radiation transport within matter with high accuracy and provides a natural way to simulate radiation transport in complex systems. One of the codes based on MC algorithm that are widely used for radiographic images simulation is MC-GPU, a codes developed by Andrea Basal. This study was aimed to investigate the time computation of x-ray imaging simulation in GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) compared to a standard CPU (Central Processing Unit). Furthermore, the effect of physical parameters to the quality of radiographic images and the comparison of image quality resulted from simulation in the GPU and CPU are evaluated in this paper. The simulations were run in CPU which was simulated in serial condition, and in two GPU with 384 cores and 2304 cores. In simulation using GPU, each cores calculates one photon, so, a large number of photon were calculated simultaneously. Results show that the time simulations on GPU were significantly accelerated compared to CPU. The simulations on the 2304 core of GPU were performed about 64 -114 times faster than on CPU, while the simulation on the 384 core of GPU were performed about 20 – 31 times faster than in a single core of CPU. Another result shows that optimum quality of images from the simulation was gained at the history start from 10{sup 8} and the energy from 60 Kev to 90 Kev. Analyzed by statistical approach, the quality of GPU and CPU images are relatively the same.

  16. The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline metal ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, E. M.; Rashad, M. M.; Khalil, H. F. Y.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Hussein, M. R.; El-Sabbah, M. M. B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline metal ferrite MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films have been synthesized via electrodeposition-anodization process. Electrodeposited (M)Fe2 alloys were obtained from aqueous sulfate bath. The formed alloys were electrochemically oxidized (anodized) in aqueous (1 M KOH) solution, at room temperature, to the corresponding hydroxides. The parameters controlling the current efficiency of the electrodeposition of (M)Fe2 alloys such as the bath composition and the current density were studied and optimized. The anodized (M)Fe2 alloy films were annealed in air at 400 °C for 2 h. The results revealed the formation of three ferrite thin films were formed. The crystallite sizes of the produced films were in the range between 45 and 60 nm. The microstructure of the formed film was ferrite type dependent. The corrosion behavior of ferrite thin films in different pH solutions was investigated using open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The open circuit potential indicates that the initial potential E im of ZnFe2O4 thin films remained constant for a short time, then sharply increased in the less negative direction in acidic and alkaline medium compared with Ni and Cu ferrite films. The values of the corrosion current density I corr were higher for the ZnFe2O4 films at pH values of 1 and 12 compared with that of NiFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 which were higher only at pH value 1. The corrosion rate was very low for the three ferrite films when immersion in the neutral medium. The surface morphology recommended that Ni and Cu ferrite films were safely used in neutral and alkaline medium, whereas Zn ferrite film was only used in neutral atmospheres.

  17. SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sminchak, Joel

    2012-09-30

    This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data

  18. SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sminchak, Joel

    2012-09-30

    This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data

  19. Design of a memory-access controller with 3.71-times-enhanced energy efficiency for Internet-of-Things-oriented nonvolatile microcontroller unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsui, Masanori; Hanyu, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    In realizing a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) for sensor nodes in Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications, it is important to solve the data-transfer bottleneck between the central processing unit (CPU) and the nonvolatile memory constituting the MCU. As one circuit-oriented approach to solving this problem, we propose a memory access minimization technique for magnetoresistive-random-access-memory (MRAM)-embedded nonvolatile MCUs. In addition to multiplexing and prefetching of memory access, the proposed technique realizes efficient instruction fetch by eliminating redundant memory access while considering the code length of the instruction to be fetched and the transition of the memory address to be accessed. As a result, the performance of the MCU can be improved while relaxing the performance requirement for the embedded MRAM, and compact and low-power implementation can be performed as compared with the conventional cache-based one. Through the evaluation using a system consisting of a general purpose 32-bit CPU and embedded MRAM, it is demonstrated that the proposed technique increases the peak efficiency of the system up to 3.71 times, while a 2.29-fold area reduction is achieved compared with the cache-based one.

  20. Predicting the oral pharmacokinetic profiles of multiple-unit (pellet) dosage forms using a modeling and simulation approach coupled with biorelevant dissolution testing: case example diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Atsushi; Blume, Henning; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this research was to characterize the dissolution profile of a poorly soluble drug, diclofenac, from a commercially available multiple-unit enteric coated dosage form, Diclo-Puren® capsules, and to develop a predictive model for its oral pharmacokinetic profile. The paddle method was used to obtain the dissolution profiles of this dosage form in biorelevant media, with the exposure to simulated gastric conditions being varied in order to simulate the gastric emptying behavior of pellets. A modified Noyes-Whitney theory was subsequently fitted to the dissolution data. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for multiple-unit dosage forms was designed using STELLA® software and coupled with the biorelevant dissolution profiles in order to simulate the plasma concentration profiles of diclofenac from Diclo-Puren® capsule in both the fasted and fed state in humans. Gastric emptying kinetics relevant to multiple-units pellets were incorporated into the PBPK model by setting up a virtual patient population to account for physiological variations in emptying kinetics. Using in vitro biorelevant dissolution coupled with in silico PBPK modeling and simulation it was possible to predict the plasma profile of this multiple-unit formulation of diclofenac after oral administration in both the fasted and fed state. This approach might be useful to predict variability in the plasma profiles for other drugs housed in multiple-unit dosage forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    Ross's Simulation, Fourth Edition introduces aspiring and practicing actuaries, engineers, computer scientists and others to the practical aspects of constructing computerized simulation studies to analyze and interpret real phenomena. Readers learn to apply results of these analyses to problems in a wide variety of fields to obtain effective, accurate solutions and make predictions about future outcomes. This text explains how a computer can be used to generate random numbers, and how to use these random numbers to generate the behavior of a stochastic model over time. It presents the statist

  2. Improvement of the performances of a tandem simulated moving bed chromatography by controlling the yield level of a key product of the first simulated moving bed unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungyong; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2017-03-10

    One of the trustworthy processes for ternary separation is a tandem simulated moving bed (SMB) process, which consists of two subordinate four-zone SMB units (Ring I and Ring II). To take full advantage of a tandem SMB as a means of recovering all three products with high purities and high economical efficiency, it is important to understand how the separation condition in Ring II is affected by that in Ring I, and further to reflect such point in the stage of designing a tandem SMB. In regard to such issue, it was clarified in this study that the Ring I factors affecting the Ring II condition could be represented by the yield level of a key product of Ring I (Y key RingI ). As the Y key RingI level became higher, the amount of the Ring I key-product that was reloaded into Ring II was reduced, which affected favorably the Ring II separation condition. On the other hand, the higher Y key RingI level caused a larger dilution for the stream from Ring I to Ring II, which affected adversely the Ring II separation condition. As a result, a minimum in the desorbent usage of a tandem SMB occurred at the Y key RingI level where the two aforementioned factors could be balanced with each other. If such an optimal Y key RingI level was adopted, the desorbent usage could be reduced by up to 25%. It was also found that as the throughput of a tandem SMB became higher, the factor related to the migration of the Ring I key-product into Ring II was more influential in the performances of a tandem SMB than the factor related to the dilution of the stream from Ring I to Ring II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of Two Desk-Top Computer Simulations Used to Train Tactical Decision Making (TDM) of Small Unit Infantry Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    .... A questionnaire administered to leaders following simulation exercises documented their sense of personal involvement during mission execution and their perceptions of the training value of the simulations...

  4. DayCent-Chem Simulations of Ecological and Biogeochemical Processes of Eight Mountain Ecosystems in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Melannie D.; Baron, Jill S.; Clow, David W.; Creed, Irena F.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Ewing, Holly A.; Haines, Bruce D.; Knoepp, Jennifer; Lajtha, Kate; Ojima, Dennis S.; Parton, William J.; Renfro, Jim; Robinson, R. Bruce; Van Miegroet, Helga; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Williams, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) cause complex responses in ecosystems, from fertilization to forest ecosystem decline, freshwater eutrophication to acidification, loss of soil base cations, and alterations of disturbance regimes. DayCent-Chem, an ecosystem simulation model that combines ecosystem nutrient cycling and plant dynamics with aqueous geochemical equilibrium calculations, was developed to address ecosystem responses to combined atmospheric N and S deposition. It is unique among geochemically-based models in its dynamic biological cycling of N and its daily timestep for investigating ecosystem and surface water chemical response to episodic events. The model was applied to eight mountainous watersheds in the United States. The sites represent a gradient of N deposition across locales, from relatively pristine to N-saturated, and a variety of ecosystem types and climates. Overall, the model performed best in predicting stream chemistry for snowmelt-dominated sites. It was more difficult to predict daily stream chemistry for watersheds with deep soils, high amounts of atmospheric deposition, and a large degree of spatial heterogeneity. DayCent-Chem did well in representing plant and soil carbon and nitrogen pools and fluxes. Modeled stream nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations compared well with measurements at all sites, with few exceptions. Simulated daily stream sulfate (SO42-) concentrations compared well to measured values for sites where SO42- deposition has been low and where SO42- adsorption/desorption reactions did not seem to be important. The concentrations of base cations and silica in streams are highly dependent on the geochemistry and weathering rates of minerals in each catchment, yet these were rarely, if ever, known. Thus, DayCent-Chem could not accurately predict weathering products for some catchments. Additionally, few data were available for exchangeable soil cations or the magnitude of base cation

  5. The optimal parameter design for a welding unit of manufacturing industry by Taguchi method and computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahraee, S.M.; Chegeni, A.; Toghtamish, A.

    2016-07-01

    Manufacturing systems include a complicated combination of resources, such as materials, labors, and machines. Hence, when the manufacturing systems are faced with a problem related to the availability of resources it is difficult to identify the root of the problem accurately and effectively. Managers and engineers in companies are trying to achieve a robust production line based on the maximum productivity. The main goal of this paper is to design a robust production line, taking productivity into account in the selected manufacturing industry. This paper presents the application of Taguchi method along with computer simulation for finding an optimum factor setting for three controllable factors, which are a number of welding machines, hydraulic machines, and cutting machines by analyzing the effect of noise factors in a selected manufacturing industry. Based on the final results, the optimal design parameter of welding unit of in the selected manufacturing industry will be obtained when factor A is located at level 2 and B and C are located at level 1. Therefore, maximum productive desirability is achieved when the number of welding machines, hydraulic machines, and cutting machines is equal to 17, 2, and 1, respectively. This paper has a significant role in designing a robust production line by considering the lowest cost and timely manner based on the Taguchi method. (Author)

  6. The optimal parameter design for a welding unit of manufacturing industry by Taguchi method and computer simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mojib Zahraee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Manufacturing systems include a complicated combination of resources, such as materials, labors, and machines. Hence, when the manufacturing systems are faced with a problem related to the availability of resources it is difficult to identify the root of the problem accurately and effectively. Managers and engineers in companies are trying to achieve a robust production line based on the maximum productivity. The main goal of this paper is to design a robust production line, taking productivity into account in the selected manufacturing industry. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents the application of Taguchi method along with computer simulation for finding an optimum factor setting for three controllable factors, which are a number of welding machines, hydraulic machines, and cutting machines by analyzing the effect of noise factors in a selected manufacturing industry. Findings and Originality/value: Based on the final results, the optimal design parameter of welding unit of in the selected manufacturing industry will be obtained when factor A is located at level 2 and B and C are located at level 1. Therefore, maximum productive desirability is achieved when the number of welding machines, hydraulic machines, and cutting machines is equal to 17, 2, and 1, respectively. This paper has a significant role in designing a robust production line by considering the lowest cost and timely manner based on the Taguchi method.

  7. Demonstration of airborne transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 between simulated pig units located at close range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C.S.; Angen, Øystein; Andreasen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Airborne transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was studied as the percentage of air needed to establish airborne transmission from an infected pig unit into a neighbouring non-infected pig unit. The experiment was carried out in two containers constructed as pig units, placed 1 m apart...... and connected by pipes. By manipulating the air pressure in the two units, the amount of ventilation air transferred from the infected pigs (unit A) to the non-infected pigs (unit B) was controlled and measured. In three experiments, between 48 and 50 specific pathogen free-pigs were randomly assigned to each...... of the two units. In unit A, five pigs (experiment 1) or eight pigs (experiments 2 and 3) were inoculated with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2. In experiments 1 and 3, 10% of the air was transferred from unit A to B; in experiment 2, 70% of the air was transferred. In the non-infected unit (B), 36...

  8. Cost savings from reduced catheter-related bloodstream infection after simulation-based education for residents in a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elaine R; Feinglass, Joe; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Barnard, Cynthia; O'Donnell, Anna; McGaghie, William C; Wayne, Diane B

    2010-04-01

    Interventions to reduce preventable complications such as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) can also decrease hospital costs. However, little is known about the cost-effectiveness of simulation-based education. The aim of this study was to estimate hospital cost savings related to a reduction in CRBSI after simulation training for residents. This was an intervention evaluation study estimating cost savings related to a simulation-based intervention in central venous catheter (CVC) insertion in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) at an urban teaching hospital. After residents completed a simulation-based mastery learning program in CVC insertion, CRBSI rates declined sharply. Case-control and regression analysis methods were used to estimate savings by comparing CRBSI rates in the year before and after the intervention. Annual savings from reduced CRBSIs were compared with the annual cost of simulation training. Approximately 9.95 CRBSIs were prevented among MICU patients with CVCs in the year after the intervention. Incremental costs attributed to each CRBSI were approximately $82,000 in 2008 dollars and 14 additional hospital days (including 12 MICU days). The annual cost of the simulation-based education was approximately $112,000. Net annual savings were thus greater than $700,000, a 7 to 1 rate of return on the simulation training intervention. A simulation-based educational intervention in CVC insertion was highly cost-effective. These results suggest that investment in simulation training can produce significant medical care cost savings.

  9. Using simulation to isolate physician variation in intensive care unit admission decision making for critically ill elders with end-stage cancer: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnato, Amber E; Hsu, Heather E; Bryce, Cindy L; Lave, Judith R; Emlet, Lillian L; Angus, Derek C; Arnold, Robert M

    2008-12-01

    To determine the feasibility of high-fidelity simulation for studying variation in intensive care unit admission decision making for critically ill elders with end-stage cancer. Mixed qualitative and quantitative analysis of physician subjects participating in a simulation scenario using hospital set, actors, medical chart, and vital signs tracings. The simulation depicted a 78-yr-old man with metastatic gastric cancer, life-threatening hypoxia most likely attributable to cancer progression, and stable preferences to avoid intensive care unit admission and intubation. Two independent raters assessed the simulations and subjects completed a postsimulation web-based survey and debriefing interview. Peter M. Winter Institute for Simulation Education and Research at the University of Pittsburgh. Twenty-seven hospital-based attending physicians, including 6 emergency physicians, 13 hospitalists, and 8 intensivists. Outcomes included qualitative report of clinical verisimilitude during the debriefing interview, survey-reported diagnosis and prognosis, and observed treatment decisions. Independent variables included physician demographics, risk attitude, and reactions to uncertainty. All (100%) reported that the case and simulation were highly realistic, and their diagnostic and prognostic assessments were consistent with our intent. Eight physicians (29.6%) admitted the patient to the intensive care unit. Among the eight physicians who admitted the patient to the intensive care unit, three (37%) initiated palliation, two (25%) documented the patient's code status (do not intubate/do not resuscitate), and one intubated the patient. Among the 19 physicians who did not admit the patient to the intensive care unit, 13 (68%) initiated palliation and 5 (42%) documented code status. Intensivists and emergency physicians (p = 0.048) were more likely to admit the patient to the intensive care unit. Years since medical school graduation were inversely associated with the

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

    2011-11-29

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

  11. Exergy analysis of an industrial unit of catalyst regeneration based on the results of modeling and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toghyani, Mahboubeh; Rahimi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    An industrial process is synthesized and developed for decoking of de-hydrogenation catalyst, used in LAB (Linear Alkyl Benzene) production. A multi-tube fixed bed reactor, with short length tubes is designed for decoking of catalyst as the main equipment of the process. This study provides a microscopic exergy analysis for decoking reactor and a macroscopic exergy analysis for synthesized regeneration process. The dynamic mathematical modeling technique and the simulation of process by a commercial software are applied simultaneously. The used model was previously developed for performance analysis of decoking reactor. An appropriate exergy model is developed and adopted to estimate the enthalpy, exergetic efficiency and irreversibility. The model is validated with respect to some operating data measured in a commercial regeneration unit for variations in gas and particle characteristics along the reactor. In coke-combustion period, in spite of high reaction rate, the reactor has low exergetic efficiency due to entropy production during heat and mass transfer processes. The effects of inlet gas flow rate, temperature and oxygen concentration are investigated on the exergetic efficiency and irreversibilities. Macroscopic results indicate that the fan has the highest irreversibilities among the other equipment. Applying proper operating variables reduces the cycle irreversibilities at least by 20%. - Highlights: • A microscopic exergy analysis for a multi-tube fixed bed reactor is conducted. • Controlling the O_2 concentration upgrades the reactor exergetic performance. • A macroscopic exergy analysis for synthesized regeneration process is conducted. • The fan is one of the main sources of the regeneration cycle irreversibility. • The proposed strategies can reduce the cycle irreversibilities at least by 20%.

  12. A multi-level simulation platform of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid generation system - Part II. Balancing units model library and system simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Cheng; Cai, Ningsheng; Croiset, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Following our integrated hierarchical modeling framework of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC), this paper firstly introduces the model libraries of main balancing units, including some state-of-the-art achievements and our specific work. Based on gPROMS programming code, flexible configuration and modular design are fully realized by specifying graphically all unit models in each level. Via comparison with the steady-state experimental data of Siemens-Westinghouse demonstration system, the in-house multi-level SOFC-gas turbine (GT) simulation platform is validated to be more accurate than the advanced power system analysis tool (APSAT). Moreover, some units of the demonstration system are designed reversely for analysis of a typically part-load transient process. The framework of distributed and dynamic modeling in most of units is significant for the development of control strategies in the future.

  13. Application of the visual system analyzer (ViSA): simulation of the steam generator tube rupture event at Ulchin unit 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Kim, K.D.; Hwang, M.K.; Jeong, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the Visual System Analyzer (ViSA) based on the best-estimate (B-E) codes, MARS and RETRAN-3D. The key features of ViSA are: (1) The use of the same input and the same level of accuracy as the original codes is guaranteed (2) Users can design their own plant mimic by a drag-and-drop from the provided indicators (3) The on-line interactive control enables users to simulate the operator's actions (4) The nodalization window is designed to display the transient temperature and void distributions. ViSA is composed of two parts; the B-E code with plant input and the Graphic User Interface (GUI) that includes the plant mimic and an interactive control function, etc. The calculation results of the B-E code are transferred to a user via the GUI and a user can apply the operator action to the B-E code using an interactive control function. Therefore, it is not necessary to prepare complex control input data to simulate the various manual operations which may occur during the plant transient. In this study, the Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) Accident, which occurred at Ulchin Unit 4 in April 2002, has been simulated using ViSA and the simulation results are compared with the measured plant data. The RETRAN-3D plant input data used in this simulation is a genetic input deck prepared for the simulation from a normal operation condition to a Small-Break LOCA. From the results of the SGTR simulation, we found that the GUI functions of ViSA and the input data for Ulchin Unit 4 have enough effectiveness and soundness. (author)

  14. Estimating canopy bulk density and canopy base height for conifer stands in the interior Western United States using the Forest Vegetation Simulator Fire and Fuels Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth Ex; Frederick Smith; Tara Keyser; Stephanie Rebain

    2017-01-01

    The Forest Vegetation Simulator Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE-FVS) is often used to estimate canopy bulk density (CBD) and canopy base height (CBH), which are key indicators of crown fire hazard for conifer stands in the Western United States. Estimated CBD from FFE-FVS is calculated as the maximum 4 m running mean bulk density of predefined 0.3 m thick canopy layers (...

  15. Development and validation of an observation tool for the assessment of nursing pain management practices in intensive care unit in a standardized clinical simulation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Emilie; Bourgault, Patricia; Lavoie, Stephan; Coleman, Robin-Marie; Méziat-Burdin, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Pain management in the intensive care unit is often inadequate. There is no tool available to assess nursing pain management practices. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a measuring tool to assess nursing pain management in the intensive care unit during standardized clinical simulation. A literature review was performed to identify relevant components demonstrating optimal pain management in adult intensive care units and to integrate them in an observation tool. This tool was submitted to an expert panel and pretested. It was then used to assess pain management practice during 26 discrete standardized clinical simulation sessions with intensive care nurses. The Nursing Observation Tool for Pain Management (NOTPaM) contains 28 statements grouped into 8 categories, which are grouped into 4 dimensions: subjective assessment, objective assessment, interventions, and reassessment. The tool's internal consistency was calculated at a Cronbach's alpha of 0.436 for the whole tool; the alpha varies from 0.328 to 0.518 for each dimension. To evaluate the inter-rater reliability, intra-class correlation coefficient was used, which was calculated at 0.751 (p nurses' pain management in a standardized clinical simulation. The NOTPaM is the first tool created for this purpose. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental characterization, modeling and simulation of a wood pellet micro-combined heat and power unit used as a heat source for a residential building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiers, Stephane; Aoun, Bernard; Peuportier, Bruno [MINES ParisTech, CEP - Centre Energetique et Procedes, 60 Boulevard St Michel, 75272 Paris Cedex 06 (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cogeneration provides heat and power in a more efficient way than separate production. Micro-cogeneration (micro-CHP) is an emerging solution for the improvement of energy and environmental assessments of residential buildings. A wood pellet Stirling engine micro-CHP unit has been studied in order to characterize its annual performance when integrated to a building. First, through a test bench experiment, both transient and steady state behaviors of the micro-CHP unit have been characterized and modeled. Then a more complete model representing a hot water and heating system including the micro-CHP unit and a stratified storage tank has been carried out. This model has been coupled to a building model. A sensitivity analysis by simulation shows that the dimensioning of different elements of the system strongly influences its global energy performance. (author)

  17. Simulation-based evaluation of the performance of the F test in a linear multilevel model setting with sparseness at the level of the primary unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyndonckx, Robin; Aerts, Marc; Hens, Niel

    2016-09-01

    In a linear multilevel model, significance of all fixed effects can be determined using F tests under maximum likelihood (ML) or restricted maximum likelihood (REML). In this paper, we demonstrate that in the presence of primary unit sparseness, the performance of the F test under both REML and ML is rather poor. Using simulations based on the structure of a data example on ceftriaxone consumption in hospitalized children, we studied variability, type I error rate and power in scenarios with a varying number of secondary units within the primary units. In general, the variability in the estimates for the effect of the primary unit decreased as the number of secondary units increased. In the presence of singletons (i.e., only one secondary unit within a primary unit), REML consistently outperformed ML, although even under REML the performance of the F test was found inadequate. When modeling the primary unit as a random effect, the power was lower while the type I error rate was unstable. The options of dropping, regrouping, or splitting the singletons could solve either the problem of a high type I error rate or a low power, while worsening the other. The permutation test appeared to be a valid alternative as it outperformed the F test, especially under REML. We conclude that in the presence of singletons, one should be careful in using the F test to determine the significance of the fixed effects, and propose the permutation test (under REML) as an alternative. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Assessment of Two Desk-Top Computer Simulations Used to Train Tactical Decision Making (TDM) of Small Unit Infantry Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    Fifty-two leaders in the Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Course (BNCOC) at Fort Benning, Georgia, participated in an assessment of two desk-top computer simulations used to train tactical decision making...

  19. Impacts of different characterizations of large-scale background on simulated regional-scale ozone over the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogrefe, Christian; Liu, Peng; Pouliot, George; Mathur, Rohit; Roselle, Shawn; Flemming, Johannes; Lin, Meiyun; Park, Rokjin J.

    2018-03-01

    This study analyzes simulated regional-scale ozone burdens both near the surface and aloft, estimates process contributions to these burdens, and calculates the sensitivity of the simulated regional-scale ozone burden to several key model inputs with a particular emphasis on boundary conditions derived from hemispheric or global-scale models. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations supporting this analysis were performed over the continental US for the year 2010 within the context of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) and Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF-HTAP) activities. CMAQ process analysis (PA) results highlight the dominant role of horizontal and vertical advection on the ozone burden in the mid-to-upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Vertical mixing, including mixing by convective clouds, couples fluctuations in free-tropospheric ozone to ozone in lower layers. Hypothetical bounding scenarios were performed to quantify the effects of emissions, boundary conditions, and ozone dry deposition on the simulated ozone burden. Analysis of these simulations confirms that the characterization of ozone outside the regional-scale modeling domain can have a profound impact on simulated regional-scale ozone. This was further investigated by using data from four hemispheric or global modeling systems (Chemistry - Integrated Forecasting Model (C-IFS), CMAQ extended for hemispheric applications (H-CMAQ), the Goddard Earth Observing System model coupled to chemistry (GEOS-Chem), and AM3) to derive alternate boundary conditions for the regional-scale CMAQ simulations. The regional-scale CMAQ simulations using these four different boundary conditions showed that the largest ozone abundance in the upper layers was simulated when using boundary conditions from GEOS-Chem, followed by the simulations using C-IFS, AM3, and H-CMAQ boundary conditions, consistent with the analysis of the ozone fields

  20. An Asynchronous Multi-Sensor Micro Control Unit for Wireless Body Sensor Networks (WBSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hsing Luo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an asynchronous multi-sensor micro control unit (MCU core is proposed for wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs. It consists of asynchronous interfaces, a power management unit, a multi-sensor controller, a data encoder (DE, and an error correct coder (ECC. To improve the system performance and expansion abilities, the asynchronous interface is created for handshaking different clock domains between ADC and RF with MCU. To increase the use time of the WBSN system, a power management technique is developed for reducing power consumption. In addition, the multi-sensor controller is designed for detecting various biomedical signals. To prevent loss error from wireless transmission, use of an error correct coding technique is important in biomedical applications. The data encoder is added for lossless compression of various biomedical signals with a compression ratio of almost three. This design is successfully tested on a FPGA board. The VLSI architecture of this work contains 2.68-K gate counts and consumes power 496-μW at 133-MHz processing rate by using TSMC 0.13-μm CMOS process. Compared with the previous techniques, this work offers higher performance, more functions, and lower hardware cost than other micro controller designs.

  1. Using discrete event simulation to compare the performance of family health unit and primary health care centre organizational models in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, André S; Oliveira, Mónica D; Sá, Armando B

    2011-10-15

    Recent reforms in Portugal aimed at strengthening the role of the primary care system, in order to improve the quality of the health care system. Since 2006 new policies aiming to change the organization, incentive structures and funding of the primary health care sector were designed, promoting the evolution of traditional primary health care centres (PHCCs) into a new type of organizational unit--family health units (FHUs). This study aimed to compare performances of PHCC and FHU organizational models and to assess the potential gains from converting PHCCs into FHUs. Stochastic discrete event simulation models for the two types of organizational models were designed and implemented using Simul8 software. These models were applied to data from nineteen primary care units in three municipalities of the Greater Lisbon area. The conversion of PHCCs into FHUs seems to have the potential to generate substantial improvements in productivity and accessibility, while not having a significant impact on costs. This conversion might entail a 45% reduction in the average number of days required to obtain a medical appointment and a 7% and 9% increase in the average number of medical and nursing consultations, respectively. Reorganization of PHCC into FHUs might increase accessibility of patients to services and efficiency in the provision of primary care services.

  2. Computer simulation of deasphalting vacuum residues in a pilot unit; Simulacao computacional de desasfaltacao de residuo de vacuo realizada em unidade piloto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha, Viktor Oswaldo Cardenas; Quirino, Filipe Augusto Barral; Koroisgi, Erika Tomie; Rivarola, Florencia Wisnivesky Rocca; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Maciel Filho, Rubens [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica; Medina, Lilian Carmen; Barros, Ricardo Soares de [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    In the context of the national petroleum industry, it is interesting to keep the production of the paraffinic lubricant oil type I, which implies in the identification of new loads to ensure the feeding of the existing units. Therefore, it is important to carry out carefully the characterization of the oils, defining its potential for fuel, asphalt and lubricant. Aiming to introduce in the characterization and evaluation of petroleum for lubricant, carried out by PETROBRAS/CENPES, information of basic oils, more similar to industrial oils, was built up in the Laboratory of Process Separation Development - LDPS of UNICAMP/FEQ, a deasphalting pilot unit. In this work, the deasphalting process of a vacuum residue of Brazilian petroleum is simulated, using Aspen Plus{sup R} simulator, in order to remove asphaltenes, resins and other heavy components of vacuum residue. The simulations were carried out considering the configuration of the pilot plant, evaluating the extraction in near-critical operational condition applied to a petroleum, using propane as the solvent. The extraction efficiency and the solvent power were evaluated considering variations in temperature, pressure and in the solvent/feed ratio in order to obtain yields with more efficiency in the production of deasphalted oil (DAO), what means more asphaltene removal. (author)

  3. Simulator of a geotermoelectric unit for the training of operators; Simulador de una unidad geotermoelectrica para entrenamiento de operadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavira Mondragon, Jose Antonio; Lopez Aguilera, Diana Monica; Roldan Villasana, Edgardo Javier; Rodriguez Lozano, Saul [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The use of simulators replica in real time for operators training has demonstrated to be one of the best forms to enable the personnel of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). This article shows the basic characteristics of a simulator replica of the Cerro Prieto geotermoelectric power station of Baja California. It is expected that with this simulator 400 people between operators, shift superintendents and operation and maintenance auxiliary personnel become qualified. [Spanish] El uso de simuladores replica en tiempo real para entrenamiento de operadores de centrales generadoras ha demostrado ser una de las mejores formas de capacitar al personal de la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Este articulo muestra las caracteristicas principales de un simulador replica de la central geotermoelectrica de Cerro Prieto Baja California. Se espera que con este simulador se capaciten 400 personas entre operadores, superintendentes de turno y auxiliares de operacion y mantenimiento.

  4. Using Simulation for Clinical Practice Hours in Nurse Practitioner Education in The United States: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya; Nye, Carla; Coram, Cathy

    2016-02-01

    The National Organization for Nurse Practitioner Faculty (NONPF) does not allow simulation to be used in lieu of traditional clinical hours. The NONPF cites a lack of empirical evidence related to learning outcomes with simulation as rationale for its stance. The purpose of this systematic review was to search, extract, appraise, and synthesize research related to the use of simulation in Nurse Practitioner (NP) education in order to answer the two following questions: 1) What research related to simulation in NP education has emerged in the literature between 2010 and April 2015?, and 2) Of the research studies that have emerged, what level of Kirkpatrick's Training Evaluation Model (1994) is evaluated? This review was reported in line with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). A literature search was completed in PubMed and CINAHL using a combination of medical subject headings, or Mesh terms, as well as keywords to retrieve non-indexed citations. The inclusion criteria for this review were broad in order to disseminate information on future research needed. The review considered studies related to NP education that included any form of simulation intervention, e.g. role-playing and standardized patients. The review considered studies that described original research, but no other design restrictions were imposed. The review was limited to studies published in the English language. The database search strategy yielded 198 citations. These results were narrowed down to 15 studies based on identified inclusion criteria. There is a lack of empirical evidence in the literature to support using simulation in lieu of direct patient care clinical hours in NP education. The evidence in this systematic review affirms NONPF's statement. Five years after the inception of NONPF's position statement, research to support learning outcomes with simulation in nurse practitioner education remains lacking. There is a need to produce rigorous

  5. Results Of The Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing Using An Improved Solvent Formulation And Salt Waste Processing Facility Simulated Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D Cs in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is ∼15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under

  6. Using simulated historical time series to prioritize fuel treatments on landscapes across the United States: The LANDFIRE prototype project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Matthew Rollins; Zhi-Liang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Canopy and surface fuels in many fire-prone forests of the United States have increased over the last 70 years as a result of modern fire exclusion policies, grazing, and other land management activities. The Healthy Forest Restoration Act and National Fire Plan establish a national commitment to reduce fire hazard and restore fire-adapted ecosystems across the USA....

  7. The simulation of the process of sodium freezing in the tubes for the optimization of fast breeder reactor units maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashlykov, O.L.; Shcheklein, S.E.; Annikov, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    The peculiarities of the repair works of the fast breeder reactor sodium systems are considered. The requirements for the sodium melting exclusion inside the equipment and piping during their opening and repair are given. The results of the sodium cooling process simulation with SolidWorks software are also described [ru

  8. Hydrological processes in regional climate model simulations of the central United States flood of June-July 1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Christopher J.; Arritt, Raymond W.; Takle, Eugene S.

    2003-01-01

    Thirteen regional climate model (RCM) simulations of June-July 1993 were compared with each other and observations. Water vapor conservation and precipitation characteristics in each RCM were examined for a 10° X 10° subregion of the upper Mississippi River basin, containing the region of maximum...

  9. Estimates of mercury flux into the United States from non-local and global sources : results from a 3-D CTM simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Streets, D.; Kim, M.; Crist, K.; Ohio Univ.

    2008-11-01

    The sensitivity of Hg concentration and deposition in the United States to emissions in China was investigated by using a global chemical transport model: Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART). Two forms of gaseous Hg were included in the model: elemental Hg (HG(0)) and oxidized or reactive Hg (HGO). We simulated three different emission scenarios to evaluate the model's sensitivity. One scenario included no emissions from China, while the others were based on different estimates of Hg emissions in China. The results indicated, in general, that when Hg emissions were included, HG(0) concentrations increased both locally and globally. Increases in Hg concentrations in the United States were greatest during spring and summer, by as much as 7%. Ratios of calculated concentrations of Hg and CO near the source region in eastern Asia agreed well with ratios based on measurements. Increases similar to those observed for HG(0) were also calculated for deposition of HGO. Calculated increases in wet and dry deposition in the United States were 5-7% and 5-9%, respectively. The results indicate that long-range transcontinental transport of Hg has a non-negligible impact on Hg deposition levels in the United States.

  10. Analyzing different HPCI operation modes simulated with ATHLET-CD regarding possible core degradation phenomena in Fukushima-Daiichi unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratfisch, Christoph; Koch, Marco K. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Reactor Simulation and Safety Group

    2017-02-15

    For extented application and analyses of the severe accident code ATHLET-CD, the course of the invessel accident in Unit 3 of Fukushima-Daiichi is simulated in the frame of the research project SUBA as a part of the BMBF sponsored collaborative project WASA-BOSS (Weiterentwicklung und Anwendung von Severe Accident Codes - Bewertung und Optimierung von Stoerfallmassnahmen). Investigations, carried out by TEPCO, had shown that the High-Pressure Coolant Injection system (HPCI) might have stopped earlier than expected. A parameter variation was performed to analyze the impact of the tripped HPCI injection regarding the thermohydraulic behaviour as well as the core degradation phenomena.

  11. [The balance of harmful trace contaminants between the air humidity condensate and air in a simulator of the Mir orbit station moisture condensation unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotopol'skiĭ, V M; Smolenskaia, T S

    2000-01-01

    Subject of the investigation was the balance of harmful trace contaminants (HTC) between the air moisture condensate and air in a simulator of the MIR moisture condensation unit. Experiments involved various classes of water-solvent compounds including alcohols (C1-C4), ketons (C1-C2), aldehydes (C1-C2), fatty acids (C2-C4), esters (acetates C4-C6), and ammonium. For most of the compounds, removal efficiency correlates with air humidity and virtually does not depend on the HTC concentration within the range of 0.25 to 59.1 mg/m3.

  12. Simulation of the behaviour of a set of Cu/sub 2/S-CdS unit photocells. [Spice II program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemin, J L; Bordure, G

    1982-03-01

    With the help of a general simulation program (the Spice II program from the University of California, Berkeley), adapted to photocell modeling, authors studied the behavior of a large solar photocell consisting of smaller Cu/sub 2/S-CdS unit solar cells in parallel, in particular, a theoretical set of photocells identical with the best cell made in the laboratory, a set of 30 real photocells characterized individually and the effect of introducing low efficiency cells. The role of each parameter characterizing the photocells is indicated, in order to improve the behavior of photovoltaic panels of larger dimensions. 2 refs.

  13. SIMRAD.NBC. Simulation and information system to manage rescue units at disaster (with focus on NBC threats); SIMRAD.NBC. Simulations- und Informationssystem zum administrieren von Hilfseinheiten bei Katastrophen (im Fokus auf ABC-Bedrohungen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroust, G. [Linz Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Telekooperation; Rainer, K.; Schoenhacker, S. [Forschungsinstitut des Roten Kreuzes, Wien (Austria); Roth, M. [creative BITS, Traun (Austria); Ziehesberger, P. [Ziehesberger Elektronik, Neuhofen/Krems (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    The goal of the project SimRad.NBC is to create and test the basis for a training and support system for the management of first responder units with a special focus on CBRN threats. In this project, the foundation for interaction between humans and technical equipment will be analysed, simulated, optimised and trained by technology that really meets the needs. Thus, the preparedness of first responders for crisis will be elevated. Important factors which have an impact on people involved are collected, structured and analysed for their consequences in a special survey. In this survey, the focus is not only on first responders 'in the field', but also on unit leaders, casualties and other persons involved. Furthermore, the specific importance of the different impacts (which can be positive or negative), their interdependency, but also needs and requests regarding simulation systems are investigated. To achieve that goal, CBRN experts from different organisations were consulted to bring in their specific knowledge. The project SimRad.NBC started at the end of 2007. The contribution presents the preliminary results of the project and gives a short outlook to the follow-up project SimRad.COMP. Both projects are funded by the Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology (BMVIT) within the KIRAS security research programme. (orig.)

  14. Changes in the convective population and thermodynamic environments in convection-permitting regional climate simulations over the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Prein, A. F.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Ikeda, K.; Liu, C.

    2017-11-01

    Novel high-resolution convection-permitting regional climate simulations over the US employing the pseudo-global warming approach are used to investigate changes in the convective population and thermodynamic environments in a future climate. Two continuous 13-year simulations were conducted using (1) ERA-Interim reanalysis and (2) ERA-Interim reanalysis plus a climate perturbation for the RCP8.5 scenario. The simulations adequately reproduce the observed precipitation diurnal cycle, indicating that they capture organized and propagating convection that most climate models cannot adequately represent. This study shows that weak to moderate convection will decrease and strong convection will increase in frequency in a future climate. Analysis of the thermodynamic environments supporting convection shows that both convective available potential energy (CAPE) and convective inhibition (CIN) increase downstream of the Rockies in a future climate. Previous studies suggest that CAPE will increase in a warming climate, however a corresponding increase in CIN acts as a balancing force to shift the convective population by suppressing weak to moderate convection and provides an environment where CAPE can build to extreme levels that may result in more frequent severe convection. An idealized investigation of fundamental changes in the thermodynamic environment was conducted by shifting a standard atmospheric profile by ± 5 °C. When temperature is increased, both CAPE and CIN increase in magnitude, while the opposite is true for decreased temperatures. Thus, even in the absence of synoptic and mesoscale variations, a warmer climate will provide more CAPE and CIN that will shift the convective population, likely impacting water and energy budgets on Earth.

  15. Relative power density distribution calculations of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor with full-scope explicit modeling of monte carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. O.; Kim, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Relative power density distributions of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor calculated by Monte Carlo modeling with the MCNP code. The Kori unit 1 core is modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-eighth of the reactor in-vessel component with reflective boundaries at 0 and 45 degrees. The axial core model is based on half core symmetry and is divided into four axial segments. Fission reaction density in each rod is calculated by following 100 cycles with 5,000 test neutrons in each cycle after starting with a localized neutron source and ten noncontributing settle cycles. Relative assembly power distributions are calculated from fission reaction densities of rods in assembly. After 100 cycle calculations, the system coverages to a κ value of 1.00039 ≥ 0.00084. Relative assembly power distribution is nearly the same with that of the Kori unit 1 FSAR. Applicability of the full-scope Monte Carlo simulation in the power distribution calculation is examined by the relative root mean square error of 2.159%. (author)

  16. Dynamic simulation of a pilot scale vacuum gas oil hydrocracking unit by the space-time CE/SE method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadighi, S.; Ahmad, A. [Institute of Hydrogen Economy, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Shirvani, M. [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    This work introduces a modified space-time conservation element/solution element (CE/SE) method for the simulation of the dynamic behavior of a pilot-scale hydrocracking reactor. With this approach, a four-lump dynamic model including vacuum gas oil (VGO), middle distillate, naphtha and gas is solved. The proposed method is capable of handling the stiffness of the partial differential equations resulting from the hydrocracking reactions. To have a better judgment, the model is also solved by the finite difference method (FDM), and the results from both approaches are compared. Initially, the absolute average deviation of the cold dynamic simulation using the CE/SE approach is 8.98 %, which is better than that obtained using the FDM. Then, the stability analysis proves that for achieving an appropriate response from the dynamic model, the Courant number, which is a function of the time step size, mesh size and volume flow rate through the catalytic bed, should be less than 1. Finally, it is found that, following a careful selection of these parameters, the CE/SE solutions to the hydrocracking model can produce higher accuracy than the FDM results. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuohy, Aidan [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Smith, Jeff [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rylander, Matt [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Singhvi, Vikas [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Enbar, Nadav [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Coley, Steven [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Roark, Jeff [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ela, Erik [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lannoye, Eamonn [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pilbrick, Charles Russ [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rudkevich, Alex [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hansen, Cliff [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-07-11

    Increasing levels of distributed and utility scale Solar Photovoltaics (PV) will have an impact on many utility functions, including distribution system operations, bulk system performance, business models and scheduling of generation. In this project, EPRI worked with Southern Company Services and its affiliates and the Tennessee Valley Authority to assist these utilities in their strategic planning efforts for integrating PV, based on modeling, simulation and analysis using a set of innovative tools. Advanced production simulation models were used to investigate operating reserve requirements. To leverage existing work and datasets, this last task was carried out on the California system. Overall, the project resulted in providing useful information to both of the utilities involved and through the final reports and interactions during the project. The results from this project can be used to inform the industry about new and improved methodologies for understanding solar PV penetration, and will influence ongoing and future research. This report summarizes each of the topics investigated over the 2.5-year project period.

  18. Basin-scale simulation of current and potential climate changed hydrologic conditions in the Lake Michigan Basin, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Daniel E.; Walker, John F.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) is the largest public investment in the Great Lakes in two decades. A task force of 11 Federal agencies developed an action plan to implement the initiative. The U.S. Department of the Interior was one of the 11 agencies that entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of the GLRI to complete scientific projects throughout the Great Lakes basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, a bureau within the Department of the Interior, is involved in the GLRI to provide scientific support to management decisions as well as measure progress of the Great Lakes basin restoration efforts. This report presents basin-scale simulated current and forecast climatic and hydrologic conditions in the Lake Michigan Basin. The forecasts were obtained by constructing and calibrating a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) model of the Lake Michigan Basin; the PRMS model was calibrated using the parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis (PEST) software suite. The calibrated model was used to evaluate potential responses to climate change by using four simulated carbon emission scenarios from eight general circulation models released by the World Climate Research Programme’s Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3. Statistically downscaled datasets of these scenarios were used to project hydrologic response for the Lake Michigan Basin. In general, most of the observation sites in the Lake Michigan Basin indicated slight increases in annual streamflow in response to future climate change scenarios. Monthly streamflows indicated a general shift from the current (2014) winter-storage/snowmelt-pulse system to a system with a more equally distributed hydrograph throughout the year. Simulated soil moisture within the basin illustrates that conditions within the basin are also expected to change on a monthly timescale. One effect of increasing air temperature as a result of the changing

  19. Performance Characterization and Simulation of Amine-Based Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Watts,Carly; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Boerman, Craig; Colunga, Aaron; Vogel, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) concentrations in the vapor phase of a space suit is critical to ensuring an astronauts safety, comfortability, and capability to perform extra-vehicular activity (EVA) tasks. Historically, this has been accomplished using lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and metal oxides (MetOx). Lithium hydroxide is a consumable material and requires priming with water before it becomes effective at removing carbon dioxide. MetOx is regenerable through a power-intensive thermal cycle but is significantly heavier on a volume basis than LiOH. As an alternative, amine-based vacuum swing beds are under aggressive development for EVA applications which control atmospheric concentrations of both CO2 and H2O through a fully-regenerative process. The current concept, referred to as the rapid cycle amine (RCA), has resulted in numerous laboratory prototypes. Performance of these prototypes have been assessed and documented from experimental and theoretical perspectives. To support developmental efforts, a first principles model has also been established for the vacuum swing adsorption technology. The efforts documented herein summarize performance characterization and simulation results for several variable metabolic profiles subjected to the RCA. Furthermore, a variety of control methods are explored including timed swing cycles, instantaneous CO2 feedback control, and time-averaged CO2 feedback control. A variety of off-nominal tests are also explored including high/low suit temperatures, increasingly high humidity cases, and dynamic pressure cases simulating the suit pre-breathe protocol. Consequently, this work builds on efforts previous efforts to fully bound the performance of the rapid cycle amine under a variety of nominal and off-nominal conditions.

  20. Interprofessional Simulations Promote Knowledge Retention and Enhance Perceptions of Teamwork Skills in a Surgical-Trauma-Burn Intensive Care Unit Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Katie L; Quatrara, Beth

    The current state of health care encompasses highly acute, complex patients, managed with ever-changing technology. The ability to function proficiently in critical care relies on knowledge, technical skills, and interprofessional teamwork. Integration of these factors can improve patient outcomes. Simulation provides "hands-on" practice and allows for the integration of teamwork into knowledge/skill training. However, simulation can require a significant investment of time, effort, and financial resources. The Institute of Medicine recommendations from 2015 include "strengthening the evidence base for interprofessional education (IPE)" and "linking IPE with changes in collaborative behavior." In one surgical-trauma-burn intensive care unit (STBICU), no IPE existed. The highly acute and diverse nature of the patients served by the unit highlights the importance of appropriate training. This is heightened during critical event situations where patients deteriorate rapidly and the team intervenes swiftly. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate knowledge retention and analyze changes in perceptions of teamwork among nurses and resident physicians in a STBICU setting after completion of an interprofessional critical event simulation and (2) provide insight for future interprofessional simulations (IPSs), including the ideal frequency of such training, associated cost, and potential effect on nursing turnover. A comparison-cohort pilot study was developed to evaluate knowledge retention and analyze changes in perceptions of teamwork. A 1-hour critical event IPS was held for nurses and resident physicians in a STBICU setting. A traumatic brain injury patient with elevated intracranial pressure, rapid deterioration, and cardiac arrest was utilized for the simulation scenario. The simulation required the team to use interventions to reduce elevated intracranial pressure and then perform cardiac resuscitation according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidelines. A

  1. Simulation-based training delivered directly to the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit engenders preparedness, comfort, and decreased anxiety among multidisciplinary resuscitation teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Beke, Dorothy; Imprescia, Annette; Kappus, Liana J; Garden, Alexander; Hayes, Gavin; Laussen, Peter C; Bacha, Emile; Weinstock, Peter H

    2010-09-01

    Resuscitation of pediatric cardiac patients involves unique and complex physiology, requiring multidisciplinary collaboration and teamwork. To optimize team performance, we created a multidisciplinary Crisis Resource Management training course that addressed both teamwork and technical skill needs for the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit. We sought to determine whether participation improved caregiver comfort and confidence levels regarding future resuscitation events. We developed a simulation-based, in situ Crisis Resource Management curriculum using pediatric cardiac intensive care unit scenarios and unit-specific resuscitation equipment, including an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit. Participants replicated the composition of a clinical team. Extensive video-based debriefing followed each scenario, focusing on teamwork principles and technical resuscitation skills. Pre- and postparticipation questionnaires were used to determine the effects on participants' comfort and confidence regarding participation in future resuscitations. A total of 182 providers (127 nurses, 50 physicians, 2 respiratory therapists, 3 nurse practitioners) participated in the course. All participants scored the usefulness of the program and scenarios as 4 of 5 or higher (5 = most useful). There was significant improvement in participants' perceived ability to function as a code team member and confidence in a code (P < .001). Participants reported they were significantly more likely to raise concerns about inappropriate management to the code leader (P < .001). We developed a Crisis Resource Management training program in a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit to teach technical resuscitation skills and improve team function. Participants found the experience useful and reported improved ability to function in a code. Further work is needed to determine whether participation in the Crisis Resource Management program objectively improves team function during real

  2. a Movable Charging Unit for Green Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBanhawy, E. Y.; Nassar, K.

    2013-05-01

    Battery swapping of electric vehicles (EVs) matter appears to be the swiftest and most convenient to users. The existence of swapping stations increases the feasibility of distributed energy storage via the electric grid. However, it is a cost-prohibitive way of charging. Early adaptors' preferences of /perceptions about EV system in general, has its inflectional effects on potential users hence the market penetration level. Yet, the charging matter of electric batteries worries the users and puts more pressure on them with the more rigorous planning-ahead they have to make prior to any trip. This paper presents a distinctive way of charging. It aims at making the overall charging process at ease. From a closer look into the literature, most of EVs' populations depend on domestic charge. Domestic charging gives them more confidence and increases the usability factor of the EV system. Nevertheless, they still need to count on the publically available charging points to reach their destination(s). And when it comes to multifamily residences, it becomes a thorny problem as these apartments do not have a room for charging outlets. Having said the irritating charging time needed to fatten the batteries over the day and the minimal average mileage drove daily, hypothetically, home delivery charging (Movable Charging Unit-MCU) would be a stupendous solution. The paper discusses the integration of shortest path algorithm problem with the information about EV users within a metropolitan area, developing an optimal route for a charging unit. This MCU delivers charging till homes whether by swapping batteries or by fast charging facility. Information about users is to be provided by the service provider of the neighbourhood, which includes charging patterns (timing, power capacity). This problem lies under the shortest path algorithms problem. It provides optimal route of charging that in return shall add more reliability and usability values and alleviate the charging

  3. Structural, morphological, impedance and magnetic studies of nanostructured LiNi0.45M0.1Mn0.45O2 (MCu and Al cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Murali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Layered structure LiNi0.45M0.1Mn0.45O2 (MCu and Al cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries are synthesized by sol–gel auto combustion method. The structural, morphological, electrical and magnetic properties are examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field effect scanning electron microscope FESEM, FT-IR, EIS and ESR. XRD data revealed the rhombohedral and α-NaFeO2 structure with a space group R-3m. The electrical conductivity, dielectric constant, and dielectric loss are measured in the room temperature at a frequency ranging from 20 Hz to 1 MHz. The electrical conductivity of the compound is measured by AC impedance. An effective improvement in the electrical conductivity of order 5.42 × 10−6 S/cm is observed for the copper doped LNMO compounds. ESR spectra is recorded at room temperature on a Bruker EMX model X-band spectrometer operating at a frequency of 9.50 GHz. The critical dopants of Cu, with minimum g-factor and maximum line-width (W are observed. Keywords: Sol–gel, FESEM, AC impedance, ESR

  4. Examination of Organic Carryover from 2-cm Contactors to Support the Modular CSSX Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, Charles A.; Norato, Michael A.; Walker; D. Douglas; Pierce, Robert A.; Eubanks, Ronnye A.; Clark, James D.; Smith, Wilson M. Jr.; Crump, Stephen L.; Nelson, D. Zane; Fink, Samuel D.; Peters, Thomas B.; May, Cecil G.; Herman, David T.; Bolton, Henry L.

    2005-01-01

    A bank of four 2-cm centrifugal contactors was operated in countercurrent fashion to help address questions about organic carryover for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The contactors, having weirs sized for strip operation, were used to examine carryover for both strip effluent (SE) and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). Since only one bank of contactors was available in the short time frame of this work, the organic phase and only one aqueous phase were present in the flow loops at a time. Personnel maintained flowsheet-typical organic phase to aqueous phase (O:A) flow ratios when varying flow rates. Solvent from two different batches were tested with strip solution. In addition, potential mitigations of pH adjustment and coalescing media were examined. The experiment found that organic carryover after decanting averaged 220 ppm by mass with a range of 74 to 417 ppm of Isopar(reg s ign) L for strip effluent (SE)/organic solvent contacts. These values are based on measured modifier. Values were bounded by a value of 95 ppm based upon Isopar(reg s ign) L values as reported. The higher modifier-based numbers are considered more reliable at this time. Carryover of Isopar(reg s ign) L in DSS simulant averaged 77 ppm by mass with a range of 70 to 88 ppm of Isopar(reg s ign) L based on modifier content. The carryover was bounded by a value of 19 ppm based upon Isopar(reg s ign) L values as reported. More work is needed to resolve the discrepancy between modifier and Isopar(reg s ign) L values. The work did not detect organic droplets greater than 18 microns in SE. Strip output contained droplets down to 0.5 micron in size. Droplets in DSS were almost monodisperse by comparison, having a size range 4.7 +/- 1.6 micron in one test and 5.2 +/- 0.8 micron in the second demonstration. Optical microscopy provided qualitative results confirming the integrity of droplet size measurements in this work. Acidic or basic adjustments of aqueous strip

  5. Examination of Organic Carryover from 2-cm Contactors to Support the Modular CSSX Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A.; Norato, Michael A.; Walker; D. Douglas; Pierce, Robert A.; Eubanks, Ronnye A.; Clark, James D.; Smith, Wilson M. Jr.; Crump, Stephen L.; Nelson, D. Zane; Fink, Samuel D.; Peters, Thomas B.; May, Cecil G.; Herman, David T.; Bolton, Henry L.

    2005-04-29

    A bank of four 2-cm centrifugal contactors was operated in countercurrent fashion to help address questions about organic carryover for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The contactors, having weirs sized for strip operation, were used to examine carryover for both strip effluent (SE) and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). Since only one bank of contactors was available in the short time frame of this work, the organic phase and only one aqueous phase were present in the flow loops at a time. Personnel maintained flowsheet-typical organic phase to aqueous phase (O:A) flow ratios when varying flow rates. Solvent from two different batches were tested with strip solution. In addition, potential mitigations of pH adjustment and coalescing media were examined. The experiment found that organic carryover after decanting averaged 220 ppm by mass with a range of 74 to 417 ppm of Isopar{reg_sign} L for strip effluent (SE)/organic solvent contacts. These values are based on measured modifier. Values were bounded by a value of 95 ppm based upon Isopar{reg_sign} L values as reported. The higher modifier-based numbers are considered more reliable at this time. Carryover of Isopar{reg_sign} L in DSS simulant averaged 77 ppm by mass with a range of 70 to 88 ppm of Isopar{reg_sign} L based on modifier content. The carryover was bounded by a value of 19 ppm based upon Isopar{reg_sign} L values as reported. More work is needed to resolve the discrepancy between modifier and Isopar{reg_sign} L values. The work did not detect organic droplets greater than 18 microns in SE. Strip output contained droplets down to 0.5 micron in size. Droplets in DSS were almost monodisperse by comparison, having a size range 4.7 +/- 1.6 micron in one test and 5.2 +/- 0.8 micron in the second demonstration. Optical microscopy provided qualitative results confirming the integrity of droplet size measurements in this work. Acidic or basic adjustments of aqueous strip solution

  6. Techno-economic assessment of FT unit for synthetic diesel production in existing stand-alone biomass gasification plant using process simulation tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunpinyo, Piyapong; Narataruksa, Phavanee; Tungkamani, Sabaithip

    2014-01-01

    For alternative thermo-chemical conversion process route via gasification, biomass can be gasified to produce syngas (mainly CO and H2). On more applications of utilization, syngas can be used to synthesize fuels through the catalytic process option for producing synthetic liquid fuels...... such as Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel. The embedding of the FT plant into the stand-alone based on power mode plants for production of a synthetic fuel is a promising practice, which requires an extensive adaptation of conventional techniques to the special chemical needs found in a gasified biomass. Because...... there are currently no plans to engage the FT process in Thailand, the authors have targeted that this work focus on improving the FT configurations in existing biomass gasification facilities (10 MWth). A process simulation model for calculating extended unit operations in a demonstrative context is designed...

  7. Escherichia coli transfer from simulated wildlife feces to lettuce during foliar irrigation: A field study in the Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel L; Kovac, Jasna; Kent, David J; Roof, Sherry; Tokman, Jeffrey I; Mudrak, Erika; Kowalcyk, Barbara; Oryang, David; Aceituno, Anna; Wiedmann, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Wildlife intrusion has been associated with pathogen contamination of produce. However, few studies have examined pathogen transfer from wildlife feces to pre-harvest produce. This study was performed to calculate transfer coefficients for Escherichia coli from simulated wildlife feces to field-grown lettuce during irrigation. Rabbit feces inoculated with a 3-strain cocktail of non-pathogenic E. coli were placed in a lettuce field 2.5-72 h before irrigation. Following irrigation, the E. coli concentration on the lettuce was determined. After exclusion of an outlier with high E. coli levels (Most Probable Number = 5.94*10 8 ), the average percent of E. coli in the feces that transferred to intact lettuce heads was 0.0267% (Standard Error [SE] = 0.0172). Log-linear regression showed that significantly more E. coli transferred to outer leaves compared to inner leaves (Effect = 1.3; 95% Confidence Interval = 0.4, 2.1). Additionally, the percent of E. coli that transferred from the feces to the lettuce decreased significantly with time after fecal placement, and as the distance between the lettuce and the feces, and the lettuce and the sprinklers increased. These findings provide key data that may be used in future quantitative risk assessments to identify potential intervention strategies for reducing food safety risks associated with fresh produce. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Uncertainties in United States agricultural N2O emissions: comparing forward model simulations to atmospheric N2O data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevison, C. D.; Saikawa, E.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric N2O concentrations have increased from 275 ppb in the preindustrial to about 325 ppb in recent years, a ~20% increase with important implications for both anthropogenic greenhouse forcing and stratospheric ozone recovery. This increase has been driven largely by synthetic fertilizer production and other perturbations to the global nitrogen cycle associated with human agriculture. Several recent regional atmospheric inversion studies have quantified North American agricultural N2O emissions using top-down constraints based on atmospheric N2O data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network, including surface, aircraft and tall tower platforms. These studies have concluded that global N2O inventories such as EDGAR may be underestimating the true U.S. anthropogenic N2O source by a factor of 3 or more. However, simple back-of-the-envelope calculations show that emissions of this magnitude are difficult to reconcile with the basic constraints of the global N2O budget. Here, we explore some possible reasons why regional atmospheric inversions might overestimate the U.S. agricultural N2O source. First, the seasonality of N2O agricultural sources is not well known, but can have an important influence on inversion results, particularly when the inversions are based on data that are concentrated in the spring/summer growing season. Second, boundary conditions can strongly influence regional inversions but the boundary conditions used may not adequately account for remote influences on surface data such as the seasonal stratospheric influx of N2O-depleted air. We will present a set of forward model simulations, using the Community Land Model (CLM) and two atmospheric chemistry tracer transport models, MOZART and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), that examine the influence of terrestrial emissions and atmospheric chemistry and dynamics on atmospheric variability in N2O at U.S. and

  9. Assessment of three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper limb during simulated swimming using wearable inertial-magnetic measurement units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Giovanardi, Andrea; Magalhães, Fabrício Anício; Di Michele, Rocco; Cortesi, Matteo; Gatta, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the joint kinematics during swimming plays a fundamental role both in sports conditioning and in clinical contexts. Contrary to the traditional video analysis, wearable inertial-magnetic measurements units (IMMUs) allow to analyse both the underwater and aerial phases of the swimming stroke over the whole length of the swimming pool. Furthermore, the rapid calibration and short data processing required by IMMUs provide coaches and athletes with an immediate feedback on swimming kinematics during training. This study aimed to develop a protocol to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the upper limbs during swimming using IMMUs. Kinematics were evaluated during simulated dry-land swimming trials performed in the laboratory by eight swimmers. A stereo-photogrammetric system was used as the gold standard. The results showed high coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC) values, with median (first-third quartile) of 0.97 (0.93-0.95) and 0.99 (0.97-0.99) for simulated front-crawl and breaststroke, respectively. Furthermore, the joint angles were estimated with an accuracy increasing from distal to proximal joints, with wrist indices showing median CMC values always higher than 0.90. The present findings represent an important step towards the practical use of technology based on IMMUs for the kinematic analysis of swimming in applied contexts.

  10. Assessment of physiological performance and perception of pushing different wheelchairs on indoor modular units simulating a surface roughness often encountered in under-resourced settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kotaro; Rispin, Karen

    2017-01-01

    In under-resourced settings where motorized wheelchairs are rarely available, manual wheelchair users with limited upper-body strength and functionalities need to rely on assisting pushers for their mobility. Because traveling surfaces in under-resourced settings are often unpaved and rough, wheelchair pushers could experience high physiological loading. In order to evaluate pushers' physiological loading and to improve wheelchair designs, we built indoor modular units that simulate rough surface conditions, and tested a hypothesis that pushing different wheelchairs would result in different physiological performances and pushers' perception of difficulty on the simulated rough surface. Eighteen healthy subjects pushed two different types of pediatric wheelchairs (Moti-Go manufactured by Motivation, and KidChair by Hope Haven) fitted with a 50-kg dummy on the rough and smooth surfaces at self-selected speeds. Oxygen uptake, traveling distance for 6 minutes, and the rating of difficulty were obtained. The results supported our hypothesis, showing that pushing Moti-Go on the rough surface was physiologically less loading than KidChair, but on the smooth surface, the two wheelchairs did not differ significantly. These results indicate wheelchair designs to improve pushers' performance in under-resourced settings should be evaluated on rough surfaces.

  11. Risk assessment of occupational exposure to benzene using numerical simulation in a complex geometry of a reforming unit of petroleum refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayatian, Majid; Ashrafi, Khosro; Azari, Mansour Rezazadeh; Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Mehrabi, Yadollah

    2018-04-01

    There has been an increasing concern about the continuous and the sudden release of volatile organic pollutants from petroleum refineries and occupational and environmental exposures. Benzene is one of the most prevalent volatile compounds, and it has been addressed by many authors for its potential toxicity in occupational and environmental settings. Due to the complexities of sampling and analysis of benzene in routine and accidental situations, a reliable estimation of the benzene concentration in the outdoor setting of refinery using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) could be instrumental for risk assessment of occupational exposure. In the present work, a computational fluid dynamic model was applied for exposure risk assessment with consideration of benzene being released continuously from a reforming unit of a refinery. For simulation of benzene dispersion, GAMBIT, FLUENT, and CFD post software are used as preprocessing, processing, and post-processing, respectively. Computational fluid dynamic validation was carried out by comparing the computed data with the experimental measurements. Eventually, chronic daily intake and lifetime cancer risk for routine operations through the two seasons of a year are estimated through the simulation model. Root mean square errors are 0.19 and 0.17 for wind speed and concentration, respectively. Lifetime risk assessments of workers are 0.4-3.8 and 0.0096-0.25 per 1000 workers in stable and unstable atmospheric conditions, respectively. Exposure risk is unacceptable for the head of shift work, chief engineer, and general workers in 141 days (38.77%) in a year. The results of this study show that computational fluid dynamics is a useful tool for modeling of benzene exposure in a complex geometry and can be used to estimate lifetime risks of occupation groups in a refinery setting.

  12. Environments of Long-Lived Mesoscale Convective Systems Over the Central United States in Convection Permitting Climate Simulations: Long-Lived Mesoscale Convective Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qing [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Houze, Robert A. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Leung, L. Ruby [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Feng, Zhe [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-12-27

    Continental-scale convection-permitting simulations of the warm seasons of 2011 and 2012 reproduce realistic structure and frequency distribution of lifetime and event mean precipitation of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) over the central United States. Analysis is performed to determine the environmental conditions conducive to generating the longest-lived MCSs and their subsequent interactions. The simulations show that MCSs systematically form over the Great Plains ahead of a trough in the westerlies in combination with an enhanced low-level jet from the Gulf of Mexico. These environmental properties at the time of storm initiation are most prominent for the MCSs that persist for the longest times. Systems reaching 9 h or more in lifetime exhibit feedback to the environment conditions through diabatic heating in the MCS stratiform regions. As a result, the parent synoptic-scale wave is strengthened as a divergent perturbation develops over the MCS at high levels, while a cyclonic circulation perturbation develops in the midlevels of the trough, where the vertical gradient of heating in the MCS region is maximized. The quasi-balanced mesoscale vortex helps to maintain the MCS over a long period of time by feeding dry, cool air into the environment at the rear of the MCS region, so that the MCS can draw in air that increases the evaporative cooling that helps maintain the MCS. At lower levels the south-southeasterly jet of warm moist air from the Gulf is enhanced in the presence of the synoptic-scale wave. That moisture supply is essential to the continued redevelopment of the MCS.

  13. Comparative Simulation Study of Glucose Control Methods Designed for Use in the Intensive Care Unit Setting via a Novel Controller Scoring Metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJournett, Jeremy; DeJournett, Leon

    2017-11-01

    Effective glucose control in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting has the potential to decrease morbidity and mortality rates and thereby decrease health care expenditures. To evaluate what constitutes effective glucose control, typically several metrics are reported, including time in range, time in mild and severe hypoglycemia, coefficient of variation, and others. To date, there is no one metric that combines all of these individual metrics to give a number indicative of overall performance. We proposed a composite metric that combines 5 commonly reported metrics, and we used this composite metric to compare 6 glucose controllers. We evaluated the following controllers: Ideal Medical Technologies (IMT) artificial-intelligence-based controller, Yale protocol, Glucommander, Wintergerst et al PID controller, GRIP, and NICE-SUGAR. We evaluated each controller across 80 simulated patients, 4 clinically relevant exogenous dextrose infusions, and one nonclinical infusion as a test of the controller's ability to handle difficult situations. This gave a total of 2400 5-day simulations, and 585 604 individual glucose values for analysis. We used a random walk sensor error model that gave a 10% MARD. For each controller, we calculated severe hypoglycemia (140 mg/dL), and coefficient of variation (CV), as well as our novel controller metric. For the controllers tested, we achieved the following median values for our novel controller scoring metric: IMT: 88.1, YALE: 46.7, GLUC: 47.2, PID: 50, GRIP: 48.2, NICE: 46.4. The novel scoring metric employed in this study shows promise as a means for evaluating new and existing ICU-based glucose controllers, and it could be used in the future to compare results of glucose control studies in critical care. The IMT AI-based glucose controller demonstrated the most consistent performance results based on this new metric.

  14. Impact of a Simulation-Based Communication Workshop on Resident Preparedness for End-of-Life Communication in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Markin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although residents frequently lead end-of-life (EOL discussions in the intensive care unit (ICU, training in EOL care during residency has been required only recently, and few educational interventions target EOL communication in the ICU. This study evaluated a simulation-based intervention designed to improve resident EOL communication skills with families in the ICU. Methods. Thirty-four second-year internal medicine residents at a large urban teaching hospital participated in small group sessions with faculty trained in the “VitalTalk” method. A Likert-type scale questionnaire measured self-assessed preparedness before, immediately following, and approximately 9 months after intervention. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon rank-sum analysis. Results. Self-assessed preparedness significantly improved for all categories surveyed (preintervention mean; postintervention mean; p value, including discussing bad news (3.3; 4.2; p<0.01, conducting a family conference (3.1; 4.1; p<0.01, discussing treatment options (3.2; 3.9; p<0.01, discussing discontinuing ICU treatments (2.9; 3.5; p<0.01, and expressing empathy (3.9; 4.5; p<0.01. Improvement persisted at follow-up for all items except “expressing empathy.” Residents rated the educational quality highly. Conclusion. This study provides evidence that brief simulation-based interventions can produce lasting improvements in residents’ confidence to discuss EOL care with family members of patients in the ICU.

  15. Ground-water hydrology and simulation of ground-water flow at Operable Unit 3 and surrounding region, U.S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The Naval Air Station, Jacksonville (herein referred to as the Station), occupies 3,800 acres adjacent to the St. Johns River in Duval County, Florida. Operable Unit 3 (OU3) occupies 134 acres on the eastern side of the Station and has been used for industrial and commercial purposes since World War II. Ground water contaminated by chlorinated organic compounds has been detected in the surficial aquifer at OU3. The U.S. Navy and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a cooperative hydrologic study to evaluate the potential for ground water discharge to the neighboring St. Johns River. A ground-water flow model, previously developed for the area, was recalibrated for use in this study. At the Station, the surficial aquifer is exposed at land surface and forms the uppermost permeable unit. The aquifer ranges in thickness from 30 to 100 feet and consists of unconsolidated silty sands interbedded with local beds of clay. The low-permeability clays of the Hawthorn Group form the base of the aquifer. The USGS previously conducted a ground-water investigation at the Station that included the development and calibration of a 1-layer regional ground-water flow model. For this investigation, the regional model was recalibrated using additional data collected after the original calibration. The recalibrated model was then used to establish the boundaries for a smaller subregional model roughly centered on OU3. Within the subregional model, the surficial aquifer is composed of distinct upper and intermediate layers. The upper layer extends from land surface to a depth of approximately 15 feet below sea level; the intermediate layer extends from the upper layer down to the top of the Hawthorn Group. In the northern and central parts of OU3, the upper and intermediate layers are separated by a low-permeability clay layer. Horizontal hydraulic conductivities in the upper layer, determined from aquifer tests, range from 0.19 to 3.8 feet per day. The horizontal hydraulic

  16. [Study of prevention and control of delirium in ventilated patients by simulating blockage of circadian rhythm with sedative in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyan; Dong, Chenming; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Hongsong; Song, Ruixia; Yang, Zhaohui; Feng, Fang; Qi, Yan; Yang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    To explore the effect of giving sedatives according to the circadian rhythm in prevention of occurrence of delirium and the prognosis of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit (ICU). A prospective double-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted. The patients admitted to Department of Critical Care Medicine of the Second Hospital of Lanzhou University from July 2014 to February 2015, undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation over 12 hours were enrolled. All the patients were given fentanyl for analgesia, and they were randomly divided into simulated circadian clock group (study group, n = 35) and non-simulated circadian clock group (control group, n = 35). The patients in each group were subdivided into three subgroups according to the kinds of sedative drugs, namely dexmedetomidine group (n = 8), propofol group (n = 14), and dexmedetomidine combined with propofol group (combination group, n = 13). Visual analogue scale (VAS) standard and Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS) were used to control the analgesic and to quantify the depth of sedation by titrating the dose of sedative drugs, the simulated circadian clock was set to control the RASS score at 0-1 during the day, and -1 to -2 at night in study group. The RASS score in the control group was set at -1 to -2 day and night. The urine 6-hydroxy acid melatonin (aMT6s) levels at different time points in the first diurnal rhythm (06:00, 12:00, 18:00, 24:00) were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The incidence of delirium, severe hypotension, severe bradycardia and other adverse reactions, duration of mechanical ventilation and the time of extubation, length of ICU stay, amount of sedative and analgesic drugs used were recorded. The correlation between delirium and other indexes was analyzed by using Spearman correlation analysis. (1) There were no significant differences in gender, age, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHEII

  17. Simulacioni model rešavanja taktičkih situacija i etičkih izazova u toku marševanja jedinice / Simulation model for solving tactical situations and ethical challenges during marching of military units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srećko Kuzmanović

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Simulacioni modeli imaju veliku perspektivu primene u osposobljavanju pojedinaca, jedinica i komandi Vojske Srbije tokom procesa školovanja i obuke. U članku je ponuđen jedan od mogućih oblika primene simulacionog modela u toku marševanja jedinice, u kojem se rešavaju taktičke situacije i etički izazovi, a koji može biti primenljiv u toku školovanja i obuke oficirskog kadra Vojske Srbije. / Simulation models can be widely applied in training individuals, units and commanding units of the Serbian Army during the process of military education and training. The simulation model offered in the paper can be applied during marching of military units in order to solve tactical situations and ethical challenges. It can be also used for military education and training of the officers of the Serbian Army.

  18. Development of a prototype of a Master Central Unit (MCU) for the automation of Distribution Control Centers; Desarrollo de un prototipo de Unidad Central Maestra (UCM) para la automatizacion de Centros de Control de Distribucion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe Blanco, Carlos Eduardo; Mata Almanza, Rafael; Picasso Blanquel, Cuitlahuac [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    For the purpose of contributing to the strategic plan and to the improvement of productivity and competitiveness levels, the Federal Electric Commission (CFE, Spanish acronym) is making a significant investment in human resources and materials to modernize electric energy supply systems, including monitoring, protection and automatic control for operating all the elements of the electrical process, from generating plants to transmission lines, distribution systems and commercial applications. With this modernization, the CFE is also creating the infrastructure for the interoperability and interconnectivity of the above systems, in such a way to enable it to broaden, continue and complement the functional integration of the linked institutional systems of the latest generation. The total integration of the systems will allow the CFE to move toward Intelligent Electric Networks. Therefore, the CFE requested help from the Electric Research Institute (IIE, Spanish acronym) to develop part of the infrastructure to modernize the automation of distribution. This consists of the development of a prototype of the supervision and control system, using interoperable open technology owned by the CFE which enables using the functions of a SCADA system (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) to supervise and control electric distribution networks. [Spanish] Con el proposito de contribuir al plan estrategico y mejoramiento de los niveles de productividad y competitividad, la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) esta invirtiendo fuertemente en recursos humanos y materiales para la modernizacion de los sistemas de suministro de energia electrica, incluyendo el monitoreo, proteccion y control automatico para la operacion de todos los elementos del proceso electrico, desde los centros de generacion hasta las lineas de transmision, los sistemas de distribucion y las aplicaciones de comercializacion. Con dicha modernizacion, la CFE tambien esta generando la infraestructura para la interoperabilidad e interconectividad de los sistemas antes mencionados, de tal forma que le permita ampliar, continuar y complementar la integracion funcional de los sistemas institucionales legados y de ultima generacion. La integracion total de los sistemas le permitiran a la CFE su migracion a lo que son las Redes Electricas Inteligentes. Por lo anterior, la CFE solicito apoyo al Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) para desarrollar parte de la infraestructura para la modernizacion de la automatizacion de la distribucion, que consiste en el desarrollo de un prototipo de sistema de supervision y control, con tecnologia abierta interoperable y propietaria de la CFE, que le permita realizar las funciones de un sistema SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) para supervision y control de redes electricas de distribucion.

  19. SU-E-T-161: Characterization and Validation of CT Simulator Hounsfield Units to Relative Stopping Power Values for Proton Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a calibration curve that includes and minimizes the variations of Hounsfield Unit (HU) from a CT scanner to Relative Stopping Power (RSP) of tissues along the proton beam path. The variations are due to scanner and proton energy, technique, phantom size and placement, and tissue arrangement. Methods: A CIRS 062 M phantom with 10 plugs of known relative electron density (RED) was scanned through a 16 slice GE Discovery CT Simulator scanner. Three setup combinations of plug distributions and techniques clinically implemented for five treatment regions were scanned with energies of 100, 120, and 140 kV. Volumetric HU values were measured for each plug and scan. The RSP values derived through the Bethe-Bloch formula are currently being verified with parallel-plate ionization chamber measurements in water using 80, 150, and 225 MeV proton beam. Typical treatment plans for treatment regions of brain, head-&-neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis are being planned and dose delivered will be compared with film and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) measurements. Results: Percentage variations were determined for each variable. For tissues close to water, variations were <1% from any given parameter. Tissues far from water equivalence (lung and bone) showed the greatest sensitivity to change (7.4% maximum) with scanner energy and up to 5.3% with positioning of the phantom. No major variations were observed for proton energies within the treatment range. Conclusion: When deriving a calibration curve, attention should be placed to low and high HU values. A thorough verification process of calculated vs. water-phantom measured RSP values at different proton energies, followed by dose validation of planned vs. measured doses in phantom with film and OSL detectors are currently being undertaken

  20. Simulation of the turbine trip of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant using the code Simulate-3K; Simulacion del disparo de turbina de la Unidad 1 de la central nuclear Laguna Verde empleando el codigo Simulate-3K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alegria A, A. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Filio L, C. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Ortiz V, J., E-mail: aalegria@cnsns.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    In order to compare the results obtained from the model developed in the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) with the code Simulate-3K (S3K) with respect to those reported by the process computer of the Central (SIIP), the simulation of the turbine trip transient was carried out, caused by the firing of the main generator, the low differential pressure of oil of its seals and the automatic Scram of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, at 87% of power nominal during the operation cycle 16. Since the reactor was brought to a safe stop due to Scram, was enough to simulate 20 seconds to observe the maximum increase in pressure with S3K. In this work, the following parameters are shown and compared: the neutron flux, the thermal power, the pressure in the dome, the flow at the entrance to the core, the steam flow that leaves the vessel and the minimal critical power ratio (MCPR). The neutron flux of the average power range monitors of the nuclear power plant was compared with the S3K detectors model. Finally, the MCPR was calculated with a different correlation to that of the fuel supplier and its deviation from its safety limit was determined. In conclusion, the results obtained show the current state of the model for the simulation of reactivity transients and the opportunity areas to consolidate this tool in support of the process of licensing refueling in the CNSNS. (Author)

  1. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  2. BPU Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehr, Martin; Skovhede, Kenneth; Vinter, Brian

    2013-01-01

    in that process. Our goal is to support all execution platforms, and in this work we introduce the Bohrium Processing Unit, BPU, which will be the FPGA backend for Bohrium. The BPU is modeled as a PyCSP application, and the clear advantages of using CSP for simulating a new CPU is described. The current Py...

  3. MCU-Based Solar Powered Chicken Feeder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenor M. Reyes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Poultry is a great potential industry particularly in Batangas Province. The method of feeding chicken needs to be considered as chicken must be fed regularly to be more productive. The conventional method of feeding chicken is the need to continuously provide the food, be alert and conscious on the food remaining in cages and to feed the chickens in a correct period of time to avoid the decline of the production. Growers also find it difficult to manage their businesses effectively because they need to be around the cages every now and then to monitor the poultry. Timing and exactness are the key to provide a uniform time in feeding the chickens. This will benefit the owner of the business in terms of time and effort. Another advantage of this project is in terms of savings to the owner of the poultry business. This technology was designed to automatically feed chickens at a given period of time and to give alarm when the feeds are running out of supply. The power to be supplied to this prototype will be drawn from the sun by means of solar panels and will be stored in typical car battery. The feeds will be stored in a container and evenly distributed by using a conveyor to the feeding basin of the poultry. It will be more efficient than manual conventional way of feeding because less effort will be needed in feeding the chickens and less feeds will be wasted. In addition to that, the stored power can also be used for lighting purposes for the growers to save energy and energy bills.

  4. Determination of homogenization factors in the simulation in the azymuthal flux unit distribution in the control ring of a experimental fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jachic, J.

    1987-01-01

    The azimuthal neutronic flux distribution in the control ring region for a low power fast reactor is simulated using a plate and rectangular smash models for one dimensional calculations under periodic boundary conditions in the frontier. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Data used in the analysis presented in the manuscript "Dynamic Evaluation of Two Decades of WRF-CMAQ Ozone Simulations over the Contiguous United States"

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Files containing daily maximum 8-hr ozone mixing ratio observations and WRF/CMAQ simulations used in the analysis presented in the manuscript “Dynamic Evaluation of...

  6. Present status of reactor physics in the United States and Japan-II. 6. Present Status of GNF New Nodal Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, T.; Tamitani, M.; Moore, B.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents core simulator consolidation work done at Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF). The unified simulator needs to supersede the capabilities of past simulator packages from the original GNF partners: GE (Ref. 1), Hitachi (Ref. 2), and Toshiba (Ref. 3). At the same time, an effort is being made to produce a simulation package that will be a state-of-the-art analysis tool when released, in terms of the physics solution methodology and functionality. The core simulator will be capable and qualified for (a) high-energy cycles in the U.S. markets, (b) mixed-oxide (MOX) introduction in Japan, and (c) high-power density plants in Europe, etc. The unification of the lattice physics code is also in progress based on a transport model with collision probability methods. The AETNA core simulator is built upon the PANAC11 software base. The goal is to essentially replace the 1.5-energy group model with a higher-order multigroup nonlinear nodal solution capable of the required modeling fidelity, while keeping highly automated library generation as well as functionality. All required interfaces to PANAC11 will be preserved, which minimizes the impact on users and process automation. Preliminary results show statistical accuracy improvement over the 1.5- group model. The status of the GNF new nodal simulator is presented. It is built on a highly automated software base by combining the best technologies of GE, Hitachi, and Toshiba and will provide a BWR core analysis tool with high functionality and fidelity. (authors)

  7. Closure simulation of the MSIV of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant using the Simulate 3K code; Simulacion del cierre de las MSIV de la Unidad 1 de la central nuclear Laguna Verde empleando el codigo Simulate-3K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alegria A, A., E-mail: aalegria@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper the simulation of closure transient of all main steam isolation valves (MSIV) was performed with the Simulate-3K (S-3K) code for the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (NPP-LV), which operates to thermal power of 2317 MWt, corresponding to the cycle 15 of operation. The set points for the performance of systems correspond to those set out in transient analysis: 3 seconds for the closure of all MSIV; the start of Scram when 121% of the neutron flux is reached, respect from baseline before the transient; the opening by peer of safety relief valves (SRV) in relief mode when the set point of the pressure is reached, the shoot of the feedwater flow seconds after the start of closing of the MSIV and the shoot of the recirculation water pumps when the pressure is reached in the dome of 1048 psig. The simulation time was of 57 seconds, with the top 50 to reach the steady state, from which the closure of all MSIV starts. In this paper the behavior of the pressure in the dome are analyzed, thermal power, neutron flux, the collapsed water level, the flow at the entrance of core, the steam flow coming out of vessel and the flow through of the SRV; the fuel temperature, the minimal critical power ratio, the readings in the instrumentation systems and reactivities. Instrumentation systems were implemented to analyze the neutron flux, these consist of 96 local power range monitors (LPRM) located in different radial and axial positions of the core and 4 channels of average power range monitors, which grouped at 24 LPRM each one. LPRM response to the change of neutron flux in the center of the core, at different axial positions is also shown. Finally, the results show that the safety limit MCPR is not exceeded. (Author)

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the Tomotherapy treatment unit in the static mode using MC HAMMER, a Monte Carlo tool dedicated to Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, E; Tomsej, M; Cravens, B; Salvat, F; Ruchala, K; Olivera, G H; Vynckier, S

    2007-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) is designed to deliver highly modulated IMRT treatments. The concept of HT provides new challenges in MC simulation, because simultaneous movement of the gantry, the couch and the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) must be simulated accurately. However, before accounting for gantry, couch movement and multileaf collimator configurations, high accuracy must be achieved while simulating open static fields (1 x 40, 2.5 x 40 and 5 x 40 cm 2 ). This is performed using MC HAMMER, which is a graphical user interface allowing MC simulation using PENELOPE for various configurations of HT. Since the geometry of the different elements and materials involved in the beam generation are precisely known and defined, the only parameters that need to be tuned on are therefore electron source spot size and electron energy. Beyond the build up region, good agreement (2%/1mm) is achieved for all the field sizes between measurements (ion chamber) and simulations with an electron source energy set to 5.5 MeV. The electron source spot size is modelled as a gaussian distribution with full width half maximum equal to 1.4 mm. This value was chosen to match measured and calculated penumbras in the longitudinal direction

  9. Geant4 simulation of the Elekta XVI kV CBCT unit for accurate description of potential late toxicity effects of image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochu, F M; Burnet, N G; Jena, R; Plaistow, R; Thomas, S J; Parker, M A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the modelisation of the Elekta XVI Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) machine components with Geant4 and its validation against calibration data taken for two commonly used machine setups. Preliminary dose maps of simulated CBCTs coming from this modelisation work are presented. This study is the first step of a research project, GHOST, aiming to improve the understanding of late toxicity risk in external beam radiotherapy patients by simulating dose depositions integrated from different sources (imaging, treatment beam) over the entire treatment plan. The second cancer risk will then be derived from different models relating irradiation dose and second cancer risk. (paper)

  10. Performance of risk-adjusted control charts to monitor in-hospital mortality of intensive care unit patients: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, Antonie; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; de Jonge, Evert; Cook, David A.; Peek, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Increases in case-mix adjusted mortality may be indications of decreasing quality of care. Risk-adjusted control charts can be used for in-hospital mortality monitoring in intensive care units by issuing a warning signal when there are more deaths than expected. The aim of this study was

  11. Simulation of Concentrations and Dispersion of Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S Due to Incinerators of Sulfur Recovery Units in a Gas Refinery in Asaluyeh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Minabi

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the variations of measured concentrations were consistent with those of simulated ones. Meanwhile, the contribution of neighbor industries was determined. Comparision of 8-h H2S concentrations with OSHA and NIOSH standard limits indicated that there was no significant health risk in this refinery.

  12. Hydrologic Response Unit Routing in SWAT to Simulate Effects of Vegetated Filter Strip for South-Korean Conditions Based on VFSMOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Jae Lim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model has been used worldwide for many hydrologic and Non-Point Source (NPS Pollution analyses on a watershed scale. However, it has many limitations in simulating the Vegetative Filter Strip (VFS because it considers only ‘filter strip width’ when the model estimates sediment trapping efficiency and does not consider the routing of sediment with overland flow which is expected to maximize the sediment trapping efficiency from upper agricultural subwatersheds to lower spatially-explicit filter strips. Therefore, the SWAT overland flow option between landuse-subwatersheds with sediment routing capability was enhanced by modifying the SWAT watershed configuration and SWAT engine based on the numerical model VFSMOD applied to South-Korean conditions. The enhanced SWAT can simulate the VFS sediment trapping efficiency for South-Korean conditions in a manner similar to the desktop VFSMOD-w system. Due to this enhancement, SWAT is applicable to simulate the effects of overland flow from upper subwatersheds to reflect increased runoff volume at the lower subwatershed, which occurs in the field if no diversion channel is installed. In this study, the enhanced SWAT model was applied to small watersheds located at Jaun-ri in South-Korea to simulate a diversion channel and spatially-explicit VFS. Sediment can be reduced by 31%, 65%, and 68%, with a diversion channel, the VFS, and the VFS with diversion channel, respectively. The enhanced SWAT should be used in estimating site-specific effects on sediment reduction with diversion channels and VFS, instead of the currently available SWAT, which does not simulate sediment routing in overland flow and does not consider other sensitive factors affecting sediment reduction with VFS.

  13. Simulation and design of distillation units for treatment of sulfite pulping condensates to recover methanol and furfural. Part II. Applicability of multiple-effect distillation using live steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, G.; Zacchi, G.

    1979-06-01

    A distillation unit has been designed for a capacity of 73 t/h of condensate and for at least 90% recovery of the contaminating organics. This unit consists of three columns: a primary stripper to remove volatile organics and two upgrading columns to purify the methanol and furfural byproducts. Three different energy-saving alternatives for satisfying the energy requirements have been studied: utilisation of secondary steam from the evaporation plant, and application of the principle of multi-effect distillation in one-stripper and in two-stripper configurations. Investment cost needed in all alternatives amounts to 5.5 to 6.0 MCr (millions of Swedish Crowns) while operating cost varies between 0.8 to 3.1 MCr. The first design alternative has a payoff period of 2.3 years while the two multi-effect distillation alternatives have a payoff period of about 3 years.

  14. Pregnancy Requires Major Changes in the Quality of the Diet for Nutritional Adequacy: Simulations in the French and the United States Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia M Bianchi

    Full Text Available Maternal nutrition is critical to the health of both mother and offspring, but there is a paucity of data on the nutritional adequacy of diets during pregnancy.Our objective was to identify to what extent pregnancy reduces the nutritional adequacy of the expecting mother's diet and if this nutritional gap can be resolved by simple quantitative or qualitative changes in the diet.We evaluated the observed overall nutritional adequacy of diets of French and American women of childbearing age participating in ENNS (n = 344 and NHANES (n = 563 using the probabilistic approach of the PANDiet system, resulting in a 100-point score. Then, we simulated the changes in the PANDiet scores of women of childbearing age who would remain on their diet during pregnancy. Finally, by either increasing the quantity of consumed foods or using eleven snacks recommended during pregnancy, we simulated the effect of a 150-kcal increase in the energy intake of French women.Observed PANDiet scores were equal to 59.3 ± 7.0 and 58.8 ± 9.3 points respectively in France and in the US. Simulation of pregnancy for women of childbearing age led to a decrease in nutritional adequacy for key nutrients during pregnancy and resulted in reducing PANDiet scores by 3.3 ± 0.1 and 3.7 ± 0.1 points in France and in the US. Simulated 150-kcal increases in energy intake proved to be only partially effective in filling the gap both when the quantity of food consumed was increased and when recommended snacks were used.The decrease in nutritional adequacy induced by pregnancy cannot be addressed by simply following generic dietary guidelines.

  15. Obesity trend in the United States and economic intervention options to change it: A simulation study linking ecological epidemiology and system dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H-J; Xue, H; Liu, S; Huang, T T K; Wang, Y C; Wang, Y

    2018-05-29

    To study the country-level dynamics and influences between population weight status and socio-economic distribution (employment status and family income) in the US and to project the potential impacts of socio-economic-based intervention options on obesity prevalence. Ecological study and simulation. Using the longitudinal data from the 2001-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (N = 88,453 adults), we built and calibrated a system dynamics model (SDM) capturing the feedback loops between body weight status and socio-economic status distribution and simulated the effects of employment- and income-based intervention options. The SDM-based simulation projected rising overweight/obesity prevalence in the US in the future. Improving people's income from lower to middle-income group would help control the rising prevalence, while only creating jobs for the unemployed did not show such effect. Improving people from low- to middle-income levels may be effective, instead of solely improving reemployment rate, in curbing the rising obesity trend in the US adult population. This study indicates the value of the SDM as a virtual laboratory to evaluate complex distributive phenomena of the interplay between population health and economy. Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Motor unit number index (MUNIX) derivation from the relationship between the area and power of surface electromyogram: a computer simulation and clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Francesc

    2018-06-01

    Objective. The motor unit number index (MUNIX) is a technique based on the surface electromyogram (sEMG) that is gaining acceptance as a method for monitoring motor neuron loss, because it is reliable and produces less discomfort than other electrodiagnostic techniques having the same intended purpose. MUNIX assumes that the relationship between the area of sEMG obtained at increasing levels of muscle activation and the values of a variable called ‘ideal case motor unit count’ (ICMUC), defined as the product of the ratio between area and power of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) by that of the sEMG, is described by a decreasing power function. Nevertheless, the reason for this comportment is unknown. The objective of this work is to investigate if the definition of MUNIX could derive from more basic properties of the sEMG. Approach. The CMAP and sEMG epochs obtained at different levels of muscle activation from (1) the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle of persons with and without a carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and (2) from a computer model of sEMG generation previously published were analysed. Main results. MUNIX reflects the power relationship existing between the area and power of a sEMG. The exponent of this function was smaller in patients with motor CTS than in the rest of the subjects. The analysis of the relationship between the area and power of a sEMG could aid in distinguishing a MUNIX reduction due to a motoneuron loss from that due to a loss of muscle fibre. Significance. MUNIX is derived from the relationship between the area and power of a sEMG. This relationship changes when there is a loss of motor units (MUs), which partially explains the diagnostic sensibility of MUNIX. Although the reasons for this change are unknown, it could reflect an increase in the proportion of MUs of great amplitude.

  17. Long-term consequences of selected competitive strategies during deregulation of the United States electric utility industry: System dynamics modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Yehia Fahim

    Currently, U.S. investor-owned utilities (IOUs) are facing major reforms in their business environment similar to the airlines, telecommunications, banking, and insurance industries. As a result, IOUs are gearing up for fierce price competition in the power generation sector, and are vying for electricity customers outside their franchised service territories. Energy experts predict that some IOUs may suffer fatal financial setbacks (especially those with nuclear plants), while others may thrive under competition. Both federal and state energy regulators anticipate that it may take from five to ten years to complete the transition of America's electric utility industry from a regulated monopoly to a market-driven business. During this transition, utility executives are pursuing aggressive business strategies to confront the upcoming price wars. The most compelling strategies focus on cutting operation and maintenance (O&M) costs of power production, downsizing the work force, and signing bilateral energy agreements with large price-sensitive customers to retain their business. This research assesses the impact of the three pivotal strategies on financial performance of utilities during transition to open market competition. A system-dynamics-based management flight simulator has been developed to predict the dynamic performance of a hypothetical IOU organization preparing for market competition. The simulation results show that while the three business strategies lead to short-lived gains, they also produce unanticipated long-term consequences that adversely impact the organization's operating revenues. Generally, the designed flight simulator serves as a learning laboratory which allows management to test new strategies before implementation.

  18. Suitability Assessment of an ICE-Based Micro-CCHP Unit in Different Spanish Climatic Zones: Application of an Experimental Model in Transient Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Rey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tri-generation plants will have an important role in the near future in the residential sector where heating and cooling demands come into play throughout the year. Depending on the building’s location, the characteristics of its enclosure and its use, the thermal loads and demands will be different. This article analyses and compares a combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP system tested in the laboratory and a single household located in Spain. The cooling capacity is obtained using a reversible heat pump where the compressor is driven directly by a gas engine with internal combustion engine (ICE technology. The tests were carried out in a work bench at three different operating speeds. A variable-speed model is developed in the TRNSYS simulation environment with an operating strategy following the thermal load (FTL. Once the micro-CCHP system was modeled with experimental data and validated, it was dynamically simulated to analyze its performance in different climatic zones defined in the Spanish “Código Técnico de la Edificación” (CTE. This study reveals that the micro-CCHP system is suitable in mild weathers during the summer season.

  19. Homology modeling, docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations using graphical processing unit architecture to probe the type-11 phosphodiesterase catalytic site: a computational approach for the rational design of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichero, Elena; D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Moscatelli, Marco; Bruno, Olga; Orro, Alessandro; Rotolo, Chiara; Milanesi, Luciano; Fossa, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Phosphodiesterase 11 (PDE11) is the latest isoform of the PDEs family to be identified, acting on both cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The initial reports of PDE11 found evidence for PDE11 expression in skeletal muscle, prostate, testis, and salivary glands; however, the tissue distribution of PDE11 still remains a topic of active study and some controversy. Given the sequence similarity between PDE11 and PDE5, several PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to cross-react with PDE11. Accordingly, many non-selective inhibitors, such as IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, and dipyridamole, have been documented to inhibit PDE11. Only recently, a series of dihydrothieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one derivatives proved to be selective toward the PDE11 isoform. In the absence of experimental data about PDE11 X-ray structures, we found interesting to gain a better understanding of the enzyme-inhibitor interactions using in silico simulations. In this work, we describe a computational approach based on homology modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation to derive a predictive 3D model of PDE11. Using a Graphical Processing Unit architecture, it is possible to perform long simulations, find stable interactions involved in the complex, and finally to suggest guideline for the identification and synthesis of potent and selective inhibitors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Graphics-processing-unit-accelerated finite-difference time-domain simulation of the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolskiy, V. P.; Stegailov, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) serve as important tools for many modern technologies. However, the proper microscopic models of the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and metal NPs are currently not very well developed in many cases. One part of the problem is the description of the warm dense matter that is formed in NPs after intense irradiation. Another part of the problem is the description of the electromagnetic waves around NPs. Description of wave propagation requires the solution of Maxwell’s equations and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is the classic approach for solving them. There are many commercial and free implementations of FDTD, including the open source software that supports graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration. In this report we present the results on the FDTD calculations for different cases of the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and metal nanoparticles. Following our previous results, we analyze the efficiency of the GPU acceleration of the FDTD algorithm.

  1. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  2. Experimental development, 1D CFD simulation and energetic analysis of a 15 kw micro-CHP unit based on reciprocating internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muccillo, M.; Gimelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    Cogeneration is commonly recognized as one of the most effective solutions to achieve the increasingly stringent reduction in primary energy consumption and greenhouse emissions. This characteristic led to the adoption of specific directives promoting this technique. In addition, a strategic role in power reliability is recognized to distributed generation. The study and prototyping of cogeneration plants, therefore, has involved many research centres. This paper deals with energetic aspects of CHP referring to the study of a 15 kW micro-CHP plant based on a LPG reciprocating engine designed, built and grid connected. The plant consists of a heat recovery system characterized by a single water circuit recovering heat from exhaust gases, from engine coolant and from the energy radiated by the engine within the shell hosting the plant. Some tests were carried out at whole open throttle and the experimental data were collected. However it was needed to perform a 1D thermo-fluid dynamics simulation of the engine to completely characterize the micro-CHP. As the heat actually recovered depends on the user's thermal load, particularly from the required temperature's level, a comparison of the results for six types of users were performed: residential, hospital, office, commercial, sports, hotel. Both Italian legislative indexes IRE and LT were evaluated, as defined by A.E.E.G resolution n. 42/02 and subsequent updates, as well as the plant's total Primary Energy Saving. - Highlights: • This paper deals with energetic aspects of CHP referring to the study of a 15 kW micro-CHP plant. • The 15 kW micro-CHP plant is based on a GPL reciprocating engine designed, built and grid connected. • Some tests were carried out at whole open throttle and the experimental data were collected. • It was needed to perform a 1D thermo-fluid dynamics simulation of the engine to completely characterize the micro-CHP. • The analysed solution is particularly suited for

  3. Evaluation of a seven-year air quality simulation using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) models in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Gang; Hu, Jianlin; Chen, Shu-Hua; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Kleeman, Michael; Ying, Qi

    2014-03-01

    The performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)/Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) system in the eastern United States is analyzed based on results from a seven-year modeling study with a 4-km spatial resolution. For 2-m temperature, the monthly averaged mean bias (MB) and gross error (GE) values are generally within the recommended performance criteria, although temperature is over-predicted with MB values up to 2K. Water vapor at 2-m is well-predicted but significant biases (>2 g kg(-1)) were observed in wintertime. Predictions for wind speed are satisfactory but biased towards over-prediction with 0nitrate and sulfate concentrations are also well reproduced. The other unresolved PM2.5 components (OTHER) are significantly overestimated by more than a factor of two. No conclusive explanations can be made regarding the possible cause of this universal overestimation, which warrants a follow-up study to better understand this problem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analyses of insulin-potentiating fragments of human growth hormone by computative simulation; essential unit for insulin-involved biological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, K; Hori, H

    2000-07-01

    We analyzed the structural features of insulin-potentiating fragments of human growth hormone by computative simulations. The peptides were designated from the N-terminus sequences of the hormone positions at 1-15 (hGH(1-15); H2N-Phe1-Pro2-Thr3-Ile4-Pro5-Leu6-Ser7-Arg8-L eu9-Phe10-Asp11-Asn12-Ala13-Met14-Leu15 -COOH), 6-13 (hGH(6-13)), 7-13 (hGH(7-13)) and 8-13 (hGH(8-13)), which enhanced insulin-producing hypoglycemia. In these peptide molecules, ionic bonds were predicted to form between 8th-arginyl residue and 11th-aspartic residue, and this intramolecular interaction caused the formation of a macrocyclic structure containing a tetrapeptide Arg8-Leu9-Phe10-Asp11. The peptide positions at 6-10 (hGH(6-10)), 9-13 (hGH(9-13)) and 10-13 (hGH(10-13)) did not lead to a macrocyclic formation in the molecules, and had no effect on the insulin action. Although beta-Ala13hGH(1-15), in which the 13th-alanine was replaced by a beta-alanyl residue, had no effect on insulin-producing hypoglycemia, the macrocyclic region (Arg8-Leu9-Phe10-Asp11) was observed by the computative simulation. An isothermal vibration analysis of both of beta-Ala13hGH(1-15) and hGH(1-15) peptide suggested that beta-Ala13hGH(1-15) is molecule was more flexible than hGH(1-15); C-terminal carboxyl group of Leu15 easily accessed to Arg8 and inhibited the ionic bond formation between Arg8 and Asp11 in beta-Ala13hGH(1-15). The peptide of hGH(8-13) dose-dependently enhanced the insulin-involved fatty acid synthesis in rat white adipocytes, and stabilized the C6-NBD-PC (1-acyl-2-[6-[(7-nitro-2,1,3benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-caproyl]-sn- glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) model membranes. In contrast, hGH(9-13) had no effect both on the fatty acid synthesis and the membrane stability. In the same culture conditions as the fatty acid synthesis assay, hGH(8-13) had no effect on the transcript levels of glucose transporter isoforms (GLUT 1, 4) and hexokinase isozymes (HK I, II) in rat white adipocytes. Judging from

  5. METRIC context unit architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    METRIC is an architecture for a simple but powerful Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC). Its speed comes from the simultaneous processing of several instruction streams, with instructions from the various streams being dispatched into METRIC's execution pipeline as they become available for execution. The pipeline is thus kept full, with a mix of instructions for several contexts in execution at the same time. True parallel programming is supported within a single execution unit, the METRIC Context Unit. METRIC's architecture provides for expansion through the addition of multiple Context Units and of specialized Functional Units. The architecture thus spans a range of size and performance from a single-chip microcomputer up through large and powerful multiprocessors. This research concentrates on the specification of the METRIC Context Unit at the architectural level. Performance tradeoffs made during METRIC's design are discussed, and projections of METRIC's performance are made based on simulation studies.

  6. Reactor refueling machine simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohosky, T.L.; Swidwa, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes in combination: a nuclear reactor; a refueling machine having a bridge, trolley and hoist each driven by a separate motor having feedback means for generating a feedback signal indicative of movement thereof. The motors are operable to position the refueling machine over the nuclear reactor for refueling the same. The refueling machine also has a removable control console including means for selectively generating separate motor signals for operating the bridge, trolley and hoist motors and for processing the feedback signals to generate an indication of the positions thereof, separate output leads connecting each of the motor signals to the respective refueling machine motor, and separate input leads for connecting each of the feedback means to the console; and a portable simulator unit comprising: a single simulator motor; a single simulator feedback signal generator connected to the simulator motor for generating a simulator feedback signal in response to operation of the simulator motor; means for selectively connecting the output leads of the console to the simulator unit in place of the refueling machine motors, and for connecting the console input leads to the simulator unit in place of the refueling machine motor feedback means; and means for driving the single simulator motor in response to any of the bridge, trolley or hoist motor signals generated by the console and means for applying the simulator feedback signal to the console input lead associated with the motor signal being generated by the control console

  7. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in the experimental section of the air-condensing unit of Scientific Production Company "Turbocon"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemov, V. I.; Minko, K. B.; Yan'kov, G. G.; Kiryukhin, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model was developed to be used for numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer processes in the experimental section of the air condenser (ESAC) created in the Scientific Production Company (SPC) "Turbocon" and mounted on the territory of the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute. The simulations were performed using the author's CFD code ANES. The verification of the models was carried out involving the experimental data obtained in the tests of ESAC. The operational capability of the proposed models to calculate the processes in steam-air mixture and cooling air and algorithms to take into account the maldistribution in the various rows of tube bundle was shown. Data on the influence of temperature and flow rate of the cooling air on the pressure in the upper header of ESAC, effective heat transfer coefficient, steam flow distribution by tube rows, and the dimensions of the ineffectively operating zones of tube bundle for two schemes of steam-air mixture flow (one-pass and two-pass ones) were presented. It was shown that the pressure behind the turbine (in the upper header) increases significantly at increase of the steam flow rate and reduction of the flow rate of cooling air and its temperature rise, and the maximum value of heat transfer coefficient is fully determined by the flow rate of cooling air. Furthermore, the steam flow rate corresponding to the maximum value of heat transfer coefficient substantially depends on the ambient temperature. The analysis of the effectiveness of the considered schemes of internal coolant flow was carried out, which showed that the two-pass scheme is more effective because it provides lower pressure in the upper header, despite the fact that its hydraulic resistance at fixed flow rate of steam-air mixture is considerably higher than at using the one-pass schema. This result is a consequence of the fact that, in the two-pass scheme, the condensation process involves the larger internal surface of tubes

  8. Time-dependent wave front propagation simulation of a hard x-ray split-and-delay unit: Towards a measurement of the temporal coherence properties of x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL a split-and-delay unit based on geometrical wavefront beam splitting and multilayer mirrors is built which covers the range of photon energies from 5 keV up to 20 keV. Maximum delays between Δτ=±2.5  ps at hν=20  keV and up to Δτ=±23  ps at hν=5  keV will be possible. Time-dependent wave-optics simulations have been performed by means of Synchrotron Radiation Workshop software for XFEL pulses at hν=5  keV. The XFEL radiation was simulated using results of time-dependent simulations applying the self-amplified spontaneous emission code FAST. Main features of the optical layout, including diffraction on the beam splitter edge and optics imperfections measured with a nanometer optic component measuring machine slope measuring profiler, were taken into account. The impact of these effects on the characterization of the temporal properties of XFEL pulses is analyzed. An approach based on fast Fourier transformation allows for the evaluation of the temporal coherence despite large wavefront distortions caused by the optics imperfections. In this way, the fringes resulting from time-dependent two-beam interference can be filtered and evaluated yielding a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.187  fs (HWHM for real, nonperfect mirrors, while for ideal mirrors a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.191  fs (HWHM is expected.

  9. Simulator configuration maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Requirements and recommendations of this section defines NPP personnel activity aimed to the provision of the simulator configuration compliance with the current configuration of the power-generating unit-prototype, standard and technical requirements and describe a monitoring procedure for a set of simulator software and hardware, training, organizational and technical documents

  10. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  11. Life Extension Program for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit at Savannah River Site - 13179

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samadi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. Currently, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the CSSX process are deployed in the (ARP)/Modular CSSX Unit (MCU), to process salt waste for permanent disposition. The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. The original plant was permitted for a three year design life; however, given the successful operation of the plant, a life extension program was completed to continue operations. The program included detailed engineering analyses of the life-expectancy of passive and active components, resulting in component replacement and/or maintenance and monitoring program improvements. The program also included a review of the operations and resulted in a series of operational improvements. Since the improvements have been made, an accelerated processing rate has been demonstrated. In addition, plans for instituting a next-generation solvent are in place and will enhance the decontamination factors. (author)

  12. Numerical simulation of resin degassing unit in gas-phase fluidized bed polyethylene process and its application%气相法PE装置脱挥单元的数值模拟及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴文清

    2014-01-01

    基于费克扩散定理、亨利定律、质量守恒定律等,结合气相法工艺聚乙烯(PE)装置脱挥单元中脱气仓的运行情况,建立了脱气仓的数学模型。运用该模型定量分析了N2流量、停留时间、压力等操作条件对脱气仓操作曲线和脱挥性能的影响,模拟分析了300kt/a气相法PE装置脱挥单元,确定了优选操作条件:操作点应同时位于出口处组分的质量分数与N2流量关系曲线的转折点,以及N2流量与停留时间关系曲线的转折点附近;N2流量与PE流量之比为0.010~0.040。%The resin degassing unit mathematical model of gas-phase fluidized bed polyethylene process was established based on Fick's diffusion law, Henry's law, mass conservation equation and so on. Then the model was applied to quantitatively analyzing the impact of the operating conditions such as nitrogen flow rate, residence time and pressure on the operation curve of purge bin and degassing performance curve, and simulation analysis of resin degassing unit in a 300 kt/a gas-phase polyethylene installations was performed to determine the preferred operating conditions. Specific conditions: operating point should be located at the turning point on outlet mass percentage of the components-nitrogen flow curve and at the turning point on nitrogen flow-residence time curve, and the flow ratio of nitrogen to polyethylene ranged from 0.010 to 0.040.

  13. Unit Manning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGinniss, Mike

    2003-01-01

    .... This decision combines two crucial initiatives: first, transforming the Army from an individual soldier replacement system to a unit manning system that enhances cohesion and keeps trained soldiers, leaders, and commanders together longer, thereby...

  14. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  15. Drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanchik, N P; Demin, A V; Khrustalev, N N; Linnik, G N; Lovchev, S V; Rozin, M M; Sidorov, R V; Sokolov, S I; Tsaregradskiy, Yu P

    1981-01-01

    A drilling unit is proposed which includes a hydraulic lifter, hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump with valve distribution and sectional drilling pump with separators of the working and flushing fluid. In order to reduce metal consumption and the overall dimensions of the drilling unit, the working cavity of each cylinder of the hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump is equipped with suction and injection valves and is hydraulically connected to the working cavity by one of the sections of the drilling pump.

  16. Computer Simulation Western

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Computer Simulation Western is a unit within the Department of Applied Mathematics at the University of Western Ontario. Its purpose is the development of computational and mathematical methods for practical problems in industry and engineering and the application and marketing of such methods. We describe the unit and our efforts at obtaining research and development grants. Some representative projects will be presented and future plans discussed. (author)

  17. Next Generation Solvent - Materials Compatibility With Polymer Components Within Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (Final Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX(reg s ign)79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX(reg s ign)79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX(reg s ign)79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX(reg s ign)79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX(reg s ign)79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and

  18. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and

  19. Network Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Richard

    2006-01-01

    "Network Simulation" presents a detailed introduction to the design, implementation, and use of network simulation tools. Discussion topics include the requirements and issues faced for simulator design and use in wired networks, wireless networks, distributed simulation environments, and fluid model abstractions. Several existing simulations are given as examples, with details regarding design decisions and why those decisions were made. Issues regarding performance and scalability are discussed in detail, describing how one can utilize distributed simulation methods to increase the

  20. Massively parallel multicanonical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jonathan; Zierenberg, Johannes; Weigel, Martin; Janke, Wolfhard

    2018-03-01

    Generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations such as the multicanonical method and similar techniques are among the most efficient approaches for simulations of systems undergoing discontinuous phase transitions or with rugged free-energy landscapes. As Markov chain methods, they are inherently serial computationally. It was demonstrated recently, however, that a combination of independent simulations that communicate weight updates at variable intervals allows for the efficient utilization of parallel computational resources for multicanonical simulations. Implementing this approach for the many-thread architecture provided by current generations of graphics processing units (GPUs), we show how it can be efficiently employed with of the order of 104 parallel walkers and beyond, thus constituting a versatile tool for Monte Carlo simulations in the era of massively parallel computing. We provide the fully documented source code for the approach applied to the paradigmatic example of the two-dimensional Ising model as starting point and reference for practitioners in the field.

  1. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  2. Simulators IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, B.T.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers on simulators with artificial intelligence, and the human decision making process; visuals for simulators: human factors, training, and psycho-physical impacts; the role of institutional structure on simulation projects; maintenance trainers for economic value and safety; biomedical simulators for understanding nature, for medical benefits, and the physiological effects of simulators; the mathematical models and numerical techniques that drive today's simulators; and the demography of simulators, with census papers identifying the population of real-time simulator training devices; nuclear reactors

  3. Simulators for NPP operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, A.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on the application of full-scale simulators for training and maintaining proficiency of unit control room operators that is an essential element of Russian NPPs personnel education system. The existing simulators for the unit control room operating personnel are listed. The integrated approach to developing and maintaining the training hardware is described. The integrated approach is being implemented on the basis of observance of the existing requirements to training hardware, improvement of regulations, control from a single centre responsible for the provision of support to the activities, inclusion into the plans of simulators for development of skills for operating control over equipment and systems, as well as control from local boards [ru

  4. Compact Design of 10 kW Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Systems with Microcontroller Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiaokang Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fuel, oxidant supply and cooling systems with microcontroller units (MCU are developed in a compact design to fit two 5 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC stacks. At the initial stage, the testing facility of the system has a large volume (2.0 m × 2.0 m × 1.5 m with a longer pipeline and excessive control sensors for safe testing. After recognizing the performance and stability of stack, the system is redesigned to fit in a limited space (0.4 m × 0.5 m × 0.8 m. Furthermore, the stack performance is studied under different hydrogen recycling modes. Then, two similar 5 kW stacks are directly coupled with diodes to obtain a higher power output and safe operation. The result shows that the efficiency of the 5 kW stack is 43.46% with a purge period of 2 min with hydrogen recycling and that the hydrogen utilization rate µf is 66.31%. In addition, the maximum power output of the twin-coupled module (a power module with two stacks in electrical cascade/parallel arrangement is 9.52 kW.

  5. Microcontroller Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulaev, A.B.

    1994-01-01

    The general purpose micro controller unit based on 8-bit single-chip microcomputer of the MCS-51 family is described. The controller has the data and program memories, a serial interface and an external bus for functional I/O extensions. The controller consists of a microcomputer chip, up to 4 ROM-RAM chips and 10 SSI and MSI chips, and it measures 160x120 mm. Both hardware and software micro system debugging tools are described. (author). 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. United States History Simulations: 1787-1868: Constitution Convention, Missouri Compromise, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, The Compromise of 1850, The Kansas/Nebraska Act, Southern Secession from the Union, and the Impeachment and Trial of Andrew Johnson. ETC Simulations Number Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostrop, Richard W.

    This book presents simulation activities for significant events in U.S. history from 1787-1868. Intended for student involvement, the simulations require student research and practice in order to carry out the designated roles. The simulation and role play serve to involve the students actively in their learning, using both the affective and…

  7. Solar unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, A M; Trushevskiy, S N; Tveryanovich, E V

    1982-01-01

    A solar unit is proposed which contains an inclined solar collector with supply and outlet pipelines, the first of which is connected to the source of a heat carrier, while the second is connected through the valve to the tank for collecting heated heat carrier equipped with a device for recovery. In order to improve the effectiveness of heating the heat carrier, it additionally contains a concentrator of solar radiation and a device for maintaining a level of the heat carrier in the collector in the zone of the focal spot of the concentrator, while the heat pipeline is connected to the source of the heat carrier with the help of a device for maintaining the level of the heat carrier.

  8. Laboratory-scale integrated ARP filter test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. There is a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. This task attempted to simulate the entire ARP process, including multiple batches (5), washing, chemical cleaning, and blending the feed with heels and recycle streams. The objective of the tests was to determine whether one of these processes is causing excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter. The authors conducted the tests with feed solutions containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 simulant supernate with no MST.

  9. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  10. Units of rotational information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Chiribella, Giulio; Hu, Qinheping

    2017-12-01

    Entanglement in angular momentum degrees of freedom is a precious resource for quantum metrology and control. Here we study the conversions of this resource, focusing on Bell pairs of spin-J particles, where one particle is used to probe unknown rotations and the other particle is used as reference. When a large number of pairs are given, we show that every rotated spin-J Bell state can be reversibly converted into an equivalent number of rotated spin one-half Bell states, at a rate determined by the quantum Fisher information. This result provides the foundation for the definition of an elementary unit of information about rotations in space, which we call the Cartesian refbit. In the finite copy scenario, we design machines that approximately break down Bell states of higher spins into Cartesian refbits, as well as machines that approximately implement the inverse process. In addition, we establish a quantitative link between the conversion of Bell states and the simulation of unitary gates, showing that the fidelity of probabilistic state conversion provides upper and lower bounds on the fidelity of deterministic gate simulation. The result holds not only for rotation gates, but also to all sets of gates that form finite-dimensional representations of compact groups. For rotation gates, we show how rotations on a system of given spin can simulate rotations on a system of different spin.

  11. Temperature measuring system based on ADuC812 MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dongmei; Ge Liangquan; Cheng Feng; Li Jinfeng

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a temperature measuring system which is composed of a single chip microcomputer ADuC812, new type digital temperature sensor TMP100,LED display circuit and based on I 2 C bus. I 2 C bus which is invented by PHILIPS company needs only two signal lines (SDA, SCL), can realized perfect duplex synchronous data transmission. Using the method of hardware setting of device address, can completely avoid the disadvantages of device selection addressing, thus can make hardware system has simplifier and more flexible extension method. The key part of the system is composed of a single chip microcomputer ADuC812 which is compatible with MCS-51 and is invented by AD company in america. The software is compiled with 8051 assembly language. The data acquisitin single chip microcomputer measurement system with I 2 C bus fully shows the features of flexibility, precise and high integration. Proposed high accuracy measurement method to realize environment temperature measure. (authors)

  12. Using SDI-12 with ST microelectronics MCU's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saari, Alexandra [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hinzey, Shawn Adrian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Frigo, Janette Rose [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Proicou, Michael Chris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Borges, Louis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-03

    ST Microelectronics microcontrollers and processors are readily available, capable and economical processors. Unfortunately they lack a broad user base like similar offerings from Texas Instrument, Atmel, or Microchip. All of these devices could be useful in economical devices for remote sensing applications used with environmental sensing. With the increased need for environmental studies, and limited budgets, flexibility in hardware is very important. To that end, and in an effort to increase open support of ST devices, I am sharing my teams' experience in interfacing a common environmental sensor communication protocol (SDI-12) with ST devices.

  13. Design of coin sorter counter based on MCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yahan; Si, Xu

    2018-04-01

    With unmanned tickets, vending machines promotion, greatly increased the circulation of coins, especially bus companies, the financial sector need to classify a large number of coins every day, inventory, a huge workload. The design of the microcontroller as the control center, combined with the sensor technology and the corresponding mechanical structure to complete the separation of coins and finishing the packaging work and real-time monitoring and display of the type and number of coins function, this article details the system hardware and software design, and The test adjustment shows that the system can achieve the function of separating and sorting coins and monitoring the type and quantity of coins displayed on the coin.

  14. Cernavoda NPP simulator - next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatar, F.; Ionescu, T.; Dascalu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Demand for extending the amount of training and scope for Cernavoda Unit 1 as well as the new trend in the simulator owners world, led to a change in the Romanian philosophy of simulator specification. Up to now the training was conducted on a Full Scope simulator, a 1:1 replica of Cernavoda Unit 1 reference plant. The present task is to define the simulation facilities and structure capable to meet the requirements for training, qualification and licensing of personnel for both Cernavoda Unit 1 and Unit 2. Obviously, the Cernavoda Unit 2 belongs to the same technological family but has rather different control room layout. Since this target requires a new simulator the costs would be rather high in accordance to the degree of automation of Cernavoda NPP. Therefore, depending on training requirements and financing, the Cernavoda Unit 1 simulator modernization, which also provides an alternative to full scope control room simulator, may be a viable option. Therefore the solution that with discuss for Cernavoda training extension is the migration of Cernavoda Unit 1 simulator to state-of-the-art. Consequently, the Cernavoda Unit 1 simulator modernization task will be organized as project including the following major items: 1. Rehost existing U1 simulation software from VAX 4500 to: - Best commercial multi-processor server for simulation server (HP, O/S Linux); - Best commercial single processor PC for I/O communications (HP, O/S Linux); 2. Replace DCC with enhanced emulated version: Best commercial individual PC for DCC emulation (HP, O/S Windows); Support for actual keyboards; Replacement of RAMTEK System and CONRAC Monitors with X terminals or PC's; 3. Conversion of AutoCAD-based panel graphic pages to RAVE-based; 4. Install the required software tools for developing enhanced simulation modules; 5. Replace the simulation modules with advanced modules; 6. Replace the present Windows Instructor Facilities with ISIS; 7. Development of a selection of MCR-U1 virtual

  15. Simulating Vito

    CERN Document Server

    Fragapane, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the techniques used to simulate the proposed upgrade to the ASPIC line at ISOLDE, VITO. It discusses the process used in the program SIMION by explaining how to start with an Autodesk Inventor drawing and import this into SIMION to get a working simulation. It then goes on to discuss the pieces of VITO which have been simulated in the program and how they were simulated. Finally, it explains a little about the simulations of the full beamline which have been done and discusses what still needs to be done.

  16. Electron accelerating unit for streak image tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The simulation results show that the accelerating unit improves both the spatial and temporal .... This electron emission process is simulated as a statistical sample in terms of Monte ... solver using above method in MATLAB language. First the .... semiconductors and insulators: Models and measurements. J. Phys. Rev.

  17. Simulation of irradiation creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiley, T.C.; Jung, P.

    1977-01-01

    The results to date in the area of radiation enhanced deformation using beams of light ions to simulate fast neutron displacement damage are reviewed. A comparison is made between these results and those of in-reactor experiments. Particular attention is given to the displacement rate calculations for light ions and the electronic energy losses and their effect on the displacement cross section. Differences in the displacement processes for light ions and neutrons which may effect the irradiation creep process are discussed. The experimental constraints and potential problem areas associated with these experiments are compared to the advantages of simulation. Support experiments on the effect of thickness on thermal creep are presented. A brief description of the experiments in progress is presented for the following laboratories: HEDL, NRL, ORNL, PNL, U. of Lowell/MIT in the United States, AERE Harwell in the United Kingdom, CEN Saclay in France, GRK Karlsruhe and KFA Julich in West Germany

  18. Termination unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  19. Termination unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  20. Simulators of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanobetti, D.

    1984-01-01

    The report deals with the simulators of nuclear power stations used for the training of operators and for the analysis of operations. It reviews the development of analogical, hybrid and digital simulators up to the present, indicating the impact resulting from the TMI-2 accident. It indicates, the components of simulators and the present accepted terminology for a classification of the various types of simulators. It reviews the present state of the art of the technology: how a basic mathematical model of a nuclear power system is worked out and what are the technical problems associated with more accurate models. Examples of elaborate models are given: for a PWR pressurizer, for an AGR steam generator. It also discusses certain problems of hardware technology. Characteristics of present replica simulators are given with certain details: simulated transient evolutions and malfunctions, accuracy of simulation. The work concerning the assessment of the validity of certain simulators is reported. A list of simulator manufacturers and a survey of the principal simulators in operation in the countries of the European Community, in the United States, and in certain other countries are presented. Problem associated with the use of simulators as training facilities, and their use as operational devices are discussed. Studies and research in progress for the expected future development of simulators are reviewed

  1. Enhanced Master Controller Unit Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Patricia; Johnson, Yvette; Johnson, Brian; Williams, Philip; Burton, Geoffrey; McCoy, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The Enhanced Master Controller Unit Tester (EMUT) software is a tool for development and testing of software for a master controller (MC) flight computer. The primary function of the EMUT software is to simulate interfaces between the MC computer and external analog and digital circuitry (including other computers) in a rack of equipment to be used in scientific experiments. The simulations span the range of nominal, off-nominal, and erroneous operational conditions, enabling the testing of MC software before all the equipment becomes available.

  2. Simulation games

    OpenAIRE

    Giddings, S.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter outlines the conventions and pleasures of simulation games as a category, and explores the complicated and contested term simulation. This concept goes to the heart of what computer games and video games are, and the ways in which they articulate ideas, processes, and phenomena between their virtual worlds and the actual world. It has been argued that simulations generate and communicate knowledge and events quite differently from the long-­dominant cultural mode of narrative. Th...

  3. Development and implementation of an interface control-process and of additional models in the simulator of combined cycle units; Desarrollo e implantacion de una interfaz control-proceso y de modelos adicionales en el simulador de unidades de ciclo combinado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez R, Rogelio E; Ramirez G, Miguel; Melgar G, Jose L; Codero C, Juan C; Romero J, Guillermo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    In this article are described the design and implementation of an interface control-process and the formulation of the process models for the simulation of the vibration amplitudes of the steam and gas turbines and of the monitoring system of gas discharges, which comprise a simulator of total reach of combined cycle units. These three systems had to be developed and implemented in the simulator of combined cycle units, that the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) developed for the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), with the purpose of solving different problematic caused by the use of a platform of commercial software for the construction of simulators. The problematic presented by the platform of software is briefly described, as well as the solutions contributed with respect to the interconnection of signals control-process, and to the lack of models of the mechanical part of the steam and gas turbines, and of the monitoring system of polluting emissions. [Spanish] En este articulo se describen el diseno e implantacion de una interfaz control-proceso y la formulacion de los modelos de proceso para la simulacion de las amplitudes de vibracion de las turbinas de gas y de vapor y del sistema de monitoreo de emisiones de gases, los cuales forman parte de un simulador de alcance total de unidades de ciclo combinado. Estos tres sistemas tuvieron que ser desarrollados e implementados en el simulador de unidades de ciclo combinado, que el Instituto de Investigaciones electricas (IIE) desarrollo para la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), con el fin de resolver diferentes problematicas ocasionadas por la utilizacion de una plataforma de software comercial para la construccion de simuladores. Se describen brevemente las problematicas presentadas por la plataforma de software, asi como las soluciones aportadas en lo relativo a la interconexion de senales control-proceso, y a la falta de modelos de la parte mecanica de las turbinas de gas y de vapor, y

  4. Simulation reframed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneebone, Roger L

    2016-01-01

    Simulation is firmly established as a mainstay of clinical education, and extensive research has demonstrated its value. Current practice uses inanimate simulators (with a range of complexity, sophistication and cost) to address the patient 'as body' and trained actors or lay people (Simulated Patients) to address the patient 'as person'. These approaches are often separate.Healthcare simulation to date has been largely for the training and assessment of clinical 'insiders', simulating current practices. A close coupling with the clinical world restricts access to the facilities and practices of simulation, often excluding patients, families and publics. Yet such perspectives are an essential component of clinical practice. This paper argues that simulation offers opportunities to move outside a clinical 'insider' frame and create connections with other individuals and groups. Simulation becomes a bridge between experts whose worlds do not usually intersect, inviting an exchange of insights around embodied practices-the 'doing' of medicine-without jeopardising the safety of actual patients.Healthcare practice and education take place within a clinical frame that often conceals parallels with other domains of expert practice. Valuable insights emerge by viewing clinical practice not only as the application of medical science but also as performance and craftsmanship.Such connections require a redefinition of simulation. Its essence is not expensive elaborate facilities. Developments such as hybrid, distributed and sequential simulation offer examples of how simulation can combine 'patient as body' with 'patient as person' at relatively low cost, democratising simulation and exerting traction beyond the clinical sphere.The essence of simulation is a purposeful design, based on an active process of selection from an originary world, abstraction of what is criterial and re - presentation in another setting for a particular purpose or audience. This may be done within

  5. Simulated experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerknes, R.

    1977-01-01

    A cybernetic model has been developed to elucidate some of the main principles of the growth regulation system in the epidermis of the hairless mouse. A number of actual and theoretical biological experiments have been simulated on the model. These included simulating the cell kinetics as measured by pulse labelling with tritiated thymidine and by continuous labelling with tritiated thymidine. Other simulated experiments included steady state, wear and tear, painting with a carcinogen, heredity and heredity and tumour. Numerous diagrams illustrate the results of these simulated experiments. (JIW)

  6. Flight code validation simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Brent A.

    1996-05-01

    An End-To-End Simulation capability for software development and validation of missile flight software on the actual embedded computer has been developed utilizing a 486 PC, i860 DSP coprocessor, embedded flight computer and custom dual port memory interface hardware. This system allows real-time interrupt driven embedded flight software development and checkout. The flight software runs in a Sandia Digital Airborne Computer and reads and writes actual hardware sensor locations in which Inertial Measurement Unit data resides. The simulator provides six degree of freedom real-time dynamic simulation, accurate real-time discrete sensor data and acts on commands and discretes from the flight computer. This system was utilized in the development and validation of the successful premier flight of the Digital Miniature Attitude Reference System in January of 1995 at the White Sands Missile Range on a two stage attitude controlled sounding rocket.

  7. Excel simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Verschuuren, Gerard M

    2013-01-01

    Covering a variety of Excel simulations, from gambling to genetics, this introduction is for people interested in modeling future events, without the cost of an expensive textbook. The simulations covered offer a fun alternative to the usual Excel topics and include situations such as roulette, password cracking, sex determination, population growth, and traffic patterns, among many others.

  8. Simulating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Dina; Holt, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Students use manipulative models and small-scale simulations that promote learning of complex biological concepts. The authors have developed inexpensive wet-lab simulations and manipulative models for "Diagnosing Diabetes," "A Kidney Problem?" and "A Medical Mystery." (Contains 5 figures and 3 online resources.)

  9. Simulation tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, F

    2006-01-01

    In the last two decades, simulation tools made a significant contribution to the great progress in development of power electronics. Time to market was shortened and development costs were reduced drastically. Falling costs, as well as improved speed and precision, opened new fields of application. Today, continuous and switched circuits can be mixed. A comfortable number of powerful simulation tools is available. The users have to choose the best suitable for their application. Here a simple rule applies: The best available simulation tool is the tool the user is already used to (provided, it can solve the task). Abilities, speed, user friendliness and other features are continuously being improved—even though they are already powerful and comfortable. This paper aims at giving the reader an insight into the simulation of power electronics. Starting with a short description of the fundamentals of a simulation tool as well as properties of tools, several tools are presented. Starting with simplified models ...

  10. Simulator justifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, B.T.

    1990-01-01

    For several years, the authors have been convinced by overwhelming evidence that dynamic simulators are justified for many applications where acceptance has been slow. They speculate as to why this situation has existed and list many benefits that accrue to those who use simulators for training and other purposes. This paper along may be sufficient to convince a receptive approval chain of the value of simulator ownership. It is intended primarily as an aid and supporting document for those who find it necessary to build a detailed justification for a specific simulator acquisition. The purchase of a simulator requires justification. For new military aircraft and for spacecraft, a simulator for training and performance evaluation is virtually assumed, value having been proven many times over. for commercial aircraft, safety is the overwhelming justification. For nuclear power plants, government regulations require operators to be licensed by examination on a certified simulator. For other applications, including air traffic control, biomedical, communications, electronic power transmission and distribution, emergency engineering and management, fossil power plants, gaming land vehicles, manufacturing, maintenance, marine vehicles, process plants, weapons, etc

  11. Process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, E.G.; Suarez, P.S.; Pantaleon, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The search for an optimal design of a heavy water plant is done by means of a simulation model for the mass and enthalpy balances of the SH 2 -H 2 O exchange process. A symplified model for the simulation diagram where the entire plant is represented by a sole tray tower with recicles, and heat and mass feeds/extractions was used. The tower is simulated by the method developed by Tomich with the convergence part given by the algorithm of Broyden. The concluding part of the work is centered in setting the design parameters (flowrates, heat exchange rates, number of plates) wich give the desired process operating conditions. (author) [es

  12. Solar Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  13. Multimagnetical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, U.; Berg, B.A.; Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL; Neuhaus, T.

    1992-01-01

    We modified the recently proposed multicanonical MC algorithm for the case of a magnetic field driven order-order phase transition. We test this multimagnetic Monte Carlo algorithm for the D = 2 Ising model at β = 0.5 and simulate square lattices up to size 100 x 100. On these lattices with periodic boundary conditions it is possible to enhance the appearance of order-order interfaces during the simulation by many orders of magnitude as compared to the standard Monte Carlo simulation

  14. Simulators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancarani, A.; Zanobetti, D.

    1983-01-01

    The different types of simulator for nuclear power plants depend on the kind of programme and the degree of representation to be achieved, which in turn determines the functions to duplicate. Different degrees correspond to different simulators and hence to different choices in the functions. Training of nuclear power plant operators takes advantage of the contribution of simulators of various degrees of complexity and fidelity. Reduced scope simulators are best for understanding basic phenomena; replica simulators are best used for formal qualification and requalification of personnel, while modular mini simulators of single parts of a plant are best for replay and assessment of malfunctions. Another category consists of simulators for the development of assistance during operation, with the inclusion of disturbance and alarm analysis. The only existing standard on simulators is, at present, the one adopted in the United States. This is too stringent and is never complied with by present simulators. A description of possible advantages of a European standard is therefore offered: it rests on methods of measurement of basic simulator characteristics such as fidelity in values and time. (author)

  15. Operational Requirements Document (ORD) for Warfighters' Simulation (WARSIM) 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... The WARSIM 2000 simulation system will use a computer based simulation and associated hardware to support the training of unit commanders and their staffs from battalion through theater level as well...

  16. Exploration Supply Chain Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Exploration Supply Chain Simulation project was chartered by the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop a software tool, with proper data, to quantitatively analyze supply chains for future program planning. This tool is a discrete-event simulation that uses the basic supply chain concepts of planning, sourcing, making, delivering, and returning. This supply chain perspective is combined with other discrete or continuous simulation factors. Discrete resource events (such as launch or delivery reviews) are represented as organizational functional units. Continuous resources (such as civil service or contractor program functions) are defined as enabling functional units. Concepts of fixed and variable costs are included in the model to allow the discrete events to interact with cost calculations. The definition file is intrinsic to the model, but a blank start can be initiated at any time. The current definition file is an Orion Ares I crew launch vehicle. Parameters stretch from Kennedy Space Center across and into other program entities (Michaud Assembly Facility, Aliant Techsystems, Stennis Space Center, Johnson Space Center, etc.) though these will only gain detail as the file continues to evolve. The Orion Ares I file definition in the tool continues to evolve, and analysis from this tool is expected in 2008. This is the first application of such business-driven modeling to a NASA/government-- aerospace contractor endeavor.

  17. 3D simulation of the catalyst density radial distribution in a riser of the FCC unit; Simulacao 3D da distribuicao radial de densidade do catalisador num riser de uma unidade de FCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apolonio, Adelia M.; Santos, Valdemir A. dos; Finkler, Christine L.L. [Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco (UNICAP), Recife, PE (Brazil); Dantas, Carlos C. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2008-07-01

    Local variations in the catalyst/vacuum gas oils mixing can lead to low conversions in some parts of a fluid cracking catalytic riser, while in other parts, high conversions will produce undesirable fuel gas and coke quantities. Knowledge of the apparent solid concentration in a cross-section of the riser is then essential. A computational program to generate tri dimensional graphics and level curves of the radial catalyst density in FCC risers was elaborated. The algorithm is based on determinations of the polynomial coefficients with aid of least square method and was tested with literature data, obtained by applications of nuclear technique of gamma radiation attenuation. The simulation results showed convergence with the experimental data. The precision of the mapping depends on the number of measurements and promote better conditions of diagnostic of the distribution catalyst type in the riser. (author)

  18. A Simulation-Based Evaluation of Premovement Active Surveillance Protocol Options for the Managed Movement of Turkeys to Slaughter During an Outbreak of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd Weaver, J; Malladi, Sasidhar; Bonney, Peter J; Patyk, Kelly A; Bergeron, Justin G; Middleton, Jamie L; Alexander, Catherine Y; Goldsmith, Timothy J; Halvorson, David A

    2016-05-01

    Risk management decisions associated with live poultry movement during a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreak should be carefully considered. Live turkey movements may pose a risk for disease spread. On the other hand, interruptions in scheduled movements can disrupt business continuity. The Secure Turkey Supply (STS) Plan was developed through an industry-government-academic collaboration to address business continuity concerns that might arise during a HPAI outbreak. STS stakeholders proposed outbreak response measure options that were evaluated through risk assessment. The developed approach relies on 1) diagnostic testing of two pooled samples of swabs taken from dead turkeys immediately before movement via the influenza A matrix gene real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) test; 2) enhanced biosecurity measures in combination with a premovement isolation period (PMIP), restricting movement onto the premises for a few days before movement to slaughter; and 3) incorporation of a distance factor from known infected flocks such that exposure via local area spread is unlikely. Daily exposure likelihood estimates from spatial kernels from past HPAI outbreaks were coupled with simulation models of disease spread and active surveillance to evaluate active surveillance protocol options that differ with respect to the number of swabs per pooled sample and the timing of the tests in relation to movement. Simulation model results indicate that active surveillance testing, in combination with strict biosecurity, substantially increased HPAI virus detection probability. When distance from a known infected flock was considered, the overall combined likelihood of moving an infected, undetected turkey flock to slaughter was predicted to be lower at 3 and 5 km. The analysis of different active surveillance protocol options is designed to incorporate flexibility into HPAI emergency response plans.

  19. Cernavoda power simulator modernization - A step forward in Romanian low cost maintenance simulation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucur, I.; Tatar, F.; Ionescu, Teodor

    2004-01-01

    At Cernavoda NPP the training is conducted on a Full Scope Simulator, a 1:1 replica of Cernavoda Unit 1 reference plant. For the improvement of training delivery the current task is to define the simulation facilities and structure capable to meet the increased requirements for training, qualification and licensing of nuclear personnel. Besides, this upgrade of simulation facilities should be considered if we are addressing the task of extension of training for Cernavoda Unit 2. In order to achieve this target, if we take into account the deployment of a new simulator, the costs would be extremely high. Many utilities carried out similar strategies, utilizing alternative simulators as a complement to full scope simulator in the areas of training and model maintenance. Therefore, depending upon training requirements and finances, the Cernavoda Unit 1 Simulator modernization providing also an alternative to full scope control room simulator may be a viable option. In this case, the solution that we discuss for Cernavoda training extension is the migration of Cernavoda Unit 1 Simulator to state-of-the-art. The paper has the following contents: - Considerations; - Benefits; - Required tasks; - Simulator Modernization Hardware; - Software Scope; - Executive System Programs; - Development and Debug Programs; - Modeling Software; - Plant System Models; - Graphical Model Builder; - Emulation Software; - Instructor Station Software; - Cernavoda 2 simulation facilities; - Limitations

  20. Matching soil grid unit resolutions with polygon unit scales for DNDC modelling of regional SOC pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. D.; Yu, D. S.; Ni, Y. L.; Zhang, L. M.; Shi, X. Z.

    2015-03-01

    Matching soil grid unit resolution with polygon unit map scale is important to minimize uncertainty of regional soil organic carbon (SOC) pool simulation as their strong influences on the uncertainty. A series of soil grid units at varying cell sizes were derived from soil polygon units at the six map scales of 1:50 000 (C5), 1:200 000 (D2), 1:500 000 (P5), 1:1 000 000 (N1), 1:4 000 000 (N4) and 1:14 000 000 (N14), respectively, in the Tai lake region of China. Both format soil units were used for regional SOC pool simulation with DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) process-based model, which runs span the time period 1982 to 2000 at the six map scales, respectively. Four indices, soil type number (STN) and area (AREA), average SOC density (ASOCD) and total SOC stocks (SOCS) of surface paddy soils simulated with the DNDC, were attributed from all these soil polygon and grid units, respectively. Subjecting to the four index values (IV) from the parent polygon units, the variation of an index value (VIV, %) from the grid units was used to assess its dataset accuracy and redundancy, which reflects uncertainty in the simulation of SOC. Optimal soil grid unit resolutions were generated and suggested for the DNDC simulation of regional SOC pool, matching with soil polygon units map scales, respectively. With the optimal raster resolution the soil grid units dataset can hold the same accuracy as its parent polygon units dataset without any redundancy, when VIV indices was assumed as criteria to the assessment. An quadratic curve regression model y = -8.0 × 10-6x2 + 0.228x + 0.211 (R2 = 0.9994, p < 0.05) was revealed, which describes the relationship between optimal soil grid unit resolution (y, km) and soil polygon unit map scale (1:x). The knowledge may serve for grid partitioning of regions focused on the investigation and simulation of SOC pool dynamics at certain map scale.

  1. Simulation optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a significant advance in flotation circuit optimisation through performance benchmarking using metallurgical modelling and steady-state computer simulation. This benchmarking includes traditional measures, such as grade and recovery, as well as new flotation measures, such as ore floatability, bubble surface area flux and froth recovery. To further this optimisation, Outotec has released its HSC Chemistry software with simulation modules. The flotation model developed by the AMIRA P9 Project, of which Outotec is a sponsor, is regarded by industry as the most suitable flotation model to use for circuit optimisation. This model incorporates ore floatability with flotation cell pulp and froth parameters, residence time, entrainment and water recovery. Outotec's HSC Sim enables you to simulate mineral processes in different levels, from comminution circuits with sizes and no composition, through to flotation processes with minerals by size by floatability components, to full processes with true particles with MLA data.

  2. Non-linear Loudspeaker Unit Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of a 6½-inch loudspeaker unit are performed and compared with a displacement measurement. The non-linear loudspeaker model is based on the major nonlinear functions and expanded with time-varying suspension behaviour and flux modulation. The results are presented with FFT plots of thr...... frequencies and different displacement levels. The model errors are discussed and analysed including a test with loudspeaker unit where the diaphragm is removed....

  3. Development of simulators for SMRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafri, M.N.; Butt, P.

    1998-01-01

    The first step towards the introduction of simulator culture in Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) was taken in 1976 when the work on the development of analog computer based Basic Principles Simulator of KANUPP was initiated to test the Modified Real Time Control software. The project was revitalized in 1988 to develop a digital computer model of major KANUPP systems along with real-time simulation executive software and man-machine interface software in FORTRAN-77 on VAX-11/780. This simulator was later ported on microcomputers using C-language with four display units, entitled as KANUPP Test Simulator (KTS), and is presently being employed for training and teaching at KANUPP Inplant Plant Training Center(INPTC) and Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering (KINPOE) respectively. The acquisition of Advanced Process Simulator Software (APROS) in 1991 laid the foundation for establishing an enhanced simulator environment to meet the present day requirements and scope of simulators. The development of APROS based Engineering Analyzer for KANUPP was initiated in 1992. With the contract for 300 MWe two loop PWR nuclear power plant from China the development of Full Scope Training Simulator for CHASNUPP-1 was initiated in 1993, which is scheduled to be completed in end 1997. The process of development of simulators for SMRs provided the opportunities to achieve indigenous capabilities for the design and development of control room with real time I/O interface, real time data communication using RTPs and a general purpose security guarded real-time graphics display system, as well as considerable experience on the design and development of SMRs simulators. This paper presents information on the present state of SMRs simulator development and the achievements made in PAEC. (author)

  4. Development of AC-DC power system simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Tatsumi; Ueda, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Toshio

    1984-01-01

    A modeling and realization technique is described for realtime plant dynamics simulation of nuclear power generating unit in AC-DC power system simulator. Dynamic behavior of reactor system and steam system is important for investigation a further adequate unit control and protection system to system faults in AC and DC power system. Each unit of two nuclear power generating unit in the power system simulator consists of micro generator, DC motors, flywheels and process computer. The DC motor and flywheel simulates dynamic characteristics of steam turbine, and process computer simulates plant dynamics by digital simulation. We have realized real-time plant dynamics simulation by utilizing a high speed process I/O and a high speed digital differential analyzing processor (DDA) in which we builted a newly developed simple plant model. (author)

  5. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  6. Plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumitsu, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    A simulator of a reactor plant of the present invention comprises a plurality of distributed computers, an indication processing section and an operation section. The simulation calculation functions of various kinds of plant models in the plant are shared by the plurality of computers. The indication processing section controls collection of data of the plant simulated by the computers and instructions of an operator. The operation section is operated by the operator and the results of operation are transmitted to the indication processing section, to conduct operation trainings and display the results of the simulation. Each of the computers and the indication processing portion are connected with each other by a network having a memory for common use. Data such as the results of calculation of plant models and various kinds of parameters of the plant required commonly to the calculators and the indication processing section are stored in the common memory, and adapted to be used by way of the network. (N.H.)

  7. Characterisation of an airblast sputtering unit - verification of numeric simulations using an adapted phase doppler droplet measuring technique; Charakterisierung eines Airblastzerstaeubers - Bestaetigung numerischer Simulationen mit einem angepassten Phasen-Doppler-Tropfenmessverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willmann, M.

    1999-07-01

    Two-phase flows were investigated in high-pressure conditions in order to assess the influence of pressure and temperature on spray jet dispersion in so-called airblast sputtering units, whose function is described. The project was to contribute to improved characterisation and better understanding of spray jets. New methods of measurement and calculation were employed that provide more comprehensive and accurate data on two-phase flows. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit sollen Zweiphasenstroemungen unter Hochdruckbedingungen untersucht werden, um den Einfluss von Druck und Temperatur auf die Spruehstrahl-Ausbreitung unter Verwendung von sogenannten Airblast-Zerstaeubern aufzuzeigen. Diese Zerstaeuberbauart wird derzeit typischerweise in Gasturbinen eingesetzt, ihre Funktionsweise wird in einem Kapitel der Arbeit dargestellt. Mit der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein wesentlicher Beitrag zur verbesserten Charakterisierung und zum erweiterten Verstaendnis von Spruehstrahlen, insbesondere unter Einsatz von Airblast-Zerstaeubern geschaffen. Dabei werden sowohl im messtechnischen Bereich wie auch auf numerischer Seite neue Methoden vorgestellt, die eine wesentlich umfassendere und genauere Darstellung von Zweiphasenstroemungen erlauben. Der Einsatz dieser erweiterten Methoden an der Stroemung eines Modellairblastzerstaeubers zeigt wichtige Effekte bei der Tropfenausbreitung und -verdunstung auf. Die Arbeit ist dabei in drei Teilbereiche gegliedert. In einem messtechnisch ausgerichteten Teil werden die neuen, erweiterten Ansaetze zur Auslegung des Phasen-Doppler Verfahrens vorgestellt und damit die Grundlagen zur experimentellen Charakterisierung eines Spruehstrahls geschaffen. In zweiten Teil erfolgt die Darstellung der verwendeten numerischen Methoden. Im dritten Teil werden schliesslich die Resultate experimenteller wie numerischer Untersuchungen parallel eingesetzt, um die physikalischen Phaenomene im Spruehstrahl eines Airblastzerstaeubers darzustellen und damit die

  8. Estimating the Potential Impact of Tobacco Control Policies on Adverse Maternal and Child Health Outcomes in the United States Using the SimSmoke Tobacco Control Policy Simulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David; Mohlman, Mary Katherine; Zhang, Yian

    2016-05-01

    Numerous studies document the causal relationship between prenatal smoking and adverse maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes. Studies also reveal the impact that tobacco control policies have on prenatal smoking. The purpose of this study is to estimate the effect of tobacco control policies on prenatal smoking prevalence and adverse MCH outcomes. The US SimSmoke simulation model was extended to consider adverse MCH outcomes. The model estimates prenatal smoking prevalence and, applying standard attribution methods, uses estimates of MCH prevalence and relative smoking risks to estimate smoking-attributable MCH outcomes over time. The model then estimates the effect of tobacco control policies on adverse birth outcomes averted. Different tobacco control policies have varying impacts on the number of smoking-attributable adverse MCH birth outcomes. Higher cigarette taxes and comprehensive marketing bans individually have the biggest impact with a 5% to 10% reduction across all outcomes for the period from 2015 to 2065. The policies with the lowest impact (2%-3% decrease) during this period are cessation treatment, health warnings, and complete smoke-free laws. Combinations of all policies with each tax level lead to 23% to 28% decreases across all outcomes. Our findings demonstrate the substantial impact of strong tobacco control policies for preventing adverse MCH outcomes, including long-term health implications for children exposed to low birth weight and preterm birth. These benefits are often overlooked in discussions of tobacco control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Design of simulation-based medical education and advantages and disadvantages of in situ simulation versus off-site simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Østergaard, Doris; LeBlanc, Vicki; Ottesen, Bent; Konge, Lars; Dieckmann, Peter; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-01-21

    Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has traditionally been conducted as off-site simulation in simulation centres. Some hospital departments also provide off-site simulation using in-house training room(s) set up for simulation away from the clinical setting, and these activities are called in-house training. In-house training facilities can be part of hospital departments and resemble to some extent simulation centres but often have less technical equipment. In situ simulation, introduced over the past decade, mainly comprises of team-based activities and occurs in patient care units with healthcare professionals in their own working environment. Thus, this intentional blend of simulation and real working environments means that in situ simulation brings simulation to the real working environment and provides training where people work. In situ simulation can be either announced or unannounced, the latter also known as a drill. This article presents and discusses the design of SBME and the advantage and disadvantage of the different simulation settings, such as training in simulation-centres, in-house simulations in hospital departments, announced or unannounced in situ simulations. Non-randomised studies argue that in situ simulation is more effective for educational purposes than other types of simulation settings. Conversely, the few comparison studies that exist, either randomised or retrospective, show that choice of setting does not seem to influence individual or team learning. However, hospital department-based simulations, such as in-house simulation and in situ simulation, lead to a gain in organisational learning. To our knowledge no studies have compared announced and unannounced in situ simulation. The literature suggests some improved organisational learning from unannounced in situ simulation; however, unannounced in situ simulation was also found to be challenging to plan and conduct, and more stressful among participants. The importance of

  10. Using ADA Tasks to Simulate Operating Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAcetis, Louis A.; Schmidt, Oron; Krishen, Kumar

    1990-01-01

    A method of simulating equipment using ADA tasks is discussed. Individual units of equipment are coded as concurrently running tasks that monitor and respond to input signals. This technique has been used in a simulation of the space-to-ground Communications and Tracking subsystem of Space Station Freedom.

  11. SI units in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, P S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1978-11-01

    The proposal of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements that the special units of radiation and radioactivity-roentgen, rad, rem and curie-be replaced by the International System (SI) of Units has been accepted by international bodies. This paper reviews the resons for introducing the new units and their features. The relation between the special units and the corresponding SI units is discussed with examples. In spite of anticipated difficulties, the commission recommends a smooth and efficient changeover to the SI units in ten years.

  12. Operator training and the training simulator experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.

    The author outlines the approach used by Ontario Hydro to train operators from the day they are hired as Operators-in-Training until they are Authorized Unit First Operators. He describes in detail the use of the simulator in the final year of the authorization program, drawing on experience with the Pickering NGS A simulator. Simulators, he concludes, are important aids to training but by no means all that is required to guarantee capable First Operators

  13. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  14. Optical programmable Boolean logic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2011-11-10

    Logic units are the building blocks of many important computational operations likes arithmetic, multiplexer-demultiplexer, radix conversion, parity checker cum generator, etc. Multifunctional logic operation is very much essential in this respect. Here a programmable Boolean logic unit is proposed that can perform 16 Boolean logical operations from a single optical input according to the programming input without changing the circuit design. This circuit has two outputs. One output is complementary to the other. Hence no loss of data can occur. The circuit is basically designed by a 2×2 polarization independent optical cross bar switch. Performance of the proposed circuit has been achieved by doing numerical simulations. The binary logical states (0,1) are represented by the absence of light (null) and presence of light, respectively.

  15. Simulating events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, C; Bruzzone, L [Techint Italimpianti, Milan (Italy)

    2000-06-01

    The Petacalco Marine terminal on the Pacific coast in the harbour of Lazaro Carclenas (Michoacan) in Mexico, provides coal to the thermoelectric power plant at Pdte Plutarco Elias Calles in the port area. The plant is being converted from oil to burn coal to generate 2100 MW of power. The article describes the layout of the terminal and equipment employed in the unloading, coal stacking, coal handling areas and the receiving area at the power plant. The contractor Techint Italimpianti has developed a software system, MHATIS, for marine terminal management which is nearly complete. The discrete event simulator with its graphic interface provides a real-type decision support system for simulating changes to the terminal operations and evaluating impacts. The article describes how MHATIS is used. 7 figs.

  16. Unit Cost Compendium Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Unit Cost Compendium (UCC) Calculations raw data set was designed to provide for greater accuracy and consistency in the use of unit costs across the USEPA...

  17. United States housing, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman

    2013-01-01

    Provides current and historical information on housing market in the United States. Information includes trends for housing permits and starts, housing completions for single and multifamily units, and sales and construction. This report will be updated annually.

  18. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  19. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Providers, Emergency Consultations, and General Public. Contact Us Malaria Treatment (United States) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines For Clinicians (United States) Download PDF version ...

  20. Neuromechanical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald H Edwards

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the interaction between the body and the brain for the control of behavior has been recognized in recent years with the advent of neuromechanics, a field in which the coupling between neural and biomechanical processes is an explicit focus. A major tool used in neuromechanics is simulation, which connects computational models of neural circuits to models of an animal’s body situated in a virtual physical world. This connection closes the feedback loop that links the brain, the body, and the world through sensory stimuli, muscle contractions and body movement. Neuromechanical simulations enable investigators to explore the dynamical relationships between the brain, the body, and the world in ways that are difficult or impossible through experiment alone. Studies in a variety of animals have permitted the analysis of extremely complex and dynamic neuromechanical systems, they have demonstrated that the nervous system functions synergistically with the mechanical properties of the body, they have examined hypotheses that are difficult to test experimentally, and they have explored the role of sensory feedback in controlling complex mechanical systems with many degrees of freedom. Each of these studies confronts a common set of questions: (i how to abstract key features of the body, the world and the CNS in a useful model, (ii how to ground model parameters in experimental reality, (iii how to optimize the model and identify points of sensitivity and insensitivity, and (iv how to share neuromechanical models for examination, testing, and extension by others.

  1. Meteorite Unit Models for Structural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Carlozzi, Alexander A.; Karajeh, Zaid S.; Bryson, Kathryn L.

    2017-10-01

    To assess the threat posed by an asteroid entering Earth’s atmosphere, one must predict if, when, and how it fragments during entry. A comprehensive understanding of the asteroid material properties is needed to achieve this objective. At present, the meteorite material found on earth are the only objects from an entering asteroid that can be used as representative material and be tested inside a laboratory. Due to complex composition, it is challenging and expensive to obtain reliable material properties by means of laboratory test for a family of meteorites. In order to circumvent this challenge, meteorite unit models are developed to determine the effective material properties including Young’s modulus, compressive and tensile strengths and Poisson’s ratio, that in turn would help deduce the properties of asteroids. The meteorite unit model is a representative volume that accounts for diverse minerals, porosity, cracks and matrix composition.The Young’s Modulus and Poisson’s Ratio in the meteorite units are calculated by performing several hundreds of Monte Carlo simulations by randomly distributing the various phases inside these units. Once these values are obtained, cracks are introduced in these units. The size, orientation and distribution of cracks are derived by CT-scans and visual scans of various meteorites. Subsequently, simulations are performed to attain stress-strain relations, strength and effective modulus values in the presence of these cracks. The meteorite unit models are presented for H, L and LL ordinary chondrites, as well as for terrestrial basalt. In the case of the latter, data from the simulations is compared with experimental data to validate the methodology. These meteorite unit models will be subsequently used in fragmentation modeling of full scale asteroids.

  2. Simulating spin models on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Over the last couple of years it has been realized that the vast computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs) could be harvested for purposes other than the video game industry. This power, which at least nominally exceeds that of current CPUs by large factors, results from the relative simplicity of the GPU architectures as compared to CPUs, combined with a large number of parallel processing units on a single chip. To benefit from this setup for general computing purposes, the problems at hand need to be prepared in a way to profit from the inherent parallelism and hierarchical structure of memory accesses. In this contribution I discuss the performance potential for simulating spin models, such as the Ising model, on GPU as compared to conventional simulations on CPU.

  3. Evaluation of seasonal exergy efficiency of air handing unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kęstutis Genys

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the air handling unit seasonal exergy efficiency. TRNSYS simulation tool is used to evaluate it. The object of research is air treatment device used to treat an air for the ventilation of laboratory. The mathematical model of air handling unit using TRNSYS simulation tool was developed when the technical parameters of air handling unit and energy exchange in it were analysed. The developed model according to the made observations during the warm and cold periods was tested and validation of elements was performed. The simulation of air handling unit operation after the verification of reliability and permitted tolerances was performed. The control mechanisim which allows simulating the operation of air handling unit during cold and warm periods of the year was made. The mathematical algorithm for calculation of air handling unit exergy efficiency coefficient applying the principles of exergy analysis was developed. The seasonal exergy efficiency of air handling unit equal to 3.94 percent during the simulation was obtained.

  4. Simulating the rubble mound underlying armour units protecting a breakwater

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available on such infrastructure. We are developing analytical techniques for understanding breakwater structural stability. We are modelling the infrastructure using a physics engine, which handles the rigid body mechanics. We report here on our attempts to model the rubble...

  5. Leveraging DMO’s Hi-Tech Simulation Against the F-16 Flying Training Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    39-49. 6 United States Department of Transportation, Airplance Simulator Qualification, Report AC No.120-40B (Washington, DC: Federal Aviation...and Motion Simulation Conference. Binghamton, NY: Singer-Simulation Products Division, 1976. United States Department of Transportation. Airplance

  6. A multiplicity logic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialkowski, J.; Moszynski, M.; Zagorski, A.

    1981-01-01

    The logic diagram principle of operation and some details of the design of the multiplicity logic unit are presented. This unit was specially designed to fulfil the requirements of a multidetector arrangement for gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The unit is equipped with 16 inputs controlled by a common coincidence gate. It delivers a linear output pulse with the height proportional to the multiplicity of coincidences and logic pulses corresponding to 0, 1, ... up to >= 5-fold coincidences. These last outputs are used to steer the routing unit working with the multichannel analyser. (orig.)

  7. ENERGY STAR Unit Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These quarterly Federal Fiscal Year performance reports track the ENERGY STAR qualified HOME units that Participating Jurisdictions record in HUD's Integrated...

  8. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory of...

  9. 31 CFR 500.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 500.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including U.S. trust territories...

  10. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory of...

  11. Parallelization of quantum molecular dynamics simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kaori; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Shibahara, Masahiko; Kotake, Susumu

    1998-02-01

    A quantum molecular dynamics simulation code has been developed for the analysis of the thermalization of photon energies in the molecule or materials in Kansai Research Establishment. The simulation code is parallelized for both Scalar massively parallel computer (Intel Paragon XP/S75) and Vector parallel computer (Fujitsu VPP300/12). Scalable speed-up has been obtained with a distribution to processor units by division of particle group in both parallel computers. As a result of distribution to processor units not only by particle group but also by the particles calculation that is constructed with fine calculations, highly parallelization performance is achieved in Intel Paragon XP/S75. (author)

  12. Neighbors United for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime; Virella, Irmarie

    2009-01-01

    Modeled upon the ecclesiastic community group concept of Latin America to unite and strengthen the bond between the Church and neighborhoods, a community-based organization created Vecinos Unidos por la Salud (Neighbors United for Health) to bring health messages into urban Latino neighborhoods. The model is based on five tenants, and incorporates…

  13. Smart Rocking Armour Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; Arefin, Syed Shamsil; van der Lem, Cock; van gent, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure the rocking motion of lab-scale armour units. Sensors as found in mobile phones are used. These sensors, data-storage and battery are all embedded in the model units, such that they can be applied without wires attached to them. The technique is applied to

  14. High-Performance Beam Simulator for the LANSCE Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Baily, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    A high performance multiparticle tracking simulator is currently under development at Los Alamos. The heart of the simulator is based upon the beam dynamics simulation algorithms of the PARMILA code, but implemented in C++ on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware using NVIDIA's CUDA platform. Linac operating set points are provided to the simulator via the EPICS control system so that changes of the real time linac parameters are tracked and the simulation results updated automatically. This simulator will provide valuable insight into the beam dynamics along a linac in pseudo real-time, especially where direct measurements of the beam properties do not exist. Details regarding the approach, benefits and performance are presented.

  15. AESS: Accelerated Exact Stochastic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David D.; Peterson, Gregory D.

    2011-12-01

    method: The Accelerated Exact Stochastic Simulation (AESS) tool provides implementations of a wide variety of popular variations on the Gillespie method. Users can select the specific algorithm considered most appropriate. Comparisons between the methods and with other available implementations indicate that AESS provides the fastest known implementation of Gillespie's method for a variety of test models. Users may wish to execute ensembles of simulations to sweep parameters or to obtain better statistical results, so AESS supports acceleration of ensembles of simulation using parallel processing with MPI, SSE vector units on x86 processors, and/or using NVIDIA GPUs with CUDA.

  16. Qualified operator training in the simulated control room environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Teodor; Studineanu, Emil; Radulescu, Catalina; Bolocan, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Mainly designed for the training of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 operators, the virtual simulated environment allows the training of the already qualified operators for Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, adding to the already trained knowledge, the differences which has occurred in the Unit 2 design. Using state-of-the-art computers and displays and qualified software, the virtual simulated panels could offer a viable alternative to classic hardware-based training. This approach allows quick training of the new procedures required by the new configuration of the re-designed operator panels in the main control room of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. (authors)

  17. Qualified operator training in the simulated control room environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Teodor; Studineanu, Emil; Radulescu, Catalina; Bolocan, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Mainly designed for the training of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 operators, the virtual simulated environment allows the training of the already qualified operators for Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, adding to the already trained knowledge, the differences which have occurred in the Unit 2 design. Using state-of-the-art computers and displays and qualified software, the virtual simulated panels could offer a viable alternative to classic hardware-based training. This approach allows quick training of the new procedures required by the new configuration of the re-designed operator panels in the main control room of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. (authors)

  18. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  19. Decision unit program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madjar, N.; Pastor, C.; Chambon, B.; Drain, D.; Giorni, A.; Dauchy, A.

    1981-01-01

    A decision unit has been built to simplify the electronic logic set-up in multi-detectors experiments. This unit, designed with fast memories used as decision making tables, replaces conventional logic modules. Nine inputs are provided for receiving the fast detector signals (charged particles, gammas, neutrons, ...). Fifteen independent outputs allow the identification of the choosen events among the 2 9 possible events. A CAMAC interface between the unit and the computer, or a manual control auxiliary module, is used to load, in the memory, the pattern of the choosen events [fr

  20. Smart Rocking Armour Units

    OpenAIRE

    Hofland, B.; Arefin, Syed Shamsil; van der Lem, Cock; van gent, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure the rocking motion of lab-scale armour units. Sensors as found in mobile phones are used. These sensors, data-storage and battery are all embedded in the model units, such that they can be applied without wires attached to them. The technique is applied to double-layer units in order to compare the results to the existing knowledge for this type of armour layers. In contrast to previous research, the gyroscope reading is used to determine the (rocking)...

  1. Allocating multiple units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranæs, Torben; Krishna, Kala

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the allocation and rent distribution in multi-unit, combinatorial-bid auctions under complete information. We focus on the natural multi-unit analogue of the first-price auction, where buyers bid total payments, pay their bids, and where the seller allocates goods to maximize his...... auction, which is the multi unit analogue of a second-price auction. Furthermore, we characterize these equilibria when valuations take a number of different forms: diminishing marginal valuations, increasing average valuations, and marginal valuations with single turning points...

  2. Current Issues in the Use of Virtual Simulations for Dismounted Soldier Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knerr, Bruce W

    2006-01-01

    Research on the use of virtual simulation to train Soldiers and leaders in small dismounted units has largely focused on the use of specially developed, relatively high-fidelity PC-based simulators...

  3. LOADING SIMULATION PROGRAM C

    Science.gov (United States)

    LSPC is the Loading Simulation Program in C++, a watershed modeling system that includes streamlined Hydrologic Simulation Program Fortran (HSPF) algorithms for simulating hydrology, sediment, and general water quality

  4. Manned Flight Simulator (MFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Simulation Division, home to the Manned Flight Simulator (MFS), provides real-time, high fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop flight simulation capabilities...

  5. Tax Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  6. Insects: An Interdisciplinary Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The author talks about an interdisciplinary unit on insects, and presents activities that can help students practice communication skills (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and learn about insects with hands-on activities.

  7. UnitedHealth Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  8. Operable Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of operable unit data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  9. Flywheel and power unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, R.W.

    1992-10-28

    A power unit, e.g. for an electrically driven vehicle, incorporates a flywheel for storing kinetic energy and a battery for storing electrical energy. The battery is incorporated as a substantial part of the rotating mass of the flywheel. Preferably the unit further includes an electrical machine being a motor or generator or machine operable either as a motor or a generator for transferring energy between the battery and the flywheel and/or for the input or output of rotary energy therefrom or thereto. The motor may be used for powering the flywheel and may also operate in a regenerative mode for recharging the unit on de-acceleration of the vehicle. The unit of the invention may also be utilized as an electrical stored power source, e.g. wind or water driven. (author)

  10. Does size matter? Animal units and animal unit months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar Smith; Joe Hicks; Scott Lusk; Mike Hemmovich; Shane Green; Sarah McCord; Mike Pellant; John Mitchell; Judith Dyess; Jim Sprinkle; Amanda Gearhart; Sherm Karl; Mike Hannemann; Ken Spaeth; Jason Karl; Matt Reeves; Dave Pyke; Jordan Spaak; Andrew Brischke; Del Despain; Matt Phillippi; Dave Weixelmann; Alan Bass; Jessie Page; Lori Metz; David Toledo; Emily Kachergis

    2017-01-01

    The concepts of animal units, animal unit months, and animal unit equivalents have long been used as standards for range management planning, estimating stocking rates, reporting actual use, assessing grazing fees, ranch appraisal, and other purposes. Increasing size of cattle on rangelands has led some to suggest that the definition of animal units and animal unit...

  11. UniTed

    OpenAIRE

    Harma, Eero

    2010-01-01

    UniTed on Teddy boy- tyylistä inspiroitunut kevät/kesä mallisto naisille.Mallistossa yhdistyy perinteinen teddy boy- vaatetus ja klassinen feminiinisyys, sekä menneisyys ja nykyisyys. Suunnittelun lähtökohtia olivat naisellisuus, tyylikkyys ja pyrkimys luoda nykyaikaista suunnittelua menneisyydestä lainaillen. United is a teddy boy- style inspired spring/summer collection for women. The collection combines traditional Teddy boy style with classical feminity and past with the present. The b...

  12. Inovation of the computer system for the WWER-440 simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrumpf, L.

    1988-01-01

    The configuration of the WWER-440 simulator computer system consists of four SMEP computers. The basic data processing unit consists of two interlinked SM 52/11.M1 computers with 1 MB of main memory. This part of the computer system of the simulator controls the operation of the entire simulator, processes the programs of technology behavior simulation, of the unit information system and of other special systems, guarantees program support and the operation of the instructor's console. An SM 52/11 computer with 256 kB of main memory is connected to each unit. It is used as a communication unit for data transmission using the DASIO 600 interface. Semigraphic color displays are based on the microprocessor modules of the SM 50/40 and SM 53/10 kit supplemented with a modified TESLA COLOR 110 ST tv receiver. (J.B.). 1 fig

  13. Astronaut Neil Armstrong participates in simulation of moon's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit, deploys a lunar surface television camera during lunar surface simulation training in bldg 9, Manned Spacecraft Center. Armstrong is the prime crew commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission.

  14. Freestanding midwifery unit versus obstetric unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Charlotte; Møller, Anna Margrethe; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2011-01-01

    low-risk women intending FMU birth and a matched control group of 839 low-risk women intending OU birth were included at the start of care in labour. OU women were individually chosen to match selected obstetric/socio-economic characteristics of FMU women. Analysis was by intention to treat. Main......Objective To compare perinatal and maternal morbidity and birth interventions in low-risk women giving birth in two freestanding midwifery units (FMUs) and two obstetric units (OUs). Design A cohort study with a matched control group. Setting The region of North Jutland, Denmark. Participants 839...... women were significantly less likely to experience an abnormal fetal heart rate (RR: 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.5), fetal–pelvic complications (0.2, 0.05 to 0.6), shoulder dystocia (0.3, 0.1 to 0.9), occipital–posterior presentation (0.5, 0.3 to 0.9) and postpartum haemorrhage >500 ml (0.4, 0.3 to 0...

  15. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  16. Large Scale Simulation Platform for NODES Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotorrio, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Qin, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Min, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-27

    This report summarizes the Large Scale (LS) simulation platform created for the Eaton NODES project. The simulation environment consists of both wholesale market simulator and distribution simulator and includes the CAISO wholesale market model and a PG&E footprint of 25-75 feeders to validate the scalability under a scenario of 33% RPS in California with additional 17% of DERS coming from distribution and customers. The simulator can generate hourly unit commitment, 5-minute economic dispatch, and 4-second AGC regulation signals. The simulator is also capable of simulating greater than 10k individual controllable devices. Simulated DERs include water heaters, EVs, residential and light commercial HVAC/buildings, and residential-level battery storage. Feeder-level voltage regulators and capacitor banks are also simulated for feeder-level real and reactive power management and Vol/Var control.

  17. Harvesting graphics power for MD simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meel, J.A.; Arnold, A.; Frenkel, D.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.; Belleman, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss an implementation of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a graphic processing unit (GPU) in the NVIDIA CUDA language. We tested our code on a modern GPU, the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTX. Results for two MD algorithms suitable for short-ranged and long-ranged interactions, and a

  18. Harvesting graphics power for MD simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meel, J.A. van; Arnold, A.; Frenkel, D.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.; Belleman, R.G.

    We discuss an implementation of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a graphic processing unit (GPU) in the NVIDIA CUDA language. We tested our code on a modern GPU, the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTX. Results for two MD algorithms suitable for short-ranged and long-ranged interactions, and a

  19. GPU Accelerated Surgical Simulators for Complex Morhpology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Jesper; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2005-01-01

    a springmass system in order to simulate a complex organ such as the heart. Computations are accelerated by taking advantage of modern graphics processing units (GPUs). Two GPU implementations are presented. They vary in their generality of spring connections and in the speedup factor they achieve...

  20. Simulations: Interdisciplinary Instruction at Its Best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkler, Karen W.

    2003-01-01

    Draws on numerous different content areas in the development of a 4-to-6 week long unit with the culminating activity of a simulated Mexican cafe. Students assume the roles of restaurant personnel and greet customers, take and fill orders, cook a variety of Mexican entrees, tally the check, and make change, all in the target language while…

  1. Rapanos v. United States & Carabell v. United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents associated with guidance for implementing the definition of waters of the United States under the Clean Water Act following the Rapanos v. United States, and Carabell v. United States Supreme Court decision.

  2. Qualification of RETRAN for simulator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The use of full-scope control room replica simulators increased substantially following the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2. The technical capability required to represent severe events has been included, in varying degrees, in most simulators purchased since the TMI-2 accident. The ability of the instructor to create a large variety of combinations of malfunctions has also greatly expanded. The nuclear industry has developed a standard which establishes the minimum functional requirements for full-scope nuclear control room simulators used for operator training. This standard, ANSI/ANS-3.5, was first issued in 1981 and was reissued in 1985. A method for performing simulator qualification with best estimate analytical data has been proposed in EPRI NP-4243, Analytic Simulator Qualification Methodology. The idea presented there is to choose a set of transients which drive the simulator into all the system conditions (dynamic states) likely to be encountered during operator training. The key observable parameters for each state are compared to analyses performed with the best estimate analytical model The closeness of the comparison determines the fidelity of the simulator. The approach described in EPRI NP-4243 has been adapted for evaluating RETRAN's capability for use in simulator qualification. RETRAN analyses which compare the RETRAN results to plant or test facility data are evaluated with respect to the simulator test matrix documented in EPRI NP-4243

  3. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  4. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, A. L. II [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-03-03

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  5. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material

  6. Productivity improvement using discrete events simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazza, M. H. F. Al; Elbishari, E. M. Y.; Ismail, M. Y. Bin; Adesta, E. Y. T.; Rahman, Nur Salihah Binti Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The increasing in complexity of the manufacturing systems has increased the cost of investment in many industries. Furthermore, the theoretical feasibility studies are not enough to take the decision in investing for that particular area. Therefore, the development of the new advanced software is protecting the manufacturer from investing money in production lines that may not be sufficient and effective with their requirement in terms of machine utilization and productivity issue. By conducting a simulation, using accurate model will reduce and eliminate the risk associated with their new investment. The aim of this research is to prove and highlight the importance of simulation in decision-making process. Delmia quest software was used as a simulation program to run a simulation for the production line. A simulation was first done for the existing production line and show that the estimated production rate is 261 units/day. The results have been analysed based on utilization percentage and idle time. Two different scenarios have been proposed based on different objectives. The first scenario is by focusing on low utilization machines and their idle time, this was resulted in minimizing the number of machines used by three with the addition of the works who maintain them without having an effect on the production rate. The second scenario is to increase the production rate by upgrading the curing machine which lead to the increase in the daily productivity by 7% from 261 units to 281 units.

  7. Exercise evaluation and simulation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meitzler, W.D.; Jaske, R.T.

    1983-12-01

    The Exercise Evaluation and Simulation Facility (EESF) is a mini computer based system that will serve as a tool to aid FEMA in the evaluation of radiological emergency plans and preparedness around commercial nucler power facilities. The EESF integrates the following resources: a meteorological model, dose model, evacuation model, map information, and exercise information into a single system. Thus the user may access these various resources concurrently, and on completion display the results on a color graphic display or hardcopy unit. A unique capability made possible by the integration of these models is the computation of estimated total dose to the population

  8. Simulator for NPP Temelin and I and C system assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcek, V.

    1997-01-01

    The paper provides a brief overview over the NPP Temelin simulator design features, the recent status and the future planned steps of the simulator system integration, testing and operation. The simulator is designed as the full scope control room replica type simulator with stimulation of the selected special I and C subsystems as are used on the man-machine interface in the reference unit main control room. The primary goal of the simulator is provide plant operators and other plant technical staff with comprehensive training in all aspects of the plant control and monitoring under the operating conditions simulated in the real-time (normal operation, incident and accident scenarios). The quality and scope of simulation offers possibility to use efficiently simulator as well for a wide spectrum of the engineering analyses to help the plant designers evaluate, verify and improve especially I and C system algorithms, plant operating instructions as well as the MCR man-machine design before the reference unit startup. The paper deals with simulation approach used for in depth analyses, assessment and potential improvements of the sophisticated and complex I and C system algorithms developed and prepared for implementation in the reference plant on the state-of-the-art digital platform of Westinghouse technology (Eagle system cabinets, WDPF system units, NPL cabinets, etc.), using display based version of the full scope simulator as an efficient supporting tool for this analyses. (author)

  9. COCOA: Simulating Observations of Star Cluster Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Abbas; Giersz, Mirek; Pych, Wojciech; Dalessandro, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    COCOA (Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions) creates idealized mock photometric observations using results from numerical simulations of star cluster evolution. COCOA is able to present the output of realistic numerical simulations of star clusters carried out using Monte Carlo or N-body codes in a way that is useful for direct comparison with photometric observations. The code can simulate optical observations from simulation snapshots in which positions and magnitudes of objects are known. The parameters for simulating the observations can be adjusted to mimic telescopes of various sizes. COCOA also has a photometry pipeline that can use standalone versions of DAOPHOT (ascl:1104.011) and ALLSTAR to produce photometric catalogs for all observed stars.

  10. Parallel discrete event simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeinder, B.J.; Hertzberger, L.O.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Withagen, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    In simulating applications for execution on specific computing systems, the simulation performance figures must be known in a short period of time. One basic approach to the problem of reducing the required simulation time is the exploitation of parallelism. However, in parallelizing the simulation

  11. Combine Harvester Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Ole; Sørlie, James Arnold

    1999-01-01

    A simulator for training pilots in the operation of a modern high-tech combine harvester is presented. The new simulator application is based on DMI´s well-known DMS maritime simulator architecture. Two major challenges have been encountered in the development of the simulator: 1) interfacing the...

  12. Business process simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Nakatumba, J.; Rozinat, A.; Russell, N.C.; Brocke, vom J.; Rosemann, M.

    2010-01-01

    Although simulation is typically considered as relevant and highly applicable, in reality the use of simulation is limited. Many organizations have tried to use simulation to analyze their business processes at some stage. However, few are using simulation in a structured and effective manner. This

  13. Gas-centrifuge unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope-enrichment unit is described for separating a gaseous mixture feedstock including a compound of a light nuclear isotope at a predetermined concentration and a compound of a heavy nuclear isotope at a predetermined concentration into at least two unit-output fractions including a waste fraction depleted in the light isotope to a predetermined concentration and a product fraction enriched in the light isotope to a predetermined concentration. The unit comprises a first group of cascades of gas centrifuges, each cascade having an enriching stage, a stripping stage, an input, a light-fraction output, and a heavy-fraction output for separating the gaseous-mixture feed stock into light and heavy gaseous-mixture fractions; and an auxillary cascade

  14. Mechanical strainer unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraeling, J.B.; Netkowicz, R.J.; Schnall, I.H.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanical strainer unit is connected to a flanged conduit which originates in and extends out of a suppression chamber in a nuclear reactor. The strainer includes a plurality of centrally apertured plates positioned along a common central axis and in parallel and spaced relationship. The plates have a plurality of bores radially spaced about the central axis. Spacer means such as washers are positioned between adjacent plates to maintain the plates is spaced relationship and form communicating passages of a predetermined size to the central apertures. Connecting means such as bolts or studs extend through the aligned bores to maintain the unit in assembled relationship and secure the unit to the pipe. By employing perforated plates and blocking off certain of the communicating passages, a dual straining effect can be achieved

  15. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muino, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M.A.B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Duren, M.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A.I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R.M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S.M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O.L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C.U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E.J.; Fenyuk, A.B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipcic, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M.C.N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M.J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L.R.; Flowerdew, M.J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A.J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S.T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J.A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E.J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B.J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Y.S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia Navarro, J.E.; Gardner, R.W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gautard, V.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E.N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C.N.P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M.H.; Gentile, S.; Georgatos, F.; George, S.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S.M.; Gilbert, L.M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gingrich, D.M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F.M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P.F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K.W.; Glonti, G.L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Gopfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gossling, C.; Gottfert, T.; Goggi, V.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L.S.; Goncalo, R.; Gonella, L.; Gong, C.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M.L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J.J.; Goossens, L.; Gordon, H.A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorisek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M.I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M.P.; Goussiou, A.G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafstrom, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H.M.; Gray, J.A.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z.D.; Gregor, I.M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A.A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y.V.; Groh, M.; Groll, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Y.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C.B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H.K.; Hadley, D.R.; Haefner, P.; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, J.B.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, P.H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G.A.; Harenberg, T.; Harrington, R.D.; Harris, O.M.; Harrison, K; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hashemi, K.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.J.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayward, H.S.; Haywood, S.J.; Head, S.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Hemperek, T.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A.M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Henss, T.; Hernandez Jimenez, Y.; Hershenhorn, A.D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hessey, N.P.; Higon-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J.C.; Hiller, K.H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S.J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M.C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M.R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J.L.; Homma, Y.; Horazdovsky, T.; Hori, T.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Horvat, S.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howe, T.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P.J.; Hsu, S.C.; Huang, G.S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hughes, E.W.; Hughes, G.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Irles Quiles, A.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Isobe, T.; Issakov, V.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Itoh, Y.; Ivashin, A.V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J.M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J.N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M.R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D.K.; Jansen, E.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jared, R.C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jez, P.; Jezequel, S.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K.E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S; Johns, K.A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Jones, T.J.; Jorge, P.M.; Joseph, J.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabachenko, V.V.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L.V.; Kalinowski, A.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V.A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A.N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R.D.; Kastanas, A.; Kastoryano, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M.S.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V.A.; Kazarinov, M.Y.; Keates, J.R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P.T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Kelly, M.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Khakzad, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, M.S.; Kim, P.C.; Kim, S.H.; Kind, O.; Kind, P.; King, B.T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G.P.; Kirsch, L.E.; Kiryunin, A.E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E.B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; 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Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R.D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.A.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  16. Displays and simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohon, N.

    A 'simulator' is defined as a machine which imitates the behavior of a real system in a very precise manner. The major components of a simulator and their interaction are outlined in brief form, taking into account the major components of an aircraft flight simulator. Particular attention is given to the visual display portion of the simulator, the basic components of the display, their interactions, and their characteristics. Real image displays are considered along with virtual image displays, and image generators. Attention is given to an advanced simulator for pilot training, a holographic pancake window, a scan laser image generator, the construction of an infrared target simulator, and the Apollo Command Module Simulator.

  17. Power station simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanobetti

    1989-01-01

    The number and the variety of simulators have gown to such an extent that it has become necessary to classify the numerous types now available. Simulators are of paramount importance for the design of nuclear power plants, for optimizing their efficiency and for the training of their operators: factors that contribute to their overall security. This book contains chapters on the following subjects: the development of power plant simulators, the components and classification of simulators, simulator technology, simulator performance and problems in simulator training

  18. Mobile emergency response unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadi, W.J.; Trolan, R.T.; Becker, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The Hotspot quick-response unit was the solution to a requirement to find, identify, and control areas of radioactive contamination at the scene of a nuclear weapons accident. The unit consists of two trucks and two trailers, and is designed to be transported by one U.S. Air Force C-141. One truck (generator truck) carries a 40 kW generator-heater-air conditioner combination, spare tires, and accessories. The other (water truck) carries supplies and a 250-gal water tank. One trailer (counting trailer) contains detecting, counting, and recording equipment. The other (decontaminating trailer) contains a shower, sink, 30-gal hot water tank, and supplies

  19. Computer simulation of the NASA water vapor electrolysis reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The water vapor electrolysis (WVE) reactor is a spacecraft waste reclamation system for extended-mission manned spacecraft. The WVE reactor's raw material is water, its product oxygen. A computer simulation of the WVE operational processes provided the data required for an optimal design of the WVE unit. The simulation process was implemented with the aid of a FORTRAN IV routine.

  20. Simulators of tray distillation columns as tools for interpreting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... at 0.05 m intervals were determined from top to the bottom of simulators of tray distillation columns exposed to 20 mCi of 137 Cs. Signals generated from the simulators were identical with the experimental signals obtained from the Stabilizer Column of the crude oil distillation unit at the Tema Oil Refinery Ghana Limited.

  1. Simulation-based modeling of building complexes construction management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, Aleksandr; Severova, Galina; Potashova, Irina

    2018-03-01

    The study reported here examines the experience in the development and implementation of business simulation games based on network planning and management of high-rise construction. Appropriate network models of different types and levels of detail have been developed; a simulation model including 51 blocks (11 stages combined in 4 units) is proposed.

  2. Construction requirements for full-term newborn simulation manikin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielen, M.W.H.; Bovendeerd, P.H.M.; Neto Fonseca, L.T.; van der Hout-van der Jagt, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the Netherlands, approximately 4500 newborns are admitted each year in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In order to determine and practice optimal treatment for these fragile patients, clinicians increasingly use educative simulation. However, a high-fidelity simulation of

  3. Methodology for Developing a Diesel Exhaust After Treatment Simulation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Tine; Jensen, Johanne; Åberg, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    A methodology for the development of catalyst models is presented. Also, a methodology of the implementation of such models into a modular simulation tool, which simulates the units in succession, is presented. A case study is presented illustrating how suitable models can be found and used for s...

  4. Multipurpose simulator ''MR TRIOS'' for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Takeshi; Uehara, Shigeru; Takata, Hideo; Kamishima, Naoyuki

    1993-01-01

    MHI (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries) has developed MR TRIOS (Mitsubishi Reprocessing plant TRansient simulation code for Integrated process for Operation Support), the realtime dynamic simulator, for multipurpose use to support the Reprocessing Plant operation in various aspects. MR TRIOS integrates the Simulation Models of the unit process in a Reprocessing Plant, including Shearing, Dissolution, NOx absorption, Accountability and Adjustment and Co-decontamination process, where each Simulation Model has two kinds of models: Process and Control System. MR TRIOS can simulate the process behavior of the unit process in an integrated manner as well as independently. It is supported by MR CONTROL, the simulator control program developed by MHI. From MR TRIOS one can obtain real-time process values, such as temperature, pressure, density, flow rate, and concentration of nuclides, enabling the evaluation of the process dynamic characteristics under various operating conditions. MR TRIOS has proved to be an effective tool for the comprehensive study of the process and system dynamics, for operation technique improvements and for training

  5. Stability Analysis for Operation of DG Units in Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouresmaeil, Edris; Shaker, Hamid Reza; Mehrasa, Majid

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multifunction control strategy for the stable operation of Distributed Generation (DG) units during grid integration. The proposed control model is based on Direct Lyapunov Control (DLC) theory and provides a stable region for the appropriate operation of DG units during grid....... Application of this concept can guarantee to reduce the stress on the grid during the energy demand peak. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the proficiency and performance of the proposed DLC technique in DG technology....

  6. Transfer of manufacturing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing and unfolding relocation of activities is one of the major trends, that calls for attention in the domain of operations management. In particular, prescriptive models outlining: stages of the process, where to locate, and how to establish the new facilities have been studied, while...... and dilemmas to be addressed when transferring manufacturing units....

  7. United States Attorney Prosecutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    property of CocaCola Bottling Company, Fayetteville, North Carolina, of a value in excess of $100.00, in violation of Title 18 United States Code, Section...another, to-wit: a Cocacola soft drink machine, the amount of damage to said personal property being more than $200.00, in violation of North Carolina

  8. Planter unit test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    A planter test stand was developed to evaluate individual row-crop metering units in early 2013. This test stand provided the ability to quantify actual seed metering in terms of population, seed spacing, skips, and multiples over a range of meter RPMs and vacuum pressures. Preliminary data has been...

  9. United Kingdom's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    This is a presentation of the United Kingdom's experience with power transmission open access. The topics of the presentation include the objectives of changing, commercial arrangements and economic drivers, long term effects, the effects of moving to a more competitive environment, and factors affecting open access such as political climate and market regulation

  10. Whale Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Materials in this teaching unit are designed to foster an interest in whale preservation among intermediate grade and junior high school students. Several readings provide background information on various types of whales and the economic value of whales. Student activities include a true and false game, a crossword, and a mobile. A resource list…

  11. Multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevostyanov, V. S.; Uralskij, V. I.; Uralskij, A. V.; Sinitsa, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents scientific and engineering developments of multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit in which the selective effect of grinding bodies on the crushing material is realized, depending on its physical and mechanical characteristics and various schemes for organizing the technological process

  12. United in change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanneke Posthumus; Josje den Ridder; Joep de Hart

    2014-01-01

    Original title: Verenigd in verandering The importance of citizens who unite in civil society organisations is broadly recognised. Organisations bind people to each other, to the community and to the political system. How are civil-society organisations in the Netherlands faring? Is there

  13. Unit III: International Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Phyllis

    1983-01-01

    This lesson helps students understand the global network involved in international events. Students have an opportunity to examine the impact of international law and the role of international organizations, national governments, and private individuals in the effort to secure the release of United States hostages in Iran. (AM)

  14. Unit 16 - Output

    OpenAIRE

    Unit 16, CC in GIS; Star, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    This unit discusses issues related to GIS output, including the different types of output possible and the hardware for producing each. It describes text, graphic and digital data that can be generated by a GIS as well as line printers, dot matrix printers/plotters, pen plotters, optical scanners and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) as technologies for generating the output.

  15. Defining line replaceable units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parada Puig, J. E.; Basten, R. J I

    2015-01-01

    Defective capital assets may be quickly restored to their operational condition by replacing the item that has failed. The item that is replaced is called the Line Replaceable Unit (LRU), and the so-called LRU definition problem is the problem of deciding on which item to replace upon each type of

  16. Neural control of muscle force: indications from a simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Carlo J. De

    2013-01-01

    We developed a model to investigate the influence of the muscle force twitch on the simulated firing behavior of motoneurons and muscle force production during voluntary isometric contractions. The input consists of an excitatory signal common to all the motor units in the pool of a muscle, consistent with the “common drive” property. Motor units respond with a hierarchically structured firing behavior wherein at any time and force, firing rates are inversely proportional to recruitment threshold, as described by the “onion skin” property. Time- and force-dependent changes in muscle force production are introduced by varying the motor unit force twitches as a function of time or by varying the number of active motor units. A force feedback adjusts the input excitation, maintaining the simulated force at a target level. The simulations replicate motor unit behavior characteristics similar to those reported in previous empirical studies of sustained contractions: 1) the initial decrease and subsequent increase of firing rates, 2) the derecruitment and recruitment of motor units throughout sustained contractions, and 3) the continual increase in the force fluctuation caused by the progressive recruitment of larger motor units. The model cautions the use of motor unit behavior at recruitment and derecruitment without consideration of changes in the muscle force generation capacity. It describes an alternative mechanism for the reserve capacity of motor units to generate extraordinary force. It supports the hypothesis that the control of motoneurons remains invariant during force-varying and sustained isometric contractions. PMID:23236008

  17. Scientific computer simulation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaizer, Joshua S.; Heller, A. Kevin; Oberkampf, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Before the results of a scientific computer simulation are used for any purpose, it should be determined if those results can be trusted. Answering that question of trust is the domain of scientific computer simulation review. There is limited literature that focuses on simulation review, and most is specific to the review of a particular type of simulation. This work is intended to provide a foundation for a common understanding of simulation review. This is accomplished through three contributions. First, scientific computer simulation review is formally defined. This definition identifies the scope of simulation review and provides the boundaries of the review process. Second, maturity assessment theory is developed. This development clarifies the concepts of maturity criteria, maturity assessment sets, and maturity assessment frameworks, which are essential for performing simulation review. Finally, simulation review is described as the application of a maturity assessment framework. This is illustrated through evaluating a simulation review performed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In making these contributions, this work provides a means for a more objective assessment of a simulation’s trustworthiness and takes the next step in establishing scientific computer simulation review as its own field. - Highlights: • We define scientific computer simulation review. • We develop maturity assessment theory. • We formally define a maturity assessment framework. • We describe simulation review as the application of a maturity framework. • We provide an example of a simulation review using a maturity framework

  18. Safety by simulation; Sicherheit durch Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Eberhard [KSG Kraftwerks-Simulator-Gesellschaft mbH, Essen (Germany); GfS Gesellschaft fuer Simulatorschulung mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Simulator training is a key component in achieving and preserving on the long term the necessary expertise of plant personnel also required by the authorities. In this way, it makes an important contribution to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Simulators are a component in the training of operating personnel of nuclear power plants which allows nuclear power plant operators to be prepared in a focused and practice-oriented way for their activity in everyday plant operation and for possible accident simulation. The simulator center is supported by 5 nuclear power plant operators: the German E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, RWE Power AG, EnBW Kraftwerke AG, and Vattenfall Europe Nuclear Energy GmbH companies as well as the Netherlands N.V. Electriciteits-Produktiemaatschappij Zuid-Nederland. They established a joint enterprise in Essen which performs in one central place the duty of simulator training incumbent upon all nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  19. 'In situ simulation' versus 'off site simulation' in obstetric emergencies and their effect on knowledge, safety attitudes, team performance, stress, and motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Van der Vleuten, Cees; Lindschou, Jane

    2013-01-01

    learner outcomes. However, many questions on how SBME can be optimized remain unanswered. One unresolved issue is how 'in situ simulation' (ISS) versus 'off site simulation' (OSS) impact learning. ISS means simulation-based training in the actual patient care unit (in other words, the labor room...

  20. Development of intelligent simulations at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    The Virtual Commander Project (VCom) is developing a capability for semiautomated optimal control of simulation entities. Properties of our control paradigm are goal-directed planning, hierarchical plan generation, automated fault detection, adaptive plan repair, and optimized cooperation and coordination among units, in addition to more conventional rule-driven behaviors. VCom has been applied to planning armor engagements at the battalion level and below. We are currently investigating movement-to-contact and fire-and-movement maneuvers. These capabilities will be demonstrated in April in conjunction with the Joint Conflict Model (JCM) a large, entity-level, constructive combat simulation. Both simulations have been developed to interoperate in a distributed computing environment using Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) protocols. Prototype applications have been demonstrated in other civilian and military contexts. A focus of our current work is the rapid prototyping of such applications.