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Sample records for unit low-dimensional chaos

  1. Evidence of low-dimensional chaos in magnetized plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zivkovic, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    We analyze probe data obtained from a toroidal magnetized plasma configuration suitable for studies of low-frequency gradient-driven instabilities. These instabilities give rise to field-aligned convection rolls analogous to Rayleigh-Benard cells in neutral fluids, and may theoretically develop similar routes to chaos. When using mean-field dimension analysis, we observe low dimensionality, but this could originate from either low-dimensional chaos, periodicity or quasi-periodicity. Therefore, we apply recurrence plot analysis as well as estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent. These analyses provide evidence of low-dimensional chaos, in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  2. Evidence for low dimensional chaos in sunspot cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, C.; Aguirre, L. A.; Maquet, J.; Gilmore, R.

    2006-04-01

    Sunspot cycles are widely used for investigating solar activity. In 1953 Bracewell argued that it is sometimes desirable to introduce the inversion of the magnetic field polarity, and that can be done with a sign change at the beginning of each cycle. It will be shown in this paper that, for topological reasons, this so-called Bracewell index is inappropriate and that the symmetry must be introduced in a more rigorous way by a coordinate transformation. The resulting symmetric dynamics is then favourably compared with a symmetrized phase portrait reconstructed from the z-variable of the Rössler system. Such a link with this latter variable - which is known to be a poor observable of the underlying dynamics - could explain the general difficulty encountered in finding evidence of low-dimensional dynamics in sunspot data.

  3. Low Dimensional Chaos from the Group Sunspot Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Xiu Li; Ke-Jun Li

    2007-01-01

    We examine the nonlinear dynamical properties of the monthly smoothed group sunspot number Rg and find that the solar activity underlying the time series of Rg is globally governed by a low-dimensional chaotic attractor.This finding is consistent with the nonlinear study results of the monthly Wolf sunspot numbers.We estimate the maximal Lyaponuv exponent (MLE) for the Rg series to be positive and to equal approximately 0.0187±0.0023 (month-1).Thus,the Lyaponuv time or predictability time of the chaotic motion is obtained to be about 4.46±0.5 years.which is slightly different with the predictability time obtained from Rz.However,they both indicate that solar activity forecast should be done only for a short to medium term due to the intrinsic complexity of the time behavior concerned.

  4. Lack of evidence for low-dimensional chaos in heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, J K; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Agner, E

    1994-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The term chaos is used to describe erratic or apparently random time-dependent behavior in deterministic systems. It has been suggested that the variability observed in the normal heart rate may be due to chaos, but this question has not been settled. METHODS AND RESULTS: Heart rate...... variability was assessed by recordings of consecutive RR intervals in ten healthy subjects using ambulatory ECG. All recordings were performed with the subjects at rest in the supine position. To test for the presence of nonlinearities and/or chaotic dynamics, ten surrogate time series were constructed from...... in the experimental data, but the prediction error as a function of the prediction length increased at a slower rate than characteristic of a low-dimensional chaotic system. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence for low-dimensional chaos in the time series of RR intervals from healthy human subjects. However, nonlinear...

  5. Evidence of low dimensional chaos in renal blood flow control in genetic and experimental hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, K.-P.; Marsh, D. J.; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    1995-01-01

    We applied a surrogate data technique to test for nonlinear structure in spontaneous fluctuations of hydrostatic pressure in renal tubules of hypertensive rats. Tubular pressure oscillates at 0.03-0.05 Hz in animals with normal blood pressure, but the fluctuations become irregular with chronic hypertension. Using time series from rats with hypertension we produced surrogate data sets to test whether they represent linearly correlated noise or ‘static’ nonlinear transforms of a linear stochastic process. The correlation dimension and the forecasting error were used as discriminating statistics to compare surrogate with experimental data. The results show that the original experimental time series can be distinguished from both linearly and static nonlinearly correlated noise, indicating that the nonlinear behavior is due to the intrinsic dynamics of the system. Together with other evidence this strongly suggests that a low dimensional chaotic attractor governs renal hemodynamics in hypertension. This appears to be the first demonstration of a transition to chaotic dynamics in an integrated physiological control system occurring in association with a pathological condition.

  6. Chaos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In certain two-dimensional time-dependent flows, the braiding of periodic orbits provides a way to analyze chaos in the system through application of the Thurston-Nielsen classification theorem (TNCT). We expand upon earlier work that introduced the application of the TNCT to braiding of almost-cyclic sets, which are individual components of almost-invariant sets [Stremler et al., "Topological chaos and periodic braiding of almost-cyclic sets," Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 114101 (2011)]. In this co...

  7. Low-Dimensional Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Duncan W; O'Hare, Dermot

    2010-01-01

    With physical properties that often may not be described by the transposition of physical laws from 3D space across to 2D or even 1D space, low-dimensional solids exhibit a high degree of anisotropy in the spatial distribution of their chemical bonds. This means that they can demonstrate new phenomena such as charge-density waves and can display nanoparticulate (0D), fibrous (1D) and lamellar (2D) morphologies. Low-Dimensional Solids presents some of the most recent research into the synthesis and properties of these solids and covers: Metal Oxide Nanoparticles; Inorganic Nanotubes and Nanowir

  8. A Unit on Deterministic Chaos for Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, D.; Assimopoulos, S.; Skordoulis, C.

    2013-01-01

    A unit aiming to introduce pre-service teachers of primary education to the limited predictability of deterministic chaotic systems is presented. The unit is based on a commercial chaotic pendulum system connected with a data acquisition interface. The capabilities and difficulties in understanding the notion of limited predictability of 18…

  9. Cohomology spaces of low dimensional complex associative algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nadia F.; Rakhimov, Isamiddin S.; Hussain, Sharifah Kartini Said

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we calculate cohomology groups of low-dimensional complex associative algebras. The calculations are based on a classification result and description of derivations of low-dimensional associative algebras obtained earlier. For the first cohomology group, we give basic cocycles up to inner derivations. We also provide basic coboundaries for the second cohomology groups for low-dimensional associative algebras (including both unital and non unital).

  10. Low-dimensional molecular metals

    CERN Document Server

    Toyota, Naoki; Muller, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Assimilating research in the field of low-dimensional metals, this monograph provides an overview of the status of research on quasi-one- and two-dimensional molecular metals, describing normal-state properties, magnetic field effects, superconductivity, and the phenomena of interacting p and d electrons.

  11. Low dimensional chaos is present in radon time variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaime, B. [Escuela Superior Politecnica de Chimborazo, Riobamba (Ecuador); Ugo, F.; Stefano, M. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale Applicata; Elio, G. [Servizo di fisica, Pavia (Italy). Universita Studi

    1995-12-31

    An indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentration time series registered in a house at Angera (Italy) in 1986 and 1987 was characterised by an important aperiodic component presenting a chaotic-deterministic behaviour. The data were analysed by comparing three algorithms that are used to extract phase-space dynamical information from experimental time series. They show different fractal dimensions. Consequently, the phenomenon is intrinsically unpredictable and a small number of parameters (related to fractal dimension) can be sufficient to describe its attractor dynamics, even when it is influenced by many variables such as micro climatic and geological conditions. Also large, rare concentrations, related to small changes in the above mentioned variables are present in radon time sets. (Author).

  12. Chaos, self-organized criticality, and SETAR nonlinearity: An analysis of purchasing power parity between Canada and the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, Apostolos [Department of Economics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta., T2N 1N4 (Canada)]. E-mail: Serletis@ucalgary.ca; Shahmoradi, Asghar [Faculty of Economics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    This paper uses monthly observations for the real exchange rate between Canada and the United States over the recent flexible exchange rate period (from January 1, 1973 to August 1, 2004) to test purchasing power parity between Canada and the United States using unit root and stationarity tests. Moreover, given the apparent random walk behavior in the real exchange rate, various tests from dynamical systems theory, such as for example, the Nychka et al. [Nychka DW, Ellner S, Ronald GA, McCaffrey D. Finding chaos in noisy systems. J Roy Stat Soc B 1992;54:399-426] chaos test, the Li [Li W. Absence of 1/f spectra in Dow Jones average. Int J Bifurcat Chaos 1991;1:583-97] self-organized criticality test, and the Hansen [Hansen, B.E. Inference when a nuisance parameter is not identified under the null hypothesis. Econometrica 1996;64:413-30] threshold effects test are used to distinguish between stochastic and deterministic origin for the real exchange rate.

  13. Distinguishing Error from Chaos in Ecological Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, George; Grenfell, Bryan; May, Robert M.

    1990-11-01

    Over the years, there has been much discussion about the relative importance of environmental and biological factors in regulating natural populations. Often it is thought that environmental factors are associated with stochastic fluctuations in population density, and biological ones with deterministic regulation. We revisit these ideas in the light of recent work on chaos and nonlinear systems. We show that completely deterministic regulatory factors can lead to apparently random fluctuations in population density, and we then develop a new method (that can be applied to limited data sets) to make practical distinctions between apparently noisy dynamics produced by low-dimensional chaos and population variation that in fact derives from random (high-dimensional)noise, such as environmental stochasticity or sampling error. To show its practical use, the method is first applied to models where the dynamics are known. We then apply the method to several sets of real data, including newly analysed data on the incidence of measles in the United Kingdom. Here the additional problems of secular trends and spatial effects are explored. In particular, we find that on a city-by-city scale measles exhibits low-dimensional chaos (as has previously been found for measles in New York City), whereas on a larger, country-wide scale the dynamics appear as a noisy two-year cycle. In addition to shedding light on the basic dynamics of some nonlinear biological systems, this work dramatizes how the scale on which data is collected and analysed can affect the conclusions drawn.

  14. Persistent Chaos of Measles Epidemics in the Prevaccination United States Caused by a Small Change in Seasonal Transmission Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Dalziel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemics of infectious diseases often occur in predictable limit cycles. Theory suggests these cycles can be disrupted by high amplitude seasonal fluctuations in transmission rates, resulting in deterministic chaos. However, persistent deterministic chaos has never been observed, in part because sufficiently large oscillations in transmission rates are uncommon. Where they do occur, the resulting deep epidemic troughs break the chain of transmission, leading to epidemic extinction, even in large cities. Here we demonstrate a new path to locally persistent chaotic epidemics via subtle shifts in seasonal patterns of transmission, rather than through high-amplitude fluctuations in transmission rates. We base our analysis on a comparison of measles incidence in 80 major cities in the prevaccination era United States and United Kingdom. Unlike the regular limit cycles seen in the UK, measles cycles in US cities consistently exhibit spontaneous shifts in epidemic periodicity resulting in chaotic patterns. We show that these patterns were driven by small systematic differences between countries in the duration of the summer period of low transmission. This example demonstrates empirically that small perturbations in disease transmission patterns can fundamentally alter the regularity and spatiotemporal coherence of epidemics.

  15. Optical properties of low-dimensional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, T

    1998-01-01

    This book surveys recent theoretical and experimental studies of optical properties of low-dimensional materials. As an extended version of Optical Properties of Low-Dimensional Materials (Volume 1, published in 1995 by World Scientific), Volume 2 covers a wide range of interesting low-dimensional materials including both inorganic and organic systems, such as disordered polymers, deformable molecular crystals, dilute magnetic semiconductors, SiGe/Si short-period superlattices, GaAs quantum wires, semiconductor microcavities, and photonic crystals. There are excellent review articles by promis

  16. Detection and Prognostics on Low Dimensional Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes the application of known and novel prognostic algorithms on systems that can be described by low dimensional, potentially nonlinear dynamics....

  17. Colored chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: ergodicity and chaos; Hamiltonian dynamics; metric properties; Lyapunov exponents; KS entropy; dynamical realization; lattice formulation; and numerical results.

  18. Chaos and stochasticity in volcanic eruptions the case of Mount Etna and Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, Warner

    1996-03-01

    The series of historical eruptions of Mount Etna and Vesuvius volcanoes are analyzed to verify the presence of low-dimensional chaos in the mechanism driving eruptive activity. A recently developed optimal methodology which is efficient on relatively small sets of data is used. The results indicate that there is no evidence of low-dimensional chaos in the sequences considered, and the mechanism appears better described by a classical stationary stochastic process.

  19. The danger of wishing for chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    With the discovery of chaos came the hope of finding simple models that would be capable of explaining complex phenomena. Numerous papers claimed to find low-dimensional chaos in a number of areas ranging from the weather to the stock market. Years later, many of these claims have been disproved and the fantastic hopes pinned on chaos have been toned down as research with more realistic objectives follows. The difficulty in calculating reliable estimates of the correlation dimension and the maximal Lyapunov exponent, two of the hallmarks of chaos, are explored. Given that nonlinear dynamics is a relatively new and growing field of science, the need for statistical testing is greater than ever. Surrogate data provides one possible approach but great care is needed in generating relevant surrogates and in interpreting the results. Examples of misleading applications and challenges for the future of research in nonlinear dynamics are discussed.

  20. Dynamo transition in low-dimensional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K; Lessinnes, Thomas; Carati, Daniele; Sarris, Ioannis; Kumar, Krishna; Singh, Meenakshi

    2008-09-01

    Two low-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models containing three velocity and three magnetic modes are described. One of them (nonhelical model) has zero kinetic and current helicity, while the other model (helical) has nonzero kinetic and current helicity. The velocity modes are forced in both these models. These low-dimensional models exhibit a dynamo transition at a critical forcing amplitude that depends on the Prandtl number. In the nonhelical model, dynamo exists only for magnetic Prandtl number beyond 1, while the helical model exhibits dynamo for all magnetic Prandtl number. Although the model is far from reproducing all the possible features of dynamo mechanisms, its simplicity allows a very detailed study and the observed dynamo transition is shown to bear similarities with recent numerical and experimental results.

  1. Boolean Chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Rui; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Gao, Zheng; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Socolar, Joshua E. S.; Adams, Matthew M.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    We observe deterministic chaos in a simple network of electronic logic gates that are not regulated by a clocking signal. The resulting power spectrum is ultra-wide-band, extending from dc to beyond 2 GHz. The observed behavior is reproduced qualitatively using an autonomously updating Boolean model with signal propagation times that depend on the recent history of the gates and filtering of pulses of short duration, whose presence is confirmed experimentally. Electronic Boolean chaos may fin...

  2. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabiraj, Lipika, E-mail: lipika.kabiraj@tu-berlin.de; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O. [Hermann Föttinger Institut, Technische Universität Berlin (Germany); Karimi, Nader [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sailor, Anna [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  3. Chaos control applied to coherent states in transitional flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausch, Marina; Eckhardt, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.eckhardt@physik.uni-marburg.de [Fachbereich Physik, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Renthof 6, 35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-12-22

    Chaos control refers to a group of techniques by which an otherwise unstable dynamical state of a system can be maintained by small control forces. We here discuss their application to stabilizing the fixed points in a low dimensional model for shear flows. The simulations demonstrate a prototypical application of chaos control, show that control is almost always possible, and give insights into optimizing the control matrix from a design point of view.

  4. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF LOW-DIMENSIONAL SEMICONDUCTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Y Chiragwandi Z; G(o..)thberg P; Willander M

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the optical spectra of low-dimensional semiconductor systems by calculating all possible optical transitions between electronic states. Optical absorption and emission have been obtained under different carrier population conditions and in different photon wavelengths. The line-shapes of the peaks in the optical spectrum are determined by the density of electronic states of the system, and the symmetries and intensities of these peaks can be improved by reducing the dimensionality of the system. Optical gain requires in general a population inversion, whereas for a quantum-dot system, there exists a threshold value of the population inversion.

  5. Phononics in low-dimensional materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Balandin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Phonons – quanta of crystal lattice vibrations – reveal themselves in all electrical, thermal, and optical phenomena in materials. Nanostructures open exciting opportunities for tuning the phonon energy spectrum and related material properties for specific applications. The possibilities for controlled modification of the phonon interactions and transport – referred to as phonon engineering or phononics – increased even further with the advent of graphene and two-dimensional van der Waals materials. We describe methods for tuning the phonon spectrum and engineering the thermal properties of the low-dimensional materials via ribbon edges, grain boundaries, isotope composition, defect concentration, and atomic-plane orientation.

  6. Robust Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, S; Grebogi, C; Banerjee, Soumitro; Yorke, James A.; Grebogi, Celso

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed to make practical use of chaos in communication, in enhancing mixing in chemical processes and in spreading the spectrum of switch-mode power suppies to avoid electromagnetic interference. It is however known that for most smooth chaotic systems, there is a dense set of periodic windows for any range of parameter values. Therefore in practical systems working in chaotic mode, slight inadvertent fluctuation of a parameter may take the system out of chaos. We say a chaotic attractor is robust if, for its parameter values there exists a neighborhood in the parameter space with no periodic attractor and the chaotic attractor is unique in that neighborhood. In this paper we show that robust chaos can occur in piecewise smooth systems and obtain the conditions of its occurrence. We illustrate this phenomenon with a practical example from electrical engineering.

  7. Chaos in free electron laser oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, C. [Univ Paris 11, LAL, UMR 8607, F-91898 Orsay, (France); Bachelard, R.; Couprie, M.E. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, F-91192 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Garzella, D. [CEA DSM DRECAM SPAM, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Orlandi, G.L. [CR Frascati FIM FISACC, ENEA, I-00044 Frascati, (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The chaotic nature of a storage-ring free electron laser (FEL) is investigated. The derivation of a low embedding dimension for the dynamics allows the low-dimensionality of this complex system to be observed, whereas its unpredictability is demonstrated, in some ranges of parameters, by a positive Lyapounov exponent. The route to chaos is then explored by tuning a single control parameter, and a period-doubling cascade is evidenced, as well as intermittence. (authors)

  8. Discrete Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Waelbroeck, H

    1999-01-01

    We propose a theory of deterministic chaos for discrete systems, based on their representations in symbolic history spaces Ømega. These are spaces of semi-infinite sequences, as the one-sided shift spaces, but endowed with a more general topology which we call a semicausal topology. We show that define metrical properties, including the correlation dimension of the attractor. Examples are considered: Asymmetric neural networks and random cellular automata are not chaotic. A neural network model with memory, on the other hand, does appear to be an example of discrete chaos.

  9. Vortices in Low-Dimensional Magnetic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, B. V.

    2011-05-01

    Vortices are objects that are important to describe several physical phenomena. There are many examples of such objects in nature as in a large variety of physical situations like in fluid dynamics, superconductivity, magnetism, and biology. Historically, the interest in magnetic vortex-like excitations begun in the 1960s. That interest was mainly associated with an unusual phase-transition phenomenon in two-dimensional magnetic systems. More recently, direct experimental evidence for the existence of magnetic vortex states in nano-disks was found. The interest in such model was renewed due to the possibility of the use of magnetic nano-disks as bit elements in nano-scale memory devices. The goal of this study is to review some key points for the understanding of the vortex behavior and the progress that have been done in the study of vortices in low-dimensional magnetic systems.

  10. Low-dimensional dynamics of structured random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Renfrew, David; Vegué, Marina; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2016-02-01

    Using a generalized random recurrent neural network model, and by extending our recently developed mean-field approach [J. Aljadeff, M. Stern, and T. Sharpee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 088101 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.088101], we study the relationship between the network connectivity structure and its low-dimensional dynamics. Each connection in the network is a random number with mean 0 and variance that depends on pre- and postsynaptic neurons through a sufficiently smooth function g of their identities. We find that these networks undergo a phase transition from a silent to a chaotic state at a critical point we derive as a function of g . Above the critical point, although unit activation levels are chaotic, their autocorrelation functions are restricted to a low-dimensional subspace. This provides a direct link between the network's structure and some of its functional characteristics. We discuss example applications of the general results to neuroscience where we derive the support of the spectrum of connectivity matrices with heterogeneous and possibly correlated degree distributions, and to ecology where we study the stability of the cascade model for food web structure.

  11. Magnetic exchange disorder in low-dimensional quantum magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackmore, W.J.A. [U. Warwick, Physics; Goddard, P.A. [U. Warwick, Physics; Xiao, F. [U. Bern, Chemistry; Landee, C.P. [Clark University, Chemistry; Turnbull, M. M. [Clark University, Chemistry; Lancaster, T [U. Durham, Physics; Singleton, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-02-13

    Low-dimensional quantum magnetism is currently of great interest due to the fact that reduced dimensionality can support strong quantum fluctuations, which may lead to unusual phenomena and quantum-critical behavior. The effect of random exchange strengths in two-dimensional (2D) antiferromagnets is still not fully understood despite much effort. This project aims to rectify this by investigating the high-field properties of the 2D coordination polymer (QuinH)2Cu(ClxBr1-x)4.2H2O. The exchange pathway is through Cu-Halide-Cu bonds, and by randomizing the proportion of chlorine and bromine atoms in the unit cell, disorder can be introduced into the system.

  12. Anticipatory synchronization via low-dimensional filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyragiene, T., E-mail: tatjana.pyragiene@ftmc.lt; Pyragas, K.

    2017-06-15

    An anticipatory chaotic synchronization scheme based on a low-order all-pass filter is proposed. The filter is designed as a Padé approximation to the transfer function of an ideal delay line, which is used in a standard Voss scheme. We show that despite its simplicity, the filter works in an anticipatory scheme as well as an ideal delay line. It provides extremely small synchronization error in the whole interval of anticipation time where the anticipatory manifold is stable. The efficacy of our scheme is explained by an analytically solvable model of unidirectionally coupled unstable spirals and confirmed numerically by an example of unidirectionally coupled chaotic Rössler systems. - Highlights: • A new coupling scheme for anticipating chaotic synchronization is proposed. • The scheme consists of a drive system coupled to a low-dimensional filter. • Long-term anticipation is achieved without using time-delay terms. • An analytical treatment estimates the maximum anticipation time. • The method is verified for the Rössler system.

  13. Bose-Einstein Condensation in low dimensionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Kwangsik; Landau, D. P.

    2006-03-01

    Using path integral Monte Carlo simulation methods[1], we have studied properties of Bose-Einstein Condensates harmonically trapped in low dimemsion. Each boson has a hard-sphere potential whose core radius equals its corresponding scattering length. We have tightly confined the motion of trapped particles in one or more direction by increasing the trap anisotropy in order to simulate lower dimensional atomic gases. We have investigated the effect of both the temperature and the dimemsionality on the energetics and structural properties such as the total energy, the density profile, and the superfluid fraction. Our results show that the physics of low dimensional bosonic systems is very different from that of their three dimensional counterparts[2]. The superfluid fraction for a quasi-2D boson gas decreases faster than that for both a quasi-1D system[3] and a true 3D system with increasing temperature. The superfluid fraction decreases gradually as the two-body interaction strength increases although it shows no noticable dependence for both a quasi-1D system and a true 3D system. [1] K. Nho and D. P. Landau, Phys. Rev. A. 70, 53614 (2004).[2] N. D. Mermin and H. Wagner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 22, 1133 (1966);1.5inP. C. Hohenberg, Phys. Rev. 158, 383 (1967).[3] K. Nho and D. Blume, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 193601 (2005).

  14. Low Dimensionality Effects in Complex Magnetic Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Paula J. Lampen

    Complex magnetic oxides represent a unique intersection of immense technological importance and fascinating physical phenomena originating from interwoven structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. The resulting energetically close competing orders can be controllably selected through external fields. Competing interactions and disorder represent an additional opportunity to systematically manipulate the properties of pure magnetic systems, leading to frustration, glassiness, and other novel phenomena while finite sample dimension plays a similar role in systems with long-range cooperative effects or large correlation lengths. A rigorous understanding of these effects in strongly correlated oxides is key to manipulating their functionality and device performance, but remains a challenging task. In this dissertation, we examine a number of problems related to intrinsic and extrinsic low dimensionality, disorder, and competing interactions in magnetic oxides by applying a unique combination of standard magnetometry techniques and unconventional magnetocaloric effect and transverse susceptibility measurements. The influence of dimensionality and disorder on the nature and critical properties of phase transitions in manganites is illustrated in La0.7 Ca0.3MnO3, in which both size reduction to the nanoscale and chemically-controlled quenched disorder are observed to induce a progressive weakening of the first-order nature of the transition, despite acting through the distinct mechanisms of surface effects and site dilution. In the second-order material La0.8Ca0.2MnO3, a strong magnetic field is found to drive the system toward its tricritical point as competition between exchange interactions in the inhomogeneous ground state is suppressed. In the presence of large phase separation stabilized by chemical disorder and long-range strain, dimensionality has a profound effect. With the systematic reduction of particle size in microscale-phase-separated (La, Pr

  15. Data-Driven Low-Dimensional Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for Airfoil Icing

    CERN Document Server

    DeGennaro, Anthony M; Martinelli, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The formation and accretion of ice on the leading edge of an airfoil can be detrimental to aerodynamic performance. Furthermore, the geometric shape of leading edge ice profiles can vary significantly depending on a wide range of physical parameters, which can translate into a wide variability in aerodynamic performance. The purpose of this work is to explore the variability in airfoil aerodynamic performance that results from variability in leading edge ice shape profile. First, we demonstrate how to identify a low-dimensional set of parameters that governs ice shape from a database of ice shapes using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). Then, we investigate the effects of uncertainty in the POD coefficients. This is done by building a global response surface surrogate using Polynomial Chaos Expansions (PCE). To construct this surrogate efficiently, we use adaptive sparse grid sampling of the POD parameter space. We then analyze the data from a statistical standpoint.

  16. Convergent chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradas, Marc; Pumir, Alain; Huber, Greg; Wilkinson, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Chaos is widely understood as being a consequence of sensitive dependence upon initial conditions. This is the result of an instability in phase space, which separates trajectories exponentially. Here, we demonstrate that this criterion should be refined. Despite their overall intrinsic instability, trajectories may be very strongly convergent in phase space over extremely long periods, as revealed by our investigation of a simple chaotic system (a realistic model for small bodies in a turbulent flow). We establish that this strong convergence is a multi-facetted phenomenon, in which the clustering is intense, widespread and balanced by lacunarity of other regions. Power laws, indicative of scale-free features, characterize the distribution of particles in the system. We use large-deviation and extreme-value statistics to explain the effect. Our results show that the interpretation of the ‘butterfly effect’ needs to be carefully qualified. We argue that the combination of mixing and clustering processes makes our specific model relevant to understanding the evolution of simple organisms. Lastly, this notion of convergent chaos, which implies the existence of conditions for which uncertainties are unexpectedly small, may also be relevant to the valuation of insurance and futures contracts.

  17. Control of collective network chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre, E-mail: alexandre.wagemakers@urjc.es; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F., E-mail: miguel.sanjuan@urjc.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Barreto, Ernest, E-mail: ebarreto@gmu.edu; So, Paul, E-mail: paso@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences and The Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of “reduced” ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  18. Control of collective network chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Barreto, Ernest; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; So, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of "reduced" ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  19. Enhancing chaoticity of spatiotemporal chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowen; Zhang, Heqiao; Xue, Yu; Hu, Gang

    2005-01-01

    In some practical situations strong chaos is needed. This introduces the task of chaos control with enhancing chaoticity rather than suppressing chaoticity. In this paper a simple method of linear amplifications incorporating modulo operations is suggested to make spatiotemporal systems, which may be originally chaotic or nonchaotic, strongly chaotic. Specifically, this control can eliminate periodic windows, increase the values and the number of positive Lyapunov exponents, make the probability distributions of the output chaotic sequences more homogeneous, and reduce the correlations of chaotic outputs for different times and different space units. The applicability of the method to practical tasks, in particular to random number generators and secure communications, is briefly discussed.

  20. Mechanical properties of low dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Deepika

    Recent advances in low dimensional materials (LDMs) have paved the way for unprecedented technological advancements. The drive to reduce the dimensions of electronics has compelled researchers to devise newer techniques to not only synthesize novel materials, but also tailor their properties. Although micro and nanomaterials have shown phenomenal electronic properties, their mechanical robustness and a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationship are critical for their use in practical applications. However, the challenges in probing these mechanical properties dramatically increase as their dimensions shrink, rendering the commonly used techniques inadequate. This dissertation focuses on developing techniques for accurate determination of elastic modulus of LDMs and their mechanical responses under tensile and shear stresses. Fibers with micron-sized diameters continuously undergo tensile and shear deformations through many phases of their processing and applications. Significant attention has been given to their tensile response and their structure-tensile properties relations are well understood, but the same cannot be said about their shear responses or the structure-shear properties. This is partly due to the lack of appropriate instruments that are capable of performing direct shear measurements. In an attempt to fill this void, this dissertation describes the design of an inexpensive tabletop instrument, referred to as the twister, which can measure the shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of micron-sized individual fibers. An automated system applies a pre-determined twist to the fiber sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and KevlarRTM 119, were found to have G = 17 and 2.4 GPa, respectively. In addition to measuring the shear

  1. ENSO dynamics: low-dimensional-chaotic or stochastic?

    CERN Document Server

    Zivkovic, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    We apply a test for low-dimensional, deterministic dynamics to the Nino 3 time series for the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The test is negative, indicating that the dynamics is high-dimensional/stochastic. However, application of stochastic forcing to a time-delay equation for equatorial-wave dynamics can reproduce this stochastic dynamics and other important aspects of ENSO. Without such stochastic forcing this model yields low-dimensional, deterministic dynamics, hence these results emphasize the importance of the stochastic nature of the atmosphere-ocean interaction in low-dimensional models of ENSO.

  2. Quantum signatures of chaos or quantum chaos?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunakov, V. E., E-mail: bunakov@VB13190.spb.edu [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    A critical analysis of the present-day concept of chaos in quantum systems as nothing but a “quantum signature” of chaos in classical mechanics is given. In contrast to the existing semi-intuitive guesses, a definition of classical and quantum chaos is proposed on the basis of the Liouville–Arnold theorem: a quantum chaotic system featuring N degrees of freedom should have M < N independent first integrals of motion (good quantum numbers) specified by the symmetry of the Hamiltonian of the system. Quantitative measures of quantum chaos that, in the classical limit, go over to the Lyapunov exponent and the classical stability parameter are proposed. The proposed criteria of quantum chaos are applied to solving standard problems of modern dynamical chaos theory.

  3. Low-dimensional boron structures based on icosahedron B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, C. B.; Yu, M.; Tandy, P.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2015-10-01

    One-dimensional icosahedral boron chains and two-dimensional icosahedral boron sheets (icosahedral α, δ6, and δ4 sheets) that contain icosahedra B12 as their building units have been predicted in a computer simulation study using a state-of-the-art semi-empirical Hamiltonian. These novel low-dimensional icosahedral structures exhibit interesting bonding and electronic properties. Specifically, the three-center, two-electron bonding between icosahedra B12 of the boron bulk (rhombohedral boron) transforms into a two-center bonding in these new allotropes of boron sheets. In contrast to the previously reported stable buckled α and triangular boron monolayer sheets, these new allotropes of boron sheets form a planar network. Calculations of electronic density of states (DOS) reveal a semiconducting nature for both the icosahedral chain and the icosahedral δ6 and δ4 sheets, as well as a nearly gapless (or metallic-like) feature in the DOS for the icosahedral α sheet. The results for the energy barrier per atom between the icosahedral δ6 and α sheets (0.17 eV), the icosahedral δ6 and δ4 sheets (0.38 eV), and the icosahedral α and δ4 sheets (0.27 eV), as indicated in the respective parentheses, suggest that these new allotropes of boron sheets are relatively stable.

  4. Low Dimensional Methods for Jet Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    and is capable of operating in temperatures of up to 26000 F (14500 C) with minimal growth. The pressure drop through a 3.2in. (8.13cm.) substrate...6, 50% to 100% Figure 10. New base SPL conditions with fan blade speeds. MUA unit at 85%, eductor fan on, T~f = 750 In accordance with ISO 3745...heater, control valve). Therefore, we do not anticipate any changes and will not wait for the facility’s ISO validation to continue further with this

  5. PREFACE: Dynamics of low-dimensional systems Dynamics of low-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, M.; Miret-Artés, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    With the development of techniques for high-resolution inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS), electron scattering (EELS) and neutron spin echo spectroscopy, it has become possible, within approximately the last thirty years, to measure the dispersion curves of surface phonons in insulators, semiconductors and metals. In recent years, the advent of new experimental techniques such as 3He spin-echo spectroscopy, scanning inelastic electron tunnel spectroscopy, inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy and inelastic photoemission have extended surface phonon spectroscopy to a variety of systems. These include ultra-thin metal films, adsorbates at surface and elementary processes where surface phonons play an important role. Other important directions have been actively pursued in the past decade: the dynamics of stepped surfaces and clusters grown on metal surfaces, due to their relevance in many dynamical and chemical processes at surfaces, including heterogeneous catalysis; clusters; diffusion etc. The role of surface effects in these processes has been conjectured since the early days of surface dynamics, although only now is the availability of ab initio approaches providing those conjectures with a microscopic basis. Last but not least, the investigation of non-adiabatic effects, originating for instance from the hybridization (avoided crossing) of the surface phonons branches with the quasi 1D electron-hole excitation branch, is also a challenging new direction. Furthermore, other elementary oscillations such as surface plasmons are being actively investigated. The aforementioned experimental breakthroughs have been accompanied by advances in the theoretical study of atom-surface interaction. In particular, in the past decade first principles calculations based on density functional perturbation theory have boosted the theoretical study of the dynamics of low-dimensional systems. Phonon dispersion relations of clean surfaces, the dynamics of adsorbates, and the

  6. Low dimensional behavior of large systems of globally coupled oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Edward; Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2008-09-01

    It is shown that, in the infinite size limit, certain systems of globally coupled phase oscillators display low dimensional dynamics. In particular, we derive an explicit finite set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the macroscopic evolution of the systems considered. For example, an exact, closed form solution for the nonlinear time evolution of the Kuramoto problem with a Lorentzian oscillator frequency distribution function is obtained. Low dimensional behavior is also demonstrated for several prototypical extensions of the Kuramoto model, and time-delayed coupling is also considered.

  7. Inferring low-dimensional microstructure representations using convolutional neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lubbers, Nicholas; Barros, Kipton

    2016-01-01

    We apply recent advances in machine learning and computer vision to a central problem in materials informatics: The statistical representation of microstructural images. We use activations in a pre-trained convolutional neural network to provide a high-dimensional characterization of a set of synthetic microstructural images. Next, we use manifold learning to obtain a low-dimensional embedding of this statistical characterization. We show that the low-dimensional embedding extracts the parameters used to generate the images. According to a variety of metrics, the convolutional neural network method yields dramatically better embeddings than the analogous method derived from two-point correlations alone.

  8. A unified theory of chaos linking nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Wu, Guo-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental issue in nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics is how to distinguish chaotic from stochastic fluctuations in short experimental recordings. This dilemma underlies many complex systems models from stochastic gene expression or stock exchange to quantum chaos. Traditionally, deterministic chaos is characterized by "sensitive dependence on initial conditions" as indicated by a positive Lyapunov exponent. However, ambiguity arises when applying this criterion to real-world data that are corrupted by measurement noise or perturbed nonautonomously by exogenous deterministic or stochastic inputs. Here, we show that a positive Lyapunov exponent is surprisingly neither necessary nor sufficient proof of deterministic chaos, and that a nonlinear dynamical system under deterministic or stochastic forcing may exhibit multiple forms of nonautonomous chaos assessable by a noise titration assay. These findings lay the foundation for reliable analysis of low-dimensional chaos for complex systems modeling an...

  9. Low dimensional homeochaos in coevolving host-parasitoid dimorphic populations: Extinction thresholds under local noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanyés, Josep

    2011-10-01

    A discrete time model describing the population dynamics of coevolution between host and parasitoid haploid populations with a dimorphic matching allele coupling is investigated under both determinism and stochastic population disturbances. The role of the properties of the attractors governing the survival of both populations is analyzed considering equal mutation rates and focusing on host and parasitoid growth rates involving chaos. The purely deterministic model reveals a wide range of ordered and chaotic Red Queen dynamics causing cyclic and aperiodic fluctuations of haplotypes within each species. A Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse route to chaos is identified by increasing both host and parasitoid growth rates. From the bifurcation diagram structure and from numerical stability analysis, two different types of chaotic sets are roughly differentiated according to their size in phase space and to their largest Lyapunov exponent: the Confined and Expanded attractors. Under the presence of local population noise, these two types of attractors have a crucial role in the survival of both coevolving populations. The chaotic confined attractors, which have a low largest positive Lyapunov exponent, are shown to involve a very low extinction probability under the influence of local population noise. On the contrary, the expanded chaotic sets (with a higher largest positive Lyapunov exponent) involve higher host and parasitoid extinction probabilities under the presence of noise. The asynchronies between haplotypes in the chaotic regime combined with low dimensional homeochaos tied to the confined attractors is suggested to reinforce the long-term persistence of these coevolving populations under the influence of stochastic disturbances. These ideas are also discussed in the framework of spatially-distributed host-parasitoid populations.

  10. Quantum phase transitions in low-dimensional optical lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Liberto, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss quantum phase transitions in low-dimensional optical lattices, namely one- and two-dimensional lattices. The dimensional confinement is realized in experiments by suppressing the hopping in the extra dimensions through a deep potential barrier that prevents the atoms to tu

  11. Confinement Effects in Low-Dimensional Lead Iodide Perovskite Hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Machteld E.; Fang, Honghua; Filip, Marina R.; Giustino, Feliciano; Baas, Jacobus; Blake, Graeme R.; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Palstra, Thomas T. M.

    2016-01-01

    We use a layered solution crystal growth technique to synthesize high-quality single crystals of phenylalkylammonium lead iodide organic/inorganic hybrid compounds. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals low-dimensional structures consisting of inorganic sheets separated by bilayers of the organic

  12. Topological and geometrical analysis of a low-dimensional chaotic model obtained for the dynamics of cereal crops cycles observed from satellite in semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    A low-dimensional chaotic model was recently obtained for the dynamics of cereal crops cycles in semi-arid region [1]. This model was obtained from one single time series of vegetation index measured from space. The global modeling approach [2] was used based on powerful algorithms recently developed for this purpose [3]. The resulting model could be validated by comparing its predictability (a data assimilation scheme was used for this purpose) with a statistical prediction approach based on the search of analogous states in the phase space [4]. The cereal crops model exhibits a weakly dissipative chaos (DKY = 2.68) and a toroidal-like structure. At present, quite few cases of such chaos are known and these are exclusively theoretical. The first case was introduced by Lorenz in 1984 to model the global circulation dynamics [5], which attractor's structure is remained poorly understood. Indeed, one very powerful way to characterize low-dimensional chaos is based on the topological analysis of the attractors' flow [6]. Unfortunately, such approach does not apply to weakly dissipative chaos. In this work, a color tracer method is introduced and used to perform a complete topological analysis of both the Lorenz-84 system and the cereal crops model. The usual stretching and squeezing mechanisms are easily detected in the attractors' structure. A stretching taking place in the globally contracting direction of the flow is also found in both attractors. Such stretching is unexpected and was not reported previously. The analysis also confirms the toroidal type of chaos and allows producing both the skeleton and algebraic descriptions of the two attractors. Their comparison shows that the cereal crops attractor is a new attractor. References [1] Mangiarotti S., Drapreau L., Letellier C., 2014. Two chaotic global models for cereal crops cycles observed from satellite in Northern Morocco. revision submitted. [2] Letellier C., Aguirre L.A., Freitas U.S., 2009. Frequently

  13. A search for chaos in the blazar: W2R 1926+42 and its possible consequence

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Strigachev, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We search for low-dimensional chaotic signatures in the optical lightcurve of the $Kepler$ field blazar W2R 1926+42. The frequently used correlation integral method is employed in our analysis. We find no apparent evidence for the presence of low-dimensional chaos in the lightcurve. If further confirmed, these results could be of importance for modeling the blazar emission mechanisms.

  14. Chaos theory in politics

    CERN Document Server

    Erçetin, Şefika; Tekin, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigates global politics and political implications of social science and management with the aid of the latest complexity and chaos theories. Until now, deterministic chaos and nonlinear analysis have not been a focal point in this area of research. This book remedies this deficiency by utilizing these methods in the analysis of the subject matter. The authors provide the reader a detailed analysis on politics and its associated applications with the help of chaos theory, in a single edited volume.

  15. Quantum Chaos and Statistical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Srednicki, Mark

    1994-01-01

    We briefly review the well known connection between classical chaos and classical statistical mechanics, and the recently discovered connection between quantum chaos and quantum statistical mechanics.

  16. Physical white chaos generation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Anbang; Wang, Bingjie; Li, Lei; Zhang, Mingjiang; Zhang, Wendong

    2014-01-01

    Physical chaos is a fascinating prospect for high-speed data security by serving as a masking carrier or a key source, but suffers from a colored spectrum that divulges system's intrinsic oscillations and degrades randomness. Here, we demonstrate that physical chaos with a white spectrum can be achieved by the optical heterodyning of two delayed-feedback lasers. A white chaotic spectrum with 1-dB fluctuation in a band of 11 GHz is experimentally obtained. The white chaos also has a perfect delta-like autocorrelation function and a high dimensionality of greater than 10, which makes chaos reconstruction extremely difficult and thus improves security.

  17. Applied Chaos Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Mark

    1997-04-01

    The publication by Ott, Grebogi and Yorke(E. Ott, C. Grebogi and J. A. Yorke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1196 (1990).) of their theory of chaos control in 1990 led to an explosion of experimental work applying their theory to mechanical systems and electronic circuits, lasers and chemical reactors, and heart and brain tissue, to name only a few. In this talk the basics of chaos control as implemented in a simple mechanical system will be described, as well as extensions of the method to biological applications. Finally, current advances in the field, including the maintenance of chaos and the control of high dimensional chaos, will be discussed.

  18. Cosmology, Epistemology and Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Wasaburo

    1992-03-01

    We may consider the following three fundamental epistemological questions concerning cosmology. Can cosmology at last understand the origin of the universe? Can computers at last create? Can life be formed at last synthetically? These questions are in some sense related to the liar paradox containing the self-reference and, therefore, may not be answered by recursive processes in finite time. There are, however, various implications such that the chaos may break the trap of the self- reference paradox. In other words, Goedel's incompleteness theorem would not apply to chaos, even if the chaos can be generated by recursive processes. Internal relations among cosmology, epistemology and chaos must be investigated in greater detail

  19. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 2: Mechanics II, Momentum, Energy, Rotational and Harmonic Motion, and Chaos (Units 8 - 15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Physics Group. The Physics Suite contains a broad array of curricular materials that are based on physics education research, including: Understanding Physics, by Cummings, Laws, Redish and Cooney (an introductory textbook based on the best-selling text by Halliday/Resnick/Walker) RealTime Physics Laboratory Modules Physics by Inquiry (intended for use in a workshop setting) Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tutorials in Introductory Physics Activity Based Tutorials (designed primarily for use in recitations)

  20. Antitumor activity of low-dimensional alumina structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovin, M. S.; Fomenko, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    Nano-dimensional materials have recently attracted much attention with respect to their potential role in medicine. Physical mechanisms of interaction of nanoparticles with tumor cells will help to develop new methods for cancer disease treatment. Based on aluminum oxide phases, positively charged low-dimensional structures have different shape: agglomerates of nanosheets, nameplates, cone-shaped nanoaggregates were synthesized with the help of aluminum nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity effect of these low-dimensional structures on A549, HeLa, MDA, PyMT tumor cells was studied. It was shown that agglomerates of nanosheets were more toxic for investigating cell lines. Agglomerates of nanosheets had a medium toxic effect at a concentration of 10 mg/ml while nameplates and cone-shaped nanoaggregates were nontoxic. The toxic effect of agglomerates of nanosheets correlates with their shape, mainly the presence of multiple edges.

  1. Vector cylindrical harmonics for low-dimensional convection models

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Douglas H; Knox, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Approximate empirical models of thermal convection can allow us to identify the essential properties of the flow in simplified form, and to produce empirical estimates using only a few parameters. Such "low-dimensional" empirical models can be constructed systematically by writing numerical or experimental measurements as superpositions of a set of appropriate basis modes, a process known as Galerkin projection. For Boussinesq convection in a cylinder, those basis modes should be defined in cylindrical coordinates, vector-valued, divergence-free, and mutually orthogonal. Here we construct two such basis sets, one using Bessel functions in the radial direction, and one using Chebyshev polynomials. We demonstrate that each set has those desired characteristics and demonstrate the advantages and drawbacks of each set. We show their use for representing sample simulation data and point out their potential for low-dimensional convection models.

  2. Isotope low-dimensional structures elementary excitations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Plekhanov, Vladimir G

    2012-01-01

    This Briefs volume describes the properties and structure of  elementary excitations in isotope low-dimensional structures. Without assuming prior knowledge of quantum physics, the present book provides the basic knowledge needed to understand the recent developments in the sub-disciplines of nanoscience isotopetronics, novel device concepts and materials for nanotechnology. It is the first and comprehensive interdisciplinary account of the newly developed scientific discipline isotopetronics.

  3. Low -Dimensional Halide Perovskites and Their Advanced Optoelectronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Xiaokun; Deng, Hui; Qiao, Keke; Farooq, Umar; Ishaq, Muhammad; Yi, Fei; Liu, Huan; Tang, Jiang; Song, Haisheng

    2017-07-01

    Metal halide perovskites are crystalline materials originally developed out of scientific curiosity. They have shown great potential as active materials in optoelectronic applications. In the last 6 years, their certified photovoltaic efficiencies have reached 22.1%. Compared to bulk halide perovskites, low-dimensional ones exhibited novel physical properties. The photoluminescence quantum yields of perovskite quantum dots are close to 100%. The external quantum efficiencies and current efficiencies of perovskite quantum dot light-emitting diodes have reached 8% and 43 cd A-1, respectively, and their nanowire lasers show ultralow-threshold room-temperature lasing with emission tunability and ease of synthesis. Perovskite nanowire photodetectors reached a responsivity of 10 A W-1 and a specific normalized detectivity of the order of 1012 Jones. Different from most reported reviews focusing on photovoltaic applications, we summarize the rapid progress in the study of low-dimensional perovskite materials, as well as their promising applications in optoelectronic devices. In particular, we review the wide tunability of fabrication methods and the state-of-the-art research outputs of low-dimensional perovskite optoelectronic devices. Finally, the anticipated challenges and potential for this exciting research are proposed.

  4. Stochastic chaos in a turbulent swirling flow

    CERN Document Server

    Faranda, Davide; Saint-Michel, Brice; Wiertel, Cecile; Padilla, Vincent; Dubrulle, Berengere; Daviaud, Francois

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental evidence of the existence of a random attractor in a fully developed turbulent swirling flow. By defining a global observable which tracks the asymmetry in the flux of angular momentum imparted to the flow, we can first reconstruct the associated turbulent attractor and then follow its route towards chaos. We further show that the experimental attractor can be modeled by stochastic Duffing equations, that match the quantitative properties of the experimental flow, namely the number of quasi-stationary states and transition rates among them, the effective dimensions, and the continuity of the first Lyapunov exponents. Such properties can neither be recovered using deterministic models nor using stochastic differential equations based on effective potentials obtained by inverting the probability distributions of the experimental global observables. Our findings open the way to low dimensional modeling of systems featuring a large number of degrees of freedom and multiple quasi-station...

  5. A bound on chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldacena, Juan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ (United States); Shenker, Stephen H. [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford, Douglas [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-08-17

    We conjecture a sharp bound on the rate of growth of chaos in thermal quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. Chaos can be diagnosed using an out-of-time-order correlation function closely related to the commutator of operators separated in time. We conjecture that the influence of chaos on this correlator can develop no faster than exponentially, with Lyapunov exponent λ{sub L}≤2πk{sub B}T/ℏ. We give a precise mathematical argument, based on plausible physical assumptions, establishing this conjecture.

  6. Uncertainty Relation for Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Yahalom, A; Levitan, J; Elgressy, G; Horwitz, L P; Ben-Zion, Y

    2011-01-01

    A necessary condition for the emergence of chaos is given. It is well known that the emergence of chaos requires a positive exponent which entails diverging trajectories. Here we show that this is not enough. An additional necessary condition for the emergence of chaos in the region where the trajectory of the system goes through, is that the product of the maximal positive exponent times the duration in which the system configuration point stays in the unstable region should exceed unity. We give a theoretical analysis justifying this result and a few examples.

  7. Chaos applications in telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Stavroulakis, Peter

    2005-01-01

    IntroductionPeter StavroulakisChaotic Signal Generation and Transmission Antonio Cândido Faleiros,Waldecir João Perrella,TâniaNunes Rabello,Adalberto Sampaio Santos, andNeiYoshihiro SomaChaotic Transceiver Design Arthur Fleming-DahlChaos-Based Modulation and DemodulationTechniques Francis C.M. Lau and Chi K. TseA Chaos Approach to Asynchronous DS-CDMASystems S. Callegari, G. Mazzini, R. Rovatti, and G. SettiChannel Equalization in Chaotic CommunicationSystems Mahmut CiftciOptical Communications using ChaoticTechniques Gregory D. VanWiggerenAPPENDIX AFundamental Concepts of the Theory ofChaos a

  8. A bound on chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Maldacena, Juan; Stanford, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We conjecture a sharp bound on the rate of growth of chaos in thermal quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. Chaos can be diagnosed using an out-of-time-order correlation function closely related to the commutator of operators separated in time. We conjecture that the influence of chaos on this correlator can develop no faster than exponentially, with Lyapunov exponent $\\lambda_L \\le 2 \\pi k_B T/\\hbar$. We give a precise mathematical argument, based on plausible physical assumptions, establishing this conjecture.

  9. Nanoscale electrodeposition of low-dimensional metal phases and clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikov, Georgi

    2016-08-01

    The present status of the problem of electrochemical formation of low-dimensional metal phases is reviewed. The progress in this field achieved in the last two decades is discussed on the basis of experimental results obtained in selected electrochemical systems with well defined single crystal substrates. The influence of crystallographic orientation and surface inhomogeneities of foreign substrates on the mechanism of formation and the atomic structure of two-dimensional (2D) metal phases in the underpotential deposition range is considered. The localized electrodeposition of metal nanoclusters on solid state surfaces applying the STM-tip as a nanoelectrode is demonstrated.

  10. Low dimensional neutron moderators for enhanced source brightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezei, Ferenc; Zanini, Luca; Takibayev, Alan;

    2014-01-01

    In a recent numerical optimization study we have found that liquid para-hydrogen coupled cold neutron moderators deliver 3–5 times higher cold neutron brightness at a spallation neutron source if they take the form of a flat, quasi 2-dimensional disc, in contrast to the conventional more voluminous...... for cold neutrons. This model leads to the conclusions that the optimal shape for high brightness para-hydrogen neutron moderators is the quasi 1-dimensional tube and these low dimensional moderators can also deliver much enhanced cold neutron brightness in fission reactor neutron sources, compared...

  11. Nanoscale electrodeposition of low-dimensional metal phases and clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikov, Georgi

    2016-07-01

    The present status of the problem of electrochemical formation of low-dimensional metal phases is reviewed. The progress in this field achieved in the last two decades is discussed on the basis of experimental results obtained in selected electrochemical systems with well defined single crystal substrates. The influence of crystallographic orientation and surface inhomogeneities of foreign substrates on the mechanism of formation and the atomic structure of two-dimensional (2D) metal phases in the underpotential deposition range is considered. The localized electrodeposition of metal nanoclusters on solid state surfaces applying the STM-tip as a nanoelectrode is demonstrated.

  12. Critical states of transient chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, Z; Szépfalusy, P

    1999-01-01

    One-dimensional maps exhibiting transient chaos and defined on two preimages of the unit interval [0,1] are investigated. It is shown that such maps have continuously many conditionally invariant measures $\\mu_{\\sigma}$ scaling at the fixed point at $x=0$ as $x^{\\sigma}$, but smooth elsewhere. Here $\\sigma$ should be smaller than a critical value $\\sigma_{c}$ that is related to the spectral properties of the Frobenius-Perron operator. The corresponding natural measures are proven to be entirely concentrated on the fixed point.

  13. Chaos Rules Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Murphy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available About 20 years ago, while lost in the midst of my PhD research, I mused over proposed titles for my thesis. I was pretty pleased with myself when I came up with Chaos Rules (the implied double meaning was deliberate, or more completely, Chaos Rules: An Exploration of the Work of Instructional Designers in Distance Education. I used the then-emerging theories of chaos and complexity to underpin my analysis. So it was with more than a little excitement that I read the call for contributions to this special issue of IRRODL. What follows is a walk-through of my thesis with an emphasis on the contribution of chaos and complexity theory.

  14. Defining Low-Dimensional Projections to Guide Protein Conformational Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novinskaya, Anastasia; Devaurs, Didier; Moll, Mark; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2017-01-01

    Exploring the conformational space of proteins is critical to characterize their functions. Numerous methods have been proposed to sample a protein's conformational space, including techniques developed in the field of robotics and known as sampling-based motion-planning algorithms (or sampling-based planners). However, these algorithms suffer from the curse of dimensionality when applied to large proteins. Many sampling-based planners attempt to mitigate this issue by keeping track of sampling density to guide conformational sampling toward unexplored regions of the conformational space. This is often done using low-dimensional projections as an indirect way to reduce the dimensionality of the exploration problem. However, how to choose an appropriate projection and how much it influences the planner's performance are still poorly understood issues. In this article, we introduce two methodologies defining low-dimensional projections that can be used by sampling-based planners for protein conformational sampling. The first method leverages information about a protein's flexibility to construct projections that can efficiently guide conformational sampling, when expert knowledge is available. The second method builds similar projections automatically, without expert intervention. We evaluate the projections produced by both methodologies on two conformational search problems involving three middle-size proteins. Our experiments demonstrate that (i) defining projections based on expert knowledge can benefit conformational sampling and (ii) automatically constructing such projections is a reasonable alternative.

  15. Exploiting chaos for applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditto, William L., E-mail: wditto@hawaii.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Sinha, Sudeshna, E-mail: sudeshna@iisermohali.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Mohali, Knowledge City, Sector 81, SAS Nagar, PO Manauli 140306, Punjab (India)

    2015-09-15

    We discuss how understanding the nature of chaotic dynamics allows us to control these systems. A controlled chaotic system can then serve as a versatile pattern generator that can be used for a range of application. Specifically, we will discuss the application of controlled chaos to the design of novel computational paradigms. Thus, we present an illustrative research arc, starting with ideas of control, based on the general understanding of chaos, moving over to applications that influence the course of building better devices.

  16. Failure in distinguishing colored noise from chaos using the ``noise titration'' technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ubiratan S.; Letellier, Christophe; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2009-03-01

    Identifying chaos in experimental data—noisy data—remains a challenging problem for which conclusive arguments are still very difficult to provide. In order to avoid problems usually encountered with techniques based on geometrical invariants (dimensions, Lyapunov exponent, etc.), Poon and Barahona introduced a numerical titration procedure which compares one-step-ahead predictions of linear and nonlinear models [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 7107 (2001)]. We investigate the aformentioned technique in the context of colored noise or other types of nonchaotic behaviors. The main conclusion is that in several examples noise titration fails to distinguish such nonchaotic signals from low-dimensional deterministic chaos.

  17. Generalized Statistical Mechanics at the Onset of Chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Robledo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Transitions to chaos in archetypal low-dimensional nonlinear maps offer real and precise model systems in which to assess proposed generalizations of statistical mechanics. The known association of chaotic dynamics with the structure of Boltzmann–Gibbs (BG statistical mechanics has suggested the potential verification of these generalizations at the onset of chaos, when the only Lyapunov exponent vanishes and ergodic and mixing properties cease to hold. There are three well-known routes to chaos in these deterministic dissipative systems, period-doubling, quasi-periodicity and intermittency, which provide the setting in which to explore the limit of validity of the standard BG structure. It has been shown that there is a rich and intricate behavior for both the dynamics within and towards the attractors at the onset of chaos and that these two kinds of properties are linked via generalized statistical-mechanical expressions. Amongst the topics presented are: (i permanently growing sensitivity fluctuations and their infinite family of generalized Pesin identities; (ii the emergence of statistical-mechanical structures in the dynamics along the routes to chaos; (iii dynamical hierarchies with modular organization; and (iv limit distributions of sums of deterministic variables. The occurrence of generalized entropy properties in condensed-matter physical systems is illustrated by considering critical fluctuations, localization transition and glass formation. We complete our presentation with the description of the manifestations of the dynamics at the transitions to chaos in various kinds of complex systems, such as, frequency and size rank distributions and complex network images of time series. We discuss the results.

  18. Joint density of states in low dimensional semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, C. I.; Contreras-Solorio, D. A.; Hernández, L.

    2016-02-01

    We present a different approach to evaluate density of states for quasi-bidimensional systems, which bonds density of states in the confinement direction with in-plane 2D density of states. Applying the convolution operation, we propose an accurately mathematical expression that combines directly the valence band and conduction band density of states functions to generate a joint density of states for direct transitions. When considering low dimensional semiconductors, another expression is found which shows that the density of states for electrons (holes) can be calculated by convolution operations between the confinement direction and in-plane electron (hole) density of states. Using both expressions, we have calculated the quantum well and superlattice absorption coefficient, resulting in positive alignment with experimental data. A more complete description of physical absorption is achieved with this new approach.

  19. Low Dimensional Semiconductor Structures Characterization, Modeling and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Horing, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Starting with the first transistor in 1949, the world has experienced a technological revolution which has permeated most aspects of modern life, particularly over the last generation. Yet another such revolution looms up before us with the newly developed capability to control matter on the nanometer scale. A truly extraordinary research effort, by scientists, engineers, technologists of all disciplines, in nations large and small throughout the world, is directed and vigorously pressed to develop a full understanding of the properties of matter at the nanoscale and its possible applications, to bring to fruition the promise of nanostructures to introduce a new generation of electronic and optical devices. The physics of low dimensional semiconductor structures, including heterostructures, superlattices, quantum wells, wires and dots is reviewed and their modeling is discussed in detail. The truly exceptional material, Graphene, is reviewed; its functionalization and Van der Waals interactions are included h...

  20. Toward Ultrafast Spin Dynamics in Low Dimensional Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-Hsin

    Since the discovery of long spin relaxation times of itinerant electrons up to 100 nanoseconds and spin diffusion lengths over 100 mum in GaAs, extraordinary advances in semiconductor spintronics have been made in the past one and half decades. Incorporating spins in semiconductors requires the following essential capabilities: (i) injection of spins into semiconductors, (ii) manipulation of spins, and (iii) sensitive detection of spin coherence. The solutions to these challenges lie in a deeper understanding of spin interactions and spin relaxation in semiconductors as well as appropriate tools to probe spin dynamics. In particular, recent experiments have suggested the important role of dimensionality in spin dynamics. For example, spin-orbit interaction, the dominant source of spin relaxation in most II-VI and III-V semiconductors, has been shown to be significantly suppressed in reduced dimensions. Low-dimensional semiconductors are therefore appealing candidates for exploring spin physics and device applications. This dissertation aims at exploring spin dynamics in low dimensional semiconductor systems using time-resolved optical techniques. The time resolution allows for a direct measurement of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium carrier spins and various spin interactions in the time domain. Optical approaches are also a natural fit for probing optically active nanostructures where electric approaches can often encounter challenges. For instance, fabricating electric contacts with nanostructures is a proven challenge because of their reduced size and modified electronic structure. This dissertation is divided into three sections targeting an ultimate goal of employing optical methods to explore spin dynamics in low dimensional semiconductors. First, the time-resolved Kerr rotation technique is employed to study spin relaxation in Fe/MgO/GaAs heterostructures. The results reveal rich interactions between the GaAs electron spins, nuclear spins, and the

  1. Energy-saving with low dimensional network in Physarum plasmodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Gomi, Takuma; Endo, Tatsuya; Hirai, Tomo; Sasaki, Takato

    2017-04-01

    An adaptation process in the transportation network of Physarum plasmodium was investigated by measuring oxygen consumption during network formation. Simultaneously, the fractal dimension as a measure of network structure was estimated. Oxygen consumption decreased during the development of the network, whereas the network structure changed from a thin mesh-type to a thick dendritic type. Our data suggested that the morphology of the plasmodial network governed energy consumption; a low dimensional network in the sense of the fractal dimension reduced energy consumption. These data were supported by experimental results excluding biological reasons, such as differences in starvation/nutrient-fullness states, and aspects of mitochondrial distribution. Model analysis using the Physarum algorithm with volume conservation constraints confirmed the above findings.

  2. Nonparametric forecasting of low-dimensional dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tyrus; Giannakis, Dimitrios; Harlim, John

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a nonparametric modeling approach for forecasting stochastic dynamical systems on low-dimensional manifolds. The key idea is to represent the discrete shift maps on a smooth basis which can be obtained by the diffusion maps algorithm. In the limit of large data, this approach converges to a Galerkin projection of the semigroup solution to the underlying dynamics on a basis adapted to the invariant measure. This approach allows one to quantify uncertainties (in fact, evolve the probability distribution) for nontrivial dynamical systems with equation-free modeling. We verify our approach on various examples, ranging from an inhomogeneous anisotropic stochastic differential equation on a torus, the chaotic Lorenz three-dimensional model, and the Niño-3.4 data set which is used as a proxy of the El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  3. Low dimensional gyrokinetic PIC simulation by δf method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. M.; Nishimura, Yasutaro; Cheng, C. Z.

    2015-11-01

    A step by step development of our low dimensional gyrokinetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation is reported. One dimensional PIC simulation of Langmuir wave dynamics is benchmarked. We then take temporal plasma echo as a test problem to incorporate the δf method. Electrostatic driftwave simulation in one dimensional slab geometry is resumed in the presence of finite density gradients. By carefully diagnosing contour plots of the δf values in the phase space, we discuss the saturation mechanism of the driftwave instabilities. A v∥ formulation is employed in our new electromagnetic gyrokinetic method by solving Helmholtz equation for time derivative of the vector potential. Electron and ion momentum balance equations are employed in the time derivative of the Ampere's law. This work is supported by Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan, MOST 103-2112-M-006-007 and MOST 104-2112-M-006-019.

  4. Low-dimensional modelling of flame dynamics in heated microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Federico; Legros, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents simulations of stoichiometric methane/air premixed flames into a microchannel at atmospheric pressure. These simulations result from numerical resolutions of reduced-order models. Indeed, combustion control into microchannels would be allowed by fast simulations that in turn enable real-time adjustments of the device's parameters. Former experimental studies reported the occurrence of a Flame Repetitive Extinction/Ignition (FREI) phenomenon provided that a temperature gradient is sustained at the channel's walls. Conducting unsteady one-dimensional simulations including complex chemistry, a late numerical study tried to explain the occurrence of this phenomenon. The present study therefore explores low-dimensional models that potentially reproduce the FREI phenomenon. Provided a calibration of some empirical constants, an unsteady two-dimensional model including one-step chemical reaction is shown to decently reproduce the FREI regime all along the range of mixture flow rates investigated ...

  5. Solar Cells Based on Low-dimensional Nanocomposite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Khrypko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Converting solar energy into electric energy with using of solar batteries is a major task for developers and research teams. In this article we will look at the development of different generations of solar batteries for to create a nanocomposite structure. Production of solar batteries has gone through some steps, taking into account technological and economic aspects that have been associated with improved of their parameters. Thus the first generations of solar batteries have been based on the single-crystal silicon substrates (с-Si. The use of polycrystalline silicon and multi- crystalline allowed lower costs of modules, but due to the efficiency of solar energy conversion. The solar batteries of the second generation were based on thin-film technology, in which use different materials: silicon films based on amorphous silicon (a-Si, a film based on cadmium telluride (CdTe and film selenide copper-indium-gallium (CuInGaSe2, or CIGS. The use of such technology has allowed increasing the coefficient of performance (COP solar cell with a significant reduction in costs. The solar batteries of third-generation based on nanotechnology, nanocrystals and nano-sized clusters of semiconductors. The creation of such solar cells requires availability of a low-dimensional composite structure. Low-dimensional nanocomposite structures that are constructed on quantum dots and nano-porous materials have new modified optoelectronic properties. They can be used in solar elements, where absorption bands can be optimally adapted to the wavelength of radiation light. These structures could theoretically can lead to increased efficiency of solar energy conversion more than 65%, which can double practically current efficiency of solar batteries.

  6. Fractal Patterns and Chaos Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers incorporate the chaos game and the concept of a fractal into various areas of the algebra and geometry curriculum. The chaos game approach to fractals provides teachers with an opportunity to help students comprehend the geometry of affine transformations.

  7. Enlightenment philosophers’ ideas about chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kulik

    2014-07-01

     It is grounded that the philosopher and enlightener Johann Gottfried von Herder advanced an idea of objectivity of process of transformation chaos into order. It is shown that idea of «The law of nature» existing as for ordering chaos opened far­reaching prospects for researches of interaction with chaos.

  8. Introducing chaos a graphic guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sardar, Ziauddin; Abrams, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Explains how chaos makes its presence felt in many varieties of event, from the fluctuation of animal populations to the ups and downs of the stock market. This book also examines the roots of chaos in modern mathematics and physics, and explores the relationship between chaos and complexity.

  9. Predictability analysis and validation of a low-dimensional model - an application to the dynamics of cereal crops observed from satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Sylvain; Drapeau, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    The global modeling approach aims to obtain parsimonious models of observed dynamics from few or single time series (Letellier et al. 2009). Specific algorithms were developed and validated for this purpose (Mangiarotti et al. 2012a). This approach was applied to the dynamics of cereal crops in semi-arid region using the vegetation index derived from satellite data as a proxy of the dynamics. A low-dimensional autonomous model could be obtained. The corresponding attractor is characteristic of weakly dissipative chaos and exhibits a toroidal-like structure. At present, only few theoretical cases of such chaos are known, and none was obtained from real world observations. Under smooth conditions, a robust validation of three-dimensional chaotic models can be usually performed based on the topological approach (Gilmore 1998). Such approach becomes more difficult for weakly dissipative systems, and almost impossible under noisy observational conditions. For this reason, another validation approach is developed which consists in comparing the forecasting skill of the model to other forecasts for which no dynamical model is required. A data assimilation process is associated to the model to estimate the model's skill; several schemes are tested (simple re-initialization, Extended and Ensemble Kalman Filters and Back and Forth Nudging). Forecasts without model are performed based on the search of analogous states in the phase space (Mangiarotti et al. 2012b). The comparison reveals the quality of the model's forecasts at short to moderate horizons and contributes to validate the model. These results suggest that the dynamics of cereal crops can be reasonably approximated by low-dimensional chaotic models, and also bring out powerful arguments for chaos. Chaotic models have often been used as benchmark to test data assimilation schemes; the present work shows that such tests may not only have a theoretical interest, but also almost direct applicative potential. Moreover

  10. Low-dimensional models for cereal crop cycles observed from space in semi-arid region at different geographic locations and scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Sylvain; Le Jean, Flavie; Jarlan, Lionel; Drapeau, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    A low dimensional model (three variables) was recently obtained for the cycle of cereal crops in north Morocco [1, 2]. This model is chaotic, toroidal and weakly dissipative. These characteristics were unexpected since such systems were previously found only in few theoretical cases. A detailed analysis of the model's flow also reveals that a double direction extension can occur locally in the flow of the cereal crops attractor resulting from this model. Such behavior of the flow was not reported before. In order to investigate the generality of these results, it was tried to obtain models for other sites. Several models presenting similar properties were obtained in other provinces, providing a strong argument for the existence of weakly dissipative chaos in nature. One four-dimensional model could be also obtained. This model was conservative, but it could be transformed into a chaotic model by adding dissipative terms. [1] Mangiarotti S., Coudret R., Drapeau L. & Jarlan L., 2012. Polynomial search and Global modelling: two algorithms for modeling chaos. Physical Review E, 86(4), 046205. [2] Mangiarotti S., Drapeau L. & Letellier C., 2014. Two chaotic global models for cereal crops cycles observed from satellite in Northern Morocco. Chaos, 24, 023130.

  11. Continuous control of ionization wave chaos by spatially derived feedback signals

    CERN Document Server

    Mausbach, T; Piel, A; Atipo, A; Pierre, T; Bonhomme, G; Mausbach, Th.; Klinger, Th.; Pierre, Th.

    1997-01-01

    In the positive column of a neon glow discharge, two different types of ionization waves occur simultaneously. The low-dimensional chaos arising from the nonlinear interaction between the two waves is controlled by a continuous feedback technique. The control strategy is derived from the time-delayed autosynchronization method. Two spatially displaced points of observation are used to obtain the control information, using the propagation characteristics of the chaotic wave.

  12. Hydrodynamics and transport in low-dimensional interacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Manas

    Recent ground-breaking experiments have realized strongly interacting quantum degenerate Fermi gas in a cold atomic system with tunable interactions. This has provided a table-top system which is extremely hydrodynamic in nature. This experimental realization helps us to investigate several aspects such as the interplay between nonlinearity, dissipation and dispersion. We find, for instance, that the dynamics in such a system shows near perfect agreement with a hydrodynamic theory. In collaboration with the group of John Thomas at Duke we interpreted studies of collision of two strongly interacting Fermi gases that led to shock waves which are a hallmark of nonlinear physics. Due to reasons such as the nature of interactions, higher dimensionality, these cold atomic systems are non-integrable and moreover the underlying field theory construction is mostly phenomenological in nature. On the other hand there are certain one-dimensional systems which are not only integrable but also facilitate more formal and rigorous ways of deriving the corresponding integrable field theories. One such family of models is the family of Calogero models (and their generalizations). They provide an extraordinary insight into the field of strongly correlated systems and hydrodynamics. We study the collective field theory of such models and address aspects of nonlinear physics such as Spin-Charge Interaction, Emptiness Formation Probability, Solitons etc; We derive a two-component nonlinear, nonlocal, integrable field theory. We also show that the Calogero family which is integrable even in an external harmonic trap (usually unavoidable in cold atom setups) is relatively "short ranged" thereby qualifying as a toy model for cold atom experiments. Transport in certain strongly correlated systems (impurity models) was studied using few low-dimensional techniques such as a 1/N diagrammatic expansion, Slave Boson Mean Field Theory and the Bethe Ansatz. A mesoscopic setup such as parallel

  13. Chaos Induced by Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Shigehara, T; Mishima, T; Cheon, T; Shigehara, Takaomi; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Mishima, Taketoshi; Cheon, Taksu

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we show that two-dimensional billiards with point interactions inside exhibit a chaotic nature in the microscopic world, although their classical counterpart is non-chaotic. After deriving the transition matrix of the system by using the self-adjoint extension theory of functional analysis, we deduce the general condition for the appearance of chaos. The prediction is confirmed by numerically examining the statistical properties of energy spectrum of rectangular billiards with multiple point interactions inside. The dependence of the level statistics on the strength as well as the number of the scatterers is displayed. KEYWORDS: wave chaos, quantum mechanics, pseudointegrable billiard, point interaction, functional analysis

  14. Dissipative structures and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Hazime

    1998-01-01

    This monograph consists of two parts and gives an approach to the physics of open nonequilibrium systems. Part I derives the phenomena of dissipative structures on the basis of reduced evolution equations and includes Bénard convection and Belousov-Zhabotinskii chemical reactions. Part II discusses the physics and structures of chaos. While presenting a construction of the statistical physics of chaos, the authors unify the geometrical and statistical descriptions of dynamical systems. The shape of chaotic attractors is characterized, as are the mixing and diffusion of chaotic orbits and the fluctuation of energy dissipation exhibited by chaotic systems.

  15. The physics of chaos and related problems; Proceedings of the Fifty-ninth Nobel Symposium, Graftavallen, Sweden, June 11-16, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, S.

    Reviews and reports of theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations of chaotic and other nonlinear phenomena in physics are presented. The topics examined are chaos in low-dimensionality systems, pattern formation, turbulence, computational aspects, and quantum systems. Consideration is given to the transition from periodic motion to unbounded chaos in a simple pendulum, the chaotic dynamics of instabilities in solids, neutron scattering from a convecting nematic, patterns and noise in hydrodynamic systems, pattern formation and chaos in synergetic systems, ergodic aspects of turbulence theory, drift and diffusion in reversible computation, and Farey organization of the fractional Hall effect.

  16. Spin-flip Raman scattering in low-dimensional semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debus, Joerg

    2012-07-01

    The challenges for achieving novel spin effects or improving existent spin phenomena are based on interaction, namely interactions between carriers themselves as well as a carrier and a second system, such as the nuclear spin or phonon system leading to a scattering process and thus to spin decoherence. By means of the resonant spin-flip Raman scattering technique fundamental spin interactions of carriers confined in low-dimensional semiconductors, their dependence on the local structure symmetry as well as the type and excitation state of the carrier complex are characterized. It is shown that the scattering processes of the electron, hole, and exciton spins depend on the symmetry of the crystal lattice, quantum confinement potential, and magnetic field confinement. The studies outline problems of the semiconductor spintronics, but also ways to identify and monitor them, and present a novel quantum dot structure providing a long exciton lifetime and temperature-robust longitudinal spin relaxation time thus making a step toward the realization of spin-based applications.

  17. Effective Electron Mass in Low-Dimensional Semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Sitangshu

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with the Effective Electron Mass (EEM) in low dimensional semiconductors. The materials considered are quantum confined non-linear optical, III-V, II-VI, GaP, Ge, PtSb2, zero-gap, stressed, Bismuth, carbon nanotubes, GaSb, IV-VI, Te, II-V, Bi2Te3, Sb, III-V, II-VI, IV-VI semiconductors and quantized III-V, II-VI, IV-VI and HgTe/CdTe superlattices with graded interfaces and effective mass superlattices. The presence of intense electric field and the light waves change the band structure of optoelectronic semiconductors in fundamental ways, which have also been incorporated in the study of the EEM in quantized structures of optoelectronic compounds that control the studies of the quantum effect devices under strong fields. The importance of measurement of band gap in optoelectronic materials under strong electric field and external photo excitation has also been discussed in this context. The influence of crossed electric and quantizing magnetic fields on the EEM and the EEM in heavily doped sem...

  18. Electronic properties and phase transitions in low-dimensional semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panich, A M [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)], E-mail: pan@bgu.ac.il

    2008-07-23

    We present the first review of the current state of the literature on electronic properties and phase transitions in TlX and TlMX{sub 2} (M = Ga, In; X = Se, S, Te) compounds. These chalcogenides belong to a family of the low-dimensional semiconductors possessing chain or layered structure. They are of significant interest because of their highly anisotropic properties, semi- and photoconductivity, nonlinear effects in their I-V characteristics (including a region of negative differential resistance), switching and memory effects, second harmonic optical generation, relaxor behavior and potential applications for optoelectronic devices. We review the crystal structure of TlX and TlMX{sub 2} compounds, their transport properties under ambient conditions, experimental and theoretical studies of the electronic structure, transport properties and semiconductor-metal phase transitions under high pressure, and sequences of temperature-induced structural phase transitions with intermediate incommensurate states. The electronic nature of the ferroelectric phase transitions in the above-mentioned compounds, as well as relaxor behavior, nanodomains and possible occurrence of quantum dots in doped and irradiated crystals is discussed. (topical review)

  19. Optoelectronic and nonlinear optical processes in low dimensional semiconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Singh

    2006-11-01

    Spatial confinement of quantum excitations on their characteristic wavelength scale in low dimensional materials offers unique possibilities to engineer the electronic structure and thereby control their physical properties by way of simple manipulation of geometrical parameters. This has led to an overwhelming interest in quasi-zero dimensional semiconductors or quantum dots as tunable materials for multitude of exciting applications in optoelectronic and nonlinear optical devices and quantum information processing. Large nonlinear optical response and high luminescence quantum yield expected in these systems is a consequence of huge enhancement of transition probabilities ensuing from quantum confinement. High quantum efficiency of photoluminescence, however, is not usually realized in the case of bare semiconductor nanoparticles owing to the presence of surface states. In this talk, I will focus on the role of quantum confinement and surface states in ascertaining nonlinear optical and optoelectronic properties of II–VI semiconductor quantum dots and their nanocomposites. I will also discuss the influence of nonlinear optical processes on their optoelectronic characteristics.

  20. Efimov-Like Behaviour in Low-Dimensional Polymer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Federica; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.; Maji, Jaya; Masetto, Mario; Seno, Flavio; Trovato, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    In the quantum Efimov effect, identical bosons form infinitely many bound trimer states at the bound dimer dissociation threshold, with their energy spectrum obeying a universal geometrical scaling law. Inspired by the formal correspondence between the possible trajectories of a quantum particle and the possible conformations of a polymer chain, the existence of a triple-stranded DNA bound state when a double-stranded DNA is not stable was recently predicted by modelling three directed polymer chains in low-dimensional lattices, both fractal (ddouble-stranded DNA requires in d≤ 2 the introduction of a weighting factor penalizing the formation of denaturation bubbles, that is non-base paired portions of DNA. The details of how bubble weighting is defined for a three-chain system were shown to crucially affect the presence of Efimov-like behaviour on a fractal lattice. Here we assess the same dependence on the euclidean 1+1 lattice, by setting up the transfer matrix method for three infinitely long chains confined in a finite size geometry. This allows us to discriminate unambiguously between the absence of Efimov-like behaviour and its presence in a very narrow temperature range, in close correspondence with what was already found on the fractal lattice. When present, however, no evidence is found for triple-stranded bound states other than the ground state at the two-chain melting temperature.

  1. Low dimensional silver nanostructures: synthesis, growth mechanism, properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuchuan; Yu, Aibing

    2010-12-01

    This work presents a review of the recent advances on the low-dimensional (LD) silver nanostructures (e.g., one-dimensional nanorods and nanowires, and two-dimensional nanoplates and nanodisks). First, the methods, either physical or chemical, for the synthesis of silver LD nanostructures are introduced. Then, the use is discussed of advanced experimental techniques (e.g., transmission electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, ultraviolet-visible and Raman spectra) and theoretical techniques at different time and length scales from quantum mechanics (e.g., ab initio simulation and density function theory) to molecular dynamics method for understanding the principles of governing particle growth, as well as discrete dipolar approximate method for understanding the optical properties of different shapes and sizes of silver LD nanostructures. Subsequently, the functional applications of the LD silver nanostructures in different areas such optical, electronic, and sensing, particularly for those related to surface plasma resonance are summarized based on the recent findings. Finally, some perspectives and comments for future investigation of silver nanostructures are also briefly discussed.

  2. Disorder-related effects in electron systems of low dimensionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramada, Apostol

    1999-08-01

    This dissertation reports on research we have done on different topics in the physics of low-dimensional disordered electron systems. For two-dimensional systems in the presence of a magnetic field, we approach aspects related to the delocalized states (levitation, structure and position in multilayer systems) and the problem of generation of high harmonics of the cyclotron resonance. We estimate that the delocalized state ``levitate'' away from the center of the Landau level as the inverse of the fourth power of the magnetic field. In a two-layer system, the delocalized states repel each other in a manner similar to the usual level repulsion in quantum mechanics. We calculate the position and structure of the delocalized states. In the limit of the weak magnetic field, we establish the physics and develop the quantitative theory which explain the recent observation of the enhancement of the harmonics of the cyclotron resonance in this limit. For the case of one-dimensional systems, we study the effect of inhomogeneity on the tunnel density of states in a Luttinger liquid. We show that for a periodic inhomogeneity, an additional anomaly develops in the electron density of states and we find its position and magnitude. In the case of a disordered inhomogeneity, the plasmons associated with the low-energy excitations of the system become localized and, as a consequence, the correlator of the fluctuations of the densities of states is modified, acquiring an oscillatory dependence on the distance.

  3. A Description of Quantum Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, K; Ohya, M; Inoue, Kei; Kossakowski, Andrzej; Ohya, Masanori

    2004-01-01

    A measure describing the chaos of a dynamics was introduced by two complexities in information dynamics, and it is called the chaos degree. In particular, the entropic chaos degree has been used to characterized several dynamical maps such that logistis, Baker's, Tinckerbel's in classical or quantum systems. In this paper, we give a new treatment of quantum chaos by defining the entropic chaos degree for quantum transition dynamics, and we prove that every non-chaotic quantum dynamics, e.g., dissipative dynamics, has zero chaos degree. A quantum spin 1/2 system is studied by our chaos degree, and it is shown that this degree well describes the chaotic behavior of the spin system.

  4. Chaos and simple determinism in reversed field pinch plasmas: Nonlinear analysis of numerical simulation and experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Christopher A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-09-01

    In this dissertation the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas is investigated. To properly assess this possibility, data from both numerical simulations and experiment are analyzed. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos in the data. These tools include phase portraits and Poincare sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental date were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or low simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system.

  5. Morphogenesis of Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmet, Marat

    2012-01-01

    Morphogenesis, as it is understood in a wide sense by Ren\\'e Thom, is considered for various types of chaos. That is, those, obtained by period-doubling cascade, Devaney's and Li-Yorke chaos. Moreover, in discussion form we consider inheritance of intermittency, the double-scroll Chua's attractor and quasiperiodical motions as a possible skeleton of a chaotic attractor. To make our introduction of the paper more clear, we have to say that one may consider other various accompanying concepts of chaos such that a structure of the chaotic attractor, its fractal dimension, form of the bifurcation diagram, the spectra of Lyapunov exponents, etc. We make comparison of the main concept of our paper with Turing's morphogenesis and John von Neumann automata, considering that this may be not only formal one, but will give ideas for the chaos development in the morphogenesis of Turing and for self-replicating machines. To provide rigorous study of the subject, we introduce new definitions such as chaotic sets of functio...

  6. Chaos in drive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratochvíl C.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to provide an elementary introduction to the subject of chaos in the electromechanical drive systems. In this article, we explore chaotic solutions of maps and continuous time systems. These solutions are also bounded like equilibrium, periodic and quasiperiodic solutions.

  7. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  8. Colpitts and Chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1996-01-01

    order limit cycle is found. If the the forward Early voltage parameter is added chaos is observed again. An examination of the eigenvalues of the oscillator with the simple memoryless Ebers-Moll BJT injection model is presented. By adding bulk resistors to the model stable limit cycles of orders 1, 2, 3...

  9. SPICE and Chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Can we believe in the results of our circuit simulators ? Is it possible to distinguish between results due to numerical chaos and resultsdue to the eventual chaotic nature of our modelsof physical systems ?. Three experiments with SPICE are presented: (1) A "stable" active RCcircuit with poles i...

  10. Aggregation and sampling in deterministic chaos: implications for chaos identification in hydrological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Salas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature reveals conflicting results regarding the existence and inherent nature of chaos in hydrological processes such as precipitation and streamflow, i.e. whether they are low dimensional chaotic or stochastic. This issue is examined further in this paper, particularly the effect that certain types of transformations, such as aggregation and sampling, may have on the identification of the dynamics of the underlying system. First, we investigate the dynamics of daily streamflows for two rivers in Florida, one with strong surface and groundwater storage contributions and the other with a lesser basin storage contribution. Based on estimates of the delay time, the delay time window, and the correlation integral, our results suggest that the river with the stronger basin storage contribution departs significantly from the behavior of a chaotic system, while the departure is less significant for the river with the smaller basin storage contribution. We pose the hypothesis that the chaotic behavior depicted on continuous precipitation fields or small time-step precipitation series becomes less identifiable as the aggregation (or sampling time step increases. Similarly, because streamflows result from a complex transformation of precipitation that involves accumulating and routing excess rainfall throughout the basin and adding surface and groundwater flows, the end result may be that streamflows at the outlet of the basin depart from low dimensional chaotic behavior. We also investigate the effect of aggregation and sampling using series derived from the Lorenz equations and show that, as the aggregation and sampling scales increase, the chaotic behavior deteriorates and eventually ceases to show evidence of low dimensional determinism.

  11. Extraordinary Spin-Wave Thermal Conductivity in Low-Dimensional Copper Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Low-Dimensional Copper Oxides Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 611102 6. AUTHORS Sd. PROJECT NUMBER David Cahill Se. TASK NUMBER Sf...TDTR) to advance understanding of the1mal transp01i in low dimensional copper - oxides that display extraordina1y thennal transp01i by the1mal...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 ABSTRACT Final Report: Extraoridinary Spin-Wave Thermal Conductivity in Low-Dimensional Copper Oxides Report Title We applied

  12. Chaos theory applied to the caloric response of the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, T

    1993-12-01

    Developments in the field of nonlinear dynamics has given us a new conceptual framework for understanding the mechanisms involved in the regulation of complex nonlinear systems. This concept, called "chaos" or "deterministic chaos," has been applied to EKG, EEG, and other physiological signals, but not yet to the ENG signal. The underlying geometrical structure in chaotic dynamics is fractal (noninteger dimension), and calculating the fractal dimension of the electronystagmographic recording from caloric testing gave a dimension ranging from 3.3 to 7.7. This result demonstrates that the multidimensional vestibular system, with its numerous neurological pathways, can somehow reduce the degrees of freedom and give rise to an irregular dynamic low-dimensional behavior, which is associated with deterministic chaos.

  13. No evidence of chaos but some evidence of dependence in the US stock market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, Apostolos E-mail: serletis@ucalgary.ca; Shintani, Mototsugu E-mail: mototsugu.shintani@vanderbilt.edu

    2003-07-01

    This paper uses recent advances in the field of applied econometrics and tools from dynamical systems theory to test for random walks and chaos in the US stock market, using daily observations on the Dow Jones Industrial Average (from January 3, 1928 to October 18, 2000 - a total of 18,490 observations). In doing so, we follow the recent contribution by Whang and Linton [J Econometr 91 (1999) 1] and construct the standard error for the Nychka et al. [J Roy Statist Soc B 54 (1992) 399] dominant Lyapunov exponent, thereby providing a statistical test of chaos. We find statistically significant evidence against low-dimensional chaos and point to the use of stochastic models and statistical inference in the modeling of asset markets.

  14. Effective electron mass in low-dimensional semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Sitangshu [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Nano Scale Device Research Lab.; Ghatak, Kamakhya Prasad [National Institute of Technology, Agartala, Tripura West (India). Dept. of Electronics and Communication Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Provides a treatment of the effective electron mass in nanodevices. Explains changes of the band structure of optoelectronic semiconductors by intense electric fields and light waves. Gives insight into the electronic behavior in doped semiconductors and their nanostructures. Supports tuition by 200 open problems and questions. This book deals with the Effective Electron Mass (EEM) in low dimensional semiconductors. The materials considered are quantum confined non-linear optical, III-V, II-VI, GaP, Ge, PtSb2, zero-gap, stressed, Bismuth, carbon nanotubes, GaSb, IV-VI, Te, II-V, Bi2Te3, Sb, III-V, II-VI, IV-VI semiconductors and quantized III-V, II-VI, IV-VI and HgTe/CdTe superlattices with graded interfaces and effective mass superlattices. The presence of intense electric field and the light waves change the band structure of optoelectronic semiconductors in fundamental ways, which have also been incorporated in the study of the EEM in quantized structures of optoelectronic compounds that control the studies of the quantum effect devices under strong fields. The importance of measurement of band gap in optoelectronic materials under strong electric field and external photo excitation has also been discussed in this context. The influence of crossed electric and quantizing magnetic fields on the EEM and the EEM in heavily doped semiconductors and their nanostructures is discussed. This book contains 200 open research problems which form the integral part of the text and are useful for both Ph. D aspirants and researchers in the fields of solid-state sciences, materials science, nanoscience and technology and allied fields in addition to the graduate courses in modern semiconductor nanostructures. The book is written for post graduate students, researchers and engineers, professionals in the fields of solid state sciences, materials science, nanoscience and technology, nanostructured materials and condensed matter physics.

  15. Nanoscale control of low-dimensional spin structures in manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wang; Iftikhar, Ahmed Malik; Renrong, Liang; Wen, Huang; Renkui, Zheng; Jinxing, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Due to the upcoming demands of next-generation electronic/magnetoelectronic devices with low-energy consumption, emerging correlated materials (such as superconductors, topological insulators and manganites) are one of the highly promising candidates for the applications. For the past decades, manganites have attracted great interest due to the colossal magnetoresistance effect, charge-spin-orbital ordering, and electronic phase separation. However, the incapable of deterministic control of those emerging low-dimensional spin structures at ambient condition restrict their possible applications. Therefore, the understanding and control of the dynamic behaviors of spin order parameters at nanoscale in manganites under external stimuli with low energy consumption, especially at room temperature is highly desired. In this review, we collected recent major progresses of nanoscale control of spin structures in manganites at low dimension, especially focusing on the control of their phase boundaries, domain walls as well as the topological spin structures (e.g., skyrmions). In addition, capacitor-based prototype spintronic devices are proposed by taking advantage of the above control methods in manganites. This capacitor-based structure may provide a new platform for the design of future spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB920902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61306105 and 51572278), the Information Science and Technology (TNList) Cross-discipline Foundation from Tsinghua National Laboratory, China and the Fund from the State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

  16. Low dimensional semiconductor structures. Characterization, modeling and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uenlue, Hilmi [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Physics Engineering; Horing, Norman J.M. (eds.) [Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Engineering Physics

    2013-09-01

    Gives a state of the art report of important topics in nanoscience. Includes a broad spectrum of areas developing rapidly in nanostructures science and technology. Delivers a tutorial- and review-like presentation. Starting with the first transistor in 1949, the world has experienced a technological revolution which has permeated most aspects of modern life, particularly over the last generation. Yet another such revolution looms up before us with the newly developed capability to control matter on the nanometer scale. A truly extraordinary research effort, by scientists, engineers, technologists of all disciplines, in nations large and small throughout the world, is directed and vigorously pressed to develop a full understanding of the properties of matter at the nanoscale and its possible applications, to bring to fruition the promise of nanostructures to introduce a new generation of electronic and optical devices. The physics of low dimensional semiconductor structures, including heterostructures, superlattices, quantum wells, wires and dots is reviewed and their modeling is discussed in detail. The truly exceptional material, Graphene, is reviewed; its functionalization and Van der Waals interactions are included here. Recent research on optical studies of quantum dots and on the physical properties of one-dimensional quantum wires is also reported. Chapters on fabrication of nanowire - based nanogap devices by the dielectrophoretic assembly approach. The broad spectrum of research reported here incorporates chapters on nanoengineering and nanophysics. In its presentation of tutorial chapters as well as advanced research on nanostructures, this book is ideally suited to meet the needs of newcomers to the field as well as experienced researchers interested in viewing colleagues' recent advances.

  17. INTRODUCTION: Physics of Low-dimensional Systems: Nobel Symposium 73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Stig

    1989-01-01

    The physics of low-dimensional systems has developed in a remarkable way over the last decade and has accelerated over the last few years, in particular because of the discovery of the new high temperature superconductors. The new developments started more than fifteen years ago with the discovery of the unexpected quasi-one-dimensional character of the TTF-TCNQ. Since then the field of conducting quasi-one-dimensional organic systems have been rapidly growing. Parallel to the experimental work there has been an important theoretical development of great conceptual importance, such as charge density waves, soliton-like excitations, fractional charges, new symmetry properties etc. A new field of fundamental importance was the discovery of the Quantum Hall Effect in 1980. This field is still expanding with new experimental and theoretical discoveries. In 1986, then, came the totally unexpected discovery of high temperature superconductivity which started an explosive development. The three areas just mentioned formed the main themes of the Symposium. They do not in any way exhaust the progress in low-dimensional physics. We should mention the recent important development with both two-dimensional and one-dimensional and even zero-dimensional structures (quantum dots). The physics of mesoscopic systems is another important area where the low dimensionality is a key feature. Because of the small format of this Symposium we could unfortunately not cover these areas. A Nobel Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to bring together a group of prominent scientists for a stimulating exchange of new ideas and results. The Nobel Symposia are very small meetings by invitation only and the number of key international participants is typically in the range 25-40. These Symposia are arranged through a special Nobel Symposium Committee after proposal from individuals. This Symposium was sponsored by the Nobel Foundation through its Nobel Symposium Fund with grants from The

  18. Converting transient chaos into sustained chaos by feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    1994-02-01

    A boundary crisis is a catastrophic event in which a chaotic attractor is suddenly destroyed, leaving a nonattracting chaotic saddle in its place in the phase space. Based on the controlling-chaos idea [E. Ott, C. Grebogi, and J. A. Yorke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1196 (1990)], we present a method for stabilizing chaotic trajectories on the chaotic saddle by applying only small parameter perturbations. This strategy enables us to convert transient chaos into sustained chaos, thereby restoring attracting chaotic motion.

  19. Energy–pressure relation for low-dimensional gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mancarella

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A particularly simple relation of proportionality between internal energy and pressure holds for scale-invariant thermodynamic systems (with Hamiltonians homogeneous functions of the coordinates, including classical and quantum – Bose and Fermi – ideal gases. One can quantify the deviation from such a relation by introducing the internal energy shift as the difference between the internal energy of the system and the corresponding value for scale-invariant (including ideal gases. After discussing some general thermodynamic properties associated with the scale-invariance, we provide criteria for which the internal energy shift density of an imperfect (classical or quantum gas is a bounded function of temperature. We then study the internal energy shift and deviations from the energy–pressure proportionality in low-dimensional models of gases interpolating between the ideal Bose and the ideal Fermi gases, focusing on the Lieb–Liniger model in 1d and on the anyonic gas in 2d. In 1d the internal energy shift is determined from the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz integral equations and an explicit relation for it is given at high temperature. Our results show that the internal energy shift is positive, it vanishes in the two limits of zero and infinite coupling (respectively the ideal Bose and the Tonks–Girardeau gas and it has a maximum at a finite, temperature-depending, value of the coupling. Remarkably, at fixed coupling the energy shift density saturates to a finite value for infinite temperature. In 2d we consider systems of Abelian anyons and non-Abelian Chern–Simons particles: as it can be seen also directly from a study of the virial coefficients, in the usually considered hard-core limit the internal energy shift vanishes and the energy is just proportional to the pressure, with the proportionality constant being simply the area of the system. Soft-core boundary conditions at coincident points for the two-body wavefunction introduce

  20. Material Synthesis and Characterization on Low-Dimensional Cobaltates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Hao

    In this thesis, results of the investigation of a new low-dimensional cobaltates Ba2-xSrxCoO 4 are presented. The synthesis of both polycrystalline and single crystalline compounds using the methods of conventional solid state chemical reaction and floating-zone optical furnace is first introduced. Besides making polycrystalline powders, we successfully, for the first time, synthesized large single crystals of Ba2CoO4. Single crystals were also obtained for Sr doped Ba2-xSrxCoO 4. Powder and single crystal x-ray diffraction results indicate that pure Ba2CoO4 has a monoclinic structure at room temperature. With Sr doping, the lattice structure changes to orthorhombic when x ≥ 0.5 and to tetragonal when x = 2.0. In addition, Ba2CoO4 and Sr2CoO4, have completely different basic building blocks in the structure. One is CoO4 tetrahedron and the later is CoO6 octahedron, respectively. Electronic and magnetic properties were characterized and discussed. The magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and thermal conductivity show that Ba2CoO4 has an antiferromagnetic (AF) ground state with an AF ordering temperature TN = 25 K. However, the magnitude of the Neel temperature TN is significantly lower than the Curie-Weiss temperature (|theta| ˜ 110 K), suggesting either reduced-dimensional magnetic interactions and/or the existence of magnetic frustration. The AF interaction persists in all the samples with different doping concentrations. The Neel temperature doesn't vary much in the monoclinic structure regime but decreases when the system enters orthorhombic. Magnetically, Ba2CoO4 has an AF insulating ground state while Sr2CoO4 has a ferromagnetic (FM) metallic ground state. Neutron powder refinement results indicate a magnetic structure with the spin mostly aligned along the a-axis. The result from a mu-spin rotation/relaxation (mu+SR) experiment agrees with our refinement. It confirms the AF order in the ab -plane. We also studied the spin dynamics and its anisotropy in

  1. The joy of transient chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tél, Tamás [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, and MTA-ELTE Theoretical Physics Research Group, Pázmány P. s. 1/A, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary)

    2015-09-15

    We intend to show that transient chaos is a very appealing, but still not widely appreciated, subfield of nonlinear dynamics. Besides flashing its basic properties and giving a brief overview of the many applications, a few recent transient-chaos-related subjects are introduced in some detail. These include the dynamics of decision making, dispersion, and sedimentation of volcanic ash, doubly transient chaos of undriven autonomous mechanical systems, and a dynamical systems approach to energy absorption or explosion.

  2. Chaos control of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, A; Weiss, J N; Ditto, W L; Spano, M L

    1995-01-01

    Chaos theory has shown that many disordered and erratic phenomena are in fact deterministic, and can be understood causally and controlled. The prospect that cardiac arrhythmias might be instances of deterministic chaos is therefore intriguing. We used a recently developed method of chaos control to stabilize a ouabain-induced arrhythmia in rabbit ventricular tissue in vitro. Extension of these results to clinically significant arrhythmias such as fibrillation will require overcoming the additional obstacles of spatiotemporal complexity.

  3. Chaos detection and predictability

    CERN Document Server

    Gottwald, Georg; Laskar, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing chaoticity from regularity in deterministic dynamical systems and specifying the subspace of the phase space in which instabilities are expected to occur is of utmost importance in as disparate areas as astronomy, particle physics and climate dynamics.   To address these issues there exists a plethora of methods for chaos detection and predictability. The most commonly employed technique for investigating chaotic dynamics, i.e. the computation of Lyapunov exponents, however, may suffer a number of problems and drawbacks, for example when applied to noisy experimental data.   In the last two decades, several novel methods have been developed for the fast and reliable determination of the regular or chaotic nature of orbits, aimed at overcoming the shortcomings of more traditional techniques. This set of lecture notes and tutorial reviews serves as an introduction to and overview of modern chaos detection and predictability techniques for graduate students and non-specialists.   The book cover...

  4. Wireless communication with chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hai-Peng; Baptista, Murilo S; Grebogi, Celso

    2013-05-03

    The modern world fully relies on wireless communication. Because of intrinsic physical constraints of the wireless physical media (multipath, damping, and filtering), signals carrying information are strongly modified, preventing information from being transmitted with a high bit rate. We show that, though a chaotic signal is strongly modified by the wireless physical media, its Lyapunov exponents remain unaltered, suggesting that the information transmitted is not modified by the channel. For some particular chaotic signals, we have indeed proved that the dynamic description of both the transmitted and the received signals is identical and shown that the capacity of the chaos-based wireless channel is unaffected by the multipath propagation of the physical media. These physical properties of chaotic signals warrant an effective chaos-based wireless communication system.

  5. Chaos in quantum channels

    CERN Document Server

    Hosur, Pavan; Roberts, Daniel A; Yoshida, Beni

    2015-01-01

    We study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. These results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  6. Handbook of Chaos Control

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, H G

    2008-01-01

    This long-awaited revised second edition of the standard reference on the subject has been considerably expanded to include such recent developments as novel control schemes, control of chaotic space-time patterns, control of noisy nonlinear systems, and communication with chaos, as well as promising new directions in research. The contributions from leading international scientists active in the field provide a comprehensive overview of our current level of knowledge on chaos control and its applications in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and engineering. In addition, they show the overlap with the traditional field of control theory in the engineering community.An interdisciplinary approach of interest to scientists and engineers working in a number of areas

  7. Arithmetic quantum chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Marklof, J

    2005-01-01

    The central objective in the study of quantum chaos is to characterize universal properties of quantum systems that reflect the regular or chaotic features of the underlying classical dynamics. Most developments of the past 25 years have been influenced by the pioneering models on statistical properties of eigenstates (Berry 1977) and energy levels (Berry and Tabor 1977; Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit 1984). Arithmetic quantum chaos (AQC) refers to the investigation of quantum system with additional arithmetic structures that allow a significantly more extensive analysis than is generally possible. On the other hand, the special number-theoretic features also render these systems non-generic, and thus some of the expected universal phenomena fail to emerge. Important examples of such systems include the modular surface and linear automorphisms of tori (`cat maps') which will be described below.

  8. Chaos in quantum channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang [Department of Physics, Stanford University,476 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Roberts, Daniel A. [Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Yoshida, Beni [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. These results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  9. Controlling chaos faster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Christian [Network Dynamics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS), 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience (BCCN), 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Institute for Mathematics, Georg–August–Universität Göttingen, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); Kolodziejski, Christoph [Network Dynamics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS), 37077 Göttingen (Germany); III. Physical Institute—Biophysics, Georg–August–Universität Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Timme, Marc [Network Dynamics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS), 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Institute for Nonlinear Dynamics, Georg–August–Universität Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    Predictive feedback control is an easy-to-implement method to stabilize unknown unstable periodic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems. Predictive feedback control is severely limited because asymptotic convergence speed decreases with stronger instabilities which in turn are typical for larger target periods, rendering it harder to effectively stabilize periodic orbits of large period. Here, we study stalled chaos control, where the application of control is stalled to make use of the chaotic, uncontrolled dynamics, and introduce an adaptation paradigm to overcome this limitation and speed up convergence. This modified control scheme is not only capable of stabilizing more periodic orbits than the original predictive feedback control but also speeds up convergence for typical chaotic maps, as illustrated in both theory and application. The proposed adaptation scheme provides a way to tune parameters online, yielding a broadly applicable, fast chaos control that converges reliably, even for periodic orbits of large period.

  10. Noise tolerant spatiotemporal chaos computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Ditto, William L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Lindner, John F. [Physics Department, The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 44691 (United States); Sinha, Sudeshna [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Mohali, Punjab 140306 (India)

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and design a noise tolerant chaos computing system based on a coupled map lattice (CML) and the noise reduction capabilities inherent in coupled dynamical systems. The resulting spatiotemporal chaos computing system is more robust to noise than a single map chaos computing system. In this CML based approach to computing, under the coupled dynamics, the local noise from different nodes of the lattice diffuses across the lattice, and it attenuates each other's effects, resulting in a system with less noise content and a more robust chaos computing architecture.

  11. Noise tolerant spatiotemporal chaos computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Lindner, John F; Sinha, Sudeshna; Ditto, William L

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and design a noise tolerant chaos computing system based on a coupled map lattice (CML) and the noise reduction capabilities inherent in coupled dynamical systems. The resulting spatiotemporal chaos computing system is more robust to noise than a single map chaos computing system. In this CML based approach to computing, under the coupled dynamics, the local noise from different nodes of the lattice diffuses across the lattice, and it attenuates each other's effects, resulting in a system with less noise content and a more robust chaos computing architecture.

  12. Tailoring wavelets for chaos control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G W; Zhan, Meng; Lai, C-H

    2002-12-31

    Chaos is a class of ubiquitous phenomena and controlling chaos is of great interest and importance. In this Letter, we introduce wavelet controlled dynamics as a new paradigm of dynamical control. We find that by modifying a tiny fraction of the wavelet subspaces of a coupling matrix, we could dramatically enhance the transverse stability of the synchronous manifold of a chaotic system. Wavelet controlled Hopf bifurcation from chaos is observed. Our approach provides a robust strategy for controlling chaos and other dynamical systems in nature.

  13. Galaxies and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Voglis, Nikos

    2003-01-01

    Galaxies and Chaos examines the application of tools developed for Nonlinear Dynamical Systems to Galactic Dynamics and Galaxy Formation, as well as to related issues in Celestial Mechanics. The contributions collected in this volume have emerged from selected presentations at a workshop on this topic and key chapters have been suitably expanded in order to be accessible to nonspecialist researchers and postgraduate students wishing to enter this exciting field of research.

  14. SPICE and Chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Can we believe in the results of our circuit simulators ? Is it possible to distinguish between results due to numerical chaos and resultsdue to the eventual chaotic nature of our modelsof physical systems ?. Three experiments with SPICE are presented: (1) A "stable" active RCcircuit with poles i...... in the models of the circuits to be analyzed. If trimmed properly SPICE normally gives the correct result....

  15. Fractals and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Earnshow, R; Jones, H

    1991-01-01

    This volume is based upon the presentations made at an international conference in London on the subject of 'Fractals and Chaos'. The objective of the conference was to bring together some of the leading practitioners and exponents in the overlapping fields of fractal geometry and chaos theory, with a view to exploring some of the relationships between the two domains. Based on this initial conference and subsequent exchanges between the editors and the authors, revised and updated papers were produced. These papers are contained in the present volume. We thank all those who contributed to this effort by way of planning and organisation, and also all those who helped in the production of this volume. In particular, we wish to express our appreciation to Gerhard Rossbach, Computer Science Editor, Craig Van Dyck, Production Director, and Nancy A. Rogers, who did the typesetting. A. J. Crilly R. A. Earnshaw H. Jones 1 March 1990 Introduction Fractals and Chaos The word 'fractal' was coined by Benoit Mandelbrot i...

  16. Chaos on the interval

    CERN Document Server

    Ruette, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this book is to survey the relations between the various kinds of chaos and related notions for continuous interval maps from a topological point of view. The papers on this topic are numerous and widely scattered in the literature; some of them are little known, difficult to find, or originally published in Russian, Ukrainian, or Chinese. Dynamical systems given by the iteration of a continuous map on an interval have been broadly studied because they are simple but nevertheless exhibit complex behaviors. They also allow numerical simulations, which enabled the discovery of some chaotic phenomena. Moreover, the "most interesting" part of some higher-dimensional systems can be of lower dimension, which allows, in some cases, boiling it down to systems in dimension one. Some of the more recent developments such as distributional chaos, the relation between entropy and Li-Yorke chaos, sequence entropy, and maps with infinitely many branches are presented in book form for the first time. The author gi...

  17. Failure of chaos control

    Science.gov (United States)

    van De Water W; de Weger J

    2000-11-01

    We study the control of chaos in an experiment on a parametrically excited pendulum whose excitation mechanism is not perfect. This imperfection leads to a weakly excited degree of freedom with an associated small eigenvalue. Although the state of the pendulum could be characterized well and although the perturbation is weak, we fail to control chaos. From a numerical model we learn that the small eigenvalue cannot be ignored when attempting control. However, the estimate of this eigenvalue from an (experimental) time series is elusive. The reason is that points in an experimental time series are distributed according to the natural measure. It is this extremely uneven distribution of points that thwarts attempts to measure eigenvalues that are very different. Another consequence of the phase-space distribution of points for control is the occurrence of logarithmic-oscillations in the waiting time before control can be attempted. We come to the conclusion that chaos needs to be destroyed before the information needed for its control can be obtained.

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph R.

    This dissertation is a survey of ultrafast time-resolved optical measurements conducted on a variety of low-dimensional semiconductor systems to further the understanding of the dynamic behavior in the following systems: ZnMnTe/ZnSe quantum dots, ZnTe/ZnMnSe quantum dots, InGaAs quantum wells, CdMnSe colloidal quantum dots, multi-shell CdSe/CdMnS/CdS colloidal nanoplatelets, and graphene and graphene-related solutions and films. Using time-resolved photoluminescence to study epitaxially-grown ZnTe and ZnMnTe quantum dots in corresponding ZnMnSe and ZnSe matrices, the location dependence of manganese ions in respect to magnetic polaron formation is shown. The structure with manganese ions located in the matrix exhibited magnetic polaron behavior consistent with previous literature, whereas the structure with the magnetic ions located within the quantum dots exhibited unconventional magnetic polaron properties. These properties, including temperature and magnetic field insensitivity, were explained through the use of a model that predicted an increased internal magnetic field due to a decreased effective volume of the magnetic polaron and a higher effective temperature due to laser heating. Magneto-time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on a system of colloidal CdMnSe quantum dots show that the magnetic polaron properties differ significantly from the epitaxially grown quantum dots. First the timescales at which the magnetic polaron forms and the polarization saturates are different by more than an order of magnitude, and second, the magnetic polaron energy exhibited step-like behavior as the strength of the externally applied magnetic field is increased. The field dependent MP formation energy that is observed experimentally is explained as due to the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling of Mn dimers within the QDs. This model is further verified by the observation of quantized behavior in the Zeeman energy splitting. Through the use of magneto

  19. A hyper-chaos-based image encryption algorithm using pixel-level permutation and bit-level permutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueping; Wang, Chunhua; Chen, Hua

    2017-03-01

    Recently, a number of chaos-based image encryption algorithms that use low-dimensional chaotic map and permutation-diffusion architecture have been proposed. However, low-dimensional chaotic map is less safe than high-dimensional chaotic system. And permutation process is independent of plaintext and diffusion process. Therefore, they cannot resist efficiently the chosen-plaintext attack and chosen-ciphertext attack. In this paper, we propose a hyper-chaos-based image encryption algorithm. The algorithm adopts a 5-D multi-wing hyper-chaotic system, and the key stream generated by hyper-chaotic system is related to the original image. Then, pixel-level permutation and bit-level permutation are employed to strengthen security of the cryptosystem. Finally, a diffusion operation is employed to change pixels. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is secure and reliable for image encryption.

  20. Chaos Theory and Post Modernism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Chaos theory is often associated with post modernism. However, one may make the point that both terms are misunderstood. The point of this article is to define both terms and indicate their relationship. Description: Chaos theory is associated with a definition of a theory dealing with variables (butterflies) that are not directly related to a…

  1. Death and revival of chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszás, Bálint; Feudel, Ulrike; Tél, Tamás

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the death and revival of chaos under the impact of a monotonous time-dependent forcing that changes its strength with a non-negligible rate. Starting on a chaotic attractor it is found that the complexity of the dynamics remains very pronounced even when the driving amplitude has decayed to rather small values. When after the death of chaos the strength of the forcing is increased again with the same rate of change, chaos is found to revive but with a different history. This leads to the appearance of a hysteresis in the complexity of the dynamics. To characterize these dynamics, the concept of snapshot attractors is used, and the corresponding ensemble approach proves to be superior to a single trajectory description, that turns out to be nonrepresentative. The death (revival) of chaos is manifested in a drop (jump) of the standard deviation of one of the phase-space coordinates of the ensemble; the details of this chaos-nonchaos transition depend on the ratio of the characteristic times of the amplitude change and of the internal dynamics. It is demonstrated that chaos cannot die out as long as underlying transient chaos is present in the parameter space. As a condition for a "quasistatically slow" switch-off, we derive an inequality which cannot be fulfilled in practice over extended parameter ranges where transient chaos is present. These observations need to be taken into account when discussing the implications of "climate change scenarios" in any nonlinear dynamical system.

  2. Chaos Theory and Post Modernism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Chaos theory is often associated with post modernism. However, one may make the point that both terms are misunderstood. The point of this article is to define both terms and indicate their relationship. Description: Chaos theory is associated with a definition of a theory dealing with variables (butterflies) that are not directly related to a…

  3. Controlling Beam Halo-Chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方锦清; 罗晓曙; 陈关荣; 翁甲强

    2001-01-01

    Beam halo-chaos is essentially a complex spatiotemporal chaotic motion in a periodic-focusing channel of a highpower linear proton accelerator. The controllability condition for beam halo-chaos is analysed qualitatively. A special nonlinear control method, i.e. the wavelet-based function feedback, is proposed for controlling beam halochaos. Particle-in-cell simulations are used to explore the nature of halo-chaos formation, which has shown that the beam hMo-chaos is suppressed effectively after using nonlinear control for the proton beam with an initial full Gaussian distribution. The halo intensity factor Hav is reduced from 14%o to zero, and the other statistical physical quantities of beam halo-chaos are more than doubly reduced. The potential applications of such nonlinear control in experiments are briefly pointed out.

  4. Chaos Criminology: A critical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Adrienne L.

    There has been a push since the early 1980's for a paradigm shift in criminology from a Newtonian-based ontology to one of quantum physics. Primarily this effort has taken the form of integrating Chaos Theory into Criminology into what this thesis calls 'Chaos Criminology'. However, with the melding of any two fields, terms and concepts need to be translated properly, which has yet to be done. In addition to proving a translation between fields, this thesis also uses a set of criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of the current use of Chaos Theory in Criminology. While the results of the theory evaluation reveal that the current Chaos Criminology work is severely lacking and in need of development, there is some promise in the development of Marx's dialectical materialism with Chaos Theory.

  5. Linear and Nonlinear Dynamical Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Chirikov, B V

    1997-01-01

    Interrelations between dynamical and statistical laws in physics, on the one hand, and between the classical and quantum mechanics, on the other hand, are discussed with emphasis on the new phenomenon of dynamical chaos. The principal results of the studies into chaos in classical mechanics are presented in some detail, including the strong local instability and robustness of the motion, continuity of both the phase space as well as the motion spectrum, and time reversibility but nonrecurrency of statistical evolution, within the general picture of chaos as a specific case of dynamical behavior. Analysis of the apparently very deep and challenging contradictions of this picture with the quantum principles is given. The quantum view of dynamical chaos, as an attempt to resolve these contradictions guided by the correspondence principle and based upon the characteristic time scales of quantum evolution, is explained. The picture of the quantum chaos as a new generic dynamical phenomenon is outlined together wit...

  6. Energy-pressure relation for low-dimensional gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancarella, Francesco; Mussardo, Giuseppe; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    A particularly simple relation of proportionality between internal energy and pressure holds for scale-invariant thermodynamic systems (with Hamiltonians homogeneous functions of the coordinates), including classical and quantum - Bose and Fermi - ideal gases. One can quantify the deviation from such a relation by introducing the internal energy shift as the difference between the internal energy of the system and the corresponding value for scale-invariant (including ideal) gases. After discussing some general thermodynamic properties associated with the scale-invariance, we provide criteria for which the internal energy shift density of an imperfect (classical or quantum) gas is a bounded function of temperature. We then study the internal energy shift and deviations from the energy-pressure proportionality in low-dimensional models of gases interpolating between the ideal Bose and the ideal Fermi gases, focusing on the Lieb-Liniger model in 1d and on the anyonic gas in 2d. In 1d the internal energy shift is determined from the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz integral equations and an explicit relation for it is given at high temperature. Our results show that the internal energy shift is positive, it vanishes in the two limits of zero and infinite coupling (respectively the ideal Bose and the Tonks-Girardeau gas) and it has a maximum at a finite, temperature-depending, value of the coupling. Remarkably, at fixed coupling the energy shift density saturates to a finite value for infinite temperature. In 2d we consider systems of Abelian anyons and non-Abelian Chern-Simons particles: as it can be seen also directly from a study of the virial coefficients, in the usually considered hard-core limit the internal energy shift vanishes and the energy is just proportional to the pressure, with the proportionality constant being simply the area of the system. Soft-core boundary conditions at coincident points for the two-body wavefunction introduce a length scale, and induce a

  7. User-Driven CHAOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Lund, Haakon; Skov, Mette

    2016-01-01

    CHAOS (Cultural Heritage Archive Open System) provides streaming access to more than 500.000 broad-casts by the Danish Broadcast Corporation from 1931 and onwards. The archive is part of the LARM project with the purpose of enabling researchers to search, annotate, and interact with recordings....... To optimally sup-port the researchers a user-centred approach was taken to develop the platform and related metadata scheme. Based on the requirements a three level metadata scheme was developed: (1) core archival metadata, (2) LARM metadata, and (3) project-specific metadata. The paper analyses how.......fm’s strength in providing streaming access to a large, shared corpus of broadcasts....

  8. Metadata in CHAOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Skov, Mette; Lund, Haakon

    CHAOS (Cultural Heritage Archive Open System) provides streaming access to more than 500.000 broad-casts by the Danish Broadcast Corporation from 1931 and onwards. The archive is part of the LARM project with the purpose of enabling researchers to search, annotate, and interact with recordings....... To optimally sup-port the researchers a user-centred approach was taken to develop the platform and related metadata scheme. Based on the requirements a three level metadata scheme was developed: (1) core archival metadata, (2) LARM metadata, and (3) project-specific metadata. The paper analyses how.......fm’s strength in providing streaming access to a large, shared corpus of broadcasts....

  9. Nonhyperbolic homoclinic chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Cicogna, G

    1999-01-01

    Homoclinic chaos is usually examined with the hypothesis of hyperbolicity of the critical point. We consider here, following a (suitably adjusted) classical analytic method, the case of non-hyperbolic points and show that, under a Melnikov-type condition plus an additional assumption, the negatively and positively asymptotic sets persist under periodic perturbations, together with their infinitely many intersections on the Poincaré section. We also examine, by means of essentially the same procedure, the case of (heteroclinic) orbits tending to the infinity; this case includes in particular the classical Sitnikov 3--body problem.

  10. Quantum dissipative chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T A

    1993-01-01

    Using the decoherence formalism of Gell-Mann and Hartle, a quantum system is found which is the equivalent of the classical chaotic Duffing oscillator. The similarities and the differences from the classical oscillator are examined; in particular, a new concept of quantum maps is introduced, and alterations in the classical strange attractor due to the presence of scale- dependent quantum effects are studied. Classical quantities such as the Lyapunov exponents and fractal dimension are examined, and quantum analogs are suggested. These results are generalized into a framework for quantum dissipative chaos, and there is a brief discussion of other work in this area.

  11. Fingerprints of Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, V; Baran, Virgil; Bonasera, Aldo

    1998-01-01

    The asymptotic distance between trajectories $d_{\\infty}$, is studied in detail to characterize the occurrence of chaos. We show that this quantity is quite distinct and complementary to the Lyapunov exponents, and it allows for a quantitave estimate for the folding mechanism which keeps the motion bounded in phase space. We study the behaviour of $d_{\\infty}$ in simple unidimensional maps. Near a critical point $d_{\\infty}$ has a power law dependence on the control parameter. Furthermore, at variance with the Lyapunov exponents, it shows jumps when there are sudden changes on the available phase-space.

  12. Quantum bouncer with chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembiński, S. T.; Makowski, A. J.; Pepłowski, P.

    1993-02-01

    We report for the first time quantum calculations for the so-called bouncer model, the classical analog of which is well known to manifest a chaotic behavior. Three versions of our model are fully tractable quantum mechanically and are potentially a rich source of data for establishing properties of a quantum system of which the classical mechanics can be chaotic. Among the results presented here, consequences of the varying bandwidth of infinite-dimensional transition matrices on the use of the correspondence between classical chaos and non-Poissonian quasienergy statistics are discussed.

  13. Landslide in Aureum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    15 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the results of a small landslide off of a hillslope in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars. Mass movement occurred from right (the slope) to left (the lobate feature pointed left). Small dark dots in the landslide area are large boulders. This feature is located near 2.6oS, 24.5oW. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  14. Landslide in Aureum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    15 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the results of a small landslide off of a hillslope in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars. Mass movement occurred from right (the slope) to left (the lobate feature pointed left). Small dark dots in the landslide area are large boulders. This feature is located near 2.6oS, 24.5oW. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  15. Han Hoan Chao Ban Den Hoa Ky. Sach Chi Dan Danh Cho Nguoi Ti Nan. (Welcome to the United States. A Guidebook for Refugees).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Refugee Service Center.

    This guidebook provides Vietnamese-speaking refugees being resettled in the United States with general information about what they will encounter and the services they can receive in their first months in the country. The book is distributed to overseas processing agencies, refugees overseas who have been approved for U.S. admission, and service…

  16. Fabrication, Characterization, Properties, and Applications of Low-Dimensional BiFeO3 Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-dimensional BiFeO3 nanostructures (e.g., nanocrystals, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanoislands have received considerable attention due to their novel size-dependent properties and outstanding multiferroic properties at room temperature. In recent years, much progress has been made both in fabrications and (microstructural, electrical, and magnetic in characterizations of BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures. An overview of the state of art in BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures is presented. First, we review the fabrications of high-quality BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures via a variety of techniques, and then the structural characterizations and physical properties of the BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures are summarized. Their potential applications in the next-generation magnetoelectric random access memories and photovoltaic devices are also discussed. Finally, we conclude this review by providing our perspectives to the future researches of BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures and some key problems are also outlined.

  17. Chaos a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Chaos: A Very Short Introduction shows that we all have an intuitive understanding of chaotic systems. It uses accessible maths and physics (replacing complex equations with simple examples like pendulums, railway lines, and tossing coins) to explain the theory, and points to numerous examples in philosophy and literature (Edgar Allen Poe, Chang-Tzu, and Arthur Conan Doyle) that illuminate the problems. The beauty of fractal patterns and their relation to chaos, as well as the history of chaos, and its uses in the real world and implications for the philosophy of science are all discussed in this Very Short Introduction.

  18. Quantum chaos in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunakov, V. E., E-mail: bunakov@VB13190.spb.edu [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    A definition of classical and quantum chaos on the basis of the Liouville–Arnold theorem is proposed. According to this definition, a chaotic quantum system that has N degrees of freedom should have M < N independent first integrals of motion (good quantum numbers) that are determined by the symmetry of the Hamiltonian for the system being considered. Quantitative measures of quantum chaos are established. In the classical limit, they go over to the Lyapunov exponent or the classical stability parameter. The use of quantum-chaos parameters in nuclear physics is demonstrated.

  19. Stalling chaos control accelerates convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Since chaos control has found its way into many applications, the development of fast, easy-to-implement and universally applicable chaos control methods is of crucial importance. Predictive feedback control has been widely applied but suffers from a speed limit imposed by highly unstable periodic orbits. We show that this limit can be overcome by stalling the control, thereby taking advantage of the stable directions of the uncontrolled chaotic map. This analytical finding is confirmed by numerical simulations, giving a chaos-control method that is capable of successfully stabilizing periodic orbits of high period.

  20. Oscillatory instability and routes to chaos in Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection: effect of external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Nandukumar, Yada

    2015-01-01

    We investigate oscillatory instability and routes to chaos in Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection of electrically conducting fluids in presence of external horizontal magnetic field. Three dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the governing equations are performed for the investigation. DNS shows that oscillatory instability is inhibited by the magnetic field. The supercritical Rayleigh number for the onset of oscillation is found to scale with the Chandrasekhar number $\\mathrm{Q}$ as $\\mathrm{Q}^{\\alpha}$ in DNS with $\\alpha = 1.8$ for low Prandtl numbers ($\\mathrm{Pr}$). Most interestingly, DNS shows $\\mathrm{Q}$ dependent routes to chaos for low Prandtl number fluids like mercury ($\\mathrm{Pr} = 0.025$). For low $\\mathrm{Q}$, period doubling routes are observed, while, quasiperiodic routes are observed for high $\\mathrm{Q}$. The bifurcation structure associated with $\\mathrm{Q}$ dependent routes to chaos is then understood by constructing a low dimensional model from the DNS data. The model also shows...

  1. A musculoskeletal model of human locomotion driven by a low dimensional set of impulsive excitation primitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Massimo; Gizzi, Leonardo; Lloyd, David G; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Human locomotion has been described as being generated by an impulsive (burst-like) excitation of groups of musculotendon units, with timing dependent on the biomechanical goal of the task. Despite this view being supported by many experimental observations on specific locomotion tasks, it is still unknown if the same impulsive controller (i.e., a low-dimensional set of time-delayed excitastion primitives) can be used as input drive for large musculoskeletal models across different human locomotion tasks. For this purpose, we extracted, with non-negative matrix factorization, five non-negative factors from a large sample of muscle electromyograms in two healthy subjects during four motor tasks. These included walking, running, sidestepping, and crossover cutting maneuvers. The extracted non-negative factors were then averaged and parameterized to obtain task-generic Gaussian-shaped impulsive excitation curves or primitives. These were used to drive a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the human lower extremity. Results showed that the same set of five impulsive excitation primitives could be used to predict the dynamics of 34 musculotendon units and the resulting hip, knee and ankle joint moments (i.e., NRMSE = 0.18 ± 0.08, and R (2) = 0.73 ± 0.22 across all tasks and subjects) without substantial loss of accuracy with respect to using experimental electromyograms (i.e., NRMSE = 0.16 ± 0.07, and R (2) = 0.78 ± 0.18 across all tasks and subjects). Results support the hypothesis that biomechanically different motor tasks might share similar neuromuscular control strategies. This might have implications in neurorehabilitation technologies such as human-machine interfaces for the torque-driven, proportional control of powered prostheses and orthoses. In this, device control commands (i.e., predicted joint torque) could be derived without direct experimental data but relying on simple parameterized Gaussian-shaped curves, thus decreasing the input drive

  2. A Chaos Conveyor Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Britney E.

    2013-10-01

    A critical question for the habitability of Europa remains: how does the ice shell work? The detection of shallow subsurface lenses below Europa’s chaos implies that the ice shell is recycled rapidly and that Europa may be currently active. While this is not the first time liquid water has been implicated for Europa, the location of these features combined with new perspective on their dynamics frames the question in a new way. Melt lenses are intriguing potential habitats. Moreover, their formation requires the existence of impurities within the upper ice shell that may be sources of energy for microorganisms. Geomorphic evidence also exists for hydraulic redistribution of fluids both vertically and horizontally through pores and fractures. This process, observed in terrestrial ice shelves, may preserve liquid water within the ice matrix over many kilometers from the source. Horizontal transport of material may produce interconnectivity between distinct regions of Europa, thus preserving habitable conditions within the ice over a longer duration. At a surface age of 40-90 Myr, with 25-50% covered by chaos terrain, Europa's resurfacing rate is very high and water likely plays a significant role. Because of the vigor of overturn implied by this new work, it is likely that surface and subsurface materials are well-mixed within the largest and deepest lenses, providing a mechanism for bringing oxidants and other surface contaminants to the deeper ice shell where it can reach the ocean by convective or compositional effects. The timescales over which large lenses refreeze are large compared to the timescales for vertical transport, while the timescales for smaller lenses are comparable to or shorter than convective timescales. Moreover, marine ice accretion at the bottom of the ice shell may be contributing to a compositional buoyancy engine that would change the makeup of the ice shell. From this point of view, we evaluate the habitability of Europa’s ice and

  3. Chaos and complexity by design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2017-04-01

    We study the relationship between quantum chaos and pseudorandomness by developing probes of unitary design. A natural probe of randomness is the "frame poten-tial," which is minimized by unitary k-designs and measures the 2-norm distance between the Haar random unitary ensemble and another ensemble. A natural probe of quantum chaos is out-of-time-order (OTO) four-point correlation functions. We show that the norm squared of a generalization of out-of-time-order 2 k-point correlators is proportional to the kth frame potential, providing a quantitative connection between chaos and pseudorandomness. Additionally, we prove that these 2 k-point correlators for Pauli operators completely determine the k-fold channel of an ensemble of unitary operators. Finally, we use a counting argument to obtain a lower bound on the quantum circuit complexity in terms of the frame potential. This provides a direct link between chaos, complexity, and randomness.

  4. Chaos and complexity by design

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    We study the relationship between quantum chaos and pseudorandomness by developing probes of unitary design. A natural probe of randomness is the "frame potential," which is minimized by unitary $k$-designs and measures the $2$-norm distance between the Haar random unitary ensemble and another ensemble. A natural probe of quantum chaos is out-of-time-order (OTO) four-point correlation functions. We show that the norm squared of a generalization of out-of-time-order $2k$-point correlators is proportional to the $k$th frame potential, providing a quantitative connection between chaos and pseudorandomness. Additionally, we prove that these $2k$-point correlators for Pauli operators completely determine the $k$-fold channel of an ensemble of unitary operators. Finally, we use a counting argument to obtain a lower bound on the quantum circuit complexity in terms of the frame potential. This provides a direct link between chaos, complexity, and randomness.

  5. User-Driven Chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Lund, Haakon; Skov, Mette

    2016-01-01

    CHAOS (Cultural Heritage Archive Open System) provides streaming access to more than 500,000 broadcasts by the Danish Broadcast Corporation from 1931 and onwards. The archive is part of the LARM project with the purpose of enabling researchers to search, annotate, and interact with recordings....... To support the researchers the optimal way, a usercentred approach was taken to develop the platform and related metadata scheme. Based on the requirements, a three level metadata scheme was developed: 1) core archival metadata, 2) LARM metadata, and 3) project-specific metadata. The paper analyses how...... metadata are project-specific, they have been applied to serve as invaluable access points for fellow researchers due to their factual and neutral nature. The researchers particularly stress LARM.fm’s strength in providing streaming access to a large, shared corpus of broadcasts....

  6. Ergodic cobweb chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Matsumoto

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study augments the traditional linear cobweb model with lower and upper bounds for variations of output. Its purpose is to detect the relationship between the output constraints and the dynamics of the modified model. Due to the upper and lower bounds, a transitional function takes on a tilted z-profile having three piecewise segments with two turning points. It prevents the price (or quantity dynamics from explosive oscillations. This study demonstrates, by presenting numerical examples, that the modified cobweb model can generate various dynamics ranging from stable periodic cycles to ergodic chaos if a product of the marginal propensity to consume and the marginal product is greater than unity.

  7. Chaos and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchener, W Garrett; Nowak, Martin A

    2004-04-01

    Human language is a complex communication system with unlimited expressibility. Children spontaneously develop a native language by exposure to linguistic data from their speech community. Over historical time, languages change dramatically and unpredictably by accumulation of small changes and by interaction with other languages. We have previously developed a mathematical model for the acquisition and evolution of language in heterogeneous populations of speakers. This model is based on game dynamical equations with learning. Here, we show that simple examples of such equations can display complex limit cycles and chaos. Hence, language dynamical equations mimic complicated and unpredictable changes of languages over time. In terms of evolutionary game theory, we note that imperfect learning can induce chaotic switching among strict Nash equilibria.

  8. Hasard et chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ruelle, David

    1991-01-01

    Comment expliquer le hasard ? Peut-on rendre raison de l'irraisonnable ? Ce livre, où il est question des jeux de dés, des loteries, des billards, des attracteurs étranges, de l'astrologie et des oracles, du temps qu'il fera, du libre arbitre, de la mécanique quantique, de l'écoulement des fluides, du théorème de Gödel et des limites de l'entendement humain, expose les fondements et les conséquences de la théorie du chaos. David Ruelle est membre de l'Académie des sciences et professeur de physique théorique à l'Institut des hautes études scientifiques de Bures-sur-Yvette.

  9. The Chaos Within Sudoku

    CERN Document Server

    Ercsey-Ravasz, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical structure of the widely popular Sudoku puzzles is akin to typical hard constraint satisfaction problems that lie at the heart of many applications, including protein folding and the general problem of finding the ground state of a glassy spin system. Via an exact mapping of Sudoku into a deterministic, continuous-time dynamical system, here we show that the difficulty of Sudoku translates into transient chaotic behavior exhibited by the dynamical system. In particular, we show that the escape rate $\\kappa$, an invariant characteristic of transient chaos, provides a single scalar measure of the puzzle's hardness, which correlates well with human difficulty level ratings. Accordingly, $\\eta = -\\log_{10}{\\kappa}$ can be used to define a "Richter"-type scale for puzzle hardness, with easy puzzles falling in the range $0 3$. To our best knowledge, there are no known puzzles with $\\eta > 4$.

  10. Partially predictable chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Wernecke, Hendrik; Gros, Claudius

    2016-01-01

    For a chaotic system pairs of initially close-by trajectories become eventually fully uncorrelated on the attracting set. This process of decorrelation is split into an initial decrease characterized by the maximal Lyapunov exponent and a subsequent diffusive process on the chaotic attractor causing the final loss of predictability. The time scales of both processes can be either of the same or of very different orders of magnitude. In the latter case the two trajectories linger within a finite but small distance (with respect to the overall size of the attractor) for exceedingly long times and therefore remain partially predictable. We introduce a 0-1 indicator for chaos capable of describing this scenario, arguing, in addition, that the chaotic closed braids found close to a period-doubling transition are generically partially predictable.

  11. Stochastic Estimation via Polynomial Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    TΨ is a vector with P+1 elements. With these dimensions, (29) is solvable by standard numerical linear algebra techniques. The specific matrix...initial conditions for partial differential equations. Here, the elementary theory of the polynomial chaos is presented followed by the details of a...the elementary theory of the polynomial chaos is presented followed by the details of a number of example calculations where the statistical mean and

  12. Boundary condition may change chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., RIAM, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawai, Yoshinobu [Kyushu Univ., Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Role of boundary condition for the appearance of chaos is examined. Imposition of the boundary condition is interpreted as the reduction of the system size L. For a demonstration, Rayleigh-Benard instability is considered and the shell model analysis is applied. It is shown that the reduction of L reduces the number of positive Lyapunov exponent of the system, hence opens the route from the turbulence, to the chaos and to the limit cycle/fixed point. (author)

  13. From 1D chain to 3D network: A theoretical study on TiO{sub 2} low dimensional structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Ling-ju; He, Tao, E-mail: het@nanoctr.cn [CAS Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); Zeng, Zhi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-06-14

    We have performed a systematic study on a series of low dimensional TiO{sub 2} nanostructures under density functional theory methods. The geometries, stabilities, growth mechanism, and electronic structures of 1D chain, 2D ring, 2D ring array, and 3D network of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures are analyzed. Based on the Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4} building unit, a series of 1D TiO{sub 2} nano chains and rings can be built. Furthermore, 2D ring array and 3D network nanostructures can be constructed from 1D chains and rings. Among non-periodic TiO{sub 2} chain and ring structures, one series of ring structures is found to be more stable. The geometry model of the 2D ring arrays and 3D network structures in this work has provided a theoretical understanding on the structure information in experiments. Based on these semiconductive low dimensional structures, moreover, it can help to understand and design new hierarchical TiO{sub 2} nanostructure in the future.

  14. Engineering Low Dimensional Materials with van der Waals Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chenhao

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials grow into a hot and big field in condensed matter physics in the past decade. One particularly intriguing thing is the possibility to stack different layers together as one wish, like playing a Lego game, which can create artificial structures that do not exist in nature. These new structures can enable rich new physics from interlayer interaction: The interaction is strong, because in low-dimension materials electrons are exposed to the interface and are susceptible to other layers; and the screening of interaction is less prominent. The consequence is rich, not only from the extensive list of two-dimensional materials available nowadays, but also from the freedom of interlayer configuration, such as displacement and twist angle, which creates a gigantic parameter space to play with. On the other hand, however, the huge parameter space sometimes can make it challenging to describe consistently with a single picture. For example, the large periodicity or even incommensurability in van der Waals systems creates difficulty in using periodic boundary condition. Worse still, the huge superlattice unit cell and overwhelming computational efforts involved to some extent prevent the establishment of a simple physical picture to understand the evolution of system properties in the parameter space of interlayer configuration. In the first part of the dissertation, I will focus on classification of the huge parameter space into subspaces, and introduce suitable theoretical approaches for each subspace. For each approach, I will discuss its validity, limitation, general solution, as well as a specific example of application demonstrating how one can obtain the most important effects of interlayer interaction with little computation efforts. Combining all the approaches introduced will provide an analytic solution to cover majority of the parameter space, which will be very helpful in understanding the intuitive physical picture behind

  15. Frequency and phase synchronization in large groups: Low dimensional description of synchronized clapping, firefly flashing, and cricket chirping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Edward; Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2017-05-01

    A common observation is that large groups of oscillatory biological units often have the ability to synchronize. A paradigmatic model of such behavior is provided by the Kuramoto model, which achieves synchronization through coupling of the phase dynamics of individual oscillators, while each oscillator maintains a different constant inherent natural frequency. Here we consider the biologically likely possibility that the oscillatory units may be capable of enhancing their synchronization ability by adaptive frequency dynamics. We propose a simple augmentation of the Kuramoto model which does this. We also show that, by the use of a previously developed technique [Ott and Antonsen, Chaos 18, 037113 (2008)], it is possible to reduce the resulting dynamics to a lower dimensional system for the macroscopic evolution of the oscillator ensemble. By employing this reduction, we investigate the dynamics of our system, finding a characteristic hysteretic behavior and enhancement of the quality of the achieved synchronization.

  16. Inference and Decoding of Motor Cortex Low-Dimensional Dynamics via Latent State-Space Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghagolzadeh, Mehdi; Truccolo, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    Motor cortex neuronal ensemble spiking activity exhibits strong low-dimensional collective dynamics (i.e., coordinated modes of activity) during behavior. Here, we demonstrate that these low-dimensional dynamics, revealed by unsupervised latent state-space models, can provide as accurate or better reconstruction of movement kinematics as direct decoding from the entire recorded ensemble. Ensembles of single neurons were recorded with triple microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in ventral and dorsal premotor (PMv, PMd) and primary motor (M1) cortices while nonhuman primates performed 3-D reach-to-grasp actions. Low-dimensional dynamics were estimated via various types of latent state-space models including, for example, Poisson linear dynamic system (PLDS) models. Decoding from low-dimensional dynamics was implemented via point process and Kalman filters coupled in series. We also examined decoding based on a predictive subsampling of the recorded population. In this case, a supervised greedy procedure selected neuronal subsets that optimized decoding performance. When comparing decoding based on predictive subsampling and latent state-space models, the size of the neuronal subset was set to the same number of latent state dimensions. Overall, our findings suggest that information about naturalistic reach kinematics present in the recorded population is preserved in the inferred low-dimensional motor cortex dynamics. Furthermore, decoding based on unsupervised PLDS models may also outperform previous approaches based on direct decoding from the recorded population or on predictive subsampling.

  17. An Image Encryption Scheme Based on Hyperchaotic Rabinovich and Exponential Chaos Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Tong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new four-dimensional hyperchaotic map based on the Rabinovich system to realize chaotic encryption in higher dimension and improve the security. The chaotic sequences generated by Runge-Kutta method are combined with the chaotic sequences generated by an exponential chaos map to generate key sequences. The key sequences are used for image encryption. The security test results indicate that the new hyperchaotic system has high security and complexity. The comparison between the new hyperchaotic system and the several low-dimensional chaotic systems shows that the proposed system performs more efficiently.

  18. Low dimensional representation of face space by face-selective inferior temporal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Sina; Dehaqani, Mohammad-Reza A; Esteky, Hossein

    2017-05-01

    The representation of visual objects in primate brain is distributed and multiple neurons are involved in encoding each object. One way to understand the neural basis of object representation is to estimate the number of neural dimensions that are needed for veridical representation of object categories. In this study, the characteristics of the match between physical-shape and neural representational spaces in monkey inferior temporal (IT) cortex were evaluated. Specifically, we examined how the number of neural dimensions, stimulus behavioral saliency and stimulus category selectivity of neurons affected the correlation between shape and neural representational spaces in IT cortex. Single-unit recordings from monkey IT cortex revealed that there was a significant match between face space and its neural representation at lower neural dimensions, whereas the optimal match for the non-face objects was observed at higher neural dimensions. There was a statistically significant match between the face and neural spaces only in the face-selective neurons, whereas a significant match was observed for non-face objects in all neurons regardless of their category selectivity. Interestingly, the face neurons showed a higher match for the non-face objects than for the faces at higher neural dimensions. The optimal representation of face space in the responses of the face neurons was a low dimensional map that emerged early (~150 ms post-stimulus onset) and was followed by a high dimensional and relatively late (~300 ms) map for the non-face stimuli. These results support a multiplexing function for the face neurons in the representation of very similar shape spaces, but with different dimensionality and timing scales. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A New Generation of Luminescent Materials Based on Low-Dimensional Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2017-06-02

    Low-dimensional perovskites with high luminescence properties are promising materials for optoelectronic applications. In this article, properties of two emerging types of low-dimensional perovskites are discussed, including perovskite quantum dots CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br or I) and zero-dimensional perovskite Cs4PbBr6. Moreover, their application for light down conversion in LCD backlighting systems and in visible light communication are also presented. With their superior optical properties, we believe that further development of these materials will potentially open more prospective applications, especially for optoelectronics devices.

  20. Low-dimensional modeling of a driven cavity flow with two free parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Hoffmann; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Brøns, Morten

    2003-01-01

    parameters to appear in the inhomogeneous boundary conditions without the addition of any constraints. This is necessary because both the driving lid and the rotating rod are controlled simultaneously. Apparently, the results reported for this model are the first to be obtained for a low-dimensional model......-dimensional models. SPOD is capable of transforming data organized in different sets separately while still producing orthogonal modes. A low-dimensional model is constructed and used for analyzing bifurcations occurring in the flow in the lid-driven cavity with a rotating rod. The model allows one of the free...

  1. Extraction and application of the low dimensional dynamical component from underwater acoustic target radiating noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Juan; LU Jiren

    2001-01-01

    Signal processing in phase space based on nonlinear dynamics theory is a new method for underwater acoustic signal processing. One key problem when analyzing actual acoustic signal in phase space is how to reduce the noise and lower the embedding dimension. In this paper, local-geometric-projection method is applied to obtain low dimensional element from various target radiating noise and the derived phase portraits show obviously low dimensional attractors. Furthermore, attractor dimension and cross prediction error are used for classification. It concludes that combining these features representing the geometric and dynamical properties respectively shows effects in target classification.

  2. 2012 Symposium on Chaos, Complexity and Leadership

    CERN Document Server

    Erçetin, Şefika

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings from the 2012 symposium on "Chaos, complexity and leadership"  reflect current research results from all branches of Chaos, Complex Systems and their applications in Management. Included are the diverse results in the fields of applied nonlinear methods, modeling of data and simulations, as well as theoretical achievements of Chaos and Complex Systems. Also highlighted are  Leadership and Management applications of Chaos and Complexity Theory.

  3. String Cosmology and Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Barrow, John D.; Dabrowski, Mariusz P.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate Bianchi type IX ''Mixmaster'' universes within the framework of the low-energy tree-level effective action for string theory, which (when the ''stringy'' 2-form axion potential vanishes) is formally the same as the Brans-Dicke action with $\\omega =-1$. We show that, unlike the case of general relativity in vacuum, there is no Mixmaster chaos in these string cosmologies. In the Einstein frame an infinite sequence of chaotic oscillations of the scale factors on approach to the initial singularity is impossible, as it was in general relativistic Mixmaster universes in the presence of stiff -fluid matter (or a massless scalar field). A finite sequence of oscillations of the scale factors approximated by Kasner metrics is possible, but it always ceases when all expansion rates become positive. In the string frame the evolution through Kasner epochs changes to a new form which reflects the duality symmetry of the theory. Again, we show that chaotic oscillations must end after a finite time. The need ...

  4. Stickiness in Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    We distinguish two types of stickiness in systems of two degrees of freedom (a) stickiness around an island of stability and (b) stickiness in chaos, along the unstable asymptotic curves of unstable periodic orbits. We studied these effects in the standard map with a rather large nonlinearity K=5, and we emphasized the role of the asymptotic curves U, S from the central orbit O and the asymptotic curves U+U-S+S- from the simplest unstable orbit around the island O1. We calculated the escape times (initial stickiness times) for many initial points outside but close to the island O1. The lines that separate the regions of the fast from the slow escape time follow the shape of the asymptotic curves S+,S-. We explained this phenomenon by noting that lines close to S+ on its inner side (closer to O1) approach a point of the orbit 4/9, say P1, and then follow the oscillations of the asymptotic curve U+, and escape after a rather long time, while the curves outside S+ after their approach to P1 follow the shape of t...

  5. Chaos of chiral condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Koji; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    Assigning a chaos index for vacua of generic quantum field theories is a challenging problem. We find chaotic behavior of chiral condensates of a quantum gauge theory at strong coupling limit, by using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We evaluate the time evolution of homogeneous quark condensates and in an N=2 supersymmetric QCD with the SU(N_c) gauge group at large N_c and at large 't Hooft coupling lambda. At an equivalent classical gravity picture, a Lyapunov exponent is readily defined. We show that the condensates exhibit chaotic behavior for energy density E > (6x10^2) (N_c/lambda^2) (m_q)^4 where m_q is the quark mass. The energy region of the chaotic vacua of the N=2 supersymmetric QCD increases for smaller N_c or larger lambda. The Lyapunov exponent is calculated as a function of the theory (N_c,lambda,E), showing that the N=2 supersymmetric QCD is more chaotic for smaller N_c.

  6. Chaos and microbial systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kot, M.

    1990-07-01

    A recurrent theme of much recent research is that seemingly random fluctuations often occur as the result of simple deterministic mechanisms. Hence, much of the recent work in nonlinear dynamics has centered on new techniques for identifying order in seemingly chaotic systems. To determine the robustness of these techniques, chaos must, to some extent, be brought into the laboratory. Preliminary investigations of the forced double-Monod equations, a model for a predator and a prey in a chemostat with periodic variation in inflowing substrate concentration, suggest that simple microbial systems may provide the perfect framework for determining the efficacy and relevance of the new nonlinear dynamics in dealing with complex population dynamics. This research has two main goals, that is the mathematical analysis and computer simulation of the periodically forced double-Monod equations and of related models; and experimental (chemostat) population studies that evaluate the accuracy and generality of the models, and that judge the usefulness of various new techniques of nonlinear dynamics to the study of populations.

  7. A musculoskeletal model of human locomotion driven by a low dimensional set of impulsive excitation primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo eSartori

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human locomotion has been described as being generated by an impulsive (burst-like excitation of groups of musculotendon units, with timing dependent on the biomechanical goal of the task. Despite this view is supported by many experimental observations on specific locomotion tasks, it is still unknown if the same impulsive controller (i.e. a low-dimensional set of time-delayed excitation primitives can be used as input drive for large musculoskeletal models across different human locomotor tasks. For this purpose, we extracted, with non-negative matrix factorization, five non-negative factors from a large sample of muscle EMG signals in two healthy subjects during four motor tasks including walking, running, sidestepping, and crossover cutting maneuvers. The extracted non-negative factors were then averaged and parameterized to obtain task-generic Gaussian-shaped impulsive excitation curves or primitives. These were used to drive a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the human lower extremity. Results showed that the same set of five impulsive excitation primitives could be used to predict the dynamics of 34 musculotendon units and the resulting hip, knee and ankle joint moments (i.e. NRMSE = 0.18±0.08, and R2 = 0.73±0.22 across all tasks and subjects without substantial loss of accuracy with respect to using experimental EMG recordings (i.e. NRMSE = 0.16±0.07, and R2 = 0.78±0.18 across all tasks and subjects. Results support the hypothesis that dynamically different motor tasks might share similar neuromuscular control strategies. This might have implications in neurorehabilitation technologies such as human-machine interfaces for the torque-driven, proportional control of powered prostheses and orthoses. In this, device control commands (i.e. predicted joint torque could be derived without direct experimental data but relying on simple parameterized Gaussian-shaped curves, thus decreasing the input drive complexity and the number of

  8. !CHAOS: A cloud of controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angius, S.; Bisegni, C.; Ciuffetti, P.; Di Pirro, G.; Foggetta, L. G.; Galletti, F.; Gargana, R.; Gioscio, E.; Maselli, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Michelotti, A.; Orrù, R.; Pistoni, M.; Spagnoli, F.; Spigone, D.; Stecchi, A.; Tonto, T.; Tota, M. A.; Catani, L.; Di Giulio, C.; Salina, G.; Buzzi, P.; Checcucci, B.; Lubrano, P.; Piccini, M.; Fattibene, E.; Michelotto, M.; Cavallaro, S. R.; Diana, B. F.; Enrico, F.; Pulvirenti, S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is aimed to present the !CHAOS open source project aimed to develop a prototype of a national private Cloud Computing infrastructure, devoted to accelerator control systems and large experiments of High Energy Physics (HEP). The !CHAOS project has been financed by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Research and Education) and aims to develop a new concept of control system and data acquisition framework by providing, with a high level of aaabstraction, all the services needed for controlling and managing a large scientific, or non-scientific, infrastructure. A beta version of the !CHAOS infrastructure will be released at the end of December 2015 and will run on private Cloud infrastructures based on OpenStack.

  9. On CFT and quantum chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiaci, Gustavo J.; Verlinde, Herman

    2016-12-01

    We make three observations that help clarify the relation between CFT and quantum chaos. We show that any 1+1-D system in which conformal symmetry is non-linearly realized exhibits two main characteristics of chaos: maximal Lyapunov behavior and a spectrum of Ruelle resonances. We use this insight to identify a lattice model for quantum chaos, built from parafermionic spin variables with an equation of motion given by a Y-system. Finally we point to a relation between the spectrum of Ruelle resonances of a CFT and the analytic properties of OPE coefficients between light and heavy operators. In our model, this spectrum agrees with the quasi-normal modes of the BTZ black hole.

  10. On CFT and Quantum Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Turiaci, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    We make three observations that help clarify the relation between CFT and quantum chaos. We show that any 1+1-D system in which conformal symmetry is non-linearly realized exhibits two main characteristics of chaos: maximal Lyapunov behavior and a spectrum of Ruelle resonances. We use this insight to identify a lattice model for quantum chaos, built from parafermionic spin variables with an equation of motion given by a Y-system. Finally we point to a relation between the spectrum of Ruelle resonances of a CFT and the analytic properties of OPE coefficients between light and heavy operators. In our model, this spectrum agrees with the quasi-normal modes of the BTZ black hole.

  11. Ultrafast dynamics of confined and localised excitons and biexcitons in low-dimensional semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    1999-01-01

    Coherent optical spectroscopy in the form of nonlinear transient four-wave mixing (TFWM) and linear resonant Rayleigh scattering (RRS) has been applied to investigate the exciton dynamics of low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures. The dephasing times of excitons are determined from...

  12. PROPER ORTHOGONAL DECOMPOSITION AND LOW-DIMENSIONAL APPROXIMATION OF WALL PRESSURE FLUCTUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shi-he; DUAN Hong-dong; LU Jing

    2004-01-01

    Wall pressure fluctuation is one of the source terms which result in the vibration of hydraulic structures. To consider both the space and time correlation of the pressure field, the method of proper orthogonal decomposition and low-dimensional approximation were used here to describe the pressure signals of the turbulent boundary layer, the apron of the stilling pond and the vertically impinging jet.

  13. Quantum evolution from spin-gap to AF state in a low-dimensional spin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnezdilov, Vladimir [ILTP, Kharkov (Ukraine); Lemmens, Peter; Wulferding, Dirk [IPKM, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany); Kremer, Reinhard [MPI-FKF, Stuttgart (Germany); Broholm, Collin [DPA, Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore (United States); Berger, Helmuth [EPFL Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    The low-dimensional spin systems {alpha}- and {beta}-TeVO{sub 4} share the same monoclinic crystal symmetry while having a different connectivity of VO{sub 4} octahedra and long range order vs. a quantum disordered ground state, respectively. We report a rich magnetic Raman spectrum and phonon anomalies that evidence strong spin-lattice coupling in both systems.

  14. Electron Spin Resonance and Related Phenomena in Low-Dimensional Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fanciulli, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Deals with the discussion of the development of spin resonance in low dimensional structures, such as two-dimensional electron systems, quantum wires, and quantum dots. This title discusses opportunities for spin resonance techniques, with emphasis on fundamental physics, nanoelectronics, spintronics, and quantum information processing

  15. Characterization of Low-dimensional Structures by Advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yücelen, E.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes method development in TEM-related techniques and their application to the study of nanoprecipitates and low-dimensional structures. The work is divided into two parts. • The first part is focused on the structures of nanoprecipitates found in Al-Co, Al-Ni and Al-Fe-Zr

  16. Synchrotron Studies of Quantum Emergence in Non-Low Dimensional Materials Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James W. Allen

    2011-08-26

    This document is the final report of research performed under U.S. DOE Award Number DE-FG02-07ER46379, entitled Synchrotron Studies of Quantum Emergence in Non-Low Dimensional Materials. It covers the full period of the award, from June 1, 2007 through May 31, 2011.

  17. The information geometry of chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafaro, Carlo

    2008-10-01

    In this Thesis, we propose a new theoretical information-geometric framework (IGAC, Information Geometrodynamical Approach to Chaos) suitable to characterize chaotic dynamical behavior of arbitrary complex systems. First, the problem being investigated is defined; its motivation and relevance are discussed. The basic tools of information physics and the relevant mathematical tools employed in this work are introduced. The basic aspects of Entropic Dynamics (ED) are reviewed. ED is an information-constrained dynamics developed by Ariel Caticha to investigate the possibility that laws of physics---either classical or quantum---may emerge as macroscopic manifestations of underlying microscopic statistical structures. ED is of primary importance in our IGAC. The notion of chaos in classical and quantum physics is introduced. Special focus is devoted to the conventional Riemannian geometrodynamical approach to chaos (Jacobi geometrodynamics) and to the Zurek-Paz quantum chaos criterion of linear entropy growth. After presenting this background material, we show that the ED formalism is not purely an abstract mathematical framework, but is indeed a general theoretical scheme from which conventional Newtonian dynamics is obtained as a special limiting case. The major elements of our IGAC and the novel notion of information geometrodynamical entropy (IGE) are introduced by studying two "toy models". To illustrate the potential power of our IGAC, one application is presented. An information-geometric analogue of the Zurek-Paz quantum chaos criterion of linear entropy growth is suggested. Finally, concluding remarks emphasizing strengths and weak points of our approach are presented and possible further research directions are addressed. At this stage of its development, IGAC remains an ambitious unifying information-geometric theoretical construct for the study of chaotic dynamics with several unsolved problems. However, based on our recent findings, we believe it already

  18. Distributed chaos and isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2015-01-01

    Power spectrum of the distributed chaos can be represented by a weighted superposition of the exponential functions which is converged to a stretched exponential $\\exp-(k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta }$. An asymptotic theory has been developed in order to estimate the value of $\\beta$ for the isotropic turbulence. This value has been found to be $\\beta =3/4$. Excellent agreement has been established between this theory and the data of direct numerical simulations not only for the velocity field but also for the passive scalar and energy dissipation fields. One can conclude that the isotropic turbulence emerges from the distributed chaos.

  19. L'ordre du chaos

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    Le mouvement brownien ; la mémoire des atomes ; le chaos ; déterminisme et prédictabilité ; déterminisme et chaos ; les phénomènes de physique et les échelles de longueur ; un ordre caché dans la matière désordonnée ; les verres de spin et l'étude des milieux désordonnés ; la convection ; la croissance fractale ; la physique de la matière hétérogène ; la matière ultradivisée.

  20. ergodicity and chaos in geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadel, S.; Gaiumi, M.

    2009-04-01

    The past three dicades can be considered as a period in which the fundamentals of scientific epistemology have been subjected to drastic revision.The dissemination of the general theory of systems in 1972 , one year after the death of ludwing von Berthalanfi , the proposition of fuzzy logic by Zade, and the foemulation of chaos theory in 1986 by Harison and Biswas allserved to explode the myth that scientific thought was invulnerable. This paper , which has resulted from the theoretical investigation of project based on the paraglicial sediment and glacial evidence on the Zagros-pishkoh to explain the elements of chaos theory and their compatibility with ergodic geomorphology

  1. Is chaos good for learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, J C

    2013-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that an artificial neural network training on time-series data from the logistic map at the onset of chaos trains more effectively when it is weakly chaotic. This suggests that a modest amount of chaos in the brain in addition to the ever present random noise might be beneficial for learning. In such a case, human subjects might exhibit an increased Lyapunov exponent in their EEG recordings during the performance of creative tasks, suggesting a possible line of future research.

  2. Controlling chaos with simple limiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corron; Pethel; Hopper

    2000-04-24

    New experimental results demonstrate that chaos control can be accomplished using controllers that are very simple relative to the system being controlled. Chaotic dynamics in a driven pendulum and a double scroll circuit are controlled using an adjustable, passive limiter-a weight for the pendulum and a diode for the circuit. For both experiments, multiple unstable periodic orbits are selectively controlled using minimal perturbations. These physical examples suggest that chaos control can be practically applied to a much wider array of important problems than initially thought possible.

  3. Chaos and transient chaos in an experimental nonlinear pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Aline Souza; Savi, Marcelo Amorim; Pereira-Pinto, Francisco Heitor Iunes

    2006-06-01

    Pendulum is a mechanical device that instigates either technological or scientific studies, being associated with the measure of time, stabilization devices as well as ballistic applications. Nonlinear characteristic of the pendulum attracts a lot of attention being used to describe different phenomena related to oscillations, bifurcation and chaos. The main purpose of this contribution is the analysis of chaos in an experimental nonlinear pendulum. The pendulum consists of a disc with a lumped mass that is connected to a rotary motion sensor. This assembly is driven by a string-spring device that is attached to an electric motor and also provides torsional stiffness to the system. A magnetic device provides an adjustable dissipation of energy. This experimental apparatus is modeled and numerical simulations are carried out. Free and forced vibrations are analyzed showing that numerical results are in close agreement with those obtained from experimental data. This analysis shows that the experimental pendulum has a rich response, presenting periodic response, chaos and transient chaos.

  4. Deterministic polarization chaos from a laser diode

    CERN Document Server

    Virte, Martin; Thienpont, Hugo; Sciamanna, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years after the invention of the laser diode and fourty years after the report of the butterfly effect - i.e. the unpredictability of deterministic chaos, it is said that a laser diode behaves like a damped nonlinear oscillator. Hence no chaos can be generated unless with additional forcing or parameter modulation. Here we report the first counter-example of a free-running laser diode generating chaos. The underlying physics is a nonlinear coupling between two elliptically polarized modes in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. We identify chaos in experimental time-series and show theoretically the bifurcations leading to single- and double-scroll attractors with characteristics similar to Lorenz chaos. The reported polarization chaos resembles at first sight a noise-driven mode hopping but shows opposite statistical properties. Our findings open up new research areas that combine the high speed performances of microcavity lasers with controllable and integrated sources of optical chaos.

  5. Chaos in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Lecar, M; Holman, M; Murray, N

    2002-01-01

    The physical basis of chaos in the solar system is now better understood: in all cases investigated so far, chaotic orbits result from overlapping resonances. Perhaps the clearest examples are found in the asteroid belt. Overlapping resonances account for its Kirkwood gaps and were used to predict and find evidence for very narrow gaps in the outer belt. Further afield, about one new ``short-period'' comet is discovered each year. They are believed to come from the ``Kuiper Belt'' (at 40 AU or more) via chaotic orbits produced by mean-motion and secular resonances with Neptune. Finally, the planetary system itself is not immune from chaos. In the inner solar system, overlapping secular resonances have been identified as the possible source of chaos. For example, Mercury, in 10^{12} years, may suffer a close encounter with Venus or plunge into the Sun. In the outer solar system, three-body resonances have been identified as a source of chaos, but on an even longer time scale of 10^9 times the age of the solar ...

  6. On the Mechanisms Behind Chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2006-01-01

    behind the chaotic behavior, e.g. one group is based on the sudden interrupt of inductive currents, another group is based on the sudden parallel coupling of capacitors with different voltages, and a third group may be based on multiplication of signals. An example of chaos based on disturbance...

  7. Distributed chaos in turbulent wakes

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    Soft and hard spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry (homogeneity) have been studied in turbulent wakes by means of distributed chaos. In the case of the soft translational symmetry breaking the vorticity correlation integral $\\int_{V} \\langle {\\boldsymbol \\omega} ({\\bf x},t) \\cdot {\\boldsymbol \\omega} ({\\bf x} + {\\bf r},t) \\rangle_{V} d{\\bf r}$ dominates the distributed chaos and the chaotic spectra $\\exp-(k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta }$ have $\\beta =1/2$. In the case of the hard translational symmetry breaking, control on the distributed chaos is switched from one type of fundamental symmetry to another (in this case to Lagrangian relabeling symmetry). Due to the Noether's theorem the relabeling symmetry results in the inviscid helicity conservation and helicity correlation integral $I=\\int \\langle h({\\bf x},t)~h({\\bf x}+{\\bf r}, t)\\rangle d{\\bf r}$ (Levich-Tsinober invariant) dominates the distributed chaos with $\\beta =1/3$. Good agreement with the experimatal data has been established for turbulent ...

  8. Pioneer Women in Chaos Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Frank Y

    2009-01-01

    The general public has been made aware of the research field of "chaos" by the book of that title by James Gleick. This paper will focus on the achievements of Sonya Kovalevskaya, Mary Cartwright, and Mary Tsingou, whose pioneer works were not mentioned in Gleick's book.

  9. Chaos Behaviour of Molecular Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-Tang; SUN Fu-Yan; SHEN Shu-Lan

    2007-01-01

    Based on H(u)ckel's molecular orbit theory,the chaos and;bifurcation behaviour of a molecular orbit modelled by a nonlinear dynamic system is studied.The relationship between molecular orbit and its energy level in the nonlinear dynamic system is obtained.

  10. MHD turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, that spectral properties of distributed chaos in MHD turbulence with zero mean magnetic field are similar to those of hydrodynamic turbulence. An exception is MHD spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry, when the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ has $\\beta=4/7$.

  11. Research progress of low-dimensional perovskites: synthesis, properties and optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Xinzhe; Pengchen, Zhu; Gu, Shuai; Jia, Zhu

    2017-01-01

    The lead halide-based perovskites, for instance, CH3NH3PbX3 and CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I), have received a lot of attention. Compared with bulk materials, low-dimensional perovskites have demonstrated a range of unique optical, electrical and mechanical properties, which enable wide applications in solar cells, lasers and other optoelectronic devices. In this paper, we provide a summary of the research progress of the low-dimensional perovskites in recent years, from synthesis methods, basic properties to their optoelectronic applications. Project jointly supported by the State Key Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB659300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11321063, 11574143), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (Nos. BK20150056, BK20151079), the Project Funded by the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.

  12. Quantum Effects in the Thermoelectric Power Factor of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the interplay between the confinement length L and the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of semiconducting materials. An analytical formula for the power factor is derived based on the one-band model assuming nondegenerate semiconductors to describe quantum effects on the power factor of the low-dimensional semiconductors. The power factor is enhanced for one- and two-dimensional semiconductors when L is smaller than Λ of the semiconductors. In this case, the low-dimensional semiconductors having L smaller than their Λ will give a better thermoelectric performance compared to their bulk counterpart. On the other hand, when L is larger than Λ , bulk semiconductors may give a higher power factor compared to the lower dimensional ones.

  13. Low-dimensionality and predictability of solar wind and global magnetosphere during magnetic storms

    CERN Document Server

    Zivkovic, Tatjana

    2011-01-01

    The storm index SYM-H, the solar wind velocity v, and interplanetary magnetic field Bz show no signatures of low-dimensional dynamics in quiet periods, but tests for determinism in the time series indicate that SYM-H exhibits a significant low-dimensional component during storm time, suggesting that self-organization takes place during magnetic storms. Even though our analysis yields no discernible change in determinism during magnetic storms for the solar wind parameters, there are significant enhancement of the predictability and exponents measuring persistence. Thus, magnetic storms are typically preceded by an increase in the persistence of the solar wind dynamics, and this increase is also present in the magnetospheric response to the solar wind.

  14. Low-dimensional dynamics in observables from complex and higher-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Murilo S.; Caldas, Iberê L.; Baptista, Mauricio S.; Baptista, Cassio S.; Ferreira, André A.; Heller, Maria Vittoria A. P.

    2000-11-01

    We analyze fluctuating observables of high-dimensional systems as the New York Stock Market S &P 500 index, the amino-acid sequence in the M. genitalium DNA, the maximum temperature of the San Francisco Bay area, and the toroidal magneto plasma potential. The probability measures of these fluctuations are obtained by the statistical analysis of a rescaling combination of the first Poincaré return time of a low-dimensional chaotic system. This result indicates that it is possible to use a measure of a low-dimensional chaotic attractor to describe a measure of these complex systems. Moreover, within this description we determine scaling power laws for average measurements of the analyzed fluctuations.

  15. Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensional systems with deformed bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algin, Abdullah; Olkun, Ali

    2017-08-01

    We study the low and high temperature thermostatistical properties of a deformed boson gas constructed by the bosonic intermediate-statistics particles confined in low spatial dimensions. Many of the deformed thermodynamical functions of the system such as internal energy and entropy are investigated by means of some elements of the Fibonacci calculus. Particular emphasis is given to a careful analysis on low dimensional systems of such deformed bosons, and the conditions under which the Bose-Einstein condensation would occur in such systems are discussed. We show that low dimensional systems with deformed bosons exhibit the Bose-Einstein condensation for values of the model deformation parameters (p , q) greater than one. We also study possible anyonic behavior of the model for high temperatures. The results obtained in this work reveal that the present deformed boson gas model can be used for modeling nonlinear behavior of systems with quasiparticles encountered in several areas of research particularly in quantum science.

  16. Quantum Effects in the Thermoelectric Power Factor of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen T; Hasdeo, Eddwi H; Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-07-15

    We theoretically investigate the interplay between the confinement length L and the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of semiconducting materials. An analytical formula for the power factor is derived based on the one-band model assuming nondegenerate semiconductors to describe quantum effects on the power factor of the low-dimensional semiconductors. The power factor is enhanced for one- and two-dimensional semiconductors when L is smaller than Λ of the semiconductors. In this case, the low-dimensional semiconductors having L smaller than their Λ will give a better thermoelectric performance compared to their bulk counterpart. On the other hand, when L is larger than Λ, bulk semiconductors may give a higher power factor compared to the lower dimensional ones.

  17. Longitudinal Susceptibility of S = 1/2 Low-Dimensional Heisenberg Ferromagnet in a Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yuan; XIANG Ying; HU Ai-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal susceptibility of the spin-1/2 low-dimensional Heisenberg ferromagnet in a magnetic field, is studied by the Green's function method within the random phase approximation. The static and dynamic longitudinal susceptibilities are calculated in the low- and high-field regions. Power laws for the position and height of the static susceptibility maximum are shown not to support the predictions of Landau theory.

  18. Orientational Order of C60 Molecules in Low-dimensional Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    The orientational order is an important concept of the materials composed of large molecules or clusters. Using high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, we have studied the orientational order of two kinds of typical low-dimensional C60 lattices: two-dimensional molecules array and C60(111) multi-layer film surface. Due to the change of the crystal field, their orientational orders are distinctly different from those in bulk system, and some unique phenomena appear.

  19. Low-dimensional model of resistive interchange convection in magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazdenkov, S.; Sato, Tetsuya [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Self-organization and generation of large shear flow component in turbulent resistive interchange convection in magnetized plasma is considered. The effect of plasma density-electrostatic potential coupling via the inertialess electron dynamics along the magnetic field is shown to play significant role in the onset of shear component. The results of large-scale numerical simulation and low-dimensional (reduced) model are presented and compared. (author)

  20. Describing high-dimensional dynamics with low-dimensional piecewise affine models: applications to renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a low-dimensional description for a high-dimensional system, which is a piecewise affine model whose state space is divided by permutations. We show that the proposed model tends to predict wind speeds and photovoltaic outputs for the time scales from seconds to 100 s better than by global affine models. In addition, computations using the piecewise affine model are much faster than those of usual nonlinear models such as radial basis function models.

  1. Terahertz and Microwave Devices Based on the Photo-Excited Low Dimensional Electronic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-11

    condition that is realized by photo-exciting the system with electromagnetic waves in the microwave and THz parts of the radiation spectrum, in the...electron system. This research aimed to advance the understanding of such radiation -induced phenomena in the two-dimensional electron system, while helping...exciting a high mobility low dimensional electron system. This research aimed to advance the understanding of such radiation -induced phenomena in the two

  2. Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows FA9550-11-1-0203 Dr. Charles E. Tinney, Aerospace Engineering and Engineering...Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows Contract/Grant Number: FA9550-11-1-0203...driven by transonic resonance (Zaman et al, 2002). What is common about many of these planar nozzle studies is that there is just one single

  3. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Physicochemical Properties of Zeolitic Systems and Their Low Dimensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Derouane, Eric; Hölderich, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    Low dimensionality is a multifarious concept which applies to very diversified materials. Thus, examples of low-dimensional systems are structures with one or several layers, single lines or patterns of lines, and small clusters isolated or dispersed in solid systems. Such low­ dimensional features can be produced in a wide variety of materials systems with a broad spectrum of scientific and practical interests. These features, in turn, induce specific properties and, particularly, specific transport properties. In the case of zeolites, low dimensionality appears in the network of small-diameter pores of molecular size, extending in one, two or three di­ mensions, that these solids exhibit as a characteristic feature and which explains the term of "molecular sieves" currently used to name these ma­ terials. Indeed, a large number of industrial processes for separation of gases and liquids, and for catalysis are based upon the use of this low­ dimensional feature in zeolites. For instance, zeolites constit...

  4. Properties of low-dimensional collective variables in the molecular dynamics of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Roberto; Camilloni, Carlo; Tiana, Guido

    2016-11-01

    The description of the dynamics of a complex, high-dimensional system in terms of a low-dimensional set of collective variables Y can be fruitful if the low-dimensional representation satisfies a Langevin equation with drift and diffusion coefficients that depend only on Y . We present a computational scheme to evaluate whether a given collective variable provides a faithful low-dimensional representation of the dynamics of a high-dimensional system. The scheme is based on the framework of a finite-difference Langevin equation, similar to that used for molecular-dynamics simulations. This allows one to calculate the drift and diffusion coefficients in any point of the full-dimensional system. The width of the distribution of drift and diffusion coefficients in an ensemble of microscopic points at the same value of Y indicates to what extent the dynamics of Y is described by a simple Langevin equation. Using a simple protein model, we show that collective variables often used to describe biopolymers display a non-negligible width both in the drift and in the diffusion coefficients. We also show that the associated effective force is compatible with the equilibrium free energy calculated from a microscopic sampling, but it results in markedly different dynamical properties.

  5. Does chaos assist localization or delocalization?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jintao; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua, E-mail: whhai2005@aliyun.com [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Low-dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Lu, Gengbiao [Department of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410004 (China)

    2014-12-01

    We aim at a long-standing contradiction between chaos-assisted tunneling and chaos-related localization study quantum transport of a single particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice. We find some near-resonant regions crossing chaotic and regular regions in the parameter space, and demonstrate that chaos can heighten velocity of delocalization in the chaos-resonance overlapping regions, while chaos may aid localization in the other chaotic regions. The degree of localization enhances with increasing the distance between parameter points and near-resonant regions. The results could be useful for experimentally manipulating chaos-assisted transport of single particles in optical or solid-state lattices.

  6. Advances in chaos theory and intelligent control

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidyanathan, Sundarapandian

    2016-01-01

    The book reports on the latest advances in and applications of chaos theory and intelligent control. Written by eminent scientists and active researchers and using a clear, matter-of-fact style, it covers advanced theories, methods, and applications in a variety of research areas, and explains key concepts in modeling, analysis, and control of chaotic and hyperchaotic systems. Topics include fractional chaotic systems, chaos control, chaos synchronization, memristors, jerk circuits, chaotic systems with hidden attractors, mechanical and biological chaos, and circuit realization of chaotic systems. The book further covers fuzzy logic controllers, evolutionary algorithms, swarm intelligence, and petri nets among other topics. Not only does it provide the readers with chaos fundamentals and intelligent control-based algorithms; it also discusses key applications of chaos as well as multidisciplinary solutions developed via intelligent control. The book is a timely and comprehensive reference guide for graduate s...

  7. Controlling neuronal noise using chaos control

    CERN Document Server

    Christini, D J; Christini, David J; Collins, James J

    1995-01-01

    Chaos control techniques have been applied to a wide variety of experimental systems, including magneto-elastic ribbons, lasers, chemical reactions, arrhythmic cardiac tissue, and spontaneously bursting neuronal networks. An underlying assumption in all of these studies is that the system being controlled is chaotic. However, the identification of chaos in experimental systems, particularly physiological systems, is a difficult and often misleading task. Here we demonstrate that the chaos criteria used in a recent study can falsely classify a noise-driven, non-chaotic neuronal model as being chaotic. We apply chaos control, periodic pacing, and anticontrol to the non-chaotic model and obtain results which are similar to those reported for apparently chaotic, {\\em in vitro} neuronal networks. We also obtain similar results when we apply chaos control to a simple stochastic system. These novel findings challenge the claim that the aforementioned neuronal networks were chaotic and suggest that chaos control tech...

  8. Coarse predictions of dipole reversals by low-dimensional modeling and data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzfeld, Matthias; Fournier, Alexandre; Hulot, Gauthier

    2017-01-01

    Low-dimensional models for Earth's magnetic dipole may be a powerful tool for studying large-scale dipole dynamics over geological time scales, where direct numerical simulation remains challenging. We investigate the utility of several low-dimensional models by calibrating them against the signed relative paleointensity over the past 2 million years. Model calibrations are done by "data assimilation" which allows us to incorporate nonlinearity and uncertainty into the computations. We find that the data assimilation is successful, in the sense that a relative error is below 8% for all models and data sets we consider. The successful assimilation of paleomagnetic data into low-dimensional models suggests that, on millennium time scales, the occurrence of dipole reversals mainly depends on the large-scale behavior of the dipole field, and is rather independent of the detailed morphology of the field. This, in turn, suggests that large-scale dynamics of the dipole may be predictable for much longer periods than the detailed morphology of the field, which is predictable for about one century. We explore these ideas and introduce a concept of "coarse predictions", along with a sound numerical framework for computing them, and a series of tests that can be applied to assess their quality. Our predictions make use of low-dimensional models and assimilation of paleomagnetic data and, therefore, rely on the assumption that currently available paleomagnetic data are sufficiently accurate, in particular with respect to the timing of reversals, to allow for coarse predictions of reversals. Under this assumption, we conclude that coarse predictions of dipole reversals are within reach. Specifically, using low-dimensional models and data assimilation enables us to reliably predict a time-window of 4 kyr during which a reversal will occur, without being precise about the timing of the reversal. Indeed, our results lead us to forecast that no reversal of the Earth's magnetic

  9. How Can We Observe and Describe Chaos?

    CERN Document Server

    Kossakowski, A; Togawa, Y; Kossakowski, Andrzej; Ohya, Masanori; Togawa, Yosio

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new approach to define chaos in dynamical systems from the point of view of Information Dynamics. Observation of chaos in reality depends upon how to observe it, for instance, how to take the scale in space and time. Therefore it is natural to abandon taking several mathematical limiting procedures. We take account of them, and chaos degree previously introduced is redefined in this paper.

  10. Systems Fragility: The Sociology of Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    THE SOCIOLOGY OF CHAOS by Lori R. Hodges March 2015 Thesis Advisor: Robert Josefek Second Reader: Wayne Porter THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBER S SYSTEMS FRAGILITY: THE SOCIOLOGY OF CHAOS 6. AUTHOR(S) Lori R. Hodges 7. PERFORMING OR GANIZATION NA:iVIE(S) AND...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK ii Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited SYSTEMS FRAGILITY: THE SOCIOLOGY OF CHAOS Lori R. Hodges

  11. Robust chaos in smooth unimodal maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecut, M.; Ali, M. K.

    2001-08-01

    Robust chaos is defined by the absence of periodic windows and coexisting attractors in some neighborhood of the parameter space. It has been conjectured that robust chaos cannot occur in smooth systems [E. Barreto, B. Hunt, and C. Grebogi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4561 (1997); 80, 3049 (1998)]. Contrary to this conjecture, we describe a general procedure for generating robust chaos in smooth unimodal maps.

  12. A Quantum Correction To Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, A Liam

    2016-01-01

    We use results on Virasoro conformal blocks to study chaotic dynamics in CFT$_2$ at large central charge c. The Lyapunov exponent $\\lambda_L$, which is a diagnostic for the early onset of chaos, receives $1/c$ corrections that may be interpreted as $\\lambda_L = \\frac{2 \\pi}{\\beta} \\left( 1 + \\frac{12}{c} \\right)$. However, out of time order correlators receive other equally important $1/c$ suppressed contributions that do not have such a simple interpretation. We revisit the proof of a bound on $\\lambda_L$ that emerges at large $c$, focusing on CFT$_2$ and explaining why our results do not conflict with the analysis leading to the bound. We also comment on relationships between chaos, scattering, causality, and bulk locality.

  13. A quantum correction to chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam [Department of Physics, Boston University,590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kaplan, Jared [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University,3400 N. Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-05-12

    We use results on Virasoro conformal blocks to study chaotic dynamics in CFT{sub 2} at large central charge c. The Lyapunov exponent λ{sub L}, which is a diagnostic for the early onset of chaos, receives 1/c corrections that may be interpreted as λ{sub L}=((2π)/β)(1+(12/c)). However, out of time order correlators receive other equally important 1/c suppressed contributions that do not have such a simple interpretation. We revisit the proof of a bound on λ{sub L} that emerges at large c, focusing on CFT{sub 2} and explaining why our results do not conflict with the analysis leading to the bound. We also comment on relationships between chaos, scattering, causality, and bulk locality.

  14. Chaos in an enzyme reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, L F; Degn, H

    1977-05-12

    Dynamic systems are usually thought to have either monotonic or periodic behaviour. Although the possibility of other types of behaviour has been recognised for many years, the existence of non-monotonic, non-periodic behaviour in dynamic systems has been firmly established only recently. It is termed chaotic behaviour. A review on the rapidly expanding literature on chaos in discrete model systems described by difference equations has been published by May. Rössler, on the other hand, has discussed a few published works on systems of differential equations with chaotic solutions, and he has proposed a three-component chemical model system which he argues has chaotic solutions [figure see text]. The argument is based on a theorem by Li and Yorke. Here we report the finding of chaotic behaviour as an experimental result in an enzyme system (peroxidase). Like Rössler we base our identification of chaos on the theorem by Li and Yorke.

  15. The chaos cookbook a practical programming guide

    CERN Document Server

    Pritchard, Joe

    2014-01-01

    The Chaos Cookbook: A Practical Programming Guide discusses the use of chaos in computer programming. The book is comprised of 11 chapters that tackle various topics relevant to chaos and programming. Chapter 1 reviews the concept of chaos, and Chapter 2 discusses the iterative functions. Chapters 3 and 4 cover differential and Lorenz equations. Chapter 5 talks about strange attractors, while Chapter 6 deals with the fractal link. The book also discusses the Mandelbrot set, and then covers the Julia sets. The other fractal systems and the cellular automata are also explained. The last chapter

  16. Analysis of FBC deterministic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has recently been discovered that the performance of a number of fossil energy conversion devices such as fluidized beds, pulsed combustors, steady combustors, and internal combustion engines are affected by deterministic chaos. It is now recognized that understanding and controlling the chaotic elements of these devices can lead to significantly improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. Application of these techniques to key fossil energy processes are expected to provide important competitive advantages for U.S. industry.

  17. Random Behaviour in Quantum Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Garbaczewski, P

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that a family of radial Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic processes displays an ergodic behaviour appropriate for known quantum chaos universality classes of nearest neighbour spacing distributions. A common feature of those parametric processes is an asymptotic balance between the radial (Bessel-type) repulsion and the harmonic attraction, as manifested in the general form of forward drifts $b(x) = {{N-1}\\over {2x}} - x$, ($N = 2,3,5$ correspond respectively to the familiar GOE, GUE and GSE cases).

  18. Polynomial-Chaos-based Kriging

    OpenAIRE

    Schöbi, R; Sudret, B.; Wiart, J.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Computer simulation has become the standard tool in many engineering fields for designing and optimizing systems, as well as for assessing their reliability. Optimization and uncertainty quantification problems typically require a large number of runs of the computational model at hand, which may not be feasible with high-fidelity models directly. Thus surrogate models (a.k.a metamodels) have been increasingly investigated in the last decade. Polynomial Chaos Expansion...

  19. Temperature chaos and quenched heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, Paolo; Parisi, Giorgio; Rizzo, Tommaso

    2014-03-01

    We present a treatable generalization of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model which introduces correlations in the elements of the coupling matrix through multiplicative disorder on the single variables and investigate the consequences on the phase diagram. We define a generalized qEA parameter and test the structural stability of the SK results in this correlated case evaluating the de Almeida-Thouless line of the model. As a main result we demonstrate the increase of temperature chaos effects due to heterogeneities.

  20. Chaos Control in Mechanical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo A. Savi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaos has an intrinsically richness related to its structure and, because of that, there are benefits for a natural system of adopting chaotic regimes with their wide range of potential behaviors. Under this condition, the system may quickly react to some new situation, changing conditions and their response. Therefore, chaos and many regulatory mechanisms control the dynamics of living systems, conferring a great flexibility to the system. Inspired by nature, the idea that chaotic behavior may be controlled by small perturbations of some physical parameter is making this kind of behavior to be desirable in different applications. Mechanical systems constitute a class of system where it is possible to exploit these ideas. Chaos control usually involves two steps. In the first, unstable periodic orbits (UPOs that are embedded in the chaotic set are identified. After that, a control technique is employed in order to stabilize a desirable orbit. This contribution employs the close-return method to identify UPOs and a semi-continuous control method, which is built up on the OGY method, to stabilize some desirable UPO. As an application to a mechanical system, a nonlinear pendulum is considered and, based on parameters obtained from an experimental setup, analyses are carried out. Signals are generated by numerical integration of the mathematical model and two different situations are treated. Firstly, it is assumed that all state variables are available. After that, the analysis is done from scalar time series and therefore, it is important to evaluate the effect of state space reconstruction. Delay coordinates method and extended state observers are employed with this aim. Results show situations where these techniques may be used to control chaos in mechanical systems.

  1. Hamiltonian chaos and fractional dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavsky, George M

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of realistic Hamiltonian systems has unusual microscopic features that are direct consequences of its fractional space-time structure and its phase space topology. The book deals with the fractality of the chaotic dynamics and kinetics, and also includes material on non-ergodic and non-well-mixing Hamiltonian dynamics. The book does not follow the traditional scheme of most of today's literature on chaos. The intention of the author has been to put together some of the most complex and yet open problems on the general theory of chaotic systems. The importance of the discussed issues and an understanding of their origin should inspire students and researchers to touch upon some of the deepest aspects of nonlinear dynamics. The book considers the basic principles of the Hamiltonian theory of chaos and some applications including for example, the cooling of particles and signals, control and erasing of chaos, polynomial complexity, Maxwell's Demon, and others. It presents a new and realistic image ...

  2. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2013-03-08

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2−uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  3. Low-dimensional modelling of a transient cylinder wake using double proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Stefan G.; Seidel, J.?Rgen; Fagley, Casey; Luchtenburg, D. M.; Cohen, Kelly; McLaughlin, Thomas

    For the systematic development of feedback flow controllers, a numerical model that captures the dynamic behaviour of the flow field to be controlled is required. This poses a particular challenge for flow fields where the dynamic behaviour is nonlinear, and the governing equations cannot easily be solved in closed form. This has led to many versions of low-dimensional modelling techniques, which we extend in this work to represent better the impact of actuation on the flow. For the benchmark problem of a circular cylinder wake in the laminar regime, we introduce a novel extension to the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) procedure that facilitates mode construction from transient data sets. We demonstrate the performance of this new decomposition by applying it to a data set from the development of the limit cycle oscillation of a circular cylinder wake simulation as well as an ensemble of transient forced simulation results. The modes obtained from this decomposition, which we refer to as the double POD (DPOD) method, correctly track the changes of the spatial modes both during the evolution of the limit cycle and when forcing is applied by transverse translation of the cylinder. The mode amplitudes, which are obtained by projecting the original data sets onto the truncated DPOD modes, can be used to construct a dynamic mathematical model of the wake that accurately predicts the wake flow dynamics within the lock-in region at low forcing amplitudes. This low-dimensional model, derived using nonlinear artificial neural network based system identification methods, is robust and accurate and can be used to simulate the dynamic behaviour of the wake flow. We demonstrate this ability not just for unforced and open-loop forced data, but also for a feedback-controlled simulation that leads to a 90% reduction in lift fluctuations. This indicates the possibility of constructing accurate dynamic low-dimensional models for feedback control by using unforced and transient

  4. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  5. Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials as Active Layer Components in Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Tejas Attreya

    Thin-film photovoltaics offer the promise of cost-effective and scalable solar energy conversion, particularly for applications of semi-transparent solar cells where the poor absorption of commercially-available silicon is inadequate. Applications ranging from roof coatings that capture solar energy to semi-transparent windows that harvest the immense amount of incident sunlight on buildings could be realized with efficient and stable thin-film solar cells. However, the lifetime and efficiency of thin-film solar cells continue to trail their inorganic silicon counterparts. Low-dimensional nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides, have recently been explored as materials in thin-film solar cells due to their exceptional optoelectronic properties, solution-processability, and chemical inertness. Thus far, issues with the processing of these materials has held back their implementation in efficient photovoltaics. This dissertation reports processing advances that enable demonstrations of low-dimensional nanomaterials in thin-film solar cells. These low-dimensional photovoltaics show enhanced photovoltaic efficiency and environmental stability in comparison to previous devices, with a focus on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as an active layer component. The introduction summarizes recent advances in the processing of carbon nanotubes and their implementation through the thin-film photovoltaic architecture, as well as the use of two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides in photovoltaic applications and potential future directions for all-nanomaterial solar cells. The following chapter reports a study of the interaction between carbon nanotubes and surfactants that enables them to be sorted by electronic type via density gradient ultracentrifugation. These insights are utilized to construct of a broad distribution of carbon nanotubes that absorb throughout the solar spectrum. This polychiral distribution is then shown

  6. Classification of real low-dimensional Jacobi (generalized)-Lie bialgebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Aghdam, A.; Sephid, M.

    2017-09-01

    We describe the definition of Jacobi (generalized)-Lie bialgebras ((g,ϕ0), (g∗,X 0)) in terms of structure constants of the Lie algebras g and g∗ and components of their 1-cocycles X0 ∈g and ϕ0 ∈g∗ in the basis of the Lie algebras. Then, using adjoint representations and automorphism Lie groups of Lie algebras, we give a method for classification of real low-dimensional Jacobi-Lie bialgebras. In this way, we obtain and classify real two- and three-dimensional Jacobi-Lie bialgebras.

  7. Characteristics of exciton photoluminescence kinetics in low-dimensional silicon structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sachenko, A V; Manojlov, E G; Svechnikov, S V

    2001-01-01

    The time-resolved visible photoluminescence of porous nanocrystalline silicon films obtained by laser ablation have been measured within the temperature range 90-300 K. A study has been made of the interrelationship between photoluminescence characteristics (intensity, emission spectra, relaxation times, their temperature dependencies and structural and dielectric properties (size and shapes of Si nanocrystals, oxide phase of nanocrystal coating, porosity). A photoluminescence model is proposed that describes photon absorption and emission occurring in quantum-size Si nanocrystals while coupled subsystems of electron-hole pairs and excitons take part in the recombination. Possible excitonic Auger recombination mechanism in low-dimensional silicon structures is considered

  8. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Appenzeller, J

    2015-12-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  9. Heat transport in low-dimensional materials: A review and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Xu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat transport is a key energetic process in materials and devices. The reduced sample size, low dimension of the problem and the rich spectrum of material imperfections introduce fruitful phenomena at nanoscale. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the understanding of heat transport process in low-dimensional materials, with focus on the roles of defects, disorder, interfaces, and the quantum-mechanical effect. New physics uncovered from computational simulations, experimental studies, and predictable models will be reviewed, followed by a perspective on open challenges.

  10. Anderson transition in low-dimensional disordered systems driven by long-range nonrandom hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; Malyshev, V A; Sierra, G; Martín-Delgado, M A; Rodríguez-Laguna, J; Domínguez-Adame, F

    2003-01-17

    The single-parameter scaling hypothesis predicts the absence of delocalized states for noninteracting quasiparticles in low-dimensional disordered systems. We show analytically, using a supersymmetric method combined with a renormalization group analysis, as well as numerically that extended states may occur in the one- and two-dimensional Anderson model with a nonrandom hopping falling off as some power of the distance between sites. The different size scaling of the bare level spacing and the renormalized magnitude of the disorder seen by the quasiparticles finally results in the delocalization of states at one of the band edges of the quasiparticle energy spectrum.

  11. Stochastic Chaos with Its Control and Synchronization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ying; Xu Wei; Zhang Tianshu; Yang Xiaoli; Wu Cunli; Fang Tong

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of chaos in the sixties of last century was a breakthrough in concept,revealing the truth that some disorder behavior, called chaos, could happen even in a deterministic nonlinear system under barely deterministic disturbance. After a series of serious studies, people begin to acknowledge that chaos is a specific type of steady state motion other than the conventional periodic and quasi-periodic ones, featuring a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, resulting from the intrinsic randomness of a nonlinear system itself. In fact, chaos is a collective phenomenon consisting of massive individual chaotic responses, corresponding to different initial conditions in phase space. Any two adjacent individual chaotic responses repel each other, thus causing not only the sensitive dependence on initial conditions but also the existence of at least one positive top Lyapunov exponent (TLE) for chaos. Meanwhile, all the sample responses share one common invariant set on the Poincaré map, called chaotic attractor,which every sample response visits from time to time ergodically. So far, the existence of at least one positive TLE is a commonly acknowledged remarkable feature of chaos. We know that there are various forms of uncertainties in the real world. In theoretical studies, people often use stochastic models to describe these uncertainties, such as random variables or random processes.Systems with random variables as their parameters or with random processes as their excitations are often called stochastic systems. No doubt, chaotic phenomena also exist in stochastic systems, which we call stochastic chaos to distinguish it from deterministic chaos in the deterministic system. Stochastic chaos reflects not only the intrinsic randomness of the nonlinear system but also the external random effects of the random parameter or the random excitation.Hence, stochastic chaos is also a collective massive phenomenon, corresponding not only to different initial

  12. Controllability, not chaos, key criterion for ocean state estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbie, Geoffrey; Hsieh, Tsung-Lin

    2017-07-01

    The Lagrange multiplier method for combining observations and models (i.e., the adjoint method or 4D-VAR) has been avoided or approximated when the numerical model is highly nonlinear or chaotic. This approach has been adopted primarily due to difficulties in the initialization of low-dimensional chaotic models, where the search for optimal initial conditions by gradient-descent algorithms is hampered by multiple local minima. Although initialization is an important task for numerical weather prediction, ocean state estimation usually demands an additional task - a solution of the time-dependent surface boundary conditions that result from atmosphere-ocean interaction. Here, we apply the Lagrange multiplier method to an analogous boundary control problem, tracking the trajectory of the forced chaotic pendulum. Contrary to previous assertions, it is demonstrated that the Lagrange multiplier method can track multiple chaotic transitions through time, so long as the boundary conditions render the system controllable. Thus, the nonlinear timescale poses no limit to the time interval for successful Lagrange multiplier-based estimation. That the key criterion is controllability, not a pure measure of dynamical stability or chaos, illustrates the similarities between the Lagrange multiplier method and other state estimation methods. The results with the chaotic pendulum suggest that nonlinearity should not be a fundamental obstacle to ocean state estimation with eddy-resolving models, especially when using an improved first-guess trajectory.

  13. Controllability, not chaos, key criterion for ocean state estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gebbie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Lagrange multiplier method for combining observations and models (i.e., the adjoint method or 4D-VAR has been avoided or approximated when the numerical model is highly nonlinear or chaotic. This approach has been adopted primarily due to difficulties in the initialization of low-dimensional chaotic models, where the search for optimal initial conditions by gradient-descent algorithms is hampered by multiple local minima. Although initialization is an important task for numerical weather prediction, ocean state estimation usually demands an additional task – a solution of the time-dependent surface boundary conditions that result from atmosphere–ocean interaction. Here, we apply the Lagrange multiplier method to an analogous boundary control problem, tracking the trajectory of the forced chaotic pendulum. Contrary to previous assertions, it is demonstrated that the Lagrange multiplier method can track multiple chaotic transitions through time, so long as the boundary conditions render the system controllable. Thus, the nonlinear timescale poses no limit to the time interval for successful Lagrange multiplier-based estimation. That the key criterion is controllability, not a pure measure of dynamical stability or chaos, illustrates the similarities between the Lagrange multiplier method and other state estimation methods. The results with the chaotic pendulum suggest that nonlinearity should not be a fundamental obstacle to ocean state estimation with eddy-resolving models, especially when using an improved first-guess trajectory.

  14. Discretization chaos - Feedback control and transition to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, Walter J.; Athalye, Amit M.

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the design of feedback controllers for chaotic dynamical systems are considered theoretically, focusing on two cases where chaos arises only when a nonchaotic continuous-time system is discretized into a simpler discrete-time systems (exponential discretization and pseudo-Euler integration applied to Lotka-Volterra competition and prey-predator systems). Numerical simulation results are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is concluded that care must be taken in applying standard dynamical-systems methods to control systems that may be discontinuous or nondifferentiable.

  15. Path and semimartingale properties of chaos processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas; Graversen, Svend-Erik

    2010-01-01

    The present paper characterizes various properties of chaos processes which in particular include processes where all time variables admit a Wiener chaos expansion of a fixed finite order. The main focus is on the semimartingale property, p-variation and continuity. The general results obtained a...

  16. Chaos in nonlinear oscillations controlling and synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshamanan, M

    1996-01-01

    This book deals with the bifurcation and chaotic aspects of damped and driven nonlinear oscillators. The analytical and numerical aspects of the chaotic dynamics of these oscillators are covered, together with appropriate experimental studies using nonlinear electronic circuits. Recent exciting developments in chaos research are also discussed, such as the control and synchronization of chaos and possible technological applications.

  17. Radio lighting based on dynamic chaos generators

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, Alexander; Gerasimov, Mark; Itskov, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    A problem of lighting objects and surfaces with artificial sources of noncoherent microwave radiation with the aim to observe them using radiometric equipment is considered. Transmitters based on dynamic chaos generators are used as sources of noncoherent wideband microwave radiation. An experimental sample of such a device, i.e., a radio lighting lamp based on a chaos microgenerator and its performance are presented.

  18. The CHAOS-4 geomagnetic field model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Lühr, H.; Finlay, Chris;

    2014-01-01

    We present CHAOS-4, a new version in the CHAOS model series, which aims to describe the Earth's magnetic field with high spatial and temporal resolution. Terms up to spherical degree of at least n = 85 for the lithospheric field, and up to n = 16 for the time-varying core field are robustly deter...

  19. "Chaos" Theory: Implications for Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Jean S.

    "Chaos" theory is a revolutionary new paradigm developed by scientists to study the behavior of natural systems. "Chaos" refers to the tendency of dynamic non-linear systems toward irregular, sometimes unpredictable, yet deterministic behavior. Major tenets of the theory are presented. The precedent for use of models developed in the natural…

  20. The CHAOS-4 Geomagnetic Field Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris; Lühr, H.

    We present CHAOS-4, a new version in the CHAOS model series, which aims at describing the Earth's magnetic field with high spatial resolution (terms up to spherical degree n=90 for the crustal field, and up to n=16 for the time-varying core field are robustly determined) and high temporal resolut...

  1. Weak chaos in the asymmetric heavy top

    CERN Document Server

    Barrientos, M; Ranada, A F

    1995-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of the slightly asymmetric heavy top, a non-integrable system obtained from the Lagrange top by breaking the symmetry of its inertia tensor. It shows signs of weak chaos, which we study numerically. We argue that it is a good example for introducing students to non-integrability and chaos. (author)

  2. PHASE CHAOS IN THE DISCRETE KURAMOTO MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maistrenko, V.; Vasylenko, A.; Maistrenko, Y.;

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the appearance of a novel, high-dimensional chaotic regime, called phase chaos, in a time-discrete Kuramoto model of globally coupled phase oscillators. This type of chaos is observed at small and intermediate values of the coupling strength. It arises from the nonlinear inter...

  3. Dazzled by unity? Order and chaos in public discourse on illicit drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Suzanne; Moore, David

    2008-02-01

    One of the ways in which researchers, policy makers and practitioners routinely characterise illicit drug use is through a taxonomy of two paired conditions, the negative state of 'chaos' and the positive state of 'order' in the form of 'stability.' In this article, we explore some of the ways in which this taxonomy operates in public discourse on illicit drug use. Google searches were conducted in order to gather a corpus of Australian, United Kingdom and United States materials making use of notions of chaos and stability in discussing illicit drug use. The chaos/stability pairing was identified in a large number of materials, including government policy documents, internet web sites for drug related services, newspaper articles and research papers. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault and Michel Serres, we argue that references to chaos and stability within public discourse produce at least three different ontological registers in which drug users are positioned: (1) the drug user as chaotic, (2) the drug using way of life as chaotic and (3) drug use activities as chaotic. These registers produce different semantic effects in that each locates the 'problem' of chaos differently and invokes it for different political and regulatory ends. Further, we argue that the taxonomy serves mainly to affirm the illegitimacy of injecting drug use by establishing and policing boundaries between the ostensibly unproductive, disorderly lives of drug users and the 'normal,' orderly and productive lives of non-injecting drug users. In concluding, we question the adequacy of chaos, as conventionally defined, in accounting for the circumstances and actions of drug users, and canvass alternative ways of viewing chaos that might offer useful critical tools for drugs research, policy and practice.

  4. 4th international interdisciplinary chaos symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Santo; Caglar, Suleyman; Ozer, Mehmet; Chaos and complex systems

    2013-01-01

    Complexity Science and Chaos Theory are fascinating areas of scientific research with wide-ranging applications.  The interdisciplinary nature and ubiquity of complexity and chaos are features that provides scientists with a motivation to pursue general theoretical tools and frameworks. Complex systems give rise to emergent behaviors, which in turn produce novel and interesting phenomena in science, engineering, as well as in the socio-economic sciences. The aim of all Symposia on Chaos and Complex Systems (CCS) is to bring together scientists, engineers, economists and social scientists, and to discuss the latest insights and results obtained in the area of corresponding nonlinear-system complex (chaotic) behavior. Especially for the “4th International Interdisciplinary Chaos Symposium on Chaos and Complex Systems,” which took place April 29th to May 2nd, 2012 in Antalya, Turkey, the scope of the symposium had been further enlarged so as to encompass the presentation of work from circuits to econophysic...

  5. Chaos the science of predictable random motion

    CERN Document Server

    Kautz, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Based on only elementary mathematics, this engaging account of chaos theory bridges the gap between introductions for the layman and college-level texts. It develops the science of dynamics in terms of small time steps, describes the phenomenon of chaos through simple examples, and concludes with a close look at a homoclinic tangle, the mathematical monster at the heart of chaos. The presentation is enhanced by many figures, animations of chaotic motion (available on a companion CD), and biographical sketches of the pioneers of dynamics and chaos theory. To ensure accessibility to motivated high school students, care has been taken to explain advanced mathematical concepts simply, including exponentials and logarithms, probability, correlation, frequency analysis, fractals, and transfinite numbers. These tools help to resolve the intriguing paradox of motion that is predictable and yet random, while the final chapter explores the various ways chaos theory has been put to practical use.

  6. Semiconductor Lasers Stability, Instability and Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsubo, Junji

    2013-01-01

    This third edition of “Semiconductor Lasers, Stability, Instability and Chaos” was significantly extended.  In the previous edition, the dynamics and characteristics of chaos in semiconductor lasers after the introduction of the fundamental theory of laser chaos and chaotic dynamics induced by self-optical feedback and optical injection was discussed. Semiconductor lasers with new device structures, such as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and broad-area semiconductor lasers, are interesting devices from the viewpoint of chaotic dynamics since they essentially involve chaotic dynamics even in their free-running oscillations. These topics are also treated with respect to the new developments in the current edition. Also the control of such instabilities and chaos control are critical issues for applications. Another interesting and important issue of semiconductor laser chaos in this third edition is chaos synchronization between two lasers and the application to optical secure communication. One o...

  7. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications of Low-Dimensional Carbon-Related Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mostofizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out to develop one of the most interesting aspects of the science and nanotechnology which is called carbon-related nanomaterials. The goal of this paper is to provide a review of some of the most exciting and important developments in the synthesis, properties, and applications of low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials. Carbon nanomaterials are formed in various structural features using several different processing methods. The synthesis techniques used to produce specific kinds of low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials such as zero-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (including fullerene, carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles, nanodiamond, and onion-like carbons, one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (including carbon nanofibers and carbon nanotubes, and two-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (including graphene and carbon nanowalls are discussed in this paper. Subsequently, the paper deals with an overview of the properties of the mainly important products as well as some important applications and the future outlooks of these advanced nanomaterials.

  8. Low-dimensional carbon and MXene-based electrochemical capacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeoheung; Lee, Keunsik; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-04-01

    Due to their unique structure and outstanding intrinsic physical properties such as extraordinarily high electrical conductivity, large surface area, and various chemical functionalities, low-dimension-based materials exhibit great potential for application in electrochemical capacitors (ECs). The electrical properties of electrochemical capacitors are determined by the electrode materials. Because energy charge storage is a surface process, the surface properties of the electrode materials greatly influence the electrochemical performance of the cell. Recently, graphene, a single layer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms arrayed into two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial, has attracted wide interest as an electrode material for electrochemical capacitor applications due to its unique properties, including a high electrical conductivity and large surface area. Several low-dimensional materials with large surface areas and high conductivity such as onion-like carbons (OLCs), carbide-derived carbons (CDCs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, metal hydroxide, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and most recently MXene, have been developed for electrochemical capacitors. Therefore, it is useful to understand the current issues of low-dimensional materials and their device applications.

  9. Formation of porous low-dimensional nickel systems during near equilibrium condensation in ultrapure inert environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perekrestov, Vyacheslav [Sumy State University, Laboratory of Vacuum Nanotechnologies, 2, Rimsky-Korsakov Str., 40007 Sumy (Ukraine); Kornyushchenko, Anna, E-mail: ann_korn@ukr.net [Sumy State University, Laboratory of Vacuum Nanotechnologies, 2, Rimsky-Korsakov Str., 40007 Sumy (Ukraine); Kosminska, Yuliya [Sumy State University, Laboratory of Vacuum Nanotechnologies, 2, Rimsky-Korsakov Str., 40007 Sumy (Ukraine); Wilde, Gerhard; Ostendorp, Stefan; Winkler, Nina [University of Muenster, Institute of Materials Physics, 10, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str., 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new method of Ni low-dimensional porous systems formation has been developed. • Ni porous structures formation mechanisms have been investigated. • New peculiarities of growth mechanism near equilibrium conditions have been found. • Prolonged condensation process lead to Ni whiskers growth with diameter 30–600 nm. • Ni magnetic properties have been investigated. - Abstract: A new technique for synthesizing porous low-dimensional nickel has been developed, which involves the controlled sputter deposition of extremely small vapor fluxes in an ultrapure inert environment. This technique is based on the phase transition of sputtered substances into the condensed state under conditions close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The evolution of morphologically unique condensates which consist of weakly bound crystals have been analyzed on the basis of electron microscopy investigations. The experiments have shown that a rather prolonged condensation for durations exceeding 4 h results in the nucleation of whiskers with diameters between 30 and 600 nm. It is suggested that highly porous nickel structures obtained near thermodynamic equilibrium belong to a new zone in the structure zone model.

  10. Functional connectivity among spikes in low dimensional space during working memory task in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Ouyang

    Full Text Available Working memory (WM is critically important in cognitive tasks. The functional connectivity has been a powerful tool for understanding the mechanism underlying the information processing during WM tasks. The aim of this study is to investigate how to effectively characterize the dynamic variations of the functional connectivity in low dimensional space among the principal components (PCs which were extracted from the instantaneous firing rate series. Spikes were obtained from medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC of rats with implanted microelectrode array and then transformed into continuous series via instantaneous firing rate method. Granger causality method is proposed to study the functional connectivity. Then three scalar metrics were applied to identify the changes of the reduced dimensionality functional network during working memory tasks: functional connectivity (GC, global efficiency (E and casual density (CD. As a comparison, GC, E and CD were also calculated to describe the functional connectivity in the original space. The results showed that these network characteristics dynamically changed during the correct WM tasks. The measure values increased to maximum, and then decreased both in the original and in the reduced dimensionality. Besides, the feature values of the reduced dimensionality were significantly higher during the WM tasks than they were in the original space. These findings suggested that functional connectivity among the spikes varied dynamically during the WM tasks and could be described effectively in the low dimensional space.

  11. Functional connectivity among spikes in low dimensional space during working memory task in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Mei; Li, Shuangyan; Tian, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is critically important in cognitive tasks. The functional connectivity has been a powerful tool for understanding the mechanism underlying the information processing during WM tasks. The aim of this study is to investigate how to effectively characterize the dynamic variations of the functional connectivity in low dimensional space among the principal components (PCs) which were extracted from the instantaneous firing rate series. Spikes were obtained from medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats with implanted microelectrode array and then transformed into continuous series via instantaneous firing rate method. Granger causality method is proposed to study the functional connectivity. Then three scalar metrics were applied to identify the changes of the reduced dimensionality functional network during working memory tasks: functional connectivity (GC), global efficiency (E) and casual density (CD). As a comparison, GC, E and CD were also calculated to describe the functional connectivity in the original space. The results showed that these network characteristics dynamically changed during the correct WM tasks. The measure values increased to maximum, and then decreased both in the original and in the reduced dimensionality. Besides, the feature values of the reduced dimensionality were significantly higher during the WM tasks than they were in the original space. These findings suggested that functional connectivity among the spikes varied dynamically during the WM tasks and could be described effectively in the low dimensional space.

  12. A Low-Dimensional Model for the Maximal Amplification Factor of Bichromatic Wave Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. Tan

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider a low-dimensional model derived from the nonlinear-Schrödinger equation that describes the evolution of a special class of surface gravity wave groups, namely bichromatic waves. The model takes only two modes into account, namely the primary mode and the third order mode which is known to be most relevant for bichromatic waves with small frequency difference. Given an initial condition, an analytical expression for the maximal amplitude of the evolution of this initial wave group according to the model can be readily obtained. The aim of this investigation is to predict the amplification factor defined as the quotient between the maximal amplitude over all time & space and the initial maximal amplitude. Although this is a problem of general interest, as a case study, initial conditions in the form of a bichromatic wave group are taken. Using the low dimensional model it is found that the least upper bound of the maximal amplification factor for this bichromatic wave group is √2. To validate the analytical results of this model, a numerical simulation on the full model is also performed. As can be expected, good agreement is observed between analytical and numerical solutions for a certain range of parameters; when the initial amplitude is not too large, or when the difference of frequency is not too small. The results are relevant and motivated for the generation of waves in hydrodynamic laboratories.

  13. Prediction based chaos control via a new neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Liqun [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: liqunshen@gmail.com; Wang Mao [Space Control and Inertia Technology Research Center, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu Wanyu [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun Guanghui [Space Control and Inertia Technology Research Center, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2008-11-17

    In this Letter, a new chaos control scheme based on chaos prediction is proposed. To perform chaos prediction, a new neural network architecture for complex nonlinear approximation is proposed. And the difficulty in building and training the neural network is also reduced. Simulation results of Logistic map and Lorenz system show the effectiveness of the proposed chaos control scheme and the proposed neural network.

  14. A Quantum Correction To Chaos

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fitzpatrick; Kaplan, Jared

    2016-01-01

    We use results on Virasoro conformal blocks to study chaotic dynamics in CFT 2 at large central charge c . The Lyapunov exponent λ L , which is a diagnostic for the early onset of chaos, receives 1 /c corrections that may be interpreted as λ L = 2 π β 1 + 12 c $$ {\\lambda}_L=\\frac{2\\pi }{\\beta}\\left(1+\\frac{12}{c}\\right) $$ . However, out of time order correlators receive other equally important 1 /c suppressed contributions that do not have such a simple interpretation. We revisit the proof ...

  15. Some new surprises in chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunimovich, Leonid A., E-mail: bunimovh@math.gatech.edu [ABC Program, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Mathematics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Vela-Arevalo, Luz V., E-mail: luzvela@math.gatech.edu [School of Mathematics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    A brief review is presented of some recent findings in the theory of chaotic dynamics. We also prove a statement that could be naturally considered as a dual one to the Poincaré theorem on recurrences. Numerical results demonstrate that some parts of the phase space of chaotic systems are more likely to be visited earlier than other parts. A new class of chaotic focusing billiards is discussed that clearly violates the main condition considered to be necessary for chaos in focusing billiards.

  16. Chaos control in duffing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ruiqi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Osaka Sangyo University, Nakagaito 3-1-1, Daito, Osaka 574-8530 (Japan); Deng Jin [Academy of Mathematics and System Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Jing Zhujun [Academy of Mathematics and System Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Mathematics, Hunan Normal University, Hunan, Changsha 410081 (China); E-mail: jingzj@math.ac.cn

    2006-01-01

    Analytical and numerical results concerning the inhibition of chaos in Duffing's equation with two weak forcing excitations are presented. We theoretically give parameter-space regions by using Melnikov's function, where chaotic states can be suppressed. The intervals of initial phase difference between the two excitations for which chaotic dynamics can be eliminated are given. Meanwhile, the influence of the phase difference on Lyapunov exponents for different frequencies is investigated. Numerical simulation results show the consistence with the theoretical analysis and the chaotic motions can be controlled to period-motions by adjusting parameter of suppressing excitation.

  17. Controlling Beam Halo-Chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, we proposed the wavelet-based feedback controller is as follows: G = -g{fab(rrms)-fab(am)} (1)where the master wavelet function is in a simplified form(2)where a and b are scaling and translation constants, respectively. C is a selected constant. The main reason of using wavelet function for controller design is that it has strong nonlinearity and excellent localization property. It turns out that for halo-chaos control purpose, the translation b can be very small, so for simplicity one may let b = 0 . Our goal of control is rms→am, in this

  18. An Experimental Investigation of Secure Communication With Chaos Masking

    CERN Document Server

    Dhar, Sourav

    2007-01-01

    The most exciting recent development in nonlinear dynamics is realization that chaos can be useful. One application involves "Secure Communication". Two piecewise linear systems with switching nonlinearities have been taken as chaos generators. In the present work the phenomenon of secure communication with chaos masking has been investigated experimentally. In this investigation chaos which is generated from two chaos generators is masked with the massage signal to be transmitted, thus makes communication is more secure.

  19. Understanding and Predicting Geomagnetic Dipole Reversals Via Low Dimensional Models and Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzfeld, M.; Fournier, A.; Hulot, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the geophysical relevance of low-dimensional models of the geomagnetic dipole fieldby comparing these models to the signed relative paleomagnetic intensity over the past 2 Myr.The comparison is done via Bayesian statistics, implemented numerically by Monte Carlo (MC) sampling.We consider several MC schemes, as well as two data sets to show the robustness of our approach with respect to its numerical implementation and to the details of how the data are collected.The data we consider are the Sint-2000 [1] and PADM2M [2] data sets.We consider three stochastic differential equation (SDE) models and one deterministic model. Experiments with synthetic data show that it is feasible that a low dimensional modelcan learn the geophysical state from data of only the dipole field,and reveal the limitations of the low-dimensional models.For example, the G12 model [3] (a deterministic model that generates dipole reversals by crisis induced intermittency)can only match either one of the two important time scales we find in the data. The MC sampling approach also allows usto use the models to make predictions of the dipole field.We assess how reliably dipole reversals can be predictedwith our approach by hind-casting five reversals documented over the past 2 Myr. We find that, besides its limitations, G12 can be used to predict reversals reliably,however only with short lead times and over short horizons. The scalar SDE models on the other hand are not useful for prediction of dipole reversals.References Valet, J.P., Maynadier,L and Guyodo, Y., 2005, Geomagnetic field strength and reversal rate over the past 2 Million years, Nature, 435, 802-805. Ziegler, L.B., Constable, C.G., Johnson, C.L. and Tauxe, L., 2011, PADM2M: a penalized maximum likelihood model of the 0-2 Ma paleomagnetic axial dipole moment, Geophysical Journal International, 184, 1069-1089. Gissinger, C., 2012, A new deterministic model for chaotic reversals, European Physical Journal B, 85:137.

  20. Markov transitions and the propagation of chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, Alexander David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-12-01

    The propagation of chaos is a central concept of kinetic theory that serves to relate the equations of Boltzmann and Vlasov to the dynamics of many-particle systems. Propagation of chaos means that molecular chaos, i.e., the stochastic independence of two random particles in a many-particle system, persists in time, as the number of particles tends to infinity. We establish a necessary and sufficient condition for a family of general n-particle Markov processes to propagate chaos. This condition is expressed in terms of the Markov transition functions associated to the n-particle processes, and it amounts to saying that chaos of random initial states propagates if it propagates for pure initial states. Our proof of this result relies on the weak convergence approach to the study of chaos due to Sztitman and Tanaka. We assume that the space in which the particles live is homomorphic to a complete and separable metric space so that we may invoke Prohorov's theorem in our proof. We also s how that, if the particles can be in only finitely many states, then molecular chaos implies that the specific entropies in the n-particle distributions converge to the entropy of the limiting single-particle distribution.

  1. Inelastic light scattering by low-lying excitations of electrons in low-dimensional semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, V. [NEST CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Pinczuk, A. [Department of Physics, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The low-dimensional electron systems that reside in artificial semiconductor heterostructures of great perfection are a contemporary materials base for explorations of collective phenomena. Studies of low-lying elementary excitations by inelastic light scattering offer insights on properties such energetics, interactions and spin magnetization. We review here recent light scattering results obtained from two-dimensional (2D) quantum fluids in semiconductor heterostructures under extreme conditions of low temperature and large magnetic field, where the quantum Hall phases are archetypes of novel behaviors. We also consider recent light scattering experiments that have probed the excitation spectra of few-electron states in semiconductor quantum dots. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Geometric gauge potentials and forces in low-dimensional scattering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zygelman, B

    2012-01-01

    We introduce and analyze several low-dimensional scattering systems that exhibit geometric phase phenomena. The systems are fully solvable and we compare exact solutions of them with those obtained in a Born-Oppenheimer projection approximation. We illustrate how geometric magnetism manifests in them, and explore the relationship between solutions obtained in the diabatic and adiabatic pictures. We provide an example, involving a neutral atom dressed by an external field, in which the system mimics the behavior of a charged particle that interacts with, and is scattered by, a ferromagnetic material. We also introduce a similar system that exhibits Aharonov-Bohm scattering. We propose some practical applications. We provide a theoretical approach that underscores universality in the appearance of geometric gauge forces. We do not insist on degeneracies in the adiabatic Hamiltonian, and we posit that the emergence of geometric gauge forces is a consequence of symmetry breaking in the latter.

  3. A Review on the Low-Dimensional and Hybridized Nanostructured Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdong Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, besides the breakthrough of high-rate growth of chemical vapor deposited single-crystal diamonds, numerous nanostructured diamond films have been rapidly developed in the research fields of the diamond-based sciences and industrial applications. The low-dimensional diamonds of two-dimensional atomic-thick nanofilms and nanostructural diamond on the surface of bulk diamond films have been theoretically and experimentally investigated. In addition, the diamond-related hybrid nanostructures of n-type oxide/p-type diamond and n-type nitride/p-type diamond, having high performance physical and chemical properties, are proposed for further applications. In this review, we first briefly introduce the three categories of diamond nanostructures and then outline the current advances in these topics, including their design, fabrication, characterization, and properties. Finally, we address the remaining challenges in the research field and the future activities.

  4. Dynamics of low dimensional model for weakly relativistic Zakharov equations for plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Biswajit [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University, Barasat, Kolkata-700126 (India); Pal, Barnali; Poria, Swarup [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata-700009 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India)

    2013-05-15

    In the present paper, the nonlinear interaction between Langmuir waves and ion acoustic waves described by the one-dimensional Zakharov equations (ZEs) for relativistic plasmas are investigated formulating a low dimensional model. Equilibrium points of the model are found and it is shown that the existence and stability conditions of the equilibrium point depend on the relativistic parameter. Computational investigations are carried out to examine the effects of relativistic parameter and other plasma parameters on the dynamics of the model. Power spectrum analysis using fast fourier transform and also construction of first return map confirm that periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic type solution exist for both relativistic as well as in non-relativistic case. Existence of supercritical Hopf bifurcation is noted in the system for two critical plasmon numbers.

  5. Salty popcorn in a homogeneous low-dimensional toy model of holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Elliot-Ripley, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a homogeneous ansatz has been used to study cold dense nuclear matter in the Sakai-Sugimoto model of holographic QCD. To justify this homogeneous approximation we here investigate a homogeneous ansatz within a low-dimensional toy version of Sakai-Sugimoto to study finite baryon density configurations and compare it to full numerical solutions. We find the ansatz corresponds to enforcing a dyon salt arrangement in which the soliton solutions are split into half-soliton layers. Within this ansatz we find analogues of the proposed baryonic popcorn transitions, in which solutions split into multiple layers in the holographic direction. The homogeneous results are found to qualitatively match the full numerical solutions, lending confidence to the homogeneous approximations of the full Sakai-Sugimoto model. In addition, we find exact compact solutions in the high density, flat space limit which demonstrate the existence of further popcorn transitions to three layers and beyond.

  6. Constructing Low-Dimensional Dynamical Systems of Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations Using Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shuai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new approach using optimization technique for constructing low-dimensional dynamical systems of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs is presented. After the spatial basis functions of the nonlinear PDEs are chosen, spatial basis functions expansions combined with weighted residual methods are used for time/space separation and truncation to obtain a high-dimensional dynamical system. Secondly, modes of lower-dimensional dynamical systems are obtained by linear combination from the modes of the high-dimensional dynamical systems (ordinary differential equations of nonlinear PDEs. An error function for matrix of the linear combination coefficients is derived, and a simple algorithm to determine the optimal combination matrix is also introduced. A numerical example shows that the optimal dynamical system can use much smaller number of modes to capture the dynamics of nonlinear partial differential equations.

  7. Low-dimensional functionality of complex network dynamics: Neurosensory integration in the Caenorhabditiselegans connectome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, James; Shlizerman, Eli; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-05-01

    We develop a biophysical model of neurosensory integration in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Building on experimental findings on the neuron conductances and their resolved connectome, we posit the first full dynamic model of the neural voltage excitations that allows for a characterization of network structures which link input stimuli to neural proxies of behavioral responses. Full connectome simulations of neural responses to prescribed inputs show that robust, low-dimensional bifurcation structures drive neural voltage activity modes. Comparison of these modes with experimental studies allows us to link these network structures to behavioral responses. Thus the underlying bifurcation structures discovered, i.e., induced Hopf bifurcations, are critical in explaining behavioral responses such as swimming and crawling.

  8. Towards an efficient multiscale modeling of low-dimensional reactive systems: study of numerical closure procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzi, Giacomo; Samaey, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a study on how to develop an efficient multiscale simulation strategy for the dynamics of chemically active systems on low-dimensional supports. Such reactions are encountered in a wide variety of situations, ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to electrochemical or (membrane) biological processes, to cite a few. We analyzed in this context different techniques within the framework of an important multiscale approach known as the equation free method (EFM), which "bridges the multiscale gap" by building microscopic configurations using macroscopic-level information only. We hereby considered two simple reactive processes on a one-dimensional lattice, the simplicity of which allowed for an in-depth understanding of the parameters controlling the efficiency of this approach. We demonstrate in particular that it is not enough to base the EFM on the time evolution of the average concentrations of particles on the lattice, but that the time evolution of clusters of particles has to be in...

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Low-Dimensional Nanostructures using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Daisuke; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Onishi, Keiko; Ohgi, Taizo

    Recent developments of fabrication, manipulation and characterization techniques at nanometer scale for low-dimensional nanostructures using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are reviewed. Firstly two reliable methods for metallic nanostructure formation using tip material transfer are introduced. Secondly STM-manipulation of Au nanoclusters grown on self-assembled monolayers is introduced, where single electron tunneling effect is clearly observable using tunneling spectroscopy. As a new type of STM manipulation, a reversible control method of surface periodic structures (phases) on Si(100) at low temperatures is introduced. Finally using a single atom deposition technique using a controlled point contact, fabrication of one-dimensional quantum well on a single dimer row of Si(100) surface is explained. Combining the fabrication and characterization capabilities of STM in various environments, STM can be a powerful tool for the exploration of nanotechnology and nanoscience.

  10. Low Dimensional Cohomology of Hom-Lie Algebras and q-deformed W (2, 2) Algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    La Mei YUAN; Hong YOU

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to study low dimensional cohomology of Hom-Lie algebras and the q-deformed W (2, 2) algebra. We show that the q-deformed W (2, 2) algebra is a Hom-Lie algebra. Also, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the equivalence classes of one-dimensional central extensions of a Hom-Lie algebra and its second cohomology group, leading us to determine the sec-ond cohomology group of the q-deformed W (2, 2) algebra. In addition, we generalize some results of derivations of finitely generated Lie algebras with values in graded modules to Hom-Lie algebras. As application, we compute all α k-derivations and in particular the first cohomology group of the q-deformed W (2, 2) algebra.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis and acetylene sensing properties of variety low dimensional zinc oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qu; Chen, Weigen; Peng, Shudi; Zeng, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Various morphologies of low dimensional ZnO nanostructures, including spheres, rods, sheets, and wires, were successfully synthesized using a simple and facile hydrothermal method assisted with different surfactants. Zinc acetate dihydrate was chosen as the precursors of ZnO nanostructures. We found that polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), glycine, and ethylene glycol (EG) play critical roles in the morphologies and microstructures of the synthesized nanostructures, and a series of possible growth processes were discussed in detail. Gas sensors were fabricated using screen-printing technology, and their sensing properties towards acetylene gas (C2H2), one of the most important arc discharge characteristic gases dissolved in oil-filled power equipments, were systematically measured. The ZnO nanowires based sensor exhibits excellent C2H2 sensing behaviors than those of ZnO nanosheets, nanorods, and nanospheres, indicating a feasible way to develop high-performance C2H2 gas sensor for practical application.

  12. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Optical Switching in Low-Dimensional Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bányai, L

    1989-01-01

    This book contains all the papers presented at the NATO workshop on "Optical Switching in Low Dimensional Systems" held in Marbella, Spain from October 6th to 8th, 1988. Optical switching is a basic function for optical data processing, which is of technological interest because of its potential parallelism and its potential speed. Semiconductors which exhibit resonance enhanced optical nonlinearities in the frequency range close to the band edge are the most intensively studied materials for optical bistability and fast gate operation. Modern crystal growth techniques, particularly molecular beam epitaxy, allow the manufacture of semiconductor microstructures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots in which the electrons are only free to move in two, one or zero dimensions, of the optically excited electron-hole pairs in these low respectively. The spatial confinement dimensional structures gives rise to an enhancement of the excitonic nonlinearities. Furthermore, the variations of the microstr...

  13. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Acetylene Sensing Properties of Variety Low Dimensional Zinc Oxide Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various morphologies of low dimensional ZnO nanostructures, including spheres, rods, sheets, and wires, were successfully synthesized using a simple and facile hydrothermal method assisted with different surfactants. Zinc acetate dihydrate was chosen as the precursors of ZnO nanostructures. We found that polyethylene glycol (PEG, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, glycine, and ethylene glycol (EG play critical roles in the morphologies and microstructures of the synthesized nanostructures, and a series of possible growth processes were discussed in detail. Gas sensors were fabricated using screen-printing technology, and their sensing properties towards acetylene gas (C2H2, one of the most important arc discharge characteristic gases dissolved in oil-filled power equipments, were systematically measured. The ZnO nanowires based sensor exhibits excellent C2H2 sensing behaviors than those of ZnO nanosheets, nanorods, and nanospheres, indicating a feasible way to develop high-performance C2H2 gas sensor for practical application.

  14. Dynamical systems approach to one-dimensional spatiotemporal chaos: A cyclist's view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yueheng

    We propose a dynamical systems approach to the study of weak turbulence (spatiotemporal chaos) based on the periodic orbit theory, emphasizing the role of recurrent patterns and coherent structures. After a brief review of the periodic orbit theory and its application to low-dimensional dynamics, we discuss its possible extension to study dynamics of spatially extended systems. The discussion is three-fold. First, we introduce a novel variational scheme for finding periodic orbits in high-dimensional systems. Second, we prove rigorously the existence of periodic structures (modulated amplitude waves) near the first instability of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, and check their role in pattern formation. Third, we present the extensive numerical exploration of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky system in the chaotic regime: structure of the equilibrium solutions, our search for the shortest periodic orbits, description of the chaotic invariant set in terms of intrinsic coordinates and return maps on the Poincare section.

  15. Physical properties of low-dimensional sp 2 -based carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, V.; Souza Filho, A. G.; Barros, E. B.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a tremendous growth in the development and understanding of sp 2 carbon-based nanostructures. The impact of this research has led to a number of fundamental discoveries that have played a central role in the understanding of many aspects of materials physics and their applications. Much of this progress has been enabled by the development of new techniques to prepare, modify, and assemble low-dimensional materials into devices. The field has also benefited greatly from much progress in theoretical and computational modeling, as well as from advances in characterization techniques developed to probe and manipulate single atomic layers, nanoribbons, and nanotubes. Some of the most fundamental physical properties of sp2 carbon-based nanostructures are reviewed and their role as model systems for solid-state physics in one and two dimensions is highlighted. The objective of this review is to provide a thorough account on current understanding of how the details of the atomic structure affect phonons, electrons, and transport in these nanomaterials. The review starts with a description of the behavior of single-layer and few-layer graphene and then expands into the analysis of nanoribbons and nanotubes in terms of their reduced dimensionality and curvature. How the properties can be modified and tailored for specific applications is then discussed. The review concludes with a historical perspective and considers some open questions concerning future directions in the physics of low-dimensional systems and their impact on continued advances in solid-state physics, and also looks beyond carbon nanosystems.

  16. Towards CHAOS-5 - How can Swarm contribute?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The launch of ESA's satellite trio Swarm in November 2013 opens an exciting new chapter in the observation and monitoring of Earth's magnetic field from space. We report preliminary results from an extension of the CHAOS series of geomagnetic field models to include both scalar and vector field...... observations from the three Swarm satellites, along with the most recent quasi-definitive ground observatory data. The fit of this new update CHAOS field model to the Swarm observations will be presented in detail providing useful insight the initial Swarm data. Enhancements of the CHAOS modelling scheme...

  17. Chaos from simple models to complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cencini, Massimo; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Chaos: from simple models to complex systems aims to guide science and engineering students through chaos and nonlinear dynamics from classical examples to the most recent fields of research. The first part, intended for undergraduate and graduate students, is a gentle and self-contained introduction to the concepts and main tools for the characterization of deterministic chaotic systems, with emphasis to statistical approaches. The second part can be used as a reference by researchers as it focuses on more advanced topics including the characterization of chaos with tools of information theor

  18. Physics and Applications of Laser Diode Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Sciamanna, Marc

    2015-01-01

    An overview of chaos in laser diodes is provided which surveys experimental achievements in the area and explains the theory behind the phenomenon. The fundamental physics underpinning this behaviour and also the opportunities for harnessing laser diode chaos for potential applications are discussed. The availability and ease of operation of laser diodes, in a wide range of configurations, make them a convenient test-bed for exploring basic aspects of nonlinear and chaotic dynamics. It also makes them attractive for practical tasks, such as chaos-based secure communications and random number generation. Avenues for future research and development of chaotic laser diodes are also identified.

  19. Chaos dynamic characteristics during mine fires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Mine fires break out and continue in confmed scopes, studying mine fire dynamics characteristics is very usefulto prevent and control fire. The judgement index of fire chaos characteristics was introduced, chaos analysis of mine Fireprocess was described, and the reconstruction of phase space was also presented. An example of mine fire was calculated.The computations show that it is feasible to analyze mine fire dynamic characteristics with chaos theory, and indicate thatfire preoeas is a catastrophe, that is to say, the fire system changes from one state to another during mine fire

  20. Chua's circuit a paradigm for chaos

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For uninitiated researchers, engineers, and scientists interested in a quick entry into the subject of chaos, this book offers a timely collection of 55 carefully selected papers covering almost every aspect of this subject. Because Chua's circuit is endowed with virtually every bifurcation phenomena reported in the extensive literature on chaos, and because it is the only chaotic system which can be easily built by a novice, simulated in a personal computer, and tractable mathematically, it has become a paradigm for chaos, and a vehicle for illustrating this ubiquitous phenomenon. Its supreme

  1. Semiconductor Lasers Stability, Instability and Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsubo, Junji

    2008-01-01

    This monograph describes fascinating recent progress in the field of chaos, stability and instability of semiconductor lasers. Applications and future prospects are discussed in detail. The book emphasizes the various dynamics induced in semiconductor lasers by optical and electronic feedback, optical injection, and injection current modulation. Recent results of both theoretical and experimental investigations are presented. Demonstrating applications of semiconductor laser chaos, control and noise, Semiconductor Lasers describes suppression and chaotic secure communications. For those who are interested in optics but not familiar with nonlinear systems, a brief introduction to chaos analysis is presented.

  2. Aggressive shadowing of a low-dimensional model of atmospheric dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lieb-Lappen, Ross M

    2011-01-01

    Predictions of the future state of the Earth's atmosphere suffer from the consequences of chaos: numerical weather forecast models quickly diverge from observations as uncertainty in the initial state is amplified by nonlinearity. One measure of the utility of a forecast is its shadowing time, informally given by the period of time for which the forecast is a reasonable description of reality. The present work uses the Lorenz 096 coupled system, a simplified nonlinear model of atmospheric dynamics, to extend a recently developed technique for lengthening the shadowing time of a dynamical system. Ensemble forecasting is used to make forecasts with and without inflation, a method whereby the ensemble is regularly expanded artificially along dimensions whose uncertainty is contracting. The first goal of this work is to compare model forecasts, with and without inflation, to a true trajectory created by integrating a modified version of the same model. The second goal is to establish whether inflation can increas...

  3. Chaos-based encryption for fractal image coding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuen Ching-Hung; Wong Kwok-Wo

    2012-01-01

    A chaos-based cryptosystem for fractal image coding is proposed.The Rényi chaotic map is employed to determine the order of processing the range blocks and to generate the keystream for masking the encoded sequence.Compared with the standard approach of fractal image coding followed by the Advanced Encryption Standard,our scheme offers a higher sensitivity to both plaintext and ciphertext at a comparable operating efficiency.The keystream generated by the Rényi chaotic map passes the randomness tests set by the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology,and so the proposed scheme is sensitive to the key.

  4. Chaos driven by interfering memory

    CERN Document Server

    Perrard, Stéphane; Fort, Emmanuel; Couder, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The transmission of information can couple two entities of very different nature, one of them serving as a memory for the other. Here we study the situation in which information is stored in a wave field and serves as a memory that pilots the dynamics of a particle. Such a system can be implemented by a bouncing drop generating surface waves sustained by a parametric forcing. The motion of the resulting "walker" when confined in a harmonic potential well is generally disordered. Here we show that these trajectories correspond to chaotic regimes characterized by intermittent transitions between a discrete set of states. At any given time, the system is in one of these states characterized by a double quantization of size and angular momentum. A low dimensional intermittency determines their respective probabilities. They thus form an eigenstate basis of decomposition for what would be observed as a superposition of states if all measurements were intrusive.

  5. Chaos concepts, control and constructive use

    CERN Document Server

    Bolotin, Yurii; Yanovsky, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a short and concise introduction to the many facets of chaos theory. While the study of chaotic behavior in nonlinear, dynamical systems is a well-established research field with ramifications in all areas of science, there is a lot to be learnt about how chaos can be controlled and, under appropriate conditions, can actually be constructive in the sense of becoming a control parameter for the system under investigation, stochastic resonance being a prime example. The present work stresses the latter aspects and, after recalling the paradigm changes introduced by the concept of chaos, leads the reader skillfully through the basics of chaos control by detailing the relevant algorithms for both Hamiltonian and dissipative systems, among others. The main part of the book is then devoted to the issue of synchronization in chaotic systems, an introduction to stochastic resonance, and a survey of ratchet models. In this second, revised and enlarged edition, two more chapters explore the many interf...

  6. Semiconductor lasers stability, instability and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsubo, Junji

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the fascinating recent advances made concerning the chaos, stability and instability of semiconductor lasers, and discusses their applications and future prospects in detail. It emphasizes the dynamics in semiconductor lasers by optical and electronic feedback, optical injection, and injection current modulation. Applications of semiconductor laser chaos, control and noise, and semiconductor lasers are also demonstrated. Semiconductor lasers with new structures, such as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and broad-area semiconductor lasers, are intriguing and promising devices. Current topics include fast physical number generation using chaotic semiconductor lasers for secure communication, development of chaos, quantum-dot semiconductor lasers and quantum-cascade semiconductor lasers, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. This fourth edition has been significantly expanded to reflect the latest developments. The fundamental theory of laser chaos and the chaotic dynamics in se...

  7. Superfluid (quantum) turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    Properties of distributed chaos in superfluid (quantum) turbulence have been studied using the data of recent direct numerical simulations (HVBK two-fluid model for He II, and a moving grid in the frames of Gross-Pitaevskii model of the Bose-Einstein condensates at low temperatures). It is found that for the viscous (normal) component of the velocity field in He II the viscosity dominates the distributed chaos with the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ and $\\beta = 2/3$. For the superfluid component the distributed chaos is dominated by the vorticity correlation integral with $\\beta =1/2$ (the soft spontaneous breaking of the space translational symmetry - homogeneity). For very low temperature the distributed chaos is tuned to the large-scale coherent motions: the viscous (normal) component is tuned to the fundamental mode, whereas the superfluid component is subharmonically tuned. For the Gross-Pitaevskii superfluid turbulence incompressible part of the energy spectrum (containing ...

  8. Optimized chaos control with simple limiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C; Stoop, R

    2001-01-01

    We present an elementary derivation of chaos control with simple limiters using the logistic map and the Henon map as examples. This derivation provides conditions for optimal stabilization of unstable periodic orbits of a chaotic attractor.

  9. A simple method of chaos control

    CERN Document Server

    Shahverdiev, E M

    1998-01-01

    A simple method to perform chaos control without the need of complex numerical and analytical calculations is proposed. The method works for dynamical systems with bounded solutions and in the trivial case of constant Jacobians.

  10. Relation of Origins of Primitive Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ogasawara, Yoshihito

    2014-01-01

    A new concept, primitive chaos, was proposed, as a concept closely related to the fundamental problems of sciences themselves such as determinism, causality, free will, predictability, and time asymmetry [{\\em J. Phys. Soc. Jpn.} {\\bf 2014}, {\\em 83}, 1401]. This concept is literally a primitive chaos in such a sense that it leads to the characteristic properties of the conventional chaos under natural conditions. Then, two contrast concepts, nondegenerate Peano continuum and Cantor set, are known as the origins of the primitive chaos. In this study, the relation of these origins is investigated with the aid of a mathematical method, topology. Then, we can see the emergence of interesting concepts such as the relation of whole and part, and coarse graining, which imply the essence of our intrinsic recognition for phenomena.

  11. Chaos on the conveyor belt

    CERN Document Server

    Sándor, Bulcsú; Tél, Tamás; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of a spring-block train placed on a moving conveyor belt is investigated both by simple experiments and computer simulations. The first block is connected by spring to an external static point, and due to the dragging effect of the belt the blocks undergo complex stick-slip dynamics. A qualitative agreement with the experimental results can only be achieved by taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of the friction force on the belt's surface, modeled as noise. As a function of the velocity of the conveyor belt and the noise strength, the system exhibits complex, self-organized critical, sometimes chaotic dynamics and phase transition-like behavior. Noise induced chaos and intermittency is also observed. Simulations suggest that the maximum complexity of the dynamical states is achieved for a relatively small number of blocks, around five.

  12. Chaos, Fractals and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. Michael T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper gives an up-to-date account of chaos and fractals, in a popular pictorial style for the general scientific reader. A brief historical account covers the development of the subject from Newton’s laws of motion to the astronomy of Poincaré and the weather forecasting of Lorenz. Emphasis is given to the important underlying concepts, embracing the fractal properties of coastlines and the logistics of population dynamics. A wide variety of applications include: NASA’s discovery and use of zero-fuel chaotic “superhighways” between the planets; erratic chaotic solutions generated by Euler’s method in mathematics; atomic force microscopy; spontaneous pattern formation in chemical and biological systems; impact mechanics in offshore engineering and the chatter of cutting tools; controlling chaotic heartbeats. Reference is made to a number of interactive simulations and movies accessible on the web.

  13. Detecting chaos from time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaofeng, Gong; Lai, C. H.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, an entirely data-based method to detect chaos from the time series is developed by introducing icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> p -neighbour points (the p -steps icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> -neighbour points). We demonstrate that for deterministic chaotic systems, there exists a linear relationship between the logarithm of the average number of icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> p -neighbour points, lnn p ,icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> , and the time step, p . The coefficient can be related to the KS entropy of the system. The effects of the embedding dimension and noise are also discussed.

  14. Compressive Sensing with Optical Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontani, D.; Choi, D.; Chang, C.-Y.; Locquet, A.; Citrin, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a technique to sample a sparse signal below the Nyquist-Shannon limit, yet still enabling its reconstruction. As such, CS permits an extremely parsimonious way to store and transmit large and important classes of signals and images that would be far more data intensive should they be sampled following the prescription of the Nyquist-Shannon theorem. CS has found applications as diverse as seismology and biomedical imaging. In this work, we use actual optical signals generated from temporal intensity chaos from external-cavity semiconductor lasers (ECSL) to construct the sensing matrix that is employed to compress a sparse signal. The chaotic time series produced having their relevant dynamics on the 100 ps timescale, our results open the way to ultrahigh-speed compression of sparse signals.

  15. Ergodic theory, randomness, and "chaos".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, D S

    1989-01-13

    Ergodic theory is the theory of the long-term statistical behavior of dynamical systems. The baker's transformation is an object of ergodic theory that provides a paradigm for the possibility of deterministic chaos. It can now be shown that this connection is more than an analogy and that at some level of abstraction a large number of systems governed by Newton's laws are the same as the baker's transformation. Going to this level of abstraction helps to organize the possible kinds of random behavior. The theory also gives new concrete results. For example, one can show that the same process could be produced by a mechanism governed by Newton's laws or by a mechanism governed by coin tossing. It also gives a statistical analog of structural stability.

  16. A watermarking algorithm satisfying topological chaos properties

    CERN Document Server

    Bahi, Jacques M

    2008-01-01

    A new watermarking algorithm is given, it is based on the so-called chaotic iterations and on the choice of some coefficients which are deduced from the description of the carrier medium. After defining these coefficients, chaotic discrete iterations are used to encrypt the watermark and to embed it in the carrier medium. This procedure generates a topological chaos and ensures that the required properties of a watermarking algorithm are satisfied. Key-words: Watermarking, Encryption, Chaotic iterations, Topological chaos, Information hiding

  17. Detecting nonlinearity and chaos in epidemic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellner, S.; Gallant, A.R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Statistics; Theiler, J. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Historical data on recurrent epidemics have been central to the debate about the prevalence of chaos in biological population dynamics. Schaffer and Kot who first recognized that the abundance and accuracy of disease incidence data opened the door to applying a range of methods for detecting chaos that had been devised in the early 1980`s. Using attractor reconstruction, estimates of dynamical invariants, and comparisons between data and simulation of SEIR models, the ``case for chaos in childhood epidemics`` was made through a series of influential papers beginning in the mid 1980`s. The proposition that the precise timing and magnitude of epidemic outbreaks are deterministic but chaotic is appealing, since it raises the hope of finding determinism and simplicity beneath the apparently stochastic and complicated surface of the data. The initial enthusiasm for methods of detecting chaos in data has been followed by critical re-evaluations of their limitations. Early hopes of a ``one size fits all`` algorithm to diagnose chaos vs. noise in any data set have given way to a recognition that a variety of methods must be used, and interpretation of results must take into account the limitations of each method and the imperfections of the data. Our goals here are to outline some newer methods for detecting nonlinearity and chaos that have a solid statistical basis and are suited to epidemic data, and to begin a re-evaluation of the claims for nonlinear dynamics and chaos in epidemics using these newer methods. We also identify features of epidemic data that create problems for the older, better known methods of detecting chaos. When we ask ``are epidemics nonlinear?``, we are not questioning the existence of global nonlinearities in epidemic dynamics, such as nonlinear transmission rates. Our question is whether the data`s deviations from an annual cyclic trend (which would reflect global nonlinearities) are described by a linear, noise-driven stochastic process.

  18. How Did You Get into Chaos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Marco; Kurths, Jürgen; Romano, M. Carmen; Moura, Alessandro; Károlyi, György

    In the celebratory dinner honouring Celso Grebogi's 60th birthday, a number of scientists in the area of chaos were asked by James Yorke to tell the tale about how they got involved in the field. Since all the participants have played crucial roles in the development of the subject, their stories give unique insights into the historical development of dynamical systems and chaos. We have transcribed their tales here.

  19. Topologically Induced Chaos in the Open Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1994-01-01

    An elementary account on chaos, its origins, and its physical impact in an infinite and multiply connected space-time is given. The anisotropy of the microwave background and the violation of the space-reflection symmetry (parity) by topological self-interference are reviewed in this context. Keywords: Robertson-Walker cosmology, relativistic chaos, chaotic nucleus, center of the Universe, CP violation, self-interference, background radiation, anisotropy, particle creation, hyperbolic manifold, deformation space, topology change, Kleinian group, limit set, mixing, shadowing.

  20. Terminal chaos for information processing in neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M

    1991-01-01

    New nonlinear phenomenon-terminal chaos caused by failure of the Lipschitz condition at equilibrium points of dynamical systems is introduced. It is shown that terminal chaos has a well organized probabilistic structure which can be predicted and controlled. This gives an opportunity to exploit this phenomenon for information processing. It appears that chaotic states of neurons activity are associated with higher level of cognitive processes such as generalization and abstraction.

  1. Chaos control using sliding-mode theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazzal, Jamal M. [Faculty of Engineering, Al-Ahliyya Amman University, Post Code 19328 Amman (Jordan)]. E-mail: jnazzal@ammanu.edu.jo; Natsheh, Ammar N. [Faculty of Engineering, Al-Ahliyya Amman University, Post Code 19328 Amman (Jordan)

    2007-07-15

    Chaos control means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, a nonlinear Sliding-Mode Controller (SMC) is presented. Two nonlinear chaotic systems are chosen to be our case study in this paper, the well known Chua's circuit and Lorenz system. The study shows the effectiveness of the designed nonlinear Sliding-Mode Controller.

  2. Chaos control in traffic flow models

    CERN Document Server

    Shahverdiev, E M; Shahverdiev, Elman Mohammed; Tadaki, Shin-ichi

    1998-01-01

    Chaos control in some of the one- and two-dimensional traffic flow dynamical models in the mean field theory is studied.One dimensional model is investigated taking into account the effect of random delay. Two dimensional model takes into account the effects of overpasses, symmetric distribution of cars and blockages of cars moving in the same direction. Chaos synchronization is performed within both replica and nonreplica approaches, and using parameter perturbation method.

  3. Chaos in World Politics: A Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Manuel Alberto Martins; Filipe, José António Candeias Bonito; Coelho, Manuel F. P.; Pedro, Isabel C.

    Chaos theory results from natural scientists' findings in the area of non-linear dynamics. The importance of related models has increased in the last decades, by studying the temporal evolution of non-linear systems. In consequence, chaos is one of the concepts that most rapidly have been expanded in what research topics respects. Considering that relationships in non-linear systems are unstable, chaos theory aims to understand and to explain this kind of unpredictable aspects of nature, social life, the uncertainties, the nonlinearities, the disorders and confusion, scientifically it represents a disarray connection, but basically it involves much more than that. The existing close relationship between change and time seems essential to understand what happens in the basics of chaos theory. In fact, this theory got a crucial role in the explanation of many phenomena. The relevance of this kind of theories has been well recognized to explain social phenomena and has permitted new advances in the study of social systems. Chaos theory has also been applied, particularly in the context of politics, in this area. The goal of this chapter is to make a reflection on chaos theory - and dynamical systems such as the theories of complexity - in terms of the interpretation of political issues, considering some kind of events in the political context and also considering the macro-strategic ideas of states positioning in the international stage.

  4. Lagrangian structures, integrability and chaos for 3D dynamical equations[45.20.Jj Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics; 02.30.Ik Integrable systems; 05.45.Ac Low-dimensional chaos;

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Miguel D [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago, Chile (Chile); Hojman, Sergio A [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago, Chile (Chile)

    2003-01-10

    In this paper, we consider the general setting for constructing action principles for three-dimensional first-order autonomous equations. We present the results for some integrable and non-integrable cases of the Lotka-Volterra equation, and show Lagrangian descriptions which are valid for systems satisfying Shil'nikov criteria on the existence of strange attractors, though chaotic behaviour has not been verified up to now. The Euler-Lagrange equations we get for these systems usually present 'time reparametrization' invariance, though other kinds of invariance may be found according to the kernel of the associated symplectic 2-form. The formulation of a Hamiltonian structure (Poisson brackets and Hamiltonians) for these systems from the Lagrangian viewpoint leads to a method of finding new constants of the motion starting from known ones, which is applied to some systems found in the literature known to possess a constant of the motion, to find the other and thus showing their integrability. In particular, we show that the so-called ABC system is completely integrable if it possesses one constant of the motion.

  5. Lagrangian structures, integrability and chaos for 3D dynamical equations 45.20.Jj Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics; 02.30.Ik Integrable systems; 05.45.Ac Low-dimensional chaos;

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, M D

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the general setting for constructing action principles for three-dimensional first-order autonomous equations. We present the results for some integrable and non-integrable cases of the Lotka-Volterra equation, and show Lagrangian descriptions which are valid for systems satisfying Shil'nikov criteria on the existence of strange attractors, though chaotic behaviour has not been verified up to now. The Euler-Lagrange equations we get for these systems usually present 'time reparametrization' invariance, though other kinds of invariance may be found according to the kernel of the associated symplectic 2-form. The formulation of a Hamiltonian structure (Poisson brackets and Hamiltonians) for these systems from the Lagrangian viewpoint leads to a method of finding new constants of the motion starting from known ones, which is applied to some systems found in the literature known to possess a constant of the motion, to find the other and thus showing their integrability. In particular, w...

  6. Centrifugation-based Purification of Emerging Low-dimensional Materials and Their Thin-film Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung Woo

    Polydispersity in low-dimensional materials offers many interesting challenges and properties. In particular, the one- and two-dimensional carbon allotropes such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have demonstrated exquisite optoelectronic properties that are highly sensitive to their physical structures, where subtle variations in diameter and thickness render them with significantly different electronic band structures. Thus, the carbon nanomaterials have been the subject of extensive studies that address their polydispersity issues. Among these, solution-phase, buoyant density-based methods such as density gradient ultracentrifugation have been widely utilized to enrich subpopulations of carbon nanotubes and graphene with narrow distribution in diameter and thickness, enabling their applications in various next-generation thin-film devices. In this thesis, I present further advancement of centrifugation-based processing methods for emerging low-dimensional materials through systematic utilization of previously explored surfactant systems, development of novel surfactant types, and study of correlation between the chemical structure of surfactants and the dispersion and optoelectronic properties of the nanomaterials. First, I employ an iterative density gradient ultracentrifugation with a combination of anionic surfactants and addition of excess counter-ions to achieve isolation of novel diameter species of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. The purification of carbon nanotubes with simultaneous, ultrahigh-purity refinement in electronic type and diameter distribution leads to collaborative studies on heat distribution characteristics and diameter-dependent direct current and radio frequency performances in monodisperse carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. Next, I develop the use of non-ionic polymeric surfactants for centrifugation-based processes. Specifically, I utilize polypropylene and polyethylene oxide-based block copolymers with density

  7. Construction of four low-dimensional NIR-luminescence-tunable Yb(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Xiu-Xia; Li, Teng; Yang, Jian; Wei, Lei-Ming; Zhang, Li-Guo; Lin, Xiao-Ming; Cai, Yue-Peng

    2014-10-07

    Four low-dimensional ytterbium(iii)-organic compounds through hydrothermal reactions of quinoline-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (2,3-H2qldc) and oxalic acid (H2ox) with Yb2O3, namely, [Yb(2,3-qldc)(ox)1/2(H2O)3·(H2O)4]n (1), [Yb(2,3-qldc)(ox)1/2(H2O)2·(H2O)2]n (2), [Yb(2,3-Hqldc)(ox)(H2O)2·(H2O)]n (3) and [Yb(2,3-Hqldc)(ox)(H2O)·(H2O)2]n (4), were first synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis (EA), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. When the reactant ratio of 2,3-H2qldc : H2ox : Yb2O3 is 2 : 1 : 1, 1-D chain-like complex 1 with three coordinated water molecules around the Yb(iii) ion was obtained in mixed solvents of H2O and CH3OH (v : v = 10 : 1) at 70 °C, and with the increase of temperature to 100 °C, the same reactants gave 2-D 6(3) topological layer-like complex 2 with two coordinated water molecules in the coordination sphere of the Yb(iii) ion. However, when the reactant ratio was changed to 1 : 1 : 1, two 2-D 6(3) topological layer-like complexes 3 (70 °C) and 4 (100 °C) were obtained at different temperatures, in which the coordination water molecules in 3 and 4 are two and one, respectively. Obviously, these results reveal that the reaction temperature and reactant ratios play critical roles in the structural direction of these low-dimensional compounds. Interestingly, with the gradual loss of coordination water molecules to the Yb(iii) ion, the near infrared (NIR) emission of four Yb(iii)-based compounds 1-4 can be gradually strengthened with increasing order of 1 complexes have tunable near infrared luminescence.

  8. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Thin Film Growth Techniques for Low-Dimensional Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, S; Dobson, P; Neave, J; Arrott, A

    1987-01-01

    This work represents the account of a NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Thin Film Growth Techniques for Low Dimensional Structures", held at the University of Sussex, Brighton, England from 15-19 Sept. 1986. The objective of the workshop was to review the problems of the growth and characterisation of thin semiconductor and metal layers. Recent advances in deposition techniques have made it possible to design new material which is based on ultra-thin layers and this is now posing challenges for scientists, technologists and engineers in the assessment and utilisation of such new material. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has become well established as a method for growing thin single crystal layers of semiconductors. Until recently, MBE was confined to the growth of III-V compounds and alloys, but now it is being used for group IV semiconductors and II-VI compounds. Examples of such work are given in this volume. MBE has one major advantage over other crystal growth techniques in that the structure of the growi...

  9. Nucleation kinetics of the formation of low dimensional calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals in isopropyl alcohol medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhya, S.; Sureshbabu, S.; Varma, H.K.; Komath, Manoj [Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum 695 012 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Calcium sulfate dihydrate, constituted as uniform crystals of low dimensions, is a potential biomaterial for clinical applications like bone graft substitution and drug delivery. In this work, isopropyl alcohol has been used as a solvent to obtain low dimensional calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals from calcium nitrate - sulfuric acid system. Reactants in 0.5 molar concentration at ambient conditions generated uniform rod-shaped crystals of length 3-5 {mu}m. Analysis using X-ray Diffractometry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry showed the material to be well crystallized, phase-pure calcium sulfate dihydrate. The nucleation kinetics has been studied by observing the induction time of phase formation in solutions of millimolar concentrations through turbidimetry at 300 K. The data have been analysed using classical nucleation theory to deduce parameters like interfacial tension (or surface free energy), nucleation rate and critical radius. The surface free energy obtained (5.6 mJ/m{sup 2}) is comparatively lower than that reported for aqueous precipitation, which could be attributed to the presence of isopropyl alcohol. On escalating the supersaturation ratio, the nucleation rate drastically increased and the critical radius decreased exponentially. Particles formed at supersaturation 1.39 showed a monomodal distribution centered at 8.2 nm in Dynamic Light Scattering analysis. Comparable particle sizes were obtained in Transmission Electron Microscopy. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Low-Dimensional-Networked Metal Halide Perovskites: The Next Big Thing

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaminov, Makhsud I.

    2017-03-03

    Low-dimensional-networked (low-DN) perovskite derivatives are bulk quantum materials in which charge carriers are localized within ordered metal halide sheets, rods, or clusters that are separated by cationic lattices. After two decades of hibernation, this class of semiconductors reemerged in the past two years, largely catalyzed by the interest in alternative, more stable absorbers to CH3NH3PbI3-type perovskites in photovoltaics. Whether low-DN perovskites will surpass other photovoltaic technologies remains to be seen, but their impressively high photo- and electroluminescence yields have already set new benchmarks in light emission applications. Here we offer our perspective on the most exciting advances in materials design of low-DN perovskites for energy- and optoelectronic-related applications. The next few years will usher in an explosive growth in this tribe of quantum materials, as only a few members have been synthesized, while the potential library of compositions and structures is believed to be much larger and is yet to be discovered.

  11. Correlation of Photocatalytic Activity with Band Structure of Low-dimensional Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanke

    Photocatalytic hydrogen generation by water splitting is a promising technique to produce clean and renewable solar fuel. The development of effective semiconductor photocatalysts to obtain efficient photocatalytic activity is the key objective. However, two critical reasons prevent wide applications of semiconductor photocatalysts: low light usage efficiency and high rates of charge recombination. In this dissertation, several low-dimensional semiconductors were synthesized with hydrothermal, hydrolysis, and chemical impregnation methods. The band structures of the low-dimensional semiconductor materials were engineered to overcome the above mentioned two shortcomings. In addition, the correlation between the photocatalytic activity of the low-dimensional semiconductor materials and their band structures were studied. First, we studied the effect of oxygen vacancies on the photocatalytic activity of one-dimensional anatase TiO2 nanobelts. Given that the oxygen vacancy plays a significant role in band structure and photocatalytic performance of semiconductors, oxygen vacancies were introduced into the anatase TiO2 nanobelts during reduction in H2 at high temperature. The oxygen vacancies of the TiO2 nanobelts boosted visible-light-responsive photocatalytic activity but weakened ultraviolet-light-responsive photocatalytic activity. As oxygen vacancies are commonly introduced by dopants, these results give insight into why doping is not always beneficial to the overall photocatalytic performance despite increases in absorption. Second, we improved the photocatalytic performance of two-dimensional lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2 O7) nanosheets, which are widely studied as an efficient photocatalyst due to the unique layered crystal structure. Nitrogen was doped into the La2Ti2O7 nanosheets and then Pt nanoparticles were loaded onto the La2Ti2O7 nanosheets. Doping nitrogen narrowed the band gap of the La2Ti 2O7 nanosheets by introducing a continuum of states by the valence

  12. Evidence of low dimensional ion transport in mechanosynthesized nanocrystalline BaMgF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preishuber-Pflügl, F; Wilkening, M

    2014-07-14

    Mechanochemical milling provides a versatile method for the preparation of nano-sized, defect rich, polycrystalline materials. If ionic materials are considered, the transport parameters of the mobile ions may greatly differ from those of the microcrystalline counterparts prepared by conventional synthesis routes. Little is known about ionic conduction in nanocrystalline materials having crystal structures that offer spatially confined transport pathways. Here, we focused on mechanosynthesized BaMgF4 that combines both nanocrystallinity and anisotropic F(-) transport. The preparation of nanocrystalline BaMgF4 is presented as a facile and rapid one-pot procedure. The reaction was followed by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NMR helped prove the formation of X-ray amorphous compounds as well as the transformation of the starting materials into the final product BaMgF4. Most importantly, besides enhanced conduction properties compared to a single crystal, our broadband impedance spectra reveal characteristics pointing to anisotropic (low dimensional) ion transport processes even in the nanocrystalline form of BaMgF4.

  13. Low-dimensional q-Tori in FPU Lattices: Dynamics and Localization Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Christodoulidi, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This is a continuation of our study concerning q-tori, i.e. tori of low dimensionality in the phase space of nonlinear lattice models like the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) model. In our previous work we focused on the beta FPU system, and we showed that the dynamical features of the q-tori serve as an interpretational tool to understand phenomena of energy localization in the FPU space of linear normal modes. In the present paper i) we employ the method of Poincare - Lindstedt series, for a fixed set of frequencies, in order to compute an explicit quasi-periodic representation of the trajectories lying on q-tori in the alpha model, and ii) we consider more general types of initial excitations in both the alpha and beta models. Furthermore we turn into questions of physical interest related to the dynamical features of the q-tori. We focus on particular q-tori solutions describing low-frequency `packets' of modes, and excitations of a small set of modes with an arbitrary distribution in q-space. In the former case, ...

  14. Low-dimensional recurrent neural network-based Kalman filter for speech enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Youshen; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a new recurrent neural network-based Kalman filter for speech enhancement, based on a noise-constrained least squares estimate. The parameters of speech signal modeled as autoregressive process are first estimated by using the proposed recurrent neural network and the speech signal is then recovered from Kalman filtering. The proposed recurrent neural network is globally asymptomatically stable to the noise-constrained estimate. Because the noise-constrained estimate has a robust performance against non-Gaussian noise, the proposed recurrent neural network-based speech enhancement algorithm can minimize the estimation error of Kalman filter parameters in non-Gaussian noise. Furthermore, having a low-dimensional model feature, the proposed neural network-based speech enhancement algorithm has a much faster speed than two existing recurrent neural networks-based speech enhancement algorithms. Simulation results show that the proposed recurrent neural network-based speech enhancement algorithm can produce a good performance with fast computation and noise reduction.

  15. Quantum transport equations for low-dimensional multiband electronic systems: I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupčić, I; Rukelj, Z; Barišić, S

    2013-04-10

    A systematic method of calculating the dynamical conductivity tensor in a general multiband electronic model with strong boson-mediated electron-electron interactions is described. The theory is based on the exact semiclassical expression for the coupling between valence electrons and electromagnetic fields and on the self-consistent Bethe-Salpeter equations for the electron-hole propagators. The general diagrammatic perturbation expressions for the intraband and interband single-particle conductivity are determined. The relations between the intraband Bethe-Salpeter equation, the quantum transport equation and the ordinary transport equation are briefly discussed within the memory-function approximation. The effects of the Lorentz dipole-dipole interactions on the dynamical conductivity of low-dimensional spα models are described in the same approximation. Such formalism proves useful in studies of different (pseudo)gapped states of quasi-one-dimensional systems with the metal-to-insulator phase transitions and can be easily extended to underdoped two-dimensional high-Tc superconductors.

  16. High Field Magnetization Studies of Low Dimensional Heisenberg S = 1/2 Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landee, C. P.; Turnbull, M. M.

    1998-03-01

    The magnetization curves of a number of low dimensional S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnets have been determined in fields up to 30 tesla at low temperatures at the National High Magnetic Fields Laboratory. Materials studied include a family of 1D materials, based upon Cu(pyrazine)(NO_3)_2, 2D magnets consisting of pyrazine-bridged copper layers, and several spin ladders with singlet ground states. All of the magnetization data show upward curvature and are well described by T = 0 calculations based upon finite cluster models(Bonner and Fisher, Phys. Rev. A135, 640 (1964); Yang and Mutter, NANL cond-mat/9610092.). Chemical substitution on the pyrazine rings permits the variation of exchange constants by more than 25 percent for the family of well isolated chains. The spin ladder systems consist of ferromagnetic dimers weakly connected by antiferromagnetic intradimer interactions. Field induced transitions are seen at fields of less than one tesla for each of the three compounds.

  17. Learning Low Dimensional Convolutional Neural Networks for High-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixun Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning powerful feature representations for image retrieval has always been a challenging task in the field of remote sensing. Traditional methods focus on extracting low-level hand-crafted features which are not only time-consuming but also tend to achieve unsatisfactory performance due to the complexity of remote sensing images. In this paper, we investigate how to extract deep feature representations based on convolutional neural networks (CNNs for high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval (HRRSIR. To this end, several effective schemes are proposed to generate powerful feature representations for HRRSIR. In the first scheme, a CNN pre-trained on a different problem is treated as a feature extractor since there are no sufficiently-sized remote sensing datasets to train a CNN from scratch. In the second scheme, we investigate learning features that are specific to our problem by first fine-tuning the pre-trained CNN on a remote sensing dataset and then proposing a novel CNN architecture based on convolutional layers and a three-layer perceptron. The novel CNN has fewer parameters than the pre-trained and fine-tuned CNNs and can learn low dimensional features from limited labelled images. The schemes are evaluated on several challenging, publicly available datasets. The results indicate that the proposed schemes, particularly the novel CNN, achieve state-of-the-art performance.

  18. Expressive body movement responses to music are coherent, consistent, and low dimensional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelynck, Denis; Maes, Pieter-Jan; Martens, Jean Pierre; Leman, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Embodied music cognition stresses the role of the human body as mediator for the encoding and decoding of musical expression. In this paper, we set up a low dimensional functional model that accounts for 70% of the variability in the expressive body movement responses to music. With the functional principal component analysis, we modeled individual body movements as a linear combination of a group average and a number of eigenfunctions. The group average and the eigenfunctions are common to all subjects and make up what we call the commonalities. An individual performance is then characterized by a set of scores (the individualities), one score per eigenfunction. The model is based on experimental data which finds high levels of coherence/consistency between participants when grouped according to musical education. This shows an ontogenetic effect. Participants without formal musical education focus on the torso for the expression of basic musical structure (tempo). Musically trained participants decode additional structural elements in the music and focus on body parts having more degrees of freedom (such as the hands). Our results confirm earlier studies that different body parts move differently along with the music.

  19. Relating high dimensional stochastic complex systems to low-dimensional intermittency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Ruelas, Alvaro; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft; Piovani, Duccio; Robledo, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    We evaluate the implication and outlook of an unanticipated simplification in the macroscopic behavior of two high-dimensional sto-chastic models: the Replicator Model with Mutations and the Tangled Nature Model (TaNa) of evolutionary ecology. This simplification consists of the apparent display of low-dimensional dynamics in the non-stationary intermittent time evolution of the model on a coarse-grained scale. Evolution on this time scale spans generations of individuals, rather than single reproduction, death or mutation events. While a local one-dimensional map close to a tangent bifurcation can be derived from a mean-field version of the TaNa model, a nonlinear dynamical model consisting of successive tangent bifurcations generates time evolution patterns resembling those of the full TaNa model. To advance the interpretation of this finding, here we consider parallel results on a game-theoretic version of the TaNa model that in discrete time yields a coupled map lattice. This in turn is represented, a la Langevin, by a one-dimensional nonlinear map. Among various kinds of behaviours we obtain intermittent evolution associated with tangent bifurcations. We discuss our results.

  20. Low-Dimensional Long-Range Topological Charge Structure in the QCD Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, I; Draper, T; Lee, F X; Liu, K F; Mathur, N; Thacker, H B; Zhang, J B

    2003-01-01

    While sign-coherent 4-dimensional structures cannot dominate topological charge fluctuations in the QCD vacuum at all scales due to reflection positivity, it is possible that enhanced coherence exists over extended space-time regions of lower dimension. Using the overlap Dirac operator to calculate topological charge density, we present evidence for such structure in pure-glue SU(3) lattice gauge theory. It is found that a typical equilibrium configuration is dominated by two oppositely-charged sign-coherent connected structures (``sheets'') covering about 80% of space-time. Each sheet is built from elementary 3-d cubes connected through 2-d faces, and approximates a low-dimensional curved manifold (or possibly a fractal structure) embedded in the 4-d space. At the heart of the sheet is a ``skeleton'' formed by about 18% of the most intense space-time points organized into a super-long-distance structure, involving connected parts spreading over maximal possible distances. We find that the skeleton is locally...

  1. Comparison of Cox Model Methods in A Low-dimensional Setting with Few Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco M Ojeda; Christian Muller; Daniela Bornigen; David-Alexandre Tregouet; Arne Schillert; Matthias Heinig; Tanja Zeller; Renate B Schnabel

    2016-01-01

    Prognostic models based on survival data frequently make use of the Cox proportional hazards model. Developing reliable Cox models with few events relative to the number of predictors can be challenging, even in low-dimensional datasets, with a much larger number of observations than variables. In such a setting we examined the performance of methods used to estimate a Cox model, including (i) full model using all available predictors and estimated by standard tech-niques, (ii) backward elimination (BE), (iii) ridge regression, (iv) least absolute shrinkage and selec-tion operator (lasso), and (v) elastic net. Based on a prospective cohort of patients with manifest coronary artery disease (CAD), we performed a simulation study to compare the predictive accu-racy, calibration, and discrimination of these approaches. Candidate predictors for incident cardio-vascular events we used included clinical variables, biomarkers, and a selection of genetic variants associated with CAD. The penalized methods, i.e., ridge, lasso, and elastic net, showed a compara-ble performance, in terms of predictive accuracy, calibration, and discrimination, and outperformed BE and the full model. Excessive shrinkage was observed in some cases for the penalized methods, mostly on the simulation scenarios having the lowest ratio of a number of events to the number of variables. We conclude that in similar settings, these three penalized methods can be used interchangeably. The full model and backward elimination are not recommended in rare event scenarios.

  2. Comparison of Cox Model Methods in A Low-dimensional Setting with Few Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M. Ojeda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic models based on survival data frequently make use of the Cox proportional hazards model. Developing reliable Cox models with few events relative to the number of predictors can be challenging, even in low-dimensional datasets, with a much larger number of observations than variables. In such a setting we examined the performance of methods used to estimate a Cox model, including (i full model using all available predictors and estimated by standard techniques, (ii backward elimination (BE, (iii ridge regression, (iv least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso, and (v elastic net. Based on a prospective cohort of patients with manifest coronary artery disease (CAD, we performed a simulation study to compare the predictive accuracy, calibration, and discrimination of these approaches. Candidate predictors for incident cardiovascular events we used included clinical variables, biomarkers, and a selection of genetic variants associated with CAD. The penalized methods, i.e., ridge, lasso, and elastic net, showed a comparable performance, in terms of predictive accuracy, calibration, and discrimination, and outperformed BE and the full model. Excessive shrinkage was observed in some cases for the penalized methods, mostly on the simulation scenarios having the lowest ratio of a number of events to the number of variables. We conclude that in similar settings, these three penalized methods can be used interchangeably. The full model and backward elimination are not recommended in rare event scenarios.

  3. Enhancement of light depolarization by random ensembles of titania-based low-dimensional nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Zdrajevsky, R. A.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Ushakova, O. V.; Angelsky, O. V.; Yermolenko, S. B.

    2015-02-01

    Depolarization peculiarities of the light scattered by the random ensembles of titania-based low-dimensional nanoparticles are studied during the experiments with aqueous suspensions of potassium polytitanate nanoplatelets and nanoribbons. The obtained experimental results are compared with the theoretical data obtained for the random systems of oblate and prolate flattened ellipsoidal nanoparticles with various values of the shape factor and dielectric function corresponding the parent material (titanium dioxide). The possibility to recover the effective dielectric function from the depolarization ratio spectra using the ellipsoidal shape model is considered. Ellipsoidal approximation is appropriate for both the nanoplatelets and nanoribbons in the spectral region for which the real part of nanoparticles permittivity is sufficiently negative and the near-resonant excitation of longitudinal mode of charge oscillations in nanoparticles occurs. Also, ellipsoidal approximation is appropriate for nanoplatelets in the region of sufficiently po sitive real part of permittivity but gives remarkably underestimated values of the depolarization ratio for nanoribbons in the region. This is presumably caused by considerable difference in the light-induced charge distributions for nanoribbons and prolate flattened ellipsoidal nanoparticles with the decreasing efficiency in longitudinal mode excitation. The recovered values of nanoparticle permittivity exhibit the red shift with respect to the permittivity values of the parent material due to its modification in the course of nanoparticles synthesis.

  4. A low-dimensional tool for predicting force decomposition coefficients for varying inflow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    We develop a low-dimensional tool to predict the effects of unsteadiness in the inflow on force coefficients acting on a circular cylinder using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes from steady flow simulations. The approach is based on combining POD and linear stochastic estimator (LSE) techniques. We use POD to derive a reduced-order model (ROM) to reconstruct the velocity field. To overcome the difficulty of developing a ROM using Poisson\\'s equation, we relate the pressure field to the velocity field through a mapping function based on LSE. The use of this approach to derive force decomposition coefficients (FDCs) under unsteady mean flow from basis functions of the steady flow is illustrated. For both steady and unsteady cases, the final outcome is a representation of the lift and drag coefficients in terms of velocity and pressure temporal coefficients. Such a representation could serve as the basis for implementing control strategies or conducting uncertainty quantification. Copyright © 2013 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  5. Emerging Low-Dimensional Materials for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Guo, Qiangbing; Qiu, Jianrong

    2017-02-22

    Low-dimensional (LD) materials demonstrate intriguing optical properties, which lead to applications in diverse fields, such as photonics, biomedicine and energy. Due to modulation of electronic structure by the reduced structural dimensionality, LD versions of metal, semiconductor and topological insulators (TIs) at the same time bear distinct nonlinear optical (NLO) properties as compared with their bulk counterparts. Their interaction with short pulse laser excitation exhibits a strong nonlinear character manifested by NLO absorption, giving rise to optical limiting or saturated absorption associated with excited state absorption and Pauli blocking in different materials. In particular, the saturable absorption of these emerging LD materials including two-dimensional semiconductors as well as colloidal TI nanoparticles has recently been utilized for Q-switching and mode-locking ultra-short pulse generation across the visible, near infrared and middle infrared wavelength regions. Beside the large operation bandwidth, these ultrafast photonics applications are especially benefit from the high recovery rate as well as the facile processibility of these LD materials. The prominent NLO response of these LD materials have also provided new avenues for the development of novel NLO and photonics devices for all-optical control as well as optical circuits beyond ultrafast lasers.

  6. Genome chaos: survival strategy during crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo; Stevens, Joshua B; Horne, Steven D; Abdallah, Batoul Y; Ye, Karen J; Bremer, Steven W; Ye, Christine J; Chen, David J; Heng, Henry H

    2014-01-01

    Genome chaos, a process of complex, rapid genome re-organization, results in the formation of chaotic genomes, which is followed by the potential to establish stable genomes. It was initially detected through cytogenetic analyses, and recently confirmed by whole-genome sequencing efforts which identified multiple subtypes including "chromothripsis", "chromoplexy", "chromoanasynthesis", and "chromoanagenesis". Although genome chaos occurs commonly in tumors, both the mechanism and detailed aspects of the process are unknown due to the inability of observing its evolution over time in clinical samples. Here, an experimental system to monitor the evolutionary process of genome chaos was developed to elucidate its mechanisms. Genome chaos occurs following exposure to chemotherapeutics with different mechanisms, which act collectively as stressors. Characterization of the karyotype and its dynamic changes prior to, during, and after induction of genome chaos demonstrates that chromosome fragmentation (C-Frag) occurs just prior to chaotic genome formation. Chaotic genomes seem to form by random rejoining of chromosomal fragments, in part through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Stress induced genome chaos results in increased karyotypic heterogeneity. Such increased evolutionary potential is demonstrated by the identification of increased transcriptome dynamics associated with high levels of karyotypic variance. In contrast to impacting on a limited number of cancer genes, re-organized genomes lead to new system dynamics essential for cancer evolution. Genome chaos acts as a mechanism of rapid, adaptive, genome-based evolution that plays an essential role in promoting rapid macroevolution of new genome-defined systems during crisis, which may explain some unwanted consequences of cancer treatment.

  7. Synchrotron Studies of Narrow Band and Low-Dimensional Materials. Final Report for July 1, 1990---December 31, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J. W.

    2003-05-13

    This report summarizes a 12-year program of various kinds of synchrotron spectroscopies directed at the electronic structures of narrow band and low-dimensional materials that display correlated electron behaviors such as metal-insulator transitions, mixed valence, superconductivity, Kondo moment quenching, heavy Fermions, and non-Fermi liquid properties.

  8. Low-dimensional modeling of hillslope sub-surface flow processes : developing and testing the hillslope-storage Boussinesq model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilberts, A.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Key words: hillslope hydrology, low-dimensional modeling, Boussinesq equation, Richards equation, water table dynamics.In this thesis the focus is on investigating the hillslope hydrological behavior, as a crucial part in understanding the catchment hydrological response. To overcome difficulties as

  9. Chaos in Black holes Surrounded by Electromagnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Santoprete, Manuele; Cicogna, Giampaolo

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we prove the occurence of chaos for charged particles moving around a Schwarzshild black hole, perturbed by uniform electric and magnetic fields. The appearance of chaos is studied resorting to the Poincare'-Melnikov method.

  10. 2nd International Symposium on Chaos, Complexity and Leadership

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Santo

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings from the 2013 symposium on "Chaos, complexity and leadership" reflect current research results from all branches of Chaos, Complex Systems and their applications in Management. Included are the diverse results in the fields of applied nonlinear methods, modeling of data and simulations, as well as theoretical achievements of Chaos and Complex Systems. Also highlighted are Leadership and Management applications of Chaos and Complexity Theory.

  11. Some Remarks on Distributional Chaos for Linear Operators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN GENG; Hou BING-ZHE; Ji You-qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we consider some properties for bounded linear operators concerning distributional chaos.Norm-unimodality of bounded linear operators implies distributional chaos.Some properties such as similarity and spectra description for norm-unimodal operators are considered.The existence of distributional chaos in nest algebra is also proved.In addition,we obtain a sufficient and necessary condition of distributional chaos for a class of operators,which contains unilateral backward weighted shift operators.

  12. Controlling Beam Halo-chaos Using a Special Nonlinear Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Beam halo-chaos in high-current accelerators has become a key concerned issue because it can cause excessive radioactivity from the accelerators therefore significantly limits their applications in industry,medicine, and national defense. Some general engineering methods for chaos control have been developedin recent years, but they generally are unsuccessful for beam halo-chaos suppression due to manytechnical constraints. Beam halo-chaos is essentially a spatotemporal chaotic motion within a high power

  13. Regularly timed events amid chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Cooper, Roy M.; Corron, Ned J.

    2015-11-01

    We show rigorously that the solutions of a class of chaotic oscillators are characterized by regularly timed events in which the derivative of the solution is instantaneously zero. The perfect regularity of these events is in stark contrast with the well-known unpredictability of chaos. We explore some consequences of these regularly timed events through experiments using chaotic electronic circuits. First, we show that a feedback loop can be implemented to phase lock the regularly timed events to a periodic external signal. In this arrangement the external signal regulates the timing of the chaotic signal but does not strictly lock its phase. That is, phase slips of the chaotic oscillation persist without disturbing timing of the regular events. Second, we couple the regularly timed events of one chaotic oscillator to those of another. A state of synchronization is observed where the oscillators exhibit synchronized regular events while their chaotic amplitudes and phases evolve independently. Finally, we add additional coupling to synchronize the amplitudes, as well, however in the opposite direction illustrating the independence of the amplitudes from the regularly timed events.

  14. Target-oriented chaos control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattani, Justine [Centre for Mathematical Biology, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Blake, Jack C.H. [Centre for Mathematical Biology, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Hilker, Frank M., E-mail: f.hilker@bath.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematical Biology, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-31

    Designing intervention methods to control chaotic behavior in dynamical systems remains a challenging problem, in particular for systems that are difficult to access or to measure. We propose a simple, intuitive technique that modifies the values of the state variables directly toward a certain target. The intervention takes into account the difference to the target value, and is a combination of traditional proportional feedback and constant feedback methods. It proves particularly useful when the target corresponds to the equilibrium of the uncontrolled system, and is available or can be estimated from expert knowledge (e.g. in biology and economy). -- Highlights: → We propose a chaos control method that forces the system to a certain target. → The intervention takes into account the difference to the target value. → It can be seen as a combination of proportional and constant feedback methods. → The method is very robust and highly efficient in the long-term. → It is particularly applicable when suitable target values are known or available.

  15. The Capabilities of Chaos and Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Abel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To what degree could chaos and complexity have organized a Peptide or RNA World of crude yet necessarily integrated protometabolism? How far could such protolife evolve in the absence of a heritable linear digital symbol system that could mutate, instruct, regulate, optimize and maintain metabolic homeostasis? To address these questions, chaos, complexity, self-ordered states, and organization must all be carefully defined and distinguished. In addition their cause-and-effect relationships and mechanisms of action must be delineated. Are there any formal (non physical, abstract, conceptual, algorithmic components to chaos, complexity, self-ordering and organization, or are they entirely physicodynamic (physical, mass/energy interaction alone? Chaos and complexity can produce some fascinating self-ordered phenomena. But can spontaneous chaos and complexity steer events and processes toward pragmatic benefit, select function over non function, optimize algorithms, integrate circuits, produce computational halting, organize processes into formal systems, control and regulate existing systems toward greater efficiency? The question is pursued of whether there might be some yet-to-be discovered new law of biology that will elucidate the derivation of prescriptive information and control. “System” will be rigorously defined. Can a low-informational rapid succession of Prigogine’s dissipative structures self-order into bona fide organization?

  16. Generic superweak chaos induced by Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Harush, Moti; Dana, Itzhack

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and study the "kicked Hall system" (KHS), i.e., charged particles periodically kicked in the presence of uniform magnetic (B) and electric (E) fields that are perpendicular to each other and to the kicking direction. We show that for resonant values of B and E and in the weak-chaos regime of sufficiently small nonintegrability parameter κ (the kicking strength), there exists a generic family of periodic kicking potentials for which the Hall effect from B and E significantly suppresses the weak chaos, replacing it by "superweak" chaos (SWC). This means that the system behaves as if the kicking strength were κ^{2} rather than κ. For E=0, SWC is known to be a classical fingerprint of quantum antiresonance, but it occurs under much less generic conditions, in particular only for very special kicking potentials. Manifestations of SWC are a decrease in the instability of periodic orbits and a narrowing of the chaotic layers, relative to the ordinary weak-chaos case. Also, for global SWC, taking place on an infinite "stochastic web" in phase space, the chaotic diffusion on the web is much slower than the weak-chaos one. Thus, the Hall effect can be relatively stabilizing for small κ. In some special cases, the effect is shown to cause ballistic motion for almost all parameter values. The generic global SWC on stochastic webs in the KHS appears to be the two-dimensional closest analog to the Arnol'd web in higher dimensional systems.

  17. Phosphate tungsten bronze series: crystallographic and structural properties of low-dimensional conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, P; Pérez, O; Labbé, P

    2001-10-01

    Phosphate tungsten bronzes have been shown to be conductors of low dimensionality. A review of the crystallographic and structural properties of this huge series of compounds is given here, corresponding to the present knowledge of the different X-ray studies and electron microscopy investigations. Three main families are described, monophosphate tungsten bronzes, Ax(PO2)4(WO3)2m, either with pentagonal tunnels (MPTBp) or with hexagonal tunnels (MPTBh), and diphosphate tungsten bronzes, Ax(P2O4)2(WO3)2m, mainly with hexagonal tunnels (DPTBh). The general aspect of these crystal structures may be described as a building of polyhedra sharing oxygen corners made of regular stacking of WO3-type slabs with a thickness function of m, joined by slices of tetrahedral PO4 phosphate or P2O7 diphosphate groups. The relations of the different slabs with respect to the basic perovskite structure are mentioned. The structural description is focused on the tilt phenomenon of the WO6 octahedra inside a slab of WO3-type. In this respect, a comparison with the different phases of the WO3 crystal structures is established. The various modes of tilting and the different possible connections between two adjacent WO3-type slabs involve a great variety of structures with different symmetries, as well as the existence of numerous twins in MPTBp's. Several phase transitions, with the appearance of diffuse scattering and modulation phenomena, were analysed by X-ray scattering measurements and through the temperature dependence of various physical properties for the MPTBp's. The role of the W displacements within the WO3-type slabs, in two modulated structures (m = 4 and m = 10), already solved, is discussed. Finally, the complexity of the structural aspects of DPTBh's is explained on the basis of the average structures which are the only ones solved.

  18. Metastable Phases and Dynamics of Low-Dimensional Strongly-Correlated Atomic Quantum Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielawa, Susanne

    In this thesis we theoretically study low-dimensional, strongly correlated systems of cold atoms, which are not in an equilibrium situation. This is motivated by recent experimental progress, which has made it possible to study quantum many-body physics in a controllable and clean setting; and parameters can be changed during the experiment. In Chapter 2 and 3 we study phases and quantum phase transitions of 'tilted' Mott insulator of bosons. We analyze a variety of lattices and tilt directions in two dimensions: square, decorated square, triangular, and kagome. We show that there are rich possibilities for correlated phases with non-trivial entanglement of pseudospin degrees of freedom encoded in the boson density. For certain configurations three-body interactions are necessary to ensure that the energy of the effective resonant subspace is bounded from below. We find quantum phases with Ising density wave order, with superfluidity transverse to the tilt direction, a quantum liquid state with no broken symmetry. We also find cases for which the resonant subspace is described by effective quantum dimer models. In Chapter 4 we study spin 1/2 chains with a Heisenberg interaction which are coupled in a way that would arise if they are taken off graphene at a zig-zag edge. In Chapter 5 we theoretically analyze interference patterns of parametrically driven one-dimensional cold atomic systems. The parametric driving leads to spatial oscillations in the interference patter, which can be analyzed to obtain the sound velocity of the 1d system, and to probe spin-charge separation.

  19. New developments in the theoretical treatment of low dimensional strongly correlated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andrew J A; Konik, Robert M; Lecheminant, Philippe; Robinson, Neil; Tsvelik, Alexei M

    2017-10-09

    We review two important non-perturbative approaches for extracting the physics of low- dimensional strongly correlated quantum systems. Firstly, we start by providing a comprehensive review of non-Abelian bosonization. This includes an introduction to the basic elements of confor- mal field theory as applied to systems with a current algebra, and we orient the reader by presenting a number of applications of non-Abelian bosonization to models with large symmetries. We then tie this technique into recent advances in the ability of cold atomic systems to realize complex symme- tries. Secondly, we discuss truncated spectrum methods for the numerical study of systems in one and two dimensions. For one-dimensional systems we provide the reader with considerable insight into the methodology by reviewing canonical applications of the technique to the Ising model (and its variants) and the sine-Gordon model. Following this we review recent work on the development of renormalization groups, both numerical and analytical, that alleviate the effects of truncating the spectrum. Using these technologies, we consider a number of applications to one-dimensional systems: properties of carbon nanotubes, quenches in the Lieb-Liniger model, 1+1D quantum chro- modynamics, as well as Landau-Ginzburg theories. In the final part we move our attention to consider truncated spectrum methods applied to two-dimensional systems. This involves combining truncated spectrum methods with matrix product state algorithms. We describe applications of this method to two-dimensional systems of free fermions and the quantum Ising model, including their non-equilibrium dynamics. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. Chaos Theory as a Model for Managing Issues and Crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Priscilla

    1996-01-01

    Uses chaos theory to model public relations situations in which the salient feature is volatility of public perceptions. Discusses the premises of chaos theory and applies them to issues management, the evolution of interest groups, crises, and rumors. Concludes that chaos theory is useful as an analogy to structure image problems and to raise…

  1. Chaos control and synchronization in a fractional neuron network system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Shangbo [Computer Department of Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Li Hua [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 (Canada)], E-mail: hua.li@uleth.ca; Zhu Zhengzhou [Computer Department of Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2008-05-15

    In this paper, an algorithm of numerical solution for fractional differential equations is presented. Chaos in a neuron network system is also illustrated. Moreover, chaos feedback control and synchronization systems are constructed. The study and experiment indicate that the chaos in fractional order neuron networks could be controlled and synchronized.

  2. Recent exp erimental progress in low-dimensional sup erconductors%低维超导的实验进展∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玺; 刘超飞; 王健

    2015-01-01

    Superconductivity is one of the most important research fields in condensed matter physics. The rapid develop-ment of material preparation technology in last few years has made the experimental study of low-dimensional physical superconducting properties feasible. This article gives a brief introduction on superconductivity and technology of low-dimensional material fabrication, and mainly focuses on the experimental progress in electrical transport studies on one-and two-dimensional superconductors, especially the results from our group. As for one-dimensional superconductivity, we review the superconductivities in single crystal Bi nanowires, crystalline Pb nano-belts, and amorphous W nanobelts, and the proximity effects in superconducting nanowires, metallic nanowires, and ferromagnetic nanowires. Surface su-perconductivity is revealed for crystalline Bi nanowire. The step-like voltage platforms in V-I curves are observed in Pb nano-belts and may be attributed to phase slip centers. Besides, vortex glass (VG) phase transition is discovered in amorphous W nano-belts. Inverse proximity effect is detected in crystalline Pb nanowires with normal electrodes, and proximity induced mini-gap is found in crystalline Au nanowire with superconducting electrodes. Furthermore, in crystalline ferromagnetic Co nanowire contacted by superconducting electrodes, unconventional long range proximity effect is observed. As for two-dimensional superconductivity, we review the superconductivities in Pb thin films on Si substrates, 2 atomic layer Ga films on GaN substrates, and one-unit-cell thick FeSe film on STO substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) method. By both in situ scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and ex situ transport and magnetization measurements, the two-atomic-layer Ga film with graphene-like structure on wide band-gap semiconductor GaN is found to be superconducting with Tc up to 5.4 K. By direct transport and magnetic measurements, the strong

  3. Applications of Chaos Sequence in Intelligent Transportation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network (VANET is an essential technology to improve safety and efficiency of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS, it provides vehicle to vehicle as well as vehicle to roadside unit (RSU wireless communications, so that on board unit (OBU located in vehicles can share messages related to road traffic with not only other OBU in the same VANET but also transportation management centre depending on retransmission of RSU. It is very important to detect and transmit real time messages of road traffic condition in VANET. This paper presents two application schemes for VANET based on chaos sequence: traffic flow forecast and vehicle secret communications. The principles of these schemes are introduced separately, and performances are verified by theoretical analysis and simulation.  

  4. Nonlinear Physics Integrability, Chaos and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshmanan, M

    1997-01-01

    Integrability and chaos are two of the main concepts associated with nonlinear physical systems which have revolutionized our understanding of them. Highly stable exponentially localized solitons are often associated with many of the important integrable nonlinear systems while motions which are sensitively dependent on initial conditions are associated with chaotic systems. Besides dramatically raising our perception of many natural phenomena, these concepts are opening up new vistas of applications and unfolding technologies: Optical soliton based information technology, magnetoelectronics, controlling and synchronization of chaos and secure communications, to name a few. These developments have raised further new interesting questions and potentialities. We present a particular view of some of the challenging problems and payoffs ahead in the next few decades by tracing the early historical events, summarizing the revolutionary era of 1950-70 when many important new ideas including solitons and chaos were ...

  5. Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos: Advances and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Thiel, Marco; Romano, M. Carmen; Károlyi, György; Moura, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    This book is a collection of contributions on various aspects of active frontier research in the field of dynamical systems and chaos. Each chapter examines a specific research topic and, in addition to reviewing recent results, also discusses future perspectives. The result is an invaluable snapshot of the state of the field by some of its most important researchers. The first contribution in this book, "How did you get into Chaos?", is actually a collection of personal accounts by a number of distinguished scientists on how they entered the field of chaos and dynamical systems, featuring comments and recollections by James Yorke, Harry Swinney, Floris Takens, Peter Grassberger, Edward Ott, Lou Pecora, Itamar Procaccia, Michael Berry, Giulio Casati, Valentin Afraimovich, Robert MacKay, and last but not least, Celso Grebogi, to whom this volume is dedicated.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics and quantum chaos an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Wimberger, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    The field of nonlinear dynamics and chaos has grown very much over the last few decades and is becoming more and more relevant in different disciplines. This book presents a clear and concise introduction to the field of nonlinear dynamics and chaos, suitable for graduate students in mathematics, physics, chemistry, engineering, and in natural sciences in general. It provides a thorough and modern introduction to the concepts of Hamiltonian dynamical systems' theory combining in a comprehensive way classical and quantum mechanical description. It covers a wide range of topics usually not found in similar books. Motivations of the respective subjects and a clear presentation eases the understanding. The book is based on lectures on classical and quantum chaos held by the author at Heidelberg University. It contains exercises and worked examples, which makes it ideal for an introductory course for students as well as for researchers starting to work in the field.

  7. Avoiding Quantum Chaos in Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Izrailev, F M; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2001-01-01

    We study a one-dimensional chain of nuclear $1/2-$spins in an external time-dependent magnetic field. This model is considered as a possible candidate for experimental realization of quantum computation. According to the general theory of interacting particles, one of the most dangerous effects is quantum chaos which can destroy the stability of quantum operations. According to the standard viewpoint, the threshold for the onset of quantum chaos due to an interaction between spins (qubits) strongly decreases with an increase of the number of qubits. Contrary to this opinion, we show that the presence of a magnetic field gradient helps to avoid quantum chaos which turns out to disappear with an increase of the number of qubits. We give analytical estimates which explain this effect, together with numerical data supporting

  8. About the Concept of Quantum Chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio S. Gomez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The research on quantum chaos finds its roots in the study of the spectrum of complex nuclei in the 1950s and the pioneering experiments in microwave billiards in the 1970s. Since then, a large number of new results was produced. Nevertheless, the work on the subject is, even at present, a superposition of several approaches expressed in different mathematical formalisms and weakly linked to each other. The purpose of this paper is to supply a unified framework for describing quantum chaos using the quantum ergodic hierarchy. Using the factorization property of this framework, we characterize the dynamical aspects of quantum chaos by obtaining the Ehrenfest time. We also outline a generalization of the quantum mixing level of the kicked rotator in the context of the impulsive differential equations.

  9. Hyperbolic Chaos A Physicist’s View

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, Sergey P

    2012-01-01

    "Hyperbolic Chaos: A Physicist’s View” presents recent progress on uniformly hyperbolic attractors in dynamical systems from a physical rather than mathematical perspective (e.g. the Plykin attractor, the Smale – Williams solenoid). The structurally stable attractors manifest strong stochastic properties, but are insensitive to variation of functions and parameters in the dynamical systems. Based on these characteristics of hyperbolic chaos, this monograph shows how to find hyperbolic chaotic attractors in physical systems and how to design a physical systems that possess hyperbolic chaos.   This book is designed as a reference work for university professors and researchers in the fields of physics, mechanics, and engineering.   Dr. Sergey P. Kuznetsov is a professor at the Department of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Russia.  

  10. Chaos Concepts, Control and Constructive Use

    CERN Document Server

    Bolotin, Yurii; Yanovsky, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The study of chaotic behaviour in nonlinear, dynamical systems is now a well established research domain with ramifications into all fields of sciences, spanning a vast range of applications, from celestial mechanics, via climate change, to the functioning of brownian motors in cells. A more recent discovery is that chaos can be controlled and, under appropriate conditions, can actually be constructive in the sense of becoming a control parameter itself for the system under investigation, stochastic resonance being a prime example. The present work is putting emphasis on the latter aspects, and after recalling the paradigm changes introduced by the concept of chaos, leads the reader skillfully through the basics of chaos control by detailing relevant algorithms for both Hamiltonian and dissipative systems amongst others. The main part of the book is then devoted to the issue of synchronization in chaotic systems, an introduction to stochastic resonance and a survey of ratchet models. This short and concise pr...

  11. Harnessing quantum transport by transient chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso; Pecora, Louis M

    2013-03-01

    Chaos has long been recognized to be generally advantageous from the perspective of control. In particular, the infinite number of unstable periodic orbits embedded in a chaotic set and the intrinsically sensitive dependence on initial conditions imply that a chaotic system can be controlled to a desirable state by using small perturbations. Investigation of chaos control, however, was largely limited to nonlinear dynamical systems in the classical realm. In this paper, we show that chaos may be used to modulate or harness quantum mechanical systems. To be concrete, we focus on quantum transport through nanostructures, a problem of considerable interest in nanoscience, where a key feature is conductance fluctuations. We articulate and demonstrate that chaos, more specifically transient chaos, can be effective in modulating the conductance-fluctuation patterns. Experimentally, this can be achieved by applying an external gate voltage in a device of suitable geometry to generate classically inaccessible potential barriers. Adjusting the gate voltage allows the characteristics of the dynamical invariant set responsible for transient chaos to be varied in a desirable manner which, in turn, can induce continuous changes in the statistical characteristics of the quantum conductance-fluctuation pattern. To understand the physical mechanism of our scheme, we develop a theory based on analyzing the spectrum of the generalized non-Hermitian Hamiltonian that includes the effect of leads, or electronic waveguides, as self-energy terms. As the escape rate of the underlying non-attracting chaotic set is increased, the imaginary part of the complex eigenenergy becomes increasingly large so that pointer states are more difficult to form, making smoother the conductance-fluctuation pattern.

  12. Ventilatory chaos is impaired in carotid atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Mangin

    Full Text Available Ventilatory chaos is strongly linked to the activity of central pattern generators, alone or influenced by respiratory or cardiovascular afferents. We hypothesized that carotid atherosclerosis should alter ventilatory chaos through baroreflex and autonomic nervous system dysfunctions. Chaotic dynamics of inspiratory flow was prospectively evaluated in 75 subjects undergoing carotid ultrasonography: 27 with severe carotid stenosis (>70%, 23 with moderate stenosis (<70%, and 25 controls. Chaos was characterized by the noise titration method, the correlation dimension and the largest Lyapunov exponent. Baroreflex sensitivity was estimated in the frequency domain. In the control group, 92% of the time series exhibit nonlinear deterministic chaos with positive noise limit, whereas only 68% had a positive noise limit value in the stenoses groups. Ventilatory chaos was impaired in the groups with carotid stenoses, with significant parallel decrease in the noise limit value, correlation dimension and largest Lyapunov exponent, as compared to controls. In multiple regression models, the percentage of carotid stenosis was the best in predicting the correlation dimension (p<0.001, adjusted R(2: 0.35 and largest Lyapunov exponent (p<0.001, adjusted R(2: 0.6. Baroreflex sensitivity also predicted the correlation dimension values (p = 0.05, and the LLE (p = 0.08. Plaque removal after carotid surgery reversed the loss of ventilatory complexity. To conclude, ventilatory chaos is impaired in carotid atherosclerosis. These findings depend on the severity of the stenosis, its localization, plaque surface and morphology features, and is independently associated with baroreflex sensitivity reduction. These findings should help to understand the determinants of ventilatory complexity and breathing control in pathological conditions.

  13. Quantum chaos on a critical Fermi surface

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Aavishkar A

    2016-01-01

    We compute parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos for a critical Fermi surface without quasiparticle excitations. We examine a theory of $N$ species of fermions at non-zero density coupled to a $U(1)$ gauge field in two spatial dimensions, and determine the Lyapunov rate and the butterfly velocity in an extended RPA approximation. The thermal diffusivity is found to be universally related to these chaos parameters, i.e. the relationship is independent of $N$, the gauge coupling constant, the Fermi velocity, the Fermi surface curvature, and high energy details.

  14. Atoms in static fields Chaos or Diffraction?

    CERN Document Server

    Dando, P A

    1998-01-01

    A brief review of the manifestations of classical chaos observed in atomic systems is presented. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of atomic spectra by periodic orbit-type theories. For diamagnetic non-hydrogenic Rydberg atoms, the dynamical explanation for observed spectral features has been disputed. By building on our previous work on the photoabsorption spectrum, we show how, by the addition of diffractive terms, the spectral fluctuations in the energy level spectrum of general Rydberg atoms can be obtained with remarkable precision from the Gutzwiller trace formula. This provides further evidence that non-hydrogenic systems are most naturally described in terms of diffraction rather than classical chaos.

  15. SENSITIVE ERROR ANALYSIS OF CHAOS SYNCHRONIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG XIAN-GAO; XU JIAN-XUE; HUANG WEI; L(U) ZE-JUN

    2001-01-01

    We study the synchronizing sensitive errors of chaotic systems for adding other signals to the synchronizing signal.Based on the model of the Henon map masking, we examine the cause of the sensitive errors of chaos synchronization.The modulation ratio and the mean square error are defined to measure the synchronizing sensitive errors by quality.Numerical simulation results of the synchronizing sensitive errors are given for masking direct current, sinusoidal and speech signals, separately. Finally, we give the mean square error curves of chaos synchronizing sensitivity and threedimensional phase plots of the drive system and the response system for masking the three kinds of signals.

  16. Distributed chaos and inertial ranges in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that appearance of inertial range of scales, adjacent to distributed chaos range, results in adiabatic invariance of an energy correlation integral for isotropic homogeneous turbulence and for buoyancy driven turbulence (with stable or unstable stratification, including Rayleigh-Taylor mixing zone). Power spectrum of velocity field for distributed chaos dominated by this adiabatic invariant has a stretched exponential form $\\propto \\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{3/5}$. Results of recent direct numerical simulations have been used in order to support these conclusions.

  17. USING OPTIMAL FEEDBACK CONTROL FOR CHAOS TARGETING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG ZHAO-WANG; ZHONG TING-XIU

    2000-01-01

    Since the conventional open-loop optimal targeting of chaos is very sensitive to noise, a close-loop optimal targeting method is proposed to improve the targeting performance under noise. The present optimal targeting model takes into consideration both precision and speed of the targeting procedure. The parameters, rather than the output, of the targeting controller, are directly optimized to obtain optimal chaos targeting. Analysis regarding the mechanism is given from physics aspect and numerical experiment on the Hénon map is carried out to compare the targeting performance under noise between the close-loop and the open-loop methods.

  18. Experimental realization of chaos control by thresholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, K; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2003-07-01

    We report the experimental verification of thresholding as a versatile tool for efficient and flexible chaos control. The strategy here simply involves monitoring a single state variable and resetting it when it exceeds a threshold. We demonstrate the success of the technique in rapidly controlling different chaotic electrical circuits, including a hyperchaotic circuit, onto stable fixed points and limit cycles of different periods, by thresholding just one variable. The simplicity of this controller entailing no run-time computation, and the ease and rapidity of switching between different targets it offers, suggests a potent tool for chaos based applications.

  19. Investigation on evolutionary optimization of chaos control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Ivan [Faculty of Applied Informatics, Tomas Bata University in Zli' n, Nad Stranemi 4511, 762 72 Zli' n (Czech Republic)], E-mail: zelinka@fai.utb.cz; Senkerik, Roman [Faculty of Applied Informatics, Tomas Bata University in Zli' n, Nad Stranemi 4511, 762 72 Zli' n (Czech Republic)], E-mail: senkerik@fai.utb.cz; Navratil, Eduard [Faculty of Applied Informatics, Tomas Bata University in Zli' n, Nad Stranemi 4511, 762 72 Zli' n (Czech Republic)], E-mail: enavratil@fai.utb.cz

    2009-04-15

    This work deals with an investigation on optimization of the feedback control of chaos based on the use of evolutionary algorithms. The main objective is to show that evolutionary algorithms are capable of optimization of chaos control. As models of deterministic chaotic systems, one-dimensional Logistic equation and two-dimensional Henon map were used. The optimizations were realized in several ways, each one for another set of parameters of evolution algorithms or separate cost functions. The evolutionary algorithm SOMA (self-organizing migrating algorithm) was used in four versions. For each version simulations were repeated several times to show and check for robustness of the applied method.

  20. Development of plenoptic infrared camera using low dimensional material based photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangliang

    Infrared (IR) sensor has extended imaging from submicron visible spectrum to tens of microns wavelength, which has been widely used for military and civilian application. The conventional bulk semiconductor materials based IR cameras suffer from low frame rate, low resolution, temperature dependent and highly cost, while the unusual Carbon Nanotube (CNT), low dimensional material based nanotechnology has been made much progress in research and industry. The unique properties of CNT lead to investigate CNT based IR photodetectors and imaging system, resolving the sensitivity, speed and cooling difficulties in state of the art IR imagings. The reliability and stability is critical to the transition from nano science to nano engineering especially for infrared sensing. It is not only for the fundamental understanding of CNT photoresponse induced processes, but also for the development of a novel infrared sensitive material with unique optical and electrical features. In the proposed research, the sandwich-structured sensor was fabricated within two polymer layers. The substrate polyimide provided sensor with isolation to background noise, and top parylene packing blocked humid environmental factors. At the same time, the fabrication process was optimized by real time electrical detection dielectrophoresis and multiple annealing to improve fabrication yield and sensor performance. The nanoscale infrared photodetector was characterized by digital microscopy and precise linear stage in order for fully understanding it. Besides, the low noise, high gain readout system was designed together with CNT photodetector to make the nano sensor IR camera available. To explore more of infrared light, we employ compressive sensing algorithm into light field sampling, 3-D camera and compressive video sensing. The redundant of whole light field, including angular images for light field, binocular images for 3-D camera and temporal information of video streams, are extracted and

  1. 基于混沌群粒子优化−情景约简算法的混合电力系统机组组合模型及其求解%Unit Commitment Model and Solution in the Hybrid Power System Based on Chaos Embedded Particle Swarm Optimization-Scenario Reduction Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田廓

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale grid-integration of new energy sources such as wind power generation and so on leads to new problems in secure and stable operation of traditional power grids. For a hybrid power grid containing thermal power plants, wind farms and energy storage equipments, by means of constructing a unit commitment model and the stochastic property of wind power output uncertainty is simulated by scenario tree. Leading chaos embedded particle swarm optimization (CEPSO) into scenario reduction algorithms (SRA) the results of stochastic simulation and the ability to search the optimal solution are improved. Taking a hybrid power system composed of a wind farm and a 10-machine system as simulation example, simulation results show that the obtained unit commitment scheme can dispatch as many wind power units as possible and the operational cost of thermal generation units can be reduced to suit to the demand of energy conservation and emission reduction.%  风电等新能源发电机组的大规模并网,对传统电力系统的安全稳定运行带来了新的问题。研究了一种含有风−火−储联合运行的混合电力系统,通过构建机组组合问题模型,利用情景树方法模拟风电出力的不确定性的随机特性,将混沌群粒子优化算法引入情景约简算法,改善随机模拟结果和提高最优解的搜寻能力。算例分析结果表明,得到的机组组合方案能够尽量多调度风电机组,降低火电机组的运行成本,适应节能减排工作需要。

  2. Extracting motor synergies from random movements for low-dimensional task-space control of musculoskeletal robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kin Chung Denny; Dalla Libera, Fabio; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2015-10-08

    In the field of human motor control, the motor synergy hypothesis explains how humans simplify body control dimensionality by coordinating groups of muscles, called motor synergies, instead of controlling muscles independently. In most applications of motor synergies to low-dimensional control in robotics, motor synergies are extracted from given optimal control signals. In this paper, we address the problems of how to extract motor synergies without optimal data given, and how to apply motor synergies to achieve low-dimensional task-space tracking control of a human-like robotic arm actuated by redundant muscles, without prior knowledge of the robot. We propose to extract motor synergies from a subset of randomly generated reaching-like movement data. The essence is to first approximate the corresponding optimal control signals, using estimations of the robot's forward dynamics, and to extract the motor synergies subsequently. In order to avoid modeling difficulties, a learning-based control approach is adopted such that control is accomplished via estimations of the robot's inverse dynamics. We present a kernel-based regression formulation to estimate the forward and the inverse dynamics, and a sliding controller in order to cope with estimation error. Numerical evaluations show that the proposed method enables extraction of motor synergies for low-dimensional task-space control.

  3. Recovery of nanomolecular electronic states from tunneling spectroscopy: LDOS of low-dimensional phthalocyanine molecular structures on Cu(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Y; Nakashima, S; Oiso, K; Yamada, T K

    2013-10-04

    Organic nanomolecules have become one of the most attractive materials for new nanoelectronics devices. Understanding of the electronic density of states around the Fermi energy of low-dimensional molecules is crucial in designing the electronic properties of molecular devices. The low dimensionality of nanomolecules results in new electronic properties owing to their unique symmetry. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is one of the most effective techniques for studying the electronic states of nanomolecules, particularly near the Fermi energy (±1.5 eV), whereas these molecular electronic states are frequently buried by the tunneling probability background in tunneling spectroscopy, resulting in incorrect determination of the molecular electronic states. Here, we demonstrate how to recover nanomolecular electronic states from dI/dV curves obtained by tunneling spectroscopy. Precise local density of states (LDOS) peaks for low-dimensional nanostructures (monolayer ultrathin films, one-dimensional chains, and single molecules) of phthalocyanine (H2Pc) molecules grown on noble fcc-Cu(111) were obtained.

  4. From Cool Cash to Coded Chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennison, Betina Wolfgang

    of management differently. In this chaos of codes the managerial challenge is to take a second order position in order to strategically manage the communication that manages management itself. Key words: Management; personnel management; human-relations; pay-system; communication; system-theory; discursive...

  5. Chaos and fractals an elementary introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, David P

    2012-01-01

    For students with a background in elementary algebra, this text provides a vivid introduction to the key phenomena and ideas of chaos and fractals, including the butterfly effect, strange attractors, fractal dimensions, Julia sets and the Mandelbrot set, power laws, and cellular automata.

  6. Controlling chaos to solutions with complex eigenvalues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Jong; Lee, Hoyun

    2003-02-01

    We derive formulas for parameter and variable perturbations to control chaos using linearized dynamics. They are available irrespective of the dimension of the system, the number of perturbed parameters or variables, and the kinds of eigenvalues of the linearized dynamics. We illustrate this using the two coupled Duffing oscillators and the two coupled standard maps.

  7. Chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Richard J.

    The dynamics of reacting chemical systems is governed by typically polynomial differential equations that may contain nonlinear terms and/or embedded feedback loops. Thus the dynamics of such systems may exhibit features associated with nonlinear dynamical systems, including (among others): temporal oscillations, excitability, multistability, reaction-diffusion-driven formation of spatial patterns, and deterministic chaos. These behaviors are exhibited in the concentrations of intermediate chemical species. Bifurcations occur between particular dynamic behaviors as system parameters are varied. The governing differential equations of reacting chemical systems have as variables the concentrations of all chemical species involved, as well as controllable parameters, including temperature, the initial concentrations of all chemical species, and fixed reaction-rate constants. A discussion is presented of the kinetics of chemical reactions as well as some thermodynamic considerations important to the appearance of temporal oscillations and other nonlinear dynamic behaviors, e.g., deterministic chaos. The behavior, chemical details, and mechanism of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction (BZR) are described. Furthermore, experimental and mathematical evidence is presented that the BZR does indeed exhibit deterministic chaos when run in a flow reactor. The origin of this chaos seems to be in toroidal dynamics in which flow-driven oscillations in the control species bromomalonic acid couple with the BZR limit cycle...

  8. A Framework for Chaos Theory Career Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Robert G. L.

    2010-01-01

    Theory in career development counselling provides a map that counsellors can use to understand and structure the career counselling process. It also provides a means to communicate this understanding and structuring to their clients as part of the counselling intervention. The chaos theory of careers draws attention to the complexity,…

  9. Chaos in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Xia; Ni Zheng-Guo; Cong Fu-Zhong; Liu Xue-Shen; Chen Lei

    2010-01-01

    It is demonstrated that Smale-horseshoe chaos exists in the time evolution of the one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate driven by time-periodic harmonic or inverted-harmonic potential.A formally exact solution of the timedependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation is constructed,which describes the matter shock waves with chaotic or periodic amplitudes and phases.

  10. Dynamic system uncertainty propagation using polynomial chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Fenfen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The classic polynomial chaos method (PCM, characterized as an intrusive methodology, has been applied to uncertainty propagation (UP in many dynamic systems. However, the intrusive polynomial chaos method (IPCM requires tedious modification of the governing equations, which might introduce errors and can be impractical. Alternative to IPCM, the non-intrusive polynomial chaos method (NIPCM that avoids such modifications has been developed. In spite of the frequent application to dynamic problems, almost all the existing works about NIPCM for dynamic UP fail to elaborate the implementation process in a straightforward way, which is important to readers who are unfamiliar with the mathematics of the polynomial chaos theory. Meanwhile, very few works have compared NIPCM to IPCM in terms of their merits and applicability. Therefore, the mathematic procedure of dynamic UP via both methods considering parametric and initial condition uncertainties are comparatively discussed and studied in the present paper. Comparison of accuracy and efficiency in statistic moment estimation is made by applying the two methods to several dynamic UP problems. The relative merits of both approaches are discussed and summarized. The detailed description and insights gained with the two methods through this work are expected to be helpful to engineering designers in solving dynamic UP problems.

  11. Spatio-temporal chaos : A solvable model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diks, C; Takens, F; DeGoede, J

    1997-01-01

    A solvable coupled map lattice model exhibiting spatio-temporal chaos is studied. Exact expressions are obtained for the spectra of Lyapunov exponents as a function of the model parameters. Although the model has spatio-temporal structure, the time series measured at a single lattice site are shown

  12. Quantum dynamical entropies in discrete classical chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, Fabio [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Cappellini, Valerio [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Zertuche, Federico [Instituto de Matematicas, UNAM, Unidad Cuernavaca, AP 273-3, Admon. 3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-01-09

    We discuss certain analogies between quantization and discretization of classical systems on manifolds. In particular, we will apply the quantum dynamical entropy of Alicki and Fannes to numerically study the footprints of chaos in discretized versions of hyperbolic maps on the torus.

  13. Teaching Chaos to Art College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Ben

    2001-03-01

    This is a report of the author's teaching the basic concepts of chaos to students at Massachusetts College of Art. In order to bypass the students' aversion to mathematics stemming from earlier difficult experiences with mathematics, the course started with some symbolism which was totally unfamiliar to them: a Boolean system based on Brown's Laws of Form. This was then used to develop the mathematical ideas of duality and self-reference. After that was a general survey of the various areas of mathematics using Guillen's Bridges to Infinity. Chaos was then introduced using Gleick's Chaos, which provides a very engaging narrative, along with an introduction to the basic ideas. Two different strategies were used to introduce the mathematical ideas. First, making use of the students' visual orientation, sensitive dependence on initial conditions, fractional dimension, fractals, the Koch snowflake, self-similiarity, and statistical self-similiarity were covered pictorially. Second, so that the students could get a real feeling for the mathematics of chaos, they individually worked out a recurrence equation with varying seeds, using a hand-held calculator.

  14. Chaos in Practice: Techniques for Career Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Robert G. L.; Bright, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The chaos theory of careers emphasises continual change, the centrality and importance of chance events, the potential of minor events to have disproportionately large impacts on subsequent events, and the capacity for dramatic phase shifts in career behaviour. This approach challenges traditional approaches to career counselling, assumptions…

  15. Dynamic system uncertainty propagation using polynomial chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Fenfen; Chen Shishi; Xiong Ying

    2014-01-01

    The classic polynomial chaos method (PCM), characterized as an intrusive methodology, has been applied to uncertainty propagation (UP) in many dynamic systems. However, the intrusive polynomial chaos method (IPCM) requires tedious modification of the governing equations, which might introduce errors and can be impractical. Alternative to IPCM, the non-intrusive polynomial chaos method (NIPCM) that avoids such modifications has been developed. In spite of the frequent application to dynamic problems, almost all the existing works about NIPCM for dynamic UP fail to elaborate the implementation process in a straightforward way, which is important to readers who are unfamiliar with the mathematics of the polynomial chaos theory. Meanwhile, very few works have compared NIPCM to IPCM in terms of their merits and applicability. Therefore, the mathematic procedure of dynamic UP via both methods considering parametric and initial condition uncertainties are comparatively discussed and studied in the present paper. Comparison of accuracy and efficiency in statistic moment estimation is made by applying the two methods to several dynamic UP problems. The relative merits of both approaches are discussed and summarized. The detailed description and insights gained with the two methods through this work are expected to be helpful to engineering designers in solving dynamic UP problems.

  16. Many-body chaos at weak coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Douglas

    2016-10-01

    The strength of chaos in large N quantum systems can be quantified using λ L , the rate of growth of certain out-of-time-order four point functions. We calculate λ L to leading order in a weakly coupled matrix Φ4 theory by numerically diagonalizing a ladder kernel. The computation reduces to an essentially classical problem.

  17. Chaos control applied to heart rhythm dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borem Ferreira, Bianca, E-mail: biaborem@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 68.503, 21.941.972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza de Paula, Aline, E-mail: alinedepaula@unb.br [Universidade de Brasi' lia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 70.910.900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Amorim Savi, Marcelo, E-mail: savi@mecanica.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 68.503, 21.941.972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > A natural cardiac pacemaker is modeled by a modified Van der Pol oscillator. > Responses related to normal and chaotic, pathological functioning of the heart are investigated. > Chaos control methods are applied to avoid pathological behaviors of heart dynamics. > Different approaches are treated: stabilization of unstable periodic orbits and chaos suppression. - Abstract: The dynamics of cardiovascular rhythms have been widely studied due to the key aspects of the heart in the physiology of living beings. Cardiac rhythms can be either periodic or chaotic, being respectively related to normal and pathological physiological functioning. In this regard, chaos control methods may be useful to promote the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits using small perturbations. In this article, the extended time-delayed feedback control method is applied to a natural cardiac pacemaker described by a mathematical model. The model consists of a modified Van der Pol equation that reproduces the behavior of this pacemaker. Results show the ability of the chaos control strategy to control the system response performing either the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits or the suppression of chaotic response, avoiding behaviors associated with critical cardiac pathologies.

  18. Control and synchronization of spatiotemporal chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Chaos control methods for the Ginzburg-Landau equation are presented using homogeneously, inhomogeneously, and locally applied multiple delayed feedback signals. In particular, it is shown that a small number of control cells is sufficient for stabilizing plane waves or for trapping spiral waves, and that successful control is closely connected to synchronization of the dynamics in regions close to the control cells.

  19. Changes in the adiabatic invariant and streamline chaos in confined incompressible Stokes flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, D. L.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Neishtadt, A. I.

    1996-03-01

    The steady incompressible flow in a unit sphere introduced by Bajer and Moffatt [J. Fluid Mech. 212, 337 (1990)] is discussed. The velocity field of this flow differs by a small perturbation from an integrable field whose streamlines are almost all closed. The unperturbed flow has two stationary saddle points (poles of the sphere) and a two-dimensional separatrix passing through them. The entire interior of the unit sphere becomes the domain of streamline chaos for an arbitrarily small perturbation. This phenomenon is explained by the nonconservation of a certain adiabatic invariant that undergoes a jump when a streamline crosses a small neighborhood of the separatrix of the unperturbed flow. An asymptotic formula is obtained for the jump in the adiabatic invariant. The accumulation of such jumps in the course of repeated crossings of the separatrix results in the complete breaking of adiabatic invariance and streamline chaos.

  20. Chaos: A Very Short Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klages, R [School of Mathematical Sciences, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-20

    This book is a new volume of a series designed to introduce the curious reader to anything from ancient Egypt and Indian philosophy to conceptual art and cosmology. Very handy in pocket size, Chaos promises an introduction to fundamental concepts of nonlinear science by using mathematics that is 'no more complicated than X=2. Anyone who ever tried to give a popular science account of research knows that this is a more challenging task than writing an ordinary research article. Lenny Smith brilliantly succeeds to explain in words, in pictures and by using intuitive models the essence of mathematical dynamical systems theory and time series analysis as it applies to the modern world. In a more technical part he introduces the basic terms of nonlinear theory by means of simple mappings. He masterly embeds this analysis into the social, historical and cultural context by using numerous examples, from poems and paintings over chess and rabbits to Olbers' paradox, card games and 'phynance'. Fundamental problems of the modelling of nonlinear systems like the weather, sun spots or golf balls falling through an array of nails are discussed from the point of view of mathematics, physics and statistics by touching upon philosophical issues. At variance with Laplace's demon, Smith's 21st century demon makes 'real world' observations only with limited precision. This poses a severe problem to predictions derived from complex chaotic models, where small variations of initial conditions typically yield totally different outcomes. As Smith argues, this difficulty has direct implications on decision-making in everyday modern life. However, it also asks for an inherently probabilistic theory, which somewhat reminds us of what we are used to in the microworld. There is little to criticise in this nice little book except that some figures are of poor quality thus not really reflecting the beauty of fractals and other wonderful objects in this

  1. CHAOS-BASED ADVANCED ENCRYPTION STANDARD

    KAUST Repository

    Abdulwahed, Naif B.

    2013-05-01

    This thesis introduces a new chaos-based Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). The AES is a well-known encryption algorithm that was standardized by U.S National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) in 2001. The thesis investigates and explores the behavior of the AES algorithm by replacing two of its original modules, namely the S-Box and the Key Schedule, with two other chaos- based modules. Three chaos systems are considered in designing the new modules which are Lorenz system with multiplication nonlinearity, Chen system with sign modules nonlinearity, and 1D multiscroll system with stair case nonlinearity. The three systems are evaluated on their sensitivity to initial conditions and as Pseudo Random Number Generators (PRNG) after applying a post-processing technique to their output then performing NIST SP. 800-22 statistical tests. The thesis presents a hardware implementation of dynamic S-Boxes for AES that are populated using the three chaos systems. Moreover, a full MATLAB package to analyze the chaos generated S-Boxes based on graphical analysis, Walsh-Hadamard spectrum analysis, and image encryption analysis is developed. Although these S-Boxes are dynamic, meaning they are regenerated whenever the encryption key is changed, the analysis results show that such S-Boxes exhibit good properties like the Strict Avalanche Criterion (SAC) and the nonlinearity and in the application of image encryption. Furthermore, the thesis presents a new Lorenz-chaos-based key expansion for the AES. Many researchers have pointed out that there are some defects in the original key expansion of AES and thus have motivated such chaos-based key expansion proposal. The new proposed key schedule is analyzed and assessed in terms of confusion and diffusion by performing the frequency and SAC test respectively. The obtained results show that the new proposed design is more secure than the original AES key schedule and other proposed designs in the literature. The proposed

  2. Low-dimensional chiral physics. Gross-Neveu universality and magnetic catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Daniel David

    2012-09-27

    In this thesis, we investigate the 3-dimensional, chirally symmetric Gross-Neveu model with functional renormalization group methods. This low-dimensional quantum field theory describes the continuum limit of the low-energy sector in certain lattice systems. The functional renormalization group allows to study in a nonperturbative way the physical properties of many-body systems and quantum field theories. The starting point is a formally exact flow equation with 1-loop structure for the generating functional of 1-particle irreducible vertices. Within a gradient expansion - tailor-made for extracting the infrared asymptotics of the momentum and frequency dependent vertices of the theory - we study the strong-coupling fixed point of the Gross-Neveu model even beyond the formal limit of infinite flavor number. This fixed point controls a 2nd order quantum phase transition from a massless phase to a phase with massive Dirac fermions. After a first analysis of the purely fermionic theory, a Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation is used to partially bosonize the theory. Within this bosonized description, we find universal critical exponents that are in excellent quantitative agreement with available results from 1/N{sub f}-expansions and Monte Carlo simulations and are expected to improve upon earlier results. The renormalization group flow allows us to gain insights into the global and local structure of the critical manifold within given truncations and better understanding of the relevant directions in the space of couplings, which in general do not coincide with the Gaussian classification. Within the framework of the so-called ''asymptotic safety''-scenario relevant for the construction of proper field theories, the fixed-point theory could be determined exactly in the limit of infinite flavor number. Here, the Gross-Neveu model yields a simple and intuitive example for how to define a nonperturbatively renormalizable quantum field theory. Going

  3. Relevance of Chaos in Numerical Solutions of Quantum Billiards

    CERN Document Server

    Li, B; Hu, B; Li, Baowen; Robnik, Marko; Hu, Bambi

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we have tested several general numerical methods in solving the quantum billiards, such as the boundary integral method (BIM) and the plane wave decomposition method (PWDM). We performed extensive numerical investigations of these two methods in a variety of quantum billiards: integrable systens (circles, rectangles, and segments of circular annulus), Kolmogorov-Armold-Moser (KAM) systems (Robnik billiards), and fully chaotic systems (ergodic, such as Bunimovich stadium, Sinai billiard and cardiod billiard). We have analyzed the scaling of the average absolute value of the systematic error $\\Delta E$ of the eigenenergy in units of the mean level spacing with the density of discretization $b$ (which is number of numerical nodes on the boundary within one de Broglie wavelength) and its relationship with the geometry and the classical dynamics. In contradistinction to the BIM, we find that in the PWDM the classical chaos is definitely relevant for the numerical accuracy at a fixed density of discre...

  4. Controlling halo-chaos via wavelet-based feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Qing Fang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Halo-chaos in high-current accelerator has become one of the key issues because it can cause excessive radioactivity from the accelerators and significantly limits the applications of the new accelerators in industrial and other fields. Some general engineering methods for chaos control have been developed, but they generally are unsuccessful for halo-chaos suppression due to many technical constraints. In this article, controllability condition for beam halo-chaos is analyzed qualitatively. Then Particles-in-Cell (PIC simulations explore the nature of beam halo-chaos formation. A nonlinear control method and wavelet function feedback controller are proposed for controlling beam halo-chaos. After control of beam halo-chaos for initial proton beam with water bag distributions, the beam halo strength factor H is reduced to zero, and other statistical physical quantities of beam halo-chaos are doubly reduced. The results show that the developed methods in this paper are very effective for proton beam halo-chaos suppression. Potential application of the halo-chaos control method is finally pointed out.

  5. (TMTSF)2X materials and structural implications for low-dimensional polymeric and disordered molecular semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Krebs, Frederik C

    2000-01-01

    The structural characteristics and the relation to the electronic properties of three types of molecular materials are discussed. In TMTSF2X salts a triclinic unit cell it suggested to be important in avoiding a 2k(F) Peierls distortion. In polythiophenes appropriate ordering of microcrystallites...

  6. Mechanics of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures: Atomistic, continuum, and multi-scale approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Arash

    nanotubes and carbon nanocones subject to different loadings and boundary conditions. This finite element technique is also used to study the natural frequencies of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures and comparing the results with those of a homogenized isotropic continuum shell. Conclusion is that, replacing the atomic lattice with an isotropic continuum shell for a graphene sheet does not significantly affect the vibration frequencies while in the case of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanocones there is a significant difference between the natural frequencies of the atomistic model and its continuum counterpart. In the case of the carbon nanotube, continuum model successfully captures the beam bending vibration modes while overestimating frequencies of the modes in which the cross-section undergoes significant deformation. Furthermore, in the case of carbon nanotubes, the continuum shell exhibits a torsional mode which appears to be an artifact resulting from the small nominal thickness typically used in the continuum shell approximation of these nanostructures. Results of this study indicate that isotropic continuum shell models, while simple and useful in static analysis, cannot accurately predict the vibration frequencies of these nanostructures. We have studied the bistable nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes by investigating the change in the tube's energy as it is compressed between flat rigid indenters of various widths. Assuming the nanotube deformed uniformly along its length and modeling the cross-section as an inextensible, non-linear beam we found that tubes with a radius greater than 12 A are bistable and that tubes with a radius greater than 25 A have a lower energy in the collapsed state than in the inflated state. The difference in energy between the collapsed and inflated states decreases nearly linearly with increasing tube radius. While the inflated state remains stable for tubes of all diameters, the energy barrier keeping the tube from

  7. EMRS Spring Meeting 2014 Symposium D: Phonons and fluctuations in low dimensional structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The E-MRS 2014 Spring meeting, held from 26-30th May 2014 in Lille included the Symposium D entitled ''Phonons and Fluctuations in Low Dimensional Structures'', the first edition of its kind. The symposium was organised in response to the increasing interest in the study of phonons in the context of advances in condensed matter physics, electronics, experimental methods and theory and, in particular, the transfer of energy across atomic interfaces and the propagation of energy in the nm-scale. Steering heat by light or vice versa and examining nano-scale energy conversion (as in thermoelectricity and harvesting e.g. in biological systems) are two aspects that share the underlying science of energy processes across atomic interfaces and energy propagation in the nanoscale and or in confined systems. The nanometer scale defies several of the bulk relationships as confinement of electrons and phonons, locality and non-equilibrium become increasingly important. The propagation of phonons as energy carriers impacts not only heat transfer, but also the very concept and handling of temperature in non-equilibrium and highly localised conditions. Much of the needed progress depends on the materials studied and this symposium targeted the interface material aspects as well as the emerging concepts to advance in this field. The symposium had its origins in a series of meetings and seminars including: (1) the first Phonon Engineering Workshop, funded by Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), the then MICINN, the CNRS, VTT, and several EU projects, held in Saint Feliu de Guixols (Girona, Spain) from 24th to 27th of May 2010 with 65 participants from Europe, the USA and Japan; (2) the first Phonons and Fluctuations workshop, held in Paris on 8th and 9th November 2010, supported by French, Spanish and Finnish national projects and EU projects, attended by about 50 researchers; (3) the second Phonon and Fluctuations workshop, held in Paris on 8th and 9th

  8. Optomechanically induced stochastic resonance and chaos transfer between optical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monifi, Faraz; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Liu, Yu-Xi; Bo, Fang; Nori, Franco; Yang, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic dynamics has been reported in many physical systems and has affected almost every field of science. Chaos involves hypersensitivity to the initial conditions of a system and introduces unpredictability into its output. Thus, it is often unwanted. Interestingly, the very same features make chaos a powerful tool to suppress decoherence, achieve secure communication and replace background noise in stochastic resonance—a counterintuitive concept that a system's ability to transfer information can be coherently amplified by adding noise. Here, we report the first demonstration of chaos-induced stochastic resonance in an optomechanical system, as well as the optomechanically mediated chaos transfer between two optical fields such that they follow the same route to chaos. These results will contribute to the understanding of nonlinear phenomena and chaos in optomechanical systems, and may find applications in the chaotic transfer of information and for improving the detection of otherwise undetectable signals in optomechanical systems.

  9. Chaos and dynamics of spinning particles in Kerr spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Wen-Biao

    2010-01-01

    We study chaos dynamics of spinning particles in Kerr spacetime of rotating black holes use the Papapetrou equations by numerical integration. Because of spin, this system exists many chaos solutions, and exhibits some exceptional dynamic character. We investigate the relations between the orbits chaos and the spin magnitude S, pericenter, polar angle and Kerr rotation parameter a by means of a kind of brand new Fast Lyapulov Indicator (FLI) which is defined in general relativity. The classical definition of Lyapulov exponent (LE) perhaps fails in curve spacetime. And we emphasize that the Poincar\\'e sections cannot be used to detect chaos for this case. Via calculations, some new interesting conclusions are found: though chaos is easier to emerge with bigger S, but not always depends on S monotonically; the Kerr parameter a has a contrary action on the chaos occurrence. Furthermore, the spin of particles can destroy the symmetry of the orbits about the equatorial plane. And for some special initial condition...

  10. Chaos in electric drive systems analysis control and application

    CERN Document Server

    Chau, K T

    2011-01-01

    In Chaos in Electric Drive Systems: Analysis, Control and Application authors Chau and Wang systematically introduce an emerging technology of electrical engineering that bridges abstract chaos theory and practical electric drives. The authors consolidate all important information in this interdisciplinary technology, including the fundamental concepts, mathematical modeling, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and hardware implementation. The book provides comprehensive coverage of chaos in electric drive systems with three main parts: analysis, control and application. Corresponding drive systems range from the simplest to the latest types: DC, induction, synchronous reluctance, switched reluctance, and permanent magnet brushless drives.The first book to comprehensively treat chaos in electric drive systemsReviews chaos in various electrical engineering technologies and drive systemsPresents innovative approaches to stabilize and stimulate chaos in typical drivesDiscusses practical application of cha...

  11. Response to ``Comment on `Identification of low order manifolds: Validating the algorithm of Maas and Pope''' [Chaos 16, 048101 (2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Carl; Morari, Manfred; Wiggins, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    Flockerzi and Heineken [Chaos 16, 048101 (2006)] present two examples with the goal of elucidating issues related to the Maas and Pope method for identifying low dimensional "slow" manifolds in systems with a time-scale separation. The goal of their first example is to show that the result claimed by Rhodes et al. [Chaos 9, 108-123 (1999)] that the Maas and Pope algorithm identifies the slow invariant manifold in the situation in which there is finite time-scale separation is incorrect. We show that their arguments result from an incomplete understanding of the situation and that, in fact, their example supports, and is completely consistent with, the result in Rhodes et al.. Their second example claims to be a counterexample to a conjecture in Rhodes et al. that away from the slow manifold the criterion of Maas and Pope [Combust. Flame 88, 239-264 (1992)] will never be fulfilled. While this conjecture may indeed be false, we argue that it is not clear that the example presented by Flockerzi and Heineken is indeed a counterexample.

  12. Revisiting Evidence of Chaos in X-ray Light Curves: The Case of GRS 1915+105

    CERN Document Server

    Mannattil, Manu; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear time series analysis has been widely used to search for signatures of low-dimensional chaos in light curves emanating from astrophysical bodies. A particularly popular example is the microquasar GRS 1915+105, whose irregular but systematic X-ray variability has been well studied using data acquired by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). With a view to building simpler models of X-ray variability, attempts have been made to classify the light curves of GRS 1915+105 as chaotic or stochastic. Contrary to some of the earlier suggestions, after careful analysis, we find no evidence for chaos or determinism in any of the GRS 1915+105 classes. The dearth of long and stationary data sets representing all the different variability classes of GRS 1915+105 make it a poor candidate for analysis using nonlinear time series techniques. We conclude that either very exhaustive data analysis with sufficiently long and stationary light curves should be performed keeping all the pitfalls of nonlinear time series a...

  13. Control of Beam Halo-Chaos by Soliton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Long; WENG Jia-Qiang; FANG Jin-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam through an alternating-gradient quadrupole magnetic field is studied using the particle-core model. The beam halo-chaos is found, and the soliton controller is proposed based on the mechanism of halo formation and strategy of controlling halo-chaos. We perform a multiparticle simulation to control the halo by soliton controller, and find that the halo-chaos and its regeneration can be eliminated. It is shown that our control method is effective.

  14. Chaotic and Chaos-Like Behavior in Continued Fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Shuji, OBATA; Shigeru, OHKURO; Toshiaki, MAEDA; Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University; Laboratory of Information aud System Engineering, Hachinohe Institute of Technology; DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES, TOKYO DENKI UNIVERSITY

    1999-01-01

    Chaotic and chaos-like behavior in continued fractions is studied with respect to several types of maps, including a logistic map. Various numerical phenomena in the continued fractions are investigated, where the fractions correspond to fractal structures. Cyclic terms in the Cauchy distribution areas are introduced, including the chaos-like behavior. It is indicated that such mixed states of distributions and cycles are common in the chaotic and chaos-like behavior.

  15. Testing for deterministic monetary chaos: Metric and topological diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkoulas, John T. [Department of Finance and Quantitative Analysis, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460 (United States)], E-mail: jbarkoul@georgiasouthern.edu

    2008-11-15

    The evidence of deterministic chaos in monetary aggregates tends to be contradictory in the literature. We revisit the issue of monetary chaos by applying tools based on both the metric (correlation dimension and Lyapunov exponents) and topological (recurrence plots) approaches to chaos. For simple-sum and divisia monetary aggregates over an expanded sample period, the empirical evidence from both approaches is negative for monetary chaotic dynamics.

  16. Quantum Chaos in Physical Systems: from Super Conductors to Quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Bittner, Elmar; Markum, Harald; Pullirsch, Rainer

    2001-01-01

    This article is the written version of a talk delivered at the Bexbach Colloquium of Science 2000 and starts with an introduction into quantum chaos and its relationship to classical chaos. The Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture is formulated and evaluated within random-matrix theory. Several examples of physical systems exhibiting quantum chaos ranging from nuclear to solid state physics are presented. The presentation concludes with recent research work on quantum chromodynamics and the qua...

  17. A low-dimensional model predicting geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Kunlun; Brown, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We test the ability of a general low-dimensional model for turbulence to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures, such as convection rolls. The model consists of stochastic ordinary differential equations, which are derived as a function of boundary geometry from the Navier-Stokes equations (Brown and Ahlers 2008). We test the model using Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection experiments in a cubic container. The model predicts a new mode in which the alignment of a convection roll switches between diagonals. We observe this mode with a measured switching rate within 30% of the prediction.

  18. Chaos theory perspective for industry clusters development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiying; Jiang, Minghui; Li, Chengzhang

    2016-03-01

    Industry clusters have outperformed in economic development in most developing countries. The contributions of industrial clusters have been recognized as promotion of regional business and the alleviation of economic and social costs. It is no doubt globalization is rendering clusters in accelerating the competitiveness of economic activities. In accordance, many ideas and concepts involve in illustrating evolution tendency, stimulating the clusters development, meanwhile, avoiding industrial clusters recession. The term chaos theory is introduced to explain inherent relationship of features within industry clusters. A preferred life cycle approach is proposed for industrial cluster recessive theory analysis. Lyapunov exponents and Wolf model are presented for chaotic identification and examination. A case study of Tianjin, China has verified the model effectiveness. The investigations indicate that the approaches outperform in explaining chaos properties in industrial clusters, which demonstrates industrial clusters evolution, solves empirical issues and generates corresponding strategies.

  19. Experimental chaos detection in the Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyebe Fouda, J. S. Armand; Bodo, Bertrand; Djeufa, Guy M. D.; Sabat, Samrat L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of four algorithms namely the maximal Lyapunov exponent (MLE), 0-1 test, conditional entropy of ordinal patterns (CPE) and recently developed permutation largest slope entropy (PLSE) algorithm for experimental chaos detection in the Duffing oscillator. We consider an electrical model of the Duffing oscillator and its equivalent electronic circuit for generating the data to validate the effectiveness of the algorithms. The performance of the PLSE is compared with the 0-1 test and the CPE algorithms on the data set obtained from the simulated circuit; and with the MLE for the data collected from the experimental circuit. The experimental data are acquired using a digital oscilloscope with 1 MHz sampling frequency. From the comparison of the experimental spectra of the four methods with the analog phase portraits of the real system, it appears that the PLSE is the more reliable algorithm for chaos detection from experimental data.

  20. Measurement induced chaos with entangled states

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, T; Tóth, L D; Gábris, A; Jex, I; Alber, G

    2011-01-01

    Quantum control, in a broad sense, may include measurement of quantum systems and, as a feed back operation, selection from an ensemble conditioned on the measurements. The resulting dynamics can be nonlinear and, if applied iteratively, can lead to true chaos in a quantum system. We consider the dynamics of an ensemble of two qubit systems subjected to measurement and conditional selection. We prove that the iterative dynamics leads to true chaos in the entanglement of the qubits. A class of special initial states exhibits high sensitivity to the initial conditions. In the parameter space of the special initial states we identify two types of islands: one converging to a separable state, while the other being asymptotically completely entangled. The islands form a fractal like structure. Adding noise to the initial state introduces a further stable asymptotic cycle.

  1. Migraine--new perspectives from chaos theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernick, D

    2005-08-01

    Converging from a number of disciplines, non-linear systems theory and in particular chaos theory offer new descriptive and prescriptive insights into physiological systems. This paper briefly reviews an approach to physiological systems from these perspectives and outlines how these concepts can be applied to the study of migraine. It suggests a wide range of potential applications including new approaches to classification, treatment and pathophysiological mechanisms. A hypothesis is developed that suggests that dysfunctional consequences can result from a mismatch between the complexity of the environment and the system that is seeking to regulate it and that the migraine phenomenon is caused by an incongruity between the complexity of mid brain sensory integration and cortical control networks. Chaos theory offers a new approach to the study of migraine that complements existing frameworks but may more accurately reflect underlying physiological mechanisms.

  2. Tuning quantum measurements to control chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jessica K.; Hope, Joseph J.; Carvalho, André R. R.

    2017-01-01

    Environment-induced decoherence has long been recognised as being of crucial importance in the study of chaos in quantum systems. In particular, the exact form and strength of the system-environment interaction play a major role in the quantum-to-classical transition of chaotic systems. In this work we focus on the effect of varying monitoring strategies, i.e. for a given decoherence model and a fixed environmental coupling, there is still freedom on how to monitor a quantum system. We show here that there is a region between the deep quantum regime and the classical limit where the choice of the monitoring parameter allows one to control the complex behaviour of the system, leading to either the emergence or suppression of chaos. Our work shows that this is a result from the interplay between quantum interference effects induced by the nonlinear dynamics and the effectiveness of the decoherence for different measurement schemes. PMID:28317933

  3. Poincaré chaos and unpredictable functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmet, Marat; Fen, Mehmet Onur

    2017-07-01

    The results of this study are continuation of the research of Poincaré chaos initiated in the papers (M. Akhmet and M.O. Fen, Commun Nonlinear Sci Numer Simulat 40 (2016) 1-5; M. Akhmet and M.O. Fen, Turk J Math, doi:10.3906/mat-1603-51, in press). We focus on the construction of an unpredictable function, continuous on the real axis. As auxiliary results, unpredictable orbits for the symbolic dynamics and the logistic map are obtained. By shaping the unpredictable function as well as Poisson function we have performed the first step in the development of the theory of unpredictable solutions for differential and discrete equations. The results are preliminary ones for deep analysis of chaos existence in differential and hybrid systems. Illustrative examples concerning unpredictable solutions of differential equations are provided.

  4. Polynomial chaos representation of databases on manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soize, C., E-mail: christian.soize@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi-Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-La-Vallée, Cedex 2 (France); Ghanem, R., E-mail: ghanem@usc.edu [University of Southern California, 210 KAP Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Characterizing the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) of a vector-valued random variable with probability distribution concentrated on a manifold is a relevant problem in data-driven settings. The probability distribution of such random vectors is multimodal in general, leading to potentially very slow convergence of the PCE. In this paper, we build on a recent development for estimating and sampling from probabilities concentrated on a diffusion manifold. The proposed methodology constructs a PCE of the random vector together with an associated generator that samples from the target probability distribution which is estimated from data concentrated in the neighborhood of the manifold. The method is robust and remains efficient for high dimension and large datasets. The resulting polynomial chaos construction on manifolds permits the adaptation of many uncertainty quantification and statistical tools to emerging questions motivated by data-driven queries.

  5. Quantum chaos in QCD and hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Markum, H; Pullirsch, R; Sengl, B; Wagenbrunn, R F; Markum, Harald; Plessas, Willibald; Pullirsch, Rainer; Sengl, Bianka; Wagenbrunn, Robert F.

    2005-01-01

    This article is the written version of a talk delivered at the Workshop on Nonlinear Dynamics and Fundamental Interactions in Tashkent and starts with an introduction into quantum chaos and its relationship to classical chaos. The Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture is formulated and evaluated within random-matrix theory. In accordance to the title, the presentation is twofold and begins with research results on quantum chromodynamics and the quark-gluon plasma. We conclude with recent research work on the spectroscopy of baryons. Within the framework of a relativistic constituent quark model we investigate the excitation spectra of the nucleon and the delta with regard to a possible chaotic behavior for the cases when a hyperfine interaction of either Goldstone-boson-exchange or one-gluon-exchange type is added to the confinement interaction. Agreement with predictions from the experimental hadron spectrum is established.

  6. An exploration of dynamical systems and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Argyris, John H; Haase, Maria; Friedrich, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    This book is conceived as a comprehensive and detailed text-book on non-linear dynamical systems with particular emphasis on the exploration of chaotic phenomena. The self-contained introductory presentation is addressed both to those who wish to study the physics of chaotic systems and non-linear dynamics intensively as well as those who are curious to learn more about the fascinating world of chaotic phenomena. Basic concepts like Poincaré section, iterated mappings, Hamiltonian chaos and KAM theory, strange attractors, fractal dimensions, Lyapunov exponents, bifurcation theory, self-similarity and renormalisation and transitions to chaos are thoroughly explained. To facilitate comprehension, mathematical concepts and tools are introduced in short sub-sections. The text is supported by numerous computer experiments and a multitude of graphical illustrations and colour plates emphasising the geometrical and topological characteristics of the underlying dynamics. This volume is a completely revised and enlar...

  7. Chaos in effective classical and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Modugno, M; Casetti, Lapo; Gatto, Raoul; Modugno, Michele

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of classical and quantum N-component phi^4 oscillators in presence of an external field. In the large N limit the effective dynamics is described by two-degree-of-freedom classical Hamiltonian systems. In the classical model we observe chaotic orbits for any value of the external field, while in the quantum case chaos is strongly suppressed. A simple explanation of this behaviour is found in the change in the structure of the orbits induced by quantum corrections. Consistently with Heisenberg's principle, quantum fluctuations are forced away from zero, removing in the effective quantum dynamics a hyperbolic fixed point that is a major source of chaos in the classical model.

  8. Kac-Moody Algebras and Controlled Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Wesley, D H

    2007-01-01

    Compactification can control chaotic Mixmaster behavior in gravitational systems with p-form matter: we consider this in light of the connection between supergravity models and Kac-Moody algebras. We show that different compactifications define "mutations" of the algebras associated with the noncompact theories. We list the algebras obtained in this way, and find novel examples of wall systems determined by hyperbolic (but not strictly hyperbolic) algebras. Cosmological models with a smooth pre-big bang phase require that chaos is absent: we show that compactification alone cannot eliminate chaos in the simplest compactifications of the heterotic string on a Calabi-Yau, or M theory on a manifold of G_2 holonomy.

  9. Buoyancy driven turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, laboratory experiments and atmospheric measurements, that buoyancy driven turbulence exhibits a broad diversity of the types of distributed chaos with its stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$. The distributed chaos with $\\beta = 1/3$ (determined by the helicity correlation integral) is the most common feature of the stably stratified turbulence (due to the strong helical waves presence). These waves mostly dominate spectral properties of the vertical component of velocity field, while the horizontal component is dominated by the diffusive processes both for the weak and strong stable stratification ($\\beta =2/3$). For the last case influence of the low boundary can overcome the wave effects and result in $\\beta =1/2$ for the vertical component of the velocity field (the spontaneous breaking of the space translational symmetry - homogeneity). For the unstably stratified turbulence in the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing zone the di...

  10. Chaos A Program Collection for the PC

    CERN Document Server

    Korsch, Hans Jürgen; Hartmann, Timo

    2008-01-01

    This new edition strives yet again to provide readers with a working knowledge of chaos theory and dynamical systems through parallel introductory explanations in the book and interaction with carefully-selected programs supplied on the accompanying diskette. The programs enable readers, especially advanced-undergraduate students in physics, engineering, and math, to tackle relevant physical systems quickly on their PCs, without distraction from algorithmic details. For the third edition of Chaos: A Program Collection for the PC, each of the previous twelve programs is polished and rewritten in C++ (both Windows and Linux versions are included). A new program treats kicked systems, an important class of two-dimensional problems, which is introduced in Chapter 13. Each chapter follows the structure: theoretical background; numerical techniques; interaction with the program; computer experiments; real experiments and empirical evidence; reference. Interacting with the many numerical experiments have proven to h...

  11. Chaos in hydrodynamic BL Herculis models

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R

    2014-01-01

    We present non-linear, convective, BL Her-type hydrodynamic models that show complex variability characteristic for deterministic chaos. The bifurcation diagram reveals a rich structure, with many phenomena detected for the first time in hydrodynamic models of pulsating stars. The phenomena include not only period doubling cascades en route to chaos (detected in earlier studies) but also periodic windows within chaotic band, type-I and type-III intermittent behaviour, interior crisis bifurcation and others. Such phenomena are known in many textbook chaotic systems, from the simplest discrete logistic map, to more complex systems like Lorenz equations. We discuss the physical relevance of our models. Although except of period doubling such phenomena were not detected in any BL Her star, chaotic variability was claimed in several higher luminosity siblings of BL Her stars - RV Tau variables, and also in longer-period, luminous irregular pulsators. Our models may help to understand these poorly studied stars. Pa...

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  14. Frozen spatial chaos induced by boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Eguiluz, V M; Piro, O; Balle, S; Eguiluz, Victor M.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Piro, Oreste; Balle, Salvador

    1999-01-01

    We show that rather simple but non-trivial boundary conditions could induce the appearance of spatial chaos (that is stationary, stable, but spatially disordered configurations) in extended dynamical systems with very simple dynamics. We exemplify the phenomenon with a nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation in a two-dimensional undulated domain. Concepts from the theory of dynamical systems, and a transverse-single-mode approximation are used to describe the spatially chaotic structures.

  15. Chaos control of parametric driven Duffing oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Leisheng; Mei, Jie; Li, Lijie, E-mail: L.Li@swansea.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-31

    Duffing resonators are typical dynamic systems, which can exhibit chaotic oscillations, subject to certain driving conditions. Chaotic oscillations of resonating systems with negative and positive spring constants are identified to investigate in this paper. Parametric driver imposed on these two systems affects nonlinear behaviours, which has been theoretically analyzed with regard to variation of driving parameters (frequency, amplitude). Systematic calculations have been performed for these two systems driven by parametric pumps to unveil the controllability of chaos.

  16. Chaos in a topologically transitive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG; Jincheng

    2005-01-01

    The chaotic phenomena have been studied in a topologically transitive system and it has been shown that the erratic time dependence of orbits in such a topologically transitive system is more complicated than what described by the well-known technology "Li-Yorke chaos". The concept "sensitive dependency on initial conditions" has been generalized, and the chaotic phenomena has been discussed for transitive systems with the generalized sensitive dependency property.

  17. Complex motions and chaos in nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, José; Zhang, Jiazhong

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together 10 chapters on a new stream of research examining complex phenomena in nonlinear systems—including engineering, physics, and social science. Complex Motions and Chaos in Nonlinear Systems provides readers a particular vantage of the nature and nonlinear phenomena in nonlinear dynamics that can develop the corresponding mathematical theory and apply nonlinear design to practical engineering as well as the study of other complex phenomena including those investigated within social science.

  18. Computer Auxiliary Analysis for Stochasticity of Chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOGeng; FANGJin-qing

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we propose a mathematics-physical statistic analytical method for stochastic process of chaos, based on stochastic test via combination measurement of Monobit and Runs. Computer auxiliary analysis shows that it is of stochasticity for stochastic number produced from the chaotic circuit. Our software is written by VB and C++, the later can be tested by the former, and at the same time it is verified by stochastic number produced by the computer. So the data treatment results are reliable.

  19. Reducing or enhancing chaos using periodic orbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, R; Chandre, C; Leoncini, X

    2006-06-01

    A method to reduce or enhance chaos in Hamiltonian flows with two degrees of freedom is discussed. This method is based on finding a suitable perturbation of the system such that the stability of a set of periodic orbits changes (local bifurcations). Depending on the values of the residues, reflecting their linear stability properties, a set of invariant tori is destroyed or created in the neighborhood of the chosen periodic orbits. An application on a paradigmatic system, a forced pendulum, illustrates the method.

  20. Chaos: Understanding and Controlling Laser Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blass, William E.

    1997-01-01

    In order to characterize the behavior of tunable diode lasers (TDL), the first step in the project involved the redesign of the TDL system here at the University of Tennessee Molecular Systems Laboratory (UTMSL). Having made these changes it was next necessary to optimize the new optical system. This involved the fine adjustments to the optical components, particularly in the monochromator, to minimize the aberrations of coma and astigmatism and to assure that the energy from the beam is focused properly on the detector element. The next step involved the taking of preliminary data. We were then ready for the analysis of the preliminary data. This required the development of computer programs that use mathematical techniques to look for signatures of chaos. Commercial programs were also employed. We discovered some indication of high dimensional chaos, but were hampered by the low sample rate of 200 KSPS (kilosamples/sec) and even more by our sample size of 1024 (1K) data points. These limitations were expected and we added a high speed data acquisition board. We incorporated into the system a computer with a 40 MSPS (million samples/sec) data acquisition board. This board can also capture 64K of data points so that were then able to perform the more accurate tests for chaos. The results were dramatic and compelling, we had demonstrated that the lead salt diode laser had a chaotic frequency output. Having identified the chaotic character in our TDL data, we proceeded to stage two as outlined in our original proposal. This required the use of an Occasional Proportional Feedback (OPF) controller to facilitate the control and stabilization of the TDL system output. The controller was designed and fabricated at GSFC and debugged in our laboratories. After some trial and error efforts, we achieved chaos control of the frequency emissions of the laser. The two publications appended to this introduction detail the entire project and its results.

  1. Optimal chaos control through reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadaleta, Sabino; Dangelmayr, Gerhard

    1999-09-01

    A general purpose chaos control algorithm based on reinforcement learning is introduced and applied to the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits in various chaotic systems and to the targeting problem. The algorithm does not require any information about the dynamical system nor about the location of periodic orbits. Numerical tests demonstrate good and fast performance under noisy and nonstationary conditions. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Chaos control of parametric driven Duffing oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Leisheng; Mei, Jie; Li, Lijie

    2014-03-01

    Duffing resonators are typical dynamic systems, which can exhibit chaotic oscillations, subject to certain driving conditions. Chaotic oscillations of resonating systems with negative and positive spring constants are identified to investigate in this paper. Parametric driver imposed on these two systems affects nonlinear behaviours, which has been theoretically analyzed with regard to variation of driving parameters (frequency, amplitude). Systematic calculations have been performed for these two systems driven by parametric pumps to unveil the controllability of chaos.

  3. Chaos synchronization based on a continuous chaos control method in semiconductor lasers with optical feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, A; Ohtsubo, J

    2001-06-01

    Chaos synchronization using a continuous chaos control method was studied in two identical chaotic laser systems consisting of semiconductor lasers and optical feedback from an external mirror. Numerical calculations for rate equations indicate that the stability of chaos synchronization depends significantly on the external mirror position. We performed a linear stability analysis for the rate equations. Our results show that the stability of the synchronization is much influenced by the mode interaction between the relaxation oscillation frequency of the semiconductor laser and the external cavity frequency. Due to this interaction, an intensive mode competition between the two frequencies destroys the synchronization, but stable synchronization can be achieved when the mode competition is very weak.

  4. Bifurcations and Chaos in Duffing Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Duffing equation with even-odd asymmetrical nonlinear-restoring force and one external forcing is investigated. The conditions of existence of primary resonance, second-order, third-order subharmonics, m-order subharmonics and chaos are given by using the second-averaging method, the Melnikov method and bifurcation theory. Numerical simulations including bifurcation diagram, bifurcation surfaces and phase portraits show the consistence with the theoretical analysis. The numerical results also exhibit new dynamical behaviors including onset of chaos, chaos suddenly disappearing to periodic orbit, cascades of inverse period-doubling bifurcations, period-doubling bifurcation, symmetry period-doubling bifurcations of period-3 orbit, symmetry-breaking of periodic orbits, interleaving occurrence of chaotic behaviors and period-one orbit, a great abundance of periodic windows in transient chaotic regions with interior crises and boundary crisis and varied chaotic attractors. Our results show that many dynamical behaviors are strictly departure from the behaviors of the Duffing equation with odd-nonlinear restoring force.

  5. Chaos in Chiral Condensates in Gauge Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Murata, Keiju; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-12-01

    Assigning a chaos index for dynamics of generic quantum field theories is a challenging problem because the notion of a Lyapunov exponent, which is useful for singling out chaotic behavior, works only in classical systems. We address the issue by using the AdS /CFT correspondence, as the large Nc limit provides a classicalization (other than the standard ℏ→0 ) while keeping nontrivial quantum condensation. We demonstrate the chaos in the dynamics of quantum gauge theories: The time evolution of homogeneous quark condensates ⟨q ¯q ⟩ and ⟨q ¯γ5q ⟩ in an N =2 supersymmetric QCD with the S U (Nc) gauge group at large Nc and at a large 't Hooft coupling λ ≡NcgYM2 exhibits a positive Lyapunov exponent. The chaos dominates the phase space for energy density E ≳(6 ×1 02)×mq4(Nc/λ2), where mq is the quark mass. We evaluate the largest Lyapunov exponent as a function of (Nc,λ ,E ) and find that the N =2 supersymmetric QCD is more chaotic for smaller Nc.

  6. Suppression of Spiral Waves and Spatiotemporal Chaos Under Local Self-adaptive Coupling Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; WU Ning-Jie; YING He-Ping; YUAN Li-Hua

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a close-loop feedback control is imposed locally on the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FHN) system to suppress the stable spirals and spatiotemporal chaos according to the principle of self-adaptive coupling interaction. The simulation results show that an expanding target wave is stimulated by the spiral waves under dynamic control period when a local area of 5 x 5 grids is controlled, or the spiral tip is driven to the board of the system. It is adso found that the spatiotemporal chaos can be suppressed to get a stable homogeneous state within 50 time units as two local grids are controlled mutually. The mechanism of the scheme is briefly discussed.

  7. An empirical study on identifying critical success factors on chaos management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaos management is one of the most necessary efforts on managing business units. Many organizations fail to cope with undesirable circumstances, which may happen without any prior notice and as a result, they may face with significant financial losses. In this paper, we present an empirical study to determine critical success factors, which could help handle any possible chaos in organizations. The proposed study of this paper is implemented for a set of travel agencies located in Tehran, Iran. Chronbach alpha is calculated as 0.821, which is well above the minimum desirable level. In addition, we have also performed factor analysis, which yields a KMO value of 0.576 with the level of significance of 0.000. The results indicate that there are six important factors including effective management strategy, internal environmental factors, creative and innovative attitudes, external environmental factors and top level management thoughts.

  8. On the structure of positive maps. II. Low dimensional matrix algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Władysław A.; Tylec, Tomasz I.

    2013-07-01

    We use a new idea that emerged in the examination of exposed positive maps between matrix algebras to investigate in more detail the differences and similarities between unital positive maps on M2 ({C}) and M3({C}). Our main tool stems from classical Grothendieck theorem on tensor product of Banach spaces and is an older and more general version of Choi-Jamiołkowski isomorphism between positive maps and block positive Choi matrices. It takes into account the correct topology on the latter set that is induced by the uniform topology on positive maps. In this setting, we show that in M2({C}) case a large class of nice positive maps can be generated from the small set of maps represented by self-adjoint unitaries, 2Px with x maximally entangled vector and p⊗ {1} with p rank 1 projector. We indicate problems with passing this result to M3({C}) case. Among similarities, in both M2({C}) and M3({C}) cases any unital positive map represented by self-adjoint unitary is unitarily equivalent to the transposition map. Consequently, we obtain a large family of exposed maps. Furthermore, for M3({C}) there appear new non-trivial class of maps represented by Choi matrices with square equal to a projector. We examine this case. We also investigate a convex structure of the Choi map, the first example of non-decomposable map. As a result the nature of the Choi map will be explained.

  9. The chaos and order in nuclear molecular dynamics; Chaos i porzadek w jadrowej dynamice molekularnej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srokowski, T. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The subject of the presented report is role of chaos in scattering processes in the frame of molecular dynamics. In this model, it is assumed that scattering particles (nuclei) consist of not-interacted components as alpha particles or {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 20}Ne clusters. The results show such effects as dynamical in stabilities and fractal structure as well as compound nuclei decay and heavy-ion fusion. The goal of the report is to make the reader more familiar with the chaos model and its application to nuclear phenomena. 157 refs, 40 figs.

  10. Prosthetic Avian Vocal Organ Controlled by a Freely Behaving Bird Based on a Low Dimensional Model of the Biomechanical Periphery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform. PMID:22761555

  11. Prosthetic avian vocal organ controlled by a freely behaving bird based on a low dimensional model of the biomechanical periphery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel M Arneodo

    Full Text Available Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform.

  12. Application of Chaos Theory to Psychological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackerby, Rae Fortunato

    This dissertation shows that an alternative theoretical approach from physics--chaos theory--offers a viable basis for improved understanding of human beings and their behavior. Chaos theory provides achievable frameworks for potential identification, assessment, and adjustment of human behavior patterns. Most current psychological models fail to address the metaphysical conditions inherent in the human system, thus bringing deep errors to psychological practice and empirical research. Freudian, Jungian and behavioristic perspectives are inadequate psychological models because they assume, either implicitly or explicitly, that the human psychological system is a closed, linear system. On the other hand, Adlerian models that require open systems are likely to be empirically tenable. Logically, models will hold only if the model's assumptions hold. The innovative application of chaotic dynamics to psychological behavior is a promising theoretical development because the application asserts that human systems are open, nonlinear and self-organizing. Chaotic dynamics use nonlinear mathematical relationships among factors that influence human systems. This dissertation explores these mathematical relationships in the context of a sample model of moral behavior using simulated data. Mathematical equations with nonlinear feedback loops describe chaotic systems. Feedback loops govern the equations' value in subsequent calculation iterations. For example, changes in moral behavior are affected by an individual's own self-centeredness, family and community influences, and previous moral behavior choices that feed back to influence future choices. When applying these factors to the chaos equations, the model behaves like other chaotic systems. For example, changes in moral behavior fluctuate in regular patterns, as determined by the values of the individual, family and community factors. In some cases, these fluctuations converge to one value; in other cases, they diverge in

  13. Sampling High-Dimensional Bandlimited Fields on Low-Dimensional Manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Unnikrishnan, Jayakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Consider the task of sampling and reconstructing a bandlimited spatial field in $\\Re^2$ using moving sensors that take measurements along their path. It is inexpensive to increase the sampling rate along the paths of the sensors but more expensive to increase the total distance traveled by the sensors per unit area, which we call the \\emph{path density}. In this paper we introduce the problem of designing sensor trajectories that are minimal in path density subject to the condition that the measurements of the field on these trajectories admit perfect reconstruction of bandlimited fields. We study various possible designs of sampling trajectories. Generalizing some ideas from the classical theory of sampling on lattices, we obtain necessary and sufficient conditions on certain configurations of straight line trajectories for perfect reconstruction. We show that a single set of equispaced parallel lines has the lowest path density from certain restricted classes of trajectories that admit perfect reconstructio...

  14. Dynamics of hourly sea level at Hillarys Boat Harbour, Western Australia: a chaos theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Rahman; Ghorbani, Mohammad Ali; Aalami, Mohammad Taghi; Kocak, Kasim; Makarynskyy, Oleg; Makarynska, Dina; Aalinezhad, Mahdi

    2011-11-01

    Water level forecasting using recorded time series can provide a local modelling capability to facilitate local proactive management practices. To this end, hourly sea water level time series are investigated. The records collected at the Hillarys Boat Harbour, Western Australia, are investigated over the period of 2000 and 2002. Two modelling techniques are employed: low-dimensional dynamic model, known as the deterministic chaos theory, and genetic programming, GP. The phase space, which describes the evolution of the behaviour of a nonlinear system in time, was reconstructed using the delay-embedding theorem suggested by Takens. The presence of chaotic signals in the data was identified by the phase space reconstruction and correlation dimension methods, and also the predictability into the future was calculated by the largest Lyapunov exponent to be 437 h or 18 days into the future. The intercomparison of results of the local prediction and GP models shows that for this site-specific dataset, the local prediction model has a slight edge over GP. However, rather than recommending one technique over another, the paper promotes a pluralistic modelling culture, whereby different techniques should be tested to gain a specific insight from each of the models. This would enable a consensus to be drawn from a set of results rather than ignoring the individual insights provided by each model.

  15. Chaos: A Topic for Interdisciplinary Education in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Saebyok

    2009-01-01

    Since society and science need interdisciplinary works, the interesting topic of chaos is chosen for interdisciplinary education in physics. The educational programme contains various university-level activities such as computer simulations, chaos experiment and team projects besides ordinary teaching. According to the participants, the programme…

  16. Master Teachers: Making a Difference on the Edge of Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Dexter

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation, by legitimizing a stark, one-size-fits-all, industrial model of education, has denied the inherent complexity and richness of what teachers do. Discussing teaching in terms of Chaos Theory, Chapin explains that while excellent teaching may occur at the edge of chaos, it is not chaotic. There are patterns…

  17. Major open problems in chaos theory and nonlinear dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y Charles

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, chaos theory and nonlinear dynamics lack research focuses. Here we mention a few major open problems: 1. an effective description of chaos and turbulence, 2. rough dependence on initial data, 3. arrow of time, 4. the paradox of enrichment, 5. the paradox of pesticides, 6. the paradox of plankton.

  18. Controlling Beam Halo-Chaos via Time-Delayed Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jin-Qing; WENG Jia-Qiang; ZHU Lun-Wu; LUO Xiao-Shu

    2004-01-01

    The study of controlling high-current proton beam halo-chaos has become a key concerned issue for many important applications. In this paper, time-delayed feedback control method is proposed for beam halo-chaos. Particle in cell simulation results show that the method is very effective and has some advantages for high-current beam experiments and engineering.

  19. Using a quantum computer to investigate quantum chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Schack, Ruediger

    1997-01-01

    We show that the quantum baker's map, a prototypical map invented for theoretical studies of quantum chaos, has a very simple realization in terms of quantum gates. Chaos in the quantum baker's map could be investigated experimentally on a quantum computer based on only 3 qubits.

  20. Universal properties of dynamically complex systems - The organization of chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccia, Itamar

    1988-06-01

    The complex dynamic behavior of natural systems far from equilibrium is discussed. Progress that has been made in understanding universal aspects of the paths to such behavior, of the trajectories at the borderline of chaos, and of the nature of the complexity in the chaotic regime, is reviewed. The emerging grammar of chaos is examined.

  1. The "Chaos" Pattern in Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Jean S.

    Piaget's theory of the cognitive development of the child is related to the recently developed non-linear "chaos" model. The term "chaos" refers to the tendency of dynamical, non-linear systems toward irregular, sometimes unpredictable, deterministic behavior. Piaget identified this same pattern in his model of cognitive development in children.…

  2. Chaos: A Topic for Interdisciplinary Education in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Saebyok

    2009-01-01

    Since society and science need interdisciplinary works, the interesting topic of chaos is chosen for interdisciplinary education in physics. The educational programme contains various university-level activities such as computer simulations, chaos experiment and team projects besides ordinary teaching. According to the participants, the programme…

  3. Experimental Control of Instabilities and Chaos in Fast Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    is short (- 10 cm) [153]-[155]; these studies have more recently been considered from the chaos control viewpoint [42]. The apparatus required to...13] Christini, David J., and James A. Collins. Controlling Nonchaotic Neuronal Noise Using Chaos Control Techniques. Phys. Rev. Lett. 75:2782-2785

  4. Erbium - doped fiber laser systems: Routes to chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubežić Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erbium-doped fiber laser systems exhibit a large variety of complex dynamical behaviors, bifurcations and attractors. In this paper, the chaotic behavior which can be achieved under certain conditions in a laser system with erbium-doped fiber, is discussed. The chaos in this system occurs through several standard scenarios. In this paper, the simulation sequence of quasiperiodic, intermittent and period-doubling scenario transitions to chaos is shown. Quasiperiodic and intermittent transitions to chaos are shown on the example system with a single ring. The electro-optical modulator was applied to the system for modulating the loss in the cavity. We used the sinusoidal and rectangular signals for modulation. Generation of chaos is achieved by changing the parameters of signal for modulation. Period-doubling transition to chaos is illustrated in a system with two rings. Simulation results are shown in the time domain and phase space.

  5. Replication of chaos in neural networks, economics and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmet, Marat

    2016-01-01

    This book presents detailed descriptions of chaos for continuous-time systems. It is the first-ever book to consider chaos as an input for differential and hybrid equations. Chaotic sets and chaotic functions are used as inputs for systems with attractors: equilibrium points, cycles and tori. The findings strongly suggest that chaos theory can proceed from the theory of differential equations to a higher level than previously thought. The approach selected is conducive to the in-depth analysis of different types of chaos. The appearance of deterministic chaos in neural networks, economics and mechanical systems is discussed theoretically and supported by simulations. As such, the book offers a valuable resource for mathematicians, physicists, engineers and economists studying nonlinear chaotic dynamics.

  6. $\\mathcal{PT}$-Symmetry-Breaking Chaos in Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, Xin-You; Ma, Jin-Yong; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry-breaking chaos in optomechanical system (OMS), which features an ultralow driving threshold. In principle, this chaos will emerge once a driving laser is applied to the cavity mode and lasts for a period of time. The driving strength is inversely proportional to the starting time of chaos. This originally comes from the dynamical enhancement of nonlinearity by field localization in $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry-breaking phase ($\\mathcal{PT}$BP). Moreover, this chaos is switchable by tuning the system parameters so that a $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry phase transition occurs. This work may fundamentally broaden the regimes of cavity optomechanics and nonlinear optics. It offers the prospect of exploring ultralow-power-laser triggered chaos and its potential applications in secret communication.

  7. Dynamical chaos in chip-scale optomechanical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiagui; Huang, Yongjun; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Jinghui; Liu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Xia, Guangqiong; Wong, Chee Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chaos has revolutionized the field of nonlinear science and stimulated foundational studies from neural networks, extreme event statistics, to physics of electron transport. Recent studies in cavity optomechanics provide a new platform to uncover quintessential architectures of chaos generation and the underlying physics. Here we report the first generation of dynamical chaos in silicon optomechanical oscillators, enabled by the strong and coupled nonlinearities of Drude electron-hole plasma. Deterministic chaotic oscillation is achieved, and statistical and entropic characterization quantifies the complexity of chaos. The correlation dimension D2 is determined at ~ 1.67 for the chaotic attractor, along with a maximal Lyapunov exponent rate about 2.94*the fundamental optomechanical oscillation. The corresponding nonlinear dynamical maps demonstrate the plethora of subharmonics, bifurcations, and stable regimes, along with distinct transitional routes into chaotic states. The chaos generation in our mesoscopic...

  8. Population Floors and the Persistence of Chaos in Ecological Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton; Rohani

    1998-06-01

    Chaotic dynamics have been observed in a wide range of population models. Here we describe the effects of perturbing several of these models so as to introduce a non-zero minimum population size. This perturbation generally reduces the likelihood of observing chaos, in both discrete and continuous time models. The extent of this effect depends on whether chaos is generated through period-doubling, quasiperiodicity, or intermittence. Chaos reached via the quasiperiodic route is more robust against the perturbation than period-doubling chaos, whilst the inclusion of a population floor in a model exhibiting intermittent chaos may increase the frequency of population bursts although these become non-chaotic. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  9. Electronic states in low-dimensional nano-structures: Comparison between the variational and plane wave basis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Wang, Hailong; Gong, Qian; Wang, Shumin

    2017-04-01

    A comparison is made between the plane wave basis and variational method. Within the framework of effective-mass approximation theory, the variational and plane wave basis method are used to calculate ground state energy and ground state binding energy in low-dimensional nano-structures under the external electric field. Comparing calculation results, the donor binding energies of ground state display the consistent trend, both of them are strongly dependent on the quantum size, impurity position and external electric field. However, the impurity ground state energy calculated using variational method may be larger than the real value and it results in the smaller binding energy for variational method. In addition, the binding energy is more sensitive to the external electric field for the variational method, which can be seen more clearly from Stark shift.

  10. Uniform Descriptions of Electron-IO Phonon Interaction in Structures of Multi-layer Coupling Low-dimensional Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGLi; SHIJun-Jie

    2005-01-01

    By using the transfer matrix method, within the framework of the dielectric continuum approximation,uniform forms for the interface optical (I0) phonon modes as well as the corresponding electron-IO phonon interaction Hamiltonians in n-layer coupling low-dimensional systems (including the coupling quantum well (CQW), coupling quantum-well wire (CQWW), and coupling quantum dot (CQD)) have been presented. Numerical calculations on the three-layer asymmetrical AIGaAs/GaAs systems are performed, and the analogous characteristics for limited frequencies of 10 phonon in the three types of systems (CQW, CQWW, and CQD) when the wave-vector and the quantum number approach zero or infinity are analyzed and specified.

  11. Uniform Descriptions of Electron-IO Phonon Interaction in Structures of Multi-layer Coupling Low-dimensional Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; SHI Jun-Jie

    2005-01-01

    By using the transfer matrix method, within the framework of the dielectric continuum approximation,uniform forms for the interface optical (IO) phonon modes as well as the corresponding electron-IO phonon interaction Hamiltonians in n-layer coupling low-dimensional systems (including the coupling quantum well (CQ W), coupling quantum-well wire (CQWW), and coupling quantum dot (CQD)) have been presented. Numerical calculations on the three-layer asymmetrical AIGaAs/GaAs systems are performed, and the analogous characteristics for limited frequencies of IO phonon in the three types of systems (CQW, CQWW, and CQD) when the wave-vector and the quantum number approach zero or infinity are analyzed and specified.

  12. Electronic properties of low-dimensional oxides Te 4Mo 20O 62 and VMoO 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narushima, K.; Shiozaki, I.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of some new low-dimensional compounds, Te 4Mo 20O 62 and VMoO 5, have been grown by gas phase transport method. From X-ray analysis the crystal structure of Te 4Mo 20O 62 was determined to be of the intergrowth tungsten bronze type. The crystal of VMoO 5 is a monoclinic plate-like structure. Te 4Mo 20O 62 is a semiconductor and the electrical resistivity shows a big two-dimensional anisotropy. It was also found to have a remarkable current dependent non-linear behavior. The magnetic susceptibility of VMoO 5 showed a metamagnetic behavior and an antiferromagnetic phase transition below 40 K.

  13. ORDER IN THE CHAOS IN SPORTS ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Azarian

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nowadays, scientists consider the world as a combination of some systems that work in a self -organizing way and the result of such a way is unpredictable and accidential states. Compulsory Natural rules are affective in such circumstances. Also it is known that systems work in a circular form in which order ends in disorder and vice versa. The idea of world as something simple has already replaced by a complicated and contradictory world. The study aim is to survey chaordic organizations characters of sport organizations. Materials and methods : For this purpose we used a standard questionnaire with appropriate reliability and validity. The statistical population of the study are whole staff of sport and youth head-quarter of west Azarbaijan province that are 89 (sample number is equal to the population's. We used Kolmogrov- Smirnov test to study data normal distribution, and in respect of normal distribution of data to test hypothesis we used sample t test and also descriptive statistical methods like mean and standard deviation, through SPSS 18. Questionnaires were filled out by whole staff of sport and youth head-quarters of west Azarbaijan province. Results: Results of this study, which have got through a single-sample t-test, show that sport organizations have six characteristics of welcoming to innovation, coherence, uncertainty, non-linearity, unpredictability, and ugly structure. It’s just the grade of the characteristic of recruiting competent staffs that is low in sport organizations; in fact they don’t enjoy it. But, within assessing the main hypothesis of the research that was around the feature of chaos-order, it was resulted that sport organizations have characteristics of a chaos-order organization and they can be considered as a chaos-order organization. Conclusions: According to the results of this study and t-table we can deduce that sport organizations are chaordic organization.

  14. Conduction at the onset of chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldovin, Fulvio

    2017-02-01

    After a general discussion of the thermodynamics of conductive processes, we introduce specific observables enabling the connection of the diffusive transport properties with the microscopic dynamics. We solve the case of Brownian particles, both analytically and numerically, and address then whether aspects of the classic Onsager's picture generalize to the non-local non-reversible dynamics described by logistic map iterates. While in the chaotic case numerical evidence of a monotonic relaxation is found, at the onset of chaos complex relaxation patterns emerge.

  15. Intramolecular quantum chaos in doped helium nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, E.; Stolyarov, D.; Zhang, X.; Kresin, V. V.; Wittig, C.

    2003-07-01

    A mass spectrometric depletion spectrum (17 700-18 300 cm -1) is reported for NO 2 in superfluid (0.37 K) helium nanodroplets. Gas phase NO 2 is believed to be vibronically chaotic at these energies. Transitions are broadened and blue-shifted relative to their gas phase counterparts. The spectrum is fitted reasonably well by setting all of the widths and shifts equal to 7 cm -1. Modest dispersions (i.e., 90% lie within 2 cm -1 of the central values) are consistent with quantum chaos in NO 2. Relaxation is dominated by interactions of NO 2 with its non-superfluid helium nearest neighbors.

  16. Wave Dynamical Chaos in Superconducting Microwave Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Rehfeld, H; Dembowski, C; Gräf, H D; Hofferbert, R; Richter, A; Lengeler, Herbert

    1997-01-01

    During the last few years we have studied the chaotic behavior of special Euclidian geometries, so-called billiards, from the quantum or in more general sense "wave dynamical" point of view. Due to the equivalence between the stationary Schroedinger equation and the classical Helmholtz equation in the two-dimensional case (plain billiards), it is possible to simulate "quantum chaos" with the help of macroscopic, superconducting microwave cavities. Using this technique we investigated spectra of three billiards from the family of Pascal's Snails (Robnik-Billiards) with a different chaoticity in each case in order to test predictions of standard stochastical models for classical chaotic systems.

  17. A new optimization algorithm based on chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article, some methods are proposed for enhancing the converging velocity of the COA (chaos optimization algorithm) based on using carrier wave two times, which can greatly increase the speed and efficiency of the first carrier wave's search for the optimal point in implementing the sophisticated searching during the second carrier wave is faster and more accurate.In addition, the concept of using the carrier wave three times is proposed and put into practice to tackle the multi-variables optimization problems, where the searching for the optimal point of the last several variables is frequently worse than the first several ones.

  18. Delayed self-synchronization in homoclinic chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arecchi, F. T.; Meucci, R.; Allaria, E.; di Garbo, A.; Tsimring, L. S.

    2002-04-01

    The chaotic spike train of a homoclinic dynamical system is self-synchronized by applying a time-delayed correction proportional to the laser output intensity. Due to the sensitive nature of the homoclinic chaos to external perturbations, stabilization of very long-periodic orbits is possible. On these orbits, the dynamics appears chaotic over a finite time, but then it repeats with a recurrence time that is slightly longer than the delay time. The effect, called delayed self-synchronization, displays analogies with neurodynamic events that occur in the buildup of long-term memories.

  19. Quantum chaos and the black hole horizon

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to AdS/CFT, the analogy between black holes and thermal systems has become a practical tool, shedding light on thermalization, transport, and entanglement dynamics. Continuing in this vein, recent work has shown how chaos in the boundary CFT can be analyzed in terms of high energy scattering right on the horizon of the dual black hole. The analysis revolves around certain out-of-time-order correlation functions, which are simple diagnostics of the butterfly effect. We will review this work, along with a general bound on these functions that implies black holes are the most chaotic systems in quantum mechanics. (NB Room Change to Main Auditorium)

  20. Geometry in the large and hyperbolic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasslacher, B.; Mainieri, R.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors calculated observables in strongly chaotic systems. This is difficult to do because of a lack of a workable orbit classification for such systems. This is due to global geometrical information from the original dynamical system being entangled in an unknown way throughout the orbit sequence. They used geometrical methods from modern mathematics and recent connections between global geometry and modern quantum field theory to study the natural geometrical objects belonging to hard chaos-hyperbolic manifolds.

  1. Chaos Synchronization in Two Coupled Duffing Oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方见树; 荣曼生; 方焯; 刘小娟

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained two general unstable periodic solutions near the homoclinic orbits of two coupled Duffing oscillators with weak periodic perturbations by using the direct perturbation technique. Theoretical analysis reveals that the stable periodic orbits are embedded in the Melnikov chaotic attractors. The corresponding numerical results show that the phase portraits in the (x, u) and (y, v) planes are identical and are synchronized when the parameters of the two coupled oscillators are identical, but they are different and asynchronized when there is any difference between these parameters. It has been shown that the system parameters play a very important role in chaos control and synchronization.

  2. Time reversibility, computer simulation, and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Hoover, William Graham

    1999-01-01

    A small army of physicists, chemists, mathematicians, and engineers has joined forces to attack a classic problem, the "reversibility paradox", with modern tools. This book describes their work from the perspective of computer simulation, emphasizing the author's approach to the problem of understanding the compatibility, and even inevitability, of the irreversible second law of thermodynamics with an underlying time-reversible mechanics. Computer simulation has made it possible to probe reversibility from a variety of directions and "chaos theory" or "nonlinear dynamics" has supplied a useful

  3. Cryptography with chaos at the physical level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Romuel F. E-mail: romuelm@iceb.ufop.br; Baptista, Murilo S.; Grebogi, C

    2004-09-01

    In this work, we devise a chaos-based secret key cryptography scheme for digital communication where the encryption is realized at the physical level, that is, the encrypting transformations are applied to the wave signal instead to the symbolic sequence. The encryption process consists of transformations applied to a two-dimensional signal composed of the message carrying signal and an encrypting signal that has to be a chaotic one. The secret key, in this case, is related to the number of times the transformations are applied. Furthermore, we show that due to its chaotic nature, the encrypting signal is able to hide the statistics of the original signal.

  4. Quasiperiodic graphs at the onset of chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, B.; Cordero-Gracia, M.; Gómez, M.; Robledo, A.

    2013-12-01

    We examine the connectivity fluctuations across networks obtained when the horizontal visibility (HV) algorithm is used on trajectories generated by nonlinear circle maps at the quasiperiodic transition to chaos. The resultant HV graph is highly anomalous as the degrees fluctuate at all scales with amplitude that increases with the size of the network. We determine families of Pesin-like identities between entropy growth rates and generalized graph-theoretical Lyapunov exponents. An irrational winding number with pure periodic continued fraction characterizes each family. We illustrate our results for the so-called golden, silver, and bronze numbers.

  5. Chaos in classical D0-brane mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur-Ari, Guy [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Hanada, Masanori [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University,Kitashirakawa Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University,Yoshida Ushinomiyacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Shenker, Stephen H. [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We study chaos in the classical limit of the matrix quantum mechanical system describing D0-brane dynamics. We determine a precise value of the largest Lyapunov exponent, and, with less precision, calculate the entire spectrum of Lyapunov exponents. We verify that these approach a smooth limit as N→∞. We show that a classical analog of scrambling occurs with fast scrambling scaling, t{sub ∗}∼log S. These results confirm the k-locality property of matrix mechanics discussed by Sekino and Susskind.

  6. Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian: Quantum chaos approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovsky, Andrey R.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss applications of the theory of quantum chaos to one of the paradigm models of many-body quantum physics — the Bose-Hubbard (BH) model, which describes, in particular, interacting ultracold Bose atoms in an optical lattice. After preliminary, pure quantum analysis of the system we introduce the classical counterpart of the BH model and the governing semiclassical equations of motion. We analyze these equations for the problem of Bloch oscillations (BOs) of cold atoms where a number of experimental results are available. The paper is written for nonexperts and can be viewed as an introduction to the field.

  7. Feigenbaum graphs at the onset of chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas [Dept. Matemática Aplicada y Estadística, ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); Robledo, Alberto, E-mail: robledo@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física y Centro de Ciencias de la Complejidad, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the properties of networks obtained from the trajectories of unimodal maps at the transition to chaos via the horizontal visibility (HV) algorithm. We find that the network degrees fluctuate at all scales with amplitude that increases as the size of the network grows, and can be described by a spectrum of graph-theoretical generalized Lyapunov exponents. We further define an entropy growth rate that describes the amount of information created along paths in network space, and find that such entropy growth rate coincides with the spectrum of generalized graph-theoretical exponents, constituting a set of Pesin-like identities for the network.

  8. Effect of Chaos on Relativistic Quantum Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    andAkis R., Phys. Rev. Lett., 103 (2009) 054101;Huang L., Lai Y.-C. and Grebogi C., Chaos, 21 (2011) 013102. [3] Novoselov K. S., Geim A. K., Morozov S. V...Feng R., Dai Z., Marchenkov A. N., Conrad E. H., First P. N. and de Heer W. A., J. Phys. Chem. B, 108 (2004) 19912; Novoselov K. S., Geim A. K., Morozov...P., Nature, 438 (2005) 201; Castro Neto A. H., Guinea F., Peres N. M. R., Novoselov K. S. and Geim A. K., Rev. Mod. Phys., 81 (2009) 109; Das Sarma S

  9. Chaos in the BMN matrix model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Yuhma; Kawai, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kentaroh [Department of Physics, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2015-06-29

    We study classical chaotic motions in the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase (BMN) matrix model. For this purpose, it is convenient to focus upon a reduced system composed of two-coupled anharmonic oscillators by supposing an ansatz. We examine three ansätze: 1) two pulsating fuzzy spheres, 2) a single Coulomb-type potential, and 3) integrable fuzzy spheres. For the first two cases, we show the existence of chaos by computing Poincaré sections and a Lyapunov spectrum. The third case leads to an integrable system. As a result, the BMN matrix model is not integrable in the sense of Liouville, though there may be some integrable subsectors.

  10. Polarization chaos in an optically pumped laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrat, C; Kul'minskii, A; Vilaseca, R; Corbalán, R

    1995-06-15

    We study the steady-state and dynamic behavior of an optically pumped J = 0 ? J = 1 ? J = 0 laser operating with an isotropic ring cavity and an axial magnetic field. The gain anisotropy induced by a linearly polarized pump-laser f ield leads, in the steady state, to locking of the two circularly polarized components of the laser field, which acquires a linear polarization parallel to that of the pump field. In the presence of laser intensity instabilities, however, locking does not occur, and polarization instabilities appear. For the f irst time to our knowledge, polarization chaos has been found in a laser system.

  11. River of kings [Mae Nam Chao Phraya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogg, R.

    1997-10-01

    Low rainfall and a growing demand for water have had profound effects on water supplies in Thailand`s Mae Nam Chao Phraya river basin. In particular, low water levels are causing problems at the Bhumibol and Sirikit dams, as rice farms are threatened. The work of a Government sponsored think-tank set up to coordinate water management in the region is describe. Strategies may include use of groundwater at peak demand, recycling waste water and improve technical efficiency to reduce distribution losses. Any such policy changes will inevitably have widespread political, economic and social consequences. (UK)

  12. Self-organized chaos through polyhomeostatic optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, D; Gros, Claudius

    2010-08-06

    The goal of polyhomeostatic control is to achieve a certain target distribution of behaviors, in contrast to homeostatic regulation, which aims at stabilizing a steady-state dynamical state. We consider polyhomeostasis for individual and networks of firing-rate neurons, adapting to achieve target distributions of firing rates maximizing information entropy. We show that any finite polyhomeostatic adaption rate destroys all attractors in Hopfield-like network setups, leading to intermittently bursting behavior and self-organized chaos. The importance of polyhomeostasis to adapting behavior in general is discussed.

  13. Importance of packing in spiral defect chaos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kapilanjan Krishna

    2008-04-01

    We develop two measures to characterize the geometry of patterns exhibited by the state of spiral defect chaos, a weakly turbulent regime of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. These describe the packing of contiguous stripes within the pattern by quantifying their length and nearest-neighbor distributions. The distributions evolve towards unique distribution with increasing Rayleigh number that suggests power-law scaling for the dynamics in the limit of infinite system size. The techniques are generally applicable to patterns that are reducible to a binary representation.

  14. Using chaos to improve measurement precision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何斌; 杨灿军; 周银生; 陈鹰

    2002-01-01

    If the measuring signals wore input to the chaotic dynamic system as initial parameters, the system outputs might be in steady state, periodic state or chaos state. If the chaotic dynamic system outputs controlled in the periodic states, the periodic numbers would be changed most with the signals. Our novel method is to add chaotic dynamic vibration to the measurement or sensor system. The sensor sensitivity and precision of a measurement system would be improved with this method. Chaotic dynamics measurement algorithms are given and their sensitivity to parameters are analyzed in this paper. The effects of noises on the system are discussed,

  15. Using chaos to improve measurement precision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    If the measuring signals were input to the chaotic dynamic system as initial parameters, the system outputs might be in steady state, periodic state or chaos state. If the chaotic dynamic system outputs controlled in the periodic states, the periodic numbers would be changed most with the signals. Our novel method is to add chaotic dynamic vibration to the measurement or sensor system.The sensor sensitivity and precision of a measurement system would be improved with this method. Chaotic dynamics measurement algorithms are given and their sensitivity to parameters are analyzed in this paper. The effects of noises on the system are discussed.

  16. Chaos in the BMN matrix model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yuhma; Kawai, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2015-06-01

    We study classical chaotic motions in the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase (BMN) matrix model. For this purpose, it is convenient to focus upon a reduced system composed of two-coupled anharmonic oscillators by supposing an ansatz. We examine three ansätze: 1) two pulsating fuzzy spheres, 2) a single Coulomb-type potential, and 3) integrable fuzzy spheres. For the first two cases, we show the existence of chaos by computing Poincaré sections and a Lyapunov spectrum. The third case leads to an integrable system. As a result, the BMN matrix model is not integrable in the sense of Liouville, though there may be some integrable subsectors.

  17. Chaos in the BMN matrix model

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, Yuhma; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2015-01-01

    We study classical chaotic motions in the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase (BMN) matrix model. For this purpose, it is convenient to focus upon a reduced system composed of two-coupled anharmonic oscillators by supposing an ansatz. We examine three ans\\"atze: 1) two pulsating fuzzy spheres, 2) a single Coulomb-type potential, and 3) integrable fuzzy spheres. For the first two cases, we show the existence of chaos by computing Poincar\\'e sections and a Lyapunov spectrum. The third case leads to an integrable system. As a result, the BMN matrix model is not integrable in the sense of Liouville, though there may be some integrable subsectors.

  18. Experimental Chaos - Proceedings of the 3rd Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert G.; Lu, Weiping; Ditto, William; Pecora, Lou; Spano, Mark; Vohra, Sandeep

    1996-10-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Spatiotemporal Chaos and Patterns * Scale Segregation via Formation of Domains in a Nonlinear Optical System * Laser Dynamics as Hydrodynamics * Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Human Epileptic Seizures * Experimental Transition to Chaos in a Quasi 1D Chain of Oscillators * Measuring Coupling in Spatiotemporal Dynamical Systems * Chaos in Vortex Breakdown * Dynamical Analysis * Radial Basis Function Modelling and Prediction of Time Series * Nonlinear Phenomena in Polyrhythmic Hand Movements * Using Models to Diagnose, Test and Control Chaotic Systems * New Real-Time Analysis of Time Series Data with Physical Wavelets * Control and Synchronization * Measuring and Controlling Chaotic Dynamics in a Slugging Fluidized Bed * Control of Chaos in a Laser with Feedback * Synchronization and Chaotic Diode Resonators * Control of Chaos by Continuous-time Feedback with Delay * A Framework for Communication using Chaos Sychronization * Control of Chaos in Switching Circuits * Astrophysics, Meteorology and Oceanography * Solar-Wind-Magnetospheric Dynamics via Satellite Data * Nonlinear Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere * Fractal Dimension of Scalar and Vector Variables from Turbulence Measurements in the Atmospheric Surface Layer * Mechanics * Escape and Overturning: Subtle Transient Behavior in Nonlinear Mechanical Models * Organising Centres in the Dynamics of Parametrically Excited Double Pendulums * Intermittent Behaviour in a Heating System Driven by Phase Transitions * Hydrodynamics * Size Segregation in Couette Flow of Granular Material * Routes to Chaos in Rotational Taylor-Couette Flow * Experimental Study of the Laminar-Turbulent Transition in an Open Flow System * Chemistry * Order and Chaos in Excitable Media under External Forcing * A Chemical Wave Propagation with Accelerating Speed Accompanied by Hydrodynamic Flow * Optics * Instabilities in Semiconductor Lasers with Optical Injection * Spatio

  19. Equilibrium behavior of coarse-grained chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egolf, David A.; Ballard, Christopher C.; Esty, C. Clark

    2015-03-01

    A wide variety of systems exhibiting spatiotemporal chaos have been shown to be extensive, in that their fractal dimensions grow linearly with volume. Ruelle argued that this extensivity is evidence that these systems can be viewed as a gas of weakly-interacting regions. We have tested this idea by performing large-scale computational studies of spatiotemporal chaos in the 1D complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, and we have found that aspects of the coarse-grained system are well-described not only as a gas, but as an equilibrium gas -- in particular, a Tonks gas (and variants) in the grand canonical ensemble. Furthermore, for small system sizes, the average number of particles in the corresponding Tonks gas exhibits oscillatory, decaying deviations from extensivity in agreement with deviations in the fractal dimension found by Fishman and Egolf. This result not only supports Ruelle's picture but also suggests that the coarse-grained behavior of this far-from-equilibrium system might be understood using equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  20. Order and chaos in soft condensed matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Sood; Rajesh Ganapathy

    2006-07-01

    Soft matter, like colloidal suspensions and surfactant gels, exhibit strong response to modest external perturbations. This paper reviews our recent experiments on the nonlinear flow behaviour of surfactant worm-like micellar gels. A rich dynamic behaviour exhibiting regular, quasi-periodic, intermittency and chaos is observed. In particular, we have shown experimentally that the route to chaos is via Type-II intermittency in shear thinning worm-like micellar solution of cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate where the strength of flow-concentration coupling is tuned by the addition of sodium chloride. A Poincaré first return map of the time series and the probability distribution of laminar length between burst events show that our data are consistent with Type-II intermittency. The existence of a `Butterfly' intensity pattern in small angle light scattering (SALS) measurements performed simultaneously with the rheological measurements confirms the coupling of flow to concentration fluctuations in the system under study. The scattered depolarised intensity in SALS, sensitive to orientational order fluctuations, shows the same time-dependence (like intermittency) as that of shear stress.