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Sample records for unit level iii

  1. Epidemiological Study of Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Conjunctivitis in a Level III Neonatal Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conjunctivitis is one of the most frequently occurring hospital-acquired infections among neonates, although it is less studied than potentially life-threatening infections, such as sepsis and pneumonia. Objectives. The aims of our work were to identify epidemiologic characteristics, pathogens, and susceptibility patterns of bacterial hospital-acquired conjunctivitis (HAC in a level III neonatal unit. Materials and Methods. Data were collected retrospectively from patient charts and laboratory databases. Hospital-acquired conjunctivitis was defined in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control/National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN diagnostic criteria. Results. One or more episodes of HAC were diagnosed in 4,0% ( of 1492 neonates admitted during the study period. Most of the episodes involved premature (75,4% and low birth weight (75,4% neonates. Infection rates were higher among patients undergoing noninvasive mechanical ventilation (46,7%, parenteral nutrition (13,6%, and phototherapy (6,8%. Predominant pathogens included Serratia marcescens (27,9%, Escherichia coli (23%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18%. Susceptibility patterns revealed bacterial resistances to several antibiotic classes. Gentamicin remains the adequate choice for empirical treatment of HAC in our NICU. Conclusion. It is important to know the local patterns of the disease in order to adjust prevention strategies. Our work contributes to the epidemiological characterization of a sometimes overlooked disease.

  2. Epidemiological Study of Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Conjunctivitis in a Level III Neonatal Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Catarina; Gonçalves, Márcia; João, Anabela

    2013-01-01

    Background. Conjunctivitis is one of the most frequently occurring hospital-acquired infections among neonates, although it is less studied than potentially life-threatening infections, such as sepsis and pneumonia. Objectives. The aims of our work were to identify epidemiologic characteristics, pathogens, and susceptibility patterns of bacterial hospital-acquired conjunctivitis (HAC) in a level III neonatal unit. Materials and Methods. Data were collected retrospectively from patient charts and laboratory databases. Hospital-acquired conjunctivitis was defined in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control/National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN) diagnostic criteria. Results. One or more episodes of HAC were diagnosed in 4,0% (n = 60) of 1492 neonates admitted during the study period. Most of the episodes involved premature (75,4%) and low birth weight (75,4%) neonates. Infection rates were higher among patients undergoing noninvasive mechanical ventilation (46,7%), parenteral nutrition (13,6%), and phototherapy (6,8%). Predominant pathogens included Serratia marcescens (27,9%), Escherichia coli (23%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18%). Susceptibility patterns revealed bacterial resistances to several antibiotic classes. Gentamicin remains the adequate choice for empirical treatment of HAC in our NICU. Conclusion. It is important to know the local patterns of the disease in order to adjust prevention strategies. Our work contributes to the epidemiological characterization of a sometimes overlooked disease. PMID:23766676

  3. Omernik's Level III Ecoregions of the Continental United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer shows Omernik's Level III ecoregions, derived from a 1:7,500,000 map created by J.M. Omernik in 1987 and from refinements of Omernik's framework that...

  4. Neonatal pleural effusions in a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Mariana Barbosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions are rare in the newborn. Still, being familiar with this condition is relevant given its association with a wide range of disorders. Only two large series of cases on this matter have been published, with no solid conclusions established. The aim of this study is to determine the etiology, management and prognosis of pleural effusions in a population of high-risk neonates.The authors performed a retrospective study in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of "Hospital de São João", Porto (Portugal, between 1997 and 2014, of all newborns with the diagnosis of pleural effusion, chylothorax, hemothorax, empyema, fetal hydrops or leakage of total parenteral nutrition (TPN.Eighty-two newborns were included, 48 males and 34 females. Pleural effusions were congenital in 19 (23.2% newborns and acquired in 63 (76.8%. Fetal hydrops was the most frequent cause (15 cases, 78.9% of congenital effusions while postoperative after intrathoracic surgery was the most common cause (39 cases, 61.9% of acquired effusions, followed by leakage of TPN (13 cases, 20.6%. Chylothorax was the most common type of effusion (41.5% of cases. Pleural effusions after intrathoracic surgery were mainly (64.1% chylothoraces. Regarding use of octreotide for treatment of acquired chylous effusions, the comparative analysis showed no statistical differences between the group of alive newborns who received octreotide and the group who did not. Twenty-seven (32.9% newborns died; the causes of death were related to underlying diseases and not to the pleural effusion. Clinical outcome is generally good, except in hydropic neonates. Blood albumin level appears to be predictive of prognosis and further investigation on its clinical significance should be encouraged.

  5. Pneumothorax in neonates: a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit experience

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    Íris Santos Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumothorax occurs more frequently in the neonatal period than in any other period of life and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Several risk factors for pneumothorax, including respiratory pathology, invasive and non-invasive respiratory support, and predictors of mortality have been described.Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of pneumothorax, to assess risk factors and to describe the clinical characteristics, management and outcome of newborn infants with pneumothorax, as well as to identify predictors of mortality in these newborns.Methods: This retrospective case-control study included all newborns hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of “Centro Hospitalar São João”, Porto, Portugal, between 2003 and 2014, with the diagnosis of pneumothorax. A control group was selected among the newborns without pneumothoraces, admitted to the same NICU during the same period. The collected data included: demographics and perinatal data, pneumothorax characteristics, classification, treatment and clinical outcomes.Results: Our study included 240 neonates (80 with pneumothoraces and 160 controls, of whom 145 were male (60.4%. Median gestational age was 37 (24-40 weeks and median birthweight 2,613 (360-4,324 grams. The prevalence in our NICU was 1.5%. Pneumothorax was significantly associated with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS (p = 0.010 and transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN (p < 0.001. Invasive mechanical ventilation (MV (p = 0.016 and FiO2 ≥ 0.4 (p = 0.003, were independent risk factors for the development of pneumothoraces. The mortality rate was 13.8%. Hypotension, MV and thoracentesis followed by a chest tube insertion were found to be predictors of mortality in newborns with pneumothoraces, but pneumothorax per se was not a predictor of mortality.Conclusion: Pneumothorax is relatively frequent in the NICU. Its risk factors and predictors of mortality should be known in order to

  6. Outdoorsman, Unit III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Agriculture, Edmonton.

    The third and final unit of the 4-H Outdoorsman Program covers the most advanced and challenging campcraft skills for 4-H members in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Survival camping (including building shelters and finding food), in-depth map-reading and orienteering, game management, hiking themes and recordkeeping are all…

  7. Auditing of Monitoring and Respiratory Support Equipment in a Level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Elena Bergon-Sendin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Random safety audits (RSAs are a safety tool but have not been widely used in hospitals. Objectives. To determine the frequency of proper use of equipment safety mechanisms in relation to monitoring and mechanical ventilation by performing RSAs. The study also determined whether factors related to the patient, time period, or characteristics of the area of admission influenced how the device safety systems were used. Methods. A prospective observational study was conducted in a level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU during 2012. 87 days were randomly selected. Appropriate overall use was defined when all evaluated variables were correctly programmed in the audited device. Results. A total of 383 monitor and ventilator audits were performed. The Kappa coefficient of interobserver agreement was 0.93. The rate of appropriate overall use of the monitors and respiratory support equipment was 33.68%. Significant differences were found with improved usage during weekends, OR 1.85 (1.12–3.06, p=0.01, and during the late shift (3 pm to 10 pm, OR 1.59 (1.03–2.4, p=0.03. Conclusions. Equipment safety systems of monitors and ventilators are not properly used. To improve patient safety, we should identify which alarms are really needed and where the difficulties lie for the correct alarm programming.

  8. Nosocomial sepsis: evaluation of the efficacy of preventive measures in a level-III neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Catarina Cardoso de; Pissarra da Silva, Susana Maria Saraiva; Flor de Lima Caldas de Oliveira, Filipa Silveira Dias; Guimarães Pereira Areias, Maria Hercília Ferreira

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate nosocomial infections preventive bundle, implemented in April 2010 in Centro Hospitalar de São João (CHSJ) Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) effectiveness. Newborns admitted to level-III NICU of CHSJ, between 1 April 2007 and 31 March 2013, with sepsis as discharge diagnosis, were selected and divided into two periods (Period 1 and 2, before and after new preventive bundle introduction). Data from the two periods were compared. Nosocomial sepsis incidence density decreased significantly from 8.6 to 4.8 per 1000 patient days from Period 1 to 2. Nosocomial infections preventive bundle implementation led to a significant decrease in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) rates from 14.1 to 10.4 per 1000 catheter days. Nosocomial infections preventive bundle implemented revealed efficient in decreasing the incidence density of nosocomial sepsis. However, CLABSI rates remain high. Physicians should be alert to the need to adhere to strict infection control protocols and institute effective measures for nosocomial infection surveillance.

  9. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level III Products

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    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  10. U.S. Level III and IV Ecoregions (U.S. EPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map service displays Level III and Level IV Ecoregions of the United States and was created from ecoregion data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection...

  11. Culture proven newborn sepsis with a special emphasis on late onset sepsis caused by Enterobacteriaceae in a level III neonatal care unit in Astana, Kazakhstan.

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    Kangozhinova, Kalamkas; Abentayeva, Botakoz; Repa, Andreas; Baltabayeva, Assem; Erwa, Wolfgang; Stauffer, Friedrich

    2013-10-01

    Newborn sepsis is one of the major public health concerns worldwide. Also in our neonatal care unit, it is one of the major problems and especially infections with Enterobacteriaceae were noted to pose an increasing problem in the last years. Data collection was done retrospectively for 2011. Early onset sepsis was defined as having a positive blood culture within 72 h and late onset sepsis after 72 h of delivery. Out of 599 patients being admitted, 58 newborns were assessed having a neonatal sepsis. Of these 58 newborns with sepsis, 11 were diagnosed within 72 h post delivery (early onset) and 47 were diagnosed after 72 h post delivery (late onset). The percentage of Enterobacteriaceae causing late onset sepsis was 57.5 %. Among these, Klebsiella pneumoniae could be isolated in 29.8 %, Enterobacter cloacae in 12.8 %, Enterobacter aerogenes in 8.5 %, and Escherichia coli in 6.4 % of late onset sepsis. Majority of the strains showed a resistance to antibiotics used in empiric treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis/treatment from birth until the onset of late onset sepsis could be analyzed in 20 out of 27 newborns with late onset sepsis caused by Enterobacteriaceae. A regimen of empirical antibiotic treatment containing aminopenicillin and/or gentamicin was administered in 16 newborns and that of cephalosporin in 14 out of 20 newborns for at least 5 days before onset of sepsis. The association of empiric long-term antibiotic treatment and the high number of late onset sepsis with often multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae might be causal and urges for a change in general antibiotic prophylaxis/treatment in newborns admitted to the neonatal care unit of our hospital.

  12. Careers (A Course of Study). Unit III: Do It Right!

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    Turley, Kay

    Designed to enable the special needs student to comprehend and complete job application forms, this set of activities on job application vocabulary, neatness, and following directions is the third unit in a nine-unit secondary level careers course intended to provide handicapped students with the knowledge and tools necessary to succeed in the…

  13. 30 CFR 57.22606 - Explosive materials and blasting units (III mines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosive materials and blasting units (III... materials and blasting units (III mines). (a) Mine operators shall notify the appropriate MSHA District Manager of all nonapproved explosive materials and blasting units to be used prior to their use....

  14. Leptin Level and Skipping Breakfast: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III)

    OpenAIRE

    Keiko Asao; Amandine Sambira Marekani; Jessica VanCleave; Amy E. Rothberg

    2016-01-01

    Skipping breakfast is a common dietary habit considered to be unhealthy. However, the mechanisms underlying skipping breakfast have not been fully explored. Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy storage and secretes in a diurnal rhythm with lowest levels in the morning. We examined the association between the serum leptin level and skipping breakfast in 5714 adults in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988–1994. We defined breakfast as any food...

  15. PENGEMBANGAN STRATEGIC BUSINESS UNIT PERHUTANI UNIT III JAWA BARAT DAN BANTEN

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    Rurin Wahyu Listriana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study aimed to 1 analyze the innovation and competitiveness ability of Strategic Business Unit (SBU in the KBM (independent business unit industri and 2 formulate alternative policies that can enhance company innovation and competitiveness. The study was conducted at KBM Industri and SBU within the KBM industri. The information and data was obtained through interviews and distributing questionnaires to 10 respondents. Respondents were chosen based on their expertise and or experience. Data processing techniques used the SWOT analysis and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. Results of this study shows that KBM Industri Unit III have the power and the opportunity to expand, increase growth, and achieve maximum progress by improving the quality, developing new products, improving processes and increasing access to wider market. The potential innovation can also be seen from the process-product innovation, knowledge-skills innovation and method-system innovation. In the KBM Industri Unit III, those potential covers the raw materials, process equipment and products. The improvement of company's innovation was influenced by the main factor organization with the value 0,436 and the most influential factors of marketing with a value 0,398, while the ultimate goal is the improvement of the process with the value 0,756. The improvement of the company's innovation strategy is through strategy priority, namely cooperation with other /external parties weighted by 0,703 and optimizing own capabilities of the research or conducting institutions development research weighted by 0,297.Keywords: SBU, KBM Industri, Innovation, AHP, SWOTABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan 1 menganalisis kemampuan inovasi dan daya saing Strategic Business Unit (SBU di Kesatuan Bisnis Mandiri (KBM Industri dan 2 merumuskan kebijakan alternatif yang dapat meningkatkan inovasi dan daya saing perusahaan. Penelitian  dilakukan pada KBM Industri  dan SBU yang ada didalam  KBM

  16. Human Requirements of Flight. Aerospace Education III. Instructional Unit IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Arthur D.

    This curriculum guide is prepared for the Aerospace Education III series publication entitled "Human Requirements of Flight." It provides specific guidelines for teachers using the textbook. The guidelines for each chapter are organized according to objectives (traditional and behavioral), suggested outline, orientation, suggested key points,…

  17. Leptin Level and Skipping Breakfast: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Marekani, Amandine Sambira; VanCleave, Jessica; Rothberg, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Skipping breakfast is a common dietary habit considered to be unhealthy. However, the mechanisms underlying skipping breakfast have not been fully explored. Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy storage and secretes in a diurnal rhythm with lowest levels in the morning. We examined the association between the serum leptin level and skipping breakfast in 5714 adults in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988–1994. We defined breakfast as any food or beverage consumed between 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. using a single 24-h recall. Skipped breakfast was seen in 13.1%. In the logistic regression models with and without adjusting for adiposity and sex, leptin levels were not associated with skipping breakfast. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and time of venipuncture, the association remained insignificant. After further adjusting for potential confounders: physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking and diabetes and after further adjusting for: dietary factors, insulin and glucose levels, there was a 9% and 11%–12%, respectively, statistically significantly higher likelihood of skipping breakfast if the leptin level was more than 50% greater. Further investigation into the biological reasons for skipping breakfast may be useful for promoting healthy lifestyles. PMID:26927164

  18. Leptin Level and Skipping Breakfast: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Marekani, Amandine Sambira; VanCleave, Jessica; Rothberg, Amy E

    2016-02-25

    Skipping breakfast is a common dietary habit considered to be unhealthy. However, the mechanisms underlying skipping breakfast have not been fully explored. Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy storage and secretes in a diurnal rhythm with lowest levels in the morning. We examined the association between the serum leptin level and skipping breakfast in 5714 adults in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994. We defined breakfast as any food or beverage consumed between 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. using a single 24-h recall. Skipped breakfast was seen in 13.1%. In the logistic regression models with and without adjusting for adiposity and sex, leptin levels were not associated with skipping breakfast. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and time of venipuncture, the association remained insignificant. After further adjusting for potential confounders: physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking and diabetes and after further adjusting for: dietary factors, insulin and glucose levels, there was a 9% and 11%-12%, respectively, statistically significantly higher likelihood of skipping breakfast if the leptin level was more than 50% greater. Further investigation into the biological reasons for skipping breakfast may be useful for promoting healthy lifestyles.

  19. Leptin Level and Skipping Breakfast: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Asao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skipping breakfast is a common dietary habit considered to be unhealthy. However, the mechanisms underlying skipping breakfast have not been fully explored. Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy storage and secretes in a diurnal rhythm with lowest levels in the morning. We examined the association between the serum leptin level and skipping breakfast in 5714 adults in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988–1994. We defined breakfast as any food or beverage consumed between 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. using a single 24-h recall. Skipped breakfast was seen in 13.1%. In the logistic regression models with and without adjusting for adiposity and sex, leptin levels were not associated with skipping breakfast. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and time of venipuncture, the association remained insignificant. After further adjusting for potential confounders: physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking and diabetes and after further adjusting for: dietary factors, insulin and glucose levels, there was a 9% and 11%–12%, respectively, statistically significantly higher likelihood of skipping breakfast if the leptin level was more than 50% greater. Further investigation into the biological reasons for skipping breakfast may be useful for promoting healthy lifestyles.

  20. Free Trade and Tariffs: Level III, Unit 2, Lesson 1; Capitalism, Communism, Socialism: Lesson 2; Nationalism vs. Internationalism: Lesson 3. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

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    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Free Trade and Tariffs; Capitalism, Communism, Socialism; and Nationalism vs. Internationalism. Each of the lessons concludes with a Mastery Test to be completed by the student. (DB)

  1. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Why You're You. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). The chapters include basic information about heredity, activities, and optional "excursions." The answers to all activities are included. An introduction describes the work of Gregor Mendel and his…

  2. Omernik's Level III Ecoregions Of The Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a...

  3. Mobile Units Supplementing Education (M.U.S.E.). Evaluation, ESEA Title III, Fiscal Year 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge County Schools, Fremont, NE.

    A project in Dodge County, Nebraska, from July 1, 1969, to June 30, 1970, used Mobile Units Supplementing Education (MUSE) under an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title III grant. The primary objective of the pilot project and the operational grant was to demonstrate and explore the possibilities of bringing special and supplemental units…

  4. 78 FR 21980 - Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Service Level III and Other Coatings, Atmospheric Storage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Service Level III and Other Coatings, Atmospheric Storage...-2012-02, ``Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Service Level III and Other Coatings, Atmospheric... aging management programs (AMP) and aging management review (AMR) items in NUREG-1801, Revision 2...

  5. On spiking units in the first optic chiasm of the blowfly. III. The sustaining unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, N.M.; Hateren, J.H. van

    1993-01-01

    We recorded from the spiking sustaining unit in the optic chiasm between lamina and medulla in the brain of the blowfly Calliphora vicina, and investigated both temporal and spatial properties of the light-adapted cell. The sustaining unit fails to follow the highest temporal frequencies followed by

  6. On spiking units in the first optic chiasm of the blowfly. III. The sustaining unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, N.M.; Hateren, J.H. van

    1993-01-01

    We recorded from the spiking sustaining unit in the optic chiasm between lamina and medulla in the brain of the blowfly Calliphora vicina, and investigated both temporal and spatial properties of the light-adapted cell. The sustaining unit fails to follow the highest temporal frequencies followed by

  7. The value of level III clearance in patients with axillary and sentinel node positive breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, Mary F

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of level III axillary clearance is contentious, with great variance worldwide in the extent and levels of clearance performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine rates of level III positivity in patients undergoing level I-III axillary clearance, and identify which patients are at highest risk of involved level III nodes. METHODS: From a database of 2850 patients derived from symptomatic and population-based screening service, 1179 patients who underwent level I-III clearance between the years 1999-2007 were identified. The pathology, surgical details, and prior sentinel nodes biopsies of patients were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven hundred seventy nine patients had level I-III axillary clearance. Of the patients, 63% (n = 747) were node positive. Of patients with node positive disease, 23% (n = 168) were level II positive and 19% (n = 141) were level III positive. Two hundred fifty patients had positive sentinel node biopsies prior to axillary clearance. Of these, 12% (n = 30) and 9% (n = 22) were level II and level III positive, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of level III involvement in patients with node positive disease were tumor size (P < 0.001, OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.2-1.5), invasive lobular disease (P < 0.001, OR = 3.6; 95% CI: 1.9-6.95), extranodal extension (P < 0.001, OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.18-0.4), and lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.04, OR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-1). Lobular invasive disease (P = 0.049, OR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1-16.8), extranodal spread (P = 0.003, OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.06-0.57), and having more than one positive sentinel node (P = 0.009, OR = 4.9; 95% CI: 1.5-16.1) were predictive of level III involvement in patients with sentinel node positive disease. CONCLUSION: Level III clearance has a selective but definite role to play in patients who have node positive breast carcinoma. Pathological characteristics of the primary tumor are of particular use in identifying those who are at various risk of level III nodal

  8. Proposed South San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Level III preaquisition survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A Level III Contaminant Preaquisition Survey was conducted during 1992 in the south San Diego Bay area to evaluate potential hazards to trustee resources and/or...

  9. Level 2 Foundation Units. Key Stage 3: National Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    These foundation units are aimed at pupils working within Level 2 entry to Year 7. They are designed to remind pupils what they know and take them forward. The units also will teach phonics knowledge from consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words to long vowel phonemes. The writing units focus on developing the following skills: understanding what a…

  10. Plasma apolipoprotein C-III levels, triglycerides, and coronary artery calcification in type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Arman; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Khera, Amit V; Qasim, Atif; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P

    2015-08-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins have emerged as causal risk factors for developing coronary heart disease independent of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) modulates triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism through inhibition of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Mutations causing loss-of-function of ApoC-III lower triglycerides and reduce coronary heart disease risk, suggestive of a causal role for ApoC-III. Little data exist about the relationship of ApoC-III, triglycerides, and atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Here, we examined the relationships between plasma ApoC-III, triglycerides, and coronary artery calcification in patients with T2DM. Plasma ApoC-III levels were measured in a cross-sectional study of 1422 subjects with T2DM but without clinically manifest coronary heart disease. ApoC-III levels were positively associated with total cholesterol (Spearman r=0.36), triglycerides (r=0.59), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.16), fasting glucose (r=0.16), and glycosylated hemoglobin (r=0.12; Ptriglycerides (Tobit regression ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-2.18; P=0.086) and separately for very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Tobit regression ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.71; P=0.53). In persons with T2DM, increased plasma ApoC-III is associated with higher triglycerides, less favorable cardiometabolic phenotypes, and higher coronary artery calcification, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. Therapeutic inhibition of ApoC-III may thus be a novel strategy for reducing plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and cardiovascular risk in T2DM. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Administration Medication Errors in Emergency Department in Level III Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia González Gómez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available • Objective: To determine the prevalence of medication errors associated with the administration in the emergency room of University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla. • Introduction: Adverse events related to health care, are increasingly common, it is estimated that between 44000 and 98000 people served in U.S. hospitals die from adverse events related to health care. In 7000 these deaths are caused by medication errors. In Spain the studies speak of similar figures. The emergency services are excluded usually in these studies because of its particular characteristics, but also are well known that these are characteristics (speed of decision-making, not having systems in unit dose dispensing ... what is expected that mistakes can be produced in larger numbers in emergency services in the areas of Spain hospitalization. • Method: This is a descriptive study in which cross-examine a sample of 627 administrations made in different areas of attention of the Emergency Department Valdecilla Hospital, in different time slots, months of the year and days a week. Between the months of January and December 2009.• Results: Have detected 119 errors in 627 observations, the most common error is log.• Conclusions: We have found a lower incidence of error 2.7%, comparing with other work (10%. While most of the studies reviewed speak of medication errors in general, including prescription, transcription, and administration.

  12. The level and nature of autistic intelligence III: Inspection time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Elise B; Soulières, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Mottron, Laurent

    2013-02-01

    Across the autism spectrum, level of intelligence is highly dependent on the psychometric instrument used for assessment, and there are conflicting views concerning which measures best estimate autistic cognitive abilities. Inspection time is a processing speed measure associated with general intelligence in typical individuals. We therefore investigated autism spectrum performance on inspection time in relation to two different general intelligence tests. Autism spectrum individuals were divided into autistic and Asperger subgroups according to speech development history. Compared to a typical control group, mean inspection time for the autistic subgroup but not the Asperger subgroup was significantly shorter (by 31%). However, the shorter mean autistic inspection time was evident only when groups were matched on Wechsler IQ and disappeared when they were matched using Raven's Progressive Matrices. When autism spectrum abilities are compared to typical abilities, results may be influenced by speech development history as well as by the instrument used for intelligence matching.

  13. 78 FR 77508 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; William States Lee III Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Combined...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; William States Lee III Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Combined Licenses Application Review AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final environmental impact...

  14. Remedial Action Report for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Wells

    2007-08-15

    This Phase III remedial action report addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility STF-02 Gun Range at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Phase I, consisting of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operble Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory Site-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring, was addressed in a previous report. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance.

  15. ANALISIS TINGKAT KEMATANGAN (MATURITY LEVELS UNIT LAYANAN PENGADAAN KABUPATEN BADUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gde Uma Darmapramita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of government procurement of goods and service is governed by presidential regulation number 70 year of 2012.  According to that, in Badung Regency implemented centralized in Procurement Service Unit of Badung Regency. As the one of Indonesia procurement unit pilot, Procurement Service Unit of Badung Regency has given the opportunity to perform a self assessment of its  maturity levels as government unit. The objective of this research is to find factors that influence Procuremet Service Unit of Badung Regency maturity levels, and also to find out in what level is Procurement Service Unit of Badung Regency stand. Data collection for this research have done by  using questionnaire that involve 50 respondents who understand very well about the duties and function of Procurement Service Unit of Badung Regency to perform a government procurement of good and services. The data analysis have been performed by use of factor analysis and supported by SPSS program. The result shows there are 3 factors that influent the Procurement Service Unit of Badung Regency maturity levels, which are : the synergy and organization culture, resources and risk management and organization’s performance development.  Whereas the maturity levels of Procurement Service Unit of Badung Regency is stand at compliance. Based to the factors that formed, the highly commitment and strong leadership of Badung Regency leader are very decisive to push ahead the enhancement  and  the development of Procurement Service Unit of Badung Regency.  First thing can be done is to establish an independent Procurement Service Unit therewith its Procurement Unit Development road maps that can be tiered and sustainable plan, monitor and evaluate

  16. Noise level analysis in adult intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Katharine Christofel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the noise level in adult intensive care unit. Methods: a quantitative study, in which the sound levels of the intensive care unit have been assessed by means of a decibel meter. Results: comparing the groups, there was a reduction in noise levels in both periods studied, but only in the afternoon there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05. The health professionals pointed out that the unit had moderate noise, coming mainly from equipment and professionals. Conclusion: adjusting the ventilator alarms contributed to the reduction of noise levels in the unit, and there was the perception that it is a moderate noise environment, although the noise levels in decibels observed were above the recommended values.

  17. Initial Survey Instructions for management unit water monitoring : level

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial survey instructions for 1.08 management unit water monitoring (level) survey on Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This survey is conducted weekly and is...

  18. Energy Optimization Modeling of Geothermal Power Plant (Case Study: Darajat Geothermal Field Unit III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, R. H. M.; Darmanto, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Darajat unit III geothermal power plant is developed by PT. Chevron Geothermal Indonesia (CGI). The plant capacity is 121 MW and load 110%. The greatest utilization power is consumed by Hot Well Pump (HWP) and Cooling Tower Fan (CTF). Reducing the utility power can be attempted by utilizing the wet bulb temperature fluctuation. In this study, a modelling process is developed by using Engineering Equation Solver (EES) software version 9.430.The possibility of energy saving is indicated by Specific Steam Consumption (SSC) net in relation to wet bulb temperature fluctuation from 9°C up to 20.5°C. Result shows that the existing daily operation reaches its optimum condition. The installation of Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) could be applied to optimize both utility power of HWP and CTF. The highest gain is obtained by VFD HWP installation as much as 0.80% when wet bulb temperature 18.5 °C.

  19. Bismalonamides (BISMA) as new extractants for Am(III) and Eu(III) from aqueous high-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murillo, M.T.; Almaraz, M.; Sanchez-Quesada, J.; Segura, M.; Iglesias-Sanchez, J.C.; Mendoza, J. de; Prados, P. [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Organica; Espartero, A.G. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Bismalonamides 1-8 and bisthiomalonamides 9-13 were synthesised and studied as extracting agents for Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid solutions into organic solvents. Bismalonamides 7a and 7g display higher distribution coefficients in chlorinated solvents than single malonamide DMDOHEMA, suggesting that bismalonamides could preorganise the binding groups around the cation more efficiently. Additionally, back-extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from a loaded organic solution of 7g in (50: 50){sub %} {sub vol} TPH/1-octanol mixture allowed to recover 99% of the initially extracted Am(III) and Eu(III) after three times of contact with fresh 0.01 mol/L nitric acid solutions. (orig.)

  20. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  1. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib J; Sölétormos, György;

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  2. Prediction of outcome from intensive care: a prospective cohort study comparing Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and III prognostic systems in a United Kingdom intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, D H; Taylor, B L; Millar, B; Smith, G B

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of two prognostic systems to predict hospital mortality in adult intensive care patients. Prospective cohort study. A mixed medical and surgical intensive care unit (ICU) in the United Kingdom. A total of 1,144 patients consecutively admitted to the study. None. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and III prognostic systems were applied to assess probabilities of hospital mortality, which were compared with the actual outcome. The overall goodness-of-fit of both models was assessed. Hospital death rates were higher than those predicted by each system. Risk estimates showed a strong positive correlation between both systems (nonsurvivors r2 = 0.756, p best overall total correct classification rate was 80.6% for APACHE III and 77.9% for APACHE II (both for a decision criterion of 40%). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.806 and 0.847 for APACHE II and III, respectively, confirming the better discrimination of APACHE III. When patients were classified by diagnostic categories, risk predictions did not fit uniformly across the spectrum of disease groups. For both models, mortality ratios were highest for trauma patients and lowest for the group with respiratory disease. APACHE II predictions for patients with gastrointestinal disease were significantly better. Risk estimates for surgical admissions were superior with APACHE II (MR = 1.27) compared with APACHE III (MR = 1.56), but were similar for medical patients (1.22 vs. 1.28 for APACHE II and III, respectively). Bias induced by factors reflecting the clinical practice in an individual ICU (e.g., admission criteria, treatment before admission) may have considerable impact on risk estimates. The identification of such factors appears to be a prerequisite for the meaningful interpretation of observed and predicted death rates on the individual ICU level. Both predictive models demonstrated a similar degree of overall goodness-of-fit. APACHE

  3. A modeling study of notch noise responses of type III units in the gerbil dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaohan; Voigt, Herbert F

    2006-12-01

    A computational model of the neural circuitry of the gerbil dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), based on the MacGregor's neuromime model, was used to simulate type III unit (P-cell) responses to notch noise stimuli. The DCN patch model is based on a previous computational model of the cat DCN [Hancock, K. E., and H. F. Voigt. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 27:73-87, 1999]. According to the experimental study of Parsons et al. [Ann. Biomed. Eng. 29:887-896, 2001], the responses of gerbil DCN type III units to notch noise stimuli are similar to those of cat DCN type IV units, which are thought to be spectral notch detectors. This suggests that type III units in the gerbil DCN may serve as spectral notch detectors. In this modeling study, a simplified notch noise response plot--spike discharge rate vs. notch cutoff frequency plot--was used to compare model responses to the experimental results. Parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis of three connection parameters within the DCN patch have been studied and shows the model is robust, providing reasonable fits to the experimental data from 14 of 15 type III units examined.

  4. The Internal Validation of Level II and Level III Respiratory Therapy Examinations. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouett, Michael L.

    This project began with the delineation of the roles and functions of respiratory therapy personnel by the American Association for Respiratory Therapy. In Phase II, The Psychological Corporation used this delineation to develop six proficiency examinations, three at each of two levels. One exam at each level was designated for the purpose of the…

  5. 76 FR 79228 - Combined Licenses at William States Lee III Nuclear Station Site, Units 1 and 2; Duke Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Combined Licenses at William States Lee III Nuclear Station Site, Units 1 and 2; Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft environmental impact statement; public...

  6. Apolipoprotein C-III Levels and Incident Coronary Artery Disease Risk: The EPIC-Norfolk Prospective Population Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capelleveen, Julian C; Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Yang, Xiaohong; Kastelein, John J P; Wareham, Nicholas J; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Stroes, Erik S G; Witztum, Joseph L; Hovingh, G Kees; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-06-01

    Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) is a key regulator of triglyceride metabolism. Elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and apoC-III levels are causally linked to coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The mechanism(s) through which apoC-III increases CAD risk remains largely unknown. The aim was to confirm the association between apoC-III plasma levels and CAD risk and to explore which lipoprotein subfractions contribute to this relationship between apoC-III and CAD risk. Plasma apoC-III levels were measured in baseline samples from a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study. The study comprised 2711 apparently healthy study participants, of whom 832 subsequently developed CAD. We studied the association of baseline apoC-III levels with incident CAD risk, lipoprotein subfractions measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and inflammatory biomarkers. ApoC-III levels were significantly associated with CAD risk (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.48-2.48 for highest compared with lowest quintile), retaining significance after adjustment for traditional CAD risk factors (odds ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.94). ApoC-III levels were positively correlated with triglyceride levels, (r=0.39), particle numbers of very-low-density lipoprotein (r=0.25), intermediate-density lipoprotein (r=0.23), small dense low-density lipoprotein (r=0.26), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (r=0.15), whereas an inverse correlation was observed with large low-density lipoprotein particle number (r=-0.11), PC-reactive protein. ApoC-III levels are significantly associated with incident CAD risk. Elevated levels of remnant lipoproteins, small dense low-density lipoprotein, and low-grade inflammation may explain this association. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Annual Groundwater Report May 2014 Through April 2015, October 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Jason [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Fred [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report provides the annual analysis of water quality restoration progress, cumulative through April 2015, for Operable Unit (OU) III, surface water and groundwater, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). The MMTS is a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act National Priorities List site located in and near the city of Monticello, San Juan County, Utah. MMTS comprises the 110-acre site of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill (mill site) and 1,700 acres of surrounding private and municipal property. Milling operations generated 2.5 million cubic yards of waste (tailings) from 1942 to 1960. The tailings were impounded at four locations on the mill site. Inorganic constituents in the tailings drained from the impoundments to contaminate local surface water (Montezuma Creek) and groundwater in the underlying alluvial aquifer. Mill tailings dispersed by wind and water also contaminated properties surrounding and downstream of the mill site. Remedial actions to remove and isolate radiologically contaminated soil, sediment, and debris from the former mill site (OU I) and surrounding properties (OU II) were completed in 1999 with the encapsulation of the wastes in an engineered repository located on DOE property 1 mile south of the former mill site. Contamination of groundwater and surface water remains within OU III at levels that exceed water quality protection standards. Uranium is the primary contaminant of concern. LM implemented monitored natural attenuation with institutional controls as the OU III remedy in 2004. Because groundwater restoration proceeded more slowly than expected and did not meet performance criteria established in the OU III Record of Decision (June 2004), LM implemented a contingency action in 2009 by an Explanation of Significant Difference to include a pump-and-treat system using a single extraction well and treatment by zero

  8. Late-preterm birth in a level III hospital: incidence and associated morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Garcez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Late-preterm infants are physiologically and metabolically immature and have important risk of morbidity and mortality.Aim: To analyze the incidence of late prematurity and its associated morbidity and mortality at a level III hospital between 2011 and 2013.Methods: This was a descriptive and retrospective study of infants born between 34 + 0/7 and 36 + 6/7 weeks’ gestation and its associated morbidity and mortality. Medical records were reviewed.Results: In a 3-year period there were 8,458 births of witch 513 (6.1% were late-preterm infants. Of these, 99/513 (19.3% had 34 weeks’ gestation, 145/513 (28.3% had 35 weeks’ gestation and 269/513 (52.4% had 36 weeks’ gestation. Late-preterm birth rate was 5.7% in 2011, 6.9% in 2012 and 5.6% in 2013 (p = 0.08. In relation to birth weight, 269 (52.4% of late-preterm infants had low birth weight. There was an association between gestational age and birth weight (p = 0.002.Of the 513 late-preterm infants, 177 (34.5% were admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU and more often at 34 weeks’ gestation (69/99, 69.7% than at 35 (57/145, 39.3% and 36 (51/269, 19.0% weeks’ gestation (p < 0.001. Most frequent clinical diagnoses were hyperbilirubinemia (112/177, 63.3%, feeding difficulties (111/177, 62.7%, transient tachypnea of the newborn (71/177, 40.1%, hypoglycemia (38/177, 21.5%, intrauterine growth restriction (33/177, 18.6%. Average length of hospitalization was 12 days. Newborns of 34 weeks’ gestation were longer admitted than newborns of 35 and 36 weeks’ gestation (15.3 vs 9.8 vs 10.8 days; p = 0.002. There was one death due to sepsis after surgical correction of gastroschisis.Conclusion: The incidence of late-preterm birth remained stable between 2011 and 2013. Late-preterm hospitalization rate in the NICU was 34.5%. Hyperbilirubinemia, feeding difficulties and respiratory disease were the main diagnosis. Late-preterm of 34 weeks’ gestation were admitted more

  9. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  10. Level 0 trigger decision unit for the LHCb experiment

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    LHCb, présenté par J. Laubser, à paraître dans les proceedings; International audience; The Level-0 Decision Unit( L0DU)is the central part of the first trigger level of the LHCb detector. The L0DU receives information from the Calorimeter, Muon and Pile-Up sub-triggers, with fixed latencies, at 40 MHz via 24 high speed optical fiber links running at 1.6 Gb/s. The L0DU performs simple physics algorithm to compute the decision in order to reduce the data flow down to 1 MHz for the next trigger...

  11. Increased Levels of Type I and III Collagen and Hyaluronan in Scleroderma Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Klaus; Heickendorff, Lene; L, Risteli

    1997-01-01

    The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) and the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and hyaluronan (HA) were measured in plasma and suction blister fluid from 13 systemic sclerosis patients and 11 healthy volunteers. Suction blisters and skin biopsies were...... from the transition zone between normal skin and scleroderma, and uninvolved abdominal skin of patients. The median value of suction blister PIIINP from the transition zone was 38% higher than suction blister PIIINP from uninvolved skin. PIIINP was localized to the dermis by immunohistochemical...... techniques. PICP and HA levels in blisters from the transition zone were 87% and 53%, respectively, above the levels measured in uninvolved skin. Furthermore, PICP and HA blister levels from the transition zone were 67% and 63%, respectively, higher than the levels measured in healthy volunteers. In plasma...

  12. Increased Levels of Type I and III Collagen and Hyaluronan in Scleroderma Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Klaus; Heickendorff, Lene; L, Risteli

    1997-01-01

    The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) and the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and hyaluronan (HA) were measured in plasma and suction blister fluid from 13 systemic sclerosis patients and 11 healthy volunteers. Suction blisters and skin biopsies were...... from the transition zone between normal skin and scleroderma, and uninvolved abdominal skin of patients. The median value of suction blister PIIINP from the transition zone was 38% higher than suction blister PIIINP from uninvolved skin. PIIINP was localized to the dermis by immunohistochemical...... techniques. PICP and HA levels in blisters from the transition zone were 87% and 53%, respectively, above the levels measured in uninvolved skin. Furthermore, PICP and HA blister levels from the transition zone were 67% and 63%, respectively, higher than the levels measured in healthy volunteers. In plasma...

  13. Risk of mortality in pediatric intensive care unit, assessed by PRISM-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilan, N; Galehgolab, B A; Emadaddin, A; Shiva, Sh

    2009-03-15

    This study aimed at evaluating the mortality rate in a PICU applying PRISM-III. Two hundred and twenty one infants and children consecutively admitted to PICU of Tabriz Children's Hospital were studied during a 13 months period of time. Data required for calculating the PRISM-III score were collected during the first 24 h of PICU stay in all patients. The prediction of actual mortality by PRISM-III scoring was evaluated by the Hosmer and Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed, as well. The observed (O) short-term (during hospital stay) mortality rate was compared with the expected (E) figures as the O/E ratio. The mean value of the PRISM-III score was 14.22 +/- 9.57(2-42). ROC analysis indicated a strong predictive power for the PRISM-III (area under the curve = 0.898) and the test was well fit to the designed study (goodness-of-fit p-value = 0.161). The observed short-term mortality rate was 9.05% and the expected mortality rate by the PRISM-III scoring was 9% (O/E ratio = 1.005). The PRISM-III scoring system was highly calibrated in our institute.

  14. Determination of optimum pressurizer level for kori unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong Soo; Lee, Chang Sup; Lee Jae Yong; Kim, Yo Han; Lee, Dong Hyuk [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To determine the optimum pressurizer water level during normal operation for Kori unit 1, performance and safety analysis are performed. The methodology is developed by evaluating {sup d}ecrease in secondary heat removal{sup e}vents such as Loss of Normal Feedwater accident. To demonstrate optimum pressurizer level setpoint, RETRAN-03 code is used for performance analysis. Analysis results of RETRAN following reactor trip are compared with the actual plant data to justify RETRAN code modelling. The results of performance and safety analyses show that the newly established level setpoints not only improve the performance of pressurizer during transient including reactor trip but also meet the design bases of the pressurizer volume and pressure. 6 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  15. Single-ion anisotropy and exchange interactions in the cyano-bridged trimers MnIII2MIII(CN)6 (MIII = Co, Cr, Fe) species incorporating [Mn(5-Brsalen)]+ units: an inelastic neutron scattering and magnetic susceptibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tregenna-Piggott, Philip L W; Sheptyakov, Denis; Keller, Lukas;

    2009-01-01

    expectations based on the unquenched orbital angular momentum of the [Fe(CN)(6)](3-) anion, giving rise to an M(s) approximately +/-9/2 ground state, isolated by approximately 11.5 cm(-1) from the higher-lying levels. The reported INS and magnetic data should now serve as a benchmark against which theoretical......The electronic structures of the compounds K[(5-Brsalen)(2)(H(2)O)(2)-Mn(2)M(III)(CN)(6)].2H(2)O (M(III) = Co(III), Cr(III), Fe(III)) have been determined by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and magnetic susceptibility studies, revealing the manganese(III) single-ion anisotropy and exchange...... interactions that define the low-lying states of the Mn-M(III)-Mn trimeric units. Despite the presence of an antiferromagnetic intertrimer interaction, the experimental evidence supports the classification of both the Cr(III) and Fe(III) compounds as single-molecule magnets. The value of 17(2) cm(-1...

  16. Energy Levels and Oscillator Strengths for Allowed Transitions in S III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    We have calculated energy levels and oscillator strengths for dipole-allowed transitions between the terms belonging to the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3), 3S(sup 2)3p3d, 3S(sup 2)3p4s, 3S(sup 2)3p4p and 3s(sup 2)3p4d configurations of S iii in the LS-coupling scheme. We used flexible radial functions and included a large number of configurations in the configuration-interaction expansions to ensure convergence. The calculated energy levels are in close agreement with the recent laboratory measurement. The present oscillator strengths are compared with other calculations and experiments and most of the existing discrepancies between the available calculations are resolved.

  17. An Investigation of Effective Discharge for Suspended Sediment by Level III Ecoregion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, A.; Simon, A.

    2002-12-01

    for seven ecoregions: Coast Range (1) Sierra Nevada (5), Snake River Basin (12), Arizona-New Mexico Plateau (22), Flint Hills (28), Central Irregular Plains (40) and the Mississippi Valley Loess Plains (74). Mean daily flow data for a substantial period of record were divided into 33 logarithmic classes and the percentage occurrence of each of these was computed. The total annual suspended sediment transport was then calculated for each class, using suspended-sediment rating equations generated through regression of instantaneous discharge and suspended sediment concentration historic sample data. The geometric midpoint of the class transporting the greatest annual sediment load was considered to be the effective discharge. Results to date demonstrate in environments as diverse the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the Mississippi Valley Loess Plains, the effective discharge for suspended sediment is close to the 1.5 year flow. In the former ecoregion, the mean recurrence interval of suspended sediment effective discharge was 1.526 years. The eventual aim of this project is to calculate effective discharges for all 2929 USGS gaging stations with sufficient instantaneous suspended sediment and associated discharges measurements. These sites cover all 84 level III ecoregions, permitting environmental and geographic patterns of effective discharge recurrence interval. Calculations will be repeated using higher temporal resolution (15 minute) flow data.

  18. Stress Levels of Nurses in Oncology Outpatient Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Woonhwa; Kiser-Larson, Norma

    2016-04-01

    Oncology nursing is often a source of substantial stress for nurses. Many nurses, particularly novice nurses, have inadequate preparation to care for patients at the end of life and their families. Unless nurses prevent or manage work-related stress by using effective coping strategies, oncology nursing staff will continue to suffer from burnout and compassion fatigue. The purpose of this article is to identify stress levels and stressful factors of nurses working in oncology outpatient units and to explore coping behaviors for work-related stress of oncology staff nurses in outpatient units. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to identify stress levels and stressful factors for outpatient oncology nurses, investigate differences in stress levels among nurses' demographic characteristics, and explore coping behaviors of the nurses. Study participants (N = 40) included RNs and licensed practical nurses who completed the Nursing Stress Scale, three open-ended questions, and a demographic questionnaire. The highest sources of stress were workload and patient death and dying. Demographic variables of age and work experience in nursing showed a significant positive relationship to work-related stress scores. The three most frequently used coping behaviors were verbalizing, exercising or relaxing, and taking time for self. Continuing education programs on stress management are highly recommended. Outpatient oncology nurses should be nurtured and supported through tailored interventions at multiple levels to help them find effective coping strategies and develop self-care competencies. Although younger and less experienced nurses had lower mean stress scores than older and more experienced nurses, the continuing education programs and tailored interventions would be helpful for all oncology nursing staff.

  19. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  20. Satisfaction Levels of Students and Professors with the Integration Workshop on Human Morphophysiology III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Mass Sosa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integration is a skill that is acquired and developed through exercises and learning activities designed for this purpose.Objective: To determine the level of satisfaction of students and professors with the integration workshop on the subject of Human Morphophysiology III in medicine studies from 2010 to 2011.Methods: A descriptive study was conducted at the Faculty of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos, in the 2010-2011 academic years, with all students and professors who attended the workshop on the subject of Integration of Human Morphophysiology III, of medicine studies, (91 students and 16 teachers. A questionnaire was administered to students and professors who addressed the organizational and methodological considerations for the development of these activities.Results: Students were satisfied with the usefulness of the study guide (Iadov 0.68 and the activities for the consolidation of the contents (Iadov 0.60. Professors showed satisfaction with quality of the guide, usefulness of tasks and organization of the workshop (Iadov 0.81. Students reported the following as positive aspects of the workshop: basic clinical linking (36.46%, usefulness of the activity for the consolidation of content (32.97% and the participation of professors in the clinical area (26.37 %. Coincidentally, professors also considered as positive the latter two aspects. There were contradictions with the participation of students and professors.Conclusions: There was satisfaction in student and professors with organizational aspects and methodological considerations taken into account.

  1. Sensitisation of Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-based luminescence by Ir(III) units in Ir/lanthanide dyads: evidence for parallel energy-transfer and electron-transfer based mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Daniel; Cankut, Ahmet J; Ali, Noorshida Mohd; Stephenson, Andrew; Spall, Steven J P; Parker, Simon C; Weinstein, Julia A; Ward, Michael D

    2014-05-07

    A series of blue-luminescent Ir(III) complexes with a pendant binding site for lanthanide(III) ions has been synthesized and used to prepare Ir(III)/Ln(III) dyads (Ln = Eu, Tb, Gd). Photophysical studies were used to establish mechanisms of Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer. In the Ir/Gd dyads, where direct Ir→Gd energy-transfer is not possible, significant quenching of Ir-based luminescence nonetheless occurred; this can be ascribed to photoinduced electron-transfer from the photo-excited Ir unit (*Ir, (3)MLCT/(3)LC excited state) to the pendant pyrazolyl-pyridine site which becomes a good electron-acceptor when coordinated to an electropositive Gd(III) centre. This electron transfer quenches the Ir-based luminescence, leading to formation of a charge-separated {Ir(4+)}˙-(pyrazolyl-pyridine)˙(-) state, which is short-lived possibly due to fast back electron-transfer (transfer pathway is again operative and leads to sensitisation of Eu-based and Tb-based emission using the energy liberated from the back electron-transfer process. In addition direct Dexter-type Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer occurs on a similar timescale, meaning that there are two parallel mechanisms by which excitation energy can be transferred from *Ir to the Eu/Tb centre. Time-resolved luminescence measurements on the sensitised Eu-based emission showed both fast and slow rise-time components, associated with the PET-based and Dexter-based energy-transfer mechanisms respectively. In the Ir/Tb dyads, the Ir→Tb energy-transfer is only just thermodynamically favourable, leading to rapid Tb→Ir thermally-activated back energy-transfer and non-radiative deactivation to an extent that depends on the precise energy gap between the *Ir and Tb-based (5)D4 states. Thus, the sensitised Tb(iii)-based emission is weak and unusually short-lived due to back energy transfer, but nonetheless represents rare examples of Tb(III) sensitisation by a energy donor that could be excited using visible

  2. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in C III

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, K M

    2015-01-01

    We report energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes for the astrophysically-important Be-like ion C III. For the calculations, 166 levels belonging to the $n \\le$ 5 configurations are considered and the {\\sc grasp} (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) is adopted. Einstein A-coefficients are provided for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions, while lifetimes are compared with available measurements as well as theoretical results, and no large discrepancies noted. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1\\% for a majority of levels, and A-values to better than 20\\% for most transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code ({\\sc darc}) is used. A wide energy range, up to 21 Ryd, is considered and resonances resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. The collision strengths are subsequently averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 8...

  3. Reliability level III method in design of square pillar resting on weak floor stratum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pytel, W.M. (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Mining Engineering)

    1990-06-01

    Current methods of design of pillars resting on weak floor strata involve only a deterministic, conventional safety factor calculation, based on material parameters treated as the mean values taken from observations. In a case where high parameters variability occurs, these methods may lead to fatal design errors resulting in excessive settlement and roof falls. Therefore, to include the influence of parameters quality, the new approach based on reliability level III method was developed. Consideration was given to the identification of the system parameters importance, and to density function for the safety factor treated as a random variable. Design procedure involving floor probability of failure was illustrated by numerical examples. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Regional and State Level Water Scarcity Report: Northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, C. K.; Lopez-Morales, C. A.; Hoover, J. H.; Voigt, B. G.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Mohammed, I. N.

    2010-12-01

    There are an abundance of large-scale, coarse resolution global water scarcity studies, but the existing literature fails to address regional and state specific scarcity measures. Moreover, while environmental water requirements are an integral factor in the development and implementation of sustainable water management practices, only recently has this notion been introduced to water scarcity research. In this paper, we argue that developing a preliminary measure of water scarcity, at the regional and state levels, will allow for more informed policy development. The goal of this study is to generate a more comprehensive understanding of water scarcity in the Northeast, by gathering fine scale data, applying a consistent methodology to the calculation of a scarcity index, and analyzing the results to see relative trends in spatio-temporal water scarcity. Public supply, irrigation, rural, industrial and thermo-power withdrawals have been compiled from USGS state water use publications from 1950 to 1985. Using the WBMplus water model runoff data, state specific in-stream environmental water requirements were calculated using the accepted hydro-ecological methodology. Water scarcity was then calculated as a ratio of water withdrawals to total available water minus environmental flow requirements for the system. In so doing, this study generates a spatially explicit and temporally varying water scarcity indicator (WSI) for the Northeastern United States between 1950 and 2000 at the regional and state levels at a five-year time interval. Calculation of a spatial and temporal water scarcity indicator enabled us to identify regions and specific states that were: slightly exploited (WSI 1.0). The minimum environmental water requirements to maintain in-stream aquatic and riparian ecosystems for the Northeastern states ranged between 27.5 to 36.3 percent of the mean annual runoff within Vermont and Maryland, respectively. The regional WSI values ranged between 0.199 in 1950

  5. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si III

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, K M

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for four types of transitions (E1, E2, M1, and M2) are reported for an astrophysically important Mg-like ion Si~III, whose emission lines have been observed in a variety of plasmas. For the calculations, well-known and widely-used GRASP code has been adopted, and results are listed for transitions among the 141 levels of the 3$\\ell3\\ell'$ and 3$\\ell$4$\\ell$ configurations. Experimental energies are available for only the lowest 58 levels but there is no major discrepancy with theoretical results. Similarly, the A-values and lifetimes show a satisfactory agreement with other available results, particularly for strong E1 transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, with the DARC code, and listed for resonance transitions over a wide energy range, up to 30~Ryd. No similar results are available in the literature for comparisons. However, comparisons are made with the more important parameter, effective collision strength ($\\Upsilon$), for which recent $R$-matr...

  6. Interactions of the apolipoprotein C-III 3238C>G polymorphism and alcohol consumption on serum triglyceride levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixing Yin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both apolipoprotein (Apo C-III gene polymorphism and alcohol consumption have been associated with increased serum triglyceride (TG levels, but their interactions on serum TG levels are not well known. The present study was undertaken to detect the interactions of the ApoC-III 3238C>G (rs5128 polymorphism and alcohol consumption on serum TG levels. Methods A total of 516 unrelated nondrinkers and 514 drinkers aged 15-89 were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the ApoC-III 3238C>G was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Interactions of the ApoC-III 3238C>G genotype and alcohol consumption was assessed by using a cross-product term between genotypes and the aforementioned factor. Results Serum total cholesterol (TC, TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, ApoA-I and ApoB levels were higher in drinkers than in nondrinkers (P P P P P P P P Conclusions This study suggests that the ApoC-III 3238CG heterozygotes benefited more from alcohol consumption than CC and GG homozygotes in increasing serum levels of HDL-C, ApoA-I, and the ratio of ApoA-I to ApoB, and lowering serum levels of TC and TG.

  7. FUNDAMENTALS OF AMHARIC (REVISED EDITION), UNITS I-III (PRONUNCIATION AND LESSONS 1-15).

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARTON, DONALD K.; AND OTHERS

    THIS IS THE FIRST OF A THREE-VOLUME, NINE-UNIT COURSE IN BASIC AMHARIC. VOLUME ONE TOGETHER WITH VOLUME TWO (UNITS IV-VIII OR LESSONS 16-35) DEAL WITH THE PROBLEMS OF PRONUNCIATION AND THE ORAL-AURAL MASTERY OF BASIC GRAMMATICAL CONSTRUCTIONS. EACH LESSON INCLUDES A DIALOG, GRAMMATICAL NOTES, PATTERN DRILLS, EXERCISES, AND A VOCABULARY LIST. AT…

  8. About the International System of Units (SI) Part III. SI Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II; French, Anthony P.; Iona, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Before discussing more details of SI, we will summarize the essentials in a few tables that can serve as ready references. If a unit isn't listed in Tables I-IV, it is not part of SI or specifically allowed for use with SI. The units and symbols that are sufficient for most everyday applications are given in bold.

  9. Indiana Studies: Hoosier History, Government, and People. Unit III: From Sectional Division to Political Unity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Harry D.; And Others

    Unit 3 of a six-unit series on Indiana state history designed to be taught in Indiana secondary schools tells the story of Indiana from 1829 to 1908. Chapter 1 discusses national issues in an Indiana context. The effects of social movements such as Abolition, the underground railroad, and the Fugitive Slave Law on Indiana politics are examined.…

  10. Associations Between Sex Hormone Levels and Periodontitis in Men: Results From NHANES III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Joao Paulo; Wang, Xiaoshan; Starr, Jacqueline R; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2015-10-01

    Sex hormones are linked to inflammation and bone turnover. The goal of this study is to explore the association between sex hormone levels and periodontitis in men using data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Data from 755 men (aged ≥ 30 years), including serum levels of testosterone, estradiol, sex hormone binding globulin, and androstenediol glucuronide, were analyzed. Calculated bioavailable testosterone (CBT) and estradiol-to-testosterone ratio were calculated. Periodontitis was defined using the latest classification of extent and severity of periodontitis for NHANES data (≥ 2 interproximal sites with ≥ 3 mm attachment loss, ≥ 2 interproximal sites with probing depth [PD] ≥ 4 mm not on the same tooth, or one site with PD ≥ 5 mm). Sex hormones were evaluated as categorized and continuous variables. Correlations between the presence and severity of periodontitis and levels of sex hormones were determined and expressed as odds ratios (ORs). When adjusted for confounding factors, high total testosterone (TT) and CBT levels correlated with both the prevalence (OR [95% confidence interval (CI)], 2.1 [1 to 4.5] and 3.9 [1 to 14.8], respectively) and severity (OR [95% CI], 2.1 [1 to 4.3] and 3.4 [1.2 to 9.8]) of periodontitis. When continuous variables were used, the ORs (95% CIs) for presence and severity of periodontitis were 1.4 (0.6 to 3.3) and 1.5 (0.6 to 3.6) for TT and 1.3 (0.9 to 1.9) and 1.3 (0.9 to 1.8) for CBT, respectively. These findings are consistent with the existence of an association of periodontitis with sex hormone levels, especially testosterone, in men.

  11. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  12. BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

  13. Job satisfaction in the x-ray department of a level III-2 private health institution in Lima, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H. Román Meza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe job satisfaction in the X-Ray Department of a level III-2 private health institution in Lima, in 2015. Material and Methods: The present study is quantitative, descriptive, prospective and cross-sectional. The population was of 22 people, the sample included everyone in the population. The unit of analysis was the Medical Technologists of Radiology. The job satisfaction was evaluated by the “Job Satisfaction Questionnaire S10 / 12” by Melia JL and Peiró JM. Results: Of the total population, 77.3% were hired on a fixed term and 40.9% had been working for 12 months or more. 86.4% of participants were occupationally satisfied. 65.9% expressed satisfaction with the services received dimension, and 10.2% had an indifferent satisfaction with the physical environment dimension. Discussion: The results showed that there is a good percentage of job satisfaction, but analyzing its aspects (dimensions it was determined that the physical environment dimension is where emphasis should be made to improve working conditions in the X- Ray Department, a situation also notorious in some health departments abroad, but in our country it is not common in public institutions, as there are other deficiencies. Conclusions: Job satisfaction was high in the department but in the analysis, it was determined that the physical environment is where the institution must improve, compared to the benefits received and supervision.

  14. Analysis of the IUI vs. III diagrams in linear and not linear united loads; Estudio de los diagramas IUI versus III en cargas conjuntas lineales y alineales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deorsola, M.; Barbero, J.C.; Morcelle, P. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria. Inst. de Investigaciones Tecnologicas para Redes y Equipos Electricos (IITREE-LAT)]. E-mail: mdeorsol@iitree.ing.unlp.edu.ar

    2001-07-01

    Users can inject high disturbance levels in electric nets. In a equivalent circuit for a certain point of a electric net, it is common to appear linear and not linear loads in parallel. The first ones represent the affected consumption by the disturbances came from the net and the second ones represent the disturbing consumption. Different relative combinations have been investigated between both load components in a generic point of a net, involving the base of the IUI vs. III dispersion diagrams, equivalent to the regulation curves for the mentioned loads. The investigated case can support the interpretation of the responsibility portions, in real situations, in relation to each harmonic disturbance source (not lineal load)

  15. AGEs and Glucose Levels Modulate Type I and III Procollagen mRNA Synthesis in Dermal Fibroblasts Cells Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serban Iren Andreea

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the dermis, fibroblasts play an important role in the turnover of the dermal extracellular matrix. Collagen I and III, the most important dermal proteins of the extracellular matrix, are progressively altered during ageing and diabetes. For mimicking diabetic conditions, the cultured human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with increasing amounts of AGE-modified BSA and D-glucose for 24 hours. The expression of procollagen α2(I and procollagen α1(III mRNA was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Our data revealed that the treatment of fibroblasts with AGE-modified BSA upregulated the expression of procollagen α2(I and procollagen α1(III mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. High glucose levels mildly induced a profibrogenic pattern, increasing the procollagen α2(I mRNA expression whereas there was a downregulation tendency of procollagen α1(III mRNA.

  16. Congenital anomalies: 15 years of experience in a level III hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Félix

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital anomalies (CAs are a leading cause of fetal and infant mortality and morbidity worldwide. They may be identified prenatally, at the moment of birth or later in life.Purpose: To describe the cases of CAs registered over the last 15 years at a level III hospital, comparing individuals who were detected through prenatal (preN diagnosis with those detected through postnatal (postN diagnosis.Methods: All records were collected from the Registo Nacional de Anomalias Congénitas (RENAC online platform between 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014, in a level III hospital, where cases of CAs were notified voluntarily (n = 1,222. We tested differences for selected variables between the years in study. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential factors associated to preN diagnosis.Results: We observed a total of 1,510 anomalies, being 493 (40.3% circulatory, 252 (20.6% chromosomal, 187 (15.3% musculoskeletal, 138 (11.3% digestive, 133 (10.9% urinary, 117 (9.6% nervous, 37 (3.0% respiratory, 35 (2.9% genital, 25 (2% anomalies of the eye, ear, face and neck, 20 (1.6% cleft lip/cleft palate and 73 (6.0% others. Time of diagnosis was known for all subjects: 770 (63.0% were diagnosed prenatally and 452 (37.0% were diagnosed at birth or during the first month of life. We found statistically significant differences between groups for several variables. Assisted reproduction techniques (p = 0.023, maternal medications during the first trimester of pregnancy (p = 0.004 and the number of anomalies per individual (p ≤ 0.001 had a statistically significant impact on receiving preN diagnosis.Conclusion: Our data confirm the importance of both RENAC national database and preN diagnosis in improving perinatal healthcare. However, in order to determine the national prevalence of CAs and understand any involved factors, it is desirable to enhance the notification in the whole country, facilitating the adjustment of national

  17. Leveling of Tuberculosis Incidence - United States, 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Jorge L; Mindra, Godwin; Haddad, Maryam B; Pratt, Robert; Price, Sandy F; Langer, Adam J

    2016-03-25

    After 2 decades of progress toward tuberculosis (TB) elimination with annual decreases of ≥0.2 cases per 100,000 persons (1), TB incidence in the United States remained approximately 3.0 cases per 100,000 persons during 2013-2015. Preliminary data reported to the National Tuberculosis Surveillance System indicate that TB incidence among foreign-born persons in the United States (15.1 cases per 100,000) has remained approximately 13 times the incidence among U.S.-born persons (1.2 cases per 100,000). Resuming progress toward TB elimination in the United States will require intensification of efforts both in the United States and globally, including increasing U.S. efforts to detect and treat latent TB infection, strengthening systems to interrupt TB transmission in the United States and globally, accelerating reductions in TB globally, particularly in the countries of origin for most U.S.

  18. Perinatal stroke: a six-year experience in a level-III maternity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Teixeira

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the incidence of perinatal stroke in a level-III maternity as well as potential risk factors, clinical presentation, neuroimaging, classification and clinical outcome of children with a minimum follow-up of 24 months.Methods: Historical prospective follow-up of all term and late preterm newborns diagnosed with perinatal stroke from January 2008 to December 2013.Results: Fifteen perinatal strokes were diagnosed in a total of 17,056 newborns (incidence 0.9/1,000. Thirteen had potential risk factors and fourteen were symptomatic. Median age at diagnosis was two days. Seizures were the most frequent symptom (14/15, being three focal-clonic, one multifocal-clonic, two generalized-tonic, three focal-tonic and five subtle. Cerebral ultrasound was performed in eleven newborns at an early stage, suggesting the diagnosis in six. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI confirmed the diagnosis in fifteen. Six had an arterial ischemic stroke, eight a cerebral venous thrombosis and one a hemorrhagic stroke. An electroencephalogram was obtained in all newborns with seizures revealing epileptic activity in eight. Search for prothrombotic disorders (in newborn and both parents showed four newborns heterozygous methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase mutation and two neonatal alloimune thrombocytopenia. No recurrence of stroke was reported. Formal development evaluation was performed in thirteen and was normal in eleven, while in two revealed delayed psychomotor development, both of which with epilepsy. On the neonatology outpatient clinic follow-up, the current median age is 3 years and 11 months.Conclusions: This study reinforces the need to maintain high level of suspicion for perinatal stroke and the importance of MRI in the classification and etiological study. Our follow-up supported a good outcome of perinatal stroke.

  19. Delineation of level III aquatic ecological function regionalization in the Taihu Lake basin%太湖流域水生态功能三级分区

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高永年; 高俊峰; 陈垌烽; 许妍; 赵家虎

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic ecoregions have been used as spatial units for aquatic ecosystem management at the watershed scale. According to the protection requirements and characteristics of aquatic ecosystems in the Taihu Lake basin, the main purpose and the principles of level III aquatic ecological function regionalization delineation in this basin were proposed. Then the indicators for delineating level III aquatic ecological function regionalization were established based on regionalization objective and principles. The indicators for delineating level Ili aquatic ecological function regionalization in the non-Taihu Lake area included benthic Shannon-Wiener diversity index, chlorophyll content, water habitat types and benthic indicator species types (including Ephemera, Bivalvia, snail, Chironomidae and Oligochaeta), and the regionalization indicators for delineating level III aquatic ecological function regionalization in the Taihu Lake area included benthic Shannon-Wiener diversity index, chlorophyll content, water flow velocity and benthic indicator species (including Oligochaeta, Chironomidae class, Bivalvia, snail and others) ratio. With the aid of GIS technology, the spatial distribution of the indicators for level III aquatic ecological function regionalization delineation was identified based on the raster data from 1106 aquatic ecoregion function units in the non-Taihu Lake area and 3568 aquatic ecoregion function units in the Taihu Lake area, respectively. Two-step spatial clustering analysis approach and manual-assisted method were used to delineate level III aquatic ecological function zones. Then the Taihu Lake basin was divided into 21 level III aquatic ecological function zones. Moreover, the characteristics of the 21 zones were summarized, showing that there were significant differences in the aspects such as topography, soil type, water quality and aquatic ecology. The results of quantitative comparison of aquatic life also indicated that the benthic dominant

  20. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S&M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years.

  1. Managing Highway Maintenance: Budget Preparation, Unit 9, Level 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit describes the essential steps in developing a maintenance budget, or performance budget, based on the work to be done. It is designed for field engineers and supervisors who assist department officials in preparing work programs and budgets. The format is a programed,…

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the BamHI repetitive sequence, including the HindIII fundamental unit, as a possible mobile element from the Japanese monkey Macaca fuscata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, V S; Kuchino, Y; Nemoto, K; Nishimura, S

    1986-01-01

    Clustered repeat units produced by BamHI digestion of genomic DNA from the Japanese monkey Macaca fuscata [JMr(BamHI)] were sequenced by dideoxy DNA sequencing. The nucleotide sequences of several individual repeats showed that the BamHI repeat contains the 170-bp HindIII element as an integral part, and that it has more than 90% homology with the HindIII repeat element [AGMr(HindIII)] found in the genomic DNA of the African green monkey. In the JMr(BamHI) repeat unit, the 170-bp HindIII element is flanked by a 6-bp inverted repeat, which is part of a 22-bp direct repeat. This latter repeat of 22-bp asymmetrically overlaps the border between the internal AGMr(HindIII)-like region and adjacent regions of the JMr(BamHI) repeat. A similar structural feature of the BamHI repeat unit has been found in the genomic DNA of the baboon, but not in that of the African green monkey. These results show clearly that the BamHI repeat of the modern Japanese monkey originated as a result of insertion of an AGMr(HindIII) element into a certain site(s) of the genomic DNA of an ancestor of the modern Japanese monkey before Macaca-Cercocebus divergence.

  3. Highway Surveying. Instructor's Guide for an Adult Course. Highway Technicians Program Unit III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmano, Ralph; Kacharian, John C.

    The revised instructor's guide, which is part of the New York State Highway Technician's Program to provide needed technicians and engineers by upgrading people in the lower-level technician jobs, is geared toward the improvement of technical skills and knowledge in highway surveying. In view of the shortage of qualified technicians and engineers…

  4. Location of lanthanide impurity levels in the III-V semiconductor GaN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, P.; Van der Kolk, E.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge from lanthanide spectroscopy on wide band gap (6–10 eV) inorganic compounds is used to understand and predict optical and electronic properties of the lanthanides in the III-V semiconductor GaN. For the first time the location of the 4fn ground state energy of each divalent and trivalent l

  5. Comparing a combination of validated questionnaires and level III portable monitor with polysomnography to diagnose and exclude sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Effie J; Driver, Helen S; Stewart, Steven C; Fitzpatrick, Michael F

    2013-12-15

    Questionnaires have been validated as screening tools in adult populations at risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Portable monitors (PM) have gained acceptance for confirmation of OSA in some patients with a high pretest probability of the disorder. We evaluated the combined diagnostic utility of 3 validated questionnaires and a Level III PM in the diagnosis and exclusion of OSA, as compared with in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) derived apnea hypopnea index (AHI). Consecutive patients referred to the Sleep Disorders Clinic completed 3 testing components: (1) 3 questionnaires (Berlin, STOP-Bang, and Sleep Apnea Clinical Score [SACS]); (2) Level III at-home PM (MediByte) study; and (3) Level I in-laboratory PSG. The utility of individual questionnaires, the Level III device alone, and the combination of questionnaires and the Level III device were compared with the PSG. One hundred twenty-eight patients participated in the study (84M, 44F), mean ± SD age 50 ± 12.3years, BMI 31 ± 6.6 kg/m(2). At a PSG threshold AHI = 10, the PM derived respiratory disturbance index (RDI) had a sensitivity and specificity of 79% and 86%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for the other screening tools were: Berlin 88%, 25%; STOP-Bang 90%, 25%; SACS 33%, 75%. The sensitivity and specificity at a PSG AHI = 15 were: PM 77%, 95%; Berlin 91%, 28%; STOP-Bang 93%, 28%; SACS 35%, 78%. Questionnaires alone, possibly given a reliance on sleepiness as a symptom, cannot reliably rule out the presence of OSA. Objective physiological measurement is critical for the diagnosis and exclusion of OSA.

  6. Customer Satisfaction Survey With Clinical Laboratory and Phlebotomy Services at a Tertiary Care Unit Level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-01-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate...

  7. Managing Highway Maintenance: Maintenance Activities, Work Units, and Classifying Work, Unit 6, Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit explains how maintenance work should be described, measured, and classified. It is designed for supervisors who need to know the mechanics of describing work. The format is a programed, self-instruction approach in which information is presented in progressive segments or…

  8. Yttrium(III)-containing tungstoantimonate(III) stabilized by tetrahedral WO4(2-) capping unit, [{Y(α-SbW9O31(OH)2)(CH3COO)(H2O)}3(WO4)]17-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Masooma; Mal, Sib Sankar; Bassil, Bassem S; Banerjee, Abhishek; Kortz, Ulrich

    2011-02-01

    The yttrium(III)-containing tungstoantimonate(III) [{Y(α-SbW(9)O(31)(OH)(2))(CH(3)COO)(H(2)O)}(3)(WO(4))](17-) (1) has been synthesized in a simple one-pot reaction of Y(3+) ions with [α-SbW(9)O(33)](9-) and WO(4)(2-) in a 3:3:1 molar ratio in 1 M LiOAc/AcOH buffer at pH 5.3. Polyanion 1 is composed of three (α-SbW(9)O(33)) units linked by three Y(3+) ions and a capping, tetrahedral WO(4)(2-) capping unit, resulting in an assembly with C(3v) symmetry. The hydrated ammonium-sodium salt of 1 was investigated in the solid state by single-crystal XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and elemental analyses, and in solution by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Snatch technique of United States national level weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Paul N; Schilling, Brian K; Stone, Michael H; Kilgore, J Lon; Chiu, Loren Z F

    2014-03-01

    This study analyzed the top 3 successful snatch attempts by individual lifters in each weight class at a U.S. National Championship weightlifting meet. Two-dimensional (2-D) body position and characteristics of the lifts were compared via 2D video analysis in groups of lifters who displaced forward, showed no displacement, or displaced backward to receive the bar. No significant group differences (p > 0.05) were noted for body mass, bar mass, or hip angle. The rearward displacement group had a significantly greater horizontal distance between the shoulder and heel at the end of the pull (determined as the point where the bar ceases to accelerate vertically). Hip angles for the no displacement group had a small-to-moderate effect size (0.50) in comparison to the forward displacement group, but they only showed a small effect size (0.17) when compared with the rearward displacement group. The forward displacement group showed a small-to-moderate effect size compared with both the no displacement group (0.51) and the rearward displacement group (0.55) concerning the horizontal distance from the shoulder to the heel. These data seem to suggest that rearward displacement in the drop-under phase in the snatch is not detrimental to performance and actually seems to be a preferred technique in U.S. national level lifters. In addition to evidence that rearward displacement is exhibited in elite lifters and is coached globally, it seems this is the preferred technique in international competitions. This technique may be considered a viable variation of the snatch by coaches and athletes of all levels.

  10. Measuring patient safety culture: an assessment of the clustering of responses at unit level and hospital level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wal, van der G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the claim that the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures patient safety culture instead of mere individual attitudes and to determine the most appropriate level (individual, unit or hospital level) for interventions aimed at improving the culture of patient s

  11. Measuring patient safety culture : an assessment of the clustering of responses at unit level and hospital level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wal, G. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To test the claim that the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures patient safety culture instead of mere individual attitudes and to determine the most appropriate level (individual, unit or hospital level) for interventions aimed at improving the culture of patient s

  12. Identification of Children with Language Impairment: Investigating the Classification Accuracy of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories, Level III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth; Campbell, Wenonah; Dempsey, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested the accuracy with which the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories, Level III (CDI-III), a parent report measure of language ability, discriminated children with language impairment from those developing language typically. Method: Parents of 58 children, 49 with typically developing language (age 30 to 42…

  13. Professional competences of nursing specialists in Mexican companies classified as risk level III and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Juárez García

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Occupational Health Nursing practice is an emergent area in Mexico, nevertheless, in other countries the nurses are the most frequent profession in this field. It is necessary increase the educative options in this practice under the best vanguard standards like the competencies system. There are evidences that show nurses as the professionals with the least competencies compared with others professionals, mainly in developing countries. In Mexico there are no standardized competencies in occupational health nursing, as well as studies about the competencies in nurses in this field and its relationship with demographic variables and occupational health indicators. In this way, it was designed a study with the following objectives: 1 To adapt and set up standardized competencies in this practice in Mexico, 2 To assess competences in nurses whose job is carried out in type III and IV companies, 3 To determine if there are differences in the competencies according to the demographic factors, and 4 To determine if there are a relationship among the competencies and key indicators of the occupational health services, such as the accident rates, “incapacities” (compensations ,and the number of medical attending at workplace.

  14. Global Strategy Implementation at the Business Unit Level: Operational Capabilities and Administrative Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kendall Roth; David M Schweiger; Allen J Morrison

    1991-01-01

    The study examines the impact of internationally strategy on organizational design and the influence of the organizational design on effectiveness at the business unit level. The empirical findings are based on survey responses from eighty-two business units competing in global industries. The findings are supportive of the contingency notion which suggests that business unit effectiveness is a function of the fit between the international strategy and the organizational design.© 1991 JIBS. J...

  15. Global Strategy Implementation at the Business Unit Level: Operational Capabilities and Administrative Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kendall Roth; David M Schweiger; Allen J Morrison

    1991-01-01

    The study examines the impact of internationally strategy on organizational design and the influence of the organizational design on effectiveness at the business unit level. The empirical findings are based on survey responses from eighty-two business units competing in global industries. The findings are supportive of the contingency notion which suggests that business unit effectiveness is a function of the fit between the international strategy and the organizational design.© 1991 JIBS. J...

  16. L'Economie Francais. Units in Economics for French Classes. Intermediate Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Carol; And Others

    Four units on the French economy, designed for classroom use at the intermediate level, are related in their educational objectives: to shed light on French culture and strengthen second language skills. Each unit describes its specific objectives, materials, texts, instructional procedures, and student evaluation methods. Sample tests and…

  17. ICT and Europe's productivity performance : Industry-level growth account comparisons with the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inklaar, R.; O'Mahony, M.; Timmer, M.P.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a new industry-level database to analyze sources of growth in four major European countries: France, Germany, Netherlands and the United Kingdom (EU-4), in comparison with the United States for the period 1979-2000. Aggregate labor productivity growth is decomposed into indu

  18. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of selection methods to deduce natural background levels for groundwater units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffioen, J.; Passier, H.F.; Klein, J.

    2008-01-01

    Establishment of natural background levels (NBL) for groundwater is commonly performed to serve as reference when assessing the contamination status of groundwater units. We compare various selection methods to establish NBLs using groundwater quality data forfour hydrogeologically different areas i

  20. Comparison of selection methods to deduce natural background levels for groundwater units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffioen, J.; Passier, H.F.; Klein, J.

    2008-01-01

    Establishment of natural background levels (NBL) for groundwater is commonly performed to serve as reference when assessing the contamination status of groundwater units. We compare various selection methods to establish NBLs using groundwater quality data forfour hydrogeologically different areas

  1. Developing advanced units of learning using IMS Learning Design level B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob; Burgos, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Please cite the original publication: Koper, R., Burgos, D. (2005). Developing advanced units of learning using IMS Learning Design level B. International Journal on Advanced Technology for Learning, 2 (4), 252-259.

  2. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. III. Water level fluctuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-10-01

    Potential environmental impacts in reservoirs and downstream river reaches below dams that may be caused by the water level fluctuation resulting from development and operation of small scale (under 25MW) hydroelectric projects are identified. The impacts discussed will be of potential concern at only those small-scale hydroelectric projects that are operated in a store and release (peaking) mode. Potential impacts on physical and chemical characteristics in reservoirs resulting from water level fluctuation include resuspension and redistribution of bank and bed sediment; leaching of soluble organic matter from sediment in the littoral zone; and changes in water quality resulting from changes in sediment and nutrient trap efficiency. Potential impacts on reservoir biota as a result of water level fluctuation include habitat destruction and the resulting partial or total loss of aquatic species; changes in habitat quality, which result in reduced standing crop and production of aquatic biota; and possible shifts in species diversity. The potential physical effects of water level fluctuation on downstream systems below dams are streambed and bank erosion and water quality problems related to resuspension and redistribution of these materials. Potential biological impacts of water level fluctuation on downstream systems below dams result from changes in current velocity, habitat reduction, and alteration in food supply. These alterations, either singly or in combination, can adversely affect aquatic populations below dams. The nature and potential significance of adverse impacts resulting from water level fluctuation are discussed. Recommendations for site-specific evaluation of water level fluctuation at small-scale hydroelectric projects are presented.

  3. Importance and assessment of the Microlevallois production in levels II and III of Abrigo de la Quebrada (Chelva, Valencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentín VILLAVERDE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Levallois products –blanks and cores– from levels II and III of Abrigo de la Quebrada are analyzed. Among the ensemble of blanks, those of small size reach significant percentages. We focus on their characteristics, including the extent to which they were modified by retouch, and on their use wear, at both the micro and macro levels of observation. Where size is concerned, explanations such as tool biography –gradual reduction by successive retouch until discard–, differential export of the larger blanks, or raw-material scarcity are considered and rejected. The alternatives remaining are the task-specific deliberate production of such small blanks and the relationship between raw-material reduction and site function.

  4. COMPARISON OF NOVORONEZH UNIT 5 NPP AND SOUTH UKRAINE UNIT 1 NPP LEVEL I PRA RESULTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MUSICKI,Z.; GINSBERG,T.

    2002-04-18

    This paper describes a study undertaken to explain the risk profile differences in the results of PRAs of two similar WER-1000 nuclear power plants. The risk profile differences are particularly significant in the area of small steam/feedwater line breaks, small-small LOCAs, support system initiators and containment bypass initiators. A top level (limited depth) approach was used in which we studied design differences, major assumptions, data differences, and also compared the two PRA analyses on an element-by-element basis in order to discern the major causative factors for the risk profile differences. We conclude that the major risk profile differences are due to differences in assumptions and engineering judgment (possibly combined with some design and data differences) involved in treatment of uncertain physical phenomena (primarily sump plugging in LOCAs and turbine building steaming effects in secondary system breaks). Additional major differences are attributable to support system characteristics.

  5. New hospital structure in the twenty-first century: the position of level III (tertiary) neurological and stroke care in a changing healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentes, Tamás; Kovács, László; Óváry, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the necessary capacity and number of neurology wards of level III progressivity that can be defined in the system of criteria detailed in this article and which possess optimal operating conditions in Hungarian terms. We used the National Health Insurance Company's database to calculate case numbers and capacity for different levels of neurological and stroke care. We also revised the allocation of advanced diagnostic and therapeutic technologies, and proposed changes, based on health insurance data. We also discussed these propositions with clinical experts to test their viability. We determined the adequate number of organisational units capable of providing special neurological healthcare services on the basis of the basic data of the Hungarian healthcare system, specifying this number as 6 instead of the current 11. In our study, we have identified significant bias in the nationwide level of neurological and stroke care organisation, which needs revised allocation of healthcare resources. Naturally, this can only be carried out through the restructuring of the emergency care system and the expansion of pre-hospital care.

  6. Type-III interferons and rheumatoid arthritis: Correlation between interferon lambda 1 (interleukin 29) and antimutated citrullinated vimentin antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Martínez, Diana; Juarez, Maribel; Patlán, Mariana; Páez, Araceli; Massó, Felipe; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis M

    2017-03-01

    To assess serum type III or lambda (λ) interferons (IFN) levels and its clinical and laboratory associations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A cross-sectional study including 43 patients with RA (86% females; age 45.3 ± 10.3 years) and 43 healthy individuals was performed. Clinical data including disease activity, acute-phase reactants, rheumatoid factor and anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies were collected. Serum IFNλ1, IFNλ2, IFNλ3, CXCL8 and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) antibody levels were measured. Patients with RA had higher IFNλ1 (113.5 ± 118.6 pg/mL versus 55.9 ± 122.3 pg/mL; p < 0.0001) and IFNλ2 (245.4 ± 327.7 pg/mL versus 5.1 ± 11.0 pg/mL; p = 0.009) levels than controls, but not IFNλ3 levels. Notably, IFNλ1 levels were found to be higher in both patients with active disease (124.9 ± 135.9 pg/mL; p < 0.001) and quiescent disease (99.0 ± 93.7 pg/mL; p < 0.01), while IFNλ2 levels were higher only in patients with active disease (264.0 ± 356.1 pg/mL; p = 0.02). A noteworthy association between serum IFNλ1 levels and anti-MCV antibody titers (Spearman's rho coefficient 0.36, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.61; p = 0.02) was observed. Serum IFNλ1 and IFNλ2 levels are abnormally elevated in patients with RA and the former are linearly associated with circulating anti-MCV antibody levels. These results may place type-III IFN as an attractive new therapeutic target in RA.

  7. Sea Levels Online: Sea Level Variations of the United States Derived from National Water Level Observation Network Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water level records are a combination of the fluctuations of the ocean and the vertical land motion at the location of the station. Monthly mean sea level (MSL)...

  8. III - Template Metaprogramming for massively parallel scientific computing - Templates for Iteration; Thread-level Parallelism

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Large scale scientific computing raises questions on different levels ranging from the fomulation of the problems to the choice of the best algorithms and their implementation for a specific platform. There are similarities in these different topics that can be exploited by modern-style C++ template metaprogramming techniques to produce readable, maintainable and generic code. Traditional low-level code tend to be fast but platform-dependent, and it obfuscates the meaning of the algorithm. On the other hand, object-oriented approach is nice to read, but may come with an inherent performance penalty. These lectures aim to present he basics of the Expression Template (ET) idiom which allows us to keep the object-oriented approach without sacrificing performance. We will in particular show to to enhance ET to include SIMD vectorization. We will then introduce techniques for abstracting iteration, and introduce thread-level parallelism for use in heavy data-centric loads. We will show to to apply these methods i...

  9. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbose, Galen; Darghouth, Naim; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-12-13

    Installations of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have been growing at a rapid pace in recent years. In 2009, approximately 7,500 megawatts (MW) of PV were installed globally, up from approximately 6,000 MW in 2008, consisting primarily of grid-connected applications. With 335 MW of grid-connected PV capacity added in 2009, the United States was the world's fourth largest PV market in 2009, behind Germany, Italy, and Japan. The market for PV in the United States is driven by national, state, and local government incentives, including up-front cash rebates, production-based incentives, requirements that electricity suppliers purchase a certain amount of solar energy, and federal and state tax benefits. These programs are, in part, motivated by the popular appeal of solar energy, and by the positive attributes of PV - modest environmental impacts, avoidance of fuel price risks, coincidence with peak electrical demand, and the possible deployment of PV at the point of use. Given the relatively high cost of PV, however, a key goal of these policies is to encourage cost reductions over time. Therefore, as policy incentives have become more significant and as PV deployment has accelerated, so too has the desire to track the installed cost of PV systems over time, by system characteristics, by system location, and by component. Despite the significant year-on-year growth, however, the share of global and U.S. electricity supply met with PV remains small, and annual PV additions are currently modest in the context of the overall electric system. To address this need, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated a report series focused on describing trends in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems in the United States. The present report, the third in the series, describes installed cost trends from 1998 through 2009, and provides preliminary cost data for systems installed in 2010. The analysis is based on project-level cost data from approximately 78

  10. Configuration-averaged open shell ab initio method for crystal field levels and magnetic properties of lanthanide(III) complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Heuvel, Willem Van den; Soncini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We present an ab initio methodology dedicated to the determination of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of ground and low-lying excited states, i.e., the crystal field levels, in lanthanide(III) complexes. Currently, the most popular and successful ab initio approach is the CASSCF/RASSI-SO method, consisting of the optimization of multiple complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) spin eigenfunctions, followed by full diagonalization of the spin--orbit coupling (SOC) Hamiltonian in the basis of the CASSCF spin states featuring spin-dependent orbitals. Based on two simple observations valid for Ln(III) complexes, namely: (i) CASSCF 4f atomic orbitals are expected to change very little when optimized for different multiconfigurational states belonging to the 4f-electronic configuration, (ii) due to strong SOC the total spin is not a good quantum number, we propose here an efficient ab initio strategy which completely avoids any multiconfigurational calculation, by optimizing a unique s...

  11. The effect of polarity and surface states on the Fermi level at III-nitride surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, P; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Guo, W; Hussey, L; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2014-09-28

    Surface states and their influence on the Fermi level at the surface of GaN and AlN are studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of polarity on surface electronic properties was studied. Accurate modeling of the valence band edge and comparison with XPS data revealed the presence of donor surface states at 1.4 eV and acceptor states at energies > 2.7 eV from the valence band in GaN. Al polar AlN showed acceptor states at energies > 3.3 eV. Density of acceptor surface states was estimated to be between 10(13) and 10(14) eV(-1) cm(-2) in both GaN and AlN. The shift in charge neutrality levels and barrier heights due to polarity and the density of surface states on AlN and GaN were estimated from XPS measurements. Theoretical modeling and comparison with XPS data implied full compensation of spontaneous polarization charge by charged surface states. Barrier height measurements also reveal a dependence on polarity with phi(metal-polar)>phi(non-polar)>phi(nitrogen-polar) suggesting that the N-polar surface is the most suitable for Ohmic contacts. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  12. Noise level in intensive care units of a public university hospital in Santa Marta (Colombia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the noise level in adult, pediatric and neonatal intensive care units of a university hospital in the city of Santa Marta (Colombia). A descriptive, observational, non-interventional study with follow-up over time was carried out. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days for each unit using a type i sound level meter, filter frequency in A weighting and Fast mode. We recorded the maximum values, the 90th percentile as background noise, and the continuous noise level. The mean hourly levels in the adult unit varied between 57.40±1.14-63.47±2.13dBA, with a maximum between 71.55±2.32-77.22±1.94dBA, and a background noise between 53.51±1.16-60.26±2.10dBA; in the pediatric unit the mean hourly levels varied between 57.07±3.07-65.72±2.46dBA, with a maximum of 68.69±3.57-79.06±2.34dBA, and a background noise between 53.33±3.54-61.96±2.85dBA; the neonatal unit in turn presented mean hourly values between 59.54±2.41-65.33±1.77dBA, with a maximum value between 67.20±2.13-77.65±3.74dBA, and a background noise between 55.02±2.03-58.70±1.95dBA. Analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between the hourly values and between the different units, with the time of day exhibiting a greater influence. The type of unit affects the noise levels in intensive care units, the pediatric unit showing the highest values and the adult unit the lowest values. However, the parameter exerting the greatest influence upon noise level is the time of day, with higher levels in the morning and evening, and lower levels at night and in the early morning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. A Novel Steganalytic Algorithm based on III Level DWT with Energy as Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V.S. Sree Rathna Lakshmi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel steganalytic algorithm which can differentiate between the normal and the stego image is proposed, in order to break a steganographic method, whose stego image is of high quality. The proposed steganographic method is employed to hide multiple images, in a JPEG cover image without any compromise in quality and is shown in experimental results. The steganographic method makes sense for JPEG, PNG and BMP image formats. The steganalytic algorithm exploits ‘3-Level DWT’ and the energy value is calculated, based on which classification between the stego and the normal image is carried out. However, the proposed steganalytic algorithm proves its accuracy, by identifying between the stego and normal image with 90% accuracy, over the existing method which shows 80% accuracy rate and is shown in experimental results.

  14. The Levels of Decision Making in Multi-Unit Community College Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Thomas C.; Creswell, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a survey of 33 multi-unit community colleges designed to determine the relationship between (1) the levels at which decisions were made in nine selected areas; (2) institutional size and history; and (3) the number of system-level personnel. Discusses the implications of the findings for practice. (AYC)

  15. Teaching at the University Level: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from the United States and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Dennis G.; Hunt, Gilbert H.; Zhukov, Vassiliy I.; Mardahaev, Lev V.

    2007-01-01

    Interest in what constitutes effective teaching in Pre-K-12 and higher education is nearly universal. This important text explores this interest at the college and university level from a unique, international perspective. "Teaching at the University Level: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from the United States and Russia" brings to one…

  16. The Levels of Decision Making in Multi-Unit Community College Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Thomas C.; Creswell, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a survey of 33 multi-unit community colleges designed to determine the relationship between (1) the levels at which decisions were made in nine selected areas; (2) institutional size and history; and (3) the number of system-level personnel. Discusses the implications of the findings for practice. (AYC)

  17. An Analysis of Grades, Class Level and Faculty Evaluation Scores in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Lee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the results of a student evaluation of faculty against the grades awarded and the level of the course for a higher education institution in the United Arab Emirates. The purpose of the study was to determine if the grades awarded in the course and/or level of the course impacted the evaluation scores awarded to the faculty…

  18. Nurse manager perspective of staff participation in unit level shared governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox Sullivan, Sheila; Norris, Mitzi R; Brown, Lana M; Scott, Karen J

    2017-08-30

    To examine the nurse manager perspective surrounding implementation of unit level shared governance in one Veterans Health Administration facility. Nursing shared governance is a formal model allowing nursing staff decision-making input into clinical practice, quality improvement, evidence-based practice and staff professional development. Unit level shared governance is a management process where decision authority is delegated to nursing staff at the unit level. Convenience sampling was used to recruit ten nurse managers who participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using content analysis and constant comparison techniques. Demographic data were described using descriptive statistics. The participants included seven female and three male nurse managers with seven Caucasian and three African American. Participant quotes were clustered to identify sub-themes that were then grouped into four global themes to describe unit level shared governance. The global themes were: (1) motivation, (2) demotivation, (3) recommendations for success, and (4) outcomes. These research findings resonate with previous studies that shared governance may be associated with increased nurse empowerment, self-management, engagement, and satisfaction. These findings reflect the need for nurse managers to promote and recognize staff participation in unit level shared governance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Radicality effect of adding an interpectoral to a subpectoral approach for dissection of level III axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Alfredo Carlos S D; Andrade, Felipe Eduardo M; Bevilacqua, José Luiz B; Barros, Maria Aparecida C; Piato, José Roberto; Santos, Donizeti R; Filassi, José Roberto; Nimir, Cristiane C B A

    2013-01-01

    The extent of axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer treatment is tailored to each patient. When the surgeon assumes that full dissection, including level III, is needed, there are basically two ways for reaching the apical nodes while preserving the pectoralis muscles: a subpectoral approach, below the joined pectoralis muscles, and another that includes an additional interpectoral dissection between the muscles. We conducted a study to evaluate the radicality of dissection using these two approaches. To determine whether the harvest of level III axillary lymph nodes is equivalent with the different approaches, we prospectively studied 75 patients with breast cancer. Careful axillary lymph node dissection was done to as radical an extent as possible, first below the lateral edge of the joined pectoralis muscles (subpectoral approach) and sequentially after opening the space between the muscles (additional interpectoral approach). The number of patients with extra level III nodes retrieved by the addition of an interpectoral dissection as well as the number of complementary nodes obtained in such patients were determined. We excised 1701 axillary lymph nodes in 75 patients (mean, 22.7). Using first the subpectoral approach, we resected 259 level III nodes in 68 patients (mean, 3.8); in 56 patients, we removed 132 additional level III nodes using the supplementary interpectoral approach (mean, 2.4). In 7 patients (9.3%), we found at least one metastatic node with the interpectoral approach. Two of these patients had positive level III nodes that were discovered only by addition of the interpectoral dissection. The dissection of level III axillary nodes is more radical when an additional interpectoral dissection is performed after a subpectoral approach has been used. The exclusive subpectoral approach frequently leaves residual nodes at the apex of the axilla.

  20. Are Productivity Levels Higher in Some European Countries than in the United States?

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert Cette

    2005-01-01

    Estimates produced by the OECD indicate that labour productivity levels are higher in a number of European countries than in the United States, implying that Europe and not the United States is the world technological leader. The author argues that a structural measure of labour productivity, closer to a measure of technical efficiency, would take into account the much lower employment rates and hours of work in Europe. Low employment rates reflect the exclusion of certain low-porductivity gr...

  1. Two Dimensional Effective Electron Mass at the Fermi Level in Quantum Wells of III-V, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S; Chatterjee, B; Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the influence of strong electric field on the two dimensional (2D)effective electron mass (EEM) at the Fermi level in quantum wells of III-V, ternary and quaternary semiconductors within the framework of k x p formalism by formulating a new 2D electron energy spectrum. It appears taking quantum wells of InSb, InAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(y) lattice matched to InP as examples that the EEM increases with decreasing film thickness, increasing electric field and increases with increasing surface electron concentration exhibiting spikey oscillations because of the crossing over of the Fermi level by the quantized level in quantum wells and the quantized oscillation occurs when the Fermi energy touches the sub-band energy. The electric field makes the mass quantum number dependent and the oscillatory mass introduces quantum number dependent mass anisotropy in addition to energy. The EEM increases with decreasing alloy composition where the variations are totally band structure dependent. Under certain limiting conditions all the results for all the cases get simplified into the well-known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The content of this paper finds three applications in the fields of nano-science and technology.

  2. Semiempirical and DFT computations of the influence of Tb(III) dopant on unit cell dimensions of cerium(III) fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyichuk, Andrii; Runowski, Marcin; Lis, Stefan; Kaczkowski, Jakub; Jezierski, Andrzej

    2015-01-30

    Several computational methods, both semiempirical and ab initio, were used to study the influence of the amount of dopant on crystal cell dimensions of CeF3 doped with Tb(3+) ions (CeF3 :Tb(3+) ). AM1, RM1, PM3, PM6, and PM7 semiempirical parameterization models were used, while the Sparkle model was used to represent the lanthanide cations in all cases. Ab initio calculations were performed by means of GGA+U/PBE projector augmented wave density functional theory. The computational results agree well with the experimental data. According to both computation and experiment, the crystal cell parameters undergo a linear decrease with increasing amount of the dopant. The computations performed using Sparkle/PM3 and DFT methods resulted in the best agreement with the experiment with the average deviation of about 1% in both cases. Typical Sparkle/PM3 computation on a 2×2×2 supercell of CeF3:Tb3+ lasted about two orders of magnitude shorter than the DFT computation concerning a unit cell of this material. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pharmacoproteomic study of the natural product Ebenfuran III in DU-145 prostate cancer cells: the quantitative and temporal interrogation of chemically induced cell death at the protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Halabalaki, Maria; Alexi, Xanthippi; Ankrett, Dyan; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Sayan, Berna S; Alexis, Michael N; Townsend, Paul A; Garbis, Spiros D

    2013-04-05

    A naturally occurring benzofuran derivative, Ebenfuran III (Eb III), was investigated for its antiproliferative effects using the DU-145 prostate cell line. Eb III was isolated from Onobrychis ebenoides of the Leguminosae family, a plant endemic in Central and Southern Greece. We have previously reported that Eb III exerts significant cytotoxic effects on certain cancer cell lines. This effect is thought to occur via the isoprenyl moiety at the C-5 position of the molecule. The study aim was to gain a deeper understanding of the pharmacological effect of Eb III on DU-145 cell death at the translational level using a relative quantitative and temporal proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from the cell pellets were subjected to solution phase trypsin proteolysis followed by iTRAQ-labeling. The labeled tryptic peptide extracts were then fractionated using strong cation exchange chromatography and the fractions were analyzed by nanoflow reverse phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis using a hybrid QqTOF platform. Using this approach, we compared the expression levels of 1360 proteins analyzed at ≤ 1% global protein false discovery rate (FDR), commonly present in untreated (control, vehicle only) and Eb III-treated cells at the different exposure time points. Through the iterative use of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis with hierarchical clustering of protein expression patterns, followed by bibliographic research, the temporal regulation of the Calpain-1, ERK2, PAR-4, RAB-7, and Bap31 proteins were identified as potential nodes of multipathway convergence to Eb III induced DU-145 cell death. These proteins were further verified with Western blot analysis. This gel-free, quantitative 2DLC-MS/MS proteomics method effectively captured novel modulated proteins in the DU-145 cell line as a response to Eb III treatment. This approach also provided greater insight to the multifocal and combinatorial signaling

  4. Reliability and Construct Validity of the 6-Minute Racerunner Test in Children and Youth with Cerebral Palsy, GMFCS Levels III and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Eline A M; Dallmeijer, Annet J; de Wolf, G Sander; Versteegt, Marieke; Schie, Petra E M van

    2017-05-01

    To determine the test-retest reliability and construct validity of a novel 6-Minute Racerunner Test (6MRT) in children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP) classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels III and IV. The racerunner is a step-propelled tricycle. The participants were 38 children and youth with CP (mean age 11 y 2 m, SD 3 y 7 m; GMFCS III, n = 19; IV, n = 19). Racerunner capability was determined as the distance covered during the 6MRT on three occasions. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), and smallest detectable differences (SDD) were calculated to assess test-retest reliability. The ICC for tests 2 and 3 were 0.89 (SDD 37%; 147 m) for children in level III and 0.91 for children in level IV (SDD 52%; 118 m). When the average of two separate test occasions was used, the SDDs were reduced to 26% (104 m; level III) and 37% (118 m; level IV). For tests 1 to 3, the mean distance covered increased from 345 m (SD 148 m) to 413 m (SD 137 m) for children in level III, and from 193 m (SD 100 m) to 239 m (SD 148 m) for children in level IV. Results suggest high test-retest reliability. However, large SDDs indicate that a single 6MRT measurement is only useful for individual evaluation when large improvements are expected, or when taking the average of two tests. The 6MRT discriminated the distance covered between children and youth in levels III and IV, supporting construct validity.

  5. EPA Level III Ecoregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The ecoregions shown here have been derived from Omernik (1987) and from refinements of Omernik's framework that have been made for other projects. These ongoing or...

  6. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H. (Michigan)

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  7. Evaluating the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals using a level III model based on poly-parameter linear free energy relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowska, Barbara; Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank

    2006-04-15

    We recently proposed how to expand the applicability of multimedia models towards polar organic chemicals by expressing environmental phase partitioning with the help of poly-parameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). Here we elaborate on this approach by applying it to three pharmaceutical substances. A PP-LFER-based version of a Level III fugacity model calculates overall persistence, concentrations and intermedia fluxes of polar and non-polar organic chemicals between air, water, soil and sediments at steady-state. Illustrative modeling results for the pharmaceuticals within a defined coastal region are presented and discussed. The model results are highly sensitive to the degradation rate in water and the equilibrium partitioning between organic carbon and water, suggesting that an accurate description of this particular partitioning equilibrium is essential in order to obtain reliable predictions of environmental fate. The PP-LFER based modeling approach furthermore illustrates that the greatest mobility in aqueous phases may be experienced by pharmaceuticals that combines a small molecular size with strong H-acceptor properties.

  8. Evaluating the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals using a level III model based on poly-parameter linear free energy relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukowska, Barbara [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Breivik, Knut [NILU- Norwegian Institute for Air Research, P.O. Box 100, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)]. E-mail: knut.breivik@nilu.no; Wania, Frank [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Scarborough, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2006-04-15

    We recently proposed how to expand the applicability of multimedia models towards polar organic chemicals by expressing environmental phase partitioning with the help of poly-parameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). Here we elaborate on this approach by applying it to three pharmaceutical substances. A PP-LFER-based version of a Level III fugacity model calculates overall persistence, concentrations and intermedia fluxes of polar and non-polar organic chemicals between air, water, soil and sediments at steady-state. Illustrative modeling results for the pharmaceuticals within a defined coastal region are presented and discussed. The model results are highly sensitive to the degradation rate in water and the equilibrium partitioning between organic carbon and water, suggesting that an accurate description of this particular partitioning equilibrium is essential in order to obtain reliable predictions of environmental fate. The PP-LFER based modeling approach furthermore illustrates that the greatest mobility in aqueous phases may be experienced by pharmaceuticals that combines a small molecular size with strong H-acceptor properties.

  9. THE INFORMATION CONTENT OF THE FARM AND UNIT LEVEL NUTRIENT BALANCES FOR THE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T SOMOGYI

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The farm gate balance is well known from the environmental literature. This method is not suitable in every case to show the nutrient load for the environment of agricultural companies that is the reason why unit level internal nutrient balances are applied to express the level of nutrient pollution on the environment. These also help to determine the source of the pollution. With the survey of the nutrient flows within the farm we determine the keystones of nutrient management to control the nutrient load of the pollution sources. On the basis of the results and the controlled data of the unit level internal balances we make recommendations for the most appropriate environmental policy instrument to reduce the nutrient pollution.

  10. Evaluation of vitamin D level in patients from neurosurgical intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ho Jun Yi; Je Hoon Jeong; Eun-Sun Jin; Il Young Shin; Hyung Sik Hwang; Seung-Myung Moon

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in maintaining normal bone metabolism. Recent studies have suggested that vitamin D influences many other physiological processes, including muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nerve function, and immune response. Furthermore, accumulated evidence suggests that vitamin D also mediates the immune system response to infection. Critical neurosurgical patients have higher infection and mortality rates. To correlate vitamin D deficiency to the immunological status of neurosurgical intensive care unit patients, we detected serum vitamin D level in 15 patients with clinically suspected infection and 10 patients with confirmed infection. Serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the primary circulating form of vitamin D, was significantly decreased in patients with suspected or confirmed infection after a 2-week neurosurgical intensive care unit hospitalization, while serum level of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the active form of vitamin D, was significantly decreased in patients after a 4-week neurosurgical intensive care unit hospitalization. These findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency is linked to the immunological status of neurosurgical intensive care unit patients and vitamin D supplementation can improve patient's immunological status.

  11. PENDUGAAN POTENSI KANDUNGAN KARBON PADA TEGAKAN JATI (TECTONA GRANDIS LINN. F DI AREAL KPH CIANJUR PERUM PERHUTANI UNIT III JAWA BARAT DAN BANTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Catleya Agnita

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The land use and land use change through forest conversion and also the increasing heavy industry which produce high value of pollutant had bad impact to the environment which finally affect the global climate change. The importance of vegetation in the forest which have a role to reduce green house gass through fotosintetic became important, then the focus of this research was to know the carbon stock of certain vegetation especially teak, in KPH Cianjur PERHUTANI UNIT III Wesat Java and Banten. The research done in the period of April 2010 until may 2010 in the KPH Cianjur, PERHUTANI UNIT III Wesat Java and Banten. The materials used for this study which teak plantation planted in the year 1997 and 1990. The step taken for the research content of establishing and making of research site estimating biomass stand, sampling of litter and understory. The result of research shown that the carbon stock of teak plantation which spacing 3 x 2 m at 1997 planting year was 73.519 ton/ha, while at 1990 planting year was 93.94 ton/ha. It means that the carbon stock of teak planted in the year 1990 was bigger than in the year 1997

  12. X-ray characterization of tripyridinium bis[tetrabromidoferrate(III)] bromide asymmetric unit in solution by Debye function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, F.; Sahraei, N.; Fathi, M. B.; Tehranchi, M. M.; Safari, N.; Amani, V.

    2016-09-01

    Abundant asymmetric unit of the [FeBr4]2[py.H]3Br magnetic molecule in the acetonitrile solvent was characterized via Debye function analysis (DFA) of the X-ray powder diffraction pattern from dilute solution. A diluted solution of the material in acetonitrile solvent has been prepared to reduce, as far as possible, the interaction between the molecular units. The X-ray diffraction from the sample was measured and Debye function simulations of three out of ten chemically plausible molecular units were observed to suitably comply with the experimental results. These three configurations were further optimized with first-principles method in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) and the most stable structure according to the calculated total energy is presented.

  13. Parental social support, coping strategies, resilience factors, stress, anxiety and depression levels in parents of children with MPS III (Sanfilippo syndrome) or children with intellectual disabilities (ID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Sheena; Cross, Elaine; Wraith, James Edmond; Jones, Simon; Mahon, Louise; Lomax, Michelle; Bigger, Brian; Hare, Dougal

    2013-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder, caused by a deficiency in one of four enzymes involved in the catabolism of the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulphate. It is a degenerative disorder, with a progressive decline in children's intellectual and physical functioning. There is currently no cure for the disorder. To date there is a paucity of research on how this disorder impacts parents psychological functioning. Specifically, research in the area has failed to employ adequate control groups to assess if the impact of this disorder on parents psychological functioning differs from parenting a child with intellectual disability (ID). The current study examined child behaviour and parental psychological functioning in 23 parents of children with MPS III and 23 parents of children with ID. Parents completed postal questionnaires about their child's behaviour and abilities and their own psychological functioning. Parents of children with MPS III reported fewer behavioural difficulties as their child aged, more severe level of intellectual disability, and similar levels of perceived social support, coping techniques, stress, anxiety and depression levels as parents of children with ID. Both groups of parents scored above the clinical cut off for anxiety and depression. Parents of children with MPS III rated themselves as significantly less future-orientated and goal directed than parents of children with ID. Services should develop support packages for parents of children with MPS III that incorporate an understanding of the unique stressors and current-difficulty approach of this population. Future research should examine gender differences between parental psychological functioning, using mixed qualitative and quantitative approaches, and utilise matched developmental level and typically developing control groups.

  14. Managerial modes of influence and counterproductivity in organizations: a longitudinal business-unit-level investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detert, James R; Treviño, Linda K; Burris, Ethan R; Andiappan, Meena

    2007-07-01

    The authors studied the effect of 3 modes of managerial influence (managerial oversight, ethical leadership, and abusive supervision) on counterproductivity, which was conceptualized as a unit-level outcome that reflects the existence of a variety of intentional and unintentional harmful employee behaviors in the unit. Counterproductivity was represented by an objective measure of food loss in a longitudinal study of 265 restaurants. After prior food loss and alternative explanations (e.g., turnover, training, neighborhood income) were controlled for, results indicated that managerial oversight and abusive supervision significantly influenced counterproductivity in the following periods, whereas ethical leadership did not. Counterproductivity was also found to be negatively related to both restaurant profitability and customer satisfaction in the same period and to mediate indirect relationships between managerial influences and distal unit outcomes.

  15. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  16. Reliability of a Shuttle Run Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy Who Are Classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System Level III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bosma, Liesbeth; Takken, Tim

    2011-01-01

    For children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level III there is no running-based field test available to assess their cardiorespiratory fitness. The current study investigated whether a shuttle run test can be reliably (test-retest) performed in a group of children with…

  17. Iron-Mediated Homogeneous ICAR ATRP of Methyl Methacrylate under ppm Level Organometallic Catalyst Iron(III Acetylacetonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP is an important polymerization process in polymer synthesis. However, a typical ATRP system has some drawbacks. For example, it needs a large amount of transition metal catalyst, and it is difficult or expensive to remove the metal catalyst residue in products. In order to reduce the amount of catalyst and considering good biocompatibility and low toxicity of the iron catalyst, in this work, we developed a homogeneous polymerization system of initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP with just a ppm level of iron catalyst. Herein, we used oil-soluble iron (III acetylacetonate (Fe(acac3 as the organometallic catalyst, 1,1′-azobis (cyclohexanecarbonitrile (ACHN with longer half-life period as the thermal initiator, ethyl 2-bromophenylacetate (EBPA as the initiator, triphenylphosphine (PPh3 as the ligand, toluene as the solvent and methyl methacrylate (MMA as the model monomer. The factors related with the polymerization system, such as concentration of Fe(acac3 and ACHN and polymerization kinetics, were investigated in detail at 90 °C. It was found that a polymer with an acceptable molecular weight distribution (Mw/Mn = 1.43 at 45.9% of monomer conversion could be obtained even with 1 ppm of Fe(acac3, making it needless to remove the residual metal in the resultant polymers, which makes such an ICAR ATRP process much more industrially attractive. The “living” features of this polymerization system were further confirmed by chain-extension experiment.

  18. Impact of Climate Change on Ambient Ozone Level and Mortality in Southeastern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Montserrat Fuentes; Chang, Howard H.; Jingwen Zhou

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in quantifying the health impacts of climate change. This paper examines the risks of future ozone levels on non-accidental mortality across 19 urban communities in Southeastern United States. We present a modeling framework that integrates data from climate model outputs, historical meteorology and ozone observations, and a health surveillance database. We first modeled present-day relationships between observed maximum daily 8-hour average ozone concentrations an...

  19. Effects of sea level rise on economy of the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Novackova, Monika; Tol, Richard,

    2017-01-01

    We report the first ex post study of the economic impact of sea level rise. We apply two econometric approaches to estimate the past effects of sea level rise on the economy of the USA, viz. Barro type growth regressions adjusted for spatial patterns and a matching estimator. Unit of analysis is 3063 counties of the USA. We fit growth regressions for 13 time periods and we estimated numerous varieties and robustness tests for both growth regressions and matching estimator. Although there is s...

  20. Evolutionary epistemology as a scientific method: a new look upon the units and levels of evolution debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontier, Nathalie

    2010-09-01

    Evolutionary epistemology can provide a unified scientific methodology that enables scholars to study the evolution of life as well as the evolution of cognition, science, culture and any other phenomenon displayed by living organisms. In this article, three heuristics are provided that allow for a thorough search for the units, levels and mechanisms of evolution. Contrary to previous approaches, units, levels and mechanisms are not identified by pointing out essential features, but rather ostensive definitions are preferred. That is, units are considered as such if a level of evolution and a mechanism of evolution is identifiable. Levels are levels if one can point out units that evolve at that level according to evolutionary mechanisms, and mechanisms are considered as such if one can point out units and levels where the mechanism is active.

  1. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  2. An Examination of the Relationship between Acculturation Level and PTSD among Central American Immigrants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Sarita Marie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between acculturation level and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) prevalence in Central American immigrants in the United States. Central American immigrants represent a population that is a part of the Latino/Hispanic Diaspora in the United States. By the year 2050 the United States…

  3. Evidence for single-chain magnet behavior in a Mn(III)-Ni(II) chain designed with high spin magnetic units: a route to high temperature metastable magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clérac, Rodolphe; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Coulon, Claude

    2002-10-30

    We herein present the synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of a new heterometallic chain of MnIII and NiII ions, [Mn2(saltmen)2Ni(pao)2(py)2](ClO4)2 (1) (saltmen2- = N,N'-(1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylene) bis(salicylideneiminate) and pao- = pyridine-2-aldoximate). The crystal structure of 1 was investigated by X-ray crystallographic analysis: compound 1 crystallized in monoclinic, space group C2/c (No. 15) with a = 21.140(3) A, b = 15.975(1) A, c = 18.6212(4) A, beta = 98.0586(4) degrees , V = 6226.5(7) A3, and Z = 4. This compound consists of two fragments, the out-of-plane dimer [Mn2(saltmen)2]2+ as a coordination acceptor building block and the neutral mononuclear unit [Ni(pao)2(py)2] as a coordination donor building block, forming an alternating chain having the repeating unit [-Mn-(O)2-Mn-ON-Ni-NO-]n. In the crystal structure, each chain is well separated with a minimum intermetallic distance between Mn and Ni ions of 10.39 A and with the absence of interchain pi overlaps between organic ligands. These features ensure a good magnetic isolation of the chains. The dc and ac magnetic measurements were performed on both the polycrystalline sample and the aligned single crystals of 1. Above 30 K, the magnetic susceptibility of this one-dimensional compound was successfully described in a mean field approximation as an assembly of trimers (Mn...Ni...Mn) with a NiII...MnIII antiferromagnetic interaction (J = -21 K) connected through a ferromagnetic MnIII...MnIII interaction (J'). However, the mean field theory fails to describe the magnetic behavior below 30 K emphasizing the one-dimensional magnetic character of the title compound. Between 5 and 15 K, the susceptibility in the chain direction was fitted to a one-dimensional Ising model leading to the same value of J'. Hysteresis loops are observed below 3.5 K, indicating a magnet-type behavior. In the same range of temperature, combined ac and dc measurements show a slow relaxation of the magnetization

  4. State-Level Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feijun; Florence, Curtis

    2017-01-13

    Injury-associated deaths have substantial economic consequences in the United States. The total estimated lifetime medical and work-loss costs associated with fatal injuries in 2013 were $214 billion (1). In 2014, unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide (the fourth, tenth, and seventeenth leading causes of death, respectively) accounted for 194,635 deaths in the United States (2). In 2014, a total of 199,756 fatal injuries occurred in the United States, and the associated lifetime medical and work-loss costs were $227 billion (3). This report examines the state-level economic burdens of fatal injuries by extending a previous national-level study (1). Numbers and rates of fatal injuries, lifetime costs, and lifetime costs per capita were calculated for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) and for four injury intent categories (all intents, unintentional, suicide, and homicide). During 2014, injury mortality rates and economic burdens varied widely among the states and DC. Among fatal injuries of all intents, the mortality rate and lifetime costs per capita ranged from 101.9 per 100,000 and $1,233, respectively (New Mexico) to 40.2 per 100,000 and $491 (New York). States can engage more effectively and efficiently in injury prevention if they are aware of the economic burden of injuries, identify areas for immediate improvement, and devote necessary resources to those areas.

  5. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Velpuri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 yr (1998–2009 of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We used a calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of the Gibe III dam using three different approaches – a historical approach, a rainfall based approach, and a statistical approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8–10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 1–2 m (95% confidence compared to the lake level modeled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modeling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of

  6. Studies on the feasibility of using completely incinerable reagents for the single-cycle separation of americium(III) from simulated high-level liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, P.K.; Kumaresan, R.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Subramanian, G.G.S.; Prathibha, T.; Syamala, K.V.; Selvan, B. Robert; Rajeswari, S.; Antony, M.P.; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.; Chaurasia, Shivkumar; Bhanage, B.M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India)

    2015-06-01

    The extraction and stripping behavior of various metal ions present in the fast reactor simulated high-level liquid waste (FR-SHLLW) was studied using a solvent phase composed of a neutral extractant, N,N,-didodecyl-N',N'-dioctyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diamide (D{sup 3}DODGA) and an acidic extractant, di-2-ethylhexyl diglycolamic acid (HDEHDGA) in n-dodecane (n-DD). The third phase formation behavior of the solvent formulation D{sup 3}DODGA + HDEHDGA/n-DD, was studied when it was contacted with FR-SHLLW, and the concentration of neutral and acidic extractant needed to avoid the third phase formation was optimized. The distribution ratio of various metal ions present in FR-SHLLW was measured in a solution of 0.1 M D{sup 3}DODGA + 0.2 M HDEHDGA/n-DD. The extraction of Am(III) was accompanied by the co-extraction of lanthanides and unwanted metal ions such as Zr(IV), Y(III), and Pd(II). A procedure was developed to minimize the extraction of unwanted metal ions by using aqueous soluble complexing agents in FR-SHLLW. Based on those results, the counter-current mixer-settler run was performed in a 20-stage mixer-settler. Quantitative extraction of Am(III), Ln(III), Y(III), and Sr(II) in 0.1 M D{sup 3}DODGA + 0.2 M HDEHDGA/n-DD was observed. The recovery of Am(III) from the loaded organic phase was carried out by the optimized aqueous formulation composed of 0.01 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) + 0.5 M citric acid (CA) at pH 1.5. The stripping of Am(III) was accompanied by co-stripping of some early lanthanides. However the later lanthanides (Eu(III) and beyond) were not back extracted to Am(III) product. Therefore, the studies foresee the possibility of intra-lanthanides as well as lanthanide-actinide separation in a single-processing cycle.

  7. Understanding the Nature of Small Business. PACE Revised. Level 3. Unit 1. Research & Development Series No. 240CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This individualized, competency-based unit on understanding the nature of small business, the first of 18 modules, is on the third level of the revised Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). Intended for the advanced secondary and postsecondary levels and for adults wanting training or retraining, this unit, together with the…

  8. Organizational Culture in Middle and Upper Level Hotel Units in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanos Kriemadis

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the level of awareness of organizational culture (OC of hotel managers in middle and upper level Hotel Units (HU in Greece. A random sample of 140 hotel managers from middle and upper Hotel Units (HU in Greece were surveyed using the Organizational Culture Assessment Questionnaire (OCAQ, a 30-item OC scale developed by Sashkin (1997. The results indicated that the mean values of the OC factors “managing change”, “achieving goals” and “cultural strength” are considered as average, while “coordinated teamwork”, “customer orientation” and the total OC score are considered to be high, when compared to Sashkin (1997 norms. Further results revealed significant differences only for the “customer orientation” factor. Generally, no significant differences were found among managers of middle and upper level HU for general awareness of OC. It is concluded that the results are rather homogenous, with all HU managers placing more or less the same importance to Sashkin’s five OC factors, with each HU manager reporting a rather satisfactory organizational culture.

  9. Two-level, two-objective evolutionary algorithms for solving unit commitment problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgopoulou, Chariklia A.; Giannakoglou, Kyriakos C. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Laboratory of Thermal Turbomachines, Parallel CFD and Optimization Unit, P.O. Box 64069, Athens 157 10 (Greece)

    2009-07-15

    A two-level, two-objective optimization scheme based on evolutionary algorithms (EAs) is proposed for solving power generating Unit Commitment (UC) problems by considering stochastic power demand variations. Apart from the total operating cost to cover a known power demand distribution over the scheduling horizon, which is the first objective, the risk of not fulfilling possible demand variations forms the second objective to be minimized. For this kind of problems with a high number of decision variables, conventional EAs become inefficient optimization tools, since they require a high number of evaluations before reaching the optimal solution(s). To considerably reduce the computational burden, a two-level algorithm is proposed. At the low level, a coarsened UC problem is defined and solved using EAs to locate promising solutions at low cost: a strategy for coarsening the UC problem is proposed. Promising solutions migrate upwards to be injected into the high level EA population for further refinement. In addition, at the high level, the scheduling horizon is partitioned in a small number of subperiods of time which are optimized iteratively using EAs, based on objective function(s) penalized to ensure smooth transition from/to the adjacent subperiods. Handling shorter chromosomes due to partitioning increases method's efficiency despite the need for iterating. The proposed two-level method and conventional EAs are compared on representative test problems. (author)

  10. Improving environmental performance through unit-level organizational citizenship behaviors for the environment: A capability perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Elisa; Spitzeck, Heiko

    2016-11-01

    Organizational citizenship behaviors for the environment (OCBEs) are increasingly advocated as a means of complementing formal practices in improving environmental performance. Adopting a capability perspective, we propose that a firm's employee involvement capability translates into environmental performance through the manifestation of unit-level OCBEs, and that this relationship is amplified by a shared vision capability. In a cross-country and multi-industry sample of 170 firms, we find support for our hypotheses, shedding light on contextual determinants of OCBEs, and on how firms may engender a positive relationship between top-down environmental initiatives and bottom-up behaviors.

  11. Unit cell modeling in support of interim performance assessment for low level tank waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, N.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    A unit cell model is used to simulate the base analysis case and related sensitivity cases for the interim performance assessment of low level tank waste disposal. Simulation case results are summarized in terms of fractional contaminant release rates to the vadose zone and to the water table at the unconfined aquifer. Results suggest that the crushed glass water conditioning layer at the top of the facility and the chemical retardation pad at the bottom of the facility can be important components of the facility. Results also suggest that the release rates to the water table are dominated by the release rate from the waste form.

  12. Variation in Residential Care Community Nurse and Aide Staffing Levels: United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Vincent; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D

    2016-02-19

    This report presents national and state estimates of staffing levels in residential care communities for registered nurses, licensed practical or vocational nurses, and aides in the United States for 2014. Data were drawn from the residential care community component of the 2014 wave of the biennial National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. For each staff type, the "staffing level" measure is presented as average hours per resident per day, defined as the total number of hours worked divided by the total number of residents, which does not necessarily reflect the amount of care given to a specific resident. Analyses examined the extent to which residential care community nurse and aide staffing levels varied by selected organizational characteristics and selected resident composition characteristics of the communities. Differences among subgroups were evaluated using two-sided t tests at the 0.05 level. In 2014, the total registered nurse, licensed practical or vocational nurse, and aide staffing level among all residential care communities was about 2 hours and 50 minutes. Registered nurse staffing levels differed for two of the three organizational characteristics (size and metropolitan statistical area [MSA]) and for only one of the four resident composition characteristics (primarily serving residents needing any assistance with activities of daily living). Licensed practical or vocational nurse staffing levels differed for all three organizational characteristics (size, MSA, and ownership) and for only one of the four resident composition characteristics (primarily serving residents diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias). In contrast, differences in aide staffing levels were common when examining both community organizational and resident composition characteristics. Registered nursing, licensed practical and vocational nursing, and aide

  13. Geoecology: a county-level environmental data base for the conterminous United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.J.; Emerson, C.J.; Nungesser, M.K.

    1980-09-01

    The Geoecology Data Base represents a unique compilation of computerized environmental data for research and development needs. Environmental assessment and planning for energy development require rapid access to data at appropriate spatial and temporal scales. In the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), we have developed an integrated data base of diverse environmental resource information from extant sources. Data are stored at the county level of resolution for the conterminous United States with some data available for subcounty units within larger, more diverse eastern counties. The Geoecology Data Base contains selected data on terrain and soils, water resources, forestry, vegetation, agriculture, land use, wildlife, air quality, climate, natural areas, and endangered species. Basic files on human population are also included to complement the environmental files. Data are stored in metric-SI units. The Geoecology Data Base is currently fulfilling diverse ongoing research needs while it is being expanded and updated as needs and new data are identified. This report is both a documentation and a user's guide to the Geoecology Data Base. It describes the Data Base design, illustrates applications, provides examples of accessing the Data Base, and gives general information on the data set contents.

  14. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has no significant impact on survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III-IV inferior vena cava thrombectomy; a multi-institutional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Era, Marc A.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Carballido, Joaquín A.; Chandrasekar, Thenappan; Chromecki, Thomas; Ciancio, Gaetano; Daneshmand, Siamak; Gontero, Paolo; Gonzalez, Javier; Haferkamp, Axel; Hohenfellner, Markus; Huang, William C.; Espinós, Estefania Linares; Mandel, Philipp; Martinez-Salamanca, Juan I.; Master, Viraj A.; McKiernan, James M.; Montorsi, Francesco; Novara, Giacomo; Pahernik, Sascha; Palou, Juan; Pruthi, Raj S.; Rodriguez-Faba, Oscar; Russo, Paul; Scherr, Douglas S.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Spahn, Martin; Terrone, Carlo; Vergho, Daniel; Wallen, Eric M.; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Zigeuner, Richard; Libertino, John A.; Evans, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The impact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) usage in level III-IV tumor thrombectomy on surgical and oncologic outcomes is unknown. We sought to determine the impact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on overall and cancer specific survival, as well as surgical complication rates, and immediate outcomes in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III-IV tumor thrombectomy with or without CPB. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 362 patients with RCC and with level III or IV tumor thrombus from 1992 to 2012 in 22 US and European centers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare overall and cancer-specific survival between patients with and without CPB. Perioperative mortality and complications rates were assessed using logistic regression analyses. Results The median overall survival was 24.6 months in non-CPB patients and 26.6 months in CPB patients. Overall survival and cancer-specific survival (CSS) did not differ significantly in both groups, neither in univariate analysis nor when adjusting for known risk factors. In multivariate analysis, no significant differences were seen in hospital LOS, Clavien 1-4 complication rate, intraoperative or 30 day mortality, and CSS between both groups. Limitations include the retrospective nature of the study. Conclusions In our multi-institutional analysis, the use of cardiopulmonary bypass did not significantly impact cancer specific survival or overall survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III or IV tumor thrombectomy. Neither approach was independently associated with increased mortality in the multivariate analysis. Higher surgical complications were not independently associated with the use of CPB. PMID:25797392

  15. Population-level differences in revascularization treatment and outcomes among various United States subpopulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garth Graham; Yang-Yu Karen Xiao; Dan Rappoport; Saima Siddiqi

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent general improvements in health care, significant disparities persist in the cardiovascular care of women and racial/ethnic minorities. This is true even when income, education level, and site of care are taken into consideration. Possible explanations for these disparities include socioeconomic considerations, elements of discrimination and racism that affect socioeconomic status, and access to adequate medical care. Coronary revascularization has become the accepted and recommended treatment for myocardial infarction(MI) today and is one of the most common major medical interventions in the United States, with more than 1 million procedures each year. This review discusses recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms, care and access to medical resources, and outcomes in revascularization as treatment for acute coronary syndrome, looking especially at women and minority populations in the United States. The data show that revascularization is used less in both female and minority patients. We summarize recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms related to MI; access to care, medical resources, and treatments; and outcomes in women, blacks, and Hispanics. The picture is complicated among the last group by the many Hispanic/Latino subgroups in the United States. Some differences in outcomes are partially explained by presentation symptoms and co-morbidities and external conditions such as local hospital capacity. Of particular note is the striking differential in both presentation co-morbidities and mortality rates seen in women, compared to men, especially in women ≤ 55 years of age. Surveillance data on other groups in the United States such as American Indians/Alaska Natives and the many Asian subpopulations show disparities in risk factors and co-morbidities, but revascularization as treatment for MI in these populations has not been adequately studied. Significant research is required to

  16. Laboratory determination of migration of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures as buffer/backfill material for high-level waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lang; Zhang, Huyuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ming

    2013-12-01

    For the safety assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the migration of Eu(III) through compacted bentonite-sand mixtures was measured under expected repository conditions. Under the evaluated conditions, advection and dispersion is the dominant migration mechanism. The role of sorption on the retardation of migration was also evaluated. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonite-sand mixtures were K=2.07×10(-10)-5.23×10(-10)cm/s, The sorption and diffusion of Eu(III) were examined using a flexible wall permeameter for a solute concentration of 2.0×10(-5)mol/l. The effective diffusion coefficients and apparent diffusion coefficients of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures were in the range of 1.62×10(-12)-4.87×10(-12)m(2)/s, 1.44×10(-14)-9.41×10(-14)m(2)/s, respectively, which has a very important significance to forecast the relationship between migration length of Eu(III) in buffer/backfill material and time and provide a reference for the design of buffer/backfill material for HLW disposal in China.

  17. Hospital-Level Changes in Adult ICU Bed Supply in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, David J; Seymour, Christopher W; Kahn, Jeremy M

    2017-01-01

    Although the number of intensive care beds in the United States is increasing, little is known about the hospitals responsible for this growth. We sought to better characterize national growth in intensive care beds by identifying hospital-level factors associated with increasing numbers of intensive care beds over time. We performed a repeated-measures time series analysis of hospital-level intensive care bed supply using data from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. All United States acute care hospitals with adult intensive care beds over the years 1996-2011. None. None. We described the number of beds, teaching status, ownership, intensive care occupancy, and urbanicity for each hospital in each year of the study. We then examined the relationship between increasing intensive care beds and these characteristics, controlling for other factors. The study included 4,457 hospitals and 55,865 hospital-years. Overall, the majority of intensive care bed growth occurred in teaching hospitals (net, +13,471 beds; 72.1% of total growth), hospitals with 250 or more beds (net, +18,327 beds; 91.8% of total growth), and hospitals in the highest quartile of occupancy (net, +10,157 beds; 54.0% of total growth). In a longitudinal multivariable model, larger hospital size, teaching status, and high intensive care occupancy were associated with subsequent-year growth. Furthermore, the effects of hospital size and teaching status were modified by occupancy: the greatest odds of increasing ICU beds were in hospitals with 500 or more beds in the highest quartile of occupancy (adjusted odds ratio, 18.9; 95% CI, 14.0-25.5; p hospitals in the highest quartile of occupancy (adjusted odds ratio, 7.3; 95% CI, 5.3-9.9; p bed expansion in the United States is occurring in larger hospitals and teaching centers, particularly following a year with high ICU occupancy.

  18. Climate-driven ground-level ozone extreme in the fall over the Southeast United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Wang, Yuhang

    2016-09-06

    Ground-level ozone is adverse to human and vegetation health. High ground-level ozone concentrations usually occur over the United States in the summer, often referred to as the ozone season. However, observed monthly mean ozone concentrations in the southeastern United States were higher in October than July in 2010. The October ozone average in 2010 reached that of July in the past three decades (1980-2010). Our analysis shows that this extreme October ozone in 2010 over the Southeast is due in part to a dry and warm weather condition, which enhances photochemical production, air stagnation, and fire emissions. Observational evidence and modeling analysis also indicate that another significant contributor is enhanced emissions of biogenic isoprene, a major ozone precursor, from water-stressed plants under a dry and warm condition. The latter finding is corroborated by recent laboratory and field studies. This climate-induced biogenic control also explains the puzzling fact that the two extremes of high October ozone both occurred in the 2000s when anthropogenic emissions were lower than the 1980s and 1990s, in contrast to the observed decreasing trend of July ozone in the region. The occurrences of a drying and warming fall, projected by climate models, will likely lead to more active photochemistry, enhanced biogenic isoprene and fire emissions, an extension of the ozone season from summer to fall, and an increase of secondary organic aerosols in the Southeast, posing challenges to regional air quality management.

  19. Analysis of death anxiety levels in nursing staff of critical care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Cristina Pascual Fernández

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When the patients are in the end-of-life, the cares would focus to favor a good death, for that reason the nursing staff must know how to integrate the death like a part of the life, being avoided that produces anxiety to them before the possibility of taking part its own fears to the death. The core of nursing staff in intensive care units is to maintain life of their patients, reason why the end-of life in them is not easy or natural.Objective: Evaluate the death anxiety levels in intensive care nursing staff.Material and method: An observational study was conducted descriptive cross hospital adult and Paediatric ICU General University Gregorio Marañón Hospital, through survey to nurses and auxiliary nurses of those units.The anxiety inventory was used to Death (Death Anxiety Inventory [DAI] for the assessment of anxiety before death. Outcomes: Paediatric ICU nurses have higher levels of anxiety that the adult ICU as well as the less experienced professionals and those declared not feel trained in the subject.Conclusions: Experience and the training are key elements that help professionals face to death, from management we must ensure that patients in stage terminal are served by professionals with this profile.

  20. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

  1. Adaptation to Sea Level Rise in Coastal Units of the National Park Service (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    83 National Park Service (NPS) units contain nearly 12,000 miles of coastal, estuarine and Great Lakes shoreline and their associated resources. Iconic natural features exist along active shorelines in NPS units, including, e.g., Cape Cod, Padre Island, Hawaii Volcanoes, and the Everglades. Iconic cultural resources managed by NPS include the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Fort Sumter, the Golden Gate, and heiaus and fish traps along the coast of Hawaii. Impacts anticipated from sea level rise include inundation and flooding of beaches and low lying marshes, shoreline erosion of coastal areas, and saltwater intrusion into the water table. These impacts and other coastal hazards will threaten park beaches, marshes, and other resources and values; alter the viability of coastal roads; and require the NPS to re-evaluate the financial, safety, and environmental implications of maintaining current projects and implementing future projects in ocean and coastal parks in the context of sea level rise. Coastal erosion will increase as sea levels rise. Barrier islands along the coast of Louisiana and North Carolina may have already passed the threshold for maintaining island integrity in any scenario of sea level rise (U.S. Climate Change Science Program Synthesis and Assessment Program Report 4.1). Consequently, sea level rise is expected to hasten the disappearance of historic coastal villages, coastal wetlands, forests, and beaches, and threaten coastal roads, homes, and businesses. While sea level is rising in most coastal parks, some parks are experiencing lower water levels due to isostatic rebound and lower lake levels. NPS funded a Coastal Vulnerability Project to evaluate the physical and geologic factors affecting 25 coastal parks. The USGS Open File Reports for each park are available at http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/. These reports were designed to inform park planning efforts. NPS conducted a Storm Vulnerability Project to provide ocean and coastal

  2. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer

  3. Prevalence of Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis at State and County Levels - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Boring, Michael; Zhang, Xingyou; Lu, Hua; Holt, James B

    2016-05-20

    Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is a common chronic condition that affects approximately 52.5 million (22.7%) adults in the United States and is a leading cause of disability (1,2). The prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis has been well documented at the national level (1), but little has been published at the state level and the county level, where interventions are carried out and can have their greatest effect. To estimate the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis among adults at the state and county levels, CDC analyzed data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that, for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) overall, the age-standardized median prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis was 24% (range = 18.8%-35.5%). The age-standardized model-predicted prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis varied substantially by county, with estimates ranging from 15.8% to 38.6%. The high prevalence of arthritis in all counties, and the high frequency of arthritis-attributable limitations (1) among adults with arthritis, suggests that states and counties might benefit from expanding underused, evidence-based interventions for arthritis that can reduce arthritis symptoms and improve self-management.

  4. Conference Report: ESF-COST High-Level Research Conference Natural Products Chemistry, Biology and Medicine III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catino, Arthur

    2010-12-01

    Natural Products Chemistry, Biology and Medicine III was the third conference in a series of events sponsored by the European Science Foundation (ESF) and the European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST). Scientists came together from within and outside the EU to present cutting-edge developments in chemical synthesis. Research areas included the synthesis of natural products, methods development, isolation/structural elucidation and chemical biology. As our capacity to produce new chemotherapeutic agents relies on chemical synthesis, this year's conference has never been so timely. This report highlights several of the scientific contributions presented during the meeting.

  5. Assessing the Potential Hydrological Impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana Water Level Using Multi-Source Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Senai, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in-situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 years (1998–2009) of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We use calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of Gibe III dam using three different approaches such as (a historical approach, a knowledge-based approach, and a nonparametric bootstrap resampling approach) to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8–10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 2 m (95% confidence) compared to the lake level modelled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modelling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of

  6. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Velpuri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in-situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 years (1998–2009 of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We use calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of Gibe III dam using three different approaches such as (a historical approach, a knowledge-based approach, and a nonparametric bootstrap resampling approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8–10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 2 m (95% confidence compared to the lake level modelled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modelling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level

  7. Design of a high-level waste repository system for the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza, J.L.; Boerigter, S.T.; Broadbent, G.E.; Cabello, E.D.; Duran, V.B.; Hollaway, W.R.; Karlberg, R.P.; Siegel, M.J.; Simonson, S.A.

    1988-05-12

    This report presents a conceptual design for a High Level Waste disposal system for fuel discharged by US commercial power reactors, using the Yucca Mountain repository site recently designated by federal legislation. Principal features of the resulting conceptual design include use of unit trains for periodic removal of old spent fuel from at-reactor storage facilities, buffer storage at the repository site using dual purpose transportation/storage casks, repackaging of the spent fuel from the dual purpose transportation/storage casks directly into special-alloy disposal canisters as intact fuel assemblies, without rod consolidation, emplacement into a repository of modular design, use of excavation techniques that minimize disturbance, both mechanical and chemical, to the geologic environment, a unit rail mounted vehicle for both the transportation and emplacement of the canister from the surface facilities to the underground repository, and a cost-effectiveness computer model of Yucca Mountain and an independent cost evaluation by members of the design team. 31 refs., 58 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. A geospatial model of ambient sound pressure levels in the contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennitt, Daniel; Sherrill, Kirk; Fristrup, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a model that predicts measured sound pressure levels using geospatial features such as topography, climate, hydrology, and anthropogenic activity. The model utilizes random forest, a tree-based machine learning algorithm, which does not incorporate a priori knowledge of source characteristics or propagation mechanics. The response data encompasses 270 000 h of acoustical measurements from 190 sites located in National Parks across the contiguous United States. The explanatory variables were derived from national geospatial data layers and cross validation procedures were used to evaluate model performance and identify variables with predictive power. Using the model, the effects of individual explanatory variables on sound pressure level were isolated and quantified to reveal systematic trends across environmental gradients. Model performance varies by the acoustical metric of interest; the seasonal L50 can be predicted with a median absolute deviation of approximately 3 dB. The primary application for this model is to generalize point measurements to maps expressing spatial variation in ambient sound levels. An example of this mapping capability is presented for Zion National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument in southwestern Utah.

  9. Impact of Climate Change on Ambient Ozone Level and Mortality in Southeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Fuentes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in quantifying the health impacts of climate change. This paper examines the risks of future ozone levels on non-accidental mortality across 19 urban communities in Southeastern United States. We present a modeling framework that integrates data from climate model outputs, historical meteorology and ozone observations, and a health surveillance database. We first modeled present-day relationships between observed maximum daily 8-hour average ozone concentrations and meteorology measured during the year 2000. Future ozone concentrations for the period 2041 to 2050 were then projected using calibrated climate model output data from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program. Daily community-level mortality counts for the period 1987 to 2000 were obtained from the National Mortality, Morbidity and Air Pollution Study. Controlling for temperature, dew-point temperature, and seasonality, relative risks associated with short-term exposure to ambient ozone during the summer months were estimated using a multi-site time series design. We estimated an increase of 0.43 ppb (95% PI: 0.14–0.75 in average ozone concentration during the 2040’s compared to 2000 due to climate change alone. This corresponds to a 0.01% increase in mortality rate and 45.2 (95% PI: 3.26–87.1 premature deaths in the study communities attributable to the increase in future ozone level.

  10. Impact of climate change on ambient ozone level and mortality in southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Howard H; Zhou, Jingwen; Fuentes, Montserrat

    2010-07-01

    There is a growing interest in quantifying the health impacts of climate change. This paper examines the risks of future ozone levels on non-accidental mortality across 19 urban communities in Southeastern United States. We present a modeling framework that integrates data from climate model outputs, historical meteorology and ozone observations, and a health surveillance database. We first modeled present-day relationships between observed maximum daily 8-hour average ozone concentrations and meteorology measured during the year 2000. Future ozone concentrations for the period 2041 to 2050 were then projected using calibrated climate model output data from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program. Daily community-level mortality counts for the period 1987 to 2000 were obtained from the National Mortality, Morbidity and Air Pollution Study. Controlling for temperature, dew-point temperature, and seasonality, relative risks associated with short-term exposure to ambient ozone during the summer months were estimated using a multi-site time series design. We estimated an increase of 0.43 ppb (95% PI: 0.14-0.75) in average ozone concentration during the 2040's compared to 2000 due to climate change alone. This corresponds to a 0.01% increase in mortality rate and 45.2 (95% PI: 3.26-87.1) premature deaths in the study communities attributable to the increase in future ozone level.

  11. Maintenance of CO2 level in a BLSS by controlling solid waste treatment unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yingying; Li, Leyuan; Liu, Hong; Fu, Yuming; Xie, Beizhen; Hu, Dawei; Liu, Dianlei; Dong, Chen; Liu, Guanghui

    A bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) is an artificial closed ecosystem for providing basic human life support for long-duration, far-distance space explorations such as lunar bases. In such a system, the circulation of gases is one of the main factor for realizing a higher closure degree. O2 produced by higher plants goes to humans, as well as microorganisms for the treatment of inedible plant biomass and human wastes; CO2 produced by the crew and microorganisms is provided for plant growth. During this process, an excessively high CO2 level will depress plant growth and may be harmful to human health; and if the CO2 level is too low, plant growth will also be affected. Thus, keeping the balance between CO2 and O2 levels is a crucial problem. In this study, a high-efficiency, controllable solid waste treatment unit is constructed, which adopts microbial fermentation of the mixture of inedible biomass and human wastes. CO2 production during the fermentation process is controlled by adjusting fermentation temperature, aeration rate, moisture, etc., so as to meet the CO2 requirement of plants

  12. Space-Time Unit-Level EBLUP for Large Data Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Aló Michele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Most important large-scale surveys carried out by national statistical institutes are the repeated survey type, typically intended to produce estimates for several parameters of the whole population, as well as parameters related to some subpopulations. Small area estimation techniques are becoming more and more important for the production of official statistics where direct estimators are not able to produce reliable estimates. In order to exploit data from different survey cycles, unit-level linear mixed models with area and time random effects can be considered. However, the large amount of data to be processed may cause computational problems. To overcome the computational issues, a reformulation of predictors and the correspondent mean cross product estimator is given. The R code based on the new formulation enables the elaboration of about 7.2 millions of data records in a matter of minutes.

  13. Levels of genetic diversity and taxonomic status of Epinephelus species in United Arab Emirates fish markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, Remi N; Dieng, Mame M; Vaughan, Grace O; Burt, John A; Idaghdour, Youssef

    2016-04-30

    Understanding the patterns of genetic diversity of fish species is essential for marine conservation and management. This is particularly important in the Arabian Gulf where marine life is subject to extreme environmental conditions that could impact genetic diversity. Here we assess genetic diversity of the most commercially important fish in the United Arab Emirates; groupers (Epinephelus spp.). Sequencing of 973 bp mitochondrial DNA from 140 tissue samples collected in four main fish markets revealed 58 haplotypes clustered within three groups. Data analysis revealed the presence of three distinct Epinephelus species being marketed as one species (hammour): Epinephelus coioides, Epinephelus areolatus and Epinephelus bleekeri. We report species-specific genetic markers and demonstrate that all three species exhibit relatively low levels of genetic variation, reflecting the effect of overfishing and environmental pressures. In light of the genetic evidence presented here, conservation and management of groupers in the UAE warrant the implementation of species-specific measures.

  14. The Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS): development of a brief measure of unit level implementation leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Ehrhart, Mark G; Farahnak, Lauren R

    2014-04-14

    In healthcare and allied healthcare settings, leadership that supports effective implementation of evidenced-based practices (EBPs) is a critical concern. However, there are no empirically validated measures to assess implementation leadership. This paper describes the development, factor structure, and initial reliability and convergent and discriminant validity of a very brief measure of implementation leadership: the Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS). Participants were 459 mental health clinicians working in 93 different outpatient mental health programs in Southern California, USA. Initial item development was supported as part of a two United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) studies focused on developing implementation leadership training and implementation measure development. Clinician work group/team-level data were randomly assigned to be utilized for an exploratory factor analysis (n = 229; k = 46 teams) or for a confirmatory factor analysis (n = 230; k = 47 teams). The confirmatory factor analysis controlled for the multilevel, nested data structure. Reliability and validity analyses were then conducted with the full sample. The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a 12-item scale with four subscales representing proactive leadership, knowledgeable leadership, supportive leadership, and perseverant leadership. Confirmatory factor analysis supported an a priori higher order factor structure with subscales contributing to a single higher order implementation leadership factor. The scale demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability as well as convergent and discriminant validity. The ILS is a brief and efficient measure of unit level leadership for EBP implementation. The availability of the ILS will allow researchers to assess strategic leadership for implementation in order to advance understanding of leadership as a predictor of organizational context for implementation. The ILS also holds promise as a tool for

  15. The implementation leadership scale (ILS): development of a brief measure of unit level implementation leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In healthcare and allied healthcare settings, leadership that supports effective implementation of evidenced-based practices (EBPs) is a critical concern. However, there are no empirically validated measures to assess implementation leadership. This paper describes the development, factor structure, and initial reliability and convergent and discriminant validity of a very brief measure of implementation leadership: the Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS). Methods Participants were 459 mental health clinicians working in 93 different outpatient mental health programs in Southern California, USA. Initial item development was supported as part of a two United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) studies focused on developing implementation leadership training and implementation measure development. Clinician work group/team-level data were randomly assigned to be utilized for an exploratory factor analysis (n = 229; k = 46 teams) or for a confirmatory factor analysis (n = 230; k = 47 teams). The confirmatory factor analysis controlled for the multilevel, nested data structure. Reliability and validity analyses were then conducted with the full sample. Results The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a 12-item scale with four subscales representing proactive leadership, knowledgeable leadership, supportive leadership, and perseverant leadership. Confirmatory factor analysis supported an a priori higher order factor structure with subscales contributing to a single higher order implementation leadership factor. The scale demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability as well as convergent and discriminant validity. Conclusions The ILS is a brief and efficient measure of unit level leadership for EBP implementation. The availability of the ILS will allow researchers to assess strategic leadership for implementation in order to advance understanding of leadership as a predictor of organizational context for implementation

  16. NOAA Water Level Predictions Stations for the Coastal United States and Other Non-U.S. Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Ocean Service (NOS) maintains a long-term database containing water level measurements and derived tidal data for coastal waters of the United States...

  17. County-Level Estimates of Nitrogen and Phosphorus from Commercial Fertilizer for the Conterminous United States, 1987-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains county-level estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer, for both farm and nonfarm uses, for the conterminous United States, for...

  18. NOAA Water Level (Tidal) Data of 205 Stations for the Coastal United States and Other Non-U.S. Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Ocean Service (NOS) maintains a long-term database containing water level measurements and derived tidal data for coastal waters of the United States...

  19. Predicting Periodontitis at State and Local Levels in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, P I; Zhang, X; Lu, H; Wei, L; Thornton-Evans, G; Greenlund, K J; Holt, J B; Croft, J B

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across the United States by using a novel, small area estimation (SAE) method. Extended multilevel regression and poststratification analyses were used to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis among adults aged 30 to 79 y at state, county, congressional district, and census tract levels by using periodontal data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2012, population counts from the 2010 US census, and smoking status estimates from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in 2012. The SAE method used age, race, gender, smoking, and poverty variables to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology case definitions at the census block levels and aggregated to larger administrative and geographic areas of interest. Model-based SAEs were validated against national estimates directly from NHANES 2009-2012. Estimated prevalence of periodontitis ranged from 37.7% in Utah to 52.8% in New Mexico among the states (mean, 45.1%; median, 44.9%) and from 33.7% to 68% among counties (mean, 46.6%; median, 45.9%). Severe periodontitis ranged from 7.27% in New Hampshire to 10.26% in Louisiana among the states (mean, 8.9%; median, 8.8%) and from 5.2% to 17.9% among counties (mean, 9.2%; median, 8.8%). Overall, the predicted prevalence of periodontitis was highest for southeastern and southwestern states and for geographic areas in the Southeast along the Mississippi Delta, as well as along the US and Mexico border. Aggregated model-based SAEs were consistent with national prevalence estimates from NHANES 2009-2012. This study is the first-ever estimation of periodontitis prevalence at state and local levels in the United States, and this modeling approach complements public health surveillance efforts to identify areas with a high burden of

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 414: Clean Slate III Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 414 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 130 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and approximately 40 miles southeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CAU 414 site consists of the release of radionuclides to the surface and shallow subsurface from the conduct of the Clean Slate III (CSIII) storage–transportation test conducted on June 9, 1963. CAU 414 includes one corrective action site (CAS), TA-23-03CS (Pu Contaminated Soil). The known releases at CAU 414 are the result of the atmospheric dispersal of contamination from the 1963 CSIII test. The CSIII test was a nonnuclear detonation of a nuclear device located inside a reinforced concrete bunker covered with 8 feet of soil. This test dispersed radionuclides, primarily uranium and plutonium, on the ground surface. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 414 will be evaluated based on information collected from a corrective action investigation (CAI). The investigation is based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 7, 2016, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; the U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 414.

  1. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  3. Assessing the level of healthcare information technology adoption in the United States: a snapshot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middleton Blackford

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensive knowledge about the level of healthcare information technology (HIT adoption in the United States remains limited. We therefore performed a baseline assessment to address this knowledge gap. Methods We segmented HIT into eight major stakeholder groups and identified major functionalities that should ideally exist for each, focusing on applications most likely to improve patient safety, quality of care and organizational efficiency. We then conducted a multi-site qualitative study in Boston and Denver by interviewing key informants from each stakeholder group. Interview transcripts were analyzed to assess the level of adoption and to document the major barriers to further adoption. Findings for Boston and Denver were then presented to an expert panel, which was then asked to estimate the national level of adoption using the modified Delphi approach. We measured adoption level in Boston and Denver was graded on Rogers' technology adoption curve by co-investigators. National estimates from our expert panel were expressed as percentages. Results Adoption of functionalities with financial benefits far exceeds adoption of those with safety and quality benefits. Despite growing interest to adopt HIT to improve safety and quality, adoption remains limited, especially in the area of ambulatory electronic health records and physician-patient communication. Organizations, particularly physicians' practices, face enormous financial challenges in adopting HIT, and concerns remain about its impact on productivity. Conclusion Adoption of HIT is limited and will likely remain slow unless significant financial resources are made available. Policy changes, such as financial incentivesto clinicians to use HIT or pay-for-performance reimbursement, may help health care providers defray upfront investment costs and initial productivity loss.

  4. Heterotrimetallic coordination polymers: {Cu(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} chains and {Ni(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} layers: synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Maria-Gabriela; Visinescu, Diana; Andruh, Marius; Marino, Nadia; Armentano, Donatella; Cano, Joan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2015-03-27

    The use of the [Fe(III) (AA)(CN)4](-) complex anion as metalloligand towards the preformed [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) or [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) heterometallic complex cations (AA=2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenathroline (phen); H2 valpn=1,3-propanediyl-bis(2-iminomethylene-6-methoxyphenol)) allowed the preparation of two families of heterotrimetallic complexes: three isostructural 1D coordination polymers of general formula {[Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (H2O)3 (μ-NC)2 Fe(III) (phen)(CN)2 {(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3}]NO3 ⋅7 H2O}n (Ln=Gd (1), Tb (2), and Dy (3)) and the trinuclear complex [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2 )3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ]⋅NO3 ⋅H2O⋅CH3 CN (4) were obtained with the [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) assembling unit, whereas three isostructural heterotrimetallic 2D networks, {[Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (ONO2 )2 (H2 O)(μ-NC)3 Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)]⋅2 H2 O⋅2 CH3 CN}n (Ln=Gd (5), Tb (6), and Dy (7)) resulted with the related [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) precursor. The crystal structure of compound 4 consists of discrete heterotrimetallic complex cations, [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2)3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ](+), nitrate counterions, and non-coordinate water and acetonitrile molecules. The heteroleptic {Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)4} moiety in 5-7 acts as a tris-monodentate ligand towards three {Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III)} binuclear nodes leading to heterotrimetallic 2D networks. The ferromagnetic interaction through the diphenoxo bridge in the Cu(II)-Ln(III) (1-3) and Ni(II)-Ln(III) (5-7) units, as well as through the single cyanide bridge between the Fe(III) and either Ni(II) (5-7) or Cu(II) (4) account for the overall ferromagnetic behavior observed in 1-7. DFT-type calculations were performed to substantiate the magnetic interactions in 1, 4, and 5. Interestingly, compound 6 exhibits slow relaxation of the magnetization with maxima of the out-of-phase ac signals below 4.0 K in the lack of a dc field, the values of the pre

  5. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hall, P. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 (Canada); Anderson, S. F. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hamann, F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Pâris, I. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Petitjean, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, Universite Paris 6, F-75014 Paris (France); Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Shen, Yue [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); York, Don, E-mail: nfilizak@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  6. Past and future sea-level rise along the coast of North Carolina, United States

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, Robert E; Kemp, Andrew C; Tebaldi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on factors that cause relative sea-level (RSL) rise to differ from the global mean, we evaluate RSL trajectories for North Carolina, United States, in the context of tide gauge and geological sea-level proxy records spanning the last $\\mathord{\\sim}$11,000 years. RSL rise was fastest ($\\mathord{\\sim}$7 mm/yr) during the early Holocene and decreased over time. During the Common Era before the 19th century, RSL rise ($\\mathord{\\sim}$0.7 to 1.1 mm/yr) was driven primarily by glacio-isostatic adjustment, dampened by tectonic uplift along the Cape Fear Arch. Ocean/atmosphere dynamics caused centennial variability of up to $\\mathord{\\sim}$0.6 mm/yr around the long-term rate. It is extremely likely (probability $P = 0.95$) that 20th century RSL rise at Sand Point, NC, (2.8 $\\pm$ 0.5 mm/yr) was faster than during any other century in $\\geq2,900$ years. Projections based on a fusion of process models, statistical models, expert elicitation and expert assessment indicate that RSL at Wilmington, NC, is very lik...

  7. Variation in low-frequency estimates of sound levels based on different units of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Russell S; Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Smith, Chad M

    2014-02-01

    The measurement and analysis of underwater sound is a complicated process because of the variable durations of contributing sources and constantly changing water column dynamics. Because the ambient sound distribution does not always follow a Gaussian structure and may be nonstationary in time, analysis over an extended period is required to accurately characterize the data. Utilizing recordings from the Indian Ocean, the temporal variation in ambient sound including transient signals was examined using multiple processing window lengths and subsampling intervals. Results illustrate the degree of uncertainty in sound levels based on different units of analysis. The average difference between sound level estimates in the 10-30 Hz band due to subsampling was 2 dB and as high as 4 dB. The difference in the full band (5-110 Hz) was as high as 6 dB. Longer averaging windows (200 vs 60 s) resulted in larger variations over different subsampling intervals. This work demonstrates how sampling protocols within a single dataset can influence results and acknowledges that comparative studies at the same location but with different sampling protocols can be substantial if signal processing parameters are not statistically accounted for to confirm interpretation of results and observed trends.

  8. Low-level light-emitting diode therapy increases mRNA expressions of IL-10 and type I and III collagens on Achilles tendinitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Murilo; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Pires, Viviane Araújo; Santos, Ana Paula; Aimbire, Flávio; Silva, José Antônio; Albertini, Regiane; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of low-level light-emitting diode (LED) therapy (880 ± 10 nm) on interleukin (IL)-10 and type I and III collagen in an experimental model of Achilles tendinitis. Thirty male Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 5), three groups in the experimental period of 7 days, control group, tendinitis-induced group, and LED therapy group, and three groups in the experimental period of 14 days, tendinitis group, LED therapy group, and LED group with the therapy starting at the 7th day after tendinitis induction (LEDT delay). Tendinitis was induced in the right Achilles tendon using an intratendinous injection of 100 μL of collagenase. The LED parameters were: optical power of 22 mW, spot area size of 0.5 cm(2), and irradiation time of 170 s, corresponding to 7.5 J/cm(2) of energy density. The therapy was initiated 12 h after the tendinitis induction, with a 48-h interval between irradiations. The IL-10 and type I and III collagen mRNA expression were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction at the 7th and 14th days after tendinitis induction. The results showed that LED irradiation increased IL-10 (p < 0.001) in treated group on 7-day experimental period and increased type I and III collagen mRNA expression in both treated groups of 7- and 14-day experimental periods (p < 0.05), except by type I collagen mRNA expression in LEDT delay group. LED (880 nm) was effective in increasing mRNA expression of IL-10 and type I and III collagen. Therefore, LED therapy may have potentially therapeutic effects on Achilles tendon injuries.

  9. Managing Highway Maintenance: Instructor's Manual for Management by Objectives Review, Unit 11, All Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit is designed for the training group leader and contains selected highlights and suggested discussion questions from six units of training: maintenance activities, work units, and classifying work; maintenance feature inventories; how to conduct a maintenance feature inventory;…

  10. Managing Highway Maintenance: Standards for Maintenance Work, Part 2, Unit 8, Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit describes the ways maintenance standards are developed and some of the factors which are considered in setting standards; the preceding unit on standards (part 1) should be completed before reading this unit. The format is a programed, self-instruction approach in which…

  11. Reforming state-level chemicals management policies in the United States: status, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Ken; Tickner, Joel; Torrie, Yve

    2009-01-01

    During the last several years there has been increasing public concern about chemicals in everyday products. Scientific studies are increasingly revealing the build-up of some substances in ecosystems and in our bodies and new findings are linking exposures to hazardous chemicals to a range of adverse human health effects. Despite these trends, there has been little federal initiative in the United States on reforming chemicals management policies for well over two decades, even though a variety of analyses have identified significant gaps in the regulatory structure. As has historically been the case, states are beginning to fill the holes in federal leadership. This article explores this emerging state leadership and establishes a vision for and elements of policies to reduce hazardous chemicals in the products we buy and the places we go. It examines international efforts to reform chemicals management policies, such as the European REACH legislation and corporate leadership in advancing safer products. Finally, it outlines specific challenges states face in developing integrated, comprehensive chemicals management policies. We conclude that while there are plenty of challenges to implementation of chemicals policy reforms, it is a propitious time for states to become leaders in policy innovation that can help achieve safer production systems and products for future generations. This article is part of a Lowell Center for Sustainable Production report entitled "Options for State Chemicals Policy Reform" that provides in-depth analysis of the pros and cons of policy options to address a range of aspects of state-level chemicals policy reform. The article has been edited slightly for use in New Solutions. The report has been widely distributed to policy-makers, advocates, and others across the United States.

  12. Influenza-Related Hospitalizations and Poverty Levels - United States, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Pérez, Alejandro; Anderson, Evan J; Bargsten, Marisa; Bohm, Susan R; Hill, Mary; Hogan, Brenna; Laidler, Matt; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lung, Krista L; Mermel, Elizabeth; Miller, Lisa; Morin, Craig; Parker, Erin; Zansky, Shelley M; Chaves, Sandra S

    2016-02-12

    Annual influenza vaccine is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months in the United States, with recognition that some persons are at risk for more severe disease (1). However, there might be previously unrecognized demographic groups that also experience higher rates of serious influenza-related disease that could benefit from enhanced vaccination efforts. Socioeconomic status (SES) measures that are area-based can be used to define demographic groups when individual SES data are not available (2). Previous surveillance data analyses in limited geographic areas indicated that influenza-related hospitalization incidence was higher for persons residing in census tracts that included a higher percentage of persons living below the federal poverty level (3-5). To determine whether this association occurs elsewhere, influenza hospitalization data collected in 14 FluSurv-NET sites covering 27 million persons during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 influenza seasons were analyzed. The age-adjusted incidence of influenza-related hospitalizations per 100,000 person-years in high poverty (≥20% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts was 21.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7-22.4), nearly twice the incidence in low poverty (poverty level) census tracts (10.9, 95% CI: 10.3-11.4). This relationship was observed in each surveillance site, among children and adults, and across racial/ethnic groups. These findings suggest that persons living in poorer census tracts should be targeted for enhanced influenza vaccination outreach and clinicians serving these persons should be made aware of current recommendations for use of antiviral agents to treat influenza (6).

  13. Verification of a level-3 diesel emissions control strategy for transport refrigeration units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewalla, Umesh

    Transport Refrigeration Units (TRUs) are refrigeration systems used to control the environment of temperature sensitive products while they are being transported from one place to another in trucks, trailers or shipping containers. The TRUs typically use an internal combustion engine to power the compressor of the refrigeration unit. In the United States TRUs are most commonly powered by diesel engines which vary from 9 to 40 horsepower. TRUs are capable of both heating and cooling. The TRU engines are relatively small, inexpensive and do not use emissions reduction techniques such as exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). A significant number of these engines operate in highly populated areas like distribution centers, truck stops, and other facilities which make them one of the potential causes for health risks to the people who live and work nearby. Diesel particulate matter (PM) is known for its adverse effects on both human beings and the environment. Considering these effects, regulatory bodies have imposed limitations on the PM emissions from a TRU engine. The objective of this study was to measure and analyze the regulated emissions from a TRU engine under both engine out and particulate filter system out conditions during pre-durability (when the filter system was new) and post-durability test (after the filter system was subjected to 1000 hours in-field trial). The verification program was performed by the Center for Alternative Fuel, Engines and Emissions (CAFEE) at West Virginia University (WVU). In this program, a catalyzed silicon carbide (SiC) diesel particulate filter (DPF) was evaluated and verified as a Level-3 Verified Diesel Emissions Control Strategy (VDECS) (. 85% PM reduction) under California Air Resources Board (CARB) regulations 2702 [1]. The emissions result showed that the filter system reduced diesel PM by a percentage of 96 +/- 1 over ISO 8178-C1 [2] cycle and 92 +/- 5 over EPA TRU [3] cycle, qualifying as a Level 3 VDECS. The percentage

  14. Low HDL levels in sepsis versus trauma patients in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sébastien; Labreuche, Julien; Drumez, Elodie; Harrois, Anatole; Hamada, Sophie; Vigué, Bernard; Couret, David; Duranteau, Jacques; Meilhac, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    The protective cardiovascular effect of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) is considered to chiefly rely on reverse cholesterol transport from peripheral tissues back to the liver. However, HDL particles display pleiotropic properties, including anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic or antioxidant functions. Some studies suggest that HDL concentration decreases during sepsis, and an association was reported between low HDL levels and a poor outcome. Like sepsis, trauma is also associated with a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. However, no study has yet explored changes in lipid profiles during trauma. We sought to compare lipid profiles between sepsis and trauma patients in intensive care unit (ICU). In septic patients, we analyzed the association between lipid profile, severity and prognosis. A prospective, observational, single-centered study was conducted in a surgical ICU. For each patient, total cholesterol, HDL, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were assessed at admission. Short-term prognosis outcome was prospectively assessed. Seventy-five consecutive patients were admitted (50 sepsis and 25 trauma). There was no difference in SOFA and SAPSII scores between the two groups. Patients with sepsis had lower total cholesterol levels than patients with trauma. Regarding the lipoprotein profile, only HDLs differed significantly between the two groups (median [IQR] = 0.33 mmol/l [0.17-0.78] in sepsis patients versus median [IQR] = 0.99 mmol/l [0.74-1.28] in trauma patients; P HDL concentration and the length of ICU stay (r = -0.35; P = 0.03) in the group of survivor septic patients at ICU discharge. In addition, poor outcome defined as death or a SOFA score >6 at day 3 was associated with lower HDL levels (median [IQR] = 0.20 mmol/l [0.11-0.41] vs. 0.35 mmol/l [0.19-0.86] in patients with poor outcome versus others; P = 0.03). Lipid profile was totally different between sepsis and trauma in ICU patients: HDL levels were

  15. Molecular-level spectroscopic investigations of the complexation and photodegradation of catechol to/by iron(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abadleh, Hind; Tofan-Lazar, Julia; Situm, Arthur; Slikboer, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  16. The impact of synapsin III gene on the neurometabolite level alterations after single-dose methylphenidate in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başay Ö

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ömer Başay,1 Burge Kabukcu Basay,1 Huseyin Alacam,2 Onder Ozturk,1 Ahmet Buber,1 Senay Gorucu Yilmaz,3 Yılmaz Kıroğlu,4 Mehmet Emin Erdal,5 Hasan Herken2 1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, 3Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, 4Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, 5Department of Medical Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin University, Mersin, Turkey Objective: To investigate the neurometabolite level changes according to synapsin III gene rs133945G>A and rs133946C>G polymorphisms by using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD.Methods: Fifty-seven adults diagnosed with ADHD were recruited for the study. The participants were examined by single-voxel 1H MRS when medication naïve and 30 minutes after oral administration of 10 mg methylphenidate (Mph. Those who had been on a stimulant discontinued the medication 48 hours before MRS imaging. Spectra were taken from the anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum, and N-acetylaspartate (NAA, choline, and creatine levels were examined. For genotyping of the synapsin III gene polymorphisms, DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes. The effects of age, sex, and ADHD subtypes were controlled in the analyses.Results: After a single dose of Mph, choline levels increased significantly in the striatum of rs133945G>A polymorphism-GG genotypes (P=0.020 and NAA levels rose in the anterior cingulate cortex of rs133946C>G polymorphism-CG genotypes (P=0.014. Both rs133945G>A and rs133946C>G polymorphisms were found to statistically significantly affect the alteration of NAA levels in response to Mph in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with

  17. Insulin and leptin levels in overweight and normal-weight Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Bahrami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, we aim to compare insulin and leptin levels in adolescents with or without excess weight and in those with or without abdominal obesity. Materials and Methods : This case-control study was conducted among 486 samples. We randomly selected 243 overweight and an equal number of normal-weight adolescents from among participants of the third survey of a national surveillance program entitled "Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and PreventIon of Adult Non-communicable diseases study." Serum insulin and leptin were compared between two groups and their correlation was determined with other variables. Results: The mean age and body mass index (BMI of participants were 14.10 ± 2.82 years and 22.12 ± 6.49 kg/m 2 , respectively. Leptin and insulin levels were higher in overweight than in normal-weight adolescents (P < 0.05. Leptin level was higher in children with abdominal obesity than in their other counterparts (P < 0.001. Leptin level was correlated with age, fasting blood glucose, BMI, and insulin level. Conclusion: Insulin and leptin levels were higher among overweight and obese children, which may reflect insulin and leptin-resistance. Given the complications of excess weight from early life, prevention and controlling childhood obesity should be considered as a health priority.

  18. Unit-level voluntary turnover rates and customer service quality: implications of group cohesiveness, newcomer concentration, and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausknecht, John P; Trevor, Charlie O; Howard, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    Despite substantial growth in the service industry and emerging work on turnover consequences, little research examines how unit-level turnover rates affect essential customer-related outcomes. The authors propose an operational disruption framework to explain why voluntary turnover impairs customers' service quality perceptions. On the basis of a sample of 75 work units and data from 5,631 employee surveys, 59,602 customer surveys, and organizational records, results indicate that unit-level voluntary turnover rates are negatively related to service quality perceptions. The authors also examine potential boundary conditions related to the disruption framework. Of 3 moderators studied (group cohesiveness, group size, and newcomer concentration), results show that turnover's negative effects on service quality are more pronounced in larger units and in those with a greater concentration of newcomers.

  19. 30-year trends in serum lipids among United States adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys II, III, and 1999-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jerome D; Cziraky, Mark J; Cai, Qian; Wallace, Anna; Wasser, Thomas; Crouse, John R; Jacobson, Terry A

    2010-10-01

    Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) II (1976 to 1980), NHANES III (1988 to 1994), and NHANES 1999 to 2006 were examined to assess trends in total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), lipid-lowering medication use, and obesity. Age-adjusted decreases in TC (210 to 200 mg/dl) and LDL cholesterol (134 to 119 mg/dl) were observed. Those with high TC showed a decrease of 9% from NHANES II to NHANES 1999 to 2006, whereas those with LDL cholesterol ≥160 mg/dl showed a decrease of 8%. A significant increase in mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was observed (50 to 53 mg/dl, p lipid medication use by those with high cholesterol increased from 16% to 38%. Mean body mass index increased from 26 to 29 kg/m(2), and prevalence of obesity doubled and was significantly associated with increased TG. In conclusion, recent favorable trends in TC and LDL cholesterol are likely due to increased awareness of high cholesterol and the greater use of lipid-lowering drugs. However, countertrends in obesity and TG levels, if continued, will likely have a negative impact on cardiovascular disease in the future.

  20. Effects of combined dietary chromium(III) propionate complex and thiamine supplementation on insulin sensitivity, blood biochemical indices, and mineral levels in high-fructose-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, Ewelina; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Michalak, Sławomir; Wójciak, Rafał W; Bogdański, Paweł

    2012-12-01

    Insulin resistance is the first step in glucose intolerance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, thus effective prevention strategies should also include dietary interventions to enhance insulin sensitivity. Nutrients, such as microelement chromium(III) and thiamine, play regulatory roles in carbohydrate metabolism. The objective of this study was to evaluate the insulin-sensitizing potential of the combined supplementary chromium(III) propionate complex (CrProp) and thiamine in insulin resistance animal model (rats fed a high-fructose diet). The experiment was carried out on 40 nine-week-old male Wistar rats divided into five groups (eight animals each). Animals were fed ad libitum: the control diet (AIN-93 M) and high-fructose diets with and without a combination of two levels of CrProp (0.1 and 1 mg Cr/kg body mass/day) and two levels of thiamine (0.5 and 10 mg/kg body mass/day) for 8 weeks. At the end of the experiment rats were sacrificed to collect blood and internal organs for analyses of blood biochemical and hematologic indices as well as tissular microelement levels that were measured using appropriate methods. It was found that both supplementary CrProp and thiamine (given alone) have significant insulin-sensitizing and moderate blood-lipid-lowering properties, while the combined supplementation with these agents does not give synergistic effects in insulin-resistant rats. CrProp given separately increased kidney Cu and Cr levels, while thiamine alone increased hepatic Cu contents and decreased renal Zn and Cu contents.

  1. Hypophosphatemia on the intensive care unit: individualized phosphate replacement based on serum levels and distribution volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bech, A.; Blans, M.; Raaijmakers, M.; Mulkens, C.; Telting, D.; Boer, H. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypophosphatemia occurs in about 25% of patients admitted to the intensive care unit. To date, a safe and validated phosphate replacement protocol is not available. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate an individualized phosphate replacement regimen. DESIGN: Fifty consecutive intensive care unit patie

  2. Managing Highway Maintenance: Standards for Maintenance Work, Part 3, Unit 8, Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit explains various uses of maintenance standards and how standards should be interpreted and communicated to formen and crew leaders. Several examples are given of the decisions made when applying the standards to routine work. The preceding units on standards (parts 1 and 2)…

  3. Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels are independently associated with procollagen III N-terminal peptide in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyogo, Hideyuki; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Maeda, Sayaka; Fukami, Kei; Ueda, Seiji; Okuda, Seiya; Nakahara, Takashi; Kimura, Yuki; Ishitobi, Tomokazu; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-02-01

    Although impaired synthesis and/or bioavailability of nitric oxide are considered to contribute to insulin resistance and the progression of liver disease in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, role of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, has not been examined. We examined retrospectively which anthropometric and metabolic parameters were independently associated with serum levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A total of 194 consecutive biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with or without type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients were significantly higher, irrespective of the presence or absence of diabetes, than those in healthy control. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that decreased total protein and procollagen N-terminal peptide levels, markers of advanced liver disease and hepatic fibrosis, respectively, were independently associated with asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease subjects without diabetes, whereas soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation end products and density ratio of liver to spleen in computed tomography were independent correlates of asymmetric dimethylarginine in diabetic patients. The present study suggests that asymmetric dimethylarginine may be associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, especially subjects without diabetes.

  4. Work stress, occupational burnout and depression levels: a clinical study of paediatric intensive care unit nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Cheng, Su-Fen; Wu, Li-Min; Ou-Yang, Mei-Chen

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between work stress and depression; and investigate the mediating effect of occupational burnout among nurses in paediatric intensive care units. The relationships among work stress, occupational burnout and depression level have been explored, neither regarding occupational burnout as the mediating role that causes work stress to induce depression nor considering the paediatric intensive care unit context. A cross-sectional correlational design was conducted. One hundred and forty-four female paediatric intensive care unit nurses from seven teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan were recruited as the participants. Data were collected by structured questionnaires including individual demographics, the Nurse Stress Checklist, the Occupational Burnout Inventory and the Taiwan Depression Questionnaire. The results indicated that after controlling for individual demographic variables, the correlations of work stress with occupational burnout, as well as work stress and occupational burnout with depression level were all positive. Furthermore, occupational burnout may exert a partial mediating effect on the relationship between work stress and depression level. This study provides information about work stress, occupational burnout and depression level, and their correlations, as well as the mediating role of occupational burnout among paediatric intensive care unit nurses. It suggests government departments and hospital administrators when formulating interventions to prevent work stress and occupational burnout. These interventions can subsequently prevent episodes of depression in paediatric intensive care unit nurses, thereby providing patients with a safe and high-quality nursing environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Stress level assessment of the nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-García, C; Ríos-Rísquez, M I; Martínez-Hurtado, R; Noguera-Villaescusa, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the work stress level among nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital and to analyse its relationship with the various sociodemographic and working variables of the studied sample. A study was designed using a quantitative, descriptive and cross-sectional approach. The target population of the study was the nursing staff selected by non-random sampling. The instrument used was the Job Content Questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 20. The mean, ranges and standard deviation for each of the variables were calculated. A bivariate analysis was also performed on the social and occupational variables of the sample. The participation rate was 80.90% (N=89). The mean of the Social support dimension was 3.13±0.397, for the Psychological demands at work dimension it was 3.10±0.384, with a mean of 2.96±0.436 being obtained for the Control over the work dimension. In the analysis of sociodemographic and work variables of the sample, only the professional category was significant, with nurses recording higher values in perception of job demands and control over their work compared to nursing assistants. In conclusion, there is a moderate perception of work stress in the analysed group of professionals. Among the sources of stress in the workplace was the low control in decision-making by practitioners, as well as the need to continually learn new things. On the other hand, the support received from colleagues is valued positively by the sample.

  6. The Dependence of C IV Broad Absorption Line Properties on Accompanying Si IV and Al III Absorption: Relating Quasar-Wind Ionization Levels, Kinematics, and Column Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Ak, N Filiz; Hall, P B; Schneider, D P; Trump, J R; Anderson, S F; Hamann, F; Myers, Adam D; Paris, I; Petitjean, P; Ross, Nicholas P; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-01-01

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line-of-sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines-of-sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C ...

  7. Evaluation of the Synthoil process. Volume III. Unit block flow diagrams for a 100,000 barrel/stream day facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, R.; Edwards, M.S.; Ulrich, W.C.

    1977-06-01

    This volume consists of individual block flowsheets for the various units of the Synthoil facility, showing the overall flows into and out of each unit. Material balances for the following units are incomplete because these are proprietary processes and the information was not provided by the respective vendors: Unit 24-Claus Sulfur Plant; Unit 25-Oxygen Plant; Unit 27-Sulfur Plant (Redox Type); and Unit 28-Sour Water Stripper and Ammonia Recovery Plant. The process information in this form was specifically requested by ERDA/FE for inclusion in the final report.

  8. The status of metal levels in common loons (Gavia immer) in the northeast United states

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — From 1989-1993, 178 common loons found dead or moribund throughout the northeastern United States were examined by personnel from Tufts University School of...

  9. Developing a United States Marine Corps Organizational and Intermediate Level Maintenance Performance Cost Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Marine Corps Integrated Maintenance Management System MIPR Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request MLG Marine Corps Logistics Unit MOSIS ...D. (1997). An examination of the Marine Operating and Support Information System ( MOSIS ) as a mechanism for linking resources to readiness for

  10. Using Machine Learning to Determine United States Army Readiness at the Battalion Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    Unit Performance. US Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Alexandria, VA, July, 1994. Norvig , Peter, Paradigms of...Russell, Stuart, and Norvig , Peter, Artificial Intelligence, A Modern Approach, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 1995. Schaffer

  11. Nucleation, propagation, electronic levels and elimination of misfit dislocations in III-V semiconductor interfaces. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, G.P.; Matragrano, M.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: strained layer defects; the structural and electronic characteristics of misfit dislocations; requirements for the growth of high quality, low defect density InGaAs strained epitaxial layers; the isolation and nucleation of misfit dislocations in strained epitaxial layers grown on patterned, ion-damaged GaAs; the effect of pattern substrate trench depth on misfit dislocation density; the thermal stability of lattice mismatched InGaAs grown on patterned GaAs; misfit dislocations in ZnSe strained epitaxial layers grown on patterned GaAs; and the measurement of deep level states caused by misfit dislocations in InGaAs/GaAs grown on patterned GaAs substrates.

  12. Evaluation of noise level at intensive care units in selected hospitals of Sanandaj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nammam Ali Azadi

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: We found the noise levels were always above the EPA thresholds at all three hospitals both during the day and night. It is recommended to train hospital officials and staffs for keeping noise levels to an acceptable level.

  13. Low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States: An overview of current commercial regulations and concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States is regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under 10 CFR 61 (1991). This regulation was issued in 1981 after a lengthy and thorough development process that considered the radionuclide concentrations and characteristics associated with commercial low-level radioactive waste streams; alternatives for waste classification; alternative technologies for low-level radioactive waste disposal; and data, modeling, and scenario analyses. The development process also included the publication of both draft and final environmental impact statements. The final regulation describes the general provisions; licenses; performance objectives; technical requirements for land disposal; financial assurances; participation by state governments and Indian tribes; and records, reports, tests, and inspections. This paper provides an overview of, and tutorial on, current commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal regulations in the United States.

  14. An Examination of Individual Level Factors in Stress and Coping Processes: Perspectives of Chinese International Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2011-01-01

    No empirical research has focused solely upon understanding the stress and coping processes of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examines the individual-level variables that affect the stress-coping process of Chinese international students and how they conceptualize and adapt to their stress at an…

  15. Building a Unit-Level Mentored Program to Sustain a Culture of Inquiry for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-24

    experiencing significant change . It also demonstrates that a unit-level mentored EBP program is sustainable despite changes in organizational structure...culture, readiness, beliefs, and implementation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Evidence-based practice, culture, mentor, organizational change 16. SECURITY...Medical Command; her areas of interest include staffing, acuity, nursing workload, change management, organizational culture and empowering junior

  16. An Examination of Individual Level Factors in Stress and Coping Processes: Perspectives of Chinese International Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2011-01-01

    No empirical research has focused solely upon understanding the stress and coping processes of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examines the individual-level variables that affect the stress-coping process of Chinese international students and how they conceptualize and adapt to their stress at an…

  17. The Classification of the Probability Unit Ability Levels of the Eleventh Grade Turkish Students by Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Ozcan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the probability unit ability levels of the eleventh grade Turkish students were classified through cluster analysis. The study was carried out in a high school located in Trabzon, Turkey during the fall semester of the 2011-2012 academic years. A total of 84 eleventh grade students participated. Students were taught about…

  18. 75 FR 24755 - DTE ENERGY; Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant Unit 1; Exemption From Certain Low-Level Waste...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... COMMISSION DTE ENERGY; Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant Unit 1; Exemption From Certain Low-Level Waste Shipment Tracking Requirements In 10 CFR Part 20 Appendix G 1.0 Background DTE Energy (DTE) is the licensee.... DTE is in the process of decommissioning Fermi-1 and radioactive waste shipments from the site are...

  19. Enhancing quality and safety competency development at the unit level: an initial evaluation of student learning and clinical teaching on dedicated education units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulready-Shick, Joann; Kafel, Kathleen W; Banister, Gaurdia; Mylott, Laura

    2009-12-01

    The need to attend to quality and safety competency development, increase capacity in nursing education programs, address the faculty and nursing shortages, and find new ways to keep step with an ever-changing health care environment has brought forth numerous creative curricular responses and collaborative efforts. To tackle these multiple needs and challenges simultaneously, a new academic-service partnership was created to collaboratively develop an innovative clinical education delivery model. The designed dedicated education unit model not only promoted student learning about quality and safety competencies via unit-based projects but also supported quality improvements in nursing care delivery. Following the initial semester of the model's implementation, a pilot study was conducted. The findings generated the evidence required to take this innovation to the next level. Moreover, the education-practice partnership, which was created to implement the clinical education delivery model, was strengthened as a result of this preliminary evaluation.

  20. Currently used dosage regimens of vancomycin fail to achieve therapeutic levels in approximately 40% of intensive care unit patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Vitor Yuzo; Zacas, Carolina Petrus; Carrilho, Claudia Maria Dantas de Maio; Delfino, Vinicius Daher Alvares

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess whether currently used dosages of vancomycin for treatment of serious gram-positive bacterial infections in intensive care unit patients provided initial therapeutic vancomycin trough levels and to examine possible factors associated with the presence of adequate initial vancomycin trough levels in these patients. Methods A prospective descriptive study with convenience sampling was performed. Nursing note and medical record data were collected from September 2013 to July 2014 for patients who met inclusion criteria. Eighty-three patients were included. Initial vancomycin trough levels were obtained immediately before vancomycin fourth dose. Acute kidney injury was defined as an increase of at least 0.3mg/dL in serum creatinine within 48 hours. Results Considering vancomycin trough levels recommended for serious gram-positive infection treatment (15 - 20µg/mL), patients were categorized as presenting with low, adequate, and high vancomycin trough levels (35 [42.2%], 18 [21.7%], and 30 [36.1%] patients, respectively). Acute kidney injury patients had significantly greater vancomycin trough levels (p = 0.0055, with significance for a trend, p = 0.0023). Conclusion Surprisingly, more than 40% of the patients did not reach an effective initial vancomycin trough level. Studies on pharmacokinetic and dosage regimens of vancomycin in intensive care unit patients are necessary to circumvent this high proportion of failures to obtain adequate initial vancomycin trough levels. Vancomycin use without trough serum level monitoring in critically ill patients should be discouraged. PMID:28099635

  1. The GAP Portion of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Type III Secreted Toxin ExoS Upregulates Total and Surface Levels of Wild Type CFTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali N. Tukaye

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA infections account for a large percentage of fatal hospital acquired pneumonias. One of the PA Type III secreted toxin (TTST ExoS, a bifunctional protein with N-terminal GTPase activating protein (GAP and C-terminal ADP rybosyl transferase (ADPRT activities, significantly contributes to PA virulence by targeting small molecular weight G-proteins (SMWGP. In this study, we have looked at one of the mechanisms by which the GAP portion of ExoS (ExoS-GAP mediates cellular toxicity. Methods: The effects of ExoS-GAP on CFTR trafficking were studied in CFBE41o- Kir 2.2 and MDCK cell lines stably expressing CFTR using a transient transfection system. Results: Transient transfection of ExoS-GAP increased the total and surface protein levels of mature wild type CFTR in epithelial cells stably expressing wild type (WT CFTR. The effect of ExoS-GAP was specific to CFTR in bronchial epithelial cells since it did not affect the total protein levels of Na+/K+ATPase, another membrane protein. A point mutation in the ExoS GAP domain (R146K, known to disrupt its catalytic GAP activity, abolished the effect of ExoS-GAP on WT CFTR. Lysosomal inhibition studies with Bafilomycin A1 indicate that ExoS-GAP decreased lysosomal degradation of the mature WT CFTR with concomitant increase in the total levels of mature WT CFTR. However, ExoS-GAP did not increase the total protein levels of ∆F508CFTR. Conclusion: The GAP portion of the PA TTST ExoS increases the total and surface levels of wild type CFTR in vitro mammalian cell system. The effect of ExoS-GAP on WT CFTR total protein levels provides new insight into understanding the virulent pathophysiology of PA infections.

  2. Intravenous C.E.R.A. maintains stable haemoglobin levels in patients on dialysis previously treated with darbepoetin alfa: results from STRIATA, a randomized phase III study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaud, Bernard; Mingardi, Giulio; Braun, Johann; Aljama, Pedro; Kerr, Peter G.; Locatelli, Francesco; Villa, Giuseppe; Van Vlem, Bruno; McMahon, Alan W.; Kerloëguen, Cécile; Beyer, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background. Extending the administration interval of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) represents an opportunity to improve the efficiency of anaemia management in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, effective haemoglobin (Hb) maintenance can be challenging with epoetin alfa and epoetin beta administered at extended intervals. C.E.R.A., a continuous erythropoietin receptor activator, has a unique pharmacologic profile and long half-life (∼130 h), allowing administration at extended intervals. Phase III results have demonstrated that C.E.R.A. administered once every 4 weeks effectively maintains stable Hb levels in patients with CKD on dialysis. Methods. STRIATA (Stabilizing haemoglobin TaRgets in dialysis following IV C.E.R.A. Treatment for Anaemia) was a multicentre, open-label randomized phase III study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous C.E.R.A. administered once every 2 weeks (Q2W) for Hb maintenance following direct conversion from darbepoetin alfa (DA). Adult patients on dialysis receiving stable intravenous DA once weekly (QW) or Q2W were randomized (1:1) to continue their current DA regimen (n = 156) or receive intravenous C.E.R.A. Q2W (n = 157) for 52 weeks. Doses were adjusted to maintain Hb levels within ± 1.0 g/dl of baseline and between 10.0 and 13.5 g/dl. The primary endpoint was the mean Hb change between baseline and the evaluation period (weeks 29–36). Results. Most patients (>80%) received DA QW before randomization. The mean (95% CI) difference between C.E.R.A. and DA in the primary endpoint was 0.18 g/dl (−0.05, 0.41), within a pre-defined non-inferiority limit. C.E.R.A. was clinically non-inferior to DA (P < 0.0001) in maintaining Hb levels. Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusions. Stable Hb levels were successfully maintained in patients on haemodialysis directly converted to Q2W intravenous C.E.R.A. from DA. PMID:18586762

  3. Human Language, Unit II: Language Curriculum, Level C [Grade Three]; Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Oregon Elementary English Project.

    Developed by the Oregon Elementary English Project, the lessons in this second of a two-part unit on the human language intended for grades three and four revolve around the character Sad Sam, who gets lost in the woods and happens to observe four animals (bears, raccoons, geese, and robins). Having been introduced to Sad Sam in lesson 1, the…

  4. Process methods and levels of automation of wood pallet repair in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonghun Park; Laszlo Horvath; Robert J. Bush

    2016-01-01

    This study documented the current status of wood pallet repair in the United States by identifying the types of processing and equipment usage in repair operations from an automation prespective. The wood pallet repair firms included in the sudy received an average of approximately 1.28 million cores (i.e., used pallets) for recovery in 2012. A majority of the cores...

  5. Communication Systems, Unit II: Language Curriculum, Level D [Grade Four]; Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Oregon Elementary English Project.

    Developed by the Oregon Elementary English Project for grades three and four, this second of two units on communication systems begins with a lesson which reinforces the concept that in order to communicate we must all have the same meaning for the signals used. Lessons 1 through 3 deal with the various kinds of communication signals used by…

  6. Managing Highway Maintenance: Maintenance Management--by Objectives, Unit 10, Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit deals with management by objectives--its definition, how it works, and necessary steps for application. It is designed for maintenance supervisors who are familiar with maintenance management systems. The format is a programed, self-instructional approach in which questions are…

  7. Managing Highway Maintenance: Instructor's Manual for Work Programs and Budgets, Unit 9, Levels 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit covers the purpose of developing work programs and budgets; a review of the program and budget development process (activity descriptions, feature inventories and quality standards, estimated work quantities, and dollar requirements); and typical calculations for work programs,…

  8. Managing Highway Maintenance: Standards for Maintenance Work, Part 1, Unit 8, Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit is about maintenance standards and is designed for superintendents and senior foremen who are responsible for scheduling and controlling routine maintenance. It describes different kinds of standards, why and how standards are developed, and how standards are to be used and…

  9. Biomass Feedstock Availability in the United States: 1999 State Level Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Marie E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perlack, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Turhollow, Anthony [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); de la Torre Ugarte, Daniel [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Becker, Denny A. [Science Applications International Corporation, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Graham, Robin L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Slinsky, Stephen E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ray, Daryll E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Interest in using biomass feedstocks to produce power, liquid fuels, and chemicals in the U.S. is increasing. Central to determining the potential for these industries to develop is an understanding of the location, quantities, and prices of biomass resources. This paper describes the methodology used to estimate biomass quantities and prices for each state in the continental United States.

  10. Lead, Allergen, and Pesticide Levels in Licensed Child Care Centers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers was conducted to provide information about lead, allergens, and pesticide levels in licensed U.S. child care centers. Lead levels were measured in settled dust, paint, and play area soil; indoor allergen levels ...

  11. Adalimumab improves health-related quality of life in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis compared with the United States general population norms: Results from a randomized, controlled Phase III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnam Neesha

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the impact of adalimumab on health-related quality of life (HRQOL for patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Background Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated disease that has a significant impact on patients' HRQOL. Adalimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that blocks tumor necrosis factor, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and is effective and well-tolerated for patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Methods Data were obtained for a secondary analysis of patients in a randomized, controlled Phase III trial evaluating the effect of adalimumab in patients with psoriasis (N = 1,205. Patients with moderate to severe psoriasis were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to adalimumab 80 mg (two 40 mg injections administered subcutaneously at baseline followed by one 40 mg injection every other week from Week 1 to Week 15 or placebo. Short Form-36 (SF-36 Health Survey scores of psoriasis patients were used to assess HRQOL and were compared with United States (US population norms at baseline and Week 16. Results Baseline Physical Component Summary (PCS scores for the placebo and adalimumab groups were similar to the general US population. Baseline mean Mental Component Summary (MCS scores were significantly lower for the adalimumab and placebo groups compared with the general population (47.4, 47.7, and 50.8 points, respectively; p Conclusion Psoriasis has a broad impact on patient functioning and well-being. Improvement in skin lesions and joint symptoms associated with adalimumab treatment was accompanied by improvements in HRQOL to levels that were similar to or greater than those of the general US population. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00237887

  12. Motor unit recruitment pattern during low-level static and dynamic contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, K

    1995-03-01

    Motor unit (MU) recruitment patterns were studied during dynamic and static contractions at workloads corresponding to 10% of maximal voluntary contraction force. The dynamic contraction consisted of a 20 degrees flexion and extension of the elbow performed with a velocity of 10 degrees/s. Motor unit potential trains were recorded from the brachial biceps muscle of 6 healthy females using a quadripolar needle electrode and a computerized decomposition program. Properties of the identified MUs were derived from concentric needle EMG. A total of 119 MUs were identified during dynamic contractions, 107 MUs during static anisotonic contractions, and 96 MUs during static isotonic contractions. The main result was that MUs recruited during different contractions showed similar properties and may belong to the same part of the motoneuron pool. This indicates that MU recruitment patterns during dynamic contractions may be almost as stereotypical as during static contractions and may even activate the same MUs.

  13. MODEL MEKANISME ADMINISTRATIF TERINTEGRASIPADA IMPLEMENTASI STRATEGI DI LEVEL UNIT BISNIS STRATEGIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Sulistiani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tulisan ini menindaklanjuti pandangan terpadu tentang elemen penting dari tiga mekanisme administratif: struktur organisasi, sistem kontrol dan manajer yang berkaitan dengan perbedaan dalam strategi kompetitif SBU (strategic business unit.Tulisan ini berdasarkan penelitian Govindarajan (1988 yang mencoba menemukan model untuk implementasi beragam strategi SBU yang dijalankan oleh korporasi berbeda. Hasilnya ditemukan bahwa lokus kontrol internal manajerial yang tinggi dan emphasis yang rendah pada pemenuhan sebuah budget berhubungan dengan kinerja tinggi dalam SBU yang menjalankan strategi diferensiasi. Hasil berbasis analisis sistem menunjukkan bahwa ketika gaya evaluatif budget, desentralisasi dan lokus kontrol berhubungan untuk memenuhi kebutuhan strategi SBU, maka dihasilkan kinerja superior. Kesesuaian sistem ini adalah sangat kuat antar SBU diferensiasi, tapi tidak begitu kuat antar unit low cost

  14. State-Level Comparison of Processes and Timelines for Distributed Photovoltaic Interconnection in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardani, K.; Davidson, C.; Margolis, R.; Nobler, E.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents results from an analysis of distributed photovoltaic (PV) interconnection and deployment processes in the United States. Using data from more than 30,000 residential (up to 10 kilowatts) and small commercial (10-50 kilowatts) PV systems, installed from 2012 to 2014, we assess the range in project completion timelines nationally (across 87 utilities in 16 states) and in five states with active solar markets (Arizona, California, New Jersey, New York, and Colorado).

  15. The Prosecution of State-Level Human Trafficking Cases in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Farrell; Monica J DeLateur; Colleen Owens; Stephanie Fahy

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to combat human trafficking, the United States federal government and all fifty states passed new laws that criminalise human trafficking and support the identification and prosecution of human trafficking perpetrators. Despite the passage of these laws, only a small number of human trafficking cases have been prosecuted in the last fifteen years. Guided by the notion that prosecutors seek to avoid uncertainty when making decisions to pursue criminal prosecution, we explore how h...

  16. Platoon-Level After Action Review Aids in the SIMNET Unit Performance Assessment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    EXERCISE AS A FUNCTION OF UNIT SIDE, TIME, RESULT, AND RANGE TIME FIRING SIDE RESULT RANGE 06:45:00 Red Near Miss 1430 07:03:00 Blue Hit 1860 07:04:00 Blue...Hit 1781 Near Miss 1612 Red Near Miss 2263 Hit 1856 07:05:00 Blue Near Miss 1563 Near Miss 1836 Kill 1132 Hit 1894 Red Near Miss 1900 Hit 1918 11

  17. The optically thick C III spectrum. 2: Level/term populations and line/multiplet intensities using an improved hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    An improved hybrid level/term calculation is employed to obtain C III level/term populations and line/fractional multiplet intensities over the extended range of electron density 4.0 less than or equal log N(sub e) less than or equal 12.0, for column lengths L ranging from zero (optically thin) to 10(exp 20)/sq cm (moderately optically thick), at electron temperatures T(sub e) approximately 40,000 K(log T(sub e) = 4.6), T(sub e) approximately 63,000 K (log T(sub e) = 4.8), T(sub e) approximately 79,500 K (log T(sub e) = 4.9), and T(sub e) = 100,000 K (log T(sub e) = 5.0). The tabulated results are relevant to the interpretation of space observations obtained over extended spectral ranges by new and planned facilities including the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectrographic Explorer (FUSE).

  18. Systematic defect donor levels in III-V and II-VI semiconductors revealed by hybrid functional density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petretto, Guido; Bruneval, Fabien

    2015-12-01

    The identification of defect levels from photoluminescence spectroscopy is a useful but challenging task. Density-functional theory (DFT) is a highly valuable tool to this aim. However, the semilocal approximations of DFT that are affected by a band gap underestimation are not reliable to evaluate defect properties, such as charge transition levels. It is now established that hybrid functional approximations to DFT improve the defect description in semiconductors. Here we demonstrate that the use of hybrid functionals systematically stabilizes donor defect states in the lower part of the band gap for many defects, impurities or vacancies, in III-V and in II-VI semiconductors, even though these defects are usually considered as acceptors. These donor defect states are a very general feature and, to the best of our knowledge, have been overlooked in previous studies. The states we identify here may challenge the older assignments to photoluminescent peaks. Though appealing to screen quickly through the possible stable charge states of a defect, semilocal approximations should not be trusted for that purpose.

  19. Level III Ecoregions of Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  20. Level III Ecoregions of Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  1. Level III Ecoregions of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  2. Level III Ecoregions of Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  3. Level III Ecoregions of Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  4. Level III Ecoregions of Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  5. Level III Ecoregions of Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  6. Level III Ecoregions of Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  7. Level III Ecoregions of Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  8. Level III Ecoregions of Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  9. Level III Ecoregions of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  10. Level III Ecoregions of Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  11. Level III Ecoregions of Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  12. Level III Ecoregions of Wisconsin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  13. Level III Ecoregions of Missouri

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  14. Level III Ecoregions of Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  15. Level III Ecoregions of Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  16. Level III Ecoregions of Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  17. Level III Ecoregions of Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  18. Level III Ecoregions of Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  19. Level III Ecoregions of Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  20. Level III Ecoregions of Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  1. Level III Ecoregions of Delaware

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  2. Level III Ecoregions of Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  3. Level III Ecoregions of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  4. Level III Ecoregions of Maryland

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  5. Level III Ecoregions of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. The ecoregions of Alaska are a...

  6. Level III Ecoregions of Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  7. Level III Ecoregions of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  8. Level III Ecoregions of Idaho

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  9. Level III Ecoregions of Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  10. Level III Ecoregions of Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  11. Level III Ecoregions of Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  12. Level III Ecoregions of Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  13. Level III Ecoregions of Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  14. Level III Ecoregions of Pennsylvania

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  15. Level III Ecoregions of Illinois

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  16. Level III Ecoregions of Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  17. Level III Ecoregions of Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  18. Level III Ecoregions of Kentucky

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  19. Level III Ecoregions of Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  20. Differences between Mice and Humans in Regulation and the Molecular Network of Collagen, Type III, Alpha-1 at the Gene Expression Level: Obstacles that Translational Research Must Overcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishi Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Collagen, type III, alpha-1 (COL3A1 is essential for normal collagen I fibrillogenesis in many organs. There are differences in phenotypes of mutations in the COL3A1 gene in humans and mutations in mice. In order to investigate whether the regulation and gene network of COL3A1 is the same in healthy populations of mice and humans, we compared the quantitative trait loci (QTL that regulate the expression level of COL3A1 and the gene network of COL3A1 pathways between humans and mice using whole genome expression profiles. Our results showed that, for the regulation of expression of Col3a1 in mice, an eQTL on chromosome (Chr 12 regulates the expression of Col3a1. However, expression of genes in the syntenic region on human Chr 7 has no association with the expression level of COL3A1. For the gene network comparison, we identified 44 top genes whose expression levels are strongly associated with that of Col3a1 in mice. We next identified 41 genes strongly associated with the expression level of COL3A1 in humans. There are a few but significant differences in the COL3A1 gene network between humans and mice. Several genes showed opposite association with expression of COL3A1. These genes are known to play important roles in development and function of the extracellular matrix of the lung. Difference in the molecular pathway of key genes in the COL3A1 gene network in humans and mice suggest caution should be used in extrapolating results from models of human lung diseases in mice to clinical lung diseases in humans. These differences may influence the efficacy of drugs in humans whose development employed mouse models.

  1. [Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia: a comparison of level of knowledge in three critical care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujante-Palazón, I; Rodríguez-Mondéjar, J J; Armero-Barranco, D; Sáez-Paredes, P

    2016-01-01

    To determine the level of knowledge of the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia guidelines of nurses working in three intensive care units (ICU) in 3 university hospitals in a Spanish region, and evaluate the relationship between this level of knowledge and years worked in the ICU. A descriptive, prospective, cross-sectional, multicentre study was conducted using a validated and reliable questionnaire, made up by 9 questions with closed answers drawn from the EVIDENCE study. A total of 98 questionnaires were collected from ICU nurses of the three university hospitals (A, B, and C) from January to April 2014. The sample from hospital A responded the most, in contrast with the sample from hospital B, which was the one with the less participation. The Pearson correlation was calculated in order to determine the relationship between nurse years worked in ICU and level of knowledge. Hospital A obtained in the best mean score in the questionnaire, 6.33 (SD 1.4) points, followed by hospital C with 6.21 (SD 1.4), and finally, the hospital B with 6.06 (SD 1.5) points. A p=.08 was obtained on relating years worked with the level of knowledge. The results showed a high level of knowledge compared other studies. There was a tendency between the years worked in the unit and the level of knowledge in ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of ambient noise levels in the intensive care unit of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem O Qutub

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion : Some sources of environmental noise, such as the use of oxygen, suction equipment or respirators are unavoidable. Nevertheless, hospital ICUs should have measures to minimize the level of exposure to noise in the ICU. Further research in this area might focus on the noise level and other modifiable environmental stress factors in the ICU that affect patients as well as the staff.

  3. Short hours, long hours: Hour levels and trends in the retail industry in the United States, Canada, and Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Carré, Françoise; Tilly, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In settings where most workers have full-time schedules, hourly wages are appropriate primary indicators of job quality and worker outcomes. However, in sectors where full-time schedules do not dominate - primarily service-producing activities - total hours matter, in addition to hourly wages, for job quality and worker outcomes. In this paper we employ a sector-focused, comparative framework to further examine hours levels - measured as average weekly hours - and trends in Canada, the United...

  4. Individual, unit and vocal clan level identity cues in sperm whale codas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gero, Shane; Whitehead, Hal; Rendell, Luke

    2016-01-01

    The ‘social complexity hypothesis’ suggests that complex social structure is a driver of diversity in animal communication systems. Sperm whales have a hierarchically structured society in which the largest affiliative structures, the vocal clans, are marked on ocean-basin scales by culturally...... transmitted dialects of acoustic signals known as ‘codas’. We examined variation in coda repertoires among both individual whales and social units—the basic element of sperm whale society—using data from nine Caribbean social units across six years. Codas were assigned to individuals using photo...

  5. Energy Efficiency Policy in the United States. Overview of Trends at Different Levels of Government

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cochran, Jaquelin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vorum, Martin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This report catalogs by sector--buildings, transportation, industrial, and power--energy efficiency policies at the federal, state, and local levels, and identifies some prominent policy trends. Four key findings emerged from this report: 1) leadership on energy efficiency is necessary--and is found--at each level of government; 2) there is no widely accepted methodology for evaluating energy efficiency policies; 3) coordination among the three levels of government--and across sectors--is increasingly important, and there are opportunities to significantly improve policy performance through a unified strategy; and 4) there are efficiencies to be gained by informing policies in one sector with experience from others.

  6. Energy Efficiency Policy in the United States: Overview of Trends at Different Levels of Government

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, E.; Cochran, J.; Vorum, M.

    2009-12-01

    This report catalogs by sector--buildings, transportation, industrial, and power--energy efficiency policies at the federal, state, and local levels, and identifies some prominent policy trends. Four key findings emerged from this report: 1) leadership on energy efficiency is necessary--and is found--at each level of government; 2) there is no widely accepted methodology for evaluating energy efficiency policies; 3) coordination among the three levels of government--and across sectors--is increasingly important, and there are opportunities to significantly improve policy performance through a unified strategy; and 4) there are efficiencies to be gained by informing policies in one sector with experience from others.

  7. Attributes for NHDPlus Catchments (Version 1.1) for the Conterminous United States: Level 3 Ecoregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the estimated area of level 3 ecological landscape regions (ecoregions), as defined by Omernik (1987), compiled for every catchment of...

  8. The Use of Twitter to Predict the Level of Influenza Activity in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    forecast the level of influenza activity. The rise in the popularity of social media websites such as Flickr, Twitter and Facebook has transformed...The CDC requires a tool that can forecast the level of influenza activity. The rise in the popularity of social media websites such as Flickr... impacted world societies, economies and tourism . In order to prevent such influenza pandemics, U.S. health agencies need to be alerted of the danger

  9. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-09-14

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the &apos

  10. Effective inundation of continental United States communities with 21st century sea level rise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A. Dahl

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent, tidally driven coastal flooding is one of the most visible signs of sea level rise. Recent studies have shown that such flooding will become more frequent and extensive as sea level continues to rise, potentially altering the landscape and livability of coastal communities decades before sea level rise causes coastal land to be permanently inundated. In this study, we identify US communities that will face effective inundation—defined as having 10% or more of livable land area flooded at least 26 times per year—with three localized sea level rise scenarios based on projections for the 3rd US National Climate Assessment. We present these results in a new, online interactive tool that allows users to explore when and how effective inundation will impact their communities. In addition, we identify communities facing effective inundation within the next 30 years that contain areas of high socioeconomic vulnerability today using a previously published vulnerability index. With the Intermediate-High and Highest sea level rise scenarios, 489 and 668 communities, respectively, would face effective inundation by the year 2100. With these two scenarios, more than half of communities facing effective inundation by 2045 contain areas of current high socioeconomic vulnerability. These results highlight the timeframes that US coastal communities have to respond to disruptive future inundation. The results also underscore the importance of limiting future warming and sea level rise: under the Intermediate-Low scenario, used as a proxy for sea level rise under the Paris Climate Agreement, 199 fewer communities would be effectively inundated by 2100.

  11. The Prosecution of State-Level Human Trafficking Cases in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Farrell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to combat human trafficking, the United States federal government and all fifty states passed new laws that criminalise human trafficking and support the identification and prosecution of human trafficking perpetrators. Despite the passage of these laws, only a small number of human trafficking cases have been prosecuted in the last fifteen years. Guided by the notion that prosecutors seek to avoid uncertainty when making decisions to pursue criminal prosecution, we explore how human trafficking crimes are indicted under these newly defined state laws. Using a sample of cases from twelve US counties and interviews with police, prosecutors and court personnel, we examine the factors that influence the decision to prosecute crimes investigated as human trafficking in state court. This research informs our understanding of why so few human trafficking cases are prosecuted and why human trafficking suspects are rarely convicted of trafficking offenses.

  12. Associations of patient safety outcomes with models of nursing care organization at unit level in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Carl-Ardy; D'amour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Clarke, Sean; Rivard, Michèle; Blais, Régis

    2013-04-01

    To examine the associations of four distinct nursing care organizational models with patient safety outcomes. Cross-sectional correlational study. Using a standardized protocol, patients' records were screened retrospectively to detect occurrences of patient safety-related events. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations of those events with four nursing care organizational models. Twenty-two medical units in 11 hospitals in Quebec, Canada, were clustered into 4 nursing care organizational models: 2 professional models and 2 functional models. Two thousand six hundred and ninety-nine were patients hospitalized for at least 48 h on the selected units. Composite of six safety-related events widely-considered sensitive to nursing care: medication administration errors, falls, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, unjustified restraints and pressure ulcers. Events were ultimately sorted into two categories: events 'without major' consequences for patients and events 'with' consequences. After controlling for patient characteristics, patient risk of experiencing one or more events (of any severity) and of experiencing an event with consequences was significantly lower, by factors of 25-52%, in both professional models than in the functional models. Event rates for both functional models were statistically indistinguishable from each other. Data suggest that nursing care organizational models characterized by contrasting staffing, work environment and innovation characteristics may be associated with differential risk for hospitalized patients. The two professional models, which draw mainly on registered nurses (RNs) to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support for nurses' professional practice, were associated with lower risks than are the two functional models.

  13. Comparability of nurse staffing measures in examining the relationship between RN staffing and unit-acquired pressure ulcers: a unit-level descriptive, correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiSun; Staggs, Vincent S

    2014-10-01

    Various staffing measures have been used in examining the relationship between nurse staffing and patient outcomes. Little research has been conducted to compare these measures based on their explanatory power as predictors of nursing-sensitive outcomes. In this study, both administrative and nurse-reported measures were examined. Administrative measures included registered nurse (RN) skill mix and three versions of nursing hours per patient day (HPPD); nurse-reported measures included RN-reported number of assigned patients and RN-perceived staffing adequacy. To examine correlations among six nurse staffing measures and to compare their explanatory power in relation to unit-acquired pressure ulcers (UAPUs). Descriptive, correlational study. 2397 nursing units in 409 U.S. acute care hospitals. Random-intercept logistic regression analyses were performed using 2011 data from a national database. Relationships between nurse staffing measures and UAPU occurrences were examined in eight models, each with one or more staffing measures as predictors. Characteristics of nursing units (RN workgroup education level and RN workgroup unit tenure) and hospitals (size, teaching status, and Magnet status) were included as control variables. Two versions of HPPD (total nursing HPPD and RN HPPD) and RN skill mix were significantly correlated with RN-reported number of assigned patients (r range=-0.87 to -0.75). These staffing measures had weaker correlations with RN-perceived staffing adequacy (r range=0.16 to 0.23). Of the six staffing variables, only RN-perceived staffing adequacy and RN skill mix were significantly associated with UAPU odds, the former being the better predictor. Although RN-perceived staffing adequacy was not highly correlated with administrative measures of HPPD and RN skill mix, it was the strongest predictor of UAPU occurrences. RN-perceived staffing adequacy can serve as a more appropriate measure of staffing for nursing-sensitive outcomes research than

  14. The Relationship Between Sound Levels In the Postanesthesia Care Unit and Use of Analgesics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    the physiological and psychological mechanisms behind the phenomena, Florence Nightingale noticed an association between noise and patient discomfort...is interesting that the relationship between sound levels and the use of analgesics remains so similar. Going back even further, Florence Nightingale s

  15. Global and regional sea level rise scenarios for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, W.; Kopp, R.E.; Weaver, C.P.; Obeysekera, J; Horton, Radley M.; Thieler, E. Robert; Zervas, C.

    2017-01-01

    The Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flood Hazard Scenarios and Tools Interagency Task Force, jointly convened by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and the National Ocean Council (NOC), began its work in August 2015. The Task Force has focused its efforts on three primary tasks:

  16. The Application of VARK Learning Styles in Introductory Level Economics Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah; Stokes, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The issues of developing strategies and approaches to teaching introductory level economics courses at university have been long standing. With the development of economics learning standards in Australia, this is a time to consider teaching and learning approaches to engage students and develop skills in economics. This paper considers that to…

  17. The Application of VARK Learning Styles in Introductory Level Economics Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah; Stokes, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The issues of developing strategies and approaches to teaching introductory level economics courses at university have been long standing. With the development of economics learning standards in Australia, this is a time to consider teaching and learning approaches to engage students and develop skills in economics. This paper considers that to…

  18. Short-term bulk energy storage system scheduling for load leveling in unit commitment: modeling, optimization, and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Reza; Saboori, Hedayat

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage systems (ESSs) have experienced a very rapid growth in recent years and are expected to be a promising tool in order to improving power system reliability and being economically efficient. The ESSs possess many potential benefits in various areas in the electric power systems. One of the main benefits of an ESS, especially a bulk unit, relies on smoothing the load pattern by decreasing on-peak and increasing off-peak loads, known as load leveling. These devices require new methods and tools in order to model and optimize their effects in the power system studies. In this respect, this paper will model bulk ESSs based on the several technical characteristics, introduce the proposed model in the thermal unit commitment (UC) problem, and analyze it with respect to the various sensitive parameters. The technical limitations of the thermal units and transmission network constraints are also considered in the model. The proposed model is a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) which can be easily solved by strong commercial solvers (for instance CPLEX) and it is appropriate to be used in the practical large scale networks. The results of implementing the proposed model on a test system reveal that proper load leveling through optimum storage scheduling leads to considerable operation cost reduction with respect to the storage system characteristics.

  19. [Levels of state-trait anxiety between mothers and fathers who have children in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Carrasco, Karmina Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background: when there is a child patient in the family, it is frequent that parents get upset. Anxiety in the mother and father could be different depending on the way each one lives the critical situation of the child patient. The purpose was to measure levels of anxiety in fathers and mothers who had a hospitalized child in an intensive care unit. Methods: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was applied to a group of 50 pairs of parents who had a hospitalized child in the intensive care unit in a pediatric hospital. A no probabilistic intentional sample was used. Differences between groups were analyzed by Student's t test. Results: no significant differences were obtained between mothers and fathers for both state-anxiety and trait-anxiety. Significant differences were obtained intra-groups between both kinds of anxiety. Conclusions: having a child who is chronically sick or hospitalized for intensive therapy causes similar levels of anxiety in both parents. Anxiety is significantly increased in both parents when their child is hospitalized in an intensive therapy unit.

  20. Grasslands and Croplands Have Different Microbial Biomass Carbon Levels per Unit of Soil Organic Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence P. McGonigle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primarily using cropped systems, previous studies have reported a positive linear relationship between microbial biomass carbon (MBC and soil organic carbon (SOC. We conducted a meta-analysis to explore this relationship separately for grasslands and croplands using available literature. Studies were limited to those using fumigation–extraction for MBC for field samples. Trials were noted separately where records were distinct in space or time. Grasslands were naturally occurring, restored, or seeded. Cropping systems were typical of the temperate zone. MBC had a positive linear response to increasing SOC that was significant in both grasslands (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.76 and croplands (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.48. However, MBC increased 2.5-fold more steeply per unit of increasing SOC for grassland soils, as compared to the corresponding response in cropland soils. Expressing MBC as a proportion of SOC across the regression overall, slopes corresponded to 2.7% for grasslands and 1.1% for croplands. The slope of the linear relationship for grasslands was significantly (p = 0.0013 steeper than for croplands. The difference between the two systems is possibly caused by a greater proportion of SOC in grasslands being active rather than passive, relative to that in croplands, with that active fraction promoting the formation of MBC.

  1. Interior characteristics at mid-levels of thunderstorms in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Dennis J.; Smith, Paul L.

    1988-01-01

    Data characterizing the vertical wind structure and hydrometeors within cumulonimbus clouds in the southeastern United States were collected by the armored T-28 aircraft during the 1986 Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment (COHMEX). Data analysis concentrated on the hydrometeor character and development, as well as the general microphysical and kinematic structure of the clouds penetrated. The high reflectivities which sometimes exceeded the usual 55 dBz limit set for the T-28, are not necessarily related to hail in the COHMEX storms. Instead, large numbers of millimeter-size particles were found, while the hail infrequently encountered was generally small. The fact that the larger hydrometeors were usually found in narrow and weak updrafts that appeared to be well mixed suggests that a coalescence mechanism was active in many of the storms. The depth of warm cloud (typically about 3.5 km) present in these storms apparently allows ample time for particles to reach the observed millimeter sizes. The presence of cloud droplets in the largest sizes measured supports this mechanism. Ice processes play a role in the precipitation, but hail was unable to grow very large in these storms probably because the high concentrations of observed growth centers suggest a natural beneficial competition process.

  2. Multi­-Threaded Algorithms for General purpose Graphics Processor Units in the ATLAS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Conde Mui\\~no, Patricia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    General purpose Graphics Processor Units (GPGPU) are being evaluated for possible future inclusion in an upgraded ATLAS High Level Trigger farm. We have developed a demonstrator including GPGPU implementations of Inner Detector and Muon tracking and Calorimeter clustering within the ATLAS software framework. ATLAS is a general purpose particle physics experiment located on the LHC collider at CERN. The ATLAS Trigger system consists of two levels, with level 1 implemented in hardware and the High Level Trigger implemented in software running on a farm of commodity CPU. The High Level Trigger reduces the trigger rate from the 100 kHz level 1 acceptance rate to 1 kHz for recording, requiring an average per­-event processing time of ~250 ms for this task. The selection in the high level trigger is based on reconstructing tracks in the Inner Detector and Muon Spectrometer and clusters of energy deposited in the Calorimeter. Performing this reconstruction within the available farm resources presents a significant ...

  3. RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY SCREENING OF 500 INFANTS IN A LEVEL II NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT AT A MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN KARNATAKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is the leading cause of infant blindness and predominantly affects premature, low birth weight babies.1 India and other middle-income countries are said to be suffering from the ‘third epidemic’. ROP is multi-factorial and early detection and treatment of threshold ROP with timely laser treatment results in excellent outcome.3-8 OBJECTIVES: 1. To determine the yield of ROP in a level II neonatal intensive care unit (NICU at a Government Medical College Hospital in Mandya district. 2. To determine disease characteristics and outcome of treatment. METHODOLOGY: The study is a prospective analysis of infants admitted during March 1st 2009 and November 30th, 2011(33 months at the NICU of Mandya Institute of Medical Sciences (MIMS Hospital. All infants weighing level III NICU’s in larger cities. With improving neonatal care, a collaborative, timely and appropriate screening strategy is necessary in the community to prevent ROP blindness in rural infants.

  4. Lifelong Learning Experience and Level of Social Exclusion or Inclusion of Asian Communities Living in Denmark and the United Kingdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Klein, Sonia; Panesar, Jasbir

    2005-01-01

    This article reflects the situation of Asian communities in Denmark and the United Kingdom which is influenced by global trends, the patterns of differing learning they participate in which are influenced by the concept of LifeLong Learning within each country, educational opportunities, socio......-economic positions of this target group and entrepreneurship activities taking place. Global trends influence disadvantaged learners level of participation in learning within Europe. The Asian communities in Denmark and the United Kingdom, despite the differences in migration period, have made the decision to live......, including Asian communities, have been negatively affected in the recent years due to the increased political restrictions and media coverage. In comparison, despite the recent immigration policies in the UK, many members of the Asian communities have embraced the opportunities LifeLong Learning has...

  5. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  6. Late spring ultraviolet levels over the United Kingdom and the link to ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Austin

    Full Text Available Erythemally-weighted ultraviolet (UVery levels measured over southern England, during anticyclonic weather between 30 April and 2 May, 1997, were almost 50 higher than normally expected for clear skies and were similar to mid-summer values for the first time since measurements began in 1990. Investigation of this episode suggests that a combination of both meteorological and chemical effects were responsible for generating record low ozone amounts for the time of year. Further, comparisons between the A band ultraviolet (315 to 400 nm wavelength amounts, and radiative calculations confirm that the high UVery was primarily due to the reduction in total ozone. These results are contrasted with a similar period for 1998, in which near climatological ozone amounts were measured. The prospects for enhanced UVery levels in future years are briefly reviewed in the light of expected increases in stratospheric halogen levels and greenhouse gases.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere · composition and chemistry · Meterology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; radiative processes

  7. A study of changes in foundation insulation levels in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Voss, M.K. [Saint Mary`s Coll., Winona, MN (United States)

    1992-10-01

    For almost 10 years the US Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a small research effort with. the objective of working with the building industry to see that cost-effective foundation insulation levels are installed in all US buildings. One of the first discoveries in 1983--1984 was that less than 5% of the existing buildings had foundation insulation and less than 30% of new construction included foundation insulation. After producing foundation handbooks, actively working with energy code and standards groups (ASHRAE and Council of American Building Officials: Model Energy Code Committee) conducting told experiments, and developing computer models for predicting energy savings has any measurable progress been made toward the fulfillment of this DOE objective? Also, in order to derive maximum energy savings impact for this ongoing research activity, market feedback of progress toward attainment of the objective is needed. Using the network of building experts available to the Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials program, a short mail survey was developed, administered, and results analyzed. This study concludes that foundation insulation usage on new residential buildings has increased from 1982 levels of around 25% to 1992 levels of around 50%. Government handbooks and recent changes in local enforced codes and standards are identified as major contributors to this improvement. Progress has been made but more is needed to capture the remaining 40% of the foundations that should be insulated. Several issues are reported as obstacles that need to be overcome to capture the remainder of the foundation market.

  8. A study of changes in foundation insulation levels in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Voss, M.K. (Saint Mary' s Coll., Winona, MN (United States))

    1992-10-01

    For almost 10 years the US Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a small research effort with. the objective of working with the building industry to see that cost-effective foundation insulation levels are installed in all US buildings. One of the first discoveries in 1983--1984 was that less than 5% of the existing buildings had foundation insulation and less than 30% of new construction included foundation insulation. After producing foundation handbooks, actively working with energy code and standards groups (ASHRAE and Council of American Building Officials: Model Energy Code Committee) conducting told experiments, and developing computer models for predicting energy savings has any measurable progress been made toward the fulfillment of this DOE objective Also, in order to derive maximum energy savings impact for this ongoing research activity, market feedback of progress toward attainment of the objective is needed. Using the network of building experts available to the Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials program, a short mail survey was developed, administered, and results analyzed. This study concludes that foundation insulation usage on new residential buildings has increased from 1982 levels of around 25% to 1992 levels of around 50%. Government handbooks and recent changes in local enforced codes and standards are identified as major contributors to this improvement. Progress has been made but more is needed to capture the remaining 40% of the foundations that should be insulated. Several issues are reported as obstacles that need to be overcome to capture the remainder of the foundation market.

  9. Landscape-level influences of terrestrial snake occupancy within the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, David A; McClure, Christopher J W; Brock, Jean C; Rudolph, D Craig; Pierce, Josh B; Lee, James R; Humphries, W Jeffrey; Gregory, Beau B; Sutton, William B; Smith, Lora L; Baxley, Danna L; Stevenson, Dirk J; Guyer, Craig

    2012-06-01

    Habitat loss and degradation are thought to be the primary drivers of species extirpations, but for many species we have little information regarding specific habitats that influence occupancy. Snakes are of conservation concern throughout North America, but effective management and conservation are hindered by a lack of basic natural history information and the small number of large-scale studies designed to assess general population trends. To address this information gap, we compiled detection/nondetection data for 13 large terrestrial species from 449 traps located across the southeastern United States, and we characterized the land cover surrounding each trap at multiple spatial scales (250-, 500-, and 1000-m buffers). We used occupancy modeling, while accounting for heterogeneity in detection probability, to identify habitat variables that were influential in determining the presence of a particular species. We evaluated 12 competing models for each species, representing various hypotheses pertaining to important habitat features for terrestrial snakes. Overall, considerable interspecific variation existed in important habitat variables and relevant spatial scales. For example, kingsnakes (Lampropeltis getula) were negatively associated with evergreen forests, whereas Louisiana pinesnake (Pituophis ruthveni) occupancy increased with increasing coverage of this forest type. Some species were positively associated with grassland and scrub/shrub (e.g., Slowinski's cornsnake, Elaphe slowinskii) whereas others, (e.g., copperhead, Agkistrodon contortrix, and eastern diamond-backed rattlesnake, Crotalus adamanteus) were positively associated with forested habitats. Although the species that we studied may persist in varied landscapes other than those we identified as important, our data were collected in relatively undeveloped areas. Thus, our findings may be relevant when generating conservation plans or restoration goals. Maintaining or restoring landscapes that

  10. Intrinsic component of resilience among entry level medical students in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehzabin Ahmed

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundResilience is the capacity to recover and to cope successfullywith everyday challenges. Resilience has intrinsic andextrinsic components and an effort has been made to studythe intrinsic component and its association with sociodemographicfactors, among the entry level students of theIntegrated Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery(MBBS course.MethodThe present study was conducted in Gulf MedicalUniversity, using a self-administered questionnaire,comprising of two parts, distributed to all the students whoconsented to participate. The first part contained questionson socio-demographic details while the second partcontained questions on the intrinsic and extrinsiccomponents of resilience of the students. The datacollected was analysed using Predictive Analytic Software(PASW 18.0 using frequency, mean, SD and median.ResultsAmong the 58 students who participated 24 (41.4% weremales and 34 (58.6% females, of which 70.7% were 20years. The mean score for the intrinsiccomponent of resilience was 48.9 (SD, 5 and range 35–60.The median scores showed no significant variation (p<0.05with age, gender, religion, nationality, family structure,highest education among parents, the person they sharetheir feelings with or the number of friends. However,minimally higher scores were noted in the median scores ofstudents from nuclear families, with Western nationalityand those whose parents had a university level education,who shared their feelings with people of their owngeneration or outside their family and who have 5–9friends.ConclusionThe intrinsic component of resilience was found to bealmost uniform for the study group and the level is high. Astudy has to further look into its effect on coping with thestresses encountered during the academic year.

  11. Characterizing the natural radiation levels throughout the main geological units of Sabkhat al Jabboul area, northern Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilal, Mohamed; Aissa, Mosa

    2015-02-01

    The concentrations of equivalent eU, eTh, and K% were determined together with soil gas radon values and carborne gamma-ray survey in order to define the natural radioactivity levels throughout main geological units of Sabkhat al Jabboul region. Forty five soil and rock samples were collected from various lithofacies in each geological unit, and analyzed by γ-ray spectrometric technique for determining the concentration values of major radioelements. Such radiometric data could be used to differentiate between various lithologies of the investigated rocks. Although no distinct radioactive anomalies were found in the area, the radiometric profiles showed some minor variations with slightly higher values than the normal level. Despite the low radioactivity and the lack of rocks diversity in the surveyed area, it was possible to classify some certain rock types based on their radiometric response. The relationships between eU, eTh and their ratios were discussed for the Quaternary, Neogene and Paleogene formations, in order to evaluate the degree of uranium distribution and remobilization. The overall results of this radiometric survey were generally low, and lying within the range of the normal background levels in Syrian.

  12. Self-assembled decanuclear Na(I)2Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 complexes: from discrete clusters to 1-D and 2-D structures, with the Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 unit displaying a large spin ground state and probable SMM behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2011-12-07

    The synthesis, magnetic characterization and X-ray crystal structures are reported for five new manganese compounds, [Mn(III)(teaH(2))(sal)]·(1/2)H(2)O (1), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(4)]·6MeOH (2), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·7MeOH (3), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·2MeOH·Et(2)O (4) and [K(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n)·5MeOH (5). Complex 1 is a mononuclear compound, formed via the reaction of Mn(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O, triethanolamine (teaH(3)) and salicylic acid (salH(2)) in a basic methanolic solution. Compound 2 is a mixed-valent hetero-metallic cluster made up of a Mn(8)Na(2) decanuclear core and is formed via the reaction of sodium azide (NaN(3)) with 1. Compounds 3-5 are isolated as 1- or 2-D coordination polymers, each containing the decanuclear Mn(8)M(2) (M = Na(+) or K(+)) core building block as the repeating unit. Compound 3 is isolated when 1 is reacted with NaN(3) over a very short reaction time and forms a 1-D coordination polymer. Each unit displays inter-cluster bridges via the O-atoms of teaH(2-) ligands bonding to the sodium ions of an adjacent cluster. Increasing the reaction time appears to drive the formation of 4 which forms 2-D polymeric sheets and is a packing polymorph of 3. The addition of KMnO(4) and NaN(3) to 1 resulted in compound 5, which also forms a 1-D coordination polymer of the decanuclear core unit. The 1-D chains are now linked via inter-cluster potassium and salicylate bridges. Solid state DC susceptibility measurements were performed on compounds 1-5. The data for 1 are as expected for an S = 2 Mn(III) ion, with the isothermal M vs. H data being fitted by matrix diagonalization methods to give values of g and the axial (D) and rhombic (E) zero field splitting parameters of 2.02, -2.70 cm(-1) and 0.36 cm(-1) respectively. The data for 2-5, each with an identical Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4

  13. Phase I/II Trial of 5-Fluorouracil and a Noncytotoxic Dose Level of Suramin in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Saby; Dreicer, Robert; Au, Jessie J. L.; Shen, Tong; Rini, Brian I.; Roman, Susan; Cooney, Matthew M.; Mekhail, Tarek; Elson, Paul; Wientjes, Guillaume M.; Ganapathi, Ram; Bukowski, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is recognized as a neoplasm resistant to chemotherapy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that suramin, at noncytotoxic doses, enhanced the activity of chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in xenograft models. Patients and Methods A phase I/II trial of noncytotoxic suramin in combination with weekly 5-FU in patients with metastatic RCC was conducted. The treatment consisted of intravenous (I.V.) suramin followed by a 500 mg/m2 I.V. bolus of 5-FU given 4.5 hours after starting suramin. In the phase I portion, a cohort of 6 patients received a suramin dose calculated to achieve a plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L. Therapy was administered once weekly for 6 doses, followed by 2 weeks off. This was followed by a phase II portion in which the primary goal was to determine the objective response rate. Results Twenty-three patients were enrolled in the study: 6 in the phase I portion and 17 in phase II. Seventy-eight percent of patients were men, the mean age was 58.8 years, 96% had previous nephrectomy, and 70% had received previous systemic therapy. Histologic subtype was clear cell in 91%. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 of 6 patients (grade 3 hypersensitivity related to suramin infusion). The suramin dosing nomogram used in phase I and II portions of the trial yielded the desired plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L from 4.5 hours to 48 hours after infusion in 94 of 115 treatments. No objective responses were noted, and the median time to treatment failure was 2.5 months. The major toxicities (all grades) were fatigue (83%), nausea/vomiting (78%), diarrhea (61%), and chills (61%). Conclusion Suramin levels expected to reverse fibroblast growth factor–induced resistance can be achieved with the dosing regimen used in this study. The toxicity observed with suramin and 5-FU was acceptable. The combination does not have clinical activity in patients with metastatic RCC. PMID:18824429

  14. Preservation of As(III) and As(V) in drinking water supply samples from across the United States using EDTA and acetic acid as a means of minimizing iron-arsenic coprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Patricia A; Schwegel, Carol A; Parks, Amy; Gamble, Bryan M; Wymer, Larry; Creed, John T

    2004-05-15

    Seven different treatment/storage conditions were investigated for the preservation of the native As(III)/As(V) found in 10 drinking water supplies from across the United States. These 10 waters were chosen because they have different As(III)/As(V) distributions; six of these waters contained enough iron to produce an iron precipitate during shipment. The waters were treated and stored under specific conditions and analyzed periodically over a span of approximately 75 days. Linear least squares (LLS) was used to estimate the change in As(III) and As(V) over the study period. Point estimates for the first and last analyses days and 95% confidence bounds were calculated from the LLS. The difference in the point estimates for the first and last day were then evaluated with respect to drinking water treatment decision making. Three primary treatments were evaluated: EDTA/AcOH-treatment and AcOH treatment as well as no treatment. The effect of temperature was explored for all treatments, while the effect of aeration was evaluated for only the EDTA/AcOH treated samples. The nontreated samples experienced a 0-40% reduction in the native arsenic concentration due to the formation of Fe/As precipitates. The Fe/As precipitates were resolubilized and shown to contain elevated concentrations of As(V) relative to the native distribution. Once this Fe/As precipitate was removed from solution using a 0.45 and 0.2 microm filter, the resulting arsenic concentration (As(III) + As(V)) was relatively constant (the largest LLS slope was -1.4 x 10(-2) (ng As g water(-1)) day(-1)). The AcOH treatment eliminated the formation of the Fe/As precipitate observed in the nontreated samples. However, two of the AcOH water samples produced analytically significant changes in the As(III) concentration. The LLS slopes for these two waters were -5.7 x 10(-2) (ng As(III) g water(-1)) day(-1) and -1.0 x 10(-1) (ng As(III) g water(-1)) day(-1). This corresponds to a -4.3 ng/g and a -7.8 ng/g change in

  15. Estimated Impacts of Sequestration-Level Funding: United States Department of Defense Fiscal Year 1015 Budget Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    3) (7)   Budget Line Items = "CH‐53K (Heavy Lift)" and "CH‐53K RDTE" Amphibious Combat Vehicle ACV ...investments are shown in Figure 4-9. At the PB15 funding level the Marine Corps begins development of the follow-on ACV program to replace the 40-year old...legacy vehicle. At BCA funding, only initial scoping and research efforts could be started. Figure 4-9. ACV Position Units FY 2015 FY 2016 FY

  16. An assessment of dioxin levels in processed ball clay from the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrario, J.; Byrne, C. [USEPA, Stennis Space Ctr. Mississippi (United States); Schaum, J. [USEPA, Washington, DC (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Introduction The presence of dioxin-like compounds in ball clay was discovered in 1996 as a result of an investigation to determine the sources of elevated levels of dioxin found in two chicken fat samples from a national survey of poultry. The investigation indicated that soybean meal added to chicken feed was the source of dioxin contamination. Further investigation showed that the dioxin contamination came from the mixing of a natural clay known as ''ball clay'' with the soybean meal as an anti-caking agent. The FDA subsequently discontinued the use of contaminated ball clay as an anti-caking agent in animal feeds. The source of the dioxins found in ball clay has yet to be established. A comparison of the characteristic dioxin profile found in ball clay to those of known anthropogenic sources from the U.S.EPA Source Inventory has been undertaken, and none of those examined match the features found in the clays. These characteristic features together with the fact that the geologic formations in which the clays are found are ancient suggest a natural origin for the dioxins. The plasticity of ball clays makes them an important commercial resource for a variety of commercial uses. The percentage of commercial uses of ball clay in 2000 included: 29% for floor and wall tile, 24% for sanitary ware, 10% pottery, and 37% for other industrial and commercial uses. The total mining of ball clay in the U.S. for 2003 was 1.12 million metric tons. EPA is examining the potential for the environmental release of dioxins from the processing/use of ball clays and evaluating potential exposure pathways. Part of this overall effort and the subject of this study includes the analysis of dioxin levels found in commercially available ball clays commonly used in ceramic art studios.

  17. A comparative study of allowable pesticide residue levels on produce in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neff Roni A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. imports a substantial and increasing portion of its fruits and vegetables. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration currently inspects less than one percent of import shipments. While countries exporting to the U.S. are expected to comply with U.S. tolerances, including allowable pesticide residue levels, there is a low rate of import inspections and few other incentives for compliance. Methods This analysis estimates the quantity of excess pesticide residue that could enter the U.S. if exporters followed originating country requirements but not U.S. pesticide tolerances, for the top 20 imported produce items based on quantities imported and U.S. consumption levels. Pesticide health effects data are also shown. Results The model estimates that for the identified items, 120 439 kg of pesticides in excess of U.S. tolerances could potentially be imported to the U.S., in cases where U.S. regulations are more protective than those of originating countries. This figure is in addition to residues allowed on domestic produce. In the modeling, the top produce item, market, and pesticide of concern were oranges, Chile, and Zeta-Cypermethrin. Pesticides in this review are associated with health effects on 13 body systems, and some are associated with carcinogenic effects. Conclusions There is a critical information gap regarding pesticide residues on produce imported to the U.S. Without a more thorough sampling program, it is not possible accurately to characterize risks introduced by produce importation. The scenario presented herein relies on assumptions, and should be considered illustrative. The analysis highlights the need for additional investigation and resources for monitoring, enforcement, and other interventions, to improve import food safety and reduce pesticide exposures in originating countries.

  18. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Yun-Liang Cui; Zhao-Fen Lin; De-Chang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both procalcitonin (PCT) and plasma endotoxin levels cannot be solely used for a definite diagnosis ofbacteremia or sepsis, and there has been few study comparing the values of the two biomarkers for the diagnosis of bacteremia.The aim of this study was to identify bacteria causing bacteremia and evaluate the role of the two biomarkers in the diagnosis ofbacteremia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU).Methods: The medical records of 420 patients in ICU were retrospectively reviewed.Patients (n =241) who met the inclusion criteria were subjected to blood culture (BC) for the analysis of the endotoxin or PCT levels.The exclusion criteria included the presence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus and/or AIDS, neutropenia without sepsis, pregnancy, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies, or blood diseases such as hematological tumors.Patients' BC episodes were divided into BC negative, Gram-negative (GN) bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups.The PCT and plasma endotoxin levels were compared in the different groups.Results: A total of 241 patients with 505 episodes of BC were analyzed.The GN bacteria group showed higher levels of PCT and endotoxin than the BC negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups.GN bacteremia was more prevalent than Gram-positive bacteremia.The GN bacteremia caused by non-Enterobacteriaceae infection presented higher endotoxin level than that by Enterobacteriaceae, but no significant difference in PCT levels was observed between the two groups.The plasma endotoxin significantly differed among different groups and was bacterial species dependent.Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia.Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China.And PCT is a more valuable biomarker than endotoxin

  19. Market-level assessment of the economic benefits of atrazine in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Paul D

    2014-11-01

    Atrazine and other triazine herbicides are widely used in US maize and sorghum production, yet the most recent market-level assessment of the economic benefits of atrazine is for market conditions prevalent in the early 1990s, before commercialization of transgenic crops. Grain markets have changed substantially since that time; for example, the size of the US maize market increased by 170% from 1990-1992 to 2007-2009. This paper reports a current assessment of the economic benefits of atrazine. Yield increases and cost changes implied by triazine herbicides are projected to reduce maize prices by 7-8% and sorghum prices by 19-20%. Projected consumer benefits from lower prices range from $US 3.6 to 4.4 × 10(9) annually, with the net projected economic benefit for triazine herbicides to the US economy ranging from $US 2.9 to 3.4 × 10(9) annually because lower prices imply reduced producer income. Productivity gains from triazine herbicides maintain an estimated 270 000-390 000 ha of land in non-crop uses that generate environmental benefits not accounted for in this analysis. Even in the current era, with transgenic varieties dominating crop production, atrazine and the other triazine herbicides continue to be a key part of maize and sorghum production and generate substantial economic benefits. © 2013 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Market-level assessment of the economic benefits of atrazine in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atrazine and other triazine herbicides are widely used in US maize and sorghum production, yet the most recent market-level assessment of the economic benefits of atrazine is for market conditions prevalent in the early 1990s, before commercialization of transgenic crops. Grain markets have changed substantially since that time; for example, the size of the US maize market increased by 170% from 1990–1992 to 2007–2009. This paper reports a current assessment of the economic benefits of atrazine. RESULTS Yield increases and cost changes implied by triazine herbicides are projected to reduce maize prices by 7–8% and sorghum prices by 19–20%. Projected consumer benefits from lower prices range from $US 3.6 to 4.4 × 109 annually, with the net projected economic benefit for triazine herbicides to the US economy ranging from $US 2.9 to 3.4 × 109 annually because lower prices imply reduced producer income. Productivity gains from triazine herbicides maintain an estimated 270 000–390 000 ha of land in non-crop uses that generate environmental benefits not accounted for in this analysis. CONCLUSION Even in the current era, with transgenic varieties dominating crop production, atrazine and the other triazine herbicides continue to be a key part of maize and sorghum production and generate substantial economic benefits. © 2013 The Authors. PestManagement Science published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:24318916

  1. Intramuscular depot formulations of leuprolide acetate suppress testosterone levels below a 20 ng/dL threshold: a retrospective analysis of two Phase III studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spitz A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aaron Spitz,1 Marc Gittelman,2 Lawrence I Karsh,3 Sanja Dragnic,4 Ahmed M Soliman,5 Aditya Lele,6 Damian Gruca,7 Michael Norton4 1Orange County Urology Associates, Laguna Beach, CA, 221st Century Oncology/UroMedix-Aventura Division, Aventura, FL, 3The Urology Center of Colorado, Denver, CO, 4US Medical Affairs, 5Health Economics and Outcomes Research, 6Data and Statistical Sciences, AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA; 7Global Medical Affairs, AbbVie Deutschland, Ludwigshafen, Germany Introduction: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH analogs is a standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer. GnRH analog therapy can reduce testosterone to “castrate” levels, historically defined as <50 ng/dL. With the advent of newer assays, a lower threshold of <20 ng/dL has recently been proposed. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of two Phase III trials of 4- and 6-month depot microsphere formulations of leuprolide acetate (LA, a GnRH agonist that has previously demonstrated efficacy in testosterone suppression to <50 ng/dL in patients on ADT. This analysis investigates the ability of these LA formulations to suppress to ≤20 ng/dL levels.Methods: In two of five AbbVie/Abbott clinical trials of microsphere formulations of LA for ADT, analytic technology permitting testosterone detection as low as 3 ng/dL was used and thus was selected for this analysis. Both trials were open-label, fixed-dose studies in prostate cancer patients, naïve to ADT. Patients received either 30 mg (4-month formulation; n=49 or 45 mg (6-month formulation; n=151 depot injections of LA microspheres. Treatment duration was up to 32 weeks for the 4-month formulation and 48 weeks for the 6-month formulation. The proportion of patients achieving the 20 ng/dL threshold was determined every 4 weeks.Results: Pooled analysis showed that 152 of 193 (79% of patients achieved serum testosterone levels of ≤20 ng/dL at 4 weeks, and

  2. Android and gynoid fat percentages and serum lipid levels in United States adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung-Bok; Min, Jin-Young

    2015-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that fat distribution is a better predictor of cardiovascular disease than body mass index (BMI). The aim of this study was to investigate the association of android and gynoid fat percentages with lipid profiles to determine whether android and/or gynoid fat percentages are associated with serum lipid levels. A population-based cross-sectional study. Five thousand six hundred and ninety-six adults (20 years and older) who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006. The regional body composition in the android and gynoid regions was defined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The estimation of lipid risk profiles included total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) -cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) -cholesterol and triglycerides (TG). Regardless of gender, android and gynoid body fat percentages were positively and significantly correlated with BMI and waist circumference. After adjustment for age, ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol consumption, dyslipidaemia and BMI, increases in android fat percentage were significantly associated with total cholesterol, TG and HDL cholesterol in males, and total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in females. The gynoid fat percentages showed a positive correlation with total cholesterol in males, whereas gynoid fat accumulation in females showed a favourable association with TG and HDL cholesterol. The observed associations differed according to ethnic groups. Our results suggest that regional fat distribution in the android and gynoid regions have different effects on lipid profiles, and that fat in the android region, rather than the gynoid region, may be an important factor in determining the risk of cardiovascular disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Feasibility and utility of mapping disease risk at the neighbourhood level within a Canadian public health unit: an ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanigaratne Susitha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted spatial analyses to determine the geographic variation of cancer at the neighbourhood level (dissemination areas or DAs within the area of a single Ontario public health unit, Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph, covering a population of 238,326 inhabitants. Cancer incidence data between 1999 and 2003 were obtained from the Ontario Cancer Registry and were geocoded down to the level of DA using the enhanced Postal Code Conversion File. The 2001 Census of Canada provided information on the size and age-sex structure of the population at the DA level, in addition to information about selected census covariates, such as average neighbourhood income. Results Age standardized incidence ratios for cancer and the prevalence of census covariates were calculated for each of 331 dissemination areas in Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph. The standardized incidence ratios (SIR for cancer varied dramatically across the dissemination areas. However, application of the Moran's I statistic, a popular index of spatial autocorrelation, suggested significant spatial patterns for only two cancers, lung and prostate, both in males (p Conclusion This paper demonstrates the feasibility and utility of a systematic approach to identifying neighbourhoods, within the area served by a public health unit, that have significantly higher risks of cancer. This exploratory, ecologic study suggests several hypotheses for these spatial patterns that warrant further investigations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Canadian study published in the peer-reviewed literature estimating the risk of relatively rare public health outcomes at a very small areal level, namely dissemination areas.

  4. Consciousness levels one week after admission to a palliative care unit improve survival prediction in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jaw-Shiun; Chen, Chao-Hsien; Wu, Chih-Hsun; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Morita, Tatsuya; Chang, Chin-Hao; Hung, Shou-Hung; Lee, Ya-Ping; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Consciousness is an important factor of survival prediction in advanced cancer patients. However, effects on survival of changes over time in consciousness in advanced cancer patients have not been fully explored. This study evaluated changes in consciousness after admission to a palliative care unit and their correlation with prognosis in terminal cancer patients. This is a prospective observational study. From a palliative care unit in Taiwan, 531 cancer patients (51.8% male) were recruited. Consciousness status was assessed at admission and one week afterwards and recorded as normal or impaired. The mean age was 65.28±13.59 years, and the average survival time was 23.41±37.69 days. Patients with normal consciousness at admission (n=317) had better survival than those with impaired consciousness at admission (n=214): (17.0 days versus 6.0 days, pconsciousness at admission had a higher percentage of survival than the impaired (78.9% versus 44.3%, pconsciousness levels: (1) normal at admission and one week afterwards, (2) impaired at admission but normal one week afterwards, (3) normal at admission but impaired one week afterwards, and (4) impaired both at admission and one week afterwards. The former two groups had significantly better survival than the latter two groups: (median survival counted from day 7 after admission), 25.5, 27.0, 7.0, and 7.0 days, respectively. Consciousness levels one week after admission should be integrated into survival prediction in advanced cancer patients.

  5. Optimization of parameters for cerium(III) biosorption onto biowaste materials of animal and plant origin using 5-level Box-Behnken design:Equilibrium, kinetic, thermodynamic and regeneration studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaya Sre Varsihini C; Devlina Das; Nilanjana Das

    2014-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) employing 5-level Box-Behnken design was used to optimize the biosorption of ce-rium(III) onto biowaste materials of animal and plant origin viz. prawn carapace (PC) and corn style (CS). Various process parame-ters viz. pH (A:3.0-9.0), biomass dosage (B:0.05-0.35 g/L), initial metal concentration (C:50-350 mg/L), contact time (D:2-6 h) and temperature (E:20-60 °C) were chosen for optimization. A log transformation was suggested by the Box-Cox plot in the present case. A low p-value of<0.0001 validated the significance of the model. Maximum Ce(III) uptake of 218.3 mg/g for PC and 180.2 mg/g for CS was noted under optimum conditions. Among the equilibrium isotherms, Freundlich model was found to be the best fit-ted one suggesting a heterogeneous mode of biosorption on PC whereas Langmuir model showed the best fit suggesting homogene-ous mode of cerium biosorption on CS. This was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Kinetic studies showed better applicability of pseudo-first order model suggesting physisorption as phenomena underlying the process. Film-diffusion was suggested by the non-linearity of the Boyd plot. Thermodynamic studies showed that the process was endothermic and spontaneous. FTIR analysis confirmed a major involvement of the participation of amide, amines, ketones and primary alcohol groups during Ce(III) biosorption. EDAX analysis confirmed the major participation of carbon group during Ce(III) biosorption. This was the first report on parameter optimization of Ce(III) biosorption onto biowaste materials using 5-level Box-Behnken experimental design which might be helpful for the recovery of Ce(III) from aqueous environment.

  6. Sustaining a "culture of silence" in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: a grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, S; Ramesh, A; Nagapoornima, M; Fernandes, Lavina M; Jisina, C; Rao, P N Suman; Swarnarekha, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP) during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians). Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to "sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations" (core category). The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The "culture of silence" reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a "noisy culture" prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs with resource constraints.

  7. Scales for evaluating self-perceived anxiety levels in patients admitted to intensive care units: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpiñá-Galvañ, Juana; Richart-Martínez, Miguel

    2009-11-01

    To review studies of anxiety in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit to describe the level of anxiety and synthesize the psychometric properties of the instruments used to measure anxiety. The CUIDEN, IME, ISOC, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PSYCINFO databases for 1995 to 2005 were searched. The search focused on 3 concepts: anxiety, intensive care, and mechanical ventilation for the English-language databases and ansiedad, cuidados intensivos, and ventilación mecánica for the Spanish-language databases. Information was extracted from 18 selected articles on the level of anxiety experienced by patients and the psychometric properties of the instruments used to measure anxiety. Moderate levels of anxiety were reported. Levels were higher in women than in men, and higher in patients undergoing positive pressure ventilation regardless of sex. Most multi-item instruments had high coefficients of internal consistency. The reliability of instruments with only a single item was not demonstrated, even though the instruments had moderate-to-high correlations with other measurements. Midlength scales, such the anxiety subscale of the Brief Symptom Inventory or the shortened state version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory are best for measuring anxiety in critical care patients.

  8. Changes in Disparity in County-Level Diagnosed Diabetes Prevalence and Incidence in the United States, between 2004 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Edward W.; Beckles, Gloria L.; Luman, Elizabeth T.; Barker, Lawrence E.; Geiss, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent decades, the United States experienced increasing prevalence and incidence of diabetes, accompanied by large disparities in county-level diabetes prevalence and incidence. However, whether these disparities are widening, narrowing, or staying the same has not been studied. We examined changes in disparity among U.S. counties in diagnosed diabetes prevalence and incidence between 2004 and 2012. Methods We used 2004 and 2012 county-level diabetes (type 1 and type 2) prevalence and incidence data, along with demographic, socio-economic, and risk factor data from various sources. To determine whether disparities widened or narrowed over the time period, we used a regression-based β-convergence approach, accounting for spatial autocorrelation. We calculated diabetes prevalence/incidence percentage point (ppt) changes between 2004 and 2012 and modeled these changes as a function of baseline diabetes prevalence/incidence in 2004. Covariates included county-level demographic and, socio-economic data, and known type 2 diabetes risk factors (obesity and leisure-time physical inactivity). Results For each county-level ppt increase in diabetes prevalence in 2004 there was an annual average increase of 0.02 ppt (p<0.001) in diabetes prevalence between 2004 and 2012, indicating a widening of disparities. However, after accounting for covariates, diabetes prevalence decreased by an annual average of 0.04 ppt (p<0.001). In contrast, changes in diabetes incidence decreased by an average of 0.04 ppt (unadjusted) and 0.09 ppt (adjusted) for each ppt increase in diabetes incidence in 2004, indicating a narrowing of county-level disparities. Conclusions County-level disparities in diagnosed diabetes prevalence in the United States widened between 2004 and 2012, while disparities in incidence narrowed. Accounting for demographic and, socio-economic characteristics and risk factors for type 2 diabetes narrowed the disparities, suggesting that these factors are

  9. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Villar, Rosangela Correa [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Gilberto de, E-mail: gilberto.castro@usp.br [Department of Clinical Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antequera, Reynaldo [Divisao de Odontologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  10. Continual Decrease in Blood Lead Level in Americans: United States National Health Nutrition and Examination Survey 1999-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Man-Fung; Cheung, Ching-Lung; Cheung, Tommy Tsang; Cheung, Bernard Man Yung

    2016-11-01

    Lead is toxic and affects neurodevelopment in children even at low levels. There has been a long-term effort in the United States to reduce exposure to lead in the environment. We studied the latest US population blood lead levels and analyzed its trend. Blood lead levels in 63,890 participants of the National Health Nutrition and Examination Survey 1999-2014 were analyzed using SPSS Complex Samples v22.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). Mean blood lead levels and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were 1.65 μg/dL (1.62-1.68), 1.44 μg/dL (1.42-1.47), 1.43 μg/dL (1.40-1.45), 1.29 μg/dL (1.27-1.32), 1.27 μg/dL (1.25-1.29), 1.12 μg/dL (1.10-1.14), 0.97 μg/dL (0.95-0.99), and 0.84 μg/dL (0.82-0.86) in 1999-2000, 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006, 2007-2008, 2009-2010, 2011-2012, and 2013-2014, respectively. Blood lead levels decreased significantly (P lead level ≥5 μg/dL were 9.9% (95% CI, 7.5-12.9), 7.4% (95% CI, 5.9-9.4), 5.3% (95% CI, 4.1-6.9), 2.9% (95% CI, 2.1-3.9), 3.1% (95% CI, 2.0-4.8), 2.1% (95% CI, 1.5-3.1), 2.0% (95% CI, 1.0-3.6), and 0.5% (95% CI, 0.3-1.0) in 1999-2000, 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006, 2007-2008, 2009-2010, 2011-2012, and 2013-2014, respectively. The decreasing trend was significant (P lead level was 3.48 μg/dL. Blood lead levels have been decreasing in the US population. The reference level also should decrease. It is still important to monitor blood lead levels in the population, especially among pregnant women and children aged 1 to 5 years. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-impact sampling under an active solid low-level radioactive waste disposal unit using horizontal drilling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, C.V.; Vold, E.L.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the performance of the solid low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal units located on a mesa top at TA-54, Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, and to provide in-situ (vadose zone) site characterization information to Area G`s Performance Assessment. The vadose zone beneath an active disposal unit (DU 37), was accessed by utilizing low-impact, air-rotary horizontal drilling technology. Core samples were pulled, via wire-line core method, in 3 horizontal holes fanning out below DU 37 at approximately 5 foot intervals depending on recovery percentage. Samples were surveyed and prepared in-field following Environmental Restoration (ER) guidelines. Samples were transferred from the field to the CST-9 Radvan for initial radiological screening. Following screening, samples were delivered to CST-3 analytical lab for analyses including moisture content, 23 inorganics, 60 volatile organic compounds (VOC`s), 68 semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC`s), tritium, lead 210, radium 226 & 228, cesium 137, isotopic plutonium, americium 241, strontium 90, isotopic uranium, and isotopic thorium. Other analyses included matric potential, alpha spectroscopy, gamma spectroscopy, and gross alpha/beta. The overall results of the analysis identified only tritium as having migrated from the DU. Am-241, Eu-152, and Pu-238 were possibly identified above background but the results are not definitive. Of all organics analysed for, only ethyl acetate was tentatively identified slightly above background. All inorganics were found to be well below regulatory limits. Based on the results of the above mentioned analyses, it was determined that Area G`s disposal units are performing well and no significant liquid phase migration of contaminants has occurred.

  12. Changes in the frequency and return level of high ozone pollution events over the eastern United States following emission controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, H. E.; Fiore, A. M.; Polvani, L. M.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Fang, Y.

    2013-03-01

    In order to quantify the impact of recent efforts to abate surface ozone (O3) pollution, we analyze changes in the frequency and return level of summertime (JJA) high surface O3 events over the eastern United States (US) from 1988-1998 to 1999-2009. We apply methods from extreme value theory (EVT) to maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3) observed by the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) and define O3 extremes as days on which MDA8 O3 exceeds a threshold of 75 ppb (MDA8 O3>75). Over the eastern US, we find that the number of summer days with MDA8 O3>75 declined on average by about a factor of two from 1988-1998 to 1999-2009. The applied generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) fits the high tail of MDA8 O3 much better than a Gaussian distribution and enables the derivation of probabilistic return levels (describing the probability of exceeding a value x within a time window T) for high O3 pollution events. This new approach confirms the significant decline in both frequency and magnitude of high O3 pollution events over the eastern US during recent years reported in prior studies. Our analysis of 1-yr and 5-yr return levels at each station demonstrates the strong impact of changes in air quality regulations and subsequent control measures (e.g., the ‘NOx SIP Call’), as the 5-yr return levels of the period 1999-2009 correspond roughly to the 1-yr return levels of the earlier time period (1988-1998). Regionally, the return levels dropped between 1988-1998 and 1999-2009 by about 8 ppb in the Mid-Atlantic (MA) and Great Lakes (GL) regions, while the strongest decline, about 13 ppb, is observed in the Northeast (NE) region. Nearly all stations (21 out of 23) have 1-yr return levels well below 100 ppb and 5-yr return levels well below 110 ppb in 1999-2009. Decreases in eastern US O3 pollution are largest after full implementation of the nitrogen oxide (NOx) reductions under the ‘NOx SIP Call’. We conclude that the application of EVT methods

  13. Individuality and adaptation across levels of selection: How shall we name and generalize the unit of Darwinism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay; Lloyd, Elisabeth A.

    1999-01-01

    Two major clarifications have greatly abetted the understanding and fruitful expansion of the theory of natural selection in recent years: the acknowledgment that interactors, not replicators, constitute the causal unit of selection; and the recognition that interactors are Darwinian individuals, and that such individuals exist with potency at several levels of organization (genes, organisms, demes, and species in particular), thus engendering a rich hierarchical theory of selection in contrast with Darwin’s own emphasis on the organismic level. But a piece of the argument has been missing, and individuals at levels distinct from organisms have been denied potency (although granted existence within the undeniable logic of the theory), because they do not achieve individuality with the same devices used by organisms and therefore seem weak by comparison. We show here that different features define Darwinian individuality across scales of size and time. In particular, species-individuals may develop few emergent features as direct adaptations. The interactor approach works with emergent fitnesses, not with emergent features; and species, as a consequence of their different mechanism for achieving individuality (reproductive exclusivity among subparts, that is, among organisms), express many effects from other levels. Organisms, by contrast, suppress upwardly cascading effects, because the organismic style of individuality (by functional integration of subparts) does not permit much competition or differential reproduction of parts from within. Species do not suppress the operation of lower levels; such effects therefore become available as exaptations conferring emergent fitness—a primary source of the different strength that species achieve as effective Darwinian individuals in evolution. PMID:10518549

  14. A Case Study of the Librarian-Initiated Publications Discovery Activities in State Level Digital Depositories in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Shiou Lin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the novel phenomenon of librarian-initiated publications discovery (LIPD in state-level digital depositories in the United States. LIPD is a series of actions taken by digital depository librarians to discover and inspect government Web sites and select Web content qualifying as government publications for inclusion in the state depositories. In a current popular model in which states employ OCLC Digital Archive™ for the depositories, the power of content selection has shifted from government agencies (content producers to digital depositories. This study systematically documented and compared the LIPD actions in four case states and developed a LIPD process model for descriptive and analytic purposes. It also discusses the impacts and challenges facing the changing practices in preserving government information as historical record. [Article content in Chinese

  15. The United Nations High Level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases: a missed opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Kavita; Parker, Richard G

    2012-11-01

    The United Nations High Level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases (September 19-20, 2011) provided an opportunity to recast the current global health agenda and offered a formidable platform to mobilize political will for concerted action. We argue that the opportunity was missed because the World Health Organization (WHO) neglected the politics of process that are key to mobilizing political support for global noncommunicable disease policies. Instead, it focused on the implementation process. The lessons to be drawn from the summit are critical because the WHO is the key agency that will be expected in the near future to steer further discussions and debate on the noncommunicable disease agenda.

  16. Determining the Probability of Violating Upper-Level Wind Constraints for the Launch of Minuteman III Ballistic Missiles at Vandenberg Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Brock, Tyler M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman Ill ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum wind shear datasets and applied this information when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition, the AMU included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on the day of launch. The AMU developed an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Applications. The GUI displays the critical sounding data easily and quickly for LWOs on day of launch. This tool will replace the existing one used by the 30 OSSWF, assist the LWOs in determining the probability of exceeding specific wind threshold values, and help to improve the overall upper winds forecast for

  17. Neonatal Outcomes of Rh-Negative Pregnancies in a Tertiary Level Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Rhesus incompatibility is a preventable cause for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, hydrops fetalis and still births. The prevalence of the Rh-negative blood group among Indian woman varies from 2% - 10%. Despite declining the incidence of Rhesus incompatibility, due to availability of anti-D immunoglobulin, and improved antenatal care of the Rh-negative pregnant woman, it still accounts for a significant proportion of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and neuro-morbidity. The prevalence of Rh-negative women having Rh-positive neonates is 60%. Objectives This study aimed to estimate the incidence of Rh iso-immunization and evaluate the outcomes of Rh iso-immunized neonates. Methods This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary level neonatal intensive care unit, Princess Esra hospital, Deccan college of medical sciences, Hyderabad, Telangana, India. Consecutive intramural and extramural neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit with the Rh-negative mother’s blood group and hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled. Neonates born to Rh+ve mothers were excluded. Neonatal gestational age, birth weight, age at admission, duration of phototherapy, duration of hospitalization, neonatal examination and investigations were recorded in a predesigned, pretested performa. Results A total of 90 neonates were born to Rh-negative mothers, of which 70% (63 had the Rh-positive blood group and 30% had the Rh-negative blood group. Of these 63 neonates, 48 (76.2% had hyperbilirubinemia and 43 neonates (68.3% had significant hyperbilirubinemia (total serum bilirubin > 15mg/dL. Among them, 2%, 75% and 23% were born to primi, multi and grandmutli, respectively. Also, 14.5% of the neonates were large for dates (LFD, 75% appropriate for dates (AFD and 10.5% were small for dates (SFD. Premature and SFD neonates had higher incidence of hyperbilirubinemia. Significantly higher incidence of jaundice occurred within 72 hours of life. The mean

  18. Nursing unit teams matter: Impact of unit-level nurse practice environment, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, and quality of care, and patient adverse events--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Timmermans, Olaf; Weeks, Susan Mace; van Heusden, Danny; Wouters, Kristien; Franck, Erik

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the impact of nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events variables at the nursing unit level. Nurse practice environment studies show growing insights and knowledge about determining factors for nurse workforce stability, quality of care, and patient safety. Until now, international studies have primarily focused on variability at the hospital level; however, insights at the nursing unit level can reveal key factors in the nurse practice environment. A cross-sectional design with a survey. In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 1108 nurses assigned to 96 nursing units completed a structured questionnaire composed of various validated instruments measuring nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout, nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events. Associations between the variables were examined using multilevel modelling techniques. Various unit-level associations (simple models) were identified between nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout dimensions, and nurse reported outcome variables. Multiple multilevel models showed various independent variables such as nursing management at the unit level, social capital, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization as important predictors of nurse reported outcome variables such job satisfaction, turnover intentions, quality of care (at the unit, the last shift, and in the hospital within the last year), patient and family complaints, patient and family verbal abuse, patient falls, nosocomial infections, and medications errors. Results suggested a stable nurse work force, with the capability to achieve superior quality and patient safety outcomes, is associated with unit-level favourable perceptions of nurse work environment factors, workload, decision latitude, and social capital, as well low levels of burnout

  19. Children born extremely preterm show significant lower cognitive, language and motor function levels compared with children born at term, as measured by the Bayley-III at 2.5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, J; Stjernqvist, K

    2014-05-01

    To assess developmental outcomes of children aged 2.5 years born extremely preterm. As a part of the population-based Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study (EXPRESS), 399 children born before 27 weeks of gestation and 366 control children born at term were assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition (Bayley-III), assigning scores for cognition, receptive and expressive communication, fine and gross motor functions. Based on control group means, prevalences of developmental delay in the preterm group were calculated. Mean score differences between subtests constituting the overall Bayley-III indices were analysed within both groups. After controlling for socio-demographic, child and assessment variables, analyses showed significantly lower performances of the preterm group compared with the control group on the Bayley-III subtests. Prevalence of moderate-severe delay was 10.8% in cognitive, 14.9% in receptive communication, 14.5% in expressive communication, 12.4% in fine motor and 7.0% in gross motor functions. Significant differences between performances on subtests included in the same indices were detected. Extremely preterm children show significant lower cognitive, communicative and motor function levels at 2.5 years compared with children born at term. Bayley-III assessments permit the acquisition of nuanced information about development following extreme prematurity. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Characteristics of neonatal units that care for very preterm infants in Europe: results from the MOSAIC study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Reempts, Patrick; Gortner, Ludwig; Milligan, David

    2007-01-01

    intensive care beds. Level II units were less specialized, but some provided mechanical ventilation (57%) or high-frequency ventilation (20%) or had neonatal surgery facilities (17%). Sixty-nine percent of level III and 36% of level I or II units had continuous medical coverage by a qualified pediatrician...

  1. The WRF Model Forecast-Derived Low-Level Wind Shear Climatology over the United States Great Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanta Basu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available For wind resource assessment projects, it is common practice to use a power-law relationship (U(z ~ zα and a fixed shear exponent (α = 1=7 to extrapolate the observed wind speed from a low measurement level to high turbine hub-heights. However, recent studies using tall-tower observations have found that the annual average shear exponents at several locations over the United States Great Plains (USGP are significantly higher than 1=7. These findings highlight the critical need for detailed spatio-temporal characterizations of wind shear climatology over the USGP, where numerous large wind farms will be constructed in the foreseeable future. In this paper, a new generation numerical weather prediction model—the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model, a fast and relatively inexpensive alternative to time-consuming and costly tall-tower projects, is utilized to determine whether it can reliably estimate the shear exponent and the magnitude of the directional shear at any arbitrary location over the USGP. Our results indicate that the WRF model qualitatively captures several low-level wind shear characteristics. However, there is definitely room for physics parameterization improvements for the WRF model to reliably represent the lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  2. Muscle-tendon units localization and activation level analysis based on high-density surface EMG array and NMF algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengjun; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Shuai; Zhang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Some skeletal muscles can be subdivided into smaller segments called muscle-tendon units (MTUs). The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework to locate the active region of the corresponding MTUs within a single skeletal muscle and to analyze the activation level varieties of different MTUs during a dynamic motion task. Approach. Biceps brachii and gastrocnemius were selected as targeted muscles and three dynamic motion tasks were designed and studied. Eight healthy male subjects participated in the data collection experiments, and 128-channel surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals were collected with a high-density sEMG electrode grid (a grid consists of 8 rows and 16 columns). Then the sEMG envelopes matrix was factorized into a matrix of weighting vectors and a matrix of time-varying coefficients by nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm. Main results. The experimental results demonstrated that the weightings vectors, which represent invariant pattern of muscle activity across all channels, could be used to estimate the location of MTUs and the time-varying coefficients could be used to depict the variation of MTUs activation level during dynamic motion task. Significance. The proposed method provides one way to analyze in-depth the functional state of MTUs during dynamic tasks and thus can be employed on multiple noteworthy sEMG-based applications such as muscle force estimation, muscle fatigue research and the control of myoelectric prostheses. This work was supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China under Grant 61431017 and 61271138.

  3. Hospital and unit characteristics associated with nursing turnover include skill mix but not staffing level: an observational cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggs, Vincent S; Dunton, Nancy

    2012-09-01

    Nursing turnover is expensive and may have adverse effects on patient care. Little is known about turnover's association with most hospital and nursing unit characteristics, including nurse staffing level and registered nurse skill mix. To explore associations between nursing unit turnover rates and several hospital- and unit-level variables, including staffing level and skill mix. Observational cross-sectional study of longitudinal data. 1884 nursing units in 306 U.S. acute care hospitals. During a 2-year period units reported monthly data on staffing and turnover. Total nursing staff turnover and registered nurse turnover rates were modeled as dependent variables in hierarchical Poisson regression models. The following hospital characteristics were considered as predictors: Magnet(®) status, ownership (government or non-government), teaching status, locale (metropolitan, micropolitan, or rural), and size (average daily census). The U.S. state in which the hospital was located was included as a covariate. Unit-level variables included total nursing hours per patient day, size of nursing staff, registered nurse skill mix, population age group (neonatal, pediatric, or adult), and service line (critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, medical/surgical, psychiatric, or rehabilitation). Government ownership, Magnet designation, and higher skill mix were associated with lower total turnover and registered nurse turnover. Neonatal units had lower total and registered nurse turnover than pediatric units, which had lower total and registered nurse turnover than adult units. Unit service line was associated only with total turnover. Psychiatric, critical care, and rehabilitation units had the lowest mean turnover rates, but most differences between service lines were not significant. The other explanatory variables considered were not significant. Several hospital and unit characteristic variables have significant associations with nursing turnover; these associations

  4. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoako AO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adae O Amoako,1 Agyenim B Amoako,2 George GA Pujalte3 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3Sports Medicine, Divisions of Primary Care, and Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Waycross, GA, USA Background and objective: Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results: Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7% compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8% respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively. Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort

  5. Tomo III

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Memorias, histórico, físicas, crítico, apologéticas de la América Meridional con unas breves advertencias y noticias útiles, a los que de orden de Su Majestad, hubiesen de viajar y describir aquellas vastas regiones. Reino Animal. Tomo III. Por un anónimo americano en Cádiz por los años de 1757. Primera Parte Prólogo Artículo 1°De los cuadrúpedos útiles al hombre a varios usos y a su sustento. Vaca Caballos Carneros de la tierra, especie de camellos Vicuña Guanacos Puercos monteses Artículo 2...

  6. Cross (Unit)-Level Effects of Cohesion on Relationships of Suicide Thoughts to Combat Exposure, Postdeployment Stressors, and Postdeployment Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James

    2015-01-01

    A behavioral health concern for the US military has been suicide, largely due to its increased prevalence in the last several years during US involvement in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), the present study examined relationships among combat exposure, postdeployment stressors, social support, and unit cohesion. Survey data were obtained from 4,567 soldiers who were members of 50 company-sized units. At the individual level, combat exposure and postdeployment stressors were associated with suicidal thoughts. Postdeployment social support was associated with fewer suicidal thoughts. There was no evidence of the stress-buffering effect of social support. At the group level, reduced risk for suicidal thoughts was associated with units having higher than average cohesion. Reduced risk for suicidal thoughts in conjunction with combat experiences was observed in units having higher than average cohesion, though not reaching a traditional level of statistical significance.

  7. A study to evaluate the levels of dioxin-like compounds in dairy feeds in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorber, M.; Ferrario, J.; Byrne, C. [United States Environmental Protection Agency, WA, DC (United States); Greene, C.; Cyrus, A. [Versar, Inc., Springfield, VA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The primary route for general population exposure to dioxin-like compounds is through the consumption of animal fats, with bovine-derived meat, milk and dairy products comprising over 50% of total exposure in the United States. The primary route of exposure hypothesized for cattle is airborne deposition of dioxins onto the leaves of feed crops. Over the last few years additional pathways of exposure have been identified associated with contaminated feed additives such as ball clay, mineral supplements, and animal byproducts. Studies by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have shown that incidental contact with pentachlorophenol (PCP)-treated wood by cattle have resulted in elevated tissue levels. Although the air-to-leaf pathway is still considered by most researchers to be the dominant pathway of exposure, the lack of any systematic examination of animal feeds to quantify the contribution of the air-to-leaf pathway has been a major gap in our empirical understanding of dioxin exposure. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in cooperation with USDA and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), has undertaken a program to study the presence of dioxin-like compounds in animal feeds. Two phases of this program have been completed, and this paper reports on the third phase. The first phase was a study on the mass balance of dioxins in lactating cows. The objective of that study was to quantify the role feeds play in total dairy cow exposure. The second phase of the program involved the collection and measurement of dioxins in minor feed components. Dioxins in specific targeted animal feed components of interest, including animal byproducts (beef, pork, poultry by-products, fish meal) and plant byproducts (deodorizer distillates from corn, soybean, peanut, cottonseed, and canola processers; cane and beet molasses), were measured. The third phase of the project, reported here, involved component sampling of dairy feeds around the US.

  8. Evaluating County-Level Heat Vulnerability and Social Inequity in the United States through Climate and Socioeconomic Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, C.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change will have many impacts on human health, perhaps most directly through extreme heat. High temperature and humidity combinations inhibit the body's ability to cool through physiological responses such as sweating. In conjunction with extended periods of extreme heat and shifted seasonality, these conditions are particularly dangerous. Current research and literature can be used to show where dangerous heat and humidity conditions are likely to be most prevalent, or where populations vulnerable to heat stress reside. To provide a better assessment of overall heat vulnerability, however, many complex factors, such as relative changes in temperature patterns or local socioeconomic conditions, must also be considered. Here, we utilize a multivariate approach to establish county-level risk scores by combining the most relevant indicators for heat vulnerability with climate model projections of wet bulb globe temperature, a metric useful for understanding how the human body will respond to conditions of high heat and humidity. We present our findings as an ESRI ArcOnline Story Map with data aggregated at the county-level in the continental United States. This format allows users to access maps showing each county's score in four categories related to heat vulnerability: heat and humidity hazards, population vulnerability, medical access, and physical infrastructure. A final map showcases a composite heat vulnerability score for each county, with comparisons to state and national averages. Our tool, part of the White House's Climate Data Initiative, is presented as a series of maps with a normalized scoring system to provide clear and easy access to the indicators most relevant to evaluating heat vulnerability at a local level. Ultimately, this readily available tool with general indices helps community decision makers communicate heat vulnerability and identify which resilience factors are most critical to improving local resilience.

  9. Nano-level monitoring of Er(III) by fabrication of coated graphite electrode based on newly synthesized Schiff base as neutral carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Koteswara Rao; Upadhyay, Anjali; Singh, Ashok K; Jain, A K

    2016-05-01

    Plasticized membranes using N-(-3-((thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)benzylidene)thiazol-2-amine (S1) and 5-((-3-((5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)benzylidene)amino)-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol (S2) have been prepared and explored as Er (III) selective electrodes. Effect of various plasticizers viz. dibutylphthalate, tri-n-butylphosphate, dioctylphthalate, acetophenone, 1-chloronapthalene, o-nitrophenyloctylether, and anion excluders viz. sodium tetraphenylborate and potassium tetrakis-p-(chlorophenyl)borate was studied in detail and improved performance was observed. Optimum performance was observed for the membrane electrode having a composition of S2: PVC: o-NPOE: KTpClPB in the ratio of 4: 38: 55: 3 (w/w, mg). The performance of the PME based on S2 was compared with CGE. The electrodes exhibit Nernstian slope for Er (III) ion with detection limit 5.4 × 10(-8)mol L(-1) for PME and 6.1 × 10(-9)mol L(-1) for CGE. The response time for PME and CGE was found to be 12s and 9s respectively. The practical utility of the CGE has been demonstrated by its usage as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of EDTA with Er (III) solution and determination of fluoride ions in mouthwash solution. The proposed electrode was also applied to the determination of added Er(3+) ion in water and binary mixtures. It is found that the electrode could be able to recover the Er(3+) ion in 96.2-99.5%.

  10. Antithrombin III and the nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, K A; Stoffersen, E

    1979-05-01

    Plasma and urinary antithrombin III (AT-III) was measured in 15 cases of nephrotic syndrome. Plasma AT-III correlated well with serum albumin, but poorly with proteinuria, whereas urinary AT-III correlated well to proteinuria. The plasma AT-III level had a mean similar to 25 healthy controls, but the range was significantly wider. A case with nephrotic syndrome and left renal vein thrombosis is reported. The urinary output of AT-III rose and the plasma level fell with the activity of the disease. Although AT-III and albumin have similar molecule weight, their renal clearance was found to be different. It is suggested that urinary loss of AT-III plays a role in the hypercoagulable state sometimes found in the nephrotic syndrome.

  11. County-level estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus from commercial fertilizer for the Conterminous United States, 1987–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronberg, Jo Ann M.; Spahr, Norman E.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Assessment program requires nutrient input for analysis of the national and regional assessment of water quality. Detailed information on nutrient inputs to the environment are needed to understand and address the many serious problems that arise from excess nutrients in the streams and groundwater of the Nation. This report updates estimated county-level farm and nonfarm nitrogen and phosphorus input from commercial fertilizer sales for the conterminous United States for 1987 through 2006. Estimates were calculated from the Association of American Plant Food Control Officials fertilizer sales data, Census of Agriculture fertilizer expenditures, and U.S. Census Bureau county population. A previous national approach for deriving farm and nonfarm fertilizer nutrient estimates was evaluated, and a revised method for selecting representative states to calculate national farm and nonfarm proportions was developed. A national approach was used to estimate farm and nonfarm fertilizer inputs because not all states distinguish between farm and nonfarm use, and the quality of fertilizer reporting varies from year to year. For states that distinguish between farm and nonfarm use, the spatial distribution of the ratios of nonfarm-to-total fertilizer estimates for nitrogen and phosphorus calculated using the national-based farm and nonfarm proportions were similar to the spatial distribution of the ratios generated using state-based farm and nonfarm proportions. In addition, the relative highs and lows in the temporal distribution of farm and nonfarm nitrogen and phosphorus input at the state level were maintained—the periods of high and low usage coincide between national- and state-based values. With a few exceptions, nonfarm nitrogen estimates were found to be reasonable when compared to the amounts that would result if the lawn application rates recommended by state and university agricultural agencies were used. Also

  12. Construct validity test of evaluation tool for professional behaviors of entry-level occupational therapy students in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon K. Yuen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to test the construct validity of an instrument to measure student professional behaviors in entry-level occupational therapy (OT students in the academic setting. Methods: A total of 718 students from 37 OT programs across the United States answered a self-assessment survey of professional behavior that we developed. The survey consisted of ranking 28 attributes, each on a 5-point Likert scale. A split-sample approach was used for exploratory and then confirmatory factor analysis. Results: A three-factor solution with nine items was extracted using exploratory factor analysis [EFA] (n=430, 60%. The factors were ‘Commitment to Learning’ (2 items, ‘Skills for Learning’ (4 items, and ‘Cultural Competence’ (3 items. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA on the validation split (n=288, 40% indicated fair fit for this three-factor model (fit indices: CFI=0.96, RMSEA=0.06, and SRMR=0.05. Internal consistency reliability estimates of each factor and the instrument ranged from 0.63 to 0.79. Conclusion: Results of the CFA in a separate validation dataset provided robust measures of goodness-of-fit for the three-factor solution developed in the EFA, and indicated that the three-factor model fitted the data well enough. Therefore, we can conclude that this student professional behavior evaluation instrument is a structurally validated tool to measure professional behaviors reported by entry-level OT students. The internal consistency reliability of each individual factor and the whole instrument was considered to be adequate to good.

  13. Effect of Teaching Protein Synthesis Unit Based On Multiple Intelligence Theory, To the Student Level of Retaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet HASENEKOĞLU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Protein Synthesis Unit was presented through Multiple Intelligence Theory based activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate Multiple Intelligence Theory’s impacts on student’s retention of knowledge acquired about Protein Synthesis. This research was conducted with Sophomores from Primary Science Education Department in Kafkas University Faculty of Education and lasted three weeks in the spring term of 2007–2008 academic year. In this study, within context of quasi-experimental method, which is based on impartially selected groups, nonequivalent control groups pretest-posttest method was used. Two classes from Primary Science Education Department were randomly selected. While the traditionalapproach was used in the control group, the teaching activities based on Multiple Intelligences Theory were used in the experimental group. The Protein Syntheses achievement test which had an reliability coefficient Cronbach Alpha of 0,8 prepared by the researcher were used to collect data.The data obtained, t test and A nova test was evaluated by using SPSS 12.0 package program. As a result of research was found that teaching based on Multiple Intelligence has been more effective in increasing student’s achievement and their levels of retention compared to teaching based on Traditional Approach.

  14. The Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning Methods on 7th Level “The Structure of Matter and Properties” Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin KOÇ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research are to determine the effectiveness of Student Teams-Achievement Division (STAD and Reading-Writing-Application (RWA methods of cooperative learning model on academic achievement at the unit of 7th Level “The Structure of Matter and Properties” and students’ views related to methods. The sample of this research are 102 students from two different secondary school in Ağrı. As data collecting tools, Pre-Knowledge Test (PKT, Academic Achievement Test (AAT and Scale Methods Views (SMV is used. For the analysis of the obtained data, one-way variance analysis (ANOVA was used for pre- test and analysis covariance (ANCOVA for academic achievement test because of significant differences in the groups’ pre- test. Descriptive statistics for students’ views about methods are used. It was found that RWA and STAD have similar effects on students’ academic achievement and students instructed with these techniques are more successful than students instructed with teacher centered instruction.

  15. County-level estimates of nutrient inputs to the landsurface of the conterminous United States, 1982-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Barbara C.; Lorenz, David L.; Mueller, David K.

    2006-01-01

    Nutrient input data for fertilizer use, livestock manure, and atmospheric deposition from various sources were estimated and allocated to counties in the conterminous United States for the years 1982 through 2001. These nationally consistent nutrient input data are needed by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program for investigations of stream- and ground-water quality. For nitrogen, the largest source was farm fertilizer; for phosphorus, the largest sources were farm fertilizer and livestock manure. Nutrient inputs from fertilizer use in nonfarm areas, while locally important, were an order of magnitude smaller than inputs from other sources. Nutrient inputs from all sources increased between 1987 and 1997, but the relative proportions of nutrients from each source were constant. Farm-fertilizer inputs were highest in the upper Midwest, along eastern coastal areas, and in irrigated areas of the West. Nonfarm-fertilizer use was similar in major metropolitan areas throughout the Nation, but was more extensive in the more populated Eastern and Central States and in California. Areas of greater manure inputs were located throughout the South-central and Southeastern States and in scattered areas of the West. Nitrogen deposition from the atmosphere generally increased from west to east and is related to the location of major sources and the effects of precipitation and prevailing winds. These nutrient-loading data at the county level are expected to be the fundamental basis for national and regional assessments of water quality for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program and other large-scale programs.

  16. National- and state-level impact and cost-effectiveness of nonavalent HPV vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, David P; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L; Skrip, Laura A; Jones, Forrest K; Bauch, Chris T; Galvani, Alison P

    2016-05-03

    Every year in the United States more than 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, a disease principally caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines protect against 66% of HPV-associated cervical cancers, and a new nonavalent vaccine protects against an additional 15% of cervical cancers. However, vaccination policy varies across states, and migration between states interdependently dilutes state-specific vaccination policies. To quantify the economic and epidemiological impacts of switching to the nonavalent vaccine both for individual states and for the nation as a whole, we developed a model of HPV transmission and cervical cancer incidence that incorporates state-specific demographic dynamics, sexual behavior, and migratory patterns. At the national level, the nonavalent vaccine was shown to be cost-effective compared with the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines at any coverage despite the greater per-dose cost of the new vaccine. Furthermore, the nonavalent vaccine remains cost-effective with up to an additional 40% coverage of the adolescent population, representing 80% of girls and 62% of boys. We find that expansion of coverage would have the greatest health impact in states with the lowest coverage because of the decreasing marginal returns of herd immunity. Our results show that if policies promoting nonavalent vaccine implementation and expansion of coverage are coordinated across multiple states, all states benefit both in health and in economic terms.

  17. Sales of Forestry-Related Specialty License Plates in the Southern United States: A County Level Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun M. Tanger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, specialty license plates have become an increasingly popular way to raise awareness and show support for a myriad of issues with which the plate is linked. Several states and various organizations that provide forestry education have developed forestry license plates. Vehicle owners can purchase the plates to show their support towards forestry by buying the forestry license plates, which generates revenue for the provider organization. Using county-level data from five states in the Southeastern United States, a statistical model was developed to examine explanatory factors of forestry-based specialty license plate sales in 2014. Using linear count regression modeling, we observed that the significant predictor variables of plate sales were income per capita, population density, the percentage of acres that are forested in the county, acres of forest in the county that are privately owned, percentage of people who are 65 or older, and presence of the forest industry in the county. Plate sales were positively correlated with the presence of the forest industry in the county.

  18. Cardiovascular Diseases on the Global Agenda: The United Nations High Level Meeting, Sustainable Development Goals, and the Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Johanna; Reddy, K Srinath; Fuster, Valentin; Narula, Jagat

    2016-12-01

    In 2011, the United Nations (UN) organized the first ever meeting for heads of state to discuss the problem of noncommunicable diseases (NCD), including cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, chronic respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus. Recognizing that these had emerged as leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, including in many low- and middle-income countries, advocates from government and civil society had called for increased attention and a UN response. Earlier, NCD including CVD were absent from the global health agenda in part because of their omission from the Millennium Development Goals. The UN meeting and the global advocacy response offered a game-changing opportunity to redress this omission. The World Heart Federation (WHF) played an instrumental role in the UN meeting and follow up, including inclusion of CVD in the Sustainable Development Goals. The next phase of the global CVD movement is expected through national action, including CVD roadmaps and partnering with the World Health Organization. The WHF is heavily committed to these goals and the other nongovernmental organizations invested in the mission must help take this historical mandate forward. Instrumental to this will be the engagement of people affected by or at risk of developing CVD, to draw more attention and resources to NCD and to ensure that successes to date in global policy translate into action at the national level.

  19. Phraseological units in Italian textbooks: an analysis of Italian textbooks ranked by the levels of language proficiency of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daša Stanič

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the treatment given to phraseological units in the teaching/learning of Italian as a foreign language. For this purpose, some textbooks of Italian based on the CEFR were analysed to determine when, how and in what contexts phraseological units are introduced and studied, and to determine to what extent the selected textbooks represent an effective support in the process of teaching/learning Italian as a foreign language. Because of their characteristics, phraseological units represent a stumbling-block for non-native speakers, especially if their L1 is not one of the Romance Languages. Until the advent of the communicative approach – but also later – phraseology received only little attention in the teaching and learning of foreign languages; it was assumed that a student would develop a phraseological competence through imitation, and it seemed that phraseological units were to be treated only at higher levels of language proficiency. On the contrary, as many recent studies convincingly suggest, phraseological units should be systematically and explicitly taught/learnt from  level A1 on.  In the CEFR phraseological units are presented as an important element of lexical competence, while they are mostly neglected in the level descriptors. This approach seems to leave no objective criteria for textbook authors who consider whether and how to incorporate phraseology in their textbooks.

  20. Effects of Selection and Training on Unit-Level Performance over Time: A Latent Growth Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H.; Ferris, Gerald R.; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Perryman, Alexa A.; Blass, Fred R.; Heetderks, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly few data exist concerning whether and how utilization of job-related selection and training procedures affects different aspects of unit or organizational performance over time. The authors used longitudinal data from a large fast-food organization (N = 861 units) to examine how change in use of selection and training relates to…

  1. Efficacy of a multimodal intervention strategy in improving hand hygiene compliance in a tertiary level intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu S Mathai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The role of hand hygiene in preventing health care associated infections (HCAIs has been clearly established. However, compliance rates remain poor among health care personnel. Aims: a To investigate the health care workers′ hand hygiene compliance rates in the intensive care unit (ICU, b to assess reasons for non-compliance and c to study the efficacy of a multimodal intervention strategy at improving compliance. Settings: A mixed medical-surgical ICU of a tertiary level hospital. Design: A before-after prospective, observational, intervention study. Materials and Methods: All health care personnel who came in contact with patients in the ICU were observed for their hand hygiene compliance before and after a multimodal intervention strategy (education, posters, verbal reminders and easy availability of products. A self-report questionnaire was also circulated to assess perceptions regarding compliance. Statistical analysis was done using c2 test or Fisher exact test (Epi info software. Results: Hand hygiene compliance among medical personnel working in the ICU was 26% and the most common reason cited for non-compliance was lack of time (37%. The overall compliance improved significantly following the intervention to 57.36% (P<0.000. All health care worker groups showed significant improvements: staff nurses (21.48-61.59%, P<0.0000, nursing students (9.86-33.33%, P<0.0000, resident trainees (21.62-60.71%, P<0.0000, visiting consultants (22-57.14%, P=0.0001, physiotherapists (70-75.95%, P=0.413 and paramedical staff (10.71-55.45%, P< 0.0000. Conclusions: Hand hygiene compliance among health care workers in the ICU is poor; however, intervention strategies, such as the one used, can be useful in improving the compliance rates significantly.

  2. Polymer light-emitting diodes based on cationic iridium(III) complexes with a 1,10-phenanthroline derivative containing a bipolar carbazole-oxadiazole unit as the auxiliary ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huaijun; Wei, Liying; Meng, Guoyun; Li, Yanhu; Wang, Guanze; Yang, Furui; Wu, Hongbin; Yang, Wei; Cao, Yong

    2014-11-01

    A 1,10-phenanthroline derivative (co-phen) containing a bipolar carbazole-oxadiazole unit was synthesized and used as the auxiliary ligand in cationic iridium(III) complexes [(ppy)2Ir(co-phen)]PF6 (ppy: 2-phenylpyridine) and [(npy)2Ir(co-phen)]PF6 (npy: 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)pyridine). Two complexes have high thermal stability with the glass-transition temperatures (Tg) of 207 °C and 241 °C, and the same 5% weight-reduction temperatures (ΔT5%) of 402 °C. Both of them were used as phosphorescent dopants in solution-processed polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs): ITO/PEDOT: PSS/PVK: PBD: complex (mass ratios 100: 40: x, x = 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0)/CsF/Al. The maximum luminances of the PLEDs using [(ppy)2Ir(co-phen)]PF6 and [(npy)2Ir(co-phen)]PF6 were 12567 cd m-2 and 11032 cd m-2, the maximum luminance efficiencies were 17.3 cd A-1 and 20.4 cd A-1, the maximum power efficiencies were 9.8 lm W-1 and 10.3 lm W-1, and the maximum external quantum efficiencies were 9.3% and 11.4% respectively. The CIE color coordinates were around (0.37, 0.57) and (0.44, 0.54) respectively, corresponding to the yellow green region.

  3. The management in the sphere of physical culture and sport at the level of administrative and territorial units: traditions and innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Savchenko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze the activity of subjects of management in the sphere of physical culture and sport at the level of territorial administrative units. Material & Methods: the legal analysis of a feature of management in the sphere of physical culture and sport of administrative and territorial units of the various level. Results: the main activities of administrative structures of the governmental authorities and the local governments are allocated. Conclusions: it is revealed that the sphere of physical culture and sport needs the improvement in the conditions of decentralization, offers on its reforming are considered.

  4. Automatic chemical monitoring in the composition of functions performed by the unit level control system in the new projects of nuclear power plant units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, L. G.; Khrennikov, N. N.

    2014-08-01

    The article presents information on the state of regulatory framework and development of a subsystem for automated chemical monitoring of water chemistries in the primary and secondary coolant circuits used as part of the automatic process control system in new projects of VVER reactor-based nuclear power plant units. For the strategy of developing and putting in use the water chemistry-related part of the automated process control system within the standard AES-2006 nuclear power plant project to be implemented, it is necessary to develop regulatory documents dealing with certain requirements imposed on automatic water chemistry monitoring systems in accordance with the requirements of federal codes and regulations in the field of using atomic energy.

  5. Geologic and hydrologic considerations for various concepts of high-level radioactive waste disposal in conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekren, E.B.; Dinwiddie, G.A.; Mytton, J.W.; Thordarson, William; Weir, J.E.; Hinrichs, E.N.; Schroder, L.J.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate and identify which geohydrologic environments in conterminous United States are best suited for various concepts or methods of underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and to establish geologic and hydrologic criteria that are pertinent to high-level waste disposal. The unproven methods of disposal include (1) a very deep drill hole (30,000-50,000 ft or 9,140-15,240 m), (2) a matrix of (an array of multiple) drill holes (1,000-20,000 ft or 305-6,100 m), (3) a mined chamber (1,000-10,000 ft or 305-3,050 m), (4) a cavity with separate manmade structures (1,000-10,000 ft or 305-3,050 m), and (5) an exploded cavity (2,000-20,000 ft or 610-6,100 m) o The geohydrologic investigation is made on the presumption that the concepts or methods of disposal are technically feasible. Field and laboratory experiments in the future may demonstrate whether or not any of the methods are practical and safe. All the conclusions drawn are tentative pending experimental confirmation. The investigation focuses principally on the geohydrologic possibilities of several methods of disposal in rocks other than salt. Disposal in mined chambers in salt is currently under field investigation, and this disposal method has been intensely investigated and evaluated by various workers under the sponsorship of the Atomic Energy Commission. Of the various geohydrologic factors that must be considered in the selection of optimum waste-disposal sites, the most important is hydrologic isolation to assure that the wastes will be safely contained within a small radius of the emplacement zone. To achieve this degree of hydrologic isolation, the host rock for the wastes must have very low permeability and the site must be virtually free of faults. In addition, the locality should be in (1) an area of low seismic risk where the possibility of large earthquakes rupturing the emplacement zone is very low, (2) where the possibility- of flooding by

  6. County-Level Estimates of Nitrogen and Phosphorus from Animal Manure for the Conterminous United States, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of county estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus in kilograms from animal manure in the conterminous United States for 2002. These estimates...

  7. Exercise and limitations in physical activity levels among new dialysis patients in the United States: an epidemiologic study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2008-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies of physical activity among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are lacking. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of physical activity among new dialysis patients in the United States.

  8. Full-cost determination of different levels of care in the intensive care unit. An activity-based costing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J J; Casciano, J P; Arikian, S R; Mauskopf, J; Paul, J E

    1996-10-01

    We applied an activity-based costing methodology to determine the full cost of intensive care service at a community hospital, a university hospital and a health maintenance organisation (HMO)-affiliated hospital. A total of 5 patient care units were analysed: the intensive care unit (ICU) and surgical ICU (SICU) at the university setting, the ICU at the community setting, and the SICU and cardiac care unit at the HMO setting. The selection of the different ICU types was based on the types of critical care units that were found in each setting (e.g. the HMO did not have an ICU). Institution-specific cost data and clinical management parameters were collected through surveys and site visits from the 3 respective organisation types. The analysis revealed a marked increase in patient-minute cost associated with mechanical ventilation. Higher costs associated with prolonged neuromuscular blockade have important economic implications with respect to selection of an appropriate neuromuscular blocking agent.

  9. Synthesis and spectral investigations of a new dyad with spiropyran and fluorescein units: toward information processing at the single molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuefeng; Zhang, Deqing; Zhou, Yucheng; Zhu, Daoben

    2003-07-11

    A new dyad 1 with two spiropyran units as the photochromic acceptors and one fluorescein unit as the fluorescent donor was synthesized and characterized. External inputs (ultraviolet light, visible light, and proton) induce the reversible changes of the structure and, concomitantly, the absorption spectrum of dyad 1 due to the presence of two spiropyran units. Only the absorption spectrum of the ME form of the spiropyran units in dyad 1 has large spectral overlap with the fluorescence spectrum of the fluorescein unit. Thus, the fluorescence intensity of dyad 1 is modulated by reversible conversion among the three states of the photochromic spiropyran units and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the ME form and the fluorescein unit. Based on the fact that dyad 1 could "read out" three external input signals (ultraviolet light, visible ligh,t and proton) and "write" a compatible specific output signal (fluorescence intensity), dyad 1 described here can be considered to perform an integrated circuit function with one OR and one AND interconnected logic gates. The present results demonstrate an efficient strategy for elaborating and transmitting information at the single molecular level.

  10. Quantitative Detection of Hepatitis A Virus and Enteroviruses Near the United States-Mexico Border and Correlation with Levels of Fecal Indicator Bacteria▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gersberg, Richard M.; Rose, Michael A.; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Dhar, Arun K.

    2006-01-01

    For decades, untreated sewage flowing northward from Tijuana, Mexico, via the Tijuana River has adversely affected the water quality of the recreational beaches of San Diego, California. We used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure the levels of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enteroviruses in coastal waters near the United States-Mexico border and compared these levels to those of the conventional fecal indicators, Escherichia coli and enterococci. Over a 2-year period from 2003 to ...

  11. Optical coherence tomography: an assessment of current training across all levels of seniority in 8 ophthalmic units in the united kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilling John S

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT is becoming an increasingly integral part of ophthalmological clinical practice. The accurate interpretation of OCT images is important both in terms of diagnosis and in directing subsequent management. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical competence in OCT image interpretation of ophthalmologists in different subspecialties and grades. Methods Eight OCT images demonstrating a single macular pathology and two normal scans were selected by case notes review. These ten images were shown to thirty doctors and 10 non-medical staff from eight units. They were asked to identify each lesion, the average thickness of the lesion, and the axis at which the OCT was taken. One point was awarded for each correct answer. Results The mean scores for the correct qualitative identification of the OCT lesion (with a maximum score of 10 for different grades of doctors and non-medical staff were as follows: medical retinal consultants (MRC, 9 (range, 8–10; vitreoretinal consultants (VRC, 7 (range, 6–9; non-retinal consultants (NRC, 4 (range, 2–6; vitreoretinal fellows (VRF, 4 (range, 3–7; specialist registrars (SpR, 3 (range, 2–5; senior house officers (SHO, 4 (range, 3–6; orthoptists, 1 (range, 0–1; ancillary staff, 2 (range, 0–3. Conclusion A wide range in the ability to accurately interpret OCT images has been demonstrated. All doctors would thereby benefit from further training in the interpretation of OCT scans.

  12. Risk Management. Unit 20. Level 3. Instructor Guide. PACE: Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Third Edition. Research & Development Series No. 303-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This instructor guide for a unit on risk management in the PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) curriculum includes the full text of the student module and lesson plans, instructional suggestions, and other teacher resources. The competencies that are incorporated into this module are at Level 3 of learning--starting and…

  13. Pricing Strategy. Unit 10. Level 2. Instructor Guide. PACE: Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Third Edition. Research & Development Series No. 302-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This instructor guide for a unit on pricing strategy in the PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) curriculum includes the full text of the student module and lesson plans, instructional suggestions, and other teacher resources. The competencies that are incorporated into this module are at Level 2 of learning--planning for a…

  14. Pricing Strategy. Unit 10. Level 3. Instructor Guide. PACE: Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Third Edition. Research & Development Series No. 303-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This instructor guide for a unit on pricing strategy in the PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) curriculum includes the full text of the student module and lesson plans, instructional suggestions, and other teacher resources. The competencies that are incorporated into this module are at Level 3 of learning--starting and…

  15. Pricing Strategy. Unit 10. Level 1. Instructor Guide. PACE: Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Third Edition. Research & Development Series No. 301-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This instructor guide for a unit on pricing strategy in the PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) curriculum includes the full text of the student module and lesson plans, instructional suggestions, and other teacher resources. The competencies that are incorporated into this module are at Level 1 of learning--understanding…

  16. Oxymatrinium tetrachloridoferrate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong He

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, (C15H25N2O2[FeCl4], contains a tetrachloridoferrate(III anion and a oxymatrinium cation [oxymatrine is (4R,7aS,13aR,13bR,13cS-dodecahydro-1H,5H,10H-dipyrido[2,1-f:3′,2′,1′-ij][1,6]naphthyridin-10-one 4-oxide]. The conformation of oxymatrine is similar to that of matrine with one ring having a half-chair conformation, while the others have chair conformations. Chiral chains of cations along the c axis are formed by O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  17. Water-Stable In(III)-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks with Rod-Shaped Secondary Building Units: Single-Crystal to Single-Crystal Transformation and Selective Sorption of C2H2 over CO2 and CH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen-Ji; Yu, Jiamei; Zhang, Yong-Zheng; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Ya; Wu, Yufeng; Xie, Lin-Hua; Li, Jian-Rong

    2017-02-20

    Three new water-stable In(III)-based metal-organic frameworks, namely, [In3(TTTA)2(OH)3(H2O)]·(DMA)3 (BUT-70, DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide), [In3(TTTA)2(CH3O)3] (BUT-70A), and [In3(TTTA)2(OH)3] (BUT-70B), with rod-shaped secondary building units (SBUs) and an new acrylate-based ligand, (2E,2'E,2″E)-3,3',3″-(2,4,6-trimethylbenzene-1,3,5-triyl)-triacrylate (TTTA(3-)) were obtained and structurally characterized. BUT-70A and -70B were generated in a single-crystal to single-crystal transformation fashion from BUT-70 through guest exchange followed by their removal. The solvents used for guest exchange were methanol and dichloromethane, respectively. Single-crystal structure analyses show that the guest exchange and removal process is accompanied by the substitution of coordinated water molecules of In(III) centers with uncoordinated carboxylate O atoms of TTTA(3-) ligands. Moreover, hydroxyl groups bridging two In(III) centers are also replaced by methoxyl groups in the transformation from BUT-70 to -70A. Overall, three metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are constructed by infinite chains consisting of corner-sharing InO4(OR)2 (R = H or Me) octahedral entities, which are interconnected by TTTA(3-) ligands to form three-dimensional frameworks. Unlike most reported MOFs with infinite chains as SBUs, such as well-known MIL-53 and M-MOF-74, which have one-dimensional channels along the chain direction, the BUT-70 series contain two-dimensional intersecting channels. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and pore volume of BUT-70A were estimated to be 460 m(2) g(-1) and 0.18 cm(3) g(-1), respectively, which are obviously lower than those of BUT-70B (695 m(2) g(-1) and 0.29 cm(3) g(-1)). Gas adsorption experiments demonstrated that BUT-70A and -70B are able to selectively adsorb C2H2 over CO2 and CH4. At 1 atm and 298 K, BUT-70A uptakes 3.1 mmol g(-1) C2H2, which is 3.6 times that of the CO2 uptake and 7.2 times that of the CH4 uptake. Compared with BUT-70A, BUT-70B

  18. A detection-level hazardous waste ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 200 areas low-level burial grounds and retrievable storage units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-01

    This plan defines the actions needed to achieve detection-level monitoring compliance at the Hanford Site 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Compliance will be achieved through characterization of the hydrogeology and monitoring of the ground water beneath the LLBG located in the Hanford Site 200 Areas. 13 refs., 20 figs.

  19. Nano-level monitoring of Yb(III) by fabrication of coated graphite electrode based on newly synthesized hexaaza macrocyclic ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashok K; Singh, Prerna

    2009-06-08

    The two macrocyclic ligands 2,12-(2-methoxyaniline)2-4,14-Me2-[20]-1,4,11,14-tetraene-1,5,8,11,15,18-N6 (L1) and 2,12-(2-methoxyaniline)(2)-4,14-Me2-8,18-dimethylacrylate-[20]-1,4,11,14-tetraene-1,5,8,11,15,18-N6 (L2) have been synthesized and explored as neutral ionophores for preparing poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) based membrane sensors selective to Yb(III) ions. Effects of various plasticizers and anion excluders were studied in detail and improved performance was observed. The best performance was obtained for the membrane sensor having a composition of L2:PVC:BA:NaTPB in the ratio of 5: 40: 52: 3 (w/w; mg). The performance of the membrane based on L2 was compared with polymeric membrane electrode (PME) as well as with coated graphite electrode (CGE). The electrodes exhibit Nernstian slope for Yb3+ ions with limits of detection of 4.3 x 10(-8) M for PME and 5.8 x 10(-9) M for CGE. The response time for PME and CGE was found to be 10 s and 8 s, respectively. The potentiometric responses are independent of the pH of the test solution in the pH range 3.0-8.0 for PME and 2.5-8.5 for CGE. The CGE has found to work satisfactorily in partially non-aqueous media upto 30% (v/v) content of methanol, ethanol and 20% (v/v) content of acetonitrile and could be used for a period of 5 months. The CGE was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Yb3+ ions with EDTA and in determination of fluoride ions in mouthwash samples. It can be used for determination of sulfite in red and white wine samples and also in determination of Yb3+ in various binary mixtures with quantitative results.

  20. The relationship between in-hospital mortality, readmission into the intensive care nursing unit and/or operating theatre and nurse staffing levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diya, Luwis; Van den Heede, Koen; Sermeus, Walter; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2012-05-01

      The aim of this article was to assess the relationship between (1) in-hospital mortality and/or (2) unplanned readmission to intensive care units or operating theatre and nurse staffing variables.   Adverse events are used as surrogates for patient safety in nurse staffing and patient safety research. A single adverse event cannot adequately capture the multi-dimensional attributes of patient safety; hence, there is a need to consider composite measures. Unplanned readmission into the postoperative Intensive Care nursing unit and/or operating Theatre and in-hospital mortality can be viewed as measures that incorporate the effects of several adverse events.   We conducted a Bayesian multilevel analysis on a subset of the 2003 Belgian Hospital Discharge and Nursing Minimum Data sets. The sample included 9054 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery or heart valve procedures from 28 Belgian acute hospitals. Two proxies of patient safety were considered, namely postoperative in-hospital mortality in the first postoperative intensive care unit and unplanned readmission into the intensive care and/or operating theatre (including mortality beyond the first postoperative intensive care unit) after the first-operative intensive care nursing unit.   There is an association between in-hospital mortality and/or unplanned readmissions and nurse staffing levels, but the relationship is moderated by volume and severity of illness respectively. In addition, the relationship differs between the two endpoints.   Higher nurse staffing levels on postoperative general nursing cardiac surgery units protected patients from unplanned readmission to intensive care units or operating theatre and in-hospital mortality. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. 76 FR 60511 - Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... Offshore Units. The policy is currently found in Chapter 16 of the Marine Safety Manual, Volume III. The... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose Chapter 16 of Volume III of the Marine Safety...

  2. Relationship of serum magnesium and vitamin d levels in a nationally-representative sample of iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study revealed significant associations between serum Mg and 25(OH D levels. This finding may be of use for further studies on the prevention and management of hypovitaminosis D in children and adolescents. Further longitudinal studies shall evaluate the underlying mechanisms and the clinical significance of the current findings.

  3. Dose coverage of axillary level I-III areas during whole breast irradiation with simplified intensity modulated radiation therapy in early stage breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Chen, Xing-Xing; Tuan, Jeffrey; Ma, Jin-Li; Mei, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Shao, Zhi-Min; Liu, Guang-Yu; Guo, Xiao-Mao

    2015-07-20

    This study was designed to evaluate the dose coverage of axillary areas during whole breast irradiation with simplified intensity modulated radiation therapy (s-IMRT) and field-in-field IMRT (for-IMRT) in early stage breast cancer patients. Sixty-one consecutive patients with breast-conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy were collected. Two plans were created for each patient: the s-IMRT and for-IMRT plan. Dosimetric parameters of axillary areas were compared. The average of mean doses delivered to the axillary level I areas in s-IMRT and for-IMRT plan were 27.7Gy and 29.1Gy (p = 0.011), respectively. The average of V47.5Gy, V45Gy and V40Gy (percent volume receiving≥ 47.5Gy, 45Gy and 40Gy) of the axillary level I in s-IMRT plan was significantly lower than that in for-IMRT plan (p 19.3cm and body width >31.9cm had significantly higher mean dose in axillary level I area (p = 0.002, 0.007, 0.001, respectively). Compared with for-IMRT plan, the s-IMRT plan delivered lower dose to axillary level I area. For centers using s-IMRT technique, caution should be exercised when selecting to omit axillary lymph node dissection for patients with breast conserving surgery and limited positive SLNs.

  4. The Effect of an Instructional Unit Incorporating Live Animals on Knowledge of Nutrition for Different Age Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Anne I.; Wunderlich, Kenneth W.

    A nutrition education unit, Rat Pak, developed by Dairy Council, Inc., is an attempt to influence students to make wise food choices. It consists of eleven lessons in an instructional sequence which incorporates the use of white rats as a means of illustrating the effect of improper diet while teaching proper diet. The purpose of this…

  5. Cardiorespiratory Fitness Levels among U.S. Youth Aged 12-15 Years: United States, 1999-2004 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aerobic work and power on a rope-braked cycle ergometer by direct measurement. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 31(4):392–7. 2006. Ogden CL, Carroll MD, Kit BK, Flegal KM. Prevalence of childhood and adult obesity in the United States, 2011–2012. JAMA 311( ...

  6. PRESERVATION OF AS(III) AND AS(V) IN DRINKING WATER SUPPLY SAMPLES FROM ACROSS THE UNITED STATES USING EDTA AND ACETIC ACID AS A MEANS OF MINIMIZING IRON-ARSENIC CO-PRECIPITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper evaluates seven different treatment/storage conditions for the preservation of the native As(III)/As(V) found in ten drinking water supplies from across the US. These ten waters were chosen because they have different As(III)/As(V) distributions; six of these waters c...

  7. Assessment of variation in the alberta context tool: the contribution of unit level contextual factors and specialty in Canadian pediatric acute care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Greta G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few validated measures of organizational context and none that we located are parsimonious and address modifiable characteristics of context. The Alberta Context Tool (ACT was developed to meet this need. The instrument assesses 8 dimensions of context, which comprise 10 concepts. The purpose of this paper is to report evidence to further the validity argument for ACT. The specific objectives of this paper are to: (1 examine the extent to which the 10 ACT concepts discriminate between patient care units and (2 identify variables that significantly contribute to between-unit variation for each of the 10 concepts. Methods 859 professional nurses (844 valid responses working in medical, surgical and critical care units of 8 Canadian pediatric hospitals completed the ACT. A random intercept, fixed effects hierarchical linear modeling (HLM strategy was used to quantify and explain variance in the 10 ACT concepts to establish the ACT's ability to discriminate between units. We ran 40 models (a series of 4 models for each of the 10 concepts in which we systematically assessed the unique contribution (i.e., error variance reduction of different variables to between-unit variation. First, we constructed a null model in which we quantified the variance overall, in each of the concepts. Then we controlled for the contribution of individual level variables (Model 1. In Model 2, we assessed the contribution of practice specialty (medical, surgical, critical care to variation since it was central to construction of the sampling frame for the study. Finally, we assessed the contribution of additional unit level variables (Model 3. Results The null model (unadjusted baseline HLM model established that there was significant variation between units in each of the 10 ACT concepts (i.e., discrimination between units. When we controlled for individual characteristics, significant variation in the 10 concepts remained. Assessment of the

  8. Newly incident cannabis use in the United States, 2002–2011: a regional and state level benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob P. Leinweber

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Cannabis use and cannabis regulatory policies recently re-surfaced as noteworthy global research and social media topics, including claims that Mexicans have been sending cannabis and other drug supplies through a porous border into the United States. These circumstances prompted us to conduct an epidemiological test of whether the states bordering Mexico had exceptionally large cannabis incidence rates for 2002–2011. The resulting range of cannabis incidence rates disclosed here can serve as 2002–2011 benchmark values against which estimates from later years can be compared. Methods The population under study is 12-to-24-year-old non-institutionalized civilian community residents of the US, sampled and assessed with confidential audio computer-assisted self-interviews (ACASI during National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, 2002–2011 (aggregate n ∼ 420,000 for which public use datasets were available. We estimated state-specific cannabis incidence rates based on independent replication sample surveys across these years, and derived meta-analysis estimates for 10 pre-specified regions, including the Mexico border region. Results From meta-analysis, the estimated annual incidence rate for cannabis use in the Mexico Border Region is 5% (95% CI [4%–7%], which is not an exceptional value relative to the overall US estimate of 6% (95% CI [5%–6%]. Geographically quite distant from Mexico and from states of the western US with liberalized cannabis policies, the North Atlantic Region population has the numerically largest incidence estimate at 7% (95% CI [6%–8%], while the Gulf of Mexico Border Region population has the lowest incidence rate at 5% (95% CI [4%–6%]. Within the set of state-specific estimates, Vermont’s and Utah’s populations have the largest and smallest incidence rates, respectively (VT: 9%; 95% CI [8%–10%]; UT: 3%; 95% CI [3%–4%]. Discussion Based on this study’s estimates, among 12-to-24-year-old US

  9. Impact of the 1980 BEIR-III report on low-level radiation risk assessment, radiation protection guides, and public health policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-06-01

    The author deals with the scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides, and this effect on evaluation of societal activities concerned with the health effects in human populations exposed to low-level radiation. Methodology is discussed for estimating risks of radio-induced cancer and genetically related ill-health in man, the sources of data, the dose-response models used, and the precision ascribed to the process. (PSB)

  10. Association of 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels with indexes of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Jari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to determine the association of serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25(OHD levels with measures of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted among 1090 students, aged 10-18 years, living in 27 provinces in Iran. Serum concentration of 25(OHD was analyzed quantitatively by direct competitive immunoassay chemiluminescence method. Body mass index (BMI and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR were considered as measures of generalized and abdominal obesity, respectively. Results: Study participants consisted of 1090 adolescents (51.9% boy and 67.1% urban residents with mean age, BMI, and waist circumference of 14.7 (2.6 years, 19.3 (4.2 kg/m 2 , and 67.82 (12.23 cm, respectively. The median serum 25(OHD was 13.0 ng/mL (interquartile range: 20.6. Overall, 40% of participants were Vitamin D deficient, and 39% were Vitamin D insufficient. Serum 25(OHD level was not associated with BMI and WHtR. Conclusion: We did not document any significant association between serum 25(OHD level and anthropometric measures in adolescents. This finding may be because of considerably high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the study population.

  11. Association of 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels with indexes of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jari, Mohsen; Qorbani, Mostafa; Moafi, Mohammad; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Keikha, Mojtaba; Ardalan, Gelayol; Kelishadi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the association of serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels with measures of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted among 1090 students, aged 10-18 years, living in 27 provinces in Iran. Serum concentration of 25(OH)D was analyzed quantitatively by direct competitive immunoassay chemiluminescence method. Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) were considered as measures of generalized and abdominal obesity, respectively. Results: Study participants consisted of 1090 adolescents (51.9% boy and 67.1% urban residents) with mean age, BMI, and waist circumference of 14.7 (2.6) years, 19.3 (4.2) kg/m2, and 67.82 (12.23) cm, respectively. The median serum 25(OH)D was 13.0 ng/mL (interquartile range: 20.6). Overall, 40% of participants were Vitamin D deficient, and 39% were Vitamin D insufficient. Serum 25(OH)D level was not associated with BMI and WHtR. Conclusion: We did not document any significant association between serum 25(OH)D level and anthropometric measures in adolescents. This finding may be because of considerably high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the study population. PMID:25983762

  12. Molecular modelling of a chemodosimeter for the selective detection of As(III) ion in water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sairam S Mallajosyula; Usha H; Ayan Datta; Swapan K Pati

    2008-11-01

    We have modelled for the first time a chemodosimeter for As(III) detection in water. The chemodosimeter modelled is a 1,3-dithiole-2-thione derivative with an anthracene unit which has been previously described as a chemodosimeter for Hg(II) detection. Quantum chemical calculations at the DFT level have been used to describe the binding energies and selectivity of the chemodosimeter. We find that the dosimeter action is intrinsically dependent on the thiophillic affinity and the coordination sphere of the metal ion. Binding studies for a series of metal ions: Pb(II), Cd(II), Hg(II), Ni(II) and As(III) followed by an analysis of the complete reaction pathway explains the high selectivity of the dosimeter towards As(III). The dosimeter efficiency is calculated as 66% for As(III)-ion.

  13. Vaccination coverage by race/ethnicity and poverty level among children aged 19-35 months--United States, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-13

    The goals of the Childhood Immunization Initiative (CII) for 1996 were to have > or =90% of children receive three or more doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine/diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DTP/DT), poliovirus vaccine, and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Hib) and one dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, and for > or =70% of children to receive three or more doses of hepatitis B vaccine. The National Immunization Survey (NIS) was undertaken as part of the CII to monitor vaccination coverage levels for each state and for 28 urban areas. This report presents coverage estimates by race/ethnicity and poverty level for 1997 and compares coverage estimates for 1995 and 1997; the findings indicate improvements in vaccination coverage levels among children living below poverty level although these levels were lower than levels among children living at or above poverty level.

  14. Cotton GhPOX1 encoding plant class III peroxidase may be responsible for the high level of reactive oxygen species production that is related to cotton fiber elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Wenqian; Qin, Yongmei; Song, Wenqiang; Li, Jun; Zhu, Yuxian

    2009-03-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in plant cell development. In plant, class III peroxidases are heme-containing enzymes encoded by a large multi-gene family participated in the release or consumption of ROS. The specific function of each member of the family is still elusive. Here, we showed that ROS was significantly generated during cotton fiber initiation and elongation, whereas, application of NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and peroxidase inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the wild-type cotton ovule culture significantly suppressed fiber growth, respectively. Their inhibitory effects were caused by the reduction of superoxide radical (O(2)(-)). Ten GhPOX genes (cDNAs) encoding cotton class III peroxidases were isolated, among them eight GhPOX genes were reported for the first time. Microarray analyses indicated that GhPOX1 was the mostly predominantly expressed in fast-elongating cotton fiber cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed the transcript level of GhPOX1 was over 400-fold higher in growing fiber cells than in ovules, flowers, roots, stems and leaves. To reveal the role of GhPOX1 in plant development, its Arabidopsis orthologue atpox13 mutant was demonstrated to be defective in branch root development. Taken together, the data suggest that GhPOX1 plays an important role during fiber cell elongation possibly by mediating production of reactive oxygen species.

  15. Functional level at admission is a predictor of survival in older patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, Lars E; Jepsen, Ditte B; Ryg, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Functional decline is associated with increased risk of mortality in geriatric patients.Assessment of activities of daily living (ADL) with the Barthel Index (BI) at admission wasstudied as a predictor of survival in older patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit. METHODS...... to an acute geriatricunit. These data suggest that assessment of ADL may have a potential role in decisionmaking for the clinical management of frail geriatric inpatients....

  16. The Knowledge Level of United States Air Force Flight Nurses Regarding the Injuries of Conventional Warfare Casualties

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    penetrating wound of brain " (United States Department of Defense, 1987, p. 182). Since it was virtually impossible to construct one question covering...exhaustion is characterized by which of the following? a. Euphoria, sharpened skills and senses b. Insomnia, anorexia , and malaise c. Unrelenting fatigue... malnutrition d. Don’t know 11. An external fixation device to immobilize a fractured extremity is best described by which of the following? a. A special cast

  17. Monolithically integrated enhancement/depletion-mode AlGaN/GaN HEMTs SRAM unit and voltage level shifter using fluorine plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonghe, Chen; Xuefeng, Zheng; Jincheng, Zhang; Xiaohua, Ma; Yue, Hao

    2016-05-01

    A GaN-based E/D mode direct-couple logic 6 transistors SRAM unit and a voltage level shifter were designed and fabricated. E-mode and D-mode AlGaN/GaN HEMTs were integrated in one wafer using fluorine plasma treatment and using a moderate AlGaN barrier layer heterojunction structure. The 6 transistors SRAM unit consists of two symmetrical E/D mode inverters and two E-mode switch HEMTs. The output low and high voltage of the SRAM unit are 0.95 and 0.07 V at a voltage supply of 1 V. The voltage level shifter lowers the supply voltage using four Ni-AlGaN Schottky diodes in a series at a positive supply voltage of 6 V and a negative supply voltage of -6 V. By controlling the states of inverter modules of the level shifter in turn, the level shifter offers two channel voltage outputs of -0.5 and -5 V. The flip voltage of the level shifter is 0.76 V. Both the SRAM unit and voltage shifter operate correctly, demonstrating the promising potential for GaN-based E/D mode digital and analog integrated circuits. Several considerations are proposed to avoid the influence of threshold voltage degradation of D-mode and E-mode HEMT on the operation of the circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61334002), the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory (No. ZHD201206), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (No. NCET-12-0915).

  18. A Multi-Level Bayesian Analysis of Racial Bias in Police Shootings at the County-Level in the United States, 2011-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody T Ross

    Full Text Available A geographically-resolved, multi-level Bayesian model is used to analyze the data presented in the U.S. Police-Shooting Database (USPSD in order to investigate the extent of racial bias in the shooting of American civilians by police officers in recent years. In contrast to previous work that relied on the FBI's Supplemental Homicide Reports that were constructed from self-reported cases of police-involved homicide, this data set is less likely to be biased by police reporting practices. County-specific relative risk outcomes of being shot by police are estimated as a function of the interaction of: 1 whether suspects/civilians were armed or unarmed, and 2 the race/ethnicity of the suspects/civilians. The results provide evidence of a significant bias in the killing of unarmed black Americans relative to unarmed white Americans, in that the probability of being {black, unarmed, and shot by police} is about 3.49 times the probability of being {white, unarmed, and shot by police} on average. Furthermore, the results of multi-level modeling show that there exists significant heterogeneity across counties in the extent of racial bias in police shootings, with some counties showing relative risk ratios of 20 to 1 or more. Finally, analysis of police shooting data as a function of county-level predictors suggests that racial bias in police shootings is most likely to emerge in police departments in larger metropolitan counties with low median incomes and a sizable portion of black residents, especially when there is high financial inequality in that county. There is no relationship between county-level racial bias in police shootings and crime rates (even race-specific crime rates, meaning that the racial bias observed in police shootings in this data set is not explainable as a response to local-level crime rates.

  19. A Multi-Level Bayesian Analysis of Racial Bias in Police Shootings at the County-Level in the United States, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cody T

    2015-01-01

    A geographically-resolved, multi-level Bayesian model is used to analyze the data presented in the U.S. Police-Shooting Database (USPSD) in order to investigate the extent of racial bias in the shooting of American civilians by police officers in recent years. In contrast to previous work that relied on the FBI's Supplemental Homicide Reports that were constructed from self-reported cases of police-involved homicide, this data set is less likely to be biased by police reporting practices. County-specific relative risk outcomes of being shot by police are estimated as a function of the interaction of: 1) whether suspects/civilians were armed or unarmed, and 2) the race/ethnicity of the suspects/civilians. The results provide evidence of a significant bias in the killing of unarmed black Americans relative to unarmed white Americans, in that the probability of being {black, unarmed, and shot by police} is about 3.49 times the probability of being {white, unarmed, and shot by police} on average. Furthermore, the results of multi-level modeling show that there exists significant heterogeneity across counties in the extent of racial bias in police shootings, with some counties showing relative risk ratios of 20 to 1 or more. Finally, analysis of police shooting data as a function of county-level predictors suggests that racial bias in police shootings is most likely to emerge in police departments in larger metropolitan counties with low median incomes and a sizable portion of black residents, especially when there is high financial inequality in that county. There is no relationship between county-level racial bias in police shootings and crime rates (even race-specific crime rates), meaning that the racial bias observed in police shootings in this data set is not explainable as a response to local-level crime rates.

  20. High levels of the type III inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) can confer faster cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsfelt, Iben Boutrup; Byskov, Kristina; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup

    2014-01-01

    The inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. We recently showed that overexpression of human PiT1 was sufficient to increase proliferation of two strict density-inhibited cell lines, murine fibroblastic NIH3T3 and pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells......, and allowed the cultures to grow to higher cell densities. In addition, upon transformation NIH3T3 cells showed increased ability to form colonies in soft agar. The cellular regulation of PiT1 expression supports that cells utilize the PiT1 levels to control proliferation, with non-proliferating cells showing...... the lowest PiT1 mRNA levels. The mechanism behind the role of PiT1 in increased cell proliferation is not known. We, however, found that compared to control cells, cultures of NIH3T3 cells overexpressing PiT1 upon seeding showed increased cell number after 24 h and had shifted more cells from G0/G1 to S+G2/M...

  1. Soil burdens of persistent organic pollutants--their levels, fate and risks Part III. Quantification of the soil burdens and related health risks in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupr, Pavel; Bartos, Tomás; Sánka, Milan; Klánová, Jana; Mikes, Ondrej; Holoubek, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    A total number of 471 soil samples collected during the period of 1996-2006 from the agricultural and forest areas of the Czech Republic were analyzed for their content of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Spatial variability of the POP concentrations was assessed using an IDW spatial GIS model analysis. For every grid of the network, resulting modeled levels of contamination allowed for estimation of the total burden of POPs in soils. Potential risks associated with contaminated soils were assessed as well. Database of the old ecological burdens counting 3061 sampling sites was used to adjust the model and incorporate the risks of heavily contaminated sites. The high levels of health risks were only found at less than 1% of the area of interest. The IDW modeling proved to be a useful tool for screening of the health risks in the large areas with scarce monitoring data. Presented approach can be applied in the risk management, to support an efficient targeting of the risk reduction measures, or to improve a design of the national monitoring.

  2. High levels of the type III inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) can confer faster cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongsfelt, Iben Boutrup [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Byskov, Kristina [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Lene, E-mail: LP@mb.au.dk [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Hematology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2014-08-01

    The inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. We recently showed that overexpression of human PiT1 was sufficient to increase proliferation of two strict density-inhibited cell lines, murine fibroblastic NIH3T3 and pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, and allowed the cultures to grow to higher cell densities. In addition, upon transformation NIH3T3 cells showed increased ability to form colonies in soft agar. The cellular regulation of PiT1 expression supports that cells utilize the PiT1 levels to control proliferation, with non-proliferating cells showing the lowest PiT1 mRNA levels. The mechanism behind the role of PiT1 in increased cell proliferation is not known. We, however, found that compared to control cells, cultures of NIH3T3 cells overexpressing PiT1 upon seeding showed increased cell number after 24 h and had shifted more cells from G0/G1 to S+G2/M within 12 h, suggesting that an early event may play a role. We here show that expression of human PiT1 in NIH3T3 cells led to faster cell adhesion; this effect was not cell type specific in that it was also observed when expressing human PiT1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also show for NIH3T3 that PiT1 overexpression led to faster cell spreading. The final total numbers of attached cells did, however, not differ between cultures of PiT1 overexpressing cells and control cells of neither cell type. We suggest that the PiT1-mediated fast adhesion potentials allow the cells to go faster out of G0/G1 and thereby contribute to their proliferative advantage within the first 24 h after seeding. - Highlights: • Effects of elevated levels of the inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 were studied. • The density-inhibited murine cell lines NIH3T3 and MC3T3-E1 showed faster adhesion. • NIH3T3 cells showed faster spreading. • We suggest that the faster adhesion/spreading contributes to faster proliferation.

  3. An Assessment of Direct Restorative Material Use in Posterior Teeth by American and Canadian Pediatric Dentists: III. Preferred Level of Participation in Decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Rae E; Andrews, Paul; Sigal, Michael J; Azarpazhooh, Amir

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess Canadian and American pediatric dentists' preferred level of participation in clinical decision-making. A web-based survey was used to collect the opinions of all active Royal College of Dentists of Canada members and American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry members on the use of direct restorative materials in posterior teeth (n equals 4,648; 19.3 percent response rate). The main survey also included a domain to elicit participants' preferred role in clinical decision-making, ranging from an active role (the dentist takes the primary role in decision-making while considering patients/caregivers opinions) to a passive role (the dentist prefers to have the patient guide the decision-making). Bivariate and multivariate analyses for the preferred role and its predictor were performed (two-tailed Pmaking, a role that may not be consistent with a patient-centered practice that emphasizes patient autonomy in decision-making.

  4. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia. Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China. And PCT is a more valuable biomarker than endotoxin in the diagnosis of bacteremia.

  5. Cost effectiveness of universal umbilical cord blood gas and lactate analysis in a tertiary level maternity unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher R H; Doherty, Dorota A; Cannon, Jeffrey W; Kohan, Rolland; Newnham, John P; Pennell, Craig E

    2016-07-01

    There is an increasing body of literature supporting universal umbilical cord blood gas analysis (UCBGA) into all maternity units. A significant impediment to UCBGA's introduction is the perceived expense of the introduction and associated ongoing costs. Consequently, this study set out to conduct the first cost-effectiveness analysis of introducing universal UCBGA. Analysis was based on 42,100 consecutive deliveries ≥23 weeks of gestation at a single tertiary obstetric unit. Within 4 years of UCBGA's introduction there was a 45% reduction in term special care nursery (SCN) admissions >2499 g. Incurred costs included initial and ongoing costs associated with universal UCBGA. Averted costs were based on local diagnosis-related grouping costs for reduction in term SCN admissions. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and sensitivity analysis results were reported. Under the base-case scenario, the adoption of universal UCBGA was less costly and more effective than selective UCBGA over 4 years and resulted in saving of AU$641,532 while adverting 376 SCN admissions. Sensitivity analysis showed that UCBGA was cost-effective in 51.8%, 83.3%, 99.6% and 100% of simulations in years 1, 2, 3 and 4. These conclusions were not sensitive to wide, clinically possible variations in parameter values for neonatal intensive care unit and SCN admissions, magnitude of averted SCN admissions, cumulative delivery numbers, and SCN admission costs. Universal UCBGA is associated with significant initial and ongoing costs; however, potential averted costs (due to reduced SCN admissions) exceed incurred costs in most scenarios.

  6. Evaluation of the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D. O.; Collins, E. D.; King, L. J.; Knauer, J. B.

    1980-07-01

    This report discusses the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of the high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station was evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a study that included filtration tests, ion exchange column tests, and ion exchange distribution tests. The contaminated waters, the SDS flowsheet, and the experiments made are described. The experimental results were used to predict the SDS performance and to indicate potential improvements.

  7. Grid-Level Application of Electrical Energy Storage: Example Use Cases in the United States and China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingchen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gevorgian, Vahan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Rui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhou, Shengru [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Caixia [State Grid Corporation of China; Lei, Xuejiao [State Grid Corporation of China; Li, Qionghui [State Grid Corporation of China; Jiang, Liping [State Grid Corporation of China

    2017-08-16

    Electrical energy storage (EES) systems are expected to play an increasing role in helping the United States and China-the world's largest economies with the two largest power systems-meet the challenges of integrating more variable renewable resources and enhancing the reliability of power systems by improving the operating capabilities of the electric grid. EES systems are becoming integral components of a resilient and efficient grid through a diverse set of applications that include energy management, load shifting, frequency regulation, grid stabilization, and voltage support.

  8. Interface simulation of strained and non-abrupt III-V quantum wells. Part 2: energy level calculation versus experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, C.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes a program able to compute the allowed energy levels and the respective wavefunctions of strained {In1 - xGaxAsyP1 - y}/{In1 - zGazAswP1 - w} for electrons, light and heavy holes in single- and multi-quantum wells and superlattices. Ground and excited states can be detected. The problem of non-abrupt interfaces has been taken into account. The computation on intentionally strained QW structures can be performed. The simulation of coupled wells may also be done, allowing theoretical prediction on the 4 K photoluminescence emission of superlattices. The adopted mathematical approach has been treated in details. The results of the presented simulations performed on heterostructures grown by low-pressure metallorganic vapor phase epitaxy and by chemical beam epitaxy heterostructures are compared with 4 K Fourier transform photoluminescence and with room temperature IR absorption data. The data used as input by this program are previously computed by the program BANDSTRAIN (described in a previous paper). In this work also the simulation of high resolution X-ray diffraction patterns is briefly presented and compared with the experimental curves; it is shown how the combined simulations of PL and X-ray data is a powerful tool in the interfaces characterization. Finally, qualitative information is extracted from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy micrographs.

  9. Optimisation of resistant starch II and III levels in durum wheat pasta to reduce in vitro digestibility while maintaining processing and sensory characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Nisha; Sissons, Mike; Fellows, Christopher M; Blazek, Jaroslav; Gilbert, Elliot P

    2013-01-15

    Foods with elevated levels of resistant starch (RS) may have beneficial effects on human health. Pasta was enriched with commercial resistant starches (RSII, Hi Maize™ 1043; RSIII, Novelose 330™) at 10%, 20% and 50% substitution of semolina for RSII and 10% and 20% for RSIII and compared with pasta made from 100% durum wheat semolina to investigate technological, sensory, in vitro starch digestibility and structural properties. The resultant RS content of pasta increased from 1.9% to ∼21% and was not reduced on cooking. Significantly, the results indicate that 10% and 20% RSII and RSIII substitution of semolina had no significant effects on pasta cooking loss, texture and sensory properties, with only a minimal reduction in pasta yellowness. Both RS types lowered the extent of in vitro starch hydrolysis compared to that of control pasta. X-ray diffraction and small-angle scattering verified the incorporation of RS and, compared to the control sample, identified enhanced crystallinity and a changed molecular arrangement following digestion. These results can be contrasted with the negative impact on pasta resulting from substitution with equivalent amounts of more traditional dietary fibre such as bran. The study suggests that these RS-containing formulations may be ideal sources for the preparation of pasta with reduced starch digestibility.

  10. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabani Amin M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3 laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226 was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7% of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18, resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a

  11. The relationship between the location of pediatric intensive care unit facilities and child death from trauma: a county-level ecologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetola, Folafoluwa O; Miller, William C; Davis, Matthew M; Bratton, Susan L

    2005-07-01

    To describe the relationship between the location of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) facilities and county-level child death from trauma in the contiguous USA. We conducted a cross-sectional ecologic study using county-level data on death due to trauma in children 0 to 14 years of age from 1996 to 1998. These data were linked to 1997 county-level data on availability of PICU facilities. In 1997, PICU facilities were present in 9% of USA counties. There were 18,337 childhood deaths from trauma in the study period. The presence of PICU facilities in a county was associated with lower mortality from trauma (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.72; 95% CI 0.67-0.78) compared to counties without PICU facilities. After controlling for residence in rural and low-income counties, and the presence of adult medicosurgical intensive care units, the presence of PICU facilities in a county remained associated with lower rates of death from trauma (IRR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.75-0.89). The presence of PICU facilities is related to lower mortality rates due to traumatic injuries at the county level. This finding may reflect the concentration of pediatric subspecialty care in counties with PICUs. This association merits further study with individual-level observations.

  12. Evaluating coastal landscape response to sea-level rise in the northeastern United States: approach and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Erika E.; Stippa, Sawyer R.; Thieler, E. Robert; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Gesch, Dean B.; Horton, Radley M.

    2014-02-13

    The U.S. Geological Survey is examining effects of future sea-level rise on the coastal landscape from Maine to Virginia by producing spatially explicit, probabilistic predictions using sea-level projections, vertical land movement rates (due to isostacy), elevation data, and land-cover data. Sea-level-rise scenarios used as model inputs are generated by using multiple sources of information, including Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models following representative concentration pathways 4.5 and 8.5 in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. A Bayesian network is used to develop a predictive coastal response model that integrates the sea-level, elevation, and land-cover data with assigned probabilities that account for interactions with coastal geomorphology as well as the corresponding ecological and societal systems it supports. The effects of sea-level rise are presented as (1) level of landscape submergence and (2) coastal response type characterized as either static (that is, inundation) or dynamic (that is, landform or landscape change). Results are produced at a spatial scale of 30 meters for four decades (the 2020s, 2030s, 2050s, and 2080s). The probabilistic predictions can be applied to landscape management decisions based on sea-level-rise effects as well as on assessments of the prediction uncertainty and need for improved data or fundamental understanding. This report describes the methods used to produce predictions, including information on input datasets; the modeling approach; model outputs; data-quality-control procedures; and information on how to access the data and metadata online.

  13. Evaluating Coastal Landscape Response to Sea-Level Rise in the Northeastern United States - Approach and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Erika E.; Stippa, Sawyer R.; Thieler, E. Robert; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Gesch, Dean B.; Horton, Radley M.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is examining effects of future sea-level rise on the coastal landscape from Maine to Virginia by producing spatially explicit, probabilistic predictions using sea-level projections, vertical land movement rates (due to isostacy), elevation data, and land-cover data. Sea-level-rise scenarios used as model inputs are generated by using multiple sources of information, including Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models following representative concentration pathways 4.5 and 8.5 in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. A Bayesian network is used to develop a predictive coastal response model that integrates the sea-level, elevation, and land-cover data with assigned probabilities that account for interactions with coastal geomorphology as well as the corresponding ecological and societal systems it supports. The effects of sea-level rise are presented as (1) level of landscape submergence and (2) coastal response type characterized as either static (that is, inundation) or dynamic (that is, landform or landscape change). Results are produced at a spatial scale of 30 meters for four decades (the 2020s, 2030s, 2050s, and 2080s). The probabilistic predictions can be applied to landscape management decisions based on sea-level-rise effects as well as on assessments of the prediction uncertainty and need for improved data or fundamental understanding. This report describes the methods used to produce predictions, including information on input datasets; the modeling approach; model outputs; data-quality-control procedures; and information on how to access the data and metadata online.

  14. The Pharmacodynamic Impact of Apremilast, an Oral Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, on Circulating Levels of Inflammatory Biomarkers in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Substudy Results from a Phase III, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial (PALACE 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Schafer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, demonstrated effectiveness (versus placebo for treatment of active psoriatic arthritis in the psoriatic arthritis long-term assessment of clinical efficacy (PALACE phase III clinical trial program. Pharmacodynamic effects of apremilast on plasma biomarkers associated with inflammation were evaluated in a PALACE 1 substudy. Of 504 patients randomized in PALACE 1, 150 (placebo: n=51; apremilast 20 mg BID: n=51; apremilast 30 mg BID: n=48 provided peripheral blood plasma samples for analysis in a multiplexed cytometric bead array assay measuring 47 proteins associated with systemic inflammatory immune responses. Association between biomarker levels and achievement of 20% improvement from baseline in modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR20 response criteria was assessed by logistic regression. At Week 24, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and ferritin were significantly reduced from baseline with apremilast 20 mg BID or 30 mg BID versus placebo. ACR20 response correlated with change in TNF-α level with both apremilast doses. At Week 40, IL-17, IL-23, IL-6, and ferritin were significantly decreased and IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonists significantly increased with apremilast 30 mg BID versus placebo. In patients with active psoriatic arthritis, apremilast reduced circulating levels of Th1 and Th17 proinflammatory mediators and increased anti-inflammatory mediators.

  15. Prevalence and Level of Listeria monocytogenes in Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y I; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Pouillot, Régis; Strain, Errol; DE Jesus, Antonio J; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Hua; Ali, Laila; Tatavarthy, Aparna; Zhang, Guodong; Hu, Lijun; Day, James; Kang, Jihun; Sahu, Surasri; Srinivasan, Devayani; Klontz, Karl; Parish, Mickey; Evans, Peter S; Brown, Eric W; Hammack, Thomas S; Zink, Donald L; Datta, Atin R

    2016-11-01

    A most-probable-number (MPN) method was used to enumerate Listeria monocytogenes in 2,320 commercial ice cream scoops manufactured on a production line that was implicated in a 2015 listeriosis outbreak in the United States. The analyzed samples were collected from seven lots produced in November 2014, December 2014, January 2015, and March 2015. L. monocytogenes was detected in 99% (2,307 of 2,320) of the tested samples (lower limit of detection, 0.03 MPN/g), 92% of which were contaminated at ice cream products linked to a listeriosis outbreak provided a unique data set for further understanding the risk associated with L. monocytogenes contamination for highly susceptible populations.

  16. Outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the intensive care unit: a multi-level strategic management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molter, G; Seifert, H; Mandraka, F; Kasper, G; Weidmann, B; Hornei, B; Öhler, M; Schwimmbeck, P; Kröschel, P; Higgins, P G; Reuter, S

    2016-02-01

    An outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) occurred in an interdisciplinary intensive care unit, affecting 10 patients. Within hours of recognition of the spread of CRAb an intervention team was instituted for collection of available data, decision-making, communication and monitoring of all interventions performed, including cohorting, temporary stop of admissions, staff education, and enforcement of infection control measures. An area was defined for cohortation of patients colonized with CRAb, with a separate nursing team and a second set of mobile equipment. New transmissions were no longer observed after only four days into the institution of enhanced infection control measures. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections - III. [O iii] bolometric corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Alison; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Brotherton, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    We present quasar bolometric corrections using the [O III] λ 5007 narrow emission line luminosity based on the detailed spectral energy distributions of 53 bright quasars at low to moderate redshift (0.0345 diversity, introduces scatter into the L_{[O III]}-Liso relationship. We found that the {[O III]} bolometric correction can be significantly improved by adding a term including the equivalent width ratio R_{Fe II} ≡ EW_{{Fe II}}/EW_{Hβ }, which is an EV1 indicator. Inclusion of R_{Fe II} in predicting Liso is significant at nearly the 3σ level and reduces the scatter and systematic offset of the luminosity residuals. Typically, {[O III]} bolometric corrections are adopted for Type 2 sources where the quasar continuum is not observed and in these cases, R_{Fe II} cannot be measured. We searched for an alternative measure of EV1 that could be measured in the optical spectra of Type 2 sources but were unable to identify one. Thus, the main contribution of this work is to present an improved {[O III]} bolometric correction based on measured bolometric luminosities and highlight the EV1 dependence of the correction in Type 1 sources.

  18. CyberStorm III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.; et al

    2010-01-01

    Projectteam Cyber Storm III - De Verenigde Staten organiseerden de afgelopen jaren een reeks grootschalige ICT-crisisoefeningen met de naam Cyber Storm. Cyber Storm III is de derde oefening in de reeks. Het scenario van Cyber Storm III staat in het teken van grootschalige ICT-verstoringen, waarbij n

  19. Educational Level and Illiteracy Rates of Mothers and Step-Fathers of Vietnamese Amerasians Enroute to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronk, Donald E.

    A study compared demographic and test data on the Vietnamese mothers or primary caregivers of Amerasian offspring (hereafter, Amerasian mothers) with those of non-Amerasian peers at the Philippine Refugee Processing Center. Eight hypotheses concerning the educational level, illiteracy rate, English language skills, husband's education, and…

  20. The record of major quaternary sea-level changes in a large coastal plain estuary, Chesapeake Bay, Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.; Mixon, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Seismic-reflection surveys of the Chesapeake Bay, combined with geologic mapping and analysis of boreholes on the Delmarva Peninsula, provide evidence of at least three generations of the Susquehanna River system and three generations of the Chesapeake Bay. The evidence for ancient courses of the Susquehanna River is preserved as three distinct paleochannels, and evidence for ancient versions of the Chesapeake Bay is preserved as three sets of paleochannel fill beneath the bay and three generations of barrier-spit deposits on the southern Delmarva Peninsula. The paleochannels represent relative sea-level minima and the channel-fill and barrier-spit deposits represents relative sea-level maxima. A history of three major marine transgressions is recorded in the stratigraphy preserved in the filled paleochannels and in the overlying barrier-spit complexes: three systematic progressions from fluvial to estuarine to bay or nearshore marine environments. This sea-level record seems to be compatible with the saw-toothed pattern of the marine oxygen-isotope record and with the concept of glacial-interglacial terminations. It also seems to have a climax character in which most of the preserved evidence is related to the largest terminations and to the extreme sea-level positions that bound those terminations. The three paleochannel-fill and barrier-spit complexes appear to correspond to oxygen-isotope stages 1,5, and either 7 or 11; the three related paleochannels correspond to stages 2, 6, and either 8 or 12. ?? 1988.

  1. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

  2. School- and Family-Level Socioeconomic Status and Health Behaviors: Multilevel Analysis of a National Survey in Wales, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Graham F.; Littlecott, Hannah J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interventions to address inequalities in adolescent health behaviors often target children from less affluent families, or schools in poorer areas. Few studies have examined whether school- or family-level affluence predicts health behaviors independently, or in combination. Methods: This article reports secondary analysis of the Welsh…

  3. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

  4. The Haiku Moment: Seeing the World in a Grain of Sand. A Curriculum Unit for Elementary Levels. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    In recent years, haiku has become a widely adopted part of the language arts, social studies, and multicultural studies curriculum, particularly at the elementary level. Haiku became popular in the 17th and 18th centuries in Japan. Haiku remains popular because these poems describe nature and human experiences, as well as being simple and short.…

  5. The Haiku Moment: Seeing the World in a Grain of Sand. A Curriculum Unit for Secondary Levels. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    In recent years, haiku has become a widely adopted part of the language arts curriculum, particularly at the elementary level. Educators appreciate the simplicity and brevity of haiku as a poetic form that young students can grasp fairly easily and therefore express themselves readily. However, this focus on form has often been to the exclusion of…

  6. Low level technology tool (LLTT) in screening for blindness: test qualities in the outpatients department of a tertiary eye unit using the Snellen chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanganise, R; Rusakaniko, S; Manjonjori, N

    2010-01-01

    To validate the use of finger counting (low level technology tool) in screening for blindness in the outpatients department of a tertiary eye unit with the view of employing the test for screening illiterate people in hard to reach parts of the country where the conventional visual acuity charts are not available. Aperformance evaluation of counting fingers (LLTT) in screening for blindness against the standard test (Snellen chart). Sekuru Kaguvi Eye Unit, Parirenyatwa Hospital, Zimbabwe. Patients presenting to the Eye Outpatient Department at Sekuru Kaguvi Eye Unit with various eye problems. Sensitivity of low level technology tool (LLTT) in identifying blind people. Sensitivity and specificity of LLTT in detecting blindness in all age groups combined was 100% and 88.5% respectively. Although sensitivity was not affected by patient age, specificity decreased with increasing age. The overall positive predictive value for the test was 53.3% and the prevalence of blindness among outpatient attendees was 11.6%. Finger counting is an effective tool that can be employed in screening for blindness in communities which are hard to reach, have low literacy rate and when conventional methods of testing visual acuity are not available.

  7. INSTALLATION OF A POST-ACCIDENT CONFINEMENT HIGH-LEVEL RADIATION MONITORING SYSTEM IN THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREENE,G.A.; GUPPY,J.G.

    1998-09-01

    This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ``Post-Accident Confinement High-Level Radiation Monitoring System'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.6 (Attachment 1). This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians in reducing risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Unit 2, through improved accident detection capability, specifically by the installation of a dual train high-level radiation detection system in the confinement of Unit 2 of the Kola NPP. The major technical objective of this project was to provide, install and make operational the necessary hardware inside the confinement of the Kola NPP Unit 2 to provide early and reliable warning of the release of radionuclides from the reactor into the confinement air space as an indication of the occurrence of a severe accident at the plant. In addition, it was intended to provide hands-on experience and training to the Russian plant workers in the installation, operation, calibration and maintenance of the equipment in order that they may use the equipment without continued US assistance as an effective measure to improve reactor safety at the plant.

  8. Using a Geospatial Model to Relate Fluvial Geomorphology to Macroinvertebrate Habitat in a Prairie River—Part 2: Matching Family-Level Indices to Geomorphological Response Units (GRUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Grace Nostbakken Meissner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many rivers are intensely managed due to anthropogenic influences such as dams, channelization, and water provision for municipalities, agriculture, and industry. With this growing pressure on fluvial systems comes a greater need to evaluate the state of their ecosystems. The purpose of this research is to use a geospatial model of the Qu’Appelle River in Saskatchewan to distinguish instream macroinvertebrate habitats at the family level. River geomorphology was assessed through the use of ArcGIS and digital elevation models; with these tools, the sinuosity, slope, fractal dimension, and stream width of the river were processed. Subsequently, Principal Component Analysis, a clustering technique, revealed areas with similar sets of geomorphological characteristics. These similar typology sequences were then grouped into geomorphological response units (GRUs, designated a color, and mapped into a geospatial model. Macroinvertebrate data was then incorporated to reveal several relationships to the model. For instance, certain GRUs contained more highly sensitive species and healthier diversity levels than others. Future possibilities for expanding on this project include incorporating stable isotope data to evaluate the food-web structure within the river basin. Although GRUs have been very successful in identifying fish habitats in other studies, the macroinvertebrates may be too sessile and their habitat too localized to be identified by such large river units. Units may need to be much shorter (250 m to better identify macroinvertebrate habitat.

  9. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Military Operations in Urban Terrain; Defense-Wide Mission Support; Air Mobility; and Space Launch Orbital Support. For military users, the GPS III...program provides Precise Positioning Service (PPS) to military operations and force enhancement. It also provides increased anti-jam power to the earth ...to be modified . On January 31, 2016, USD(AT&L) signed the GPS III revised APB. This Change 1 to the APB was due to both cost and schedule breaches

  10. The START III bargaining space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  11. Outbreak of Streptococcus pyogenes emm type 58 in a high dependency unit of a level-1 trauma center of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purva Mathur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Group A Streptococcus (GAS can cause illnesses ranging from self-limited to severe, life-threatening, invasive infections. The objective of the following study was to investigate a suspected Streptococcus pyogenes outbreak in a high dependency unit (HDU of our trauma center. Materials and Methods: All the isolates of beta hemolytic Streptococci were identified by standard microbiological methods, Vitek 2 system and latex agglutination tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Exotoxin genes, including speA, speB, speC, speF, smeZ, ssa, speG, speH, speJ, speL, speM and speI were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The emm types of isolates of S. pyogenes were determined by sequencing the variable 5′ end of emm gene after amplification by PCR. Results: In a 28 bedded poly-trauma ward with a four bedded HDU three out of four patients developed S. pyogenes emm type 58 infection. The strain was macrolide and tetracycline resistant and produced the Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins speB, speC, speG, speF and smeZ. Surveillance sampling was done for investigation from patients, health-care workers and environmental samples. Conclusion: An outbreak of GAS infections was established caused by the uncommonly reported emm type 58. The outbreak was controlled by prompt treatment, intensive surveillance, feedback and training.

  12. Free protein S level as a risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke in a prospective cohort study of healthy United Kingdom men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken-Dror, Gie; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Drenos, Fotios; Ireland, Helen A

    2011-10-15

    Plasma protein S (PS) levels are reportedly low in patients with venous thrombosis but high in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. The authors examined the association between free PS concentration and CHD or stroke risk and assessed risk in combination with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Free PS concentration was determined in 6 annual visits among 3,052 middle-aged (49-64 years) United Kingdom men from the Second Northwick Park Heart Study, with 297 CHD events from 1989 to 2005. The highest (vs. first) quintile was associated with a significantly increased CHD risk after adjustment for all other risk factors and correction for regression dilution bias (hazard ratio = 1.85, 95% confidence interval: 1.08, 3.16; P = 0.024). Models that included all well-known risk factors plus PS quintiles improved prediction of CHD (net reclassification improvement (NRI) = 7.0% (P = 0.007), category-less NRI (>0) = 22.1% (P < 0.001)), and the likelihood ratio statistic increased significantly (P = 0.018). The increase in CHD risk was particularly strong when subjects also had high CRP levels. There was no association between free PS level and stroke risk. This study confirms the independent association of elevated free PS levels with future risk of CHD, although elevated PS levels added only modestly to prediction metrics. The novel finding of increased CHD risk, particularly when CRP and PS levels are high, requires further study.

  13. An analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training using supply chain and operations management

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso, Steven; Oh, Dingjin; Younger, Larry M.

    2010-01-01

    MBA Professional Report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Enlisted Entry-Level Training (EELT) pipeline is a complex network that is of vital importance to the U.S. Marine Corps' ability to maintain a balanced force and serve as the nation's force in readiness. This report provides an all-inclusive description of the EELT pipeline by identifying the fundamental steps in the supply chain, analyzing the supply chain's critical characteristics, and providing in...

  14. A factors influencing applicant selection of entry-level physical therapist education programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Kim Curbow; Weber, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Physical therapist education programs must compete for qualified applicants due to a nationwide reduction in the applicant pool. To develop successful recruitment strategies, faculty members need information on factors influencing applicant selection of a program. The purpose of this study was to analyze factors influencing selection of an entry-level physical therapist education program. Survey subjects were students enrolled in the first professional year of an accredited entry-level physical therapist education program. A survey instrument was developed based on the literature and interviews with physical therapist students and faculty members. Results of pilot studies to determine face and content validity were acceptable. Stratified random cluster sampling was applied to select 66 entry-level physical therapy programs from an available population of 150 of the 199 accredited programs. Forty-nine programs were not included in the population for various reasons. Using a five-point Likert scale, subjects rated the influence of 51 items on their selection of a specific physical therapist education program. The overall return rate was 70.4% (1,250 surveys returned). Data were analyzed by response frequency. Four factors were selected as "very influential" by 50% or more of the subjects: degree offered, accreditation status, perception of educational quality, and program atmosphere. Additional factors selected by 45% or more of respondents as "very influential" were pass rate on licensing examination, marketability of degree, student/faculty ratio, and small class size. Factors rated "not influential" by 50% or more of subjects included ethnic, cultural, and gender issues. Since 1998, the physical therapy profession has experienced changes in entry-level degree requirements, practice requirements, and employment opportunities, resulting in increased competition for qualified applicants to education programs. The information gained in this study may assist faculty in

  15. Urinary cadmium levels and tobacco smoke exposure in women age 20-69 years in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, J A; Shafer, M M; Trentham-Dietz, A; Hampton, J M; Newcomb, P A

    2007-10-01

    Cadmium is a toxic, bioaccumulated heavy metal with a half-life of one to four decades in humans (CDC, 2005). Primary exposure sources include food and tobacco smoke. In our population-based study, a risk-factor interview was conducted as part of a breast cancer study for 251 randomly selected women living in Wisconsin (USA), aged 20-69 yr, and spot-urine specimens were also obtained. Urine collection kits were carefully designed to minimize trace element contamination during specimen collection and handling in each participant's home. Urine cadmium concentrations were quantified using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and creatinine levels and specific gravity were also determined. Statistically significant increasing creatinine-adjusted urinary cadmium mean levels relative to smoking status (never, former, and current respectively) were observed. A difference in mean cadmium levels for nonsmokers who reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure during childhood or the recent past (approximately 2 yr prior to the interview) for exposure at home, at work, or in social settings compared to those who reported no exposure was not found.

  16. Serum penicillin G levels are lower than expected in adults within two weeks of administration of 1.2 million units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Broderick

    Full Text Available When introduced in the 1950s, benzathine penicillin G (BPG was shown to be effective in eradicating group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GAS for at least 3 weeks after administration. Several studies since the 1990s suggest that at 3-4 weeks serum penicillin G levels are less than adequate (below MIC(90 of 0.016 µg/ml. We studied these levels for 4 weeks after the recommended dose of BPG in military recruits, for whom it is used as prophylaxis against GAS. The 329 subjects (mean age 20 years each received 1.2 million units BPG IM and gave sera 1 day post injection and twice more at staggered time points over 4 weeks. Serum penicillin G levels were measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectometry. The half-life of serum penicillin G was 4.1 days. By day 11, mean levels were <0.02 µg/ml, and by day 15<0.01 µg/ml. Levels in more than 50% of the subjects were below 0.02 µg/ml on day 9, and <.01 µg/ml on day 16. There was no demonstrable effect of subject body-surface area nor of the four different lots of BPG used. These data indicate that in healthy young adults serum penicillin G levels become less than protective <2½ weeks after injection of 1.2 million units of BPG. The findings require serious consideration in future medical and public health recommendations for treatment and prophylaxis of GAS upper respiratory tract infections.

  17. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for EPA Administrative Regions were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the...

  18. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  19. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  20. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for EPA Administrative Regions were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the...

  1. Level III Ecoregions of New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  2. Level III Eco Regions for New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  3. Level III Ecoregions of Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  4. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  5. Level III Ecoregions of New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  6. Level III Ecoregions of North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  7. Level III Ecoregions of North Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  8. Level III Ecoregions of New York

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  9. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  10. Level III Ecoregions of South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  11. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  12. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  13. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  14. Level III Ecoregions of West Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  15. Level III Ecoregions of South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  16. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  17. Level III Ecoregions of New Hampshire

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  18. Pre-Study of Off-site Consequence Analysis in Level 3 PSA of Wolsong Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Jik; Yang, Ho-Chang; Choi, Seong-Soo [ACT, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to perform level 3 PSA, MACCS II (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System 2) is needed. MACCS II is used in PSA for plants in order to evaluate population dose that is the effects on health and environment caused by released radioisotopes after an accident. In this study, Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) event in CANDU-6 plants is evaluated population dose that is the effects on health and environment caused by released radioisotopes after an accident. In this study, Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) event has been evaluated by using Level 1 PSA result and Level 2 PSA result(ISSAC) and MACCS II. As a result, We are obtained the following conclusion. - Early maximum early fatalities is 5.35E+02 equal to latent maximum early fatalities.(99.5%) - Early and latent maximum cancer fatalities are 2.33E+03 and 1.11E+04, respectively. (99.5%) - Early and latent maximum population doses are 1.25 and 5.00 person-rem/yr, respectively. (99.5%) Other study has shown that MACCS II was performed evaluation for Wolsong NPP. Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident(SBLOCA) event is selected by other study. The results of early and cancer fatalities applied similar assumption were 3.02E+00 and 1.89E+03, respectively. This study's results are higher than other study's result. Because, basis input data is different each studies, and event frequency are different (This study : 2.10E-07/ Other study : 4.93E-09)

  19. 放射性物位计在连续重整装置的应用%Application of Radioactive Material Level Meter in Continuous Reforming Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨霄

    2015-01-01

    Catalyst regeneration system is the core part of reaction and regeneration of continuous reforming unit. To provide reliable parameters for control system, the catalyst should be accurately detected in the process of catalyst regeneration and recycling. Radioactive material level meter is an instrument which can accurately detect the catalyst material level. This paper introduces the radioactive material level meter's working principle, configu-rations and protection matters, and meanwhile, introduces the setting and calibration of the meter in continuous re-forming unit with the domestic continuous reforming process.%催化剂再生系统是连续重整装置反再部分的核心环节。在催化剂再生和循环的过程中需要准确检测催化剂的物位,为控制系统提供可靠参数。放射性物位计就是一种能准确检测设备中催化剂物位的仪表。本文介绍了放射性物位计的工作原理、配置方法和防护事项。同时,结合国产连续重整工艺,介绍了放射性物位计在连续重整中的设置和标定。

  20. Cadmium levels in soils and plants from some long-term soil fertility experiments in the United States of America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortvedt, J.J.

    Phosphate fertilizers contain varying amounts of Cd and other heavy metals as contaminants from phosphate rock (PR). To determine whether periodic applications of P fertilizers resulted in measurable accumulations of Cd in soils and in harvested crops, soil and plant tissue samples from nine long-term (>50 yr) soil fertility experiments in the USA were analyzed for Cd, as well as P and other elements. Annual Cd rates were estimated to range from 0.3 to 1.2 g ha/sup -1/ in these experiments. Plant tissues analyzed were corn (Zea mays L.), soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) leaves or grain, and timothy (Phleum pratense L.) forage. Results from these long-term experiments have shown that plant uptake of Cd contaminants in P fertilizers containing < 10 mg Cd kg/sup -1/ is negligible. While the Cd accumulations in soil in these experiments could not be calculated, they would approximate that accumulated in most agricultural soils in the USA at this time. About 70% of the P fertilizers is produced from Florida PR, which contains <10 mg kg/sup -1/ of Cd, as compared with about 10% from the western USA, which contains higher Cd levels. Therefore, adding Cd to soils as a contaminant in P fertilizers at rates ranging from 0.3 to 1.2 g Cd ha/sup -1/ does not appear to result in increased Cd levels in plants as a result of long-term P fertilization.

  1. Current European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, injury levels in the northeastern United States and the value of Bt field corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenblust, Eric W; Breining, James A; Shaffer, John A; Fleischer, Shelby J; Roth, Gregory W; Tooker, John F

    2014-11-01

    Recent evidence indicates that some populations of European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), have declined to historic lows owing to widespread adoption of Bt corn hybrids. To understand current ECB populations in Pennsylvania field corn, the authors assessed larval damage in Bt and non-Bt corn hybrids at 29 sites over 3 years. The influence of Bt adoption rates, land cover types and moth activity on levels of ECB damage was also considered. Bt hybrids reduced ECB damage when compared with non-Bt, but these differences inconsistently translated to higher yields and, because of higher seed costs, rarely improved profits. No relationships were detected between land use or Bt adoption and ECB damage rates, but positive relationships were found between plant damage and captures of Z-race ECB moths in pheromone traps in the PestWatch network. ECB damage levels were generally low and appear to be declining across Pennsylvania. In many locations, farmers may gain greater profits by planting competitive non-Bt hybrids; however, Bt hybrids remain valuable control options, particularly in the parts of Pennsylvania where ECB populations persist. Moth captures from PestWatch appear to provide insight into where Bt hybrids are most valuable. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. CATTI英语笔译3级指定教材中参考译文语言质量分析--以第七单元为例%Language Quality Analysis on English Translation of CATTI III Prescribed Textbook-A Case Study of the Seventh Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张珊

    2015-01-01

    随着国际交流的深入和中国国际地位的突飞猛进,翻译成为对外交流必不可少的一项活动。全国翻译专业资格(水平)考试作为评定翻译水平的一项重要考试,其指定教材对翻译人才的培养有着直接的影响。该文评析全国翻译专业资格(水平)考试指定教材《英语笔译实务3级》第七单元参考译文中的一些不妥之处并以互联网翻译工具,百科全书查词和双语平行语料检索为辅助尝试改译。旨在促进全国翻译专业资格(水平)考试指定教材参考译文的规范化,使考生在指定教材运用时更轻松。%With international exchanges deepening and China's international status advancing, translation becomes an essential ac⁃tivity. China Accreditation Test for Translators and Interpreters—CATTI, serves as a measure of the level of translation, whose pre⁃scribed textbooks have a direct impact on translators-to-be. This paper exams some language translation inadequacies of the sev⁃enth unit of CATTI III prescribed textbook and assists with Internet translation tools, encyclopedia search words and bilingual par⁃allel corpus for try to retrieve translation. Aimed at promoting the standardization of English translation of CATTI prescribed text⁃book, making it easier for candidates to prepare the exam.

  3. Implementation of a Sage-Based Stirling Model Into a System-Level Numerical Model of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2011-01-01

    The Fission Power System (FPS) project is developing a Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) to verify the performance and functionality of a subscale version of the FPS reference concept in a relevant environment, and to verify component and system models. As hardware is developed for the TDU, component and system models must be refined to include the details of specific component designs. This paper describes the development of a Sage-based pseudo-steady-state Stirling convertor model and its implementation into a system-level model of the TDU.

  4. Action Tweets Linked to Reduced County-Level HIV Prevalence in the United States: Online Messages and Structural Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Molly E; Chen, Qijia; Schwartz, H Andrew; Ungar, Lyle H; Albarracin, Dolores

    2016-06-01

    HIV is uncommon in most US counties but travels quickly through vulnerable communities when it strikes. Tracking behavior through social media may provide an unobtrusive, naturalistic means of predicting HIV outbreaks and understanding the behavioral and psychological factors that increase communities' risk. General action goals, or the motivation to engage in cognitive and motor activity, may support protective health behavior (e.g., using condoms) or encourage activity indiscriminately (e.g., risky sex), resulting in mixed health effects. We explored these opposing hypotheses by regressing county-level HIV prevalence on action language (e.g., work, plan) in over 150 million tweets mapped to US counties. Controlling for demographic and structural predictors of HIV, more active language was associated with lower HIV rates. By leveraging language used on social media to improve existing predictive models of geographic variation in HIV, future targeted HIV-prevention interventions may have a better chance of reaching high-risk communities before outbreaks occur.

  5. Neighborhood-level socioeconomic determinants impact outcomes in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients in the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhunmwunsee, Loretta; Joshi, Mary-Beth M; Conlon, Debbi H; Harpole, David H

    2012-10-15

    Studies examining the impact of lower socioeconomic status (SES) on the outcomes of patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are inconsistent. The objective of this study was to clearly elucidate the association between SES, education, and clinical outcomes among patients with NSCLC. The study population was derived from a consecutive, retrospective cohort of patients with NSCLC who received treatment within the Duke Health System between 1995 and 2007. SES determinants were based on the individual's census tract and corresponding 2000 Census data. Determinants included the percentage of the population living below poverty, the median household income, and the percentages of residents with at least a high school diploma and at least a bachelor's degree. The SES and educational variables were divided into quartiles. Statistical comparisons were performed using the 25th and 75th percentiles. Individuals who resided in areas with a low median household income or in which a high percentage of residents were living below the poverty line had a shorter cancer-specific 6-year survival than individuals who resided in converse areas (P = .0167 and P = .0067, respectively). Those living in areas in which a higher percentage of residents achieved a high school diploma had improved disease outcomes compared with those living in areas in which a lower percentage attained a high school diploma (P = .0033). A survival advantage also was observed for inhabitants of areas in which a higher percentage of residents attained a bachelor's degree (P = .0455). Low SES was identified as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in patients with both early and advanced stage NSCLC. Patients who lived in areas with high poverty levels, low median incomes, and low education levels had worse mortality. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  6. Assessing the genome level diversity of Listeria monocytogenes from contaminated ice cream and environmental samples linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Luo, Yan; Curry, Phillip; Timme, Ruth; Melka, David; Doyle, Matthew; Parish, Mickey; Hammack, Thomas S.; Allard, Marc W.; Brown, Eric W.; Strain, Errol A.

    2017-01-01

    A listeriosis outbreak in the United States implicated contaminated ice cream produced by one company, which operated 3 facilities. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis on Listeria monocytogenes from food, environmental and clinical sources, identifying two clusters and a single branch, belonging to PCR serogroup IIb and genetic lineage I. WGS Cluster I, representing one outbreak strain, contained 82 food and environmental isolates from Facility I and 4 clinical isolates. These isolates differed by up to 29 SNPs, exhibited 9 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence type (ST) 5 of clonal complex 5 (CC5). WGS Cluster II contained 51 food and environmental isolates from Facility II, 4 food isolates from Facility I and 5 clinical isolates. Among them the isolates from Facility II and clinical isolates formed a clade and represented another outbreak strain. Isolates in this clade differed by up to 29 SNPs, exhibited 3 PFGE profiles and ST5. The only isolate collected from Facility III belonged to singleton ST489, which was in a single branch separate from Clusters I and II, and was not associated with the outbreak. WGS analyses clustered together outbreak-associated isolates exhibiting multiple PFGE profiles, while differentiating them from epidemiologically unrelated isolates that exhibited outbreak PFGE profiles. The complete genome of a Cluster I isolate allowed the identification and analyses of putative prophages, revealing that Cluster I isolates differed by the gain or loss of three putative prophages, causing the banding pattern differences among all 3 AscI-PFGE profiles observed in Cluster I isolates. WGS data suggested that certain ice cream varieties and/or production lines might have contamination sources unique to them. The SNP-based analysis was able to distinguish CC5 as a group from non-CC5 isolates and differentiate among CC5 isolates from

  7. Assessing the genome level diversity of Listeria monocytogenes from contaminated ice cream and environmental samples linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Luo, Yan; Curry, Phillip; Timme, Ruth; Melka, David; Doyle, Matthew; Parish, Mickey; Hammack, Thomas S; Allard, Marc W; Brown, Eric W; Strain, Errol A

    2017-01-01

    A listeriosis outbreak in the United States implicated contaminated ice cream produced by one company, which operated 3 facilities. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis on Listeria monocytogenes from food, environmental and clinical sources, identifying two clusters and a single branch, belonging to PCR serogroup IIb and genetic lineage I. WGS Cluster I, representing one outbreak strain, contained 82 food and environmental isolates from Facility I and 4 clinical isolates. These isolates differed by up to 29 SNPs, exhibited 9 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence type (ST) 5 of clonal complex 5 (CC5). WGS Cluster II contained 51 food and environmental isolates from Facility II, 4 food isolates from Facility I and 5 clinical isolates. Among them the isolates from Facility II and clinical isolates formed a clade and represented another outbreak strain. Isolates in this clade differed by up to 29 SNPs, exhibited 3 PFGE profiles and ST5. The only isolate collected from Facility III belonged to singleton ST489, which was in a single branch separate from Clusters I and II, and was not associated with the outbreak. WGS analyses clustered together outbreak-associated isolates exhibiting multiple PFGE profiles, while differentiating them from epidemiologically unrelated isolates that exhibited outbreak PFGE profiles. The complete genome of a Cluster I isolate allowed the identification and analyses of putative prophages, revealing that Cluster I isolates differed by the gain or loss of three putative prophages, causing the banding pattern differences among all 3 AscI-PFGE profiles observed in Cluster I isolates. WGS data suggested that certain ice cream varieties and/or production lines might have contamination sources unique to them. The SNP-based analysis was able to distinguish CC5 as a group from non-CC5 isolates and differentiate among CC5 isolates from

  8. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family...... and renamed as MT-III. In this study we have raised polyclonal antibodies in rabbits against recombinant rat MT-III (rMT-III). The sera obtained reacted specifically against recombinant zinc-and cadmium-saturated rMT-III, and did not cross-react with native rat MT-I and MT-II purified from the liver of zinc...... injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize...

  9. Assessment of the Level of Satisfaction and Unmet Data Needs for Specialty Drug Formulary Decisions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonyoung; Navarro, Robert P

    2016-04-01

    Formulary management within a limited budget is critical, especially for specialty drugs, which are used for serious medical conditions and are very expensive. Despite attempts to summarize the pertinent evidence, it is uncertain whether data needs of formulary decision makers for specialty drugs are satisfied. To assess the level of satisfaction of specialty drug formulary decision makers with regards to the strength of current available data sources and unmet needs regarding clinical, economic, and unpublished evidence. This study targeted pharmacists and physicians involved with formulary decision making at health plans or pharmacy benefit management companies at the national, large regional, and local levels. 95 individuals were invited to participate (without compensation) in a 21-item, web-based survey (Qualtrics), which was open from June 14 to July 31, 2014. The responses were coded for descriptive and statistical analysis. Statistical analyses included the Kruskal-Wallis test, analysis of variance, and the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. Of 95 pharmacists or physicians, 40 respondents initiated the survey, and 33 respondents completed the survey (response rate = 34.7%). Drug formulary decision makers infrequently rated data evidence strength (17.1% "always"). Clinical data evidence strength was rated highest with published randomized controlled trials (RCTs; mean [SD] = 4.06 [0.87] of 5.0), while participant organizations' internal data were rated highest for economic data evidence strength (mean [SD] = 3.91 [1.07] of 5.0). Decision makers rated the highest unmet need as more data generated from head-to-head RCTs (mean [SD] = 2.94 [0.25] of 3.0) and cost-effectiveness analyses (mean [SD] = 2.53 [0.67] of 3.0). The participants believed manufacturers might be in the best position to satisfy their desire for head-to-head RCTs (mean [SD] = 4.31 [1.09] of 5.0). Despite a variety of data sources, drug formulary decision makers continue to rely on published RCTs or

  10. Improving the quality of health care in the United States of America: the need for a multi-level approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, David

    2002-07-01

    Serious efforts to address quality require coordinated, multi-faceted, multi-level strategies that address the organisational environments and cultures that affect how care is provided. Most efforts over the past 50 years to improve the care provided by physicians and other clinicians have been individually rather than system based. Such individual interventions to modify physician behaviour typically have only modest effects whether considering the recognition and treatment of depression in primary care, following established practice guidelines, carrying out preventive interventions, monitoring and managing chronic illness appropriately, or managing pain and end-of-life care. It is increasingly recognised that quality of care is a property of health systems. Internal efforts to shape clinical routines, such as performance incentives and disease-management approaches, and external inducements and constraints that shape how clinical contexts are organised and function are equally relevant. Internal factors include the skills training of clinical personnel, organisational procedures and mechanisms to coordinate care and prevent errors, implementation of best practices, effective use of informational technologies and appropriate incentives. External factors include broader financial and reimbursement mechanisms, regulatory arrangements that protect access and patient rights in situations of vulnerability and performance-based contracts. The mobilisation of effective advocacy, independent and non-profit statutory watchdog organisations, and good consumer information can facilitate and reinforce quality efforts. System integration is admittedly difficult, and always incomplete, but movement toward this goal is an essential strategic objective.

  11. Complications of Trauma Patients Admitted to the ICU in Level I Academic Trauma Centers in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Mondello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aims of this study were to evaluate the complications that occur after trauma and the characteristics of individuals who develop complications, to identify potential risk factors that increase their incidence, and finally to investigate the relationship between complications and mortality. Methods. We did a population-based retrospective study of trauma patients admitted to ICUs of a level I trauma center. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine independent predictors for complications. Results. Of the 11,064 patients studied, 3,451 trauma patients developed complications (31.2%. Complications occurred significantly more in younger male patients. Length of stay was correlated with the number of complications (R=0.435,P<0.0001. The overall death rate did not differ between patients with or without complications. The adjusted odds ratio (OR of developing complication for patients over age 75 versus young adults was 0.7 (P<0.0001. Among males, traumatic central nervous system (CNS injury was an important predictor for complications (adjusted OR 1.24. Conclusions. Complications after trauma were found to be associated with age, gender, and traumatic CNS injury. Although these are not modifiable factors, they may identify subjects at high risk for the development of complications, allowing for preemptive strategies for prevention.

  12. Quantitative Detection of Hepatitis A Virus and Enteroviruses Near the United States-Mexico Border and Correlation with Levels of Fecal Indicator Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersberg, Richard M.; Rose, Michael A.; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Dhar, Arun K.

    2006-01-01

    For decades, untreated sewage flowing northward from Tijuana, Mexico, via the Tijuana River has adversely affected the water quality of the recreational beaches of San Diego, California. We used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure the levels of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enteroviruses in coastal waters near the United States-Mexico border and compared these levels to those of the conventional fecal indicators, Escherichia coli and enterococci. Over a 2-year period from 2003 to 2005, a total of 20 samples were assayed at two sites during both wet and dry weather: the surfzone at the mouth of the Tijuana River and the surfzone near the pier at Imperial Beach (IB), California (about 2 km north of the mouth of the Tijuana River). HAV and enterovirus were detected in 79 and 93% of the wet-weather samples, respectively. HAV concentrations in these samples ranged from 105 to 30,771 viral particles/liter, and enterovirus levels ranged from 7 to 4,417 viral particles/liter. The concentrations of HAV and enterovirus were below the limit of detection for all dry weather samples collected at IB. Regression analyses showed a significant correlation between the densities of both fecal bacterial indicators and the levels of HAV (R2 > 0.61, P 0.70, P < 0.0001), a finding that supports the use of conventional bacterial indicators to predict the levels of these viruses in recreational marine waters. PMID:16980430

  13. Quantitative detection of hepatitis a virus and enteroviruses near the United States-Mexico border and correlation with levels of fecal indicator bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersberg, Richard M; Rose, Michael A; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Dhar, Arun K

    2006-12-01

    For decades, untreated sewage flowing northward from Tijuana, Mexico, via the Tijuana River has adversely affected the water quality of the recreational beaches of San Diego, California. We used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure the levels of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enteroviruses in coastal waters near the United States-Mexico border and compared these levels to those of the conventional fecal indicators, Escherichia coli and enterococci. Over a 2-year period from 2003 to 2005, a total of 20 samples were assayed at two sites during both wet and dry weather: the surfzone at the mouth of the Tijuana River and the surfzone near the pier at Imperial Beach (IB), California (about 2 km north of the mouth of the Tijuana River). HAV and enterovirus were detected in 79 and 93% of the wet-weather samples, respectively. HAV concentrations in these samples ranged from 105 to 30,771 viral particles/liter, and enterovirus levels ranged from 7 to 4,417 viral particles/liter. The concentrations of HAV and enterovirus were below the limit of detection for all dry weather samples collected at IB. Regression analyses showed a significant correlation between the densities of both fecal bacterial indicators and the levels of HAV (R2>0.61, P0.70, P<0.0001), a finding that supports the use of conventional bacterial indicators to predict the levels of these viruses in recreational marine waters.

  14. Multi-level multi-criteria analysis of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimoun, Mousa; Madani, Kaveh; Reinhart, Debra

    2016-04-15

    Historically, the U.S. waste collection fleet was dominated by diesel-fueled waste collection vehicles (WCVs); the growing need for sustainable waste collection has urged decision makers to incorporate economically efficient alternative fuels, while mitigating environmental impacts. The pros and cons of alternative fuels complicate the decisions making process, calling for a comprehensive study that assesses the multiple factors involved. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods allow decision makers to select the best alternatives with respect to selection criteria. In this study, two MCDA methods, Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Simple Additive Weighting (SAW), were used to rank fuel alternatives for the U.S. waste collection industry with respect to a multi-level environmental and financial decision matrix. The environmental criteria consisted of life-cycle emissions, tail-pipe emissions, water footprint (WFP), and power density, while the financial criteria comprised of vehicle cost, fuel price, fuel price stability, and fueling station availability. The overall analysis showed that conventional diesel is still the best option, followed by hydraulic-hybrid WCVs, landfill gas (LFG) sourced natural gas, fossil natural gas, and biodiesel. The elimination of the WFP and power density criteria from the environmental criteria ranked biodiesel 100 (BD100) as an environmentally better alternative compared to other fossil fuels (diesel and natural gas). This result showed that considering the WFP and power density as environmental criteria can make a difference in the decision process. The elimination of the fueling station and fuel price stability criteria from the decision matrix ranked fossil natural gas second after LFG-sourced natural gas. This scenario was found to represent the status quo of the waste collection industry. A sensitivity analysis for the status quo scenario showed the overall ranking of diesel and

  15. Niveles de estrés en el personal de enfermería de unidades de cuidados paliativos Stress levels on nursing staff of palliative care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gómez Cantorna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mediante este estudio, nos gustaría saber cuál es el nivel de estrés que padecen las enfermeras, que trabajan en unidades de cuidados paliativos. Para ello hemos elegido una muestra de 94 enfermeras del SERGAS (Servicio Galego de Saúde, de las distintas unidades de cuidados paliativos, utilizando un cuestionario de datos sociodemográficos y organizacionales junto con el Maslach Burnout Inventory, como instrumentos evaluatorios. Después del análisis de los datos observamos que el personal de enfermería que trabaja en dichas unidades de cuidados paliativos, no presenta un nivel de estrés tan elevado como el que nosotros planteábamos al principio de nuestro estudio.Through this study, we would like to know what level of stress experienced by nurses working in palliative care units. We have chosen a sample of 94 nurses of SERGAS (Servicio Galego de las Saúde of the different palliative care units, using a questionnaire on demographic and organizational data with the Maslach Burnout Inventory, for assessment tools. After analyzin the dat we note that the nursing staff working in this departament of palliative care, no estres levels as high as we posed at the beginning of our study.

  16. Impact of the 2008 Global Recession on air quality over the United States: Implications for surface ozone levels from changes in NOx emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Daniel; Pan, Li; Chen, Weiwei; Lamsal, Lok; Lee, Pius; Tang, Youhua; Kim, Hyuncheol; Kondragunta, Shobha; Stajner, Ivanka

    2016-09-01

    Satellite and ground observations detected large variability in nitrogen oxides (NOx) during the 2008 economic recession, but the impact of the recession on air quality has not been quantified. This study combines observed NOx trends and a regional chemical transport model to quantify the impact of the recession on surface ozone (O3) levels over the continental United States. The impact is quantified by simulating O3 concentrations under two emission scenarios: business-as-usual (BAU) and recession. In the BAU case, the emission projection from the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule is used to estimate the "would-be" NOx emission level in 2011. In the recession case, the actual NO2 trends observed from Air Quality System ground monitors and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument on the Aura satellite are used to obtain "realistic" changes in NOx emissions. The model prediction with the recession effect agrees better with ground O3 observations over time and space than the prediction with the BAU emission. The results show that the recession caused a 1-2 ppbv decrease in surface O3 concentration over the eastern United States, a slight increase (0.5-1 ppbv) over the Rocky Mountain region, and mixed changes in the Pacific West. The gain in air quality benefits during the recession, however, could be quickly offset by the much slower emission reduction rate during the post-recession period.

  17. Sustaining a “culture of silence” in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: A grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, S.; Ramesh, A.; Nagapoornima, M.; Fernandes, Lavina M.; Jisina, C.; Suman Rao, P. N.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP) during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians). Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to “sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations” (core category). The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The “culture of silence” reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a “noisy culture” prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs with resource

  18. Sustaining a “culture of silence” in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: A grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Swathi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians. Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to “sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations” (core category. The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The “culture of silence” reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a “noisy culture” prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs

  19. Relationship between angiotensinogen, alpha 1-protease inhibitor elastase complex, antithrombin III and C-reactive protein in septic ARDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenfeldt, U; Kellermann, W; Kienapfel, G; Jochum, M

    1990-01-01

    The time-course of plasma angiotensinogen (Ao), elastase-alpha 1-protease inhibitor complex (EL alpha 1PI), antithrombin III (AT III) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been investigated of six patients suffering from adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The total plasma Ao level (active and inactive Ao) varied in individuals but was increased up to five-fold. An increasing amount of inactive Ao is found. From the beginning of their stay in the intensive care unit up to five days half of the patients displayed a positive correlation between the plasma CRP and Ao level. The CRP and Ao values were either not or were negatively correlated with the AT III values. In contrast plasma Ao and AT III levels in all patients were positively correlated during a particular period in the subsequent phase of the disease, where there was no or a negative correlation with CRP. The two acute phase reactants CRP and EL alpha 1PI were only correlated in two patients at the beginning of the disease. The markedly increased plasma level at the beginning of the inflammatory disease indicates that Ao is an acute phase reactant, and this is supported by the parallel changes in plasma CRP and Ao levels during the early days of ARDS. The relationship between the plasma levels of Ao and AT III for more than fourteen days suggests similar regulation of these members of the serpin family after termination of the acute-phase.

  20. The Negotiation of Basel III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm

    2015-01-01

    While the Basel Accords of 1988 and 2004 (Basel I and Basel II) ostensibly set out to regulate bank risk at the international level, they were effectively in the grip of neoliberal beliefs in the self-regulating potential of free markets. In 2009–2011, the Basel Accords were revised once more wit...... agency, the empirical argument is substantiated through textual–intertextual analysis of the rhetorical circulation of affective signs in the Basel III negotiations....

  1. Effect of muscle contraction levels on the force-length relationship of the human Achilles tendon during lengthening of the triceps surae muscle-tendon unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, Norihide; Kawakami, Yasuo; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2011-07-28

    Findings from animal experiments are sometimes contradictory to the idea that the tendon structure is a simple elastic spring in series with muscle fibers, and suggest influence of muscle contraction on the tendon mechanical properties. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of muscle contraction levels on the force-length relationship of the human Achilles tendon during lengthening of the triceps surae muscle-tendon unit. For seven subjects, ankle dorsiflexion was performed without (passive condition) and with contraction of plantar flexor muscles (eccentric conditions, at 3 contraction levels) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Deformation of the Achilles tendon during each trial was measured using ultrasonography. The Achilles tendon force corresponding to the tendon elongation of 10mm in the passive condition was significantly smaller than those in the eccentric conditions (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Within the eccentric conditions, the Achilles tendon force corresponding to the tendon elongation of 10mm was significantly greater in the maximal contraction level than those in submaximal eccentric conditions (p<0.05 or p<0.01). In addition, the tendon stiffness was greater in higher contraction levels (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Present results suggest that the human tendon structure is not a simple elastic spring in series with muscle fibers.

  2. Development and Implementation of Efficiency-Improving Analysis Methods for the SAGE III on ISS Thermal Model Originating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; Scola, Salvatore; Tobin, Steven; McLeod, Shawn; Mannu, Sergio; Guglielmo, Corrado; Moeller, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle in 2015. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Several novel methods have been implemented to facilitate efficient payload-level thermal analysis, including the use of a design of experiments (DOE) methodology to determine the worst-case orbits for SAGE III while on ISS, use of TD assemblies to move payloads from the Dragon trunk to the Enhanced Operational Transfer Platform (EOTP) to its final home on the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (ExPRESS) Logistics Carrier (ELC)-4, incorporation of older models in varying unit sets, ability to change units easily (including hardcoded logic blocks), case-based logic to facilitate activating heaters and active elements for varying scenarios within a single model, incorporation of several coordinate frames to easily map to structural models with differing geometries and locations, and streamlined results processing using an Excel-based text file plotter developed in-house at LaRC. This document presents an overview of the SAGE III thermal model and describes the development and implementation of these efficiency-improving analysis methods.

  3. Intra-hospital transfers to a higher level of care: contribution to total hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) mortality and length of stay (LOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Gabriel J; Greene, John D; Gardner, Marla N; Marelich, Gregory P; Quick, Bryon; Kipnis, Patricia

    2011-02-01

    Patients who experience intra-hospital transfers to a higher level of care (eg, ward to intensive care unit [ICU]) are known to have high mortality. However, these findings have been based on single-center studies or studies that employ ICU admissions as the denominator. To employ automated bed history data to examine outcomes of intra-hospital transfers using all hospital admissions as the denominator. Retrospective cohort study. A total of 19 acute care hospitals. A total of 150,495 patients, who experienced 210,470 hospitalizations, admitted to these hospitals between November 1st, 2006 and January 31st, 2008. Predictors were age, sex, admission type, admission diagnosis, physiologic derangement on admission, and pre-existing illness burden; outcomes were: 1) occurrence of intra-hospital transfer, 2) death following admission to the hospital, 3) death following transfer, and 4) total hospital length of stay (LOS). A total of 7,868 hospitalizations that began with admission to either a general medical surgical ward or to a transitional care unit (TCU) had at least one transfer to a higher level of care. These hospitalizations constituted only 3.7% of all admissions, but accounted for 24.2% of all ICU admissions, 21.7% of all hospital deaths, and 13.2% of all hospital days. Models based on age, sex, preadmission laboratory test results, and comorbidities did not predict the occurrence of these transfers. Patients transferred to higher level of care following admission to the hospital have excess mortality and LOS. Copyright © 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  4. Using a Bayesian Network to predict shore-line change vulnerability to sea-level rise for the coasts of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sea-level rise is an ongoing phenomenon that is expected to continue and is projected to have a wide range of effects on coastal environments and infrastructure during the 21st century and beyond. Consequently, there is a need to assemble relevant datasets and to develop modeling or other analytical approaches to evaluate the likelihood of particular sea-level rise impacts, such as coastal erosion, and to inform coastal management decisions with this information. This report builds on previous work that compiled oceanographic and geomorphic data as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for the U.S. Atlantic coast, and developed a Bayesian Network to predict shoreline-change rates based on sea-level rise plus variables that describe the hydrodynamic and geologic setting. This report extends the previous analysis to include the Gulf and Pacific coasts of the continental United States and Alaska and Hawaii, which required using methods applied to the USGS CVI dataset to extract data for these regions. The Bayesian Network converts inputs that include observations of local rates of relative sea-level change, mean wave height, mean tide range, a geomorphic classification, coastal slope, and observed shoreline-change rates to calculate the probability of the shoreline-erosion rate exceeding a threshold level of 1 meter per year for the coasts of the United States. The calculated probabilities were compared to the historical observations of shoreline change to evaluate the hindcast success rate of the most likely probability of shoreline change. Highest accuracy was determined for the coast of Hawaii (98 percent success rate) and lowest accuracy was determined for the Gulf of Mexico (34 percent success rate). The minimum success rate rose to nearly 80 percent (Atlantic and Gulf coasts) when success included shoreline-change outcomes that were adjacent to the most likely outcome. Additionally, the probabilistic approach determines the

  5. A Markov model assessing the impact on primary care practice revenues and patient's health when using mid-level providers, lesson learned from the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Harry; Macey, Richard; Brocklehurst, Paul

    2017-03-08

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of using mid-level providers for dental "check-up" examinations and the treatment of caries in different NHS settings in the United Kingdom. Mid-level providers are a broad category that describes non-dentist members of dental teams. This study focused on the potential use of Dental Hygiene Therapists undertaking dental "check-up" examinations and simple restorative treatment, instead of dentists. A Markov model was used to construct the natural history of caries development in adults that visit a dental practice every six months over a five-year period. Three cost perspectives are taken: those borne to dental healthcare providers in England and Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland. These represent three separate forms of retrospective payment system that are currently in use in the United Kingdom. The cost outcome was the average amount of retained practice earnings required to provide healthcare per patient visit. The health outcome was the average length of time in a cavity-free state and the cost-effectiveness outcome was incremental cost for six months in a cavity-free state. No statistical difference was found between dentists and mid-level providers in the length of time in a cavity-free state but the use of the latter saved money in all three NHS health system jurisdictions. This ranged from £7.85 (England and Wales) to £9.16 (Northern Ireland) per patient visit ($10.20 to $11.90, respectively) meaning the incremental cost for six month in a cavity-free state ranged from £261.67 ($339.93) in England and Wales to £305.33 ($369.68) in Northern Ireland. Further, changes in baseline assumptions and parameter values did not change mid-level providers being the dominant service intervention. In a time of limited funds for dental services, these results suggest that resources in public funded systems could be saved using mid-level providers in dental practices, without any health risk to patients or capital investment.

  6. Genes, genetics, and Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, F; Wong, R W K; Rabie, A B M

    2010-05-01

    To present current views that are pertinent to the investigation of the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion. Class III malocclusion is thought to be a polygenic disorder that results from an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental factors. However, research on family pedigrees has indicated that Class III malocclusion might also be a monogenic dominant phenotype. Recent studies have reported that genes that encode specific growth factors or other signaling molecules are involved in condylar growth under mechanical strain. These genes, which include Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH), parathyroid-hormone like hormone (PTHLH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and variations in their levels of expression play an important role in the etiology of Class III malocclusion. In addition, genome-wide scans have revealed chromosomal loci that are associated with Class III malocclusion. It is likely that chromosomal loci 1p36, 12q23, and 12q13 harbor genes that confer susceptibility to Class III malocclusion. In a case-control association study, we identified erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 (EPB41) to be a new positional candidate gene that might be involved in susceptibility to mandibular prognathism. Most of the earlier studies on the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion have focused on the patterns of inheritance of this phenotype. Recent investigations have focused on understanding the genetic variables that affect Class III malocclusion and might provide new approaches to uncovering the genetic etiology of this phenotype.

  7. A dynamic level IV multimedia environmental model: application to the fate of polychlorinated biphenyls in the United Kingdom over a 60-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, Andrew J; Cousins, Ian T; Seth, Rajesh; Jones, Kevin C; Mackay, Donald

    2002-05-01

    A dynamic or level IV multimedia model is described and illustrated by application to the fate of three polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in the United Kingdom over a 60-year period from their introduction into commerce until the present. Models of this type are shown to be valuable for elucidating the time response of environmental systems to increasing, decreasing, or pulse inputs. The suggestion is made that in addition to the outputs of time-dependent concentrations (which can be compared with monitoring data for validation purposes), it is useful to examine masses, fugacities, and fugacity ratios between media? The relative importance of processes is best evaluated by compiling cumulative intermedia fluxes and quantities lost by reaction and advection and examining the corresponding process rate constants or their reciprocals, the characteristic times. The suggestion is made that uncertainty and sensitivity analyses are desirable, but it must be appreciated that relative sensitivities of input parameters may change during the simulation period, so a single sensitivity analysis conducted at one point in time can be misleading. The use of the model for forecasting future trends in concentration is illustrated. Given the uncertainties in emission and advective inflow rates, the simulation of PCB fate in the United Kingdom is regarded as showing time trends that are in satisfactory agreement with monitoring data.

  8. Consumers' segmentation based on the acceptability of meat from entire male pigs with different boar taint levels in four European countries: France, Italy, Spain and United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panella-Riera, N; Blanch, M; Kallas, Z; Chevillon, P; Garavaldi, A; Gil, M; Gil, J M; Font-i-Furnols, M; Oliver, M A

    2016-04-01

    Two consumer studies were conducted to know the acceptability of pork with different boar taint levels: test 1 performed in Spain (n=126) and United Kingdom (n=146), and test 2 performed in France (n=139) and Italy (n=140). Each test had 3 types of pork: 'Female meat', 'Low boar tainted meat', and a third type was 'Medium boar tainted meat' or 'High boar tainted meat'. Three main clusters were identified on the basis of 'How delicious do you find this meat?': 1-Pork lovers, 2-Boar meat lovers, 3-Reject boar tainted meat. Additionally, in test 2, a fourth cluster was identified: 'Reject low tainted meat'. A group of 16.2-38.2% of consumers rejected meat from boars, and another group of 12.4-21.7% rated the meat with medium or high levels of boar taint better than the meat from females, identifying a niche for meat from medium and high levels of boar taint, and suggesting the need to select carcasses on the basis of boar taint.

  9. Improvement of the performances of a tandem simulated moving bed chromatography by controlling the yield level of a key product of the first simulated moving bed unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungyong; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2017-03-10

    One of the trustworthy processes for ternary separation is a tandem simulated moving bed (SMB) process, which consists of two subordinate four-zone SMB units (Ring I and Ring II). To take full advantage of a tandem SMB as a means of recovering all three products with high purities and high economical efficiency, it is important to understand how the separation condition in Ring II is affected by that in Ring I, and further to reflect such point in the stage of designing a tandem SMB. In regard to such issue, it was clarified in this study that the Ring I factors affecting the Ring II condition could be represented by the yield level of a key product of Ring I (Ykey(RingI)). As the Ykey(RingI) level became higher, the amount of the Ring I key-product that was reloaded into Ring II was reduced, which affected favorably the Ring II separation condition. On the other hand, the higher Ykey(RingI) level caused a larger dilution for the stream from Ring I to Ring II, which affected adversely the Ring II separation condition. As a result, a minimum in the desorbent usage of a tandem SMB occurred at the Ykey(RingI) level where the two aforementioned factors could be balanced with each other. If such an optimal Ykey(RingI) level was adopted, the desorbent usage could be reduced by up to 25%. It was also found that as the throughput of a tandem SMB became higher, the factor related to the migration of the Ring I key-product into Ring II was more influential in the performances of a tandem SMB than the factor related to the dilution of the stream from Ring I to Ring II.

  10. TABLE III. Deaths in 122 U.S. cities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — TABLE III. Deaths in 122 U.S. cities - 2014.122 Cities Mortality Reporting System. Each week, the vital statistics offices of 122 cities across the United States...

  11. County-level estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus from animal manure for the conterminous United States, 2007 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronberg, JoAnn M.; Arnold, Terri L.

    2017-03-24

    County-level estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus inputs from animal manure for the conterminous United States were calculated from animal population inventories in the 2007 and 2012 Census of Agriculture, using previously published methods. These estimates of non-point nitrogen and phosphorus inputs from animal manure were compiled in support of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Assessment Project of the National Water Quality Program and are needed to support national-scale investigations of stream and groundwater water quality. The estimates published in this report are comparable with older estimates which can be compared to show changes in nitrogen and phosphorus inputs from manure over time.

  12. The 2011 United Nations high-level meeting on non-communicable diseases: the Africa agenda calls for a 5-by-5 approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, G A; Mayosi, B M

    2012-11-08

    The High Level Meeting of the 66th Session of the United Nations General Assembly was held in September 2011. The Political Declaration issued at the meeting focused the attention of world leaders and the global health community on the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). The four major NCDs (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory diseases) and their four risk factors (tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol) constitute the target of the '4-by-4' approach, which is also supported by national and international health organisations. We argue that while preventing these eight NCDs and risk factors is also important in Africa, it will not be enough. A '5-by-5' strategy is needed, addressing neuropsychiatric disorders as the fifth NCD; and transmissible agents that underlie the neglected tropical diseases and other NCDs as the fifth risk factor. These phenomena cause substantial preventable death and disability, and must therefore be prioritised.

  13. Evaluation of accuracy of complete-arch multiple-unit abutment-level dental implant impressions using different impression and splinting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed; Baig, Mirza Rustum; Yunus, Norsiah

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of multiple-unit dental implant casts obtained from splinted or nonsplinted direct impression techniques using various splinting materials by comparing the casts to the reference models. The effect of two different impression materials on the accuracy of the implant casts was also evaluated for abutment-level impressions. A reference model with six internal-connection implant replicas placed in the completely edentulous mandibular arch and connected to multi-base abutments was fabricated from heat-curing acrylic resin. Forty impressions of the reference model were made, 20 each with polyether (PE) and polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) impression materials using the open tray technique. The PE and PVS groups were further subdivided into four subgroups of five each on the bases of splinting type: no splinting, bite registration PE, bite registration addition silicone, or autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The positional accuracy of the implant replica heads was measured on the poured casts using a coordinate measuring machine to assess linear differences in interimplant distances in all three axes. The collected data (linear and three-dimensional [3D] displacement values) were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference resin model and analyzed with nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney). No significant differences were found between the various splinting groups for both PE and PVS impression materials in terms of linear and 3D distortions. However, small but significant differences were found between the two impression materials (PVS, 91 μm; PE, 103 μm) in terms of 3D discrepancies, irrespective of the splinting technique employed. Casts obtained from both impression materials exhibited differences from the reference model. The impression material influenced impression inaccuracy more than the splinting material for multiple-unit abutment-level impressions.

  14. The prevalence of feeding problems in children formerly treated in a neonatal intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, M; ter Horst, H. J.; Groen, H.; Nieuwenhuis, T; Bos, A.F.; van Dijk, M W G

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of oral feeding problems in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) graduates at 1 to 2 years, and to identify clinical risk factors during NICU admission. STUDY DESIGN: Observational cohort study of 378 children, who received level III/IV NICU care for 4 days or m

  15. Evidence of nosocomial transmission of human rhinovirus in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sara M; Thompson, Meredyth; Price, Connie S; Young, Heather L

    2016-03-01

    Nosocomial respiratory infections cause significant morbidity and mortality, especially among the extremely susceptible neonatal population. Human rhinovirus C is a common viral respiratory illness that causes significant complications in children rhinovirus C in a level II-III neonatal intensive care unit in an urban public safety net hospital.

  16. The type III manufactory

    CERN Document Server

    Palcoux, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Using unusual objects in the theory of von Neumann algebra, as the chinese game Go or the Conway game of life (generalized on finitely presented groups), we are able to build, by hands, many type III factors.

  17. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology.

  18. Interdependence between government levels in Brazilian health policy: the implementation of Emergency Care Units in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Luciana Dias; Machado, Cristiani Veira; O'Dwyer, Gisele; Baptista, Tatiana Wargas de Faria; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares; Konder, Mariana Teixeira

    2015-02-01

    This article addresses policymaking related to Emergency Care Units (ECU) in the State of Rio de Janeiro between 2007 and 2013, duly identifying the relationships between the various levels of government in this process. It prioritized the context of policy formulation, the factors that motivated the inclusion and maintenance of ECUs on the state agenda and the process of how the policy was implemented in the state. The study was based on the literature that defines the agenda and implementation of public policies and on contributions from historic institutionalism. The research involved analysis of documents, secondary data, and 51 interviews with people in positions of authority in state and municipal governments. The priority given to ECUs in the government agenda was the result of a confluence of historical, structural, political and institutional factors, as well as the current context. The results of this study indicate the existence of interdependence between levels of government, however federal coordination problems have prejudiced the integration of the various components of emergency health care in the state.

  19. The topography of poverty in the United States: a spatial analysis using county-level data from the Community Health Status Indicators project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, James B

    2007-10-01

    Socioeconomic and health-related data at the county level are now available through the Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI) database. These data are useful for assessing the health of communities and regions. Users of the CHSI data can access online reports and an online mapping application for visualizing patterns in various community-related measures. It also is possible to download these data to conduct local analyses. This paper describes a spatial analysis of poverty in the United States at the county level for 2000. Spatial statistical techniques in a geographic information system were used to quantify significant spatial patterns, such as concentrated poverty rates and spatial outliers. The analysis revealed significant and stark patterns of poverty. A distinctive north-south demarcation of low versus high poverty concentrations was found, along with isolated pockets of high and low poverty within areas in which the predominant poverty rates were opposite. This pattern can be described as following a continental poverty divide. These insights can be useful in explicating the underlying processes involved in forming such spatial patterns that result in concentrated wealth and poverty. The spatial analytic techniques are broadly applicable to socioeconomic and health-related data and can provide important information about the spatial structure of datasets, which is important for choosing appropriate analysis methods.

  20. Walk the Line: The Development of Route Selection Standards for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste in the United States - 13519

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Although storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) are widely dispersed throughout the United States, these materials are also relatively concentrated in terms of geographic area. That is, the impacts of storage occur in a very small geographic space. Once shipments begin to a national repository or centralized interim storage facility, the impacts of SNF and HLRW will become more geographically distributed, more publicly visible, and almost certainly more contentious. The selection of shipping routes will likely be a major source of controversy. This paper describes the development of procedures, regulations, and standards for the selection of routes used to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The paper begins by reviewing the circumstances around the development of HM-164 routing guidelines. The paper discusses the significance of New York City versus the Department of Transportation and application of HM-164. The paper describes the methods used to implement those regulations. The paper will also describe the current HM-164 designated routes and will provide a summary data analysis of their characteristics. This analysis will reveal the relatively small spatial scale of the effects of HM 164. The paper will then describe subsequent developments that have affected route selection for these materials. These developments include the use of 'representative routes' found in the Department of Energy (DOE) 2008 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the formerly proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The paper will describe recommendations related to route selection found in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 report Going the Distance, as well as recommendations found in the 2012 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper will examine recently promulgated federal regulations (HM-232) for selection of rail