WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit lattice cell

  1. Mechanical behavior of regular open-cell porous biomaterials made of diamond lattice unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, S M; Campoli, G; Amin Yavari, S; Sajadi, B; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2014-06-01

    Cellular structures with highly controlled micro-architectures are promising materials for orthopedic applications that require bone-substituting biomaterials or implants. The availability of additive manufacturing techniques has enabled manufacturing of biomaterials made of one or multiple types of unit cells. The diamond lattice unit cell is one of the relatively new types of unit cells that are used in manufacturing of regular porous biomaterials. As opposed to many other types of unit cells, there is currently no analytical solution that could be used for prediction of the mechanical properties of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cells. In this paper, we present new analytical solutions and closed-form relationships for predicting the elastic modulus, Poisson׳s ratio, critical buckling load, and yield (plateau) stress of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cell. The mechanical properties predicted using the analytical solutions are compared with those obtained using finite element models. A number of solid and porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) specimens were manufactured using selective laser melting. A series of experiments were then performed to determine the mechanical properties of the matrix material and cellular structures. The experimentally measured mechanical properties were compared with those obtained using analytical solutions and finite element (FE) models. It has been shown that, for small apparent density values, the mechanical properties obtained using analytical and numerical solutions are in agreement with each other and with experimental observations. The properties estimated using an analytical solution based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory markedly deviated from experimental results for large apparent density values. The mechanical properties estimated using FE models and another analytical solution based on the Timoshenko beam theory better matched the experimental observations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  3. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  4. Diffractive stacks of metamaterial lattices with a complex unit cell: Self-consistent long-range bianisotropic interactions in experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwadrin, Andrej; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces and metamaterials promise arbitrary rerouting of light using two-dimensional (2D) planar arrangements of electric and magnetic scatterers, respectively, 3D stacks built out of such 2D planes. An important problem is how to self-consistently model the response of these systems in a manner that retains dipole intuition yet does full justice to the self-consistent multiple scattering via near-field and far-field retarded interactions. We set up such a general model for metamaterial lattices of complex 2D unit cells of poly-atomic basis as well as allowing for stacking in a third dimension. In particular, each scatterer is quantified by a magnetoelectric polarizability tensor and Ewald lattice summation deals with all near-field and long-range retarded electric, magnetic, and magnetoelectric couplings self-consistently. We show in theory and experiment that grating diffraction orders of dilute split ring lattices with complex unit cells show a background-free signature of magnetic dipole response. For denser lattices experiment and theory show that complex unit cells can reduce the apparent effect of bianisotropy, i.e., the strong oblique-incidence handed response that was reported for simple split ring lattices. Finally, the method is applied to calculate transmission of finite stacks of lattices. Thereby our simple methodology allows us to trace the emergence of effective material constants when building a 3D metamaterial layer by layer, as well as facilitating the design of metasurfaces.

  5. Multiple-unit antennas on paraboloidal lattices of dielectric resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Trubin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Today a multiple-unit antenna properties, containing big number DRs are studied inefficiently. At present article a possibility of the antennas building produced on paraboloidal lattices consisting DRs of the cylindrical form with lowest magnetic type resonances is considered. The results. Calculation results of the antenna parameters on dielectric resonator paraboloidal lattices are presented. The space distribution of the radiation field patterns in the near and wave zones is considered. Reflection coefficient frequency dependence of the antennas is calculated. Possibility narrowing of the directional pattern is showed. Signals frequency selection performing as well as increased electromagnetic compatibility of the suggested structures is noticed. Conclusion. Adduced calculations indicate capability of the practical application lattices on DRs as well as building on their base a wide class of the frequency selective antennas in millimeter and sub millimeter wavelength ranges. Such antennas will have enhanced electromagnetic compatibility.

  6. Simulating Lattice Spin Models on Graphics Processing Units

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Tal; Rabani, Eran; 10.1021/ct100385b

    2012-01-01

    Lattice spin models are useful for studying critical phenomena and allow the extraction of equilibrium and dynamical properties. Simulations of such systems are usually based on Monte Carlo (MC) techniques, and the main difficulty is often the large computational effort needed when approaching critical points. In this work, it is shown how such simulations can be accelerated with the use of NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) using the CUDA programming architecture. We have developed two different algorithms for lattice spin models, the first useful for equilibrium properties near a second-order phase transition point and the second for dynamical slowing down near a glass transition. The algorithms are based on parallel MC techniques, and speedups from 70- to 150-fold over conventional single-threaded computer codes are obtained using consumer-grade hardware.

  7. Relationships among Ionic Lattice Energies, Molecular (Formula Unit) Volumes, and Thermochemical Radii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, H. Donald B.; Roobottom, Helen K.; Passmore, Jack; Glasser, Leslie

    1999-08-01

    The linear generalized equation described in this paper provides a further dimension to the prediction of lattice potential energies/enthalpies of ionic solids. First, it offers an alternative (and often more direct) approach to the well-established Kapustinskii equation (whose capabilities have also recently been extended by our recent provision of an extended set of thermochemical radii). Second, it makes possible the acquisition of lattice energy estimates for salts which, up until now, except for simple 1:1 salts, could not be considered because of lack of crystal structure data. We have generalized Bartlett's correlation for MX (1:1) salts, between the lattice enthalpy and the inverse cube root of the molecular (formula unit) volume, such as to render it applicable across an extended range of ionic salts for the estimation of lattice potential energies. When new salts are synthesized, acquisition of full crystal structure data is not always possible and powder data provides only minimal structural information-unit cell parameters and the number of molecules per cell. In such cases, lack of information about cation-anion distances prevents use of the Kapustinskii equation to predict the lattice energy of the salt. However, our new equation can be employed even when the latter information is not available. As is demonstrated, the approach can be utilized to predict and rationalize the thermochemistry in topical areas of synthetic inorganic chemistry as well as in emerging areas. This is illustrated by accounting for the failure to prepare diiodinetetrachloroaluminum(III), [I(2)(+)][AlCl(4)(-)] and the instability of triiodinetetrafluoroarsenic(III), [I(3)(+)][AsF(6)(-)]. A series of effective close-packing volumes for a range of ions, which will be of interest to chemists, as measures of relative ionic size and which are of use in making our estimates of lattice energies, is generated from our approach.

  8. Bi-Cell Unit for Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patent concerns a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell . The bi-cell unit is comprised of two electrode packs. Each of the electrode packs includes an...invention relates in general to a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell and in particular, to a bi-cell unit for a hydrazine-air fuel cell .

  9. Sickle Cell Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    Included in this high school biology unit on sickle cell anemia are the following materials: a synopsis of the history of the discovery and the genetic qualities of the disease; electrophoresis diagrams comparing normal, homozygous and heterozygous conditions of the disease; and biochemical characteristics and population genetics of the disease. A…

  10. Cell processor implementation of a MILC lattice QCD application

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Guochun; Gottlieb, Steven

    2009-01-01

    We present results of the implementation of one MILC lattice QCD application-simulation with dynamical clover fermions using the hybrid-molecular dynamics R algorithm-on the Cell Broadband Engine processor. Fifty-four individual computational kernels responsible for 98.8% of the overall execution time were ported to the Cell's Synergistic Processing Elements (SPEs). The remaining application framework, including MPI-based distributed code execution, was left to the Cell's PowerPC processor. We observe that we only infrequently achieve more than 10 GFLOPS with any of the kernels, which is just over 4% of the Cell's peak performance. At the same time, many of the kernels are sustaining a bandwidth close to 20 GB/s, which is 78% of the Cell's peak. This indicates that the application performance is limited by the bandwidth between the main memory and the SPEs. In spite of this limitation, speedups of 8.7x (for 8x8x16x16 lattice) and 9.6x (for 16x16x16x16 lattice) were achieved when comparing a 3.2 GHz Cell proce...

  11. Jammed lattice sphere packings

    OpenAIRE

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a...

  12. Validation of WIMS-CANDU using Pin-Cell Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Young; Min, Byung Joo; Park, Joo Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The WIMS-CANDU is a lattice code which has a depletion capability for the analysis of reactor physics problems related to a design and safety. The WIMS-CANDU code has been developed from the WIMSD5B, a version of the WIMS code released from the OECD/NEA data bank in 1998. The lattice code POWDERPUFS-V (PPV) has been used for the physics design and analysis of a natural uranium fuel for the CANDU reactor. However since the application of PPV is limited to a fresh fuel due to its empirical correlations, the WIMS-AECL code has been developed by AECL to substitute the PPV. Also, the WIMS-CANDU code is being developed to perform the physics analysis of the present operating CANDU reactors as a replacement of PPV. As one of the developing work of WIMS-CANDU, the U{sup 238} absorption cross-section in the nuclear data library of WIMS-CANDU was updated and WIMS-CANDU was validated using the benchmark problems for pin-cell lattices such as TRX-1, TRX-2, Bapl-1, Bapl-2 and Bapl-3. The results by the WIMS-CANDU and the WIMS-AECL were compared with the experimental data.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann method with the cell-population equilibrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xiao-Yang; Cheng Bing; Shi Bao-Chang

    2008-01-01

    The central problem of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is to construct a discrete equilibrium.In this paper,a multi-speed 1D cell-model of Boltzmann equation is proposed,in which the cell-population equilibrium,a direct nonnegative approximation to the continuous Maxwellian distribution,plays an important part.By applying the explicit one-order Chapman-Enskog distribution,the model reduces the transportation and collision,two basic evolution steps in LBM,to the transportation of the non-equilibrium distribution.Furthermore,1D dam-break problem is performed and the numerical results agree well with the analytic solutions.

  14. Accuracy of the lattice-Boltzmann method using the Cell processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M. J.; de Fabritiis, G.; Giupponi, G.

    2008-11-01

    Accelerator processors like the new Cell processor are extending the traditional platforms for scientific computation, allowing orders of magnitude more floating-point operations per second (flops) compared to standard central processing units. However, they currently lack double-precision support and support for some IEEE 754 capabilities. In this work, we develop a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) code to run on the Cell processor and test the accuracy of this lattice method on this platform. We run tests for different flow topologies, boundary conditions, and Reynolds numbers in the range Re=6 350 . In one case, simulation results show a reduced mass and momentum conservation compared to an equivalent double-precision LB implementation. All other cases demonstrate the utility of the Cell processor for fluid dynamics simulations. Benchmarks on two Cell-based platforms are performed, the Sony Playstation3 and the QS20/QS21 IBM blade, obtaining a speed-up factor of 7 and 21, respectively, compared to the original PC version of the code, and a conservative sustained performance of 28 gigaflops per single Cell processor. Our results suggest that choice of IEEE 754 rounding mode is possibly as important as double-precision support for this specific scientific application.

  15. Performance of a Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics Kernel on the Cell Processor

    OpenAIRE

    Spray, J.; Hill, J; Trew, A.

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of a proof-of-concept Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics kernel on the Cell processor is described in detail, illustrating issues encountered in the porting process. The resulting code performs up to 45GFlop/s per socket, indicating that the Cell processor is likely to be a good platform for future Lattice QCD calculations.

  16. Manipulation and control of a bichromatic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Claire; Barter, Thomas; Daiss, Severin; Leung, Zephy; Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices have had great success emulating the simple models of condensed matter systems. These experiments are typically performed with a single site per unit cell. We realize a lattice with up to four sites per unit cell by overlaying an attractive triangular lattice with a repulsive one at twice the wavelength. The relative displacement of the two lattices determines the particular structure. One available configuration is the kagome lattice, which has a flat energy band. In the flat band all kinetic energy states are degenerate, so we have the opportunity to explore a regime where interactions dominate. This bichromatic lattice requires careful stabilization, but offers an opportunity to manipulate the unit cell and band structure by perturbing the lattices relative to one another. I will discuss recent progress.

  17. A Lattice-Boltzmann Method for Partially Saturated Computational Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, D. R.; Torczynski, J. R.

    The lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method is applied to complex, moving geometries in which computational cells are partially filled with fluid. The LB algorithm is modified to include a term that depends on the percentage of the cell saturated with fluid. The method is useful for modeling suspended obstacles that do not conform to the grid. Another application is to simulations of flow through reconstructed media that are not easily segmented into solid and liquid regions. A detailed comparison is made with FIDAP simulation results for the flow about a periodic line of cylinders in a channel at a non-zero Reynolds number. Two cases are examined. In the first simulation, the cylinders are given a constant velocity along the axis of the channel, and the steady solution is acquired. The transient behavior of the system is then studied by giving the cylinders an oscillatory velocity. For both steady and oscillatory flows, the method provides excellent agreement with FIDAP simulation results, even at locations close to the surface of a cylinder. In contrast to step-like solutions produced using the "bounce-back" condition, the proposed condition gives close agreement with the smooth FIDAP predictions. Computed drag forces with the proposed condition exhibit apparent quadratic convergence with grid refinement rather than the linear convergence exhibited by other LB boundary conditions.

  18. Jammed lattice sphere packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a model for the jamming and glass transitions that enables exploration of much higher dimensions than are usually accessible.

  19. Jammed lattice sphere packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a model for the jamming and glass transitions that enables exploration of much higher dimensions than are usually accessible.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Multiphase Transport in Nanostructured PEM Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Christopher D.

    As the fossil fuel crisis becomes more critical, it is imperative to develop renewable sources of power generation. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered a viable option. However, the cost of the platinum catalyst has hindered their commercialization. PEM fuel cells with platinum loading of >0.4 mg cm2 are common. Efforts towards further reducing this loading are currently underway utilizing nanostructured electrodes. A consequence of increased platinum utilization per unit area and thinner nanostructured electrodes is flooding, which is detrimental to fuel cell performance. Flooding causes a two-fold impact on cell performance: a drop in cell voltage and a rise in parasitic pumping power to overcome the increased pressure drop, which together result in a significant reduction in system efficiency. Proper water management is therefore crucial for optimum performance of the fuel cell and also for enhancing membrane durability. The goal of this thesis is to simulate the multiphase fluid transport in the nanostructured PEMFC of H2O in air with realistic density ratios. In order to pursue this goal, the ability of the pseudopotential based multiphase lattice Boltzmann method to realistically model the coexistence of the gas and liquid phases of H2O at low temperatures is explored. This method is expanded to include a gas mixture of O2 and N 2 into the multiphase H2O systems. Beginning with the examination of the phase transition region described by the current implementation of the multiphase pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model. Following this, a modified form of the pressure term with the use of a scalar multiplier kappa for the Peng-Robinson equation of state is thoroughly investigated. This method proves to be very effective at enabling numerically stable simulations at low temperatures with large density ratios. It is found that for decreasing values of kappa, this model leads to an increase in multiphase interface thickness and a

  1. Energy- and cost-efficient lattice-QCD computations using graphics processing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Quarks and gluons are the building blocks of all hadronic matter, like protons and neutrons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a theory under test by large scale experiments like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and in the future at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. However, perturbative methods can only be applied to QCD for high energies. Studies from first principles are possible via a discretization onto an Euclidean space-time grid. This discretization of QCD is called Lattice QCD (LQCD) and is the only ab-initio option outside of the high-energy regime. LQCD is extremely compute and memory intensive. In particular, it is by definition always bandwidth limited. Thus - despite the complexity of LQCD applications - it led to the development of several specialized compute platforms and influenced the development of others. However, in recent years General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) came up as a new means for parallel computing. Contrary to machines traditionally used for LQCD, graphics processing units (GPUs) are a massmarket product. This promises advantages in both the pace at which higher-performing hardware becomes available and its price. CL2QCD is an OpenCL based implementation of LQCD using Wilson fermions that was developed within this thesis. It operates on GPUs by all major vendors as well as on central processing units (CPUs). On the AMD Radeon HD 7970 it provides the fastest double-precision D kernel for a single GPU, achieving 120GFLOPS. D - the most compute intensive kernel in LQCD simulations - is commonly used to compare LQCD platforms. This performance is enabled by an in-depth analysis of optimization techniques for bandwidth-limited codes on GPUs. Further, analysis of the communication between GPU and CPU, as well as between multiple GPUs, enables high-performance Krylov space solvers and linear scaling to multiple GPUs within a single system. LQCD

  2. High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, GaInP solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2014-07-08

    High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, photovoltaic cells (10), both transparent and non-transparent to sub-bandgap light, are provided as devices for use alone or in combination with other cells in split spectrum apparatus or other applications.

  3. High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, GaInP solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanlass, Mark W; Carapella, Jeffrey J; Steiner, Myles A

    2016-11-01

    High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, photovoltaic cells (10), both transparent and non-transparent to sub-bandgap light, are provided as devices for use alone or in combination with other cells in split spectrum apparatus or other applications.

  4. Mechanical behavior of open-cell rhombic dodecahedron Ti–6Al–4V lattice structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Lijun [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Song, Weidong, E-mail: swdgh@bit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liu, Haiyan; Tang, Huiping; Wang, Jianzhong [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Non-ferrous Metal Research, Xi’an 710016 (China)

    2015-07-29

    The compression behavior of Ti–6Al–4V lattice structure with a cell shape of rhombic dodecahedron, which was fabricated by electron beam melting, was investigated at different temperatures. A series of quasi-static compression tests were performed at ambient temperature, 200 °C, 400 °C and 600 °C with a strain rate of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. Two groups of design configurations were adopted by changing the cell size and thickness of struts with the sample size maintained unchanged. The results revealed that their properties varied with different cell sizes and temperatures. Larger cell size leaded to lower modulus and strength of the lattice. Higher temperatures resulted in lower strengths, modulus, densification strains and plateau stresses. The energy absorption of lattice at high temperature was discussed, and the experimental data were compared with aluminum foams, titanium foams and stainless steel lattice. It demonstrated that the rhombic dodecahedron Ti–6Al–4V lattice structure could be applied as load-bearing components and energy absorber at high temperature.

  5. [Spin-lattice relaxation of water protons in plant and animal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuilov, F D; Nikiforov, E A; Nikiforova, V I

    2012-01-01

    NMR-spin echo method has been used to study spin-lattice relaxation time of protons T1 in plant and animal cells - muscle tissue of fish, the cells of which unlike plant cells have no developed system of vacuoles, plastids and a solid cell wall. According to the values of T1 time a new NMR parameter K, a coefficient of relaxation effectiveness of a cell structure, has been calculated. This parameter can be used for quantitative characterization of the influence of different cell structures, the tissue water interact with, for a time of spin-lattice relaxation of water protons. It has been ascertained that the values of K coefficient in animal tissue and in storing tissues of some plants differ little; it may be stipulated by permanent transmembrane water exchange which occurs at high rate in the living cell. It has been concluded that there exists a certain similarity between water state in protoplast of plant and animal cells.

  6. Enhanced electron photoemission by collective lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle-array photodetectors and solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    We propose to use collective lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays to enhance photoelectron emission in Schottky-barrier photodetectors and solar cells. We show that the interaction of lattice resonances (the Rayleigh anomaly) and individual particle excitations (localized surface plasmon resonances) leads to stronger local field enhancement and significant increase of the photocurrent compared to the case when only individual particle excitations are present. The results can be used to design new photodetectors with highly selective, tunable spectral response, able to detect photons with the energy below the semiconductor bandgap, and to develop solar cells with increased efficiency.

  7. Numerically exploring habitat fragmentation effects on populations using cell-based coupled map lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Bevers; Curtis H. Flather

    1999-01-01

    We examine habitat size, shape, and arrangement effects on populations using a discrete reaction-diffusion model. Diffusion is modeled passively and applied to a cellular grid of territories forming a coupled map lattice. Dispersal mortality is proportional to the amount of nonhabitat and fully occupied habitat surrounding a given cell, with distance decay. After...

  8. Efficient SIMDization and Data Management of the Lattice QCD Computation on the Cell Broadband Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Z. Ibrahim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD models subatomic interactions based on a four-dimensional discretized space–time continuum. The Lattice QCD computation is one of the grand challenges in physics especially when modeling a lattice with small spacing. In this work, we study the implementation of the main kernel routine of Lattice QCD that dominates the execution time on the Cell Broadband Engine. We tackle the problem of efficient SIMD execution and the problem of limited bandwidth for data transfers with the off-chip memory. For efficient SIMD execution, we present runtime data fusion technique that groups data processed similarly at runtime. We also introduce analysis needed to reduce the pressure on the scarce memory bandwidth that limits the performance of this computation. We studied two implementations for the main kernel routine that exhibit different patterns of accessing the memory and thus allowing different sets of optimizations. We show the attributes that make one implementation more favorable in terms of performance. For lattice size that is significantly larger than the local store, our implementation achieves 31.2 GFlops for single precision computations and 16.6 GFlops for double precision computations on the PowerXCell 8i, an order of magnitude better than the performance achieved on most general-purpose processors.

  9. Protein micro patterned lattices to probe a fundamental lengthscale involved in cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Guillou, Herve; Chaussy, Jacques; Block, Marc R

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion, a fundamental process of cell biology is involved in the embryo development and in numerous pathologies especially those related to cancers. We constrained cells to adhere on extracellular matrix proteins patterned in a micro lattices. The actin cytoskeleton is particularly sensitive to this constraint and reproducibly self organizes in simple geometrical patterns. Such highly organized cells are functional and proliferate. We performed statistical analysis of spread cells morphologies and discuss the existence of a fundamental lengthscale associated with active processes required for spreading.

  10. Unit: Cells, Inspection Set, National Trial Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This trial version of a unit is the series being produced by the Australian Science Education Project provides instructions for students to prepare a variety of cell types and examine them with microscopes. It also gives some information about the variety and function of cells. The core of the unit, which all students are expected to complete,…

  11. Optical induction of Bessel-like lattices in methyl-red doped liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantashyan, Paytsar; Drampyan, Rafael; Beeckman, Jeroen; Willekens, Oliver; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2015-03-01

    The optical induction of annular photonic lattices by a traveling Bessel beam has been investigated in Methyl-red (MR) doped nematic liquid crystal (LC). Non-diffracting Bessel beams were formed by an axicon. The induced Bessel-like lattice had a ~15 μm period in the radial direction. The lattice was tested by measuring the forward diffracted power of the recording Bessel beam. The dependency on the angle between the polarization of the laser beam and the director of the LC and on the axial position of the LC cell had been investigated. A diffraction efficiency of 14% had been obtained. Investigations have been performed for different MR dye doping concentrations. An erasure time of the lattice of 60 s has been determined by a 532 nm probe Gaussian beam of 2 mW in a LC cell with MR dye concentration of 1.15 wt%. The induced periodically varying refractive index in the LC medium is analogous to microstructured fibers and allows the study of light localization and soliton behavior in highly nonlinear waveguide arrays.

  12. Numerical simulation of direct methanol fuel cells using lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavar, Mojtaba Aghajani; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol, P.O. Box 484 (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    In this study Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) as an alternative of conventional computational fluid dynamics method is used to simulate Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). A two dimensional lattice Boltzmann model with 9 velocities, D2Q9, is used to solve the problem. The computational domain includes all seven parts of DMFC: anode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers, membrane and cathode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers. The model has been used to predict the flow pattern and concentration fields of different species in both clear and porous channels to investigate cell performance. The results have been compared well with results in literature for flow in porous and clear channels and cell polarization curves of the DMFC at different flow speeds and feed methanol concentrations. (author)

  13. Accurate determination of lattice parameters based on Niggli reduced cell theory by using digitized electron diffraction micrograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Cai, Canying; Lin, Jianguo; Gong, Lunjun; Yang, Qibin

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we used Niggli reduced cell theory to determine lattice constants of a micro/nano crystal by using electron diffraction patterns. The Niggli reduced cell method enhanced the accuracy of lattice constant measurement obviously, because the lengths and the angles of lattice vectors of a primitive cell can be measured directly on the electron micrographs instead of a double tilt holder. With the aid of digitized algorithm and least square optimization by using three digitized micrographs, a valid reciprocal Niggli reduced cell number can be obtained. Thus a reciprocal and real Bravais lattices are acquired. The results of three examples, i.e., Mg4Zn7, an unknown phase (Precipitate phase in nickel-base superalloy) and Ba4Ti13O30 showed that the maximum errors are 1.6% for lengths and are 0.3% for angles.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Healthy and Defective Red Blood Cell Settling in Blood Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Z; Rahnama, M; Jafari, S

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study sedimentation of a red blood cell (RBC) in a plasma-filled tube numerically. Such behaviors are studied for a healthy and a defective cell which might be created due to human diseases, such as diabetes, sickle-cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Flow-induced deformation of RBC is obtained using finite-element method (FEM), while flow and fluid-membrane interaction are handled using lattice Boltzmann (LB) and immersed boundary methods (IBMs), respectively. The effects of RBC properties as well as its geometry and orientation on its sedimentation rate are investigated and discussed. The results show that decreasing frontal area of an RBC and/or increasing tube diameter results in a faster settling. Comparison of healthy and diabetic cells reveals that less cell deformability leads to slower settling. The simulation results show that the sicklelike and spherelike RBCs have lower settling velocity as compared with a biconcave discoid cell.

  15. Effect of Yttria Content on the Zirconia Unit Cell Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogstad, Jessica A.; Lepple, Maren; Gao, Yan; Lipkin, Don M.; Levi, Carlos G. (UCSB); (GE Global)

    2012-02-06

    The relationship between yttria concentration and the unit cell parameters in partially and fully stabilized zirconia has been reassessed, motivated by the need to improve the accuracy of phase analysis upon decomposition of t{prime}-based thermal barrier coatings. Compositions ranging from 6 to 18 mol% YO{sub 1.5} were synthesized and examined by means of high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Lattice parameters were determined using the Rietveld refinement method, a whole-pattern fitting procedure. The revised empirical relationships fall within the range of those published previously. However, efforts to achieve superior homogeneity of the materials, as well as accuracy of the composition and lattice parameters, provide increased confidence in the reliability of these correlations for use in future studies. Additional insight into the potential sources for scatter previously reported for the transition region ({approx}12-14 mol% YO{sub 1.5}), where tetragonal and cubic phases have been observed to coexist, is also provided. Implications on the current understanding of stabilization mechanisms in zirconia are discussed.

  16. Optical trapping via guided resonance modes in a Slot-Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-03-12

    A novel photonic crystal lattice is proposed for trapping a two-dimensional array of particles. The lattice is created by introducing a rectangular slot in each unit cell of the Suzuki-Phase lattice to enhance the light confinement of guided resonance modes. Large quality factors on the order of 10⁵ are predicted in the lattice. A significant decrease of the optical power required for optical trapping can be achieved compared to our previous design.

  17. Surface and Interface Properties of 10–12 Unit Cells Thick Sputter Deposited Epitaxial CeO2 Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Saraf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrathin and continuous epitaxial films with relaxed lattice strain can potentially maintain more of its bulk physical and chemical properties and are useful as buffer layers. We study surface, interface, and microstructural properties of ultrathin (∼10–12 unit cells thick epitaxial ceria films grown on single crystal YSZ substrates. The out-of -plane and in-plane lattice parameters indicate relaxation in the continuous film due to misfit dislocations seen by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and substrate roughness of ∼1-2 unit cells, confirmed by atomic force microscopy and HRTEM. A combination of secondary sputtering, lattice mismatch, substrate roughness, and surface reduction creating secondary phase was likely the cause of surface roughness which should be reduced to a minimum level for effective use of it as buffer layers.

  18. Reversible (unitized) PEM fuel cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Smith, W F; Weisberg, Molter, T M

    1999-06-01

    Regenerative fuel cells (RFCs) are enabling for many weight-critical portable applications, since the packaged specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) of properly designed lightweight RFC systems is several-fold higher than that of the lightest weight rechargeable batteries. RFC systems can be rapidly refueled (like primary fuel cells), or can be electrically recharged (like secondary batteries) if a refueling infrastructure is not conveniently available. Higher energy capacity systems with higher performance, reduced weight, and freedom from fueling infrastructure are the features that RFCs promise for portable applications. Reversible proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also known as unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs), or reversible regenerative fuel cells, are RFC systems which use reversible PEM cells, where each cell is capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer. URFCs further economize portable device weight, volume, and complexity by combining the functions of fuel cells and electrolyzers in the same hardware, generally without any system performance or efficiency reduction. URFCs are being made in many forms, some of which are already small enough to be portable. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has worked with industrial partners to design, develop, and demonstrate high performance and high cycle life URFC systems. LLNL is also working with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in lightweight pressure vessels that are necessary for URFC systems to achieve the specific energy advantages over rechargeable batteries. Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (Proton) is concurrently developing and commercializing URFC systems (UNIGEN' product line), in addition to PEM electrolyzer systems (HOGEN' product line), and primary PEM fuel cell systems. LLNL is constructing demonstration URFC units in order to persuade potential sponsors, often in their own conference rooms, that advanced applications based on URFC s are

  19. Lattice-strain control of the activity in dealloyed core-shell fuel cell catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Anniyev, Toyli; Greeley, Jeff; More, Karren; Yu, Chengfei; Liu, Zengcai; Kaya, Sarp; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Toney, Michael F; Nilsson, Anders

    2010-06-01

    Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. We demonstrate the core-shell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivity-strain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of transport phenomena in fuel cells and flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ao; Shyy, Wei; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-06-01

    Fuel cells and flow batteries are promising technologies to address climate change and air pollution problems. An understanding of the complex multiscale and multiphysics transport phenomena occurring in these electrochemical systems requires powerful numerical tools. Over the past decades, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has attracted broad interest in the computational fluid dynamics and the numerical heat transfer communities, primarily due to its kinetic nature making it appropriate for modeling complex multiphase transport phenomena. More importantly, the LB method fits well with parallel computing due to its locality feature, which is required for large-scale engineering applications. In this article, we review the LB method for gas-liquid two-phase flows, coupled fluid flow and mass transport in porous media, and particulate flows. Examples of applications are provided in fuel cells and flow batteries. Further developments of the LB method are also outlined.

  1. Lattice Vibrations in Chlorobenzenes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, P. A.; Kjems, Jørgen; White, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lattice vibrational dispersion curves for the ``intermolecular'' modes in the triclinic, one molecule per unit cell β phase of p‐C6D4Cl2 and p‐C6H4Cl2 have been obtained by inelastic neutron scattering. The deuterated sample was investigated at 295 and at 90°K and a linear extrapolation to 0°K...... by consideration of electrostatic forces or by further anisotropy in the dispersion forces not described in the atom‐atom model. Anharmonic effects are shown to be large, but the dominant features in the temperature variation of frequencies are describable by a quasiharmonic model....

  2. Lattice dynamics of strontium tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabhatasree Goel; R Mittal; S L Chaplot; A K Tyagi

    2008-11-01

    We report here measurements of the phonon density of states and the lattice dynamics calculations of strontium tungstate (SrWO4). At ambient conditions this compound crystallizes to a body-centred tetragonal unit cell (space group I41/a) called scheelite structure. We have developed transferable interatomic potentials to study the lattice dynamics of this class of compounds. The model parameters have been fitted with respect to the experimentally available Raman and infra-red frequencies and the equilibrium unit cell parameters. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements have been carried out in the triple-axis spectrometer at Dhruva reactor. The measured phonon density of states is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations, thus validating the inter-atomic potential developed.

  3. Wave propagation in reconfigurable magneto-elastic kagome lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Marshall; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The paper discusses the wave propagation characteristics of two-dimensional magneto-elastic kagome lattices. Mechanical instabilities caused by magnetic interactions are exploited in combination with particle contact to bring about changes in the topology and stiffness of the lattices. The analysis uses a lumped mass system of particles, which interact through axial and torsional elastic forces as well as magnetic forces. The propagation of in-plane waves is predicted by applying Bloch theorem to lattice unit cells with linearized interactions. Elastic wave dispersion in these lattices before and after topological changes is compared, and large differences are highlighted.

  4. Development of improved methods for the LWR lattice physics code EPRI-CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.L.; Wright, R.Q.; Barhen, J.

    1982-07-01

    A number of improvements have been made by ORNL to the lattice physics code EPRI-CELL (E-C) which is widely used by utilities for analysis of power reactors. The code modifications were made mainly in the thermal and epithermal routines and resulted in improved reactor physics approximations and more efficient running times. The improvements in the thermal flux calculation included implementation of a group-dependent rebalance procedure to accelerate the iterative process and a more rigorous calculation of interval-to-interval collision probabilities. The epithermal resonance shielding methods used in the code have been extensively studied to determine its major approximations and to examine the sensitivity of computed results to these approximations. The study has resulted in several improvements in the original methodology.

  5. Some molecular/crystalline factors that affect the sensitivities of energetic materials: molecular surface electrostatic potentials, lattice free space and maximum heat of detonation per unit volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politzer, Peter; Murray, Jane S

    2015-02-01

    We discuss three molecular/crystalline properties that we believe to be among the factors that influence the impact/shock sensitivities of energetic materials (i.e., their vulnerabilities to unintended detonation due to impact or shock). These properties are (a) the anomalously strong positive electrostatic potentials in the central regions of their molecular surfaces, (b) the free space per molecule in their crystal lattices, and (c) their maximum heats of detonation per unit volume. Overall, sensitivity tends to become greater as these properties increase; however these are general trends, not correlations. Nitramines are exceptions in that their sensitivities show little or no variation with free space in the lattice and heat of detonation per unit volume. We outline some of the events involved in detonation initiation and show how the three properties are related to different ones of these events.

  6. A Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulating the Separation of Red Blood Cells at Microvascular Bifurcations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zai-Yi; HE Ying

    2012-01-01

    A computational simulation for the separation of red blood cells (RBCs) is presented.The deformability of RBCs is expressed by the spring network model,which is based on the minimum energy principle.In the computation of the fluid flow,the lattice Boltzmann method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations.Coupling of the fluid-membrane interaction is carried out by using the immersed boundary method.To verify our method,the motions of RBCs in shear flow are simulated.Typical motions of RBCs observed in the experiments are reproduced,including tank-treading,swinging and tumbling.The motions of 8 RBCs at the bifurcation are simulated when the two daughter vessels have different ratios.The results indicate that when the ratio of the daughter vessel diameter becomes smaller,the distribution of RBCs in the two vessels becomes more non-uniform.%A computational simulation for the separation of red blood cells (RBCs) is presented. The deformability of RBCs is expressed by the spring network model, which is based on the minimum energy principle. In the computation of the fluid Bow, the lattice Boltzmann method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Coupling of the fluid-membrane interaction is carried out by using the immersed boundary method. To verify our method, the motions of RBCs in shear How are simulated. Typical motions of RBCs observed in the experiments are reproduced, including tank-treading, swinging and tumbling. The motions of 8 RBCs at the bifurcation are simulated when the two daughter vessels have different ratios. The results indicate that when the ratio of te daughter vessel diameter becomes smaller, the distribution of RBCs in the two vessels becomes more non-uniform.

  7. Two phase flow simulation in a channel of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using the lattice Boltzmann method

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Salah, Yasser; Tabe, Yutaka; Chikahisa, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    Water management in polymer electrolyte (PEM) fuel cells is important for fuel cell performance and durability. Numerical simulations using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) are developed to elucidate the dynamic behavior of condensed water and gas flows in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell gas channel. A scheme for two-phase flow with large density differences was applied to establish the optimum gas channel design for different gas channel heights, droplet positions, and gas c...

  8. Dielectric-barrier discharges in two-dimensional lattice potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Josiah

    2011-01-01

    We use a pin-grid electrode to introduce a corrugated electrical potential into a planar dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) system, so that the amplitude of the applied electric field has the profile of a two-dimensional square lattice. The lattice potential provides a template for the spatial distribution of plasma filaments in the system and has pronounced effects on the patterns that can form. The positions at which filaments become localized within the lattice unit cell vary with the width of the discharge gap. The patterns that appear when filaments either overfill or under-fill the lattice are reminiscent of those observed in other physical systems involving 2d lattices. We suggest that the connection between lattice-driven DBDs and other areas of physics may benefit from the further development of models that treat plasma filaments as interacting particles.

  9. Physical Realization of von Neumann Lattices in Rotating Bose Gases with Dipole Interatomic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Jheng, Shih-Da

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a novel type of vortex lattice, referred to as a bubble crystal, which was discovered in rapidly rotating Bose gases with long-range interactions. Bubble crystals differ from vortex lattices which possess a single quantum flux per unit cell, while atoms in bubble crystals are clustered periodically and surrounded by vortices. No existing model is able to describe the vortex structure of bubble crystals; however, we identified a mathematical lattice, which is a subset of coherent states and exists periodically in the physical space. This lattice is called a von Neumann lattice, and when it possesses a single vortex per unit cell, it presents the same geometrical structure as an Abrikosov lattice. In this report, we extend the von Neumann lattice to one with an integral number of flux quanta per unit cell and demonstrate that von Neumann lattices well reproduce the translational properties of bubble crystals. Numerical simulations confirm that, as a generalized vortex, a von Neumann lattice can be physically realized using vortex lattices in rapidly rotating Bose gases with dipole interatomic interactions.

  10. Unit Cell Structure of Crystal Polytypes in InAs and InSb Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegner, Dominik; Panse, Christian; Mandl, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    , wurtzite, and 4H polytypes for InAs and InSb nanowires, using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results are compared to density functional theory calculations. Experiment and theory show that the occurrence of hexagonal bilayers tends to stretch the distances of atomic layers...... parallel to the c axis and to reduce the in-plane distances compared to those in zinc blende. The change of the lattice parameters scales linearly with the hexagonality of the polytype, defined as the fraction of bilayers with hexagonal character within one unit cell....

  11. Lattice-Strain Control of Exceptional Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasser, Peter

    2011-08-19

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach to demonstrate how lattice strain can be used to continuously tune the catalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on bimetallic nanoparticles that have been dealloyed. The sluggish kinetics of the ORR is a key barrier to the adaptation of fuel cells and currently limits their widespread use. Dealloyed Pt-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles, however, have been shown to exhibit uniquely high reactivity for this reaction. We first present evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure during dealloying, which involves removal of Cu from the surface and subsurface of the precursor nanoparticles. We then show that the resulting Pt-rich surface shell exhibits compressive strain that depends on the composition of the precursor alloy. We next demonstrate the existence of a downward shift of the Pt d-band, resulting in weakening of the bond strength of intermediate oxygenated species due to strain. Finally, we combine synthesis, strain, and catalytic reactivity in an experimental/theoretical reactivity-strain relationship which provides guidelines for the rational design of strained oxygen reduction electrocatalysts. The stoichiometry of the precursor, together with the dealloying conditions, provides experimental control over the resulting surface strain and thereby allows continuous tuning of the surface electrocatalytic reactivity - a concept that can be generalized to other catalytic reactions.

  12. Frequency Selective Surfaces with Nanoparticles Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Hung Poon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency selective surface (FSS is a periodic structure with filtering performance for optical and microwave signals. The general periodic arrays made with patterned metallic elements can act as an aperture or patch on a substrate. In this work, two kinds of materials were used to produce unit cells with various patterns. Gold nanoparticles of 25 nm diameter were used to form periodic monolayer arrays by a confined photocatalytic oxidation-based surface modification method. As the other material, silver gel was used to create multiple layers of silver. Due to the ultra-thin nature of the self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer, it is very easy to penetrate the FSS with terahertz radiation. However, the isolated silver islands made from silver gel form thicker multiple layers and contribute to much higher reflectance. This work demonstrated that multiple silver layers are more suitable than gold nanoparticles for use in the fabrication of FSS structures.

  13. Lattice Entertain You: Paper Modeling of the 14 Bravais Lattices on Youtube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein, Lawrence T., Jr.; Sein, Sarajane E.

    2015-01-01

    A system for the construction of double-sided paper models of the 14 Bravais lattices, and important crystal structures derived from them, is described. The system allows the combination of multiple unit cells, so as to better represent the overall three-dimensional structure. Students and instructors can view the models in use on the popular…

  14. Anisotropic dissipation in lattice metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Krattiger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plane wave propagation in an elastic lattice material follows regular patterns as dictated by the nature of the lattice symmetry and the mechanical configuration of the unit cell. A unique feature pertains to the loss of elastodynamic isotropy at frequencies where the wavelength is on the order of the lattice spacing or shorter. Anisotropy may also be realized at lower frequencies with the inclusion of local resonators, especially when designed to exhibit directionally non-uniform connectivity and/or cross-sectional geometry. In this paper, we consider free and driven waves within a plate-like lattice−with and without local resonators−and examine the effects of damping on the isofrequency dispersion curves. We also examine, for free waves, the effects of damping on the frequency-dependent anisotropy of dissipation. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of engineering the dissipation anisotropy by tuning the directional properties of the prescribed damping. The results demonstrate that uniformly applied damping tends to reduce the intensity of anisotropy in the isofrequency dispersion curves. On the other hand, lattice crystals and metamaterials are shown to provide an excellent platform for direction-dependent dissipation engineering which may be realized by simple changes in the spatial distribution of the damping elements.

  15. Lattice Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, J; Bagchi, B; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas; Basu, Asis; Bagchi, Bijon

    2000-01-01

    Fermions on the lattice have bosonic excitations generated from the underlying periodic background. These, the lattice bosons, arise near the empty band or when the bands are nearly full. They do not depend on the nature of the interactions and exist for any fermion-fermion coupling. We discuss these lattice boson solutions for the Dirac Hamiltonian.

  16. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge-Control Unit Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Buton, Robert M.; Gemeiner, Russel

    2005-01-01

    A lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell charge-control unit was developed as part of a Li-ion cell verification program. This unit manages the complex charging scheme that is required when Li-ion cells are charged in series. It enables researchers to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and reduces test costs substantially in comparison to individual cell testing.

  17. Position-space renormalization of the self-avoiding loop gas on the square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, K. H.; Helfrich, W.

    1983-06-01

    We propose a general method to renormalize statistical collections of loops on a lattice. It employs the ratio of the statistical weights of different “macroconfigurations”. A calculation involving up to 4 × 4 unit cells yields ν ≈ 1.04 for non-intersecting loops of multiplicity one on the square lattice.

  18. Novel negative mass density resonant metamaterial unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cselyuszka, Norbert, E-mail: cselyu@yahoo.com; Sečujski, Milan, E-mail: secujski@uns.ac.rs; Crnojević-Bengin, Vesna, E-mail: bengin@uns.ac.rs

    2015-01-02

    In this paper a novel resonant unit cell of one-dimensional acoustic metamaterials is presented, which exhibits negative effective mass density. We theoretically analyze the unit cell and develop a closed analytical formula for its effective mass density. Then we proceed to demonstrate left-handed propagation of acoustic waves using the proposed unit cell. Finally, we present its dual-band version, capable of operating at two independent frequencies. - Highlights: • A novel acoustic metamaterial unit cell provides Lorentz-type resonant effective mass density. • Analytical formula for effective mass density is derived. • Acoustic bandstop medium and left-handed metamaterial based on the novel unit cell are presented. • Modified version of the unit cell, operating at two independent frequencies, is proposed.

  19. Hexagonal Structure of Baby Skyrmion Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Hen, Itay

    2007-01-01

    We study the zero-temperature crystalline structure of baby Skyrmions by applying a full-field numerical minimization algorithm to baby Skyrmions placed inside different parallelogramic unit-cells and imposing periodic boundary conditions. We find that within this setup, the minimal energy is obtained for the hexagonal lattice, and that in the resulting configuration the Skyrmion splits into quarter-Skyrmions. In particular, we find that the energy in the hexagonal case is lower than the one obtained on the well-known rectangular lattice, in which splitting into half-Skyrmions is observed.

  20. Deformation of Two-Dimensional Nonuniform-Membrane Red Blood Cells Simulated by a Lattice Boltzmann Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-Bing; JIN Li; QIU Bing

    2008-01-01

    To study two-dimensional red blood cells deforming in a shear flow with the membrane nonuniform on the rigidity and mass, the membrane is discretized into equilength segments. The fluid inside and outside the red blood cell is simulated by the D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model and the hydrodynamic forces exerted on the membrane from the inner and outer of the red blood cell are calculated by a stress-integration method. Through the global deviation from the curvature of uniform-membrane, we find that when the membrane is nonuniform on the rigidity, the deviation first decreases with the time increases and implies that the terminal profile of the red blood cell is static. To a red blood cell with the mass nonuniform on the membrane, the deviation becomes more large, and the mass distribution affects the profile of the two sides of the flattened red blood cell in a shear flow.

  1. A pore-scale model for the cathode electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell by lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaeimanesh, Gholam Reza; Akbari, Mohammad Hadi [Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    A pore-scale model based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for the cathode electrode of a PEM fuel cell with heterogeneous and anisotropic porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) and interdigitated flow field. An active approach is implemented to model multi-component transport in GDL, which leads to enhanced accuracy, especially at higher activation over-potentials. The core of the paper is the implementation of an electrochemical reaction with an active approach in a multi-component lattice Boltzmann model for the first time. After model validation, the capability of the presented model is demonstrated through a parametric study. Effects of activation over-potential, pressure differential between inlet and outlet gas channels, land width to channel width ratio, and channel width are investigated. The results show the significant influence of GDL microstructure on the oxygen distribution and current density profile.

  2. Weakly coupled map lattice models for multicellular patterning and collective normalization of abnormal single-cell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir; Manzanares, José A.; Mafe, Salvador

    2017-04-01

    We present a weakly coupled map lattice model for patterning that explores the effects exerted by weakening the local dynamic rules on model biological and artificial networks composed of two-state building blocks (cells). To this end, we use two cellular automata models based on (i) a smooth majority rule (model I) and (ii) a set of rules similar to those of Conway's Game of Life (model II). The normal and abnormal cell states evolve according to local rules that are modulated by a parameter κ . This parameter quantifies the effective weakening of the prescribed rules due to the limited coupling of each cell to its neighborhood and can be experimentally controlled by appropriate external agents. The emergent spatiotemporal maps of single-cell states should be of significance for positional information processes as well as for intercellular communication in tumorigenesis, where the collective normalization of abnormal single-cell states by a predominantly normal neighborhood may be crucial.

  3. New face-centered photonic square lattices with flat bands

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2016-01-01

    We report two new classes of face-centered photonic square lattices with flat bands which we call the Lieb-I and the Lieb-II lattices. There are 5 and 7 sites in the corresponding unit cells of the simplest Lieb-I and Lieb-II lattices, respectively. The number of flat bands $m$ in the new Lieb lattices is related to the number of sites $N$ in the unit cell by $m=(N-1)/2$. Physical properties of the lattices with even and odd number of flat bands are different. We also consider localization of light in such Lieb lattices. If the input beam excites the flat-band mode, it will not diffract during propagation, owing to the strong localization in the flat-band mode. For the Lieb-II lattice, we also find that the beam will oscillate and still not diffract during propagation, because of the intrinsic oscillating properties of certain flat-band modes. The period of oscillation is determined by the energy difference between the two flat bands. This study provides a new platform for the investigation of flat-band modes...

  4. Water proton configurations in structures I, II, and H clathrate hydrate unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Fumihito; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2013-03-28

    Position and orientation of water protons need to be specified when the molecular simulation studies are performed for clathrate hydrates. Positions of oxygen atoms in water are experimentally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis of clathrate hydrate structures, but positions of water hydrogen atoms in the lattice are disordered. This study reports a determination of the water proton coordinates in unit cell of structure I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH) clathrate hydrates that satisfy the ice rules, have the lowest potential energy configuration for the protons, and give a net zero dipole moment. Possible proton coordinates in the unit cell were chosen by analyzing the symmetry of protons on the hexagonal or pentagonal faces in the hydrate cages and generating all possible proton distributions which satisfy the ice rules. We found that in the sI and sII unit cells, proton distributions with small net dipole moments have fairly narrow potential energy spreads of about 1 kJ∕mol. The total Coulomb potential on a test unit charge placed in the cage center for the minimum energy∕minimum dipole unit cell configurations was calculated. In the sI small cages, the Coulomb potential energy spread in each class of cage is less than 0.1 kJ∕mol, while the potential energy spread increases to values up to 6 kJ∕mol in sH and 15 kJ∕mol in the sII cages. The guest environments inside the cages can therefore be substantially different in the sII case. Cartesian coordinates for oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the sI, sII, and sH unit cells are reported for reference.

  5. Lattice paramenter, lattice disorder and resistivity of carbohydrate doepd MgB2 and their correlation with the transition temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J. H.; Oh, Sangjun; Xu, X.; Joo, Jinho; Rindflesich, M.; Tomsic, M; Dou, S. X.

    2009-01-01

    The change in the lattice parameters or the lattice disorder is claimed as a cause of the slight reduction in the transition temperature by carbon doping in MgB2. In this work, an extensive investigation on the effects of carbohydrate doping has been carried out. It is found that not only the a-axis but also the c-axis lattice parameter increases with the sintering temperature. A linear relation between the unit cell volume and the critical temperature is observed. Compared with the well know...

  6. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  7. Investigation of lattice defects and compositional gradients in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Jens; Boit, Christian [Department of Semiconductor Devices, Berlin University of Technology, Einsteinufer 19, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Abou-Ras, Daniel; Rissom, Thorsten; Unold, Thomas; Schock, Hans-Werner [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber layers used in thin-film solar cells exhibit, when grown in a multi-stage process, compositional gradients of gallium and indium, dependent on process parameters such as the Ga content. The high lateral resolution of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) allows the determination of lattice defects and the elemental concentrations at identical sample positions. Cross-sectional TEM samples of ZnO/CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}/Mo/glass stacks were prepared with varying [Ga]/([In]+[Ga]) ratio in the absorber. The shape of the Ga distribution was measured by means of EDX and differs for the various [Ga]/([In]+[Ga]) ratios. Linear (dislocations) and planar defects (stacking faults, microtwins) were studied by means of TEM bright field and dark field images along the lengths of the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} layers. Strong Ga compositional gradients were found even within individual grains. It appears that these Ga gradients correlate with the occurrence of dislocation networks in large grains (diameter > 1 {mu}m). We assume that these dislocations compensate for lattice mismatch due to the change in composition in this area of the lattice.

  8. Multi-phase micro-scale flow simulation in the electrodes of a PEM fuel cell by lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Li, X.

    The gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is a porous medium generally made of carbon cloth or paper. The gas diffusion layer has been modeled conventionally as a homogeneous porous medium with a constant permeability in the literature of PEM fuel cell. However, in fact, the permeability of such fibrous porous medium is strongly affected by the fiber orientation having non-isotropic permeability. In this work, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is applied to the multi-phase flow phenomenon in the inhomogeneous gas diffusion layer of a PEM fuel cell. The inhomogeneous porous structure of the carbon cloth and carbon paper has been modeled as void space and porous area using Stokes/Brinkman formulation and void space and impermeable fiber distributions obtained from various microscopic images. The permeability of the porous medium is calculated and compared to the experimental measurements in literature showing a good agreement. Simulation results for various fiber distributions indicate that the permeability of the medium is strongly influenced by the effect of fiber orientation. Present lattice Boltzmann flow models are applied to the multi-phase flow simulations by incorporating multi-component LB model with inter-particle interaction forces. The model successfully simulates the complicated unsteady behaviors of liquid droplet motion in the porous medium providing a useful tool to investigate the mechanism of liquid water accumulation/removal in a gas diffusion layer of a PEM fuel cell.

  9. Superradiance Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Da-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-01-01

    We show that the timed Dicke states of a collection of three-level atoms can form a tight-binding lattice in the momentum space. This lattice, coined the superradiance lattice (SL), can be constructed based on an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) system. For a one-dimensional SL, we need the coupling field of the EIT system to be a standing wave. The detuning between the two components of the standing wave introduces an effective electric field. The quantum behaviours of electrons in lattices, such as Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch band collapsing and dynamic localization can be observed in the SL. The SL can be extended to two, three and even higher dimensions where no analogous real space lattices exist and new physics are waiting to be explored.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Laser-Sintered-Nylon Diamond Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Clayton

    Additive manufacturing offers a manufacturing technique to produce complex geometry prototypes at a rapid pace and low cost. These advantages advocate additive manufacturing for the design and production of cellular structures. Cellular structures are interesting because they contain a large amount of porosity (void space of air) to manifest a lightweight structure. Designs of cellular structures generate a periodic pattern; often of complex geometry, called a lattice. There has been a significant amount of research to maximize specific stiffness of lattice structures but little to evaluate low-stiffness lattices. Low-stiffness structures benefit energy absorbance through bending of the lattice. This research seeks to assess diamond lattices as low stiffness, bending structures. The research involves PA2200 (Nylon 12) laser sintered diamond lattices with experimental compression testing and direct FEA model comparison. A correction factor is applied for a design offset of laser sintered lattices. Once applied, the experimental and FEA data agree in validating the diamond lattice as a bending-dominated structure. Diamond lattices show a 4th order relationship between stiffness and parameters of thickness and unit cell length. For density, stiffness maintains a 2nd order relationship, as predicted by bending dominated structures. The resulting stiffness can be tuned over a stiffness range of four orders of magnitude. Further research shows the results for modifying the diamond lattice and scaling stiffness and density using other materials (like metals) to expand the range of stiffness and compare diamond lattices on material property charts. Lastly, the effective Poisson's ratio varies from 0.5 to 0.4 depending on the (t/L) ratio.

  11. Hofstadter butterfly evolution in the space of two-dimensional Bravais lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, F.; Oktel, M. Ö.

    2017-06-01

    The self-similar energy spectrum of a particle in a periodic potential under a magnetic field, known as the Hofstadter butterfly, is determined by the lattice geometry as well as the external field. Recent realizations of artificial gauge fields and adjustable optical lattices in cold-atom experiments necessitate the consideration of these self-similar spectra for the most general two-dimensional lattice. In a previous work [F. Yılmaz et al., Phys. Rev. A 91, 063628 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.063628], we investigated the evolution of the spectrum for an experimentally realized lattice which was tuned by changing the unit-cell structure but keeping the square Bravais lattice fixed. We now consider all possible Bravais lattices in two dimensions and investigate the structure of the Hofstadter butterfly as the lattice is deformed between lattices with different point-symmetry groups. We model the optical lattice with a sinusoidal real-space potential and obtain the tight-binding model for any lattice geometry by calculating the Wannier functions. We introduce the magnetic field via Peierls substitution and numerically calculate the energy spectrum. The transition between the two most symmetric lattices, i.e., the triangular and the square lattices, displays the importance of bipartite symmetry featuring deformation as well as closing of some of the major energy gaps. The transitions from the square to rectangular lattice and from the triangular to centered rectangular lattices are analyzed in terms of coupling of one-dimensional chains. We calculate the Chern numbers of the major gaps and Chern number transfer between bands during the transitions. We use gap Chern numbers to identify distinct topological regions in the space of Bravais lattices.

  12. Interaction of macroparticles localized in Wigner-Seitz cells of various types of cubic lattices in an equilibrium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of two charged point macroparticles located in Wigner-Seitz cells of simple cubic (SC), body-centered cubic (BCC), or face-centered cubic (FCC) lattices in an equilibrium plasma has been studied within the Debye approximation or, more specifically, based on the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann model. The shape of the outer boundary is shown to exert a strong influence on the pattern of electrostatic interaction between the two macroparticles, which transforms from repulsion at small interparticle distances to attraction as the interparticle distance approaches half the length of the computational cell. The macroparticle pair interaction potential in an equilibrium plasma is shown to be nevertheless the Debye one and purely repulsive for likely charged macroparticles.

  13. Lattice light sheet imaging of membrane nanotubes between human breast cancer cells in culture and in brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ian; Evans, Katrina T; Ellefsen, Kyle; Lawson, Devon A; Smith, Ian F

    2017-09-08

    Membrane nanotubes are cytosolic protrusions with diameters <1 µm that extend between cells separated by tens of µm. They mediate several forms of intercellular communication and are upregulated in diverse diseases. Difficulties in visualizing and studying nanotubes within intact tissues have, however, prompted skepticism regarding their in vivo relevance, and most studies have been confined to cell culture systems. Here, we introduce lattice-light sheet imaging of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells genetically engineered to brightly express membrane-targeted GFP as a promising approach to visualize membrane nanotubes in vitro and in situ. We demonstrate that cultured cells form multiple nanotubes that mediate intercellular communication of Ca(2+) signals and actively traffic GFP-tagged membrane vesicles along their length. Furthermore, we directly visualize nanotubes in situ, interconnecting breast cancer cells in live acute brain slices from an experimental mouse model of breast cancer brain metastasis. This amenable experimental system should facilitate the transition of the study of intercellular communication by membrane nanotubes from cell culture to the whole animal.

  14. Areas on a Square Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Brian

    1974-01-01

    As an alternative to the usual method of counting squares to find the area of a plane shape, a method of counting lattice points (determined by vertices of a unit square) is proposed. Activities using this method are suggested. (DT)

  15. New methods for indexing multi-lattice diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Richard J; Waterman, David G; Parkhurst, James M; Axford, Danny; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David I; Sauter, Nicholas K; Evans, Gwyndaf; Winter, Graeme

    2014-10-01

    A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of diffraction data. The method takes advantage of a simplification of Fourier transform-based methods that is applicable when the unit-cell dimensions are known a priori. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from crystals of ∼1 µm in size, where it is shown that up to six lattices can be successfully indexed and subsequently integrated from a 1° wedge of data. Analysis is presented which shows that improvements in data-quality indicators can be obtained through accurate identification and rejection of overlapping reflections prior to scaling.

  16. III-V Multijunction Solar Cells—New Lattice-Matched Products And Development Of Upright Metamorphic 3J Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guter, W.; Kern, R.; Köstler, W.; Kubera, T.; Löckenhoff, R.; Meusel, M.; Shirnow, M.; Strobl, G.

    2011-12-01

    AZUR SPACE's current CPV product 3C40C is an advanced lattice-matched In0.50Ga0.50P/In0.01Ga0.99As/Ge triple junction (3J) solar cell. Recently, efficiencies up to 41.2% (450-600×AM1.5d) have been confirmed for this 40%-class product. This kind of solar cell structure has now reached its practical efficiency limit and went into production in 2010. AZUR offers customized cell structures, regarding size and grid design, as well as anti-reflection coatings adapted to the individual CPV system. Integration grades from diced wafers up to assemblies, such as dense arrays, are available. Special features and production results for the 3C40C structure are presented in this work. In order to further push efficiencies beyond 42% AZUR has successfully transferred the upright metamorphic cell from Fraunhofer ISE and advances this concept now for production. First results on metamorphic 3J solar cells at AZUR SPACE and the actual potential of this concept will be discussed. A target efficiency of 42% seems to be realistic.

  17. Lattice parameter, lattice disorder and resistivity of carbohydrate doped MgB2 and their correlation with the transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Oh, Sangjun; Xu, X; Joo, Jinho; Rindfleisch, M; Tomsic, M; Dou, S X

    2009-12-01

    The change in the lattice parameters or the lattice disorder is claimed as a cause of the slight reduction in the transition temperature by carbon doping in MgB2. In this work, an extensive investigation on the effects of carbohydrate doping has been carried out. It is found that not only the a-axis but also the c-axis lattice parameter increases with the sintering temperature. A linear relation between the unit cell volume and the critical temperature is observed. Compared with the well known correlation between the lattice strain and the critical temperature, the X-ray peak broadening itself shows a closer correlation with the transition temperature. The residual resistivity and the critical temperature are linearly correlated with each other as well and its implication is further discussed.

  18. Fabrication and characteristics of unit cell for SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwi-Yeol; Eom, Seung-Wook; Moon, Seong-In [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Kyongnam (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Research and development on solid oxide fuel cells in Korea have been mainly focused on unit cell and small stack. Fuel cell system is called clean generation system which not cause NOx or SOx. It is generation efficiency come to 50-60% in contrast to 40% of combustion generation system. Among the fuel cell system, solid oxide fuel cell is constructed of ceramics, so stack construction is simple, power density is very high, and there are no corrosion problems. The object of this study is to develop various composing material for SOFC generation system, and to test unit cell performance manufactured. So we try to present a guidance for developing mass power generation system. We concentrated on development of manufacturing process for cathode, anode and electrolyte.

  19. New methods for indexing multi-lattice diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gildea, Richard J. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Waterman, David G. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); CCP4, Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Parkhurst, James M.; Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sutton, Geoff [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Sauter, Nicholas K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Evans, Gwyndaf; Winter, Graeme, E-mail: graeme.winter@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of data. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from microcrystals of ∼1 µm in size. A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of diffraction data. The method takes advantage of a simplification of Fourier transform-based methods that is applicable when the unit-cell dimensions are known a priori. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from crystals of ∼1 µm in size, where it is shown that up to six lattices can be successfully indexed and subsequently integrated from a 1° wedge of data. Analysis is presented which shows that improvements in data-quality indicators can be obtained through accurate identification and rejection of overlapping reflections prior to scaling.

  20. QtUCP-A program for determining unit-cell parameters in electron diffraction experiments using double-tilt and rotation-tilt holders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Hongsheng [Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)], E-mail: zhaohscas@yahoo.com.cn; Wu Deqi [Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yao Jincheng; Chang Aimin [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-11-15

    A computer program, QtUCP, has been developed based on several well-established algorithms using GCC 4.0 and Qt 4.0 (Open Source Edition) under Debian GNU/Linux 4.0r0. It can determine the unit-cell parameters from an electron diffraction tilt series obtained from both double-tilt and rotation-tilt holders. In this approach, two or more primitive cells of the reciprocal lattice are determined from experimental data, in the meantime, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. Subsequently, the derived primitive cells are converted into the reduced form and then transformed into the reduced direct primitive cell. Finally all the patterns are indexed and the least-squares refinement is employed to obtain the optimized results of the lattice parameters. Finally, two examples are given to show the application of the program, one is based on the experiment, the other is from the simulation.

  1. QtUCP-a program for determining unit-cell parameters in electron diffraction experiments using double-tilt and rotation-tilt holders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Wu, Deqi; Yao, Jincheng; Chang, Aimin

    2008-11-01

    A computer program, QtUCP, has been developed based on several well-established algorithms using GCC 4.0 and Qt 4.0 (Open Source Edition) under Debian GNU/Linux 4.0r0. It can determine the unit-cell parameters from an electron diffraction tilt series obtained from both double-tilt and rotation-tilt holders. In this approach, two or more primitive cells of the reciprocal lattice are determined from experimental data, in the meantime, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. Subsequently, the derived primitive cells are converted into the reduced form and then transformed into the reduced direct primitive cell. Finally all the patterns are indexed and the least-squares refinement is employed to obtain the optimized results of the lattice parameters. Finally, two examples are given to show the application of the program, one is based on the experiment, the other is from the simulation.

  2. Lattice theory

    CERN Document Server

    Donnellan, Thomas; Maxwell, E A; Plumpton, C

    1968-01-01

    Lattice Theory presents an elementary account of a significant branch of contemporary mathematics concerning lattice theory. This book discusses the unusual features, which include the presentation and exploitation of partitions of a finite set. Organized into six chapters, this book begins with an overview of the concept of several topics, including sets in general, the relations and operations, the relation of equivalence, and the relation of congruence. This text then defines the relation of partial order and then partially ordered sets, including chains. Other chapters examine the properti

  3. Characterization of Nanoparticle Dispersion in Red Blood Cell Suspension by the Lattice Boltzmann-Immersed Boundary Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifu Tan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanodrug-carrier delivery in the blood stream is strongly influenced by nanoparticle (NP dispersion. This paper presents a numerical study on NP transport and dispersion in red blood cell (RBC suspensions under shear and channel flow conditions, utilizing an immersed boundary fluid-structure interaction model with a lattice Boltzmann fluid solver, an elastic cell membrane model and a particle motion model driven by both hydrodynamic loading and Brownian dynamics. The model can capture the multiphase features of the blood flow. Simulations were performed to obtain an empirical formula to predict NP dispersion rate for a range of shear rates and cell concentrations. NP dispersion rate predictions from the formula were then compared to observations from previous experimental and numerical studies. The proposed formula is shown to accurately predict the NP dispersion rate. The simulation results also confirm previous findings that the NP dispersion rate is strongly influenced by local disturbances in the flow due to RBC motion and deformation. The proposed formula provides an efficient method for estimating the NP dispersion rate in modeling NP transport in large-scale vascular networks without explicit RBC and NP models.

  4. Effect of geometric lattice design on optical/electrical properties of transparent silver grid for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ju Won; Lee, Young Tack; Pandey, Rina; Yoo, Tae-Hee; Sang, Byoung-In; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Hwang, Do Kyung; Choi, Won Kook

    2014-11-03

    Silver (Ag) grid transparent electrode is one of the most promising transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) to replace conventional indium tin oxide (ITO). We systematically investigate an effect of geometric lattice modifications on optical and electrical properties of Ag grid electrode. The reference Ag grid with 5 μm width and 100 μm pitch (duty of 0.05) prepared by conventional photo-lithography and lift-off processes shows the sheet resistance of 13.27 Ω/sq, transmittance of 81.1%, and resultant figure of merit (FOM) of 129.05. Three different modified Ag grid electrodes with stripe added-mesh (SAM), triangle-added mesh (TAM), and diagonal-added mesh (DAM) are suggested to improve optical and electrical properties. Although all three of SAM, TAM, and DAM Ag grid electrodes exhibit the lower transmittance values of about 72 - 77%, they showed much decreased sheet resistance of 6 - 8 Ω/sq. As a result, all of the lattice-modified Ag grid electrodes display significant improvement of FOM and the highest value of 171.14 is obtained from DAM Ag grid, which is comparable to that of conventional ITO electrode (175.46). Also, the feasibility of DAM Ag gird electrode for use in organic solar cell is confirmed by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. Unlike a conventional ITO electrode, DAM Ag grid electrode can induce light scattering and trapping due to the diffuse transmission that compensates for the loss in optical transparency, resulting in comparable light absorption in the photo active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC₆₀BM). P3HT:PC₆₀BM based OSCs with the DAM Ag grid electrode were fabricated, which also showed the potential for ITO-free transparent electrode.

  5. Manufacturing and Characterization of Ti6Al4V Lattice Components Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina L. Campanelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the fabrication of Selective Laser Melting (SLM titanium alloy Ti6Al4V micro-lattice structures for the production of lightweight components. Specifically, the pillar textile unit cell is used as base lattice structure and alternative lattice topologies including reinforcing vertical bars are also considered. Detailed characterizations of dimensional accuracy, surface roughness, and micro-hardness are performed. In addition, compression tests are carried out in order to evaluate the mechanical strength and the energy absorbed per unit mass of the lattice truss specimens made by SLM. The built structures have a relative density ranging between 0.2234 and 0.5822. An optimization procedure is implemented via the method of Taguchi to identify the optimal geometric configuration which maximizes peak strength and energy absorbed per unit mass.

  6. Tilted resonators in a triangular elastic lattice: chirality, Bloch waves and negative refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Tallarico, Domenico; Movchan, Alexander B; Colquitt, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    We consider a vibrating triangular mass-truss lattice whose unit cell contains a resonator of a triangular shape. The resonators are connected to the triangular lattice by trusses. Each resonator is tilted, i.e. it is rotated with respect to the triangular lattice's unit cell through an angle $\\vartheta_0$. This geometrical parameter is responsible for the emergence of a resonant mode in the Bloch spectrum for elastic waves and strongly affects the dispersive properties of the lattice. Additionally, the tilting angle $\\vartheta_0$ triggers the opening of a band gap at a Dirac-like point. We provide a physical interpretation of these phenomena and discuss the dynamical implications on elastic Bloch waves. The dispersion properties are used to design a structured interface containing tilted resonators which exhibit negative refraction and focussing, as in a "flat elastic lens".

  7. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°.

  8. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  9. Investigation of GDL compression effects on the performance of a PEM fuel cell cathode by lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaeimanesh, G. R.; Nazemian, M.

    2017-08-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with a great potential for application in vehicle propulsion systems will have a promising future. However, to overcome the exiting challenges against their wider commercialization further fundamental research is inevitable. The effects of gas diffusion layer (GDL) compression on the performance of a PEM fuel cell is not well-recognized; especially, via pore-scale simulation technique capturing the fibrous microstructure of the GDL. In the current investigation, a stochastic microstructure reconstruction method is proposed which can capture GDL microstructure changes by compression. Afterwards, lattice Boltzmann pore-scale simulation technique is adopted to simulate the reactive gas flow through 10 different cathode electrodes with dissimilar carbon paper GDLs produced from five different compression levels and two different carbon fiber diameters. The distributions of oxygen mole fraction, water vapor mole fraction and current density for the simulated cases are presented and analyzed. The results of simulations demonstrate that when the fiber diameter is 9 μm adding compression leads to lower average current density while when the fiber diameter is 7 μm the compression effect is not monotonic.

  10. Biology 23. Unit One -- The Cell: Structure and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederland Independent School District, TX.

    GRADES OR AGES: Not given. SUBJECT MATTER: Biology, the structure and physiology of the cell. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: There are four sections: a) objectives for the unit, b) bibliography, c) activities, and d) evaluation. The guide is directed to the student rather than the teacher. The guide is mimeographed and stapled, with no…

  11. LatticeQCD using OpenCL

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Matthias; Pinke, Christopher; Schäfer, Christian; Zeidlewicz, Lars

    2011-01-01

    We report on our implementation of LatticeQCD applications using OpenCL. We focus on the general concept and on distributing different parts on hybrid systems, consisting of both CPUs (Central Processing Units) and GPUs (Graphic Processing Units).

  12. Thermal characterization of nanoscale phononic crystals using supercell lattice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce L.; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2011-12-01

    The concept of a phononic crystal can in principle be realized at the nanoscale whenever the conditions for coherent phonon transport exist. Under such conditions, the dispersion characteristics of both the constitutive material lattice (defined by a primitive cell) and the phononic crystal lattice (defined by a supercell) contribute to the value of the thermal conductivity. It is therefore necessary in this emerging class of phononic materials to treat the lattice dynamics at both periodicity levels. Here we demonstrate the utility of using supercell lattice dynamics to investigate the thermal transport behavior of three-dimensional nanoscale phononic crystals formed from silicon and cubic voids of vacuum. The periodicity of the voids follows a simple cubic arrangement with a lattice constant that is around an order of magnitude larger than that of the bulk crystalline silicon primitive cell. We consider an atomic-scale supercell which incorporates all the details of the silicon atomic locations and the void geometry. For this supercell, we compute the phonon band structure and subsequently predict the thermal conductivity following the Callaway-Holland model. Our findings dictate that for an analysis based on supercell lattice dynamics to be representative of the properties of the underlying lattice model, a minimum supercell size is needed along with a minimum wave vector sampling resolution. Below these minimum values, a thermal conductivity prediction of a bulk material based on a supercell will not adequately recover the value obtained based on a primitive cell. Furthermore, our results show that for the relatively small voids and void spacings we consider (where boundary scattering is dominant), dispersion at the phononic crystal unit cell level plays a noticeable role in determining the thermal conductivity.

  13. Thermal characterization of nanoscale phononic crystals using supercell lattice dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce L. Davis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a phononic crystal can in principle be realized at the nanoscale whenever the conditions for coherent phonon transport exist. Under such conditions, the dispersion characteristics of both the constitutive material lattice (defined by a primitive cell and the phononic crystal lattice (defined by a supercell contribute to the value of the thermal conductivity. It is therefore necessary in this emerging class of phononic materials to treat the lattice dynamics at both periodicity levels. Here we demonstrate the utility of using supercell lattice dynamics to investigate the thermal transport behavior of three-dimensional nanoscale phononic crystals formed from silicon and cubic voids of vacuum. The periodicity of the voids follows a simple cubic arrangement with a lattice constant that is around an order of magnitude larger than that of the bulk crystalline silicon primitive cell. We consider an atomic-scale supercell which incorporates all the details of the silicon atomic locations and the void geometry. For this supercell, we compute the phonon band structure and subsequently predict the thermal conductivity following the Callaway-Holland model. Our findings dictate that for an analysis based on supercell lattice dynamics to be representative of the properties of the underlying lattice model, a minimum supercell size is needed along with a minimum wave vector sampling resolution. Below these minimum values, a thermal conductivity prediction of a bulk material based on a supercell will not adequately recover the value obtained based on a primitive cell. Furthermore, our results show that for the relatively small voids and void spacings we consider (where boundary scattering is dominant, dispersion at the phononic crystal unit cell level plays a noticeable role in determining the thermal conductivity.

  14. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell mini power unit for portable application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, F.; Squadrito, G.; Barbera, O.; Giacoppo, G.; Passalacqua, E.; Zerbinati, O.

    This paper describes the design, realisation and test of a power unit based on a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, operating at room temperature, for portable application. The device is composed of an home made air breathing fuel cell stack, a metal hydride tank for H 2 supply, a dc-dc converter for power output control and a fan for stack cooling. The stack is composed by 10 cells with an active surface of 25 cm 2 and produces a rated power of 15 W at 6 V and 2 A. The stack successfully runs with end-off fed hydrogen without appreciable performance degradation during the time. The final assembled system is able to generate 12 W at 9.5 V, and power a portable DVD player for 3 h in continuous. The power unit has collected about 100 h of operation without maintenance.

  15. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell mini power unit for portable application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbani, F.; Squadrito, G.; Barbera, O.; Giacoppo, G.; Passalacqua, E. [CNR-ITAE, via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse n. 5, 98126 S. Lucia, Messina (Italy); Zerbinati, O. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Dip. di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita, via Bellini 25/g, 15100 Alessandria (Italy)

    2007-06-20

    This paper describes the design, realisation and test of a power unit based on a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, operating at room temperature, for portable application. The device is composed of an home made air breathing fuel cell stack, a metal hydride tank for H{sub 2} supply, a dc-dc converter for power output control and a fan for stack cooling. The stack is composed by 10 cells with an active surface of 25 cm{sup 2} and produces a rated power of 15 W at 6 V and 2 A. The stack successfully runs with end-off fed hydrogen without appreciable performance degradation during the time. The final assembled system is able to generate 12 W at 9.5 V, and power a portable DVD player for 3 h in continuous. The power unit has collected about 100 h of operation without maintenance. (author)

  16. On-lattice agent-based simulation of populations of cells within the open-source Chaste framework

    KAUST Repository

    Figueredo, G. P.

    2013-02-21

    Over the years, agent-based models have been developed that combine cell division and reinforced random walks of cells on a regular lattice, reaction-diffusion equations for nutrients and growth factors; and ordinary differential equations for the subcellular networks regulating the cell cycle. When linked to a vascular layer, this multiple scale model framework has been applied to tumour growth and therapy. Here, we report on the creation of an agent-based multi-scale environment amalgamating the characteristics of these models within a Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) Exemplar Project. This project enables reuse, integration, expansion and sharing of the model and relevant data. The agent-based and reaction-diffusion parts of the multi-scale model have been implemented and are available for download as part of the latest public release of Chaste (Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment; http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/chaste/), part of the VPH Toolkit (http://toolkit.vph-noe.eu/). The environment functionalities are verified against the original models, in addition to extra validation of all aspects of the code. In this work, we present the details of the implementation of the agent-based environment, including the system description, the conceptual model, the development of the simulation model and the processes of verification and validation of the simulation results. We explore the potential use of the environment by presenting exemplar applications of the \\'what if\\' scenarios that can easily be studied in the environment. These examples relate to tumour growth, cellular competition for resources and tumour responses to hypoxia (low oxygen levels). We conclude our work by summarizing the future steps for the expansion of the current system.

  17. Direct calculation of the lattice Green function with arbitrary interactions for general crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasi, Joseph A; Trinkle, Dallas R

    2012-06-01

    Efficient computation of lattice defect geometries such as point defects, dislocations, disconnections, grain boundaries, interfaces, and free surfaces requires accurate coupling of displacements near the defect to the long-range elastic strain. Flexible boundary condition methods embed a defect in infinite harmonic bulk through the lattice Green function. We demonstrate an efficient and accurate calculation of the lattice Green function from the force-constant matrix for general crystals with an arbitrary basis by extending a method for Bravais lattices. New terms appear due to the presence of optical modes and the possible loss of inversion symmetry. By separately treating poles and discontinuities in reciprocal space, numerical accuracy is controlled at all distances. We compute the lattice Green function for a two-dimensional model with broken symmetry to elucidate the role of different coupling terms. The algorithm is generally applicable in two and three dimensions to crystals with arbitrary number of atoms in the unit cell, symmetry, and interactions.

  18. Temperature-Induced Lattice Relaxation of Perovskite Crystal Enhances Optoelectronic Properties and Solar Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Banavoth, Murali

    2016-12-14

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite crystals have recently become one of the most important classes of photoactive materials in the solar cell and optoelectronic communities. Albeit improvements have focused on state-of-the-art technology including various fabrication methods, device architectures, and surface passivation, progress is yet to be made in understanding the actual operational temperature on the electronic properties and the device performances. Therefore, the substantial effect of temperature on the optoelectronic properties, charge separation, charge recombination dynamics, and photoconversion efficiency are explored. The results clearly demonstrated a significant enhancement in the carrier mobility, photocurrent, charge carrier lifetime, and solar cell performance in the 60 ± 5 °C temperature range. In this temperature range, perovskite crystal exhibits a highly symmetrical relaxed cubic structure with well-aligned domains that are perpendicular to a principal axis, thereby remarkably improving the device operation. This finding provides a new key variable component and paves the way toward using perovskite crystals in highly efficient photovoltaic cells.

  19. Microbial fuel cells as pollutant treatment units: Research updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are a device that can convert chemical energy in influent substances to electricity via biological pathways. Based on the consent that MFC technology should be applied as a waste/wastewater treatment unit rather than a renewable energy source, this mini-review discussed recent R&D efforts on MFC technologies for pollutant treatments and highlighted the challenges and research and development needs. Owing to the low power density levels achievable by larger-scale MFC, the MFC should be used as a device other than energy source such as being a pollutant treatment unit.

  20. Lattice QCD on fine lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Stefan [DESY (Germany). Neumann Inst. for Computing

    2016-11-01

    These configurations are currently in use in many on-going projects carried out by researchers throughout Europe. In particular this data will serve as an essential input into the computation of the coupling constant of QCD, where some of the simulations are still on-going. But also projects computing the masses of hadrons and investigating their structure are underway as well as activities in the physics of heavy quarks. As this initial project of gauge field generation has been successful, it is worthwhile to extend the currently available ensembles with further points in parameter space. These will allow to further study and control systematic effects like the ones introduced by the finite volume, the non-physical quark masses and the finite lattice spacing. In particular certain compromises have still been made in the region where pion masses and lattice spacing are both small. This is because physical pion masses require larger lattices to keep the effects of the finite volume under control. At light pion masses, a precise control of the continuum extrapolation is therefore difficult, but certainly a main goal of future simulations. To reach this goal, algorithmic developments as well as faster hardware will be needed.

  1. Zero loss magnetic metamaterials using powered active unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2009-08-31

    We report the design and experimental measurement of a powered active magnetic metamaterial with tunable permeability. The unit cell is based on the combination of an embedded radiofrequency amplifier and a tunable phase shifter, which together control the response of the medium. The measurements show that a negative permeability metamaterial with zero loss or even gain can be achieved through an array of such metamaterial cells. This kind of active metamaterial can find use in applications that are performance limited due to material losses.

  2. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field...

  3. Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K.; Braff, William

    2009-01-01

    In a substantial improvement over present alkaline systems, an advanced hybrid bipolar plate for a unitized fuel cell/electrolyzer has been developed. This design, which operates on pure feed streams (H2/O2 and water, respectively) consists of a porous metallic foil filled with a polymer that has very high water transport properties. Combined with a second metallic plate, the pore-filled metallic plates form a bipolar plate with an empty cavity in the center.

  4. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells coupled with a biomass gasification unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypkiewicz Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of fuelling a solid oxide fuel cell stack (SOFC with biomass fuels can be realized by coupling a SOFC system with a self-standing gasification unit. Such a solution enables multi-fuel operation, elasticity of the system as well as the increase of the efficiency of small-scale biomass-to-electricity conversion units. A system of this type, consisting of biomass gasification unit, gas purification unit, SOFC stack, anode off-gas afterburner and peripherals was constructed and operated successfully. During the process, biomass fuel (wood chips was gasified with air as gasification agent. The gasifier was capable of converting up to 30 kW of fuel to syngas with efficiencies up to 75%. Syngas leaving the gasification unit is delivered to a medium temperature adsorber for sulphur compounds removal. Steam is added to the purified fuel to maintain steam to carbon ratio higher than 2. The syngas then is passed to a SOFC stack through a fuel preheater. In such a configuration it was possible to operate a commercial 1.3 kW stack within its working regime. Conducted tests confirmed successful operation of a SOFC stack fuelled by biomass-sourced syngas.

  5. Dependence of lattice strain relaxation, absorbance, and sheet resistance on thickness in textured ZnO@B transparent conductive oxide for thin-film solar cell applications

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of surface texture, strain relaxation, absorbance, grain size, and sheet resistance in textured, boron-doped ZnO (ZnO@B), transparent conductive oxide (TCO) materials of different thicknesses used for thin film, solar cell applications is investigated. The residual strain induced by the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal expansion coefficient for thicker ZnO@B is relaxed, leading to an increased surface texture, stronger absorbance, larger grain size, and lower s...

  6. Application of lattice Boltzmann method to a micro-scale flow simulation in the porous electrode of a PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Matsubara, M.; Li, X.

    The electrode of a PEM fuel cell is a porous medium generally made of carbon cloth or paper. Such a porous electrode has been widely modeled as a homogeneous porous medium with a constant permeability in the literature of PEM fuel cell. In fact, most of gas diffusion media are not homogeneous having non-isotropic permeability. In case of carbon cloth, the porous structure consists of carbon fiber tows, the bundles of carbon fiber, and void spaces among tows. The combinational effect of the void space and tow permeability results in the effective permeability of the porous electrode. In this work, the lattice Boltzmann method is applied to the simulation of the flow in the electrode of a PEM fuel cell. The electrode is modeled as void space and porous region which has certain permeability and the Stokes and Brinkman equations are solved in the flow field using the lattice Boltzmann model. The effective permeability of the porous medium is calculated and compared to an analytical calculation showing a good agreement. It has been shown that the permeability of porous medium is strongly dependant on the fiber tow orientation in three-dimensional simulations. The lattice Boltzmann method is an efficient and effective numerical scheme to analyze the flow in a complicated geometry such as the porous medium.

  7. Thermodynamics of Condensed Phases: Formula Unit Volume, "V[subscript m]", and the Determination of the Number of Formula Units, "Z", in a Crystallographic Unit Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Formula unit (or molecular) volume, "V[subscript m]", is related to many thermodynamic and physical properties of materials, so that knowledge of "V[subscript m]" is useful in prediction of such properties for known and even hypothetical materials. The symbol "Z" represents the number of formula units in a crystallographic unit cell; "Z" thus…

  8. Vortex lattice transitions in YNi2B2C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S J Levett; C D Dewhurst; D McK Paul

    2002-05-01

    We have performed extensive small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) diffraction studies of the vortex lattice in single crystal YNi2B2C for $B||c$. High-resolution SANS, combined with a field-oscillation vortex lattice preparation technique, allows us to separate Bragg scattered intensities from two orthogonal domains and accurately determine the unit cell angle, . The data suggest that upon increasing field there is a finite transition width where both low- and high-field distorted hexagonal vortex lattice phases, mutually rotated by 45°, coexist. The smooth variation of diffracted intensity from each phase through the transition corresponds to a redistribution of populations between the two types of domains.

  9. Dual Lattice of ℤ-module Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize in Mizar [5] the definition of dual lattice and their properties. We formally prove that a set of all dual vectors in a rational lattice has the construction of a lattice. We show that a dual basis can be calculated by elements of an inverse of the Gram Matrix. We also formalize a summation of inner products and their properties. Lattice of ℤ-module is necessary for lattice problems, LLL(Lenstra, Lenstra and Lovász base reduction algorithm and cryptographic systems with lattice [20], [10] and [19].

  10. Zeroing in on red blood cell unit expiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyalil, Fathima; Irwin, Greg; Ross, Bryony; Manolis, Michael; Enjeti, Anoop K

    2017-09-20

    Expiry of red blood cell (RBC) units is a significant contributor to wastage of precious voluntary donations. Effective strategies aimed at optimal resource utilization are required to minimize wastage. This retrospective study analyzed the strategic measures implemented to reduce expiry of RBC units in an Australian tertiary regional hospital. The measures, which included inventory rearrangement, effective stock rotation, and the number of emergency courier services required during a 24-month period, were evaluated. There was no wastage of RBC units due to expiry over the 12 months after policy changes. Before these changes, approximately half of RBC wastage (261/511) was due to expiry. The total number of transfusions remained constant in this period and there was no increase in the use of emergency couriers. Policy changes implemented were decreasing the RBC inventory level by one-third and effective stock rotation and using a computerized system to link the transfusion services across the area. Effective stock rotation resulted in a reduction in older blood (>28 days) received in the main laboratory rotated from peripheral hospitals, down from 6%-41% to 0%-2.5%. Age-related expiry of blood products is preventable and can be significantly reduced by improving practices in the pathology service. This study provides proof of principle for "zero tolerance for RBC unit expiry" across a large networked blood banking service. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  11. Quantum Geometry of the ``Fuzzy-Lattice'' Hubbard Model and the Fractional Chern Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Sagar; Haldane, F. D. M.

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies of interacting particles on tight-binding lattices with broken time-reversal symmetry reveal ``zero-field'' fractional quantum Hall (FQH) phases (fractional Chern insulators, FCI). In a partially-filled Landau level, the non-commutative guiding-centers are the residual degrees of freedom, requiring a ``quantum geometry'' Hilbert-space description (a real-space Schrödinger description can only apply in the ``classical geometry'' of unprojected coordinates). The continuum description does not apply on a lattice, where we describe emergence of the FCI from a non-commutative quantum lattice geometry. We define a ``fuzzy lattice'' by projecting a one-particle bandstructure (with more than one orbital per unit cell) into a single band, and then renormalize the orbital on each site to unit weight. The resulting overcomplete basis of local states is analogous to a basis of more than one coherent state per flux quantum in a Landau level. The overlap matrix characterizes ``quantum geometry'' on the ``fuzzy lattice'', defining a ``quantum distance'' measure and Berry fluxes through elementary lattice triangles. We study quantum geometry at transitions between topologically-distinct instances of a fuzzy lattice, as well as N-body states with local Hubbard interactions. supported by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-0819860

  12. Dependence of lattice strain relaxation, absorbance, and sheet resistance on thickness in textured ZnO@B transparent conductive oxide for thin-film solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Kuang-Yang; Huang, Yu-En; Chen, Chien-Hsun; Feng, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of surface texture, strain relaxation, absorbance, grain size, and sheet resistance in textured, boron-doped ZnO (ZnO@B), transparent conductive oxide (TCO) materials of different thicknesses used for thin film, solar cell applications is investigated. The residual strain induced by the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal expansion coefficient for thicker ZnO@B is relaxed, leading to an increased surface texture, stronger absorbance, larger grain size, and lower sheet resistance. These experimental results reveal the optical and material characteristics of the TCO layer, which could be useful for enhancing the performance of solar cells through an optimized TCO layer.

  13. Dependence of lattice strain relaxation, absorbance, and sheet resistance on thickness in textured ZnO@B transparent conductive oxide for thin-film solar cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Yang Kou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interplay of surface texture, strain relaxation, absorbance, grain size, and sheet resistance in textured, boron-doped ZnO (ZnO@B, transparent conductive oxide (TCO materials of different thicknesses used for thin film, solar cell applications is investigated. The residual strain induced by the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal expansion coefficient for thicker ZnO@B is relaxed, leading to an increased surface texture, stronger absorbance, larger grain size, and lower sheet resistance. These experimental results reveal the optical and material characteristics of the TCO layer, which could be useful for enhancing the performance of solar cells through an optimized TCO layer.

  14. Electrostatic forces or structural scaffolding: what stabilizes the lattice spacing of relaxed skinned muscle fibers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David A

    2014-08-21

    The filament lattice in relaxed striated muscle is thought to be stabilized by electrostatic forces between charged filaments; electrostatic theories based on known filament charge densities do predict that the lattice spacing drops slightly with sarcomere length when actin and myosin filaments overlap. However, at sarcomere lengths with no overlap, electrostatic forces are reduced to a very low level and electrostatic models predict that the lattice collapses to a much smaller spacing. This collapse is not observed, which suggests that the A-band and I-band lattices are stabilized mechanically by the M-band and Z-line. To determine which mechanisms operate, consider a model where charged-filament interactions are supplemented by elastic titin filaments and radially elastic M-bands and Z-lines. To make progress, this model is simplified by assuming that the areas of A-band and Z-line unit cells are equal. Published data for the length-dependence of the lattice spacing, in and out of overlap, can be fitted to a mechanical model with known titin elasticity and very weak M-band or Z-line stiffness (≈0.15 pN/nm per unit cell), which implies that electrostatic interactions cannot be ignored. A better fit is obtained when electrostatic interactions are restored. Electrostatic interactions also explain why the lattice spacing of relaxed muscle is a decreasing function of temperature.

  15. Computationally designed lattices with tuned properties for tissue engineering using 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Paul F; Gonella, Veronica C; Engensperger, Max; Ferguson, Stephen J; Shea, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Tissue scaffolds provide structural support while facilitating tissue growth, but are challenging to design due to diverse property trade-offs. Here, a computational approach was developed for modeling scaffolds with lattice structures of eight different topologies and assessing properties relevant to bone tissue engineering applications. Evaluated properties include porosity, pore size, surface-volume ratio, elastic modulus, shear modulus, and permeability. Lattice topologies were generated by patterning beam-based unit cells, with design parameters for beam diameter and unit cell length. Finite element simulations were conducted for each topology and quantified how elastic modulus and shear modulus scale with porosity, and how permeability scales with porosity cubed over surface-volume ratio squared. Lattices were compared with controlled properties related to porosity and pore size. Relative comparisons suggest that lattice topology leads to specializations in achievable properties. For instance, Cube topologies tend to have high elastic and low shear moduli while Octet topologies have high shear moduli and surface-volume ratios but low permeability. The developed method was utilized to analyze property trade-offs as beam diameter was altered for a given topology, and used to prototype a 3D printed lattice embedded in an interbody cage for spinal fusion treatments. Findings provide a basis for modeling and understanding relative differences among beam-based lattices designed to facilitate bone tissue growth.

  16. A Lattice Study of the Glueball Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chuan

    2001-01-01

    The glueball spectrum is studied using an improved gluonic action on asymmetric lattices in the pure SU(3) lattice gauge theory. The smallest spatial lattice spacing is about 0.08 fm which makes the extrapolation to the ontinuum limit more reliable. Converting our lattice results to physical units using the scale set by the static quark potential, we obtain the following results for the glueball masses: MG(0++) -= 1730(90) MeV for the scalarglueball and MG(2++) = 2400(95) MeV for the tensor glueball.

  17. Lattice Dynamics of Beryllium from a First-Principles Nonlocal Pseudopotential Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, F. King; Cutler, P. H.

    1970-01-01

    The lattice dynamics of beryllium, a metal with hexagonal close-packed structure and two atoms per unit cell, is investigated within the framework of Harrison's first-principles pseudopotential theory, using (i) the Slater approximation for the conduction-band-core exchange, and (ii) a modified...

  18. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  19. A three-dimensional pore-scale model of the cathode electrode in polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell by lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaeimanesh, G. R.; Akbari, M. H.

    2014-07-01

    High power density, low operation temperature, high efficiency and low emissions have granted proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the most promising future among all types of fuel cells. The porous electrodes of PEM fuel cells have a complicated, non-homogeneous, anisotropic microstructure. Therefore, pore-scale modeling techniques such as lattice Boltzmann method, which can capture non-homogeneous and anisotropic microstructures, have recently gained a great attention. In the present study, a three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model of a PEM fuel cell cathode electrode is proposed in which electrochemical reaction on the catalyst layer and microstructure of GDL are taken into account. The model enables us to simulate single-phase, multi-species reactive flow in a heterogeneous, anisotropic gas diffusion layer through an active approach. To show the capability of the proposed model, reactive flow in three reconstructed GDLs with different anisotropic characteristics is simulated to investigate the effects of GDL microstructure on species and current density distributions. The results demonstrate that when carbon fibers are more likely oriented normal to the catalyst layer, species density distribution is thicker and more disturbed. Current density also experiences a larger variation on the catalyst layer in such a case.

  20. Calculations for a BWR Lattice with Adjacent Gadolinium Pins Using the Monte Carlo Cell Code Serpent v.1.1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ferraro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are usually used to perform criticality calculations and to solve shielding problems due to their capability to model complex systems without major approximations. However, these codes demand high computational resources. The improvement in computer capabilities leads to several new applications of Monte Carlo neutron transport codes. An interesting one is to use this method to perform cell-level fuel assembly calculations in order to obtain few group constants to be used on core calculations. In the present work the VTT recently developed Serpent v.1.1.7 cell-oriented neutronic calculation code is used to perform cell calculations of a theoretical BWR lattice benchmark with burnable poisons, and the main results are compared to reported ones and with calculations performed with Condor v.2.61, the INVAP's neutronic collision probability cell code.

  1. Free µ-Lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santocanale, Luigi

    2002-01-01

    A μ-lattice is a lattice with the property that every unary polynomial has both a least and a greatest fix-point. In this paper we define the quasivariety of μ-lattices and, for a given partially ordered set P, we construct a μ-lattice JP whose elements are equivalence classes of games in a preor...

  2. Porous silicon for micro-sized fuel cell reformer units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presting, H.; Konle, J.; Starkov, V.; Vyatkin, A.; Koenig, U

    2004-04-25

    Randomly, self-organized and ordered anodically etched porous silicon with pore sizes down to hundred nanometers have been fabricated for a variety of automotive applications which range from carrier structures in fuel cell technology up to shower heads for fuel injection in combustion engines. The porous wafers are produced by deep anodic etching which is a very effective and cheap fabrication method compatible to standard Si CMOS fabrication technology. The density of nano- (and micro-) pores can be varied in a wide range by choice of substrate doping level and appropriate electrolyte solution. Surface enlargement up to a factor of 1000 can be achieved [J. Electrochem. Soc. 149 (1) (2002) G70]. After deposition of a catalyst on the inner surface of the pores these structures can be used as an effective catalytic reaction area for the injected hydrocarbons in a micro-steam reformer unit with a small reaction volume. In addition deep anodic etching (DAE) of a pinhole array with very high aspect ratios is demonstrated using a pre-patterned inverted pyramidal array which is produced by lithography and subsequent wet chemical potassium hydroxide (KOH) etch. The structures can also be used as carrier structures for the hydrogen separation membrane of the reforming gas in a reformer unit when a thin layer of palladium is evaporated prior to the anodic etching of the pores. The noble metal foil serves as anode contact during the etch as well as hydrogen separating membrane of the device.

  3. An innovative lattice Boltzmann model for simulating Michaelis-Menten-based diffusion-advection kinetics and its application within a cartilage cell bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaty Sayed, A A; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2010-04-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models (LBM) are rapidly showing their ability to simulate a lot of fluid dynamics problems that previously required very complex approaches. This study presents a LBM for simulating diffusion-advection transport of substrate in a 2-D laminar flow. The model considers the substrate influx into a set of active cells placed inside the flow field. A new innovative method was used to simulate the cells activity using the LBM by means of Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The model is validated with some numerical benchmark problems and proved highly accurate results. After validation the model was used to simulate the transport of oxygen substrates that diffuse in water to feed a set of active cartilage cells inside a new designed bioreactor.

  4. Massive Parallelization of STED Nanoscopy Using Optical Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Bin; Mestre, Michael; Trebbia, Jean-Baptiste; Lounis, Brahim

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy achieved nanometer scale resolution and showed great potential in live cell imaging. Yet, STED nanoscopy techniques are based on single point-scanning. This constitutes a drawback for wide field imaging, since the gain in spatial resolution requires dense pixelation and hence long recording times. Here we achieve massive parallelization of STED nanoscopy using wide-field excitation together with well-designed optical lattices for depletion and a fast camera for detection. Acquisition of large field of view super-resolved images requires scanning over a single unit cell of the optical lattice which can be as small as 290 nm*290nm. Interference STED (In-STED) images of 2.9 {\\mu}m* 2.9 {\\mu}m with resolution down to 70 nm are obtained at 12.5 frames per second. The development of this technique opens many prospects for fast wide-field nanoscopy.

  5. Bimaterial lattices as thermal adapters and actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Marina M.; Steeves, Craig A.

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate how anisotropic biomaterial lattices can be used in thermal actuation. Compared to other lattices with tailored thermal expansion, the anisotropy of these bimaterial lattices makes them uniquely suitable for use as thermal actuators. Each individual cell, and hence lattices consisting of such cells, can be designed with widely different predetermined coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) in different directions, enabling complex shape changes appropriate for actuation with either passive or active control. The lattices are composed of planar non-identical cells that each consist of a skewed hexagon surrounding an irregular triangle. The cells and all members of any cell are connected to each other by pins so that they have no rotational constraints and are able to expand or contract freely. In this case, the skew angles of the hexagon and the ratio of the CTEs of the two component materials determine the overall performance of the lattice. At its boundaries, the lattice is connected to substrates by pins and configured such that the CTE between two neighboring lattice vertices coincides with the CTE of the adjacent substrate. Provided the boundary behavior of the lattice is matched to the thermal properties of the substrates, temperature changes in the structure produce thermal strains without producing any corresponding stresses. Such lattices can be used in three different ways: as adaptive elements for stress-free connection of components with different CTEs; for fine tuning of structures; and as thermally driven actuators. In this paper, we demonstrate some concepts for lattice configurations that produce thermally-driven displacements that enable several actuators: a switch, a valve and tweezers.

  6. Development of Lattice-Matched 1.7 eV GalnAsP Solar Cells Grown on GaAs by MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Nikhil; Oshima, Ryuji; France, Ryan; Geisz, John; Norman, Andrew; Dippo, Pat; Levi, Dean; Young, Michelle; Olavarria, Waldo; Steiner, Myles A.

    2016-11-21

    To advance the state-of-the-art in III-V multijunction solar cells towards high concentration efficiencies approaching 50%, development of a high-quality ~1.7 eV second junction solar cell is of key interest for integration in five or more junction devices. Quaternary GalnAsP solar cells grown lattice-matched on GaAs allows bandgap tunability in the range from 1.42 to 1.92 eV and offers an attractive Al-free alternative to conventional AlGaAs solar cells. In this work, we investigate the role of growth temperature towards understanding the optimal growth window for realizing high-quality GalnAsP alloys. We demonstrate bandgap tunability from 1.6 to 1.8 eV in GalnAsP alloys for compositions close to the miscibility gap, while still maintaining lattice-matched condition to GaAs. We perform an in-depth investigation to understand the impact of varying base thickness and doping concentration on the carrier collection and performance of these 1.7 eV GalnAsP solar cells. The photo-response of these cells is found to be very sensitive to p-type zinc dopant incorporation in the base layer. We demonstrate prototype 1.7 eV GalnAsP solar cell designs that leverage enhanced depletion width as an effective method to overcome this issue and boost long-wavelength carrier collection. Short-circuit current density (JSC) measured in field-aided devices were as high as 17.25 m A/cm2. The best GalnAsP solar cell in this study achieved an efficiency of 17.2% with a JSC of 17 m A/cm2 and a fill-factor of 86.4%. The corresponding open-circuit voltage (VOC) 1.7 eV measured on this cell represents the highest Voc reported for a 1.7 eV GalnAsP solar cell. These initial cell results are encouraging and highlight the potential of Al-free GalnAsP solar cells for integration in the next generation of III-V multijunction solar cells.

  7. Fermi surface properties of paramagnetic NpCd{sub 11} with a large unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Haga, Yoshinori; Sakai, Hironori; Ikeda, Shugo; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nakamura, Akio; Onuki, Yoshichika [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Settai, Rikio [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Takeuchi, Tetsuya [Cryogenic Center, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamagami, Hiroshi, E-mail: yhomma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    We succeeded in growing a high-quality single crystal of NpCd{sub 11} with the cubic BaHg{sub 11}-type structure by the Cd-self flux method. The lattice parameter of a = 9.2968(2) A and crystallographic positions of the atoms were determined by x-ray single-crystal structure analysis. From the results of the magnetic susceptibility and specific heat experiments, this compound is found to be a 5f-localized paramagnet with the singlet ground state in the crystalline electric field (CEF) scheme. Fermi surface properties were measured using the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) technique. Long-period oscillations were observed in the dHvA frequency range of 9.1 x 10{sup 5} to 1.9 x 10{sup 7} Oe, indicating small cross-sectional areas of Fermi surfaces, which is consistent with a small Brillouin zone based on a large unit cell. From the results of dHvA and magnetoresistance experiments, the Fermi surface of NpCd{sub 11} is found to consist of many kinds of closed Fermi surfaces and a multiply-connected-like Fermi surface, although the result of energy band calculations based on the 5f-localized Np{sup 3+}(5f{sup 4}) configuration reveals the existence of only closed Fermi surfaces. The corresponding cyclotron effective mass is small, ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m{sub 0}, which is consistent with a small electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} {approx_equal} 10mJ/K{sup 2{center_dot}}mol, revealing no hybridization between the 5f electrons and conduction electrons.

  8. Indirect Fabrication of Lattice Metals with Thin Sections Using Centrifugal Casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Jiwon; Ju, Jaehyung; Thurman, James

    2016-05-14

    One of the typical methods to manufacture 3D lattice metals is the direct-metal additive manufacturing (AM) process such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In spite of its potential processing capability, the direct AM method has several disadvantages such as high cost, poor surface finish of final products, limitation in material selection, high thermal stress, and anisotropic properties of parts. We propose a cost-effective method to manufacture 3D lattice metals. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed protocol on fabrication of 3D lattice metals having a complex shape and a thin wall thickness; e.g., octet truss made of Al and Cu alloys having a unit cell length of 5 mm and a cell wall thickness of 0.5 mm. An overall experimental procedure is divided into eight sections: (a) 3D printing of sacrificial patterns (b) melt-out of support materials (c) removal of residue of support materials (d) pattern assembly (e) investment (f) burn-out of sacrificial patterns (g) centrifugal casting (h) post-processing for final products. The suggested indirect AM technique provides the potential to manufacture ultra-lightweight lattice metals; e.g., lattice structures with Al alloys. It appears that the process parameters should be properly controlled depending on materials and lattice geometry, observing the final products of octet truss metals by the indirect AM technique.

  9. First-principles investigation of the effect of charged unit cell on the electronic structure of two-dimensional MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekaari, Ashkan; Abolhassani, Mohammad Reza; Lashgari, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Density-functional theory has been applied to investigate the effect of charged unit cell on the structural and electronic properties of two-dimensional MoS2 within PBE-GGA. The charge of the unit cell of the monolayer changes from zero to n = ± 4 e with e the absolute value of the elementary electric charge. Variations of the lattice constant, Mo-S bond length, S-Mo-S bond angle, total energy, exchange and correlation contributions, and the Fermi level versus n have been calculated quantitatively, indicating decrease in the stability of the atomic structure of the monolayer with increase in the absolute value of n. It is found that the Fermi level for two-dimensional MoS2 is a function of both the number of electrons in allowed states and the inverse of the volume of the unit cell. The electronic properties of each monolayer have been also calculated via examining the related electronic band structure and density of states. Results broadly support the view that the effect of charged unit cell (n =+ e to - 4 e) on the electronic properties of MoS2 monolayer is manifested in the form of semiconductor-to-metal transition in addition to the Fermi level shift. It is also verified that as the negative charge of the unit cell increases from n = - e to - 4 e , there is an ever-increasing trend in the total number of allowed electronic states at the Fermi level, implying a direct correlation between electrical conductivity and the value of n in a way that the more negative the charge of the unit cell, the higher the electrical conductivity of the monolayer.

  10. Ultralocality on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Campos, R G; Campos, Rafael G.; Tututi, Eduardo S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the nonlocal Dirac operator yielded by a lattice model that preserves chiral symmetry and uniqueness of fields, approaches to an ultralocal and invariant under translations operator when the size of the lattice tends to zero.

  11. New integrable lattice hierarchies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, Andrew [Area de Matematica Aplicada, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Zhu Zuonong [Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced 1, 37008 Salamanca (Spain) and Department of Mathematics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: znzhu2@yahoo.com.cn

    2006-01-23

    In this Letter we give a new integrable four-field lattice hierarchy, associated to a new discrete spectral problem. We obtain our hierarchy as the compatibility condition of this spectral problem and an associated equation, constructed herein, for the time-evolution of eigenfunctions. We consider reductions of our hierarchy, which also of course admit discrete zero curvature representations, in detail. We find that our hierarchy includes many well-known integrable hierarchies as special cases, including the Toda lattice hierarchy, the modified Toda lattice hierarchy, the relativistic Toda lattice hierarchy, and the Volterra lattice hierarchy. We also obtain here a new integrable two-field lattice hierarchy, to which we give the name of Suris lattice hierarchy, since the first equation of this hierarchy has previously been given by Suris. The Hamiltonian structure of the Suris lattice hierarchy is obtained by means of a trace identity formula.

  12. Mechanical modeling of innovative metamaterials alternating pentamode lattices and confinement plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraternali, F.; Amendola, A.

    2017-02-01

    This study examines the mechanical behavior of a novel class of mechanical metamaterials alternating pentamode lattices and stiffening plates. The unit cell of such lattices consists of a sub-lattice of the face cubic-centered unit cell typically analyzed in the current literature on pentamode materials. The studied systems exhibit only three soft deformation modes in the infinitesimal stretch-dominated regime, as opposed to the five zero-energy modes of unconfined pentamode lattices. We develop analytical formulae for the vertical and bending stiffness properties and study the dependence of such quantities on the main design parameters: the lattice constant, the solid volume fraction, the cross-section area of the rods, and the layer thickness. A noteworthy result is that the effective compression modulus of the analyzed structures is equal to two thirds of the Young modulus of the stiffest isotropic elastic networks currently available in the literature, being accompanied by zero-rigidity against infinitesimal shear and twisting mechanisms. The use of the proposed metamaterials as novel seismic-isolation devices and impact-protection equipment is discussed by drawing comparisons with the response of alternative devices already available or under development.

  13. Super Unit Cells in Aperture-Based Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Tanasković

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important class of electromagnetic metamaterials are aperture-based metasurfaces. Examples include extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnets with negative refractive index. We analyze a generalization of such metamaterials where a simple aperture is now replaced by a compound object formed by superposition of two or more primitive objects (e.g., rectangles, circles, and ellipses. Thus obtained “super unit cell” shows far richer behavior than the subobjects that comprise it. We show that nonlocalities introduced by overlapping simple subobjects can be used to produce large deviations of spectral dispersion even for small additive modifications of the basic geometry. Technologically, some super cells may be fabricated by simple spatial shifting of the existing photolithographic masks. In our investigation we applied analytical calculations and ab initio finite element modeling to prove the possibility to tailor the dispersion including resonances for plasmonic nanocomposites by adjusting the local geometry and exploiting localized interactions at a subwavelength level. Any desired form could be defined using simple primitive objects, making the situation a geometrical analog of the case of series expansion of a function. Thus an additional degree of tunability of metamaterials is obtained. The obtained designer structures can be applied in different fields like waveguiding and sensing.

  14. Sober Topological Molecular Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德学; 李永明

    2003-01-01

    A topological molecular lattice (TML) is a pair (L, T), where L is a completely distributive lattice and r is a subframe of L. There is an obvious forgetful functor from the category TML of TML's to the category Loc of locales. In this note,it is showed that this forgetful functor has a right adjoint. Then, by this adjunction,a special kind of topological molecular lattices called sober topological molecular lattices is introduced and investigated.

  15. Infinite resistive lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, D; van Steenwijk, F.J.

    The resistance between two arbitrary nodes in an infinite square lattice of:identical resistors is calculated, The method is generalized to infinite triangular and hexagonal lattices in two dimensions, and also to infinite cubic and hypercubic lattices in three and more dimensions. (C) 1999 American

  16. Lattice Regularization and Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Hasenfratz, Peter; Von Allmen, R; Allmen, Reto von; Hasenfratz, Peter; Niedermayer, Ferenc

    2006-01-01

    Finding the relation between the symmetry transformations in the continuum and on the lattice might be a nontrivial task as illustrated by the history of chiral symmetry. Lattice actions induced by a renormalization group procedure inherit all symmetries of the continuum theory. We give a general procedure which gives the corresponding symmetry transformations on the lattice.

  17. Cell Churches and Stem Cell Marketing in South Korea and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipp, Douglas

    2016-05-23

    The commercial provision of putative stem cell-based medical interventions in the absence of conclusive evidence of safety and efficacy has formed the basis of an unregulated industry for more than a decade. Many clinics offering such supposed stem cell treatments include statements about the 'ethical' nature of somatic (often colloquially referred to as 'adult' stem cells) stem cells, in specific contrast to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have been the subject of intensive political, legal, and religious controversy since their first derivation in 1998. Christian groups-both Roman Catholic and evangelical Protestant-in many countries have explicitly promoted the medical potential and current-day successes in the clinical application of somatic stem cells, lending indirect support to the activities of businesses marketing stem cells ahead of evidence. In this article, I make a preliminary examination of how the structures and belief systems of certain churches in South Korea and the United States, both of which are home to significant stem cell marketing industries, has complemented other factors, including national biomedical funding initiatives, international economic rivalries, permissive legal structures, which have lent impetus to a problematic and often exploitative sector of biomedical commerce.

  18. Single fibre and multifibre unit cell analysis of strength and cracking of unidirectional composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.W.; Zhou, H.W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations of damage evolution in composites reinforced with single and multifibre are presented. Several types of unit cell models are considered: single fibre unit cell, multiple fibre unit cell with one and several damageable sections per fibres, unit cells with homogeneous...... damageable parts in composites (matrix cracks, fibre/matrix interface damage and fibre fracture) was observed in the simulations. The strength of interface begins to influence the deformation behaviour of the cell only after the fibre is broken. In this case, the higher interface layer strength leads...... and inhomogeneous interfaces, etc. Two numerical damage models, cohesive elements, and damageable layers are employed for the simulation of the damage evolution in single fibre and multifibre unit cells. The two modelling approaches were compared and lead to the very close results. Competition among the different...

  19. Use of the Primitive Unit Cell in Understanding Subtle Features of the Cubic Closest-Packed Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, John A.; Rittenhouse, Jeffrey L.; Soper, Linda M.; Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important crystal structures adopted by metals is characterized by the "abcabc"...stacking of close-packed layers. This structure is commonly referred to in textbooks as the cubic close-packed (ccp) or face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, since the entire lattice can be generated by replication of a face-centered cubic unit cell…

  20. A Lattice Study of the Glueball Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chuan

    2001-01-01

    Glueball spectrum is studied using an improved gluonic action on asymmetric lattices in the pure SU(3)gauge theory. The smallest spatial lattice spacing is about 0.08 fm which makes the extrapolation to the continuum limit more reliable. In particular, attention is paid to the scalar glueball mass which is known to have problems in the extrapolation. Converting our lattice results to physical units using the scale set by the static quark potential,we obtain the following results for the glueball masses: MG(0++) = 1730(90) MeV for the scalar glueball mass and MG(2++) = 2400(95) MeV for the tensor glueball.

  1. Automated assembling of single fuel cell units for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Muminovic, A.; Barz, C.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    The manufacturing of PEMFC stacks (POLYMER ELEKTROLYT MEMBRAN Fuel Cell) is nowadays still done by hand. Over hundreds of identical single components have to be placed accurate together for the construction of a fuel cell stack. Beside logistic problems, higher total costs and disadvantages in weight the high number of components produce a higher statistic interference because of faulty erection or material defects and summation of manufacturing tolerances. The saving of costs is about 20 - 25 %. Furthermore, the total weight of the fuel cells will be reduced because of a new sealing technology. Overall a one minute cycle time has to be aimed per cell at the manufacturing of these single components. The change of the existing sealing concept to a bonded sealing is one of the important requisites to get an automated manufacturing of single cell units. One of the important steps for an automated gluing process is the checking of the glue application by using of an image processing system. After bonding the single fuel cell the sealing and electrical function can be checked, so that only functional and high qualitative cells can get into further manufacturing processes.

  2. The deconfinement transition on coarse lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Bliss, D W; Lepage, G P

    1996-01-01

    We compute the critical temperature T_c for the deconfinement transition of pure QCD on coarse lattices, with N_t = 2, 3, 4, and lattice spacings from .33 fm to .15 fm. We employ a perturbatively improved gluon action designed to remove order a^2 and \\alpha_s a^2 errors. We find that T_c in units of the charmonium 1P--1S splitting and the torelon mass is independent of a to within approximately 5\\%.

  3. Unit cell geometry of multiaxial preforms for structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Frank; Lei, Charles; Rahman, Anisur; Du, G. W.; Cai, Yun-Jia

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the yarn geometry of multiaxial preforms. The importance of multiaxial preforms for structural composites is well recognized by the industry but, to exploit their full potential, engineering design rules must be established. This study is a step in that direction. In this work the preform geometry for knitted and braided preforms was studied by making a range of well designed samples and studying them by photo microscopy. The structural geometry of the preforms is related to the processing parameters. Based on solid modeling and B-spline methodology a software package is developed. This computer code enables real time structural representations of complex fiber architecture based on the rule of preform manufacturing. The code has the capability of zooming and section plotting. These capabilities provide a powerful means to study the effect of processing variables on the preform geometry. the code also can be extended to an auto mesh generator for downstream structural analysis using finite element method. This report is organized into six sections. In the first section the scope and background of this work is elaborated. In section two the unit cell geometries of braided and multi-axial warp knitted preforms is discussed. The theoretical frame work of yarn path modeling and solid modeling is presented in section three. The thin section microscopy carried out to observe the structural geometry of the preforms is the subject in section four. The structural geometry is related to the processing parameters in section five. Section six documents the implementation of the modeling techniques into the computer code MP-CAD. A user manual for the software is also presented here. The source codes and published papers are listed in the Appendices.

  4. X-ray powder diffraction data and unit cells of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, J.W. van; Verkroost, T.W.; Sonneveld, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    X-Ray powder diffraction data and unit cell parameters of industrially produced, as well as bench scale prepared, ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate are reported and compared with current Powder Data file (PDF) (1989) patterns. A least-squares refinement resulted in two slightly different unit cell

  5. Lattice-matched Cu2ZnSnS4/CeO2 solar cell with open circuit voltage boost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Yan, Chang; Iandolo, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    We report a reproducible enhancement of the open circuit voltage in Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells by introduction of a very thin CeO2 interlayer between the Cu2ZnSnS4 absorber and the conventional CdS buffer. CeO2, a non-toxic earth-abundant compound, has a nearly optimal band alignment with Cu2ZnSnS4...... and the two materials are lattice-matched within 0.4%. This makes it possible to achieve an epitaxial interface when growing CeO2 by chemical bath deposition at temperatures as low as 50 °C. The open circuit voltage improvement is then attributed to a decrease in the interface recombination rate through...

  6. Lattice-matched Cu2ZnSnS4/CeO2 solar cell with open circuit voltage boost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Yan, Chang; Iandolo, Beniamino; Zhou, Fangzhou; Stride, John; Schou, Jørgen; Hao, Xiaojing; Hansen, Ole

    2016-12-01

    We report a reproducible enhancement of the open circuit voltage in Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells by introduction of a very thin CeO2 interlayer between the Cu2ZnSnS4 absorber and the conventional CdS buffer. CeO2, a non-toxic earth-abundant compound, has a nearly optimal band alignment with Cu2ZnSnS4 and the two materials are lattice-matched within 0.4%. This makes it possible to achieve an epitaxial interface when growing CeO2 by chemical bath deposition at temperatures as low as 50 °C. The open circuit voltage improvement is then attributed to a decrease in the interface recombination rate through formation of a high-quality heterointerface.

  7. Nanoscale study of reactive transport in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with precious and non-precious catalysts using lattice Boltzmann method

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; Holby, Edward F; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution porous structures of catalyst layer (CL) with multicomponent in proton exchange membrane fuel cells are reconstructed using a reconstruction method called quartet structure generation set. Characterization analyses of nanoscale structures are implemented including pore size distribution, specific area and phase connectivity. Pore-scale simulation methods based on the lattice Boltzmann method are developed and used to predict the macroscopic transport properties including effective diffusivity and proton conductivity. Nonuniform distributions of ionomer in CL generates more tortuous pathway for reactant transport and greatly reduces the effective diffusivity. Tortuosity of CL is much higher than conventional Bruggeman equation adopted. Knudsen diffusion plays a significant role in oxygen diffusion and significantly reduces the effective diffusivity. Reactive transport inside the CL is also investigated. Although the reactive surface area of non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) CL is much higher t...

  8. Charge transport in zirconium doped anatase nanowires dye-sensitized solar cells: Trade-off between lattice strain and photovoltaic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archana, P. S.; Gupta, Arunava [Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, 250 Hackberry Lane, Shelby hall, Tuscaloosa 35401 Alabama (United States); Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan, E-mail: rjose@ump.edu.my [Faculty of Industrial Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, 26300 Kuantan (Malaysia)

    2014-10-13

    Zirconium (Zr) is doped up to 5 at. % in anatase TiO{sub 2} nanowires by electrospinning and used as working electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells. Variations observed in the photovoltaic parameters were correlated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, open circuit voltage decay, and X-ray diffraction measurements. Results show that homovalent substitution of Zr in TiO{sub 2} increased the chemical capacitance and electron diffusion coefficient which in turn decreased charge transport resistance and charge transit time. However, lattice strain due to size mismatch between the Zr{sup 4+} and Ti{sup 4+} ions decreased open circuit voltage and fill factor thereby setting a trade-off between doping concentration and photovoltaic properties.

  9. LATTICE DEFORMATION AND PHASE TRANSFORMATION FROM NANO-SCALE ANATASE TO NANO-SCALE RUTILE TiO2 PREPARED BY A SOL-GEL TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanqun Shao; Dian Tang; Jinghua Sun; Yekun Lee; Weihao Xiong

    2004-01-01

    Nano-scale rutile phase was transformed from nano-scale anatase upon heating, which was prepared by a sol-gel technique. The XRD data corresponding to the anatase and rutile phases were analyzed and the grain sizes of as-derived phases were calculated by Sherrer equation. The lattice parameters of the as-derived anatase and rutile unit cells were calculated and compared with those of standard lattice parameters on PDF cards. It was shown that the smaller the grain sizes, the larger the lattice deformation. The lattice parameter a has the negative deviation from the standard and the lattice parameter c has the positive deviation for both phases. The particles sizes had preferential influence on the longer parameter between the lattice parameters of a and c. With increasing temperatures, the lattice parameters of a and c in both phases approached to the equilibrium state. The larger lattice deformation facilitated the nucleation process, which lowered the transformation temperature. During the transformation from nano-scale anatase to rutile, besides the mechanism involving retention of the {112} pseudo-close-packed planes of oxygen in anatase as the{100} pseudo-close-packed planes in rutile, the new phase occurred by relaxation of lattice deformation and adjustment of the atomic sites in parent phase. The orientation relationships were suggested to be anatase {101}//rutile {101} and anatase //rutile, and the habit plane was anatase (101),

  10. First-principles study of structure, initial lattice expansion, and pressure-composition-temperature hysteresis for substituted LaNi5 and TiMn2 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D. F.; Young, K.; Ng, K. Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    The c/a unit-cell aspect ratios of CaCu5-structured AB5 and C14 Laves phase AB2 metal hydride alloy families are generally correlated to pressure-concentration-temperature hysteresis and degree of alloy pulverization. Structures of substituted LaNi4 X and C14 Ti4Mn7 X compositions and their hydrides in the α-phase were calculated by first principles using density functional theory to look at the c/a ratio and its relationship to initial lattice expansion. Lattice expansion with respect to the lattice parameters and lattice volume in the α-phase hydrides were analyzed, and a general trend in lattice expansion in the direction of higher resistance to elastic deformation was observed to correlate well to the trends in hysteresis measured in AB5 and C14 AB2 type alloys. Lattice expansion is noted to induce microstrains within the crystal lattice, and the anisotropy in the LaNi4 X and Ti4Mn7 X alloys played a role in determining the direction of higher resistance to deformation. Lattice expansions both measured and calculated have been linked to capacity degradation measurements as well as to hysteresis (a measure of irreversible energy losses due to lattice plastic deformation), which may be related to the dislocations and defects formed during hydrogenation.

  11. Logic gates realized by nonvolatile GeTe/Sb2Te3 super lattice phase-change memory with a magnetic field input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Cheng, Xiaomin; Feng, Jinlong; Guan, Xiawei; Miao, Xiangshui

    2016-07-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices or circuits that can implement both storage and calculation are a crucial requirement for the efficiency improvement of modern computer. In this work, we realize logic functions by using [GeTe/Sb2Te3]n super lattice phase change memory (PCM) cell in which higher threshold voltage is needed for phase change with a magnetic field applied. First, the [GeTe/Sb2Te3]n super lattice cells were fabricated and the R-V curve was measured. Then we designed the logic circuits with the super lattice PCM cell verified by HSPICE simulation and experiments. Seven basic logic functions are first demonstrated in this letter; then several multi-input logic gates are presented. The proposed logic devices offer the advantages of simple structures and low power consumption, indicating that the super lattice PCM has the potential in the future nonvolatile central processing unit design, facilitating the development of massive parallel computing architecture.

  12. Picometer registration of zinc impurity states in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ for phase determination in intra-unit-cell Fourier transform STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, M. H.; Firmo, I. A.; Fujita, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Orenstein, J. W.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lawler, M. J.; Kim, E.-A.; Davis, J. C.

    2012-05-01

    Direct visualization of electronic-structure symmetry within each crystalline unit cell is a new technique for complex electronic matter research (Lawler et al 2010 Nature 466 347-51, Schmidt et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065014, Fujita K et al 2012 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 81 011005). By studying the Bragg peaks in Fourier transforms of electronic structure images and particularly by resolving both the real and imaginary components of the Bragg amplitudes, distinct types of intra-unit-cell symmetry breaking can be studied. However, establishing the precise symmetry point of each unit cell in real space is crucial in defining the phase for such a Bragg-peak Fourier analysis. Exemplary of this challenge is the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ for which the surface Bi atom locations are observable, while it is the invisible Cu atoms that define the relevant CuO2 unit-cell symmetry point. Here we demonstrate, by imaging with picometer precision the electronic impurity states at individual Zn atoms substituted at Cu sites, that the phase established using the Bi lattice produces a ˜2%(2π) error relative to the actual Cu lattice. Such a phase assignment error would not diminish reliability in the determination of intra-unit-cell rotational symmetry breaking at the CuO2 plane (Lawler et al 2010 Nature 466 347-51, Schmidt et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065014, Fujita K et al 2012 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 81 011005). Moreover, this type of impurity atom substitution at the relevant symmetry site can be of general utility in phase determination for the Bragg-peak Fourier analysis of intra-unit-cell symmetry.

  13. Map service: United States Decadal Production History Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service displays present and past oil and gas production in the United States, as well as the location and intensity of exploratory drilling outside...

  14. On the existence of localized excitations in nonlinear hamiltonian lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Flach, S

    1994-01-01

    We consider time-periodic nonlinear localized excitations (NLEs) on one-dimensional translationally invariant Hamiltonian lattices with arbitrary finite interaction range and arbitrary finite number of degrees of freedom per unit cell. We analyse a mapping of the Fourier coefficients of the NLE solution. NLEs correspond to homoclinic points in the phase space of this map. Using dimensionality properties of separatrix manifolds of the mapping we show the persistence of NLE solutions under perturbations of the system, provided NLEs exist for the given system. For a class of nonintegrable Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chains we rigorously prove the existence of NLE solutions.

  15. The effect of diffusion induced lattice stress on the open-circuit voltage in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, V. G.; Godlewski, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that diffusion induced stresses in low resistivity silicon solar cells can significantly reduce both the open-circuit voltage and collection efficiency. The degradation mechanism involves stress induced changes in both the minority carrier mobility and the diffusion length. Thermal recovery characteristics indicate that the stresses are relieved at higher temperatures by divacancy flow (silicon self diffusion). The level of residual stress in as-fabricated cells was found to be negligible in the cells tested.

  16. On Traveling Waves in Lattices: The Case of Riccati Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka

    2012-09-01

    The method of simplest equation is applied for analysis of a class of lattices described by differential-difference equations that admit traveling-wave solutions constructed on the basis of the solution of the Riccati equation. We denote such lattices as Riccati lattices. We search for Riccati lattices within two classes of lattices: generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices and generalized Holling lattices. We show that from the class of generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices only the Wadati lattice belongs to the class of Riccati lattices. Opposite to this many lattices from the Holling class are Riccati lattices. We construct exact traveling wave solutions on the basis of the solution of Riccati equation for three members of the class of generalized Holling lattices.

  17. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindler, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2007-07-15

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  18. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance as Telecommunications Backup Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and industry project partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) acts as the central data repository for the data collected from real-world operation of fuel cell backup power systems. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) co-funding awarded through DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, more than 1,300 fuel cell units were deployed over a three-plus-year period in stationary, material handling equipment, auxiliary power, and backup power applications. This surpassed a Fuel Cell Technologies Office ARRA objective to spur commercialization of an early market technology by installing 1,000 fuel cell units across several different applications, including backup power. By December 2013, 852 backup power units out of 1,330 fuel cell units deployed were providing backup service, mainly for telecommunications towers. For 136 of the fuel cell backup units, project participants provided detailed operational data to the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center for analysis by NREL's technology validation team. NREL analyzed operational data collected from these government co-funded demonstration projects to characterize key fuel cell backup power performance metrics, including reliability and operation trends, and to highlight the business case for using fuel cells in these early market applications. NREL's analyses include these critical metrics, along with deployment, U.S. grid outage statistics, and infrastructure operation.

  19. "Branes" in lattice SU(2) gluodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, V I

    2003-01-01

    We review lattice evidence for existence of thin vortices in the vacuum state of SU(2) gluodynamics. On the average, the non-Abelian action density per unit area is ultraviolet divergent as a^{-2} where a is the lattice spacing. At small scales, the surface looks very crumpled so that the corresponding entropy factor appears also ultraviolet divergent. The total area, however, scales in physical units. The surface is populated by monopoles which represent a tachyonic mode. The smallest value of $a$ tested is about (3 GeV)^{-1}.

  20. A method of studying the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for the superconducting vortex lattice state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiang

    2010-01-27

    In this paper, we present a method to construct the eigenspace of the tight-binding electrons moving on a 2D square lattice with nearest-neighbor hopping in the presence of a perpendicular uniform magnetic field which imposes (quasi-)periodic boundary conditions for the wavefunctions in the magnetic unit cell. Exact unitary transformations are put forward to correlate the discrete eigenvectors of the 2D electrons with those of the Harper equation. The cyclic tridiagonal matrix associated with the Harper equation is then tridiagonalized by another unitary transformation. The obtained truncated eigenbasis is utilized to expand the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for the superconducting vortex lattice state, which shows the merit of our method in studying large-sized systems. To test our method, we have applied our results to study the vortex lattice state of an s-wave superconductor.

  1. Measuring the Scalar Curvature with Clocks and Photons: Voronoi-Delaunay Lattices in Regge Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Jonathan R

    2008-01-01

    The Riemann scalar curvature plays a central role in Einstein's geometric theory of gravity. We describe a new geometric construction of this scalar curvature invariant at an event (vertex) in a discrete spacetime geometry. This allows one to constructively measure the scalar curvature using only clocks and photons. Given recent interest in discrete pre-geometric models of quantum gravity, we believe is it ever so important to reconstruct the curvature scalar with respect to a finite number of communicating observers. This derivation makes use of a new fundamental lattice cell built from elements inherited from both the original simplicial (Delaunay) spacetime and its circumcentric dual (Voronoi) lattice. The orthogonality properties between these two lattices yield an expression for the vertex-based scalar curvature which is strikingly similar to the corresponding hinge-based expression in Regge calculus (deficit angle per unit Voronoi dual area). In particular, we show that the scalar curvature is simply a ...

  2. Eight light flavors on large lattice volumes

    CERN Document Server

    Schaich, David

    2013-01-01

    I present first results from large-scale lattice investigations of SU(3) gauge theory with eight light flavors in the fundamental representation. Using leadership computing resources at Argonne, we are generating gauge configurations with lattice volumes up to $64^3\\times128$ at relatively strong coupling, in an attempt to access the chiral regime. We use nHYP-improved staggered fermions, carefully monitoring finite-volume effects and other systematics. Here I focus on analyses of the light hadron spectrum and chiral condensate, measured on lattice volumes up to $48^3\\times96$ with fermion masses as light as m=0.004 in lattice units. We find no clear indication of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in these observables. I discuss the implications of these initial results, and prospects for further physics projects employing these ensembles of gauge configurations.

  3. Lattice effects of surface cell: Multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree study on surface scattering of CO/Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2017-05-01

    To study the scattering of CO off a movable Cu(100) surface, extensive multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) calculations are performed based on the SAP [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] potential energy surface in conjunction with a recently developed expansion model [Q. Meng and H.-D. Meyer, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 164310 (2015)] for including lattice motion. The surface vibration potential is constructed by a sum of Morse potentials where the parameters are determined by simulating the vibrational energies of a clean Cu(100) surface. Having constructed the total Hamiltonian, extensive dynamical calculations in both time-independent and time-dependent schemes are performed. Two-layer MCTDH (i.e., normal MCTDH) block-improved-relaxations (time-independent scheme) show that increasing the number of included surface vibrational dimensions lets the vibrational energies of CO/Cu(100) decrease for the frustrated translation (T mode), which is of low energy but increase those of the frustrated rotation (R mode) and the CO-Cu stretch (S mode), whose vibrational energies are larger than the energies of the in-plane surface vibrations (˜79 cm-1). This energy-shifting behavior was predicted and discussed by a simple model in our previous publication [Q. Meng and H.-D. Meyer, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 164310 (2015)]. By the flux analysis of the MCTDH/ML-MCTDH propagated wave packets, we calculated the sticking probabilities for the X + 0D, X + 1D, X + 3D, X + 5D, and X + 15D systems, where "X" stands for the used dimensionality of the CO/rigid-surface system and the second entry denotes the number of surface degrees of freedom included. From these sticking probabilities, the X + 5D/15D calculations predict a slower decrease of sticking with increasing energy as compared to the sticking of the X + 0D/1D/3D calculations. This is because the translational energy of CO is more easily transferred to surface vibrations, when the vibrational

  4. Nuclear lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epelbaum E.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress on nuclear lattice simulations using chiral effective field theory. We discuss lattice results for dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order, three-body forces at next-to-next-toleading order, isospin-breaking and Coulomb effects, and the binding energy of light nuclei.

  5. Guest-responsive covalent frameworks by the cross-linking of liquid-crystalline salts: tuning of lattice flexibility by the design of polymerizable units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yasuhiro; Sakata, Hiroaki; Achalkumar, Ammathnadu S; Yamada, Kuniyo; Matsuoka, Yuki; Iwahashi, Nobutaka; Amano, Sayaka; Saigo, Kazuhiko

    2011-12-23

    Cross-linked polymers prepared by the in-situ polymerization of liquid-crystalline salts were found to work as solid-state hosts with a flexible framework. As a component of such hosts, four kinds of polymerizable amphiphilic carboxylic acids bearing alkyl chains with acryloyloxy (A), dienyl (D), and/or nonreactive (N) chain ends (monomeric carboxylic acids; M(AAA), M(ANA), M(DDD), and M(DND)) were used. The carboxylic acids were mixed with an equimolar amount of a template unit, (1R,2S)-norephedrine (guest amine; G(RS)), to form the corresponding salts. Every salt exhibited a rectangular columnar LC phase at room temperature, which was successfully polymerized by (60)Co γ-ray-induced polymerization without serious structural disordering to afford the salt of cross-linked carboxylic acid (polymeric carboxylic acid; P(AAA), P(ANA), P(DDD), and P(DND)) with G(RS) . Owing to the noncovalency of the interactions between the polymer framework P and the template G(RS), the cross-linked polymers could reversibly release and capture a meaningful amount of G(RS). In response to the desorption and adsorption of G(RS), the cross-linked polymers dramatically switched their nanoscale structural order. A systematic comparison of the polymers revealed that the choice of polymerizable groups has a significant influence on the properties of the resultant polymer frameworks as solid-state hosts. Among these polymers, P(DDD) was found to be an excellent solid-state host, in terms of guest-releasing/capturing ability, guest-recognition ability, durability to repetitive usage, and unique structural switching mode.

  6. Advanced Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of an advanced composite bipolar plate is proposed for a unitized regenerative fuel cell and electrolyzer system that operates on pure feed streams...

  7. Super Unit Cells in Aperture-Based Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Tanasković; Zoran Jakšić; Marko Obradov; Olga Jakšić

    2015-01-01

    An important class of electromagnetic metamaterials are aperture-based metasurfaces. Examples include extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnets with negative refractive index. We analyze a generalization of such metamaterials where a simple aperture is now replaced by a compound object formed by superposition of two or more primitive objects (e.g., rectangles, circles, and ellipses). Thus obtained “super unit cell” shows far richer behavior than the subobjects that compris...

  8. Overview of commercialization of stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooie, D.T.; Williams, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper, DOE`s efforts to assist private sector organizations to develop and commercialize stationary fuel cell power plants in the United States are discussed. The paper also provides a snapshot of the status of stationary power fuel cell development occurring in the US, addressing all fuel cell types. This paper discusses general characteristics, system configurations, and status of test units and demonstration projects. The US DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center is the lead center for implementing DOE`s program for fuel cells for stationary power.

  9. Dielectric Behavior of Low Microwave Loss Unit Cell for All Dielectric Metamaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Tianhuan Luo; Bo Li; Qian Zhao; Ji Zhou

    2015-01-01

    With a deep study of the metamaterial, its unit cells have been widely extended from metals to dielectrics. The dielectric based unit cells attract much attention because of the advantage of easy preparation, tunability, and higher frequency response, and so forth. Using the conventional solid state method, we prepared a kind of incipient ferroelectrics (calcium titanate, CaTiO3) with higher microwave permittivity and lower loss, which can be successfully used to construct metamaterials. The ...

  10. Recent insights into the cell biology of thyroid angiofollicular units.

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Ides M.; Denef, Jean-François; Lengelé, Benoît; Many, Marie-Christine; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2013-01-01

    In thyrocytes, cell polarity is of crucial importance for proper thyroid function. Many intrinsic mechanisms of self-regulation control how the key players involved in thyroid hormone (TH) biosynthesis interact in apical microvilli, so that hazardous biochemical processes may occur without detriment to the cell. In some pathological conditions, this enzymatic complex is disrupted, with some components abnormally activated into the cytoplasm, which can lead to further morphological and functio...

  11. Experimental Realization of a Quantum Pentagonal Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Okubo, Tsuyoshi; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Araki, Koji; Iwase, Kenji; Amaya, Naoki; Ono, Toshio; Hosokoshi, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Geometric frustration, in which competing interactions give rise to degenerate ground states, potentially induces various exotic quantum phenomena in magnetic materials. Minimal models comprising triangular units, such as triangular and Kagome lattices, have been investigated for decades to realize novel quantum phases, such as quantum spin liquid. A pentagon is the second-minimal elementary unit for geometric frustration. The realization of such systems is expected to provide a distinct platform for studying frustrated magnetism. Here, we present a spin-1/2 quantum pentagonal lattice in the new organic radical crystal α-2,6-Cl2-V [=α-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1,5-diphenylverdazyl]. Its unique molecular arrangement allows the formation of a partially corner-shared pentagonal lattice (PCPL). We find a clear 1/3 magnetization plateau and an anomalous change in magnetization in the vicinity of the saturation field, which originate from frustrated interactions in the PCPL. PMID:26468930

  12. Dominant unit CD34+ cell dose predicts engraftment after double-unit cord blood transplantation and is influenced by bank practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtill, Duncan; Smith, Katherine; Devlin, Sean; Meagher, Richard; Tonon, Joann; Lubin, Marissa; Ponce, Doris M; Giralt, Sergio; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Stevens, Cladd E; Barker, Juliet N

    2014-11-06

    We investigated the unit characteristics associated with engraftment after double-unit cord blood (CB) transplantation (dCBT) and whether these could be reliably identified during unit selection. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment in 129 myeloablative dCBT recipients was 95% (95% confidence interval: 90-98%). When precryopreservation characteristics were analyzed, the dominant unit CD34(+) cell dose was the only characteristic independently associated with engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.43; P = .002). When postthaw characteristics were also included, only dominant unit infused viable CD34(+) cell dose independently predicted engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.95; P banks were more likely to have low recovery (P banks and units with cryovolumes other than 24.5 to 26.0 mL were more likely to have poor postthaw viability. Precryopreservation CD34(+) cell dose and banking practices should be incorporated into CB unit selection.

  13. Structure determination of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase from a crystal with lattice-translocation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xueyong [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Xu, Xiaojin [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Glycobiology Institute, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Wilson, Ian A., E-mail: wilson@scripps.edu [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The structure of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase was determined to 1.65 Å from crystals with a lattice-translocation defect using uncorrected, as well as corrected, diffraction data. Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 Å resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 Å, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  14. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  15. Numerical simulation of motion and deformation of healthy and sick red blood cell through a constricted vessel using hybrid lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Amir; Pourmahmoud, Nader; Dadvand, Abdolrahman

    2017-05-01

    In the present article, hybrid lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method is utilized to simulate two-dimensional incompressible viscous flow involving flexible immersed red blood cell (RBC) in a microchannel. The main focus of the present research is to study motion and deformation of both healthy and sick RBCs in a vessel with different sizes of stenosis. The presented computational results consent reasonably well with the available data in the literature. Two different channels i.e. a simple and a constricted channel are investigated in the present manuscript. The results show that the RBC transfer and deform without any lift force and rotation induced when it is located on the symmetry axis of the microchannel. However, when the RBC is located off the symmetry axis, the pressure difference produced in the flow around the RBC would apply lift forces on them and expel them towards the center of the channel. The healthy RBC always shows more deformation related to the sick one along the channel. Another important result of the present research is that for the ratio of [Formula: see text] a sick RBC cannot pass the stenosis, and it reasons serious difficulties for body. The present results have been compared with the available experimental and numerical results which show good agreements.

  16. Large scale simulation of liquid water transport in a gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaida, Satoshi; Tabe, Yutaka; Chikahisa, Takemi

    2017-09-01

    A method for the large-scale simulation with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for liquid water movement in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The LBM is able to analyze two-phase flows in complex structures, however the simulation domain is limited due to heavy computational loads. This study investigates a variety means to reduce computational loads and increase the simulation areas. One is applying an LBM treating two-phases as having the same density, together with keeping numerical stability with large time steps. The applicability of this approach is confirmed by comparing the results with rigorous simulations using actual density. The second is establishing the maximum limit of the Capillary number that maintains flow patterns similar to the precise simulation; this is attempted as the computational load is inversely proportional to the Capillary number. The results show that the Capillary number can be increased to 3.0 × 10-3, where the actual operation corresponds to Ca = 10-5∼10-8. The limit is also investigated experimentally using an enlarged scale model satisfying similarity conditions for the flow. Finally, a demonstration is made of the effects of pore uniformity in GDL as an example of a large-scale simulation covering a channel.

  17. Modeling of mass and charge transport in a solid oxide fuel cell anode structure by a 3D lattice Boltzmann approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Hedvig; Andersson, Martin; Sundén, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    A 3D model at microscale by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for part of an anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to analyze the interaction between the transport and reaction processes and structural parameters. The equations of charge, momentum, heat and mass transport are simulated in the model. The modeling geometry is created with randomly placed spheres to resemble the part of the anode structure close to the electrolyte. The electrochemical reaction processes are captured at specific sites where spheres representing Ni and YSZ materials are present with void space. This work focuses on analyzing the effect of structural parameters such as porosity, and percentage of active reaction sites on the ionic current density and concentration of H2 using LBM. It is shown that LBM can be used to simulate an SOFC anode at microscale and evaluate the effect of structural parameters on the transport processes to improve the performance of the SOFC anode. It was found that increasing the porosity from 30 to 50 % decreased the ionic current density due to a reduction in the number of reaction sites. Also the consumption of H2 decreased with increasing porosity. When the percentage of active reaction sites was increased while the porosity was kept constant, the ionic current density increased. However, the H2 concentration was slightly reduced when the percentage of active reaction sites was increased. The gas flow tortuosity decreased with increasing porosity.

  18. Spatial confinement of ferromagnetic resonances in honeycomb antidot lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivoruchko, V.N., E-mail: krivoruc@gmail.com [Donetsk Physics and Technology Institute NAS of Ukraine, 72 R. Luxemburg Str., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Marchenko, A.I., E-mail: marchalexx@gmail.com [Donetsk Physics and Technology Institute NAS of Ukraine, 72 R. Luxemburg Str., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2012-09-15

    We report on a theoretical investigation of the magnetic static and dynamic properties of a thin ferromagnetic film with honeycomb lattice of circular antidots using micromagnetic simulations and analytical calculations. The theoretical model is based on the Landau-Lifshitz equations and directly accounts for the effects of the magnetic state nonuniformity. A direct calculation of local dynamic susceptibility tensor yields that the resonance spectra consist of four different quasi-uniform modes of the magnetization precession related to the confinement of magnetic domains by the hole mesh. Three of four resonant modes follow a two-fold variation with respect to the in-plane orientation of the applied magnetic field. The easy axes of these modes are mutually rotated by 60 Degree-Sign and combine to yield the apparent six-fold configurational anisotropy. Additionally, a mode with intrinsic six-fold symmetry behavior exists, as well. Micromagnetic calculations of the local dynamic susceptibility tensor allow identifying the magnetic unit cell areas/domains responsible for each resonance mode. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the magnetic static and dynamic properties of honeycomb antidot lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micromagnetic simulation and analytical calculation were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four quasi-uniform precession modes exist in resonance spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The antidot unit cell areas responsible for each resonance mode were identified.

  19. Evaluation of the pneumatic tube system for transportation of packed red cell units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Dhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumatic tube system (PTS is commonly used in hospital settings to transport blood samples to diagnostic laboratories. At our blood center, we receive blood requisitions via the PTS, but units are carried to the ward by human courier. Recently we considered using the PTS for transporting blood units. Since, there are reports of hemolysis in blood samples sent through the PTS, we evaluated this system for transporting red cell units. Aims: The aim was to assess the effect of PTS transport on the quality of packed red cell units. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 red blood cells units (RBC, (25 non-irradiated and 25 irradiated were subjected to transportation through the PTS. The control arm in the study was age-matched RBC units not subjected to PTS transport. Each RBC unit was evaluated for hemoglobin (Hb, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium and plasma hemoglobin (Hb. The paired t-test was used to compare these parameters, and the P value was calculated. Results and Conclusion: The percentage of hemolysis after transportation through PTS was below the recommended guidelines. Delivery of the blood unit to the wrong station, bags lying unattended at the destination were few of the problems that had to be addressed. To conclude, though the PTS is a safe means of transporting blood products with reduction in the turn-around-time, it must be validated before use.

  20. Exploring the role of turbulent acceleration and heating in fractal current sheet of solar flares­ from hybrid particle in cell and lattice Boltzmann virtual test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B.; Lin, J.; Yuan, X.; Li, Y.; Shen, C.

    2016-12-01

    The role of turbulent acceleration and heating in the fractal magnetic reconnection of solar flares is still not clear, especially at the X-point in the diffusion region. At virtual test aspect, it is hardly to quantitatively analyze the vortex generation, turbulence evolution, particle acceleration and heating in the magnetic islands coalesce in fractal manner, formatting into largest plasmid and ejection process in diffusion region through classical magnetohydrodynamics numerical method. With the development of physical particle numerical method (particle in cell method [PIC], Lattice Boltzmann method [LBM]) and high performance computing technology in recently two decades. Kinetic simulation has developed into an effectively manner to exploring the role of magnetic field and electric field turbulence in charged particles acceleration and heating process, since all the physical aspects relating to turbulent reconnection are taken into account. In this paper, the LBM based lattice DxQy grid and extended distribution are added into charged-particles-to-grid-interpolation of PIC based finite difference time domain scheme and Yee Grid, the hybrid PIC-LBM simulation tool is developed to investigating turbulence acceleration on TIANHE-2. The actual solar coronal condition (L≈105Km,B≈50-500G,T≈5×106K, n≈108-109, mi/me≈500-1836) is applied to study the turbulent acceleration and heating in solar flare fractal current sheet. At stage I, magnetic islands shrink due to magnetic tension forces, the process of island shrinking halts when the kinetic energy of the accelerated particles is sufficient to halt the further collapse due to magnetic tension forces, the particle energy gain is naturally a large fraction of the released magnetic energy. At stage II and III, the particles from the energized group come in to the center of the diffusion region and stay longer in the area. In contract, the particles from non energized group only skim the outer part of the

  1. Control of an afterburner in a diesel fuel cell power unit under variable load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolanc, Gregor; Pregelj, Boštjan; Petrovčič, Janko; Samsun, Remzi Can

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the control system for a catalytic afterburner in a diesel fuel cell auxiliary power unit is presented. The catalytic afterburner is used to burn the non-utilised hydrogen and other possible combustible components of the fuel cell anode off-gas. To increase the energy efficiency of the auxiliary power unit, the thermal energy released in the catalytic afterburner is utilised to generate the steam for the fuel processor. For optimal operation of the power unit in all modes of operation including load change, stable steam generation is required and overall energy balance must be kept within design range. To achieve this, the reaction temperature of the catalytic afterburner must be stable in all modes of operation. Therefore, we propose the afterburner temperature control based on mass and thermal balances. Finally, we demonstrate the control system using the existing prototype of the diesel fuel cell auxiliary power unit.

  2. Lattice Simulations using OpenACC compilers

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Pushan

    2013-01-01

    OpenACC compilers allow one to use Graphics Processing Units without having to write explicit CUDA codes. Programs can be modified incrementally using OpenMP like directives which causes the compiler to generate CUDA kernels to be run on the GPUs. In this article we look at the performance gain in lattice simulations with dynamical fermions using OpenACC compilers.

  3. Architecture and Function of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have revealed that membrane proteins can form two-dimensional clusters with regular translational and orientational protein arrangements, which may allow cells to modulate protein function. However, the physical mechanisms yielding supramolecular organization and collective function of membrane proteins remain largely unknown. Here we show that bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between membrane proteins can yield regular and distinctive lattice architectures of protein clusters, and may provide a link between lattice architecture and lattice function. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) as a model system, we obtain relations between the shape of MscL and the supramolecular architecture of MscL lattices. We predict that the tetrameric and pentameric MscL symmetries observed in previous structural studies yield distinct lattice architectures of MscL clusters and that, in turn, these distinct MscL lattice architectures yield distinct lattice activation barriers. Our res...

  4. Introduction to Louis Michel's lattice geometry through group action

    CERN Document Server

    Zhilinskii, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Group action analysis developed and applied mainly by Louis Michel to the study of N-dimensional periodic lattices is the central subject of the book. Different basic mathematical tools currently used for the description of lattice geometry are introduced and illustrated through applications to crystal structures in two- and three-dimensional space, to abstract multi-dimensional lattices and to lattices associated with integrable dynamical systems. Starting from general Delone sets the authors turn to different symmetry and topological classifications including explicit construction of orbifolds for two- and three-dimensional point and space groups. Voronoï and Delone cells together with positive quadratic forms and lattice description by root systems are introduced to demonstrate alternative approaches to lattice geometry study. Zonotopes and zonohedral families of 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-dimensional lattices are explicitly visualized using graph theory approach. Along with crystallographic applications, qualitative ...

  5. Modified Lattice Landau Gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Von Smekal, L; Sternbeck, A; Williams, A G

    2007-01-01

    We propose a modified lattice Landau gauge based on stereographically projecting the link variables on the circle S^1 -> R for compact U(1) or the 3-sphere S^3 -> R^3 for SU(2) before imposing the Landau gauge condition. This can reduce the number of Gribov copies exponentially and solves the Gribov problem in compact U(1) where it is a lattice artifact. Applied to the maximal Abelian subgroup this might be just enough to avoid the perfect cancellation amongst the Gribov copies in a lattice BRST formulation for SU(N), and thus to avoid the Neuberger 0/0 problem. The continuum limit of the Landau gauge remains unchanged.

  6. Efficiency of the unit cell in rectangular finned tube arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzzoni, Luca; Dall' Olio, Roberto; Spiga, Marco [Bologna Univ., DIENCA, Bologna (Italy)

    1999-11-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an investigation concerning the efficiency of the single unit in finned air-cooled heat exchangers with staggered and in-line bundles of rectangular ducts, where a hot process fluid flows inside extended-surface tubes and atmospheric air is circulated outside, over the extended surface. The differential energy equation is numerically solved by a finite difference technique, in order to determine the spatial temperature profiles, then the fin efficiency and the augmentation factor are calculated by a simple numerical integration. The results show that the temperature distribution and the fin performance depend on four dimensionless parameters (m,{beta},p{sub x},p{sub y}), the first accounting for the heat transfer condition, the other ones accounting for the geometry of the extended surface (tube aspect ratio and pitches). Several tables are presented, allowing the efficiency of the extended surface to be deduced as a function of the thermal and geometric parameters. (Author)

  7. Binomial lattice for pricing Asian options on yields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨德生

    2003-01-01

    An efficient binomial lattice for pricing Asian options on yields is established under the affine term structure model. In order to reconnect the path of the discrete lattice,the technique of D. Nelson and K. Ramaswamy is used to transform a stochastic interest rate process into a stochastic diffusion with unit volatility. By the binomial lattice and linear interpolation,the prices of Asian options on yields can be obtained. As the number of nodes in the tree structure grows linearly with the number of time steps, the computational speed is improved. The numerical experiments to verify the validity of the lattice are also provided.

  8. Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Red Blood Cell Units in Different Whole Blood Processing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Whole blood donations in Canada are processed by either the red cell filtration (RCF or whole blood filtration (WBF methods, where leukoreduction is potentially delayed in WBF. Fresh WBF red blood cells (RBCs have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality after transfusion. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA is released by neutrophils prior to leukoreduction, degraded during RBC storage, and is associated with adverse patient outcomes. We explored cfDNA levels in RBCs prepared by RCF and WBF and different storage durations. Methods. Equal numbers of fresh (stored ≤14 days and older RBCs were sampled. cfDNA was quantified by spectrophotometry and PicoGreen. Separate regression models determined the association with processing method and storage duration and their interaction on cfDNA. Results. cfDNA in 120 RBC units (73 RCF, 47 WBF were measured. Using PicoGreen, WBF units overall had higher cfDNA than RCF units (p=0.0010; fresh WBF units had higher cfDNA than fresh RCF units (p=0.0093. Using spectrophotometry, fresh RBC units overall had higher cfDNA than older units (p=0.0031; fresh WBF RBCs had higher cfDNA than older RCF RBCs (p=0.024. Conclusion. Higher cfDNA in fresh WBF was observed compared to older RCF blood. Further study is required for association with patient outcomes.

  9. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiwen; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan; Novacco, Lawrence J.

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  10. Growth of lattice-matched GaInAsP grown on vicinal GaAs(001) substrates within the miscibility gap for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Ryuji; France, Ryan M.; Geisz, John F.; Norman, Andrew G.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2017-01-01

    The growth of quaternary Ga0.68In0.32As0.35P0.65 by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy is very sensitive to growth conditions because the composition is within a miscibility gap. In this investigation, we fabricated 1 μm-thick lattice-matched GaInAsP films grown on GaAs(001) for application to solar cells. The growth temperature and substrate miscut are varied in order to characterize the effect of the surface diffusion of adatoms on the material quality of alloys. Transmission electron microscopy and two-dimensional in-situ multi-beam optical stress determine that growth temperatures of 650 °C and below enhance the formation of the CuPtB atomic ordering and suppress material decomposition, which is found to occur at the growth surface. The root-mean-square (RMS) roughness is reduced from 33.6 nm for 750 °C to 1.62 nm for 650 °C, determined by atomic force microscopy. Initial investigations show that the RMS roughness can be further reduced using increased miscut angle, and substrates miscut toward (111)A, leading to an RMS roughness of 0.56 nm for the sample grown at 600 °C on GaAs miscut 6° toward (111)A. Using these conditions, we fabricate an inverted hetero-junction 1.62 eV Ga0.68In0.32As0.35P0.65 solar cell without an anti-reflection coating with a short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and efficiency of 12.23 mA/cm2, 1.12 V, 86.18%, and 11.80%, respectively.

  11. Growth of lattice-matched GaInAsP grown on vicinal GaAs(001) substrates within the miscibility gap for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Ryuji; France, Ryan M.; Geisz, John F.; Norman, Andrew G.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2017-01-01

    The growth of quaternary Ga0.68In0.32As0.35P0.65 by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy is very sensitive to growth conditions because the composition is within a miscibility gap. In this investigation, we fabricated 1 um-thick lattice-matched GaInAsP films grown on GaAs(001) for application to solar cells. The growth temperature and substrate miscut are varied in order to characterize the effect of the surface diffusion of adatoms on the material quality of alloys. Transmission electron microscopy and two-dimensional in-situ multi-beam optical stress determine that growth temperatures of 650 degrees C and below enhance the formation of the CuPtB atomic ordering and suppress material decomposition, which is found to occur at the growth surface. The root-mean-square (RMS) roughness is reduced from 33.6 nm for 750 degrees C to 1.62 nm for 650 degrees C, determined by atomic force microscopy. Initial investigations show that the RMS roughness can be further reduced using increased miscut angle, and substrates miscut toward (111)A, leading to an RMS roughness of 0.56 nm for the sample grown at 600 degrees C on GaAs miscut 6 degrees toward (111)A. Using these conditions, we fabricate an inverted hetero-junction 1.62 eV Ga0.68In0.32As0.35P0.65 solar cell without an anti-reflection coating with a short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and efficiency of 12.23 mA/cm2, 1.12 V, 86.18%, and 11.80%, respectively.

  12. A lattice for a lead storage battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, S.; Fukunaga, K.; Kumano, Y.

    1983-07-13

    Lattices for a lead storage cell are made of a lead alloy which contains (in percent by mass): 0.05 to 0.3 strontium; 0.02 to 0.1 aluminum; 0.05 to 3.0 tin and 0.01 to 3.0 cadmium. The storage cell has low autodischarge and a long service life.

  13. The Daniell cell, Ohm's law, and the emergence of the International System of Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    Telegraphy originated in the 1830s and 40 s and flourished in the following decades but with a patchwork of electrical standards. Electromotive force was for the most part measured in units of the predominant Daniell cell, but each telegraphy company had their own resistance standard. In 1862, the British Association for the Advancement of Science formed a committee to address this situation. By 1873, they had given definition to the electromagnetic system of units (emu) and defined the practical units of the ohm as 109 emu units of resistance and the volt as 108 emu units of electromotive force. These recommendations were ratified and expanded upon in a series of international congresses held between 1881 and 1904. A proposal by Giovanni Giorgi in 1901 took advantage of a coincidence between the conversion of the units of energy in the emu system (the erg) and in the practical system (the Joule). As it was, the same conversion factor existed between the cgs based emu system and a theretofore undefined MKS system. By introducing another unit X (where X could be any of the practical electrical units), Giorgi demonstrated that a self-consistent MKSX system was tenable without the need for multiplying factors. Ultimately, the ampere was selected as the fourth unit. It took nearly 60 years, but in 1960, Giorgi's proposal was incorporated as the core of the newly inaugurated International System of Units (SI). This article surveys the physics, physicists, and events that contributed to those developments.

  14. Lattice Gerbe Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lipstein, Arthur E

    2014-01-01

    We formulate the theory of a 2-form gauge field on a Euclidean spacetime lattice. In this approach, the fundamental degrees of freedom live on the faces of the lattice, and the action can be constructed from the sum over Wilson surfaces associated with each fundamental cube of the lattice. If we take the gauge group to be $U(1)$, the theory reduces to the well-known abelian gerbe theory in the continuum limit. We also propose a very simple and natural non-abelian generalization with gauge group $U(N) \\times U(N)$, which gives rise to $U(N)$ Yang-Mills theory upon dimensional reduction. Formulating the theory on a lattice has several other advantages. In particular, it is possible to compute many observables, such as the expectation value of Wilson surfaces, analytically at strong coupling and numerically for any value of the coupling.

  15. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown that root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All noncrystallographic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  16. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  17. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  18. Numerical simulation of liquid water and gas flow in a channel and a simplified gas diffusion layer model of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using the lattice Boltzmann method

    OpenAIRE

    Tabe, Yutaka; Lee, Yongju; Chikahisa, Takemi; Kozakai, Masaya

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) are developed to elucidate the dynamic behavior of condensed water and gas flow in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Here, the calculation process of the LBM simulation is improved to extend the simulation to a porous medium like a gas diffusion layer (GDL), and a stable and reliable simulation of two-phase flow with large density differences in the porous medium is established. It is shown that dynamic capillary fin...

  19. Vector Lattice Vortex Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-Dong; YE Fang-Wei; DONG Liang-Wei; LI Yong-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ Two-dimensional vector vortex solitons in harmonic optical lattices are investigated. The stability properties of such solitons are closely connected to the lattice depth Vo. For small Vo, vector vortex solitons with the total zero-angular momentum are more stable than those with the total nonzero-angular momentum, while for large Vo, this case is inversed. If Vo is large enough, both the types of such solitons are stable.

  20. Technicolor on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, C; Lucini, B; Patella, A; Rago, A

    2009-01-01

    Technicolor theories provide an elegant mechanism for dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We will discuss the use of lattice simulations to study the strongly-interacting dynamics of some of the candidate theories, with matter fields in representations other than the fundamental. To be viable candidates for phenomenology, such theories need to be different from a scaled-up version of QCD, which were ruled out by LEP precision measurements, and represent a challenge for modern lattice computations.

  1. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  2. Permutohedral Lattice CNNs

    OpenAIRE

    Kiefel, Martin; Jampani, Varun; Gehler, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a convolutional layer that is able to process sparse input features. As an example, for image recognition problems this allows an efficient filtering of signals that do not lie on a dense grid (like pixel position), but of more general features (such as color values). The presented algorithm makes use of the permutohedral lattice data structure. The permutohedral lattice was introduced to efficiently implement a bilateral filter, a commonly used image processing operation....

  3. [THE MODEL OF NEUROVASCULAR UNIT IN VITRO CONSISTING OF THREE CELLS TYPES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilazheva, E D; Boytsova, E B; Pozhilenkova, E A; Solonchuk, Yu R; Salmina, A B

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to model blood brain barrier and neurovascular unit in vitro. All existing models have their disadvantages, advantages and some peculiarities of preparation and usage. We obtained the three-cells neurovascular unit model in vitro using progenitor cells isolated from the rat embryos brain (Wistar, 14-16 d). After withdrawal of the progenitor cells the neurospheres were cultured with subsequent differentiation into astrocytes and neurons. Endothelial cells were isolated from embryonic brain too. During the differentiation of progenitor cells the astrocytes monolayer formation occurs after 7-9 d, neurons monolayer--after 10-14 d, endothelial cells monolayer--after 7 d. Our protocol for simultaneous isolation and cultivation of neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells reduces the time needed to obtain neurovascular unit model in vitro, consisting of three cells types and reduce the number of animals used. It is also important to note the cerebral origin of all cell types, which is also an advantage of our model in vitro.

  4. Importance of unit cells in accurate evaluation of the characteristics of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzyan, Hassan; Sadeghpour, Narges [Isfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-08-01

    Effects of the size of the unit cell on energy, atomic charges, and phonon frequencies of graphene at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone are studied in the absence and presence of an electric field using density functional theory (DFT) methods (LDA and DFT-PBE functionals with Goedecker-Teter-Hutter (GTH) and Troullier-Martins (TM) norm-conserving pseudopotentials). Two types of unit cells containing n{sub c}=4-28 carbon atoms are considered. Results show that stability of graphene increases with increasing size of the unit cell. Energy, atomic charges, and phonon frequencies all converge above n{sub c}=24 for all functional-pseudopotentials used. Except for the LDA-GTH calculations, application of an electric field of 0.4 and 0.9 V/nm strengths does not change the trends with the size of the unit cell but instead slightly decreases the binding energy of graphene. Results of this study show that the choice of unit cell size and type is critical for calculation of reliable characteristics of graphene.

  5. Solitons in spiraling Vogel lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

    2012-01-01

    We address light propagation in Vogel optical lattices and show that such lattices support a variety of stable soliton solutions in both self-focusing and self-defocusing media, whose propagation constants belong to domains resembling gaps in the spectrum of a truly periodic lattice. The azimuthally-rich structure of Vogel lattices allows generation of spiraling soliton motion.

  6. New photosensitizer with phenylenebisthiophene central unit and cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikroyannidis, J.A., E-mail: mikroyan@chemistry.upatras.gr [Chemical Technology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece); Suresh, P. [Physics Department, Molecular Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Laboratory, JNV University, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342005 (India); Roy, M.S. [Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342011 (India); Sharma, G.D., E-mail: sharmagd_in@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Molecular Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Laboratory, JNV University, Jodhpur (Raj.) 342005 (India); R and D Centre for Engineering and Science, Jaipur Engineering College, Kukas, Jaipur (Raj.) (India)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: A novel dye D was synthesized and used as photosensitizer for quasi solid state dye-sensitized solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 4.4% was obtained which was improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid (DPPA) was added as coadsorbent. Display Omitted Highlights: > A new low band gap photosensitizer with cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units was synthesized. > A power conversion efficiency of 4.4% was obtained for the dye-sensitized solar cell based on this photosensitizer. > The power conversion efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cell was further improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid was added as coadsorbent. - Abstract: A new low band gap photosensitizer, D, which contains 2,2'-(1,4-phenylene) bisthiophene central unit and cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl terminal units at both sides was synthesized. The two carboxyls attached to the 2,5-positions of the phenylene ring act as anchoring groups. Dye D was soluble in common organic solvents, showed long-wavelength absorption maximum at 620-636 nm and optical band gap of 1.72 eV. The electrochemical parameters, i.e. the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) (-5.1 eV) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) (-3.3 eV) energy levels of D show that this dye is suitable as molecular sensitizer. The quasi solid state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on D shows a short circuit current (J{sub sc}) of 9.95 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.70 V, and a fill factor (FF) of 0.64 corresponding to an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.40% under 100 mW/cm{sup 2} irradiation. The overall PCE has been further improved to 5.52% when diphenylphosphinic acid (DPPA) coadsorbent is incorporated into the D solution. This increased PCE has been attributed to the enhancement in the electron lifetime and reduced recombination of injected electrons with the iodide ions present in the electrolyte with the use of DPPA as coadsorbant. The

  7. Generating topological optical flux lattices for ultracold atoms by modulated Raman and radio-frequency couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, Li

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically generate optical flux lattices with nontrivial band topology using amplitude-modulated Raman lasers and radio-frequency (rf) magnetic fields. By tuning the strength of Raman and rf fields, three distinct phases are realized at unit filling for a unit cell. Respectively, these three phases correspond to normal insulator, topological Chern insulator, and semimetal. Nearly nondispersive bands are found to appear in the topological phase, which promises opportunities for investigating strongly correlated quantum states within a simple cold-atom setup. The validity of our proposal is confirmed by comparing the Floquet quasienergies from the evolution operator with the spectrum of the effective Hamiltonian.

  8. Classification of lattice defects in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 earth-abundant solar cell absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyou; Walsh, Aron; Gong, Xin-Gao; Wei, Su-Huai

    2013-03-20

    The kesterite-structured semiconductors Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 are drawing considerable attention recently as the active layers in earth-abundant low-cost thin-film solar cells. The additional number of elements in these quaternary compounds, relative to binary and ternary semiconductors, results in increased flexibility in the material properties. Conversely, a large variety of intrinsic lattice defects can also be formed, which have important influence on their optical and electrical properties, and hence their photovoltaic performance. Experimental identification of these defects is currently limited due to poor sample quality. Here recent theoretical research on defect formation and ionization in kesterite materials is reviewed based on new systematic calculations, and compared with the better studied chalcopyrite materials CuGaSe2 and CuInSe2 . Four features are revealed and highlighted: (i) the strong phase-competition between the kesterites and the coexisting secondary compounds; (ii) the intrinsic p-type conductivity determined by the high population of acceptor CuZn antisites and Cu vacancies, and their dependence on the Cu/(Zn+Sn) and Zn/Sn ratio; (iii) the role of charge-compensated defect clusters such as [2CuZn +SnZn ], [VCu +ZnCu ] and [ZnSn +2ZnCu ] and their contribution to non-stoichiometry; (iv) the electron-trapping effect of the abundant [2CuZn +SnZn ] clusters, especially in Cu2ZnSnS4. The calculated properties explain the experimental observation that Cu poor and Zn rich conditions (Cu/(Zn+Sn) ≈ 0.8 and Zn/Sn ≈ 1.2) result in the highest solar cell efficiency, as well as suggesting an efficiency limitation in Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 cells when the S composition is high. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fine tuned vortices in lattice SU(2) gluodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gubarev, F V; Polikarpov, M I; Syritsyn, S N; Zakharov, V I

    2003-01-01

    We report measurements of the action associated with center vortices in the lattice SU(2) pure gauge theory. In the lattice units the excess of the action on the plaquettes belonging to the vortex is approximately a constant, independent on the lattice spacing 'a'. Therefore the action of the center vortex is of order A/a^2, where 'A' is its area. Since the area A is known to scale in the physical units, the observation suggests that the suppression due to the surface action is balanced, or fine tuned to the entropy factor which is to be an exponential of A/a^2.

  10. Prediction of stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites using unit cell model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the elastic modulus and the stress-strain curve of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs were predicted by using the unit cell model that consists of fiber bundles and matrix. The unit cell model was developed based on the observation of cross sections of CMCs. The elastic modulus of CMCs was calculated from the results of finite element analysis using the developed model. The non-linear behavior of stress-strain curve of CMCs was also predicted by taking the degradation of the elastic modulus into consideration, where the degradation was related to the experimentally measured crack density in CMCs. The approach using the unit cell model was applied to two kinds of CMCs, and good agreement was obtained between the experimental and the calculated results.

  11. Reduction in potassium concentration of stored red blood cell units using a resin filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chisa; Heitmiller, Eugenie S; Ness, Paul M; King, Karen E

    2010-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a serious complication of rapid and massive blood transfusion due to high plasma potassium (K) in stored red blood cell (RBC) units. A potassium adsorption filter (PAF) was developed in Japan to remove K by exchanging with sodium (Na). We performed an in vitro evaluation of its efficacy and feasibility of use. Three AS-3 RBC units were filtered by each PAF using gravity; 10 PAFs were tested. Blood group, age, flow rate, and irradiation status were recorded. Total volume, K, Na, Cl, Mg, total Ca (tCa), RBC count, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), and plasma Hb were measured before and after filtering each unit. Ionized Ca (iCa), pH, and glucose were measured for some units. After filtration, the mean decrease in K was 97.5% in the first RBC unit, 91.2% in the second unit, and 64.4% in the third unit. The mean increases in Na, Mg, and tCa were 33.0, 151.4, and 116.1%, respectively. iCa and pH remained low; glucose was unchanged. RBC count, Hb, and Hct decreased slightly after filtration of first units; plasma Hb was unchanged. After filtration, there was no visual evidence of increased hemolysis or clot formation. The PAF decreased K concentration in stored AS-3 RBC units to minimal levels in the first and second RBC units. Optimally, one filter could be used for 2 RBC units. Although Na increased, the level may not be clinically significant. PAF may be useful for at-risk patients receiving older units or blood that has been stored after gamma irradiation. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  12. Neutron-antineutron oscillations on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Buchoff, Michael I; Wasem, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    One possible low energy process due to beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics is the neutron-antineutron transition, where baryon number changes by two units. In addition to providing a source of baryon number violation in the early universe, interactions of this kind are natural in grand unified theories (GUTs) with Majorana neutrinos that violate lepton number. Bounds on these oscillations can greatly restrict a variety of GUTs, while a non-zero signal would be a "smoking gun" for new physics; however, to make a reliable prediction, the six-quark nucleon-antinucleon matrix elements must first be calculated non-perturbatively via lattice QCD. We review the current understanding of this quantity, describe the lattice formalism, and present preliminary results from $32^3\\times256$ clover-Wilson lattices with a pion mass of 390 MeV.

  13. A Bijection between Lattice-Valued Filters and Lattice-Valued Congruences in Residuated Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study relations between lattice-valued filters and lattice-valued congruences in residuated lattices. We introduce a new definition of congruences which just depends on the meet ∧ and the residuum →. Then it is shown that each of these congruences is automatically a universal-algebra-congruence. Also, lattice-valued filters and lattice-valued congruences are studied, and it is shown that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the set of all (lattice-valued filters and the set of all (lattice-valued congruences.

  14. High light-extraction-efficiency OLED based on photonic crystal slab structures with taper unit cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Rong-jin; WANG Qing-kang

    2006-01-01

    To improve the light-extraction-efficiency of OLED,we introduced PCS (Photonic Crystal Slab) structures into the interface of ITO layer and glass substrate.PCS structures with Taper unit cells are proved to be effective in reducing the energy of guided wave trapped in high refractive index material,and an increase of light-extraction-efficiency to 95.26% is gained.This enhancement is much greater than the traditional PCS with cylinder unit cells (60%-70%).Physical mechanisms of light-extraction-efficiency enhancement in these structures are further discussed.

  15. Structure Determination of the 1918 H1N1 Neuraminidase From a Crystal With Lattice-Translocation Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.; Xu, X.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 {angstrom} resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 {angstrom}, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  16. Measuring on Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2009-12-01

    Previous derivations of the sum and product rules of probability theory relied on the algebraic properties of Boolean logic. Here they are derived within a more general framework based on lattice theory. The result is a new foundation of probability theory that encompasses and generalizes both the Cox and Kolmogorov formulations. In this picture probability is a bi-valuation defined on a lattice of statements that quantifies the degree to which one statement implies another. The sum rule is a constraint equation that ensures that valuations are assigned so as to not violate associativity of the lattice join and meet. The product rule is much more interesting in that there are actually two product rules: one is a constraint equation arises from associativity of the direct products of lattices, and the other a constraint equation derived from associativity of changes of context. The generality of this formalism enables one to derive the traditionally assumed condition of additivity in measure theory, as well introduce a general notion of product. To illustrate the generic utility of this novel lattice-theoretic foundation of measure, the sum and product rules are applied to number theory. Further application of these concepts to understand the foundation of quantum mechanics is described in a joint paper in this proceedings.

  17. Investigation of IrO2/Pt Electrocatalysts in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Baglio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available IrO2/Pt catalysts (at different concentrations were synthesized by incipient wetness technique and characterized by XRD, XRF, and SEM. Water electrolysis/fuel cell performances were evaluated in a 5 cm2 single cell under Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC configuration. The IrO2/Pt composition of 14/86 showed the highest performance for water electrolysis and the lowest one as fuel cell. It is derived that for fuel cell operation an excess of Pt favours the oxygen reduction process whereas IrO2 promotes oxygen evolution. From the present results, it appears that the diffusion characteristics and the reaction rate in fuel cell mode are significantly lower than in the electrolyser mode. This requires the enhancement of the gas diffusion properties of the electrodes and the catalytic properties for cathode operation in fuel cells.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, E J

    2015-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics (LBSD) is presented for simulation of particle suspension in Stokes flows. This method is developed from Stokesian dynamics (SD) with resistance and mobility matrices calculated using the time-independent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (TILBA). TILBA is distinguished from the traditional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in that a background matrix is generated prior to the calculation. The background matrix, once generated, can be reused for calculations for different scenarios, thus the computational cost for each such subsequent calculation is significantly reduced. The LBSD inherits the merits of the SD where both near- and far-field interactions are considered. It also inherits the merits of the LBM that the computational cost is almost independent of the particle shape.

  19. Lattice gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Peter; Majumdar, Pushan

    2012-03-01

    Lattice gauge theory is a formulation of quantum field theory with gauge symmetries on a space-time lattice. This formulation is particularly suitable for describing hadronic phenomena. In this article we review the present status of lattice QCD. We outline some of the computational methods, discuss some phenomenological applications and a variety of non-perturbative topics. The list of references is severely incomplete, the ones we have included are text books or reviews and a few subjectively selected papers. Kronfeld and Quigg (2010) supply a reasonably comprehensive set of QCD references. We apologize for the fact that have not covered many important topics such as QCD at finite density and heavy quark effective theory adequately, and mention some of them only in the last section "In Brief". These topics should be considered in further Scholarpedia articles.

  20. Improved Lattice Radial Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Brower, Richard C; Fleming, George T

    2014-01-01

    Lattice radial quantization was proposed in a recent paper by Brower, Fleming and Neuberger[1] as a nonperturbative method especially suited to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories. The lessons learned from the lattice radial quantization of the 3D Ising model on a longitudinal cylinder with 2D Icosahedral cross-section suggested the need for an improved discretization. We consider here the use of the Finite Element Methods(FEM) to descretize the universally-equivalent $\\phi^4$ Lagrangian on $\\mathbb R \\times \\mathbb S^2$. It is argued that this lattice regularization will approach the exact conformal theory at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum. Numerical tests are underway to support this conjecture.

  1. Graphene antidot lattice waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We introduce graphene antidot lattice waveguides: nanostructured graphene where a region of pristine graphene is sandwiched between regions of graphene antidot lattices. The band gaps in the surrounding antidot lattices enable localized states to emerge in the central waveguide region. We model...... the waveguides via a position-dependent mass term in the Dirac approximation of graphene and arrive at analytical results for the dispersion relation and spinor eigenstates of the localized waveguide modes. To include atomistic details we also use a tight-binding model, which is in excellent agreement...... with the analytical results. The waveguides resemble graphene nanoribbons, but without the particular properties of ribbons that emerge due to the details of the edge. We show that electrons can be guided through kinks without additional resistance and that transport through the waveguides is robust against...

  2. Digital lattice gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Zohar, Erez; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general scheme for a digital construction of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. In this method, the four-body interactions arising in models with $2+1$ dimensions and higher, are obtained stroboscopically, through a sequence of two-body interactions with ancillary degrees of freedom. This yields stronger interactions than the ones obtained through pertubative methods, as typically done in previous proposals, and removes an important bottleneck in the road towards experimental realizations. The scheme applies to generic gauge theories with Lie or finite symmetry groups, both Abelian and non-Abelian. As a concrete example, we present the construction of a digital quantum simulator for a $\\mathbb{Z}_{3}$ lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermionic matter in $2+1$ dimensions, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices, involving three atomic species, representing the matter, gauge and auxiliary degrees of freedom, that are separated in three different layers. By moving the ancilla atoms...

  3. Study of Lower Emittance Lattices for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    We study paths to significantly reduce the emittance of the SPEAR3 storage ring. Lattice possibilities are explored with the GLASS technique. New lattices are designed and optimized for practical dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. Various techniques are employed to optimize the nonlinear dynamics, including the Elegant-based genetic algorithm. Experimental studies are also carried out on the ring to validate the lattice design. The SPEAR3 storage ring is a third generation light source which has a racetrack layout with a circumference of 234.1 m. The requirement to maintain the photon beamline positions put a significant constraint on the lattice design. Consequently the emittance of SPEAR3 is not on par with some of the recently-built third generation light sources. The present operational lattice has an emittance of 10 nm. For the photon beam brightness of SSRL to remain competitive among the new or upgraded ring-based light sources, it is necessary to significantly reduce the emittance of SPEAR3. In this paper we report our ongoing effort to develop a lower emittance solution for SSRL. We first show the potential of the SPEAR3 lattice with results of the standard cell study using the GLASS technique. This is followed by a discussion of the design strategy for full-ring linear lattices. Several lattice options are compared. We then show the methods and results for dynamic aperture optimization. Experiments were also conducted on the SPEAR3 ring to implement the lattice and to measure the key lattice parameters.

  4. Culture of human cells in experimental units for spaceflight impacts on their behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Moscheni, Claudia; Maier, Jeanette Am; Castiglioni, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Because space missions produce pathophysiological alterations such as cardiovascular disorders and bone demineralization which are very common on Earth, biomedical research in space is a frontier that holds important promises not only to counterbalance space-associated disorders in astronauts but also to ameliorate the health of Earth-bound population. Experiments in space are complex to design. Cells must be cultured in closed cell culture systems (from now defined experimental units (EUs)), which are biocompatible, functional, safe to minimize any potential hazard to the crew, and with a high degree of automation. Therefore, to perform experiments in orbit, it is relevant to know how closely culture in the EUs reflects cellular behavior under normal growth conditions. We compared the performances in these units of three different human cell types, which were recently space flown, i.e. bone mesenchymal stem cells, micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells are only slightly and transiently affected by culture in the EUs, whereas these devices accelerate mesenchymal stem cell reprogramming toward osteogenic differentiation, in part by increasing the amounts of reactive oxygen species. We conclude that cell culture conditions in the EUs do not exactly mimic what happens in a culture dish and that more efforts are necessary to optimize these devices for biomedical experiments in space. Impact statement Cell cultures represent valuable preclinical models to decipher pathogenic circuitries. This is true also for biomedical research in space. A lot has been learnt about cell adaptation and reaction from the experiments performed on many different cell types flown to space. Obviously, cell culture in space has to meet specific requirements for the safety of the crew and to comply with the unique environmental challenges. For these reasons, specific devices for cell culture in space have been developed. It is important to clarify whether these

  5. A half-metallic half-Heusler alloy having the largest atomic-like magnetic moment at optimized lattice constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For half-Heusler alloys, the general formula is XYZ, where X can be a transition or alkali metal element, Y is another transition metal element, typically Mn or Cr, and Z is a group IV element or a pnicitide. The atomic arrangements within a unit-cell show three configurations. Before this study, most of the predictions of half-metallic properties of half-Heusler alloys at the lattice constants differing from their optimized lattice constant. Based on the electropositivity of X and electronegativity of Z for half-Heusler alloys, we found that one of the configurations of LiCrS exhibits half-metallic properties at its optimized lattice constant of 5.803Å, and has the maximum atomic-like magnetic moment of 5μB. The challenges of its growth and the effects of the spin-orbit effect in this alloy will be discussed.

  6. A half-metallic half-Heusler alloy having the largest atomic-like magnetic moment at optimized lattice constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R. L.; Damewood, L.; Fong, C. Y.; Yang, L. H.; Peng, R. W.; Felser, C.

    2016-11-01

    For half-Heusler alloys, the general formula is XYZ, where X can be a transition or alkali metal element, Y is another transition metal element, typically Mn or Cr, and Z is a group IV element or a pnicitide. The atomic arrangements within a unit-cell show three configurations. Before this study, most of the predictions of half-metallic properties of half-Heusler alloys at the lattice constants differing from their optimized lattice constant. Based on the electropositivity of X and electronegativity of Z for half-Heusler alloys, we found that one of the configurations of LiCrS exhibits half-metallic properties at its optimized lattice constant of 5.803Å, and has the maximum atomic-like magnetic moment of 5μB. The challenges of its growth and the effects of the spin-orbit effect in this alloy will be discussed.

  7. Optical Lattice Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Since they were first proposed in 2003 [1], optical lattice clocks have become one of the leading technologies for the next generation of atomic clocks, which will be used for advanced timing applications and in tests of fundamental physics [2]. These clocks are based on stabilized lasers whose frequency is ultimately referenced to an ultra-narrow neutral atom transition (natural linewidths magic'' value so as to yield a vanishing net AC Stark shift for the clock transition. As a result lattice clocks have demonstrated the capability of generating high stability clock signals with small absolute uncertainties (˜ 1 part in 10^16). In this presentation I will first give an overview of the field, which now includes three different atomic species. I will then use experiments with Yb performed in our laboratory to illustrate the key features of a lattice clock. Our research has included the development of state-of-the-art optical cavities enabling ultra-high-resolution optical spectroscopy (1 Hz linewidth). Together with the large atom number in the optical lattice, we are able to achieve very low clock instability (< 0.3 Hz in 1 s) [3]. Furthermore, I will show results from some of our recent investigations of key shifts for the Yb lattice clock, including high precision measurements of ultracold atom-atom interactions in the lattice and the dc Stark effect for the Yb clock transition (necessary for the evaluation of blackbody radiation shifts). [4pt] [1] H. Katori, M. Takamoto, V. G. Pal'chikov, and V. D. Ovsiannikov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 173005 (2003). [0pt] [2] Andrei Derevianko and Hidetoshi Katori, Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 331 (2011). [0pt] [3] Y. Y. Jiang, A. D. Ludlow, N. D. Lemke, R. W. Fox, J. A. Sherman, L.-S. Ma, and C. W. Oates, Nature Photonics 5, 158 (2011).

  8. Thermal conductivity prediction of nanoscale phononic crystal slabs using a hybrid lattice dynamics-continuum mechanics technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M. Reinke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has demonstrated that nanostructuring of a semiconductor material to form a phononic crystal (PnC can significantly reduce its thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present a classical method that combines atomic-level information with the application of Bloch theory at the continuum level for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of finite-thickness PnCs with unit cells sized in the micron scale. Lattice dynamics calculations are done at the bulk material level, and the plane-wave expansion method is implemented at the macrosale PnC unit cell level. The combination of the lattice dynamics-based and continuum mechanics-based dispersion information is then used in the Callaway-Holland model to calculate the thermal transport properties of the PnC. We demonstrate that this hybrid approach provides both accurate and efficient predictions of the thermal conductivity.

  9. Thermal conductivity prediction of nanoscale phononic crystal slabs using a hybrid lattice dynamics-continuum mechanics technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Charles M.; Su, Mehmet F.; Davis, Bruce L.; Kim, Bongsang; Hussein, Mahmoud I.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Olsson-III, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2011-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that nanostructuring of a semiconductor material to form a phononic crystal (PnC) can significantly reduce its thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present a classical method that combines atomic-level information with the application of Bloch theory at the continuum level for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of finite-thickness PnCs with unit cells sized in the micron scale. Lattice dynamics calculations are done at the bulk material level, and the plane-wave expansion method is implemented at the macrosale PnC unit cell level. The combination of the lattice dynamics-based and continuum mechanics-based dispersion information is then used in the Callaway-Holland model to calculate the thermal transport properties of the PnC. We demonstrate that this hybrid approach provides both accurate and efficient predictions of the thermal conductivity.

  10. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  11. Belief functions on lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Grabisch, Michel

    2008-01-01

    We extend the notion of belief function to the case where the underlying structure is no more the Boolean lattice of subsets of some universal set, but any lattice, which we will endow with a minimal set of properties according to our needs. We show that all classical constructions and definitions (e.g., mass allocation, commonality function, plausibility functions, necessity measures with nested focal elements, possibility distributions, Dempster rule of combination, decomposition w.r.t. simple support functions, etc.) remain valid in this general setting. Moreover, our proof of decomposition of belief functions into simple support functions is much simpler and general than the original one by Shafer.

  12. Lattice of ℤ-module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize the definition of lattice of ℤ-module and its properties in the Mizar system [5].We formally prove that scalar products in lattices are bilinear forms over the field of real numbers ℝ. We also formalize the definitions of positive definite and integral lattices and their properties. Lattice of ℤ-module is necessary for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lovász base reduction algorithm [14], and cryptographic systems with lattices [15] and coding theory [9].

  13. Teaching Basic Science Environmentally, The Concept: The cell is basic unit of structure of most organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests simple ways to introduce students to the concept that the cell is the basic unit of structure of most organisms. Mentions materials for microscope study that are readily available and easy to handle, e.g., membranes from between the scales of the onion bulb, thin-leaved plants, pond water, and pollen. (JHZ)

  14. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  15. Predication of Plastic Flow Characteristics in Ferrite/Pearlite Steel Using a Fern Unit Cell Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Jingtao Han; Jing Liu; Lv Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The flow stress of ferrite/pearlite steel under uni-axial tension was simulated with finite element method (FEM) by applying commercial software MARC/MENTAT. Flow stress curves of ferrite/pearlite steels were calculated based on unit cell model. The effects of volume fraction, distribution and the aspect ratio of pearlite on tensile properties have been investigated.

  16. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  17. Mitigation of Unwanted Forward Narrow-band Radiation from PCBs with a Metamaterial Unit Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruaro, Andrea; Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Mitigation of EMI from a PCB is obtained through the use of a metamaterial unit cell. The focus is on the reduction of narrow-band radiation in the forward hemisphere when the resonant element is etched on a layer located between the source of radiation and the ground plane. As opposed to previou...

  18. Recovery Act. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Gail E. [Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC., Gillingham (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-30

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration Project. Summarizing development of Delphi’s next generation SOFC system as the core power plant to prove the viability of the market opportunity for a 3-5 kW diesel SOFC system. Report includes test and demonstration results from testing the diesel APU in a high visibility fleet customer vehicle application.

  19. Experimental broadband absorption enhancement in silicon nanohole structures with optimized complex unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-09-09

    We design silicon membranes with nanohole structures with optimized complex unit cells that maximize broadband absorption. We fabricate the optimized design and measure the optical absorption. We demonstrate an experimental broadband absorption about 3.5 times higher than an equally-thick thin film.

  20. An Algorithm on Generating Lattice Based on Layered Concept Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chang-sheng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Concept lattice is an effective tool for data analysis and rule extraction, a bottleneck factor on impacting the applications of concept lattice is how to generate lattice efficiently. In this paper, an algorithm LCLG on generating lattice in batch processing based on layered concept lattice is developed, this algorithm is based on layered concept lattice, the lattice is generated downward layer by layer through concept nodes and provisional nodes in current layer; the concept nodes are found parent-child relationships upward layer by layer, then the Hasse diagram of inter-layer connection is generated; in the generated process of the lattice nodes in each layer, we do the pruning operations dynamically according to relevant properties, and delete some unnecessary nodes, such that the generating speed is improved greatly; the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has good performance.

  1. Inulin isoforms differ by repeated additions of one crystal unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-03-15

    Inulin isoforms, especially delta inulin, are important biologically as immune activators and clinically as vaccine adjuvants. In exploring action mechanisms, we previously found regular increments in thermal properties of the seven-member inulin isoform series that suggested regular additions of some energetic structural unit. Because the previous isolates carried additional longer chains that masked defining ranges, these were contrasted with new isoform isolates comprising only inulin chain lengths defining that isoform. The new series began with 19 fructose units per chain (alpha-1 inulin), increasing regularly by 6 fructose units per isoform. Thus the 'energetic unit' equates to 6 fructose residues per chain. All isoforms showed indistinguishable X-ray diffraction patterns that were also identical with known inulin crystals. We conclude that an 'energetic unit' equates to one helix turn of 6 fructose units per chain as found in one unit cell of the inulin crystal. Each isoform chain comprised progressively more helix turns plus one additional fructose and glucose residues per chain.

  2. Question 7: the first units of life were not simple cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Vic; Hunding, Axel; Kepes, Francois; Lancet, Doron; Minsky, Abraham; Raine, Derek; Root-Bernstein, Robert; Sriram, K

    2007-10-01

    Five common assumptions about the first cells are challenged by the pre-biotic ecology model and are replaced by the following propositions: firstly, early cells were more complex, more varied and had a greater diversity of constituents than modern cells; secondly, the complexity of a cell is not related to the number of genes it contains, indeed, modern bacteria are as complex as eukaryotes; thirdly, the unit of early life was an 'ecosystem' rather than a 'cell'; fourthly, the early cell needed no genes at all; fifthly, early life depended on non-covalent associations and on catalysts that were not confined to specific reactions. We present here the outlines of a theory that connects findings about modern bacteria with speculations about their origins.

  3. A study of microtubule dipole lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shubhendu

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal protein polymers orchestrating a host of important cellular functions including, but not limited to, cell support, cell division, cell motility and cell transport. In this thesis, we construct a toy-model of the microtubule lattice composed of vector Ising spins representing tubulin molecules, the building block of microtubules. Nearest-neighbor and next-to-nearest neighbor interactions are considered within an anisotropic dielectric medium. As a consequence of the helical topology, we observe that certain spin orientations render the lattice frustrated with nearest neighbor ferroelectric and next-to-nearest neighbor antiferroelectric bonds. Under these conditions, the lattice displays the remarkable property of stabilizing certain spin patterns that are robust to thermal fluctuations. We model this behavior in the framework of a generalized Ising model known as the J1 - J2 model and theoretically determine the set of stable patterns. Employing Monte-Carlo methods, we demonstrate the stability of such patterns in the microtubule lattice at human physiological temperatures. This suggests a novel biological mechanism for storing information in living organisms, whereby the tubulin spin (dipole moment) states become information bits and information gets stored in microtubules in a way that is robust to thermal fluctuations.

  4. The spin-1/2 Kagome XXZ model in a field: competition between lattice nematic and solid orders

    CERN Document Server

    Kshetrimayum, Augustine; Orus, Roman; Poilblanc, Didier

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically the spin-1/2 XXZ model in a field on an infinite Kagome lattice. We use different algorithms based on infinite Projected Entangled Pair States (iPEPS) for this, namely: (i) an approach with simplex tensors and 9-site unit cell, and (ii) an approach based on coarse-graining three spins in the Kagome lattice and mapping it to a square-lattice model with local and nearest-neighbor interactions, with usual PEPS tensors, 6- and 12-site unit cells. We observe the emergence of a plateau in the magnetization at $m_z = \\frac{1}{3}$ as a function of the magnetic field, and focus on characterizing it as a function of the anisotropy, including the XY, Heisenberg, and Ising points. We find that the 9-site simplex-method produces degenerate -- within our accuracy -- (lattice) nematic and $\\sqrt{3} \\times \\sqrt{3}$ VBC-Solid states up to the Ising point. The 6- and 12-site coarse-grained PEPS methods also produce (almost) degenerate nematic and $\\sqrt{2} \\times \\sqrt{2}$ VBC-Solid order, although with a...

  5. The JKJ Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Kenta; Noda, Fumiaki; Yamamoto, Kazami; Machida, Shinji; Molodojentsev, Alexander; Ishi, Yoshihiro

    2002-12-01

    The JKJ high-intensity proton accelerator facility consists of a 400-MeV linac, a 3-GeV 1-MW rapid-cycling synchrotron and a 50-GeV 0.75-MW synchrotron. The lattice and beam dynamics design of the two synchrotrons are reported.

  6. Quantum lattice problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raedt, Hans; von der Linden, W.; Binder, K

    1995-01-01

    In this chapter we review methods currently used to perform Monte Carlo calculations for quantum lattice models. A detailed exposition is given of the formalism underlying the construction of the simulation algorithms. We discuss the fundamental and technical difficulties that are encountered and gi

  7. Measuring on Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Knuth, Kevin H

    2009-01-01

    Previous derivations of the sum and product rules of probability theory relied on the algebraic properties of Boolean logic. Here they are derived within a more general framework based on lattice theory. The result is a new foundation of probability theory that encompasses and generalizes both the Cox and Kolmogorov formulations. In this picture probability is a bi-valuation defined on a lattice of statements that quantifies the degree to which one statement implies another. The sum rule is a constraint equation that ensures that valuations are assigned so as to not violate associativity of the lattice join and meet. The product rule is much more interesting in that there are actually two product rules: one is a constraint equation arises from associativity of the direct products of lattices, and the other a constraint equation derived from associativity of changes of context. The generality of this formalism enables one to derive the traditionally assumed condition of additivity in measure theory, as well in...

  8. Lattice Multiverse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, S. Gill

    2010-01-01

    Will the cosmological multiverse, when described mathematically, have easily stated properties that are impossible to prove or disprove using mathematical physics? We explore this question by constructing lattice multiverses which exhibit such behavior even though they are much simpler mathematically than any likely cosmological multiverse.

  9. Phenomenology from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lellouch, L P

    2003-01-01

    After a short presentation of lattice QCD and some of its current practical limitations, I review recent progress in applications to phenomenology. Emphasis is placed on heavy-quark masses and on hadronic weak matrix elements relevant for constraining the CKM unitarity triangle. The main numerical results are highlighted in boxes.

  10. Noetherian and Artinian Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Keskin Tütüncü

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that if L is a complete modular lattice which is compactly generated, then Rad(L/0 is Artinian if, and only if for every small element a of L, the sublattice a/0 is Artinian if, and only if L satisfies DCC on small elements.

  11. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  12. Packing entropy of extended, hard, rigid objects on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenshuo; Freed, Karl F.; Nemirovsky, Adolfo M.

    1993-06-01

    We present a systematic method of evaluating the packing entropy for a set of mutually avoiding extended, hard, rigid objects on a lattice. The method generalizes a simple algebraic representation of the lattice cluster theory developed by Freed and co-workers for systems composed of flexible objects. The theory provides a power series expansion in z-1 for the corrections to the zeroth order mean field approximation partition function, where z is the lattice coordination number. We illustrate the general theory by calculating the packing entropy of four-unit rigid ``square'' objects on a hypercubic lattice as a function of the volume fraction of the squares. As a particular limiting case, we also evaluate for the packing entropy of two, three, and four squares on a two-dimensional square lattice and find agreement with the cluster expansion.

  13. Analysis of band gap of non-bravais lattice photonic crystal fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yichao MA; Heming CHEN

    2009-01-01

    This article designs a novel type ofnon-bravais lattice photonic crystal fiber. To form the nesting complexperiod with positive and negative refractive index materials respectively, a cylinder with the same radius and negative refractive index is introduced into the center of each lattice unit cell in the traditional square lattice air-holes photonic crystal fiber. The photonic band-gap of the photonic crystal fiber is calculated numerically by the plane wave expansion method. The result shows that compared with the traditional square photonic band-gap fiber (PBGF),when R/A is 0.35, the refractive index of the substrate, airhole, and medium-column are 1.30, 1.0, and -1.0,respectively. This new PBGF can transmit signal by the photonic band-gap effect. When the lattice constant Λvaries from 1.5 μm to 3.0 μm, the range of the wavelength ranges from 880 nm to 2300 nm.

  14. Proof of Ira Gessel's lattice path conjecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauers, Manuel; Koutschan, Christoph; Zeilberger, Doron

    2009-01-01

    We present a computer-aided, yet fully rigorous, proof of Ira Gessel's tantalizingly simply stated conjecture that the number of ways of walking 2n steps in the region x + y ≥ 0,y ≥ 0 of the square lattice with unit steps in the east, west, north, and south directions, that start and end at the origin, equals 16n(5/6)n(1/2)n(5/3)n(2)n.

  15. A switchable pH-differential unitized regenerative fuel cell with high performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xu; Xuan, Jin; Leung, Dennis Y. C.; Zou, Haiyang; Li, Jiantao; Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Huizhi

    2016-05-01

    Regenerative fuel cells are a potential candidate for future energy storage, but their applications are limited by the high cost and poor round-trip efficiency. Here we present a switchable pH-differential unitized regenerative fuel cell capable of addressing both the obstacles. Relying on a membraneless laminar flow-based design, pH environments in the cell are optimized independently for different electrode reactions and are switchable together with the cell process to ensure always favorable thermodynamics for each electrode reaction. Benefiting from the thermodynamic advantages of the switchable pH-differential arrangement, the cell allows water electrolysis at a voltage of 0.57 V, and a fuel cell open circuit voltage of 1.89 V, rendering round-trip efficiencies up to 74%. Under room conditions, operating the cell in fuel cell mode yields a power density of 1.3 W cm-2, which is the highest performance to date for laminar flow-based cells and is comparable to state-of-the-art polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  16. A fuel cell energy storage system concept for the Space Station Freedom Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlhart, Otto J.; Rosso, Matthew J., Jr.; Marmolejo, Jose

    1989-01-01

    An update is given on work to design and build a Fuel Cell Energy Storage System (FCESS) bench-tested unit for the Space Station Freedom Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Fueled by oxygen and hydride-stored hydrogen, the FCESS is being considered as an alternative to the EMU zinc-silver oxide battery. Superior cycle life and quick recharge are the main attributes of FCESS. The design and performance of a nonventing, 28 V, 34 Ahr system with 7 amp rating are discussed.

  17. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torreão Dassen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    We develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. We present algorithms to compute both Gram-Schmidt and reduced bases in this generalized setting. A layered lattice can be seen as lattices where certain directions have infinite weight. It can also be interpre

  18. Spin qubits in antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Flindt, Christian; Mortensen, Niels Asger;

    2008-01-01

    and density of states for a periodic potential modulation, referred to as an antidot lattice, and find that localized states appear, when designed defects are introduced in the lattice. Such defect states may form the building blocks for quantum computing in a large antidot lattice, allowing for coherent...

  19. Single-unit transfusions and hemoglobin trigger: relative impact on red cell utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, William W; Thakkar, Rajiv N; Gehrie, Eric A; Chen, Weiyun; Frank, Steven M

    2017-05-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) programs can reduce unnecessary transfusions, but the optimal methods used to achieve this effect are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that encouraging single-unit red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in stable patients would have a greater impact on blood use than compliance with a specific hemoglobin (Hb) transfusion trigger alone. We analyzed blood utilization data at three community hospitals without previous PBM efforts before and after implementing a PBM program. Data were analyzed at monthly intervals to determine the relative impact of a "Why give 2 when 1 will do?" campaign promoting single-unit RBC transfusions and simultaneous efforts to promote evidence-based Hb triggers of 7 or 8 g/dL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify independent effects of these two interventions on overall RBC utilization. Univariate analysis revealed that both the increase in single-unit transfusions (from 38.0% to 70.9%; p utilization. Multivariate analysis showed that the increase in single-unit transfusions was an independent predictor of decreased RBC utilization, but the Hb triggers of both 7 and 8 g/dL were not. Overall, our PBM efforts decreased RBC utilization from 0.254 to 0.185 units/patient (27.2%) across all three hospitals (p = 0.0009). A campaign promoting single-unit RBC transfusions had a greater impact on RBC utilization than did encouraging a restrictive transfusion trigger. © 2016 AABB.

  20. The Daniell Cell, Ohm's Law and the Emergence of the International System of Units

    CERN Document Server

    Jayson, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    Telegraphy originated in the 1830s and 40s and flourished in the following decades, but with a patchwork of electrical standards. Electromotive force was for the most part measured in units of the predominant Daniell cell. Each company had their own resistance standard. In 1862 the British Association for the Advancement of Science formed a committee to address this situation. By 1873 they had given definition to the electromagnetic system of units (emu) and defined the practical units of the ohm as ${10}^9$ emu units of resistance and the volt as ${10}^8$ emu units of electromotive force. These recommendations were ratified and expanded upon in a series of international congresses held between 1881 and 1904. A proposal by Giovanni Giorgi in 1901 took advantage of a coincidence between the conversion of the units of energy in the emu system (the erg) and in the practical system (the joule) in that the same conversion factor existed between the cgs based emu system and a theretofore undefined MKS system. By in...

  1. Lattice Dynamics of the Rhenium and Technetium Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverson, Daniel; Hart, Lewis S.

    2016-05-01

    The rhenium and technetium dichalcogenides are layered van der Waals semiconductors which show a large number of Raman-active zone-centre phonon modes as a result of their unusually large unit cells and deviation from hexagonal symmetry. They thus offer the possibility of introducing in-plane anisotropy into composite heterostructures based on van der Waals materials, and Raman spectroscopy is generally used to determine their in-plane orientation. We show that first-principles calculations give a good description of the lattice dynamics of this family of materials and thus predict the zone-centre phonon frequencies and Raman activities of TcS2. We consider the distribution of the phonon modes in frequency and their atomic displacements and give a unified understanding of the phonon frequencies and Raman spectra of ReS2, TcS2 and ReSe2 in terms of the scaling of Raman frequency with the chalcogen mass.

  2. Lattice regularization of gauge theories without loss of chiral symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    't Hooft, Gerardus

    1994-01-01

    Abstract: A lattice regularization procedure for gauge theories is proposed in which fermions are given a special treatment such that all chiral flavor symmetries that are free of Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomalies are kept intact. There is no doubling of fermionic degrees of freedom. A price paid for this feature is that the number of fermionic degrees of freedom per unit cell is still infinite, although finiteness of the complete functional integrals can be proven (details are outlined in an Appendix). Therefore, although perhaps of limited usefulness for numerical simulations, our scheme can be applied for studying aspects such as analytic convergence questions, spontaneous symmetry breakdown and baryon number violation in non-Abelian gauge theories.

  3. Adsorbate-induced lattice deformation in IRMOF-74 series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawahery, Sudi; Simon, Cory M.; Braun, Efrem; Witman, Matthew; Tiana, Davide; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Smit, Berend

    2017-01-01

    IRMOF-74 analogues are among the most widely studied metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for adsorption applications because of their one-dimensional channels and high metal density. Most studies involving the IRMOF-74 series assume that the crystal lattice is rigid. This assumption guides the interpretation of experimental data, as changes in the crystal symmetry have so far been ignored as a possibility in the literature. Here, we report a deformation pattern, induced by the adsorption of argon, for IRMOF-74-V. This work has two main implications. First, we use molecular simulations to demonstrate that the IRMOF-74 series undergoes a deformation that is similar to the mechanism behind breathing MOFs, but is unique because the deformation pattern extends beyond a single unit cell of the original structure. Second, we provide an alternative interpretation of experimental small-angle X-ray scattering profiles of these systems, which changes how we view the fundamentals of adsorption in this MOF series.

  4. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  5. Introduction to lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  6. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachrajda, C. T.

    2016-10-01

    I review the the application of the lattice formulation of QCD and large-scale numerical simulations to the evaluation of non-perturbative hadronic effects in Standard Model Phenomenology. I present an introduction to the elements of the calculations and discuss the limitations both in the range of quantities which can be studied and in the precision of the results. I focus particularly on the extraction of the QCD parameters, i.e. the quark masses and the strong coupling constant, and on important quantities in flavour physics. Lattice QCD is playing a central role in quantifying the hadronic effects necessary for the development of precision flavour physics and its use in exploring the limits of the Standard Model and in searches for inconsistencies which would signal the presence of new physics.

  7. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  8. Fractional lattice charge transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  9. Lattice QCD for Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Borsanyi, Sz; Kampert, K H; Katz, S D; Kawanai, T; Kovacs, T G; Mages, S W; Pasztor, A; Pittler, F; Redondo, J; Ringwald, A; Szabo, K K

    2016-01-01

    We present a full result for the equation of state (EoS) in 2+1+1 (up/down, strange and charm quarks are present) flavour lattice QCD. We extend this analysis and give the equation of state in 2+1+1+1 flavour QCD. In order to describe the evolution of the universe from temperatures several hundreds of GeV to several tens of MeV we also include the known effects of the electroweak theory and give the effective degree of freedoms. As another application of lattice QCD we calculate the topological susceptibility (chi) up to the few GeV temperature region. These two results, EoS and chi, can be used to predict the dark matter axion's mass in the post-inflation scenario and/or give the relationship between the axion's mass and the universal axionic angle, which acts as a initial condition of our universe.

  10. Solitons in nonlinear lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a comprehensive survey of results obtained for solitons and complex nonlinear wave patterns supported by purely nonlinear lattices (NLs), which represent a spatially periodic modulation of the local strength and sign of the nonlinearity, and their combinations with linear lattices. A majority of the results obtained, thus far, in this field and reviewed in this article are theoretical. Nevertheless, relevant experimental settings are surveyed too, with emphasis on perspectives for implementation of the theoretical predictions in the experiment. Physical systems discussed in the review belong to the realms of nonlinear optics (including artificial optical media, such as photonic crystals, and plasmonics) and Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). The solitons are considered in one, two, and three dimensions (1D, 2D, and 3D). Basic properties of the solitons presented in the review are their existence, stability, and mobility. Although the field is still far from completion, general conclusions c...

  11. Parametric lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Wan

    2017-06-01

    The discretized equilibrium distributions of the lattice Boltzmann method are presented by using the coefficients of the Lagrange interpolating polynomials that pass through the points related to discrete velocities and using moments of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. The ranges of flow velocity and temperature providing positive valued distributions vary with regulating discrete velocities as parameters. New isothermal and thermal compressible models are proposed for flows of the level of the isothermal and thermal compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Thermal compressible shock tube flows are simulated by only five on-lattice discrete velocities. Two-dimensional isothermal and thermal vortices provoked by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are simulated by the parametric models.

  12. Varieties of lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Jipsen, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The study of lattice varieties is a field that has experienced rapid growth in the last 30 years, but many of the interesting and deep results discovered in that period have so far only appeared in research papers. The aim of this monograph is to present the main results about modular and nonmodular varieties, equational bases and the amalgamation property in a uniform way. The first chapter covers preliminaries that make the material accessible to anyone who has had an introductory course in universal algebra. Each subsequent chapter begins with a short historical introduction which sites the original references and then presents the results with complete proofs (in nearly all cases). Numerous diagrams illustrate the beauty of lattice theory and aid in the visualization of many proofs. An extensive index and bibliography also make the monograph a useful reference work.

  13. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sachrajda, C T

    2016-01-01

    I review the the application of the lattice formulation of QCD and large-scale numerical simulations to the evaluation of non-perturbative hadronic effects in Standard Model Phenomenology. I present an introduction to the elements of the calculations and discuss the limitations both in the range of quantities which can be studied and in the precision of the results. I focus particularly on the extraction of the QCD parameters, i.e. the quark masses and the strong coupling constant, and on important quantities in flavour physics. Lattice QCD is playing a central role in quantifying the hadronic effects necessary for the development of precision flavour physics and its use in exploring the limits of the Standard Model and in searches for inconsistencies which would signal the presence of new physics.

  14. Resonant tunneling effect in one-dimensional twinned lattice photonic crystal under total reflection conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Li, Hu; Yuxia, Tang

    2016-07-01

    Under total reflection conditions, it typically seems as though light waves will be reflected completely on the interface; in actuality, the waves can penetrate the medium as evanescent waves. In this paper, we present a twinned lattice photonic crystal with a unit cell composed of AB layers and their mirror. We assume that the refractive index n 0 of the input and output end is equal to n B and larger than n A . We first demonstrate the dependence of band structure on the incidence angle and normalized wavelength, in which the resonant tunneling bands are exposed. We then draw a comparison of bands between ABBA and AB. To conclude, we discuss the resonant tunneling effect in the twinned lattice photonic crystal under the total reflection conditions. As incidence angle increases, the resonant tunneling band ultimately vanishes completely.

  15. Piezoelectricity in two-dimensional materials: Comparative study between lattice dynamics and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, K. H.; ćakır, D.; Sevik, C.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-03-01

    The elastic constant C11 and piezoelectric stress constant e1 ,11 of two-dimensional (2D) dielectric materials comprising h-BN, 2 H -MoS2 , and other transition-metal dichalcogenides and dioxides are calculated using lattice dynamical theory. The results are compared with corresponding quantities obtained with ab initio calculations. We identify the difference between clamped-ion and relaxed-ion contributions with the dependence on inner strains which are due to the relative displacements of the ions in the unit cell. Lattice dynamics allows us to express the inner-strain contributions in terms of microscopic quantities such as effective ionic charges and optoacoustical couplings, which allows us to clarify differences in the piezoelectric behavior between h-BN and MoS2. Trends in the different microscopic quantities as functions of atomic composition are discussed.

  16. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Liberto, Marco Fedele

    2015-03-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms. Here we show that by tuning a structural deformation of the unit cell in a bipartite optical lattice, one can induce a phase transition from a superfluid into various Mott insulating phases forming a shell structure in the superimposed harmonic trap. The Mott shells are identified via characteristic features in the visibility of Bragg maxima in momentum spectra. The experimental findings are explained by Gutzwiller mean-field and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our system bears similarities with the loss of coherence in cuprate superconductors, known to be associated with the doping induced buckling of the oxygen octahedra surrounding the copper sites.

  17. International Lattice Data Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, C T H; Kenway, R D; Maynard, C M

    2002-01-01

    We propose the co-ordination of lattice QCD grid developments in different countries to allow transparent exchange of gauge configurations in future, should participants wish to do so. We describe briefly UKQCD's XML schema for labelling and cataloguing the data. A meeting to further develop these ideas will be held in Edinburgh on 19/20 December 2002, and will be available over AccessGrid.

  18. Weakly deformed soliton lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrovin, B. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (USSR). Dept. of Mechanics and Mathematics)

    1990-12-01

    In this lecture the author discusses periodic and quasiperiodic solutions of nonlinear evolution equations of phi{sub t}=K (phi, phi{sub x},..., phi{sup (n)}), the so-called soliton lattices. After introducing the theory of integrable systems of hydrodynamic type he discusses their Hamiltonian formalism, i.e. the theory of Poisson brackets of hydrodynamic type. Then he describes the application of algebraic geometry to the effective integration of such equations. (HSI).

  19. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. Follow up report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Fuel cell technology continues to grow in the United States, with strong sales in stationary applications and early markets such as data centers, materials handling equipment, and telecommunications sites. New fuel cell customers include Fortune 500 companies Apple, eBay, Coca-Cola, and Walmart, who will use fuel cells to provide reliable power to data centers, stores, and facilities. Some are purchasing multi-megawatt (MW) systems, including three of the largest non-utility purchases of stationary fuel cells in the world by AT and T, Apple and eBay - 17 MW, 10 MW and 6 MW respectively. Others are replacing fleets of battery forklifts with fuel cells. Sysco, the food distributor, has more than 700 fuel cell-powered forklifts operating at seven facilities, with more on order. Mega-retailer Walmart now operates more than 500 fuel cell forklifts at three warehouses, including a freezer facility. Although federal government budget reduction efforts are impacting a wide range of departments and programs, fuel cell and hydrogen technology continues to be funded, albeit at a lower level than in past years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding fuel cell and hydrogen R and D and has nearly 300 ongoing projects at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes universities. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and DOE's Market Transformation efforts have acted as a government ''catalyst'' for market success of emerging technologies. Early market deployments of about 1,400 fuel cells under the ARRA have led to more than 5,000 additional fuel cell purchases by industry with no DOE funding. In addition, interest in Congress remains high. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Coons (D-DE), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and John Hoeven (R-ND) re-launched the bipartisan Senate Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Caucus in August 2012 to promote the continued development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

  20. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  1. Topological Lattice Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, W; Pepe, M; Wiese, U -J

    2010-01-01

    We consider lattice field theories with topological actions, which are invariant against small deformations of the fields. Some of these actions have infinite barriers separating different topological sectors. Topological actions do not have the correct classical continuum limit and they cannot be treated using perturbation theory, but they still yield the correct quantum continuum limit. To show this, we present analytic studies of the 1-d O(2) and O(3) model, as well as Monte Carlo simulations of the 2-d O(3) model using topological lattice actions. Some topological actions obey and others violate a lattice Schwarz inequality between the action and the topological charge $Q$. Irrespective of this, in the 2-d O(3) model the topological susceptibility $\\chi_t = \\l/V$ is logarithmically divergent in the continuum limit. Still, at non-zero distance the correlator of the topological charge density has a finite continuum limit which is consistent with analytic predictions. Our study shows explicitly that some cla...

  2. Robots and lattice automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The book gives a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art research and engineering in theory and application of Lattice Automata in design and control of autonomous Robots. Automata and robots share the same notional meaning. Automata (originated from the latinization of the Greek word “αυτόματον”) as self-operating autonomous machines invented from ancient years can be easily considered the first steps of robotic-like efforts. Automata are mathematical models of Robots and also they are integral parts of robotic control systems. A Lattice Automaton is a regular array or a collective of finite state machines, or automata. The Automata update their states by the same rules depending on states of their immediate neighbours. In the context of this book, Lattice Automata are used in developing modular reconfigurable robotic systems, path planning and map exploration for robots, as robot controllers, synchronisation of robot collectives, robot vision, parallel robotic actuators. All chapters are...

  3. Hadroquarkonium from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Maurizio; Bali, Gunnar S.; Collins, Sara; Knechtli, Francesco; Moir, Graham; Söldner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    The hadroquarkonium picture [S. Dubynskiy and M. B. Voloshin, Phys. Lett. B 666, 344 (2008), 10.1016/j.physletb.2008.07.086] provides one possible interpretation for the pentaquark candidates with hidden charm, recently reported by the LHCb Collaboration, as well as for some of the charmoniumlike "X , Y , Z " states. In this picture, a heavy quarkonium core resides within a light hadron giving rise to four- or five-quark/antiquark bound states. We test this scenario in the heavy quark limit by investigating the modification of the potential between a static quark-antiquark pair induced by the presence of a hadron. Our lattice QCD simulations are performed on a Coordinated Lattice Simulations (CLS) ensemble with Nf=2 +1 flavors of nonperturbatively improved Wilson quarks at a pion mass of about 223 MeV and a lattice spacing of about a =0.0854 fm . We study the static potential in the presence of a variety of light mesons as well as of octet and decuplet baryons. In all these cases, the resulting configurations are favored energetically. The associated binding energies between the quarkonium in the heavy quark limit and the light hadron are found to be smaller than a few MeV, similar in strength to deuterium binding. It needs to be seen if the small attraction survives in the infinite volume limit and supports bound states or resonances.

  4. Digital lattice gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a general scheme for a digital construction of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. In this method, the four-body interactions arising in models with 2 +1 dimensions and higher are obtained stroboscopically, through a sequence of two-body interactions with ancillary degrees of freedom. This yields stronger interactions than the ones obtained through perturbative methods, as typically done in previous proposals, and removes an important bottleneck in the road towards experimental realizations. The scheme applies to generic gauge theories with Lie or finite symmetry groups, both Abelian and non-Abelian. As a concrete example, we present the construction of a digital quantum simulator for a Z3 lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermionic matter in 2 +1 dimensions, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices, involving three atomic species, representing the matter, gauge, and auxiliary degrees of freedom, that are separated in three different layers. By moving the ancilla atoms with a proper sequence of steps, we show how we can obtain the desired evolution in a clean, controlled way.

  5. Study on Unit Cell Models and the Effective Thermal Conductivities of Silica Aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Li, Zeng-Yao; Zhao, Xin-Peng; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two modified unit cell models, truncated octahedron and cubic array of intersecting square rods with 45-degree rotation, are developed in consideration of the tortuous path of heat conduction in solid skeleton of silica aerogel. The heat conduction is analyzed for each model and the expressions of effective thermal conductivity of the modified unit cell models are derived. Considering the random microstructure of silica aerogel, the probability model is presented. We also discuss the effect of the thermal conductivity of aerogel backbone. The effective thermal conductivities calculated by the proposed probability model are in good agreement with available experimental data when the density of the aerogel is 110 kg/m3.

  6. Strong-Coupling Lattice QCD on Anisotropic Lattices arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    de Forcrand, Philippe; Vairinhos, Helvio

    Anisotropic lattice spacings are mandatory to reach the high temperatures where chiral symmetry is restored in the strong coupling limit of lattice QCD. Here, we propose a simple criterion for the nonperturbative renormalisation of the anisotropy coupling $\\gamma$ in strongly-coupled SU($N$) or U($N$) lattice QCD with massless staggered fermions. We then compute the renormalised anisotropy $\\xi(\\gamma)$, and the strong-coupling analogue of Karsch's coefficients (the running anisotropy), for $N=3$. We achieve high precision by combining diagrammatic Monte Carlo and multi-histogram reweighting techniques. We observe that the mean field prediction in the continuous time limit captures the nonperturbative scaling, but receives a large, previously neglected correction on the unit prefactor. Using our nonperturbative prescription in place of the mean field result, we observe large corrections of the same magnitude to the continuous time limit of the static baryon mass, and of the location of the phase boundary asso...

  7. Two-dimensional Chern semimetals on the Lieb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Giandomenico; Meichanetzidis, Konstantinos

    2015-12-01

    In this work we propose a simple model that supports Chern semimetals. These gapless topological phases share several properties with the Chern insulators like a well-defined Chern number associated with each band, topologically protected edge states and topological phase transitions that occur when the bands touch each, with linear dispersion around the contact points. The tight-binding model, defined on the Lieb lattice with intra-unit-cell and suitable nearest-neighbor hopping terms between three different species of spinless fermions, supports a single Dirac-like point. The dispersion relation around this point is fully relativistic and the 3 ×3 matrices in the corresponding effective Hamiltonian satisfy the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau algebra. We show the robustness of the topologically protected edge states by employing the entanglement spectrum. Moreover, we prove that the Chern number of the lowest band is robust with respect to weak disorder. For its simplicity, our model can be naturally implemented in real physical systems like cold atoms in optical lattices.

  8. A Mechanical Lattice Aid for Crystallography Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua-Lopez, J.; Cordero-Borboa, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces a 3-dimensional mechanical lattice with adjustable telescoping mechanisms. Discusses the crystalline state, the 14 Bravais lattices, operational principles of the mechanical lattice, construction methods, and demonstrations in classroom. Provides lattice diagrams, schemes of the lattice, and various pictures of the lattice. (YP)

  9. Kenneth Wilson and lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ukawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the physics and computation of lattice QCD, a space-time lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics, and Kenneth Wilson's seminal role in its development. We start with the fundamental issue of confinement of quarks in the theory of the strong interactions, and discuss how lattice QCD provides a framework for understanding this phenomenon. A conceptual issue with lattice QCD is a conflict of space-time lattice with chiral symmetry of quarks. We discuss how this problem is resolved. Since lattice QCD is a non-linear quantum dynamical system with infinite degrees of freedom, quantities which are analytically calculable are limited. On the other hand, it provides an ideal case of massively parallel numerical computations. We review the long and distinguished history of parallel-architecture supercomputers designed and built for lattice QCD. We discuss algorithmic developments, in particular the difficulties posed by the fermionic nature of quarks, and their resolution. The triad of efforts toward b...

  10. On the Performance of Hybrid PV/Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System in the Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwan Dihrab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar hydrogen system is a unique power system that can meet the power requirements for future energy demands. Such a system uses the hydrogen as the energy carrier, which produces energy through the electrolyzer with assistance of the power from the PV during the sunny hours, and then uses stored hydrogen to produce energy through the fuel cell after sunset or on cloudy days. The current study has used premanufactured unitized regenerative fuel cells in which the electrolyzer and the fuel cell function within one cell at different modes. The system components were modeled and the one-day real operational and simulated data has been presented and compared. The measured results showed the ability of the system to meet the proposed load, and the total efficiency was about 4.5%.

  11. BioDiff - a neutron diffractometer optimized for crystals with large unit cell dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Schrader, Tobias Erich; Ostermann, Andreas; Monkenbusch, Michael; Laatsch, Bernhard; Jüttner, Philipp; Petry, Winfried; Richter, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The research reactor Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) is a modern high flux neutron source which feeds some 30 state of the art neutron beam instruments. Currently 24 are operational, others in commissioning or under construction. The newly built neutron single crystal diffractometer BIODIFF is especially designed to collect data from crystals with large unit cells. The main field of application is the structural analysis of proteins, especially the determination of hydrogen atom positions. BIOD...

  12. A Standard FODO Lattice with Adjustable Momentum Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbojevic, D.; Courant, E. D.

    1997-05-01

    An exisisting lattice made of identical FODO cells can be modified to have adjustable momentum compaction. The modified lattice consists of repeating superperiods of four FODO cells where every two cells have different horizontal phase advance. In exisiting FODO cell rings an additional quad bus is required for every two consecutive cells. This allows tuning of the momentum compaction or γt (transition) to any desired value. A value of the γt could be an imaginary number. A drawback of this modification is relatively large values of the dispersion function (two or three times larger than in the regular FODO cell design).

  13. Dielectric Behavior of Low Microwave Loss Unit Cell for All Dielectric Metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhuan Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With a deep study of the metamaterial, its unit cells have been widely extended from metals to dielectrics. The dielectric based unit cells attract much attention because of the advantage of easy preparation, tunability, and higher frequency response, and so forth. Using the conventional solid state method, we prepared a kind of incipient ferroelectrics (calcium titanate, CaTiO3 with higher microwave permittivity and lower loss, which can be successfully used to construct metamaterials. The temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric constant are also measured under different sintering temperatures. The dielectric spectra showed a slight permittivity decrease with the increase of temperature and exhibited a loss of 0.0005, combined with a higher microwave dielectric constant of ~167 and quality factor Q of 2049. Therefore, CaTiO3 is a kind of versatile and potential metamaterial unit cell. The permittivity of CaTiO3 at higher microwave frequency was also examined in the rectangular waveguide and we got the permittivity of 165, creating a new method to test permittivity at higher microwave frequency.

  14. Lattice topology dictates photon statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakci, H Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F; Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2017-08-21

    Propagation of coherent light through a disordered network is accompanied by randomization and possible conversion into thermal light. Here, we show that network topology plays a decisive role in determining the statistics of the emerging field if the underlying lattice is endowed with chiral symmetry. In such lattices, eigenmode pairs come in skew-symmetric pairs with oppositely signed eigenvalues. By examining one-dimensional arrays of randomly coupled waveguides arranged on linear and ring topologies, we are led to a remarkable prediction: the field circularity and the photon statistics in ring lattices are dictated by its parity while the same quantities are insensitive to the parity of a linear lattice. For a ring lattice, adding or subtracting a single lattice site can switch the photon statistics from super-thermal to sub-thermal, or vice versa. This behavior is understood by examining the real and imaginary fields on a lattice exhibiting chiral symmetry, which form two strands that interleave along the lattice sites. These strands can be fully braided around an even-sited ring lattice thereby producing super-thermal photon statistics, while an odd-sited lattice is incommensurate with such an arrangement and the statistics become sub-thermal.

  15. Thermal expansion of lattice parameter of (powder) silicon up to 1473 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Xianran; CHEN Jun; DENG Jinxia; LIU Guirong

    2004-01-01

    The XRPD (X-ray powder diffractometry) patterns of silicon powder with a unit cell structure of diamond were determined from 298 to 1473 K. Lattice parameters of Si linearly increase with temperature. The thermal shifts of the positions of all reflection peaks are linearly correlated with the temperature. The coefficients of the intrinsic linear thermal expansion and volumetric thermal expansion were determined as 3.87×10-6/K and 1.16 × 10-5/K respectively. It indicates that Si is still a suitable standard in the XRPD method at high temperatures.

  16. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  17. Ordered sets and lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Drashkovicheva, Kh; Igoshin, V I; Katrinyak, T; Kolibiar, M

    1989-01-01

    This book is another publication in the recent surveys of ordered sets and lattices. The papers, which might be characterized as "reviews of reviews," are based on articles reviewed in the Referativnyibreve Zhurnal: Matematika from 1978 to 1982. For the sake of completeness, the authors also attempted to integrate information from other relevant articles from that period. The bibliography of each paper provides references to the reviews in RZhMat and Mathematical Reviews where one can seek more detailed information. Specifically excluded from consideration in this volume were such topics as al

  18. Cell phone recycling experiences in the United States and potential recycling options in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Geraldo T R; Chang, Shoou-Yuh

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of cell phone recycling programs currently available in the United States. At the same time, it also provides analyses of the current recycling situation and possible recycling alternatives for Brazil. Although there are several recycling options in the United States, collection rates are still only 10% of all potential devices because customers are not aware of these possibilities. The whole system is financially based on reselling refurbished cell phones and recycled materials to developing countries which represent an effective and strong market. Several recyclers offer funds to collection partners who are either charities or who work with charities while obtaining the materials that they need in order to run their operations. A mobile phone recycling system for Brazil considering the United States experience and the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) principle is suggested. A deposit/refund/advance-recycling fee is proposed which might be implemented as a voluntary industrial initiative managed by PRO Brazil, a producer responsibility organization. One widespread public-private agreement will integrate all mobile phone stakeholders, and environmental education actions and promotional events will promote citizen's participation.

  19. Spin-1/2 kagome XXZ model in a field: Competition between lattice nematic and solid orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshetrimayum, Augustine; Picot, Thibaut; Orús, Román; Poilblanc, Didier

    2016-12-01

    We study numerically the spin-1/2 XXZ model in a field on an infinite kagome lattice. We use different algorithms based on infinite projected entangled pair states (iPEPSs) for this, namely, (i) an approach with simplex tensors and a 9-site unit cell, and (ii) an approach based on coarse-graining three spins in the kagome lattice and mapping it to a square-lattice model with local and nearest-neighbor interactions, with the usual PEPS tensors, 6- and 12-site unit cells. Similarly to our previous calculation at the SU(2)-symmetric point (Heisenberg Hamiltonian), for any anisotropy from the Ising limit to the XY limit, we also observe the emergence of magnetization plateaus as a function of the magnetic field, at mz=1/3 using 6-, 9-, and 12-site PEPS unit cells, and at mz=1/9 ,5/9 , and 7/9 using a 9-site PEPS unit cell, the latter setup being able to accommodate √{3 }×√{3 } solid order. We also find that, at mz=1/3 , (lattice) nematic and √{3 }×√{3 } VBC-order states are degenerate within the accuracy of the nine-site simplex method, for all anisotropy. The 6- and 12-site coarse-grained PEPS methods produce almost-degenerate nematic and 1 ×2 VBC-solid orders. We also find that, within our accuracy, the six-site coarse-grained PEPS method gives slightly lower energies, which can be explained by the larger amount of entanglement this approach can handle, even in cases where the PEPS unit cell is not commensurate with the expected ground-state unit cell. Furthermore, we do not observe chiral spin liquid behaviors at and close to the XY point, as has been recently proposed. Our results are the first tensor network investigations of the XXZ model in a field and reveal the subtle competition between nearby magnetic orders in numerical simulations of frustrated quantum antiferromagnets, as well as the delicate interplay between energy optimization and symmetry in tensor network numerical simulations.

  20. Evidence for a Lattice Weak Gravity Conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Heidenreich, Ben; Rudelius, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The Weak Gravity Conjecture postulates the existence of superextremal charged particles, i.e. those with mass smaller than or equal to their charge in Planck units. We present further evidence for our recent observation that in known examples a much stronger statement is true: an infinite tower of superextremal particles of different charges exists. We show that effective Kaluza-Klein field theories and perturbative string vacua respect the Sublattice Weak Gravity Conjecture, namely that a finite index sublattice of the full charge lattice exists with a superextremal particle at each site. In perturbative string theory we show that this follows from modular invariance. However, we present counterexamples to the stronger possibility that a superextremal state exists at every lattice site, including an example in which the lightest charged state is subextremal. The Sublattice Weak Gravity Conjecture has many implications both for abstract theories of quantum gravity and for real-world physics. For instance, it ...

  1. A piezo-shunted kirigami auxetic lattice for adaptive elastic wave filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouisse, Morvan; Collet, Manuel; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2016-11-01

    Tailoring the dynamical behavior of wave-guide structures can provide an efficient and physically elegant approach for optimizing mechanical components with regards to vibroacoustic propagation. Architectured materials as pyramidal core kirigami cells combined with smart systems may represent a promising way to improve the vibroacoustic quality of structural components. This paper describes the design and modeling of a pyramidal core with auxetic (negative Poisson’s ratio) characteristics and distributed shunted piezoelectric patches that allow for wave propagation control. The core is produced using a kirigami technique, inspired by the cutting/folding processes of the ancient Japanese art. The kirigami structure has a pyramidal unit cell shape that creates an in-plane negative Poisson’s ratio macroscopic behavior. This structure exhibits in-plane elastic properties (Young’s and shear modulus) which are higher than the out-of-plane ones, and hence this lattice has very specific properties in terms of wave propagation that are investigated in this work. The short-circuited configuration is first analyzed, before using negative capacitance and resistance as a shunt which provides impressive band gaps in the low frequency range. All configurations are investigated by using a full analysis of the Brillouin zone, rendering possible the deep understanding of the dynamical properties of the smart lattice. The results are presented in terms of dispersion and directivity diagrams, and the smart lattice shows quite interesting properties for the adaptive filtering of elastic waves at low frequencies bandwidths.

  2. Lattice harmonics expansion revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontrym-Sznajd, G.; Holas, A.

    2017-04-01

    The main subject of the work is to provide the most effective way of determining the expansion of some quantities into orthogonal polynomials, when these quantities are known only along some limited number of sampling directions. By comparing the commonly used Houston method with the method based on the orthogonality relation, some relationships, which define the applicability and correctness of these methods, are demonstrated. They are verified for various sets of sampling directions applicable for expanding quantities having the full symmetry of the Brillouin zone of cubic and non-cubic lattices. All results clearly show that the Houston method is always better than the orthogonality-relation one. For the cubic symmetry we present a few sets of special directions (SDs) showing how their construction and, next, a proper application depend on the choice of various sets of lattice harmonics. SDs are important mainly for experimentalists who want to reconstruct anisotropic quantities from their measurements, performed at a limited number of sampling directions.

  3. Extreme lattices: symmetries and decorrelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreanov, A.; Scardicchio, A.; Torquato, S.

    2016-11-01

    We study statistical and structural properties of extreme lattices, which are the local minima in the density landscape of lattice sphere packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Specifically, we ascertain statistics of the densities and kissing numbers as well as the numbers of distinct symmetries of the packings for dimensions 8 through 13 using the stochastic Voronoi algorithm. The extreme lattices in a fixed dimension of space d (d≥slant 8 ) are dominated by typical lattices that have similar packing properties, such as packing densities and kissing numbers, while the best and the worst packers are in the long tails of the distribution of the extreme lattices. We also study the validity of the recently proposed decorrelation principle, which has important implications for sphere packings in general. The degree to which extreme-lattice packings decorrelate as well as how decorrelation is related to the packing density and symmetry of the lattices as the space dimension increases is also investigated. We find that the extreme lattices decorrelate with increasing dimension, while the least symmetric lattices decorrelate faster.

  4. Planar conjugated polymers containing 9,10-disubstituted phenanthrene units for efficient polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangwu; Kang, Chong; Li, Cuihong; Lu, Zhen; Zhang, Jicheng; Gong, Xue; Zhao, Guangyao; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping; Bo, Zhishan

    2014-06-01

    Four novel conjugated polymers (P1-4) with 9,10-disubstituted phenanthrene (PhA) as the donor unit and 5,6-bis(octyloxy)benzothiadiazole as the acceptor unit are synthesized and characterized. These polymers are of medium bandgaps (2.0 eV), low-lying HOMO energy levels (below -5.3 eV), and high hole mobilities (in the range of 3.6 × 10(-3) to 0.02 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ). Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs) with P1-4:PC71 BM blends as the active layer and an alcohol-soluble fullerene derivative (FN-C60) as the interfacial layer between the active layer and cathode give the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.24%, indicating that 9,10-disubstituted PhA are potential donor materials for high-efficiency BHJ PSCs.

  5. Mechanical properties of regular porous biomaterials made from truncated cube repeating unit cells: Analytical solutions and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has enabled fabrication of open-cell porous biomaterials based on repeating unit cells. The micro-architecture of the porous biomaterials and, thus, their physical properties could then be precisely controlled. Due to their many favorable properties, porous biomaterials manufactured using AM are considered as promising candidates for bone substitution as well as for several other applications in orthopedic surgery. The mechanical properties of such porous structures including static and fatigue properties are shown to be strongly dependent on the type of the repeating unit cell based on which the porous biomaterial is built. In this paper, we study the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively new unit cell, namely truncated cube. We present analytical solutions that relate the dimensions of the repeating unit cell to the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, and buckling load of those porous structures. We also performed finite element modeling to predict the mechanical properties of the porous structures. The analytical solution and computational results were found to be in agreement with each other. The mechanical properties estimated using both the analytical and computational techniques were somewhat higher than the experimental data reported in one of our recent studies on selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V porous biomaterials. In addition to porosity, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the porous structures were found to be strongly dependent on the ratio of the length of the inclined struts to that of the uninclined (i.e. vertical or horizontal) struts, α, in the truncated cube unit cell. The geometry of the truncated cube unit cell approaches the octahedral and cube unit cells when α respectively approaches zero and infinity. Consistent with those geometrical observations, the analytical solutions presented in this study approached those of the octahedral and cube unit cells when

  6. Simultaneous microwave photonic and phononic band gaps in piezoelectric–piezomagnetic superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zheng-hua [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Jiang, Zheng-Sheng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen, Tao [Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Lei, Da-Jun [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Yan, Wen-Yan, E-mail: yanwenyan88@126.com [School of Software and Communication Engineering, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Qiu, Feng; Huang, Jian-Quan; Deng, Hai-Ming; Yao, Min [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China)

    2016-04-29

    A novel phoxonic crystal using the piezoelectric (PMN-PT) and piezomagnetic (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell (PPSUC) is present, in which dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can be obtained simultaneously. Two categories of phononic band gaps, originating from both the Bragg scattering of acoustic waves in periodic structures at the Brillouin zone boundary and the electromagnetic wave-lattice vibration couplings near the Brillouin zone center, can be observed in the phononic band structures. The general characteristics of the microwave photonic band structures are similar to those of pure piezoelectric or piezomagnetic superlattices, with the major discrepancy being the appearance of nearly dispersionless branches within the microwave photonic band gaps, which show an extremely large group velocity delay. Thus, the properties may also be applied to compact acoustic-microwave devices. - Highlights: • Dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can coexist in the PPSUC. • Two categories of phononic band gaps with different mechanism can be obtained. • Nearly dispersionless branches appear in the microwave photonic band gaps.

  7. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an in balance between the strength (structural integrity....... slender armour units can be studied. by load-cell technique. Moreover, the paper presents DoJos design diagrams for the prediction of both breakage and hydraulic stability...

  8. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an inbalance between the strength (structural integrity...... on slender armour units can be studied by load-cell technique. Moreover, the paper presents Dolos design diagrams for the prediction of both breakage and hydraulic stability....

  9. Analysis of the dependence of lattice deformations in Cu sup II -Co sup II hydroxide nitrate solid solutions on their composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotov, N. (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Applied Mineralogy); Petrov, K. (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry)

    1991-06-01

    The synthesized Cu{sub x}Co{sub 2-x}(OH){sub 3}NO{sub 3} hydroxide nitrate mixed crystals have a monoclinic pseudo-hexagonal lattice. The unit-cell parameters vary non-linearly with composition. In such cases the calculation of the tensor of compositional deformation and the finite Lagrangian strain tensor is a convenient method for the investigation of the structural anisotropy of lattice distortions. The lattice deformation when substituting copper for cobalt can be represented as a two-dimensional shear deformation in the ac plane and a one-dimensional deformation along the b axis. The directions of the largest and smallest deformations are determined by the arrangement of the longest Cu-O bonds in the distorted CuO{sub 6} octahedra. A change in the directions of the principal axes of the tensor of compositional deformation is observed for compositions x=0.8 and x=1.5. (orig.).

  10. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Wind River Basin Province (035) Assessment Units Quarter-Mile Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Cell maps for each oil and gas assessment unit were created by the USGS to illustrate the degree of exploration, type of production, and distribution of production...

  11. Identified metabolic signature for assessing red blood cell unit quality is associated with endothelial damage markers and clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Johansson, Pär I.; Paglia, Giuseppe;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been interest in determining whether older red blood cell (RBC) units have negative clinical effects. Numerous observational studies have shown that older RBC units are an independent factor for patient mortality. However, recently published randomized clinical trials have...

  12. The Lindquist-Wheeler formulation of lattice universes

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Rex G

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the properties of `lattice universes' wherein point masses are arranged in a regular lattice on space-like hypersurfaces; open, flat, and closed universes are considered. The universes are modelled using the Lindquist-Wheeler approximation scheme, which approximates the space-time in each lattice cell by Schwarzschild geometry. It is shown that the resulting dynamics strongly resemble those of the Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universes. The cosmological redshifts for such universes are determined numerically, using a modification of Clifton and Ferreira's approach, and they are found to closely resemble their FLRW counterparts, though with certain differences attributable to the `lumpiness' in the underlying matter content.

  13. Photonic band gap of 2D complex lattice photonic crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Chun-ying; YUAN Li-bo

    2009-01-01

    It is of great significance to present a photonic crystal lattice structure with a wide photonic bandgap. A two-dimension complex lattice photonic crystal is proposed. The photonic crystal is composed of complex lattices with triangular structure, and each single cell is surrounded by six scatterers in an hexagon. The photonic band gaps are calculated based on the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. The results indicate that the photonic crystal has tunable large TM polarization band gap, and a gap-midgap ratio of up to 45.6%.

  14. High quality-factor fano metasurface comprising a single resonator unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Warne, Larry K.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Campione, Salvatore; Brener, Igal; Liu, Sheng

    2017-06-20

    A new monolithic resonator metasurface design achieves ultra-high Q-factors while using only one resonator per unit cell. The metasurface relies on breaking the symmetry of otherwise highly symmetric resonators to induce intra-resonator mixing of bright and dark modes (rather than inter-resonator couplings), and is scalable from the near-infrared to radio frequencies and can be easily implemented in dielectric materials. The resulting high-quality-factor Fano metasurface can be used in many sensing, spectral filtering, and modulation applications.

  15. Unit cell modeling in support of interim performance assessment for low level tank waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, N.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    A unit cell model is used to simulate the base analysis case and related sensitivity cases for the interim performance assessment of low level tank waste disposal. Simulation case results are summarized in terms of fractional contaminant release rates to the vadose zone and to the water table at the unconfined aquifer. Results suggest that the crushed glass water conditioning layer at the top of the facility and the chemical retardation pad at the bottom of the facility can be important components of the facility. Results also suggest that the release rates to the water table are dominated by the release rate from the waste form.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Compressible Fluid on a Square Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Cheng-Hai

    2000-01-01

    A two-level four-direction lattice Boltzmann model is formulated on a square lattice to simulate compressible flows with a high Mach number. The particle velocities are adaptive to the mean velocity and internal energy. Therefore, the mean flow can have a high Mach number. Due to the simple form of the equilibrium distribution, the 4th order velocity tensors are not involved in the calculations. Unlike the standard lattice Boltzmann model, o special treatment is need for the homogeneity of 4th order velocity tensors on square lattices. The Navier-Stokes equations were derived by the Chapman-Enskog method from the BGK Boltzmann equation. The model can be easily extended to three-dimensional cubic lattices. Two-dimensional shock-wave propagation was simulated

  17. Entangling gates in even Euclidean lattices such as Leech lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Planat, Michel

    2010-01-01

    We point out a organic relationship between real entangling n-qubit gates of quantum computation and the group of automorphisms of even Euclidean lattices of the corresponding dimension 2n. The type of entanglement that is found in the gates/generators of Aut() depends on the lattice. In particular, we investigate Zn lattices, Barnes-Wall lattices D4, E8, 16 (associated to n = 2, 3 and 4 qubits), and the Leech lattices h24 and 24 (associated to a 3-qubit/qutrit system). Balanced tripartite entanglement is found to be a basic feature of Aut(), a nding that bears out our recent work related to the Weyl group of E8 [1, 2].

  18. Tunable spin wave spectra in two-dimensional Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} antidot lattices with varying lattice symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, R.; Barman, S.; Saha, S.; Barman, A., E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Otani, Y. [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Ferromagnetic antidot lattices are important systems for magnetic data storage and magnonic devices, and understanding their magnetization dynamics by varying their structural parameters is an important problems in magnetism. Here, we investigate the variation in spin wave spectrum in two-dimensional nanoscale Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} antidot lattices with lattice symmetry. By varying the bias magnetic field values in a broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectrometer, we observed a stark variation in the spin wave spectrum with the variation of lattice symmetry. The simulated mode profiles showed further difference in the spatial nature of the modes between different lattices. While for square and rectangular lattices extended modes are observed in addition to standing spin wave modes, all modes in the hexagonal, honeycomb, and octagonal lattices are either localized or standing waves. In addition, the honeycomb and octagonal lattices showed two different types of modes confined within the honeycomb (octagonal) units and between two such consecutive units. Simulated internal magnetic fields confirm the origin of such a wide variation in the frequency and spatial nature of the spin wave modes. The tunability of spin waves with the variation of lattice symmetry is important for the design of future magnetic data storage and magnonic devices.

  19. Auxiliary power unit based on a solid oxide fuel cell and fuelled with diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jeremy; Boltze, Matthias

    An auxiliary power unit (APU) is presented that is fuelled with diesel, thermally self-sustaining, and based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The APU is rated at 1 kW electrical, and can generate electrical power after a 3 h warm-up phase. System features include a "dry" catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) diesel reformer, a 30 cell SOFC stack with an open cathode, and a porous-media afterburner. The APU does not require a supply of external water. The SOFC stack is an outcome of a development partnership with H.C. Starck GmbH and Fraunhofer IKTS, and is discussed in detail in an accompanying paper.

  20. Root cause analysis of the degradation in a unitized regenerative fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Amit C.; Meenakshi, S.; Ghosh, Prakash C.

    2017-03-01

    The present study emphasizes the possible modes of failure of a unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) when operated in fuel cell as well as in electrolysis mode at different temperatures viz. 30 °C and 60 °C. The carbon based catalyst (Pt/C) and diffusion layers are used to characterize the degradation of the URFCs. The electrolysis mode of operation is found to dominate the root cause of failure with increase in temperature. Agglomeration and loss of catalyst along with delamination of electrode from membrane are observed. Membrane degradation owing to it's structural as well as chemical damage is seen to be prominent at higher temperature. Characterization techniques such as SEM, TEM and ICP-AES confirm the study showcasing the effect.

  1. Optimizing energy management of decentralized photovoltaic. Fuel cell - direct storage - power supply units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocklisch, Thilo; Schufft, Wolfgang; Bocklisch, Steffen [Chemnitz Univ. of Technology (TUC) (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a new optimizing energy management concept for decentralized power supply units. Main goal is the coordinated utilization of dynamically controllable combined-heat-and-power-plants (e.g. fuel cell cogeneration plants) and electrochemical direct storages (e.g. future electric car batteries) for the active balancing of fluctuating renewable energy generation (e.g. building integrated photovoltaics) and fluctuation electricity consumption. The self-utilization and partial storage of renewable energy helps to stabilize the grid in a ''bottom-up'' approach. The new energy mangement concept features a three-layer control structure, which aims for the optimization of the power flows, minimizing the fuel consumption and the dynamic stress imposed onto the fuel cell. (orig.)

  2. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R.

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/alpha, where alpha is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit alpha yields 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics.

  3. Dark matter on the lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Randy

    2014-01-01

    Several collaborations have recently performed lattice calculations aimed specifically at dark matter, including work with SU(2), SU(3), SU(4) and SO(4) gauge theories to represent the dark sector. Highlights of these studies are presented here, after a reminder of how lattice calculations in QCD itself are helping with the hunt for dark matter.

  4. Fast simulation of lattice systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, H.; Kaznelson, E.; Hansen, Frank;

    1983-01-01

    A new computer system with an entirely new processor design is described and demonstrated on a very small trial lattice. The new computer simulates systems of differential equations of the order of 104 times faster than present day computers and we describe how the machine can be applied to lattice...

  5. Branes and integrable lattice models

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Junya

    2016-01-01

    This is a brief review of my work on the correspondence between four-dimensional $\\mathcal{N} = 1$ supersymmetric field theories realized by brane tilings and two-dimensional integrable lattice models. I explain how to construct integrable lattice models from extended operators in partially topological quantum field theories, and elucidate the correspondence as an application of this construction.

  6. Charmed baryons on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanath, M

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the significance of charm baryon spectroscopy in hadron physics and review the recent developments of the spectra of charmed baryons in lattice calculations. Special emphasis is given on the recent studies of highly excited charm baryon states. Recent precision lattice measurements of the low lying charm and bottom baryons are also reviewed.

  7. Quantum phases in optical lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickerscheid, Dennis Brian Martin

    2006-01-01

    An important new development in the field of ultracold atomic gases is the study of the properties of these gases in a so-called optical lattice. An optical lattice is a periodic trapping potential for the atoms that is formed by the interference pattern of a few laser beams. A reason for the

  8. Spherical TiO2 aggregates with different building units for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Su, Xunjia; Hou, Genliang; Bi, Song; Xiao, Zhou; Jia, Haipeng

    2013-09-07

    Tailoring the architectures of spherical TiO2 aggregates is crucial to obtain superior photovoltaic properties and promote their application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Herein, we synthesized spherical TiO2 aggregates using different building units, including nanocrystallites, nanorods, nanosheets, and nanotubes, via a hydrothermal method, and studied the effect of the building units on the performances of DSSCs. The aggregates assembled by uniform nanosheet and nanotube building units were synthesized with the use of spherical TiO2 nanorod aggregates as titanium sources in an alkaline hydrothermal reaction. Compared with TiO2 nanoparticles, the spherical TiO2 aggregates possess higher surface area, more efficient light scattering ability, and better electron transport properties. Among the four types of spherical TiO2 aggregates; the nanorod, nanotube, and nanosheet aggregates demonstrate better electron transport properties than the nanocrystallite aggregates; the nanotube and nanosheet aggregates exhibit more efficient light scattering than the nanocrystallite and nanorod aggregates; and the nanotube aggregates show the highest surface area. Thus the DSSC based on nanotube aggregates exhibited the highest energy conversion efficiency of 7.48%, which is 16.0%, 9.7%, and 19.5% higher than those of the DSSCs based on the nanosheet, nanorod, and nanocrystallite aggregates, respectively.

  9. Lattice Induced Transparency in Metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Singh, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Lattice modes are intrinsic to the periodic structures and their occurrence can be easily tuned and controlled by changing the lattice constant of the structural array. Previous studies have revealed excitation of sharp absorption resonances due to lattice mode coupling with the plasmonic resonances. Here, we report the first experimental observation of a lattice induced transparency (LIT) by coupling the first order lattice mode (FOLM) to the structural resonance of a metamaterial resonator at terahertz frequencies. The observed sharp transparency is a result of the destructive interference between the bright mode and the FOLM mediated dark mode. As the FOLM is swept across the metamaterial resonance, the transparency band undergoes large change in its bandwidth and resonance position. Besides controlling the transparency behaviour, LIT also shows a huge enhancement in the Q-factor and record high group delay of 28 ps, which could be pivotal in ultrasensitive sensing and slow light device applications.

  10. Lattice models of ionic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelev, Vladimir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical analysis of Coulomb systems on lattices in general dimensions is presented. The thermodynamics is developed using Debye-Hückel theory with ion-pairing and dipole-ion solvation, specific calculations being performed for three-dimensional lattices. As for continuum electrolytes, low-density results for simple cubic (sc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and face-centered cubic (fcc) lattices indicate the existence of gas-liquid phase separation. The predicted critical densities have values comparable to those of continuum ionic systems, while the critical temperatures are 60%-70% higher. However, when the possibility of sublattice ordering as well as Debye screening is taken into account systematically, order-disorder transitions and a tricritical point are found on sc and bcc lattices, and gas-liquid coexistence is suppressed. Our results agree with recent Monte Carlo simulations of lattice electrolytes.

  11. Lattice quantum chromodynamics practical essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Knechtli, Francesco; Peardon, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the techniques central to lattice quantum chromodynamics, including modern developments. The book has four chapters. The first chapter explains the formulation of quarks and gluons on a Euclidean lattice. The second chapter introduces Monte Carlo methods and details the numerical algorithms to simulate lattice gauge fields. Chapter three explains the mathematical and numerical techniques needed to study quark fields and the computation of quark propagators. The fourth chapter is devoted to the physical observables constructed from lattice fields and explains how to measure them in simulations. The book is aimed at enabling graduate students who are new to the field to carry out explicitly the first steps and prepare them for research in lattice QCD.

  12. Unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing system for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Park, Jeong Hun; Kang, Tae-Yun; Seol, Young-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-03-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in the regeneration of artificial tissues or organs. A scaffold is a porous structure with a micro-scale inner architecture in the range of several to several hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, computer-aided construction of scaffolds should provide sophisticated functionality for porous structure design and a tool path generation strategy that can achieve micro-scale architecture. In this study, a new unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) system was developed for the automated design and fabrication of a porous structure with micro-scale inner architecture that can be applied to composite tissue regeneration. The CAM system was developed by first defining a data structure for the computing process of a unit cell representing a single pore structure. Next, an algorithm and software were developed and applied to construct porous structures with a single or multiple pore design using solid freeform fabrication technology and a 3D tooth/spine computer-aided design model. We showed that this system is quite feasible for the design and fabrication of a scaffold for tissue engineering.

  13. Imaging the impact on cuprate superconductivity of varying the interatomic distances within individual crystal unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, J A; Lee, Jinho; Wang, M; McElroy, K; Fujita, K; Andersen, B M; Hirschfeld, P J; Eisaki, H; Uchida, S; Davis, J C

    2008-03-04

    Many theoretical models of high-temperature superconductivity focus only on the doping dependence of the CuO(2)-plane electronic structure. However, such models are manifestly insufficient to explain the strong variations in superconducting critical temperature, T(c), among cuprates that have identical hole density but are crystallographically different outside of the CuO(2) plane. A key challenge, therefore, has been to identify a predominant out-of-plane influence controlling the superconductivity, with much attention focusing on the distance d(A) between the apical oxygen and the planar copper atom. Here we report direct determination of how variations in interatomic distances within individual crystalline unit cells affect the superconducting energy-gap maximum Delta of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta). In this material, quasiperiodic variations of unit cell geometry occur in the form of a bulk crystalline "supermodulation." Within each supermodulation period, we find approximately 9 +/- 1% cosinusoidal variation in local Delta that is anticorrelated with the associated d(A) variations. Furthermore, we show that phenomenological consistency would exist between these effects and the random Delta variations found near dopant atoms if the primary effect of the interstitial dopant atom is to displace the apical oxygen so as to diminish d(A) or tilt the CuO(5) pyramid. Thus, we reveal a strong, nonrandom out-of-plane effect on cuprate superconductivity at atomic scale.

  14. Intra-unit-cell nematic charge order in the titanium-oxypnictide family of superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Bozin, Emil S.; Hu, Hefei; Zhu, Yimei; Nozaki, Yasumasa; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Yin, Wei-Guo; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the role played by broken-symmetry states such as charge, spin and orbital orders in the mechanism of emergent properties, such as high-temperature superconductivity, is a major current topic in materials research. That the order may be within one unit cell, such as nematic, was only recently considered theoretically, but its observation in the iron-pnictide and doped cuprate superconductors places it at the forefront of current research. Here, we show that the recently discovered BaTi2Sb2O superconductor and its parent compound BaTi2As2O form a symmetry-breaking nematic ground state that can be naturally explained as an intra-unit-cell nematic charge order with d-wave symmetry, pointing to the ubiquity of the phenomenon. These findings, together with the key structural features in these materials being intermediate between the cuprate and iron-pnictide high-temperature superconducting materials, render the titanium oxypnictides an important new material system to understand the nature of nematic order and its relationship to superconductivity.

  15. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  16. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. A report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide members of the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells with information regarding collaborative opportunities in the United States. The report is designed to provide an overview of key issues and activities and to provide guidance on strategies for finding U.S. research and commercial partners and gaining access to the U.S. market. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the key drivers of policy at the federal and state government levels regarding hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and provides a perspective of the U.S. industry and key players. It also suggests three general pathways for accessing U.S. opportunities: enhancing visibility; developing vendor relationships; and establishing a formal presence in the U.S. The next sections summarize focus areas for commercial and research activity that currently are of the greatest interest in the U.S. Section 2 describes major programs within the federal government and national laboratories, and discusses various methods for identifying R and D funding opportunities, with an overview of federal acquisition regulations. Section 3 reviews the efforts of several state governments engaging the fuel cell industry as an economic driver and presents an overview of acquisition at the state level. Section 4 discusses university research and development (R and D) and university-industry partnerships. There are 12 appendices attached to the report. These appendices provide more detailed information regarding the key federal government agencies involved in fuel cells and hydrogen, state-specific policies and activities, national laboratories and universities, and other information regarding the fuel cell and hydrogen industry in the U.S. (Author)

  17. NMR-Based Diffusion Lattice Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g. about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles, that these experiments can be used to determine the exact shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open systems. In this theoretical work, we show that the full structure information of periodic open systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called 'SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time-intervals' (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion weighting gradient pulses with different amplitudes. The structural information is obtained by an iterative technique relying on a Gaussian envelope model of the diffusion propagator. Two solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a cubic lattice of triangles.

  18. STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

  19. Mechanotransduction of mesenchymal melanoma cell invasion into 3D collagen lattices: Filopod-mediated extension-relaxation cycles and force anisotropy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starke, J.; Maaser, K.; Wehrle-Haller, B.; Friedl, P.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal cell migration in interstitial tissue is a cyclic process of coordinated leading edge protrusion, adhesive interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) ligands, cell contraction followed by retraction and movement of the cell rear. During migration through 3D tissue, the force fields

  20. Wannier permanent wave functions for featureless bosonic mott insulators on the 1/3-filled kagome lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, S A; Kimchi, Itamar; Turner, Ari M; Stamper-Kurn, D M; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2013-03-22

    We study Bose-Hubbard models on tight-binding, non-Bravais lattices, with a filling of one boson per unit cell--and thus fractional site filling. We discuss situations where no classical bosonic insulator, which is a product state of particles on independent sites, is admitted. Nevertheless, we show that it is possible to construct a quantum Mott insulator of bosons if a trivial band insulator of fermions is possible at the same filling. The ground state wave function is simply a permanent of exponentially localized Wannier orbitals. Such a Wannier permanent wave function is featureless in that it respects all lattice symmetries and is the unique ground state of a parent Hamiltonian that we construct. Motivated by the recent experimental demonstration of a kagome optical lattice of bosons, we study this lattice at 1/3 site filling. Previous approaches to this problem have invariably produced either broken-symmetry states or topological order. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that a featureless insulator is a possible alternative and is the exact ground state of a local Hamiltonian. We briefly comment on the experimental relevance of our results to ultracold atoms as well as to 1/3 magnetization plateaus for kagome spin models in an applied field.

  1. Greens function of a free massive scalar field on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Borasoy, B

    2005-01-01

    We propose a method to calculate the Greens function of a free massive scalar field on the lattice numerically to very high precision. For masses m < 2 (in lattice units) the massive Greens function can be expressed recursively in terms of the massless Greens function and just two additional mass-independent constants.

  2. Formation of Bragg Band Gaps in Anisotropic Phononic Crystals Analyzed With the Empty Lattice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Feng Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bragg band gaps of phononic crystals generally, but not always, open at Brillouin zone boundaries. The commonly accepted explanation stems from the empty lattice model: assuming a small material contrast between the constituents of the unit cell, avoided crossings in the phononic band structure appear at frequencies and wavenumbers corresponding to band intersections; for scalar waves the lowest intersections coincide with boundaries of the first Brillouin zone. However, if a phononic crystal contains elastically anisotropic materials, its overall symmetry is not dictated solely by the lattice symmetry. We construct an empty lattice model for phononic crystals made of isotropic and anisotropic materials, based on their slowness curves. We find that, in the anisotropic case, avoided crossings generally do not appear at the boundaries of traditionally defined Brillouin zones. Furthermore, the Bragg “planes” which give rise to phononic band gaps, are generally not flat planes but curved surfaces. The same is found to be the case for avoided crossings between shear (transverse and longitudinal bands in the isotropic case.

  3. Measuring the Scalar Curvature with Clocks and Photons: Voronoi-Delaunay Lattices in Regge Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Warner; McDonald, Jonathan

    2008-04-01

    The Riemann scalar curvature plays a central role in Einstein's geometric theory of gravity. We describe a new geometric construction of this scalar curvature invariant at an event (vertex) in a discrete spacetime geometry. This allows one to constructively measure the scalar curvature using only clocks and photons. Given recent interest in discrete pre-geometric models of quantum gravity, we believe it is ever so important to reconstruct the curvature scalar with respect to a finite number of communicating observers. This derivation makes use of a fundamental lattice cell built from elements inherited from both the original simplicial (Delaunay) spacetime and its circumcentric dual (Voronoi) lattice. The orthogonality properties between these two lattices yield an expression for the vertex-based scalar curvature which is strikingly similar to the corresponding hinge-based expression in Regge Calculus (deficit angle per unit Voronoi dual area). In particular, we show that the scalar curvature is simply a vertex-based weighted average of deficits per weighted average of dual areas.

  4. Impact of the irregular microgeometry of polyurethane foam on the macroscopic acoustic behavior predicted by a unit-cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutres, O; Ouisse, M; Atalla, N; Ichchou, M

    2014-10-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of the macroscopic sound absorption behavior of highly porous polyurethane foams using two unit-cell microstructure-based models recently developed by Doutres, Atalla, and Dong [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064901 (2011); J. Appl. Phys. 113, 054901 (2013)]. In these models, the porous material is idealized as a packing of a tetrakaidecahedra unit-cell representative of the disordered network that constitutes the porous frame. The non-acoustic parameters involved in the classical Johnson-Champoux-Allard model (i.e., porosity, airflow resistivity, tortuosity, etc.) are derived from characteristic properties of the unit-cell and semi-empirical relationships. A global sensitivity analysis is performed on these two models in order to investigate how the variability associated with the measured unit-cell characteristics affects the models outputs. This allows identification of the possible limitations of a unit-cell micro-macro approach due to microstructure irregularity. The sensitivity analysis mainly shows that for moderately and highly reticulated polyurethane foams, the strut length parameter is the key parameter since it greatly impacts three important non-acoustic parameters and causes large uncertainty on the sound absorption coefficient even if its measurement variability is moderate. For foams with a slight inhomogeneity and anisotropy, a micro-macro model associated to cell size measurements should be preferred.

  5. Diffractive stacks of metamaterial lattices with a complex unit cell : Self-consistent long-range bianisotropic interactions in experiment and theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwadrin, A.; Koenderink, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces and metamaterials promise arbitrary rerouting of light using two-dimensional (2D) planar arrangements of electric and magnetic scatterers, respectively, 3D stacks built out of such 2D planes. An important problem is how to self-consistently model the response of these systems in a

  6. SQUID metamaterials on a Lieb lattice: From flat-band to nonlinear localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2017-08-01

    The dynamic equations for the fluxes through the superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that form a two-dimensional metamaterial on a Lieb lattice are derived and then linearized around zero flux to obtain the linear frequency spectrum according to the standard procedure. That spectrum due to the Lieb lattice geometry possesses a frequency band structure exhibiting two characteristic features: two dispersive bands, which form a Dirac cone at the corners of the first Brillouin zone and a flat band crossing the Dirac points. It is demonstrated numerically that localized states can be excited in the system when it is initialized with single-site excitations; depending on the amplitude of those initial states, the localization is either due to the flat-band or to nonlinear effects. Flat-band localized states are formed in the nearly linear regime, whereas localized excitations of the discrete breather type are formed in the nonlinear regime. These two regimes are separated by an intermediate turbulent regime for which no localization is observed. Notably, initial single-site excitations of only edge SQUIDs of a unit cell may end up in flat-band localized states; no such states are formed for initial single-site excitations of a corner SQUID of a unit cell. The degree of localization of the resulting states is in any case quantified using well-established measures, such as the energetic participation ratio and the second moment.

  7. Irreversible stochastic processes on lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nord, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Models for irreversible random or cooperative filling of lattices are required to describe many processes in chemistry and physics. Since the filling is assumed to be irreversible, even the stationary, saturation state is not in equilibrium. The kinetics and statistics of these processes are described by recasting the master equations in infinite hierarchical form. Solutions can be obtained by implementing various techniques: refinements in these solution techniques are presented. Programs considered include random dimer, trimer, and tetramer filling of 2D lattices, random dimer filling of a cubic lattice, competitive filling of two or more species, and the effect of a random distribution of inactive sites on the filling. Also considered is monomer filling of a linear lattice with nearest neighbor cooperative effects and solve for the exact cluster-size distribution for cluster sizes up to the asymptotic regime. Additionally, a technique is developed to directly determine the asymptotic properties of the cluster size distribution. Finally cluster growth is considered via irreversible aggregation involving random walkers. In particular, explicit results are provided for the large-lattice-size asymptotic behavior of trapping probabilities and average walk lengths for a single walker on a lattice with multiple traps. Procedures for exact calculation of these quantities on finite lattices are also developed.

  8. Lattice topology dictates photon statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Kondakci, H Esat; Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of coherent light through a disordered network is accompanied by randomization and possible conversion into thermal light. Here, we show that network topology plays a decisive role in determining the statistics of the emerging field if the underlying lattice satisfies chiral symmetry. By examining one-dimensional arrays of randomly coupled waveguides arranged on linear and ring topologies, we are led to a remarkable prediction: the field circularity and the photon statistics in ring lattices are dictated by its parity -- whether the number of sites is even or odd, while the same quantities are insensitive to the parity of a linear lattice. Adding or subtracting a single lattice site can switch the photon statistics from super-thermal to sub-thermal, or vice versa. This behavior is understood by examining the real and imaginary fields on a chiral-symmetric lattice, which form two strands that interleave along the lattice sites. These strands can be fully braided around an even-sited ring lattice th...

  9. Techno-economic analysis of fuel cell auxiliary power units as alternative to idling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Semant; Chen, Hsieh-Yeh; Schwank, Johannes

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of fuel-cell-based auxiliary power units (APUs), with emphasis on applications in the trucking industry and the military. The APU system is intended to reduce the need for discretionary idling of diesel engines or gas turbines. The analysis considers the options for on-board fuel processing of diesel and compares the two leading fuel cell contenders for automotive APU applications: proton exchange membrane fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell. As options for on-board diesel reforming, partial oxidation and auto-thermal reforming are considered. Finally, using estimated and projected efficiency data, fuel consumption patterns, capital investment, and operating costs of fuel-cell APUs, an economic evaluation of diesel-based APUs is presented, with emphasis on break-even periods as a function of fuel cost, investment cost, idling time, and idling efficiency. The analysis shows that within the range of parameters studied, there are many conditions where deployment of an SOFC-based APU is economically viable. Our analysis indicates that at an APU system cost of 100 kW -1, the economic break-even period is within 1 year for almost the entire range of conditions. At 500 kW -1 investment cost, a 2-year break-even period is possible except for the lowest end of the fuel consumption range considered. However, if the APU investment cost is 3000 kW -1, break-even would only be possible at the highest fuel consumption scenarios. For Abram tanks, even at typical land delivered fuel costs, a 2-year break-even period is possible for APU investment costs as high as 1100 kW -1.

  10. Bounds for solid angles of lattices of rank three

    CERN Document Server

    Fukshansky, Lenny

    2010-01-01

    We find sharp absolute constants $C_1$ and $C_2$ with the following property: every well-rounded lattice of rank 3 in a Euclidean space has a minimal basis so that the solid angle spanned by these basis vectors lies in the interval $[C_1,C_2]$. In fact, we show that these absolute bounds hold for a larger class of lattices than just well-rounded, and the upper bound holds for all. We state a technical condition on the lattice that may prevent it from satisfying the absolute lower bound on the solid angle, in which case we derive a lower bound in terms of the ratios of successive minima of the lattice. We use this result to show that among all spherical triangles on the unit sphere in $\\mathbb R^N$ with vertices on the minimal vectors of a lattice, the smallest possible area is achieved by a configuration of minimal vectors of the (normalized) face centered cubic lattice in $\\mathbb R^3$. Such spherical configurations come up in connection with the kissing number problem.

  11. PLASTIC ZONE OF SEMI-INFINITE CRACK INPLANAR KAGOME AND TRIANGULAR LATTICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinming Qiu; Lianghong He; Yueqiang Qian; Xiong Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The fracture investigations of the planar lattices made of ductile cell walls are cur-rently limited to bending-dominated hexagonal honeycomb. In this paper, the plastic zones of stretching-dominated lattices, including Kagome and triangular lattices, are estimated by ana-lyzing their effective yield loci. The normalized in-plane yield loci of these two lattices are almost identical convex curves enclosed by 4 straight lines, which is almost independent of the relative density but is highly sensitive to the principal stress directions. Therefore, the plastic zones around the crack tip of Kagome and triangular are estimated to be quite different to those of the con-tinuum solid and also hexagonal lattice. The plastic zones predictions by convex yield surfaces of both lattices are validated by FE calculations, although the shear lag region caused by non-local bending effect in the Kagome lattice enlarges the plastic zone in cases of small ratio of Tp/l.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann model for nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuan Yimin; Yao Zhengping [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, School of Power Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2005-01-01

    A nanofluid is a particle suspension that consists of base liquids and nanoparticles and has great potential for heat transfer enhancement. By accounting for the external and internal forces acting on the suspended nanoparticles and interactions among the nanoparticles and fluid particles, a lattice Boltzmann model is proposed for simulating flow and energy transport processes inside the nanofluids. First, we briefly introduce the conventional lattice Boltzmann model for multicomponent systems. Then, we discuss the irregular motion of the nanoparticles and inherent dynamic behavior of nanofluids and describe a lattice Boltzmann model for simulating nanofluids. Finally, we conduct some calculations for the distribution of the suspended nanoparticles. (orig.)

  13. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Avadh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bishop, Alan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Law, K J H [UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS; Kevrekidis, P G [UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  14. Lattice sums then and now

    CERN Document Server

    Borwein, J M; McPhedran, R C

    2013-01-01

    The study of lattice sums began when early investigators wanted to go from mechanical properties of crystals to the properties of the atoms and ions from which they were built (the literature of Madelung's constant). A parallel literature was built around the optical properties of regular lattices of atoms (initiated by Lord Rayleigh, Lorentz and Lorenz). For over a century many famous scientists and mathematicians have delved into the properties of lattices, sometimes unwittingly duplicating the work of their predecessors. Here, at last, is a comprehensive overview of the substantial body of

  15. Commercialization of New Lattice-Matched Multi-Junction Solar Cells Based on Dilute Nitrides: July 8, 2010 - March 7, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herb, J.

    2012-04-01

    Final Technical Progress Report for PV Incubator subcontract NAT-0-99013-03. The overall objective of this Incubator subcontract was to complete the work necessary to make commercial ready solar cells using the dilute nitride technology. The specific objectives of this program were aimed at completing the development of a triple-junction solar cell that incorporates a GaInNAs {approx}1eV subcell to the point of commercial readiness, and determining the cell reliability and, if necessary, identifying and eliminating process or material related issues that lead to early-life cell failures. There were three major objectives for Phase 1, each of which focuses on a key element of the solar cell that determines its performance in a commercial CPV system. One objective was to optimize the quality and performance of the key individual components making up the solar cell structure and then to optimize the integration of these components into a complete triple-junction cell. A second objective was to design and test anti-reflective coating that maximizes the light coupled into a 3J cell with a {approx}1 eV bottom cell bandgap. The third objective was to develop Highly Accelerated Life Tests (HALT) protocols and tools for identifying and correcting potential reliability problems. The Phase 2 objectives were a continuation of the work begun in Phase 1 but aimed at optimizing cell performance for commercial requirements. Phase 2 had four primary objectives: (1) develop a glass-matched anti-reflective coating (ARC) and optimize the cell/ARC to give good performance at 60C operating temperature, (2) optimize the cell for good operation at 60C and high concentration, and (3) complete the light biased HALT system and use it to determine what, if any, failures are observed, and (4) determine the reliability limits of the optimized cell.

  16. Lattice Trace Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Jefferies

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A bounded linear operator T on a Hilbert space ℋ is trace class if its singular values are summable. The trace class operators on ℋ form an operator ideal and in the case that ℋ is finite-dimensional, the trace tr(T of T is given by ∑jajj for any matrix representation {aij} of T. In applications of trace class operators to scattering theory and representation theory, the subject is complicated by the fact that if k is an integral kernel of the operator T on the Hilbert space L2(μ with μ a σ-finite measure, then k(x,x may not be defined, because the diagonal {(x,x} may be a set of (μ⊗μ-measure zero. The present note describes a class of linear operators acting on a Banach function space X which forms a lattice ideal of operators on X, rather than an operator ideal, but coincides with the collection of hermitian positive trace class operators in the case of X=L2(μ.

  17. Strong-coupling study of the Gribov ambiguity in lattice Landau gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Axel [Karl-Franzens Universitaet Graz, Institut fuer Physik, Graz (Austria); Pawlowski, Jan M.; Spielmann, Daniel [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Sternbeck, Andre [University of Adelaide, Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter, SA, Adelaide (Australia); Universitaet Regensburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Regensburg (Germany); Smekal, Lorenz von [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    We study the strong-coupling limit {beta}=0 of lattice SU(2) Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory. In this limit the lattice spacing is infinite, and thus all momenta in physical units are infinitesimally small. Hence, the infrared behavior can be assessed at sufficiently large lattice momenta. Our results show that at the lattice volumes used here, the Gribov ambiguity has an enormous effect on the ghost propagator in all dimensions. This underlines the severity of the Gribov problem and calls for refined studies also at finite {beta}. In turn, the gluon propagator only mildly depends on the Gribov ambiguity. (orig.)

  18. On Scale Determination in Lattice QCD with Dynamical Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    De, A K; Maiti, J

    2008-01-01

    Dependence of $a/r_c$ (inverse Sommer parameter in units of lattice spacing $a$) on $am_q$ (quark mass in lattice unit) has been observed in all lattice QCD simulations with sea quarks including the ones with improved actions. How much of this dependence is a scaling violation has remained an intriguing question. Our approach has been to investigate the issue with an action with known lattice artifacts, i.e., the standard Wilson quark and gauge action with $\\beta=5.6$ and 2 degenerate flavors of sea quarks on $ 16^3 \\times 32 $ lattices. In order to study in detail the sea quark mass dependence, measurements are carried out at eight values of the Wilson hopping parameter $\\kappa$ in the range 0.156 - 0.158 corresponding to PCAC quark mass values $am_q$ from about 0.07 to below 0.015. We analyze the static potential by fitting to the familiar phenomenological form and extract $a/r_c$. Though scaling violations may indeed be present for relatively large $am_q$, a consistent scenario at sufficiently small $am_q$...

  19. On Scale Determination in Lattice QCD with Dynamical Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    De, Asit K; Maiti, Jyotirmoy

    2008-01-01

    Dependence of a/r_c (inverse Sommer parameter in units of lattice spacing a) on am_q (quark mass in lattice unit) has been observed in all lattice QCD simulations with sea quarks including the ones with improved actions. How much of this dependence is a scaling violation has remained an intriguing question. Our approach has been to investigate the issue with an action with known lattice artifacts, i.e., the standard Wilson quark and gauge action with beta=5.6 and 2 degenerate flavors of sea quarks on 16^3 times 32 lattices. In order to study in detail the sea quark mass dependence, measurements are carried out at eight values of the PCAC quark mass values am_q from about 0.07 to below 0.015. Though scaling violations may indeed be present for relatively large am_q, a consistent scenario at sufficiently small am_q seems to emerge in the mass-independent scheme where for a fixed beta, 1/r_0 and sqrt{sigma} have linear dependence on m_q as physical effects similar to the quark mass dependence of the rho mass. We...

  20. Discrete kinetic and lattice Boltzmann formulations for reaction cross-diffusion systems and their hyperbolic extensions in chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellar, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present discrete kinetic and lattice Boltzmann formulations for reaction cross-diffusion systems, as commonly used to model microbiological chemotaxis and macroscopic predator-prey interactions, and their hyperbolic extensions with fluid-like persistence terms. For example, the canonical Patlak-Keller-Segal model for chemotaxis involves a flux of cells up the gradient of a chemical secreted by the cells, in addition to the usual down-gradient diffusive fluxes. Existing lattice Boltzmann approaches for such systems use finite difference approximations to compute the flux of cells due to the chemical gradient. The resulting coupling between, and necessary synchronisation of the evolution of, adjacent grid points greatly complicates boundary conditions, and efficient implementation on graphical processing units (GPUs). We present a kinetic formulation using cross-collisions between bases of moments for the two sets of distribution functions to couple the fluxes of the two species, from which we construct lattice Boltzmann algorithms using second-order Strang splitting. We demonstrate an efficient GPU implementation, and verify second-order spatial convergence towards spectral solutions for benchmark problems such as the finite-time blow-up in the Patlak-Keller-Segal model.

  1. Algorithm and program for precise determination of unit-cell parameters of single crystal taking into account the sample eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Smirnova, E. S.; Verin, I. A.; Bolotina, N. B.

    2017-07-01

    A technique has been developed to refine the unit-cell parameters of single crystals with minimization of the influence of instrumental errors on the result. The corresponding computational procedure HuberUB is added to the software package of Huber-5042 diffractometer with a point detector and closedcycle helium cryostat Displex DE-202. The parameters of unit cell, its orientation, the goniometer zero angles, the sample eccentricity, the distances in the goniometer, and the radiation wavelength were refined by the nonlinear least-squares method, which allows imposition of constraints on the unit-cell parameters, depending on the crystal symmetry. The technique is approved on a LuB12 single crystal. The unit-cell parameters are determined in a temperature range of 20-295 K, with an absolute error not larger than 0.0004 Å (the relative error is of 5 × 10-5). The estimates of the unit-cell parameters obtained by the proposed method are evidenced to be unbiased. Some specific features of the behavior of parameters in the ranges of 120-140 and 20-50 K are revealed, which correlate with the anomalies of the physical properties of the crystal.

  2. Exfoliation of natural van der Waals heterostructures to a single unit cell thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velický, Matěj; Toth, Peter S.; Rakowski, Alexander M.; Rooney, Aidan P.; Kozikov, Aleksey; Woods, Colin R.; Mishchenko, Artem; Fumagalli, Laura; Yin, Jun; Zólyomi, Viktor; Georgiou, Thanasis; Haigh, Sarah J.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Dryfe, Robert A. W.

    2017-02-01

    Weak interlayer interactions in van der Waals crystals facilitate their mechanical exfoliation to monolayer and few-layer two-dimensional materials, which often exhibit striking physical phenomena absent in their bulk form. Here we utilize mechanical exfoliation to produce a two-dimensional form of a mineral franckeite and show that the phase segregation of chemical species into discrete layers at the sub-nanometre scale facilitates franckeite's layered structure and basal cleavage down to a single unit cell thickness. This behaviour is likely to be common in a wider family of complex minerals and could be exploited for a single-step synthesis of van der Waals heterostructures, as an alternative to artificial stacking of individual two-dimensional crystals. We demonstrate p-type electrical conductivity and remarkable electrochemical properties of the exfoliated crystals, showing promise for a range of applications, and use the density functional theory calculations of franckeite's electronic band structure to rationalize the experimental results.

  3. Prognosis of Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgaard, Sidsel Christy; Nielsen, Jonas; Lindmark, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a procedure with inherent complications and intensive care may be necessary. We evaluated the short- and long-term outcomes of the HSCT recipients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We...... ventilation had a statistically significant effect on in-ICU (p = 0.02), 6-month (p = 0.049) and 1-year (p = 0.014) mortality. Renal replacement therapy also had a statistically significant effect on in-hospital (p = 0.038) and 6-month (p = 0.026) mortality. Short ICU admissions, i.e. ... to the ICU was confirmed in our study. Mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy and an ICU admission of ≥10 days were each risk factors for mortality in the first year after ICU admission....

  4. An explicit algorithm for fully flexible unit cell simulation with recursive thermostat chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Cho, Maenghyo

    2008-10-28

    Through the combination of the recursive multiple thermostat (RMT) Nose-Poincare and Parrinello-Rahman methods, the recursive multiple thermostat chained fully flexible unit cell (RMT-NsigmaT) molecular dynamics method is proposed for isothermal-isobaric simulation. The RMT method is known to have the advantage of achieving the ergodicity that is required for canonical sampling of the harmonic oscillator. Thus, an explicit time integration algorithm is developed for RMT-NsigmaT. We examine the ergodicity for various parameters of RMT-NsigmaT using bulk and thin film structures with different numbers of copper atoms and thicknesses in various environments. Through the numerical simulations, we conclude that the RMT-NsigmaT method is advantageous in the cases of lower temperatures.

  5. A diesel fuel processor for fuel-cell-based auxiliary power unit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsun, Remzi Can; Krekel, Daniel; Pasel, Joachim; Prawitz, Matthias; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-07-01

    Producing a hydrogen-rich gas from diesel fuel enables the efficient generation of electricity in a fuel-cell-based auxiliary power unit. In recent years, significant progress has been achieved in diesel reforming. One issue encountered is the stable operation of water-gas shift reactors with real reformates. A new fuel processor is developed using a commercial shift catalyst. The system is operated using optimized start-up and shut-down strategies. Experiments with diesel and kerosene fuels show slight performance drops in the shift reactor during continuous operation for 100 h. CO concentrations much lower than the target value are achieved during system operation in auxiliary power unit mode at partial loads of up to 60%. The regeneration leads to full recovery of the shift activity. Finally, a new operation strategy is developed whereby the gas hourly space velocity of the shift stages is re-designed. This strategy is validated using different diesel and kerosene fuels, showing a maximum CO concentration of 1.5% at the fuel processor outlet under extreme conditions, which can be tolerated by a high-temperature PEFC. The proposed operation strategy solves the issue of strong performance drop in the shift reactor and makes this technology available for reducing emissions in the transportation sector.

  6. Lattice radial quantization by cubature

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Basic aspects of a program to put field theories quantized in radial coordinates on the lattice are presented. Only scalar fields are discussed. Simple examples are solved to illustrate the strategy when applied to the 3D Ising model.

  7. Nuclear models on a lattice

    CERN Document Server

    De Soto, F; Carbonell, J; Leroy, J P; Pène, O; Roiesnel, C; Boucaud, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first results of a quantum field approach to nuclear models obtained by lattice techniques. Renormalization effects for fermion mass and coupling constant in case of scalar and pseudoscalar interaction lagrangian densities are discussed.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of triclinic lysozyme in a crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowski, Pawel A; Liu, Chunmei; Deckman, Jason; Case, David A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals can enlighten interpretation of experimental X-ray crystallography data and elucidate structural dynamics and heterogeneity in biomolecular crystals. Furthermore, because of the direct comparison against experimental data, they can inform assessment of molecular dynamics methods and force fields. We present microsecond scale results for triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme in a supercell consisting of 12 independent unit cells using four contemporary force fields (Amber ff99SB, ff14ipq, ff14SB, and CHARMM 36) in crystalline and solvated states (for ff14SB only). We find the crystal simulations consistent across multiple runs of the same force field and robust to various solvent equilibration schemes. However, convergence is slow compared with solvent simulations. All the tested force fields reproduce experimental structural and dynamic properties well, but Amber ff14SB maintains structure and reproduces fluctuations closest to the experimental model: its average backbone structure differs from the deposited structure by 0.37Å; by contrast, the average backbone structure in solution differs from the deposited by 0.65Å. All the simulations are affected by a small progressive deterioration of the crystal lattice, presumably due to imperfect modeling of hydrogen bonding and other crystal contact interactions; this artifact is smallest in ff14SB, with average lattice positions deviating by 0.20Å from ideal. Side-chain disorder is surprisingly low with fewer than 30% of the nonglycine or alanine residues exhibiting significantly populated alternate rotamers. Our results provide helpful insight into the methodology of biomolecular crystal simulations and indicate directions for future work to obtain more accurate energy models for molecular dynamics.

  9. Baryon spectroscopy in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek B. Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; David Richards; Anthony G. Williams; James Zanotti

    2004-04-01

    We review recent developments in the study of excited baryon spectroscopy in lattice QCD. After introducing the basic methods used to extract masses from correlation functions, we discuss various interpolating fields and lattice actions commonly used in the literature. We present a survey of results of recent calculations of excited baryons in quenched QCD, and outline possible future directions in the study of baryon spectra.

  10. Lattice QCD: A Brief Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H. B.

    A general introduction to lattice QCD is given. The reader is assumed to have some basic familiarity with the path integral representation of quantum field theory. Emphasis is placed on showing that the lattice regularization provides a robust conceptual and computational framework within quantum field theory. The goal is to provide a useful overview, with many references pointing to the following chapters and to freely available lecture series for more in-depth treatments of specifics topics.

  11. Berry phase in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-01-01

    We propose the lattice QCD calculation of the Berry phase which is defined by the ground state of a single fermion. We perform the ground-state projection of a single-fermion propagator, construct the Berry link variable on a momentum-space lattice, and calculate the Berry phase. As the first application, the first Chern number of the (2+1)-dimensional Wilson fermion is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation.

  12. Transport in Sawtooth photonic lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Weimann, Steffen; Real, Bastián; Cantillano, Camilo; Szameit, Alexander; Vicencio, Rodrigo A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate, theoretically and experimentally, a photonic realization of a Sawtooth lattice. This special lattice exhibits two spectral bands, with one of them experiencing a complete collapse to a highly degenerate flat band for a special set of inter-site coupling constants. We report the ob- servation of different transport regimes, including strong transport inhibition due to the appearance of the non-diffractive flat band. Moreover, we excite localized Shockley surfaces states, residing in the gap between the two linear bands.

  13. Lattice Studies of Hyperon Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, David G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    I describe recent progress at studying the spectrum of hadrons containing the strange quark through lattice QCD calculations. I emphasise in particular the richness of the spectrum revealed by lattice studies, with a spectrum of states at least as rich as that of the quark model. I conclude by prospects for future calculations, including in particular the determination of the decay amplitudes for the excited states.

  14. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGrand, T. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  15. Multifractal behaviour of -simplex lattic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Kumar; Debaprasad Giri; Sujata Krishna

    2000-06-01

    We study the asymptotic behaviour of resistance scaling and fluctuation of resistance that give rise to flicker noise in an -simplex lattice. We propose a simple method to calculate the resistance scaling and give a closed-form formula to calculate the exponent, , associated with resistance scaling, for any . Using current cumulant method we calculate the exact noise exponent for -simplex lattices.

  16. The Electronic Structure of Coupled Semiconductor Quantum Dots Arranged as a Graphene Hexagonal Lattice under a Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Juan; LI Shu-Shen

    2012-01-01

    We study the electronic spectrum of coupled quantum dots (QDs) arranged as a graphene hexagonal lattice in the presence of an external perpendicular magnetic Geld. In our tight-binding model, the effect of the magnetic field is included in both the Peierls phase of the Hamiltonian and the tight-binding basis Wannier function. The energy of the system is analyzed when the magnetic flux through the lattice unit cell is a rational fraction of the quantum flux. The calculated spectrum has recursive properties, similar to those of the classical Hofstadter butterfly. However, unlike the ideal Hofstadter butterfly structure, our result is asymmetric since the impacts of the specific material and the magnetic field on the wavefunctions are included, making the results more realistic.%We study the electronic spectrum of coupled quantum dots (QDs) arranged as a graphene hexagonal lattice in the presence of an external perpendicular magnetic field.In our tight-binding model,the effect of the magnetic field is included in both the Peierls phase of the Hamiltonian and the tight-binding basis Wannier function.The energy of the system is analyzed when the magnetic flux through the lattice unit cell is a rational fraction of the quantum flux.The calculated spectrum has recursive properties,similar to those of the classical Hofstadter butterfly.However,unlike the ideal Hofstadter butterfly structure,our result is asymmetric since the impacts of the specific material and the magnetic field on the wavefunctions are included,making the results more realistic.

  17. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-11-01

    This work describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  18. Advances in Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Greg

    In this thesis we make four contributions to the state of the art in numerical lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). First, we present the most detailed investigation yet of the autocorrelations of topological observations in hybrid Monte Carlo simulations of QCD and of the effects of the boundary conditions on these autocorrelations. This results in a numerical criterion for deciding when open boundary conditions are useful for reducing these autocorrelations, which are a major barrier to reliable calculations at fine lattice spacings. Second, we develop a dislocation-enhancing determinant, and demonstrate that it reduces the autocorrelation time of the topological charge. This alleviates problems with slow topological tunneling at fine lattice spacings, enabling simulations on fine lattices to be completed with much less computational effort. Third, we show how to apply the recently developed zMobius technique to hybrid Monte Carlo evolutions with domain wall fermions, achieving nearly a factor of two speedup in the light quark determinant, the single most expensive part of the calculation. The dislocation-enhancing determinant and the zMobius technique have enabled us to begin simulations of fine ensembles with four flavors of dynamical domain wall quarks. Finally, we show how to include the previously-neglected G1 operator in nonperturbative renormalization of the DeltaS = 1 effective weak Hamiltonian on the lattice. This removes an important systematic error in lattice calculations of weak matrix elements, in particular the important K → pipi decay.

  19. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley; Dana A. , Farooque; Mohammad , Davis; Keith

    2007-10-02

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  20. Channelling contrast analysis of lattice images: Conditions for probe-insensitive STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossouw, Chris J., E-mail: chris.rossouw@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Dwyer, Christian [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Katz-Boon, Hadas; Etheridge, Joanne [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-01-15

    Quantitative analysis of lattice resolved images generated by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) requires specification of probe characteristics, such as defocus, aberration and source distribution. In this paper we show that knowledge of such characteristics is unnecessary for quantitative interpretation, if the signal is integrated over a unit cell. Such a condition, whether the result of experimental setup or post-processing of lattice resolved images, reduces the intensity distribution to that of channelling contrast, where the signal for plane wave incidence is averaged over the angular range of the probe, and the result is independent of the probe characteristics. We use a Bloch wave model to show analytically how this applies to all forms of STEM imaging, such as that formed by annular dark field or backscatter detection, as well as characteristic X-ray fluorescence or electron energy loss. As a specific example, we consider how the signal from an annular dark field detector can be used to determine specimen thickness via a transfer curve for the zone axis and scattering geometries employed. This method has advantages over matching lattice images with calculations since these are sensitive to probe coherence and aberration, and saturation of the on-column intensity is approached more rapidly. - Highlights: • Analysis of lattice-resolved STEM images to form channelling contrast. • Conditions for analysis to be independent of probe aberrations are established. • Analysis applicable to STEM imaging using ADF, BSE, X-ray and EELS detection. • Specifically applied to ADF imaging for thickness of Au nanoparticles.

  1. Uncertainty Analysis of Light Water Reactor Fuel Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arenas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the calculation of uncertainty based on available cross-section covariance data and computational tool on fuel lattice levels, which included pin cell and the fuel assembly models. Uncertainty variations due to temperatures changes and different fuel compositions are the main focus of this analysis. Selected assemblies and unit pin cells were analyzed according to the OECD LWR UAM benchmark specifications. Criticality and uncertainty analysis were performed using TSUNAMI-2D sequence in SCALE 6.1. It was found that uncertainties increase with increasing temperature, while kinf decreases. This increase in the uncertainty is due to the increase in sensitivity of the largest contributing reaction of uncertainty, namely, the neutron capture reaction 238U(n, γ due to the Doppler broadening. In addition, three types (UOX, MOX, and UOX-Gd2O3 of fuel material compositions were analyzed. A remarkable increase in uncertainty in kinf was observed for the case of MOX fuel. The increase in uncertainty of kinf in MOX fuel was nearly twice the corresponding value in UOX fuel. The neutron-nuclide reaction of 238U, mainly inelastic scattering (n, n′, contributed the most to the uncertainties in the MOX fuel, shifting the neutron spectrum to higher energy compared to the UOX fuel.

  2. Bidirectional relationship of mast cells-neurovascular unit communication in neuroinflammation and its involvement in POCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Xiang; Dong, Hongquan; Hu, Youli; Qian, Yanning

    2017-03-30

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) has been hypothesized to be mediated by surgery-induced neuroinflammation, which is also a key element in the pathobiology of neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and neuropsychiatric disorders. There is extensive communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Inflammation resulting from activation of the innate immune system cells in the periphery can impact central nervous system behaviors, such as cognitive performance. Mast cells (MCs), as the"first responders" in the CNS, can initiate, amplify, and prolong other immune and nervous responses upon activation. In addition, MCs and their secreted mediators modulate inflammatory processes in multiple CNS pathologies and can thereby either contribute to neurological damage or confer neuroprotection. Neuroinflammation has been considered to be linked to neurovascular dysfunction in several neurological disorders. This review will provide a brief overview of the bidirectional relationship of MCs-neurovascular unit communication in neuroinflammation and its involvement in POCD, providing a new and unique therapeutic target for the adjuvant treatment of POCD.

  3. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Mass Transfer in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells under Operation Mode Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional, single-phase, isothermal, multicomponent, transient model is built to investigate the transport phenomena in unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs under the condition of switching from the fuel cell (FC mode to the water electrolysis (WE mode. The model is coupled with an electrochemical reaction. The proton exchange membrane (PEM is selected as the solid electrolyte of the URFC. The work is motivated by the need to elucidate the complex mass transfer and electrochemical process under operation mode switching in order to improve the performance of PEM URFC. A set of governing equations, including conservation of mass, momentum, species, and charge, are considered. These equations are solved by the finite element method. The simulation results indicate the distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, water mass fraction, and electrolyte potential response to the transient phenomena via saltation under operation mode switching. The hydrogen mass fraction gradients are smaller than the oxygen mass fraction gradients. The average mass fractions of the reactants (oxygen and hydrogen and product (water exhibit evident differences between each layer in the steady state of the FC mode. By contrast, the average mass fractions of the reactant (water and products (oxygen and hydrogen exhibit only slight differences between each layer in the steady state of the WE mode. Under either the FC mode or the WE mode, the duration of the transient state is only approximately 0.2 s.

  4. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Ahmadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primarily because of the challenge in fabricating porous biomaterials with arbitrarily complex morphological designs. In the present work, we studied the relationship between relative density (RD of porous Ti6Al4V EFI alloy and five compressive properties of the material, namely elastic gradient or modulus (Es20–70, first maximum stress, plateau stress, yield stress, and energy absorption. Porous structures with different RD and six different unit cell configurations (cubic (C, diamond (D, truncated cube (TC, truncated cuboctahedron (TCO, rhombic dodecahedron (RD, and rhombicuboctahedron (RCO were fabricated using selective laser melting. Each of the compressive properties increased with increase in RD, the relationship being of a power law type. Clear trends were seen in the influence of unit cell configuration and porosity on each of the compressive properties. For example, in terms of Es20–70, the structures may be divided into two groups: those that are stiff (comprising those made using C, TC, TCO, and RCO unit cell and those that are compliant (comprising those made using D and RD unit cell.

  5. Fatigue design of a mechanically biocompatible lattice for a proof-of-concept femoral stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabnejad Khanoki, Sajad; Pasini, Damiano

    2013-06-01

    A methodology is proposed to design a spatially periodic microarchitectured material for a two-dimensional femoral implant under walking gait conditions. The material is composed of a graded lattice with controlled property distribution that minimizes concurrently bone resorption and interface failure. The periodic microstructure of the material is designed for fatigue fracture caused by cyclic loadings on the hip joint as a result of walking. The bulk material of the lattice is Ti6AL4V and its microstructure is assumed free of defects. The Soderberg diagram is used for the fatigue design under multiaxial loadings. Two cell topologies, square and Kagome, are chosen to obtain optimized property gradients for a two-dimensional implant. Asymptotic homogenization (AH) theory is used to address the multiscale mechanics of the implant as well as to capture the stress and strain distribution at both the macro and the microscale. The microstress distribution found with AH is also compared with that obtained from a detailed finite element analysis. For the maximum value of the von Mises stress, we observe a deviation of 18.6% in unit cells close to the implant boundary, where the AH assumption of spatial periodicity of the fluctuating fields ceases to hold. In the second part of the paper, the metrics of bone resorption and interface shear stress are used to benchmark the graded cellular implant with existing prostheses made of fully dense titanium implant. The results show that the amount of initial postoperative bone loss for square and Kagome lattice implants decreases, respectively, by 53.8% and 58%. In addition, the maximum shear interface failure at the distal end is significantly reduced by about 79%. A set of proof-of-concepts of planar implants have been fabricated via Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to demonstrate the manufacturability of Ti6AL4V into graded lattices with alternative cell size. Optical microscopy has been used to measure the morphological parameters

  6. A lexicographic shellability characterization of geometric lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Geometric lattices are characterized as those finite, atomic lattices such that every atom ordering induces a lexicographic shelling given by an edge labeling known as a minimal labeling. This new characterization fits into a similar paradigm as McNamara's characterization of supersolvable lattices as those lattices admitting a different type of lexicographic shelling, namely one in which each maximal chain is labeled with a permutation of {1,...,n}. Geometric lattices arise as the intersection lattices of central hyperplane arrangements and more generally as the lattices of flats for matroids.

  7. Inhibition of Autophagy Enhances Curcumin United light irradiation-induced Oxidative Stress and Tumor Growth Suppression in Human Melanoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Mei, Zhusong; Guo, Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin carcinoma, which possesses fast propagating and highly invasive characteristics. Curcumin is a natural phenol compound that has various biological activities, such as anti-proliferative and apoptosis-accelerating impacts on tumor cells. Unfortunately, the therapeutical activities of Cur are severely hindered due to its extremely low bioavailability. In this study, a cooperative therapy of low concentration Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation was performed to inspect the synergistic effects on the apoptosis, proliferation and autophagy in human melanoma A375 cell. The results showed that red united blue light irradiation efficaciously synergized with Cur to trigger oxidative stress-mediated cell death, induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. Meanwhile, Western blotting revealed that combined disposure induced the formation of autophagosomes. Conversely, inhibition of the autophagy enhanced apoptosis, obstructed cell cycle arrest and induced reversible proliferation arrest to senescence. These findings suggest that Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation could generate photochemo-preventive effects via enhancing apoptosis and triggering autophagy, and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy convert reversible arrested cells to senescence, therefore reducing the possibility that damaged cells might escape programmed death. PMID:27502897

  8. Equilibrium bifurcations and chaotic transitions in coupled microlaser lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyopoulos, S

    2004-12-01

    Analytic and simulation studies for the steady-state equilibria and bifurcations of coupled microlaser arrays are described. Lateral cavity interactions affect the gain in each cavity, leading to active photonic lattice behavior, equivalent to a nonlinear coupled oscillator lattice. The coupled-cavity rate equations are employed to follow the coherent photon and carrier population in each lattice site. Fixed-point-type steady states, of constant lattice phase shift, result for low coupling strengths; the radiation envelope for these states conforms with a periodic Bloch state over the array. Bifurcations to limit cycles of increasing complexity occur at higher coupling via period doubling sequences. The associated spatial patterns of photon and carrier lattice distribution resemble photonic convection cells. Limit cycles of different periods, emanating mathematically from different original fixed points, coexist at high strengths, each one accessible from different initial conditions. The multiplicity of possible limit cycles in systems with many degrees of freedom (number of lattice sites) combined with changes in their accessibility from initial conditions offers new insights to chaotic transitions, compared to low dimensionality paradigms.

  9. Embedded Lattice and Properties of Gram Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize in Mizar [14] the definition of embedding of lattice and its properties. We formally define an inner product on an embedded module. We also formalize properties of Gram matrix. We formally prove that an inverse of Gram matrix for a rational lattice exists. Lattice of Z-module is necessary for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lov´asz base reduction algorithm [16] and cryptographic systems with lattice [17].

  10. Design and optical characterization of high-Q guided-resonance modes in the slot-graphite photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luis Javier; Huang, Ningfeng; Ma, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Jaquay, Eric; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-12-16

    A new photonic crystal structure is generated by using a regular graphite lattice as the base and adding a slot in the center of each unit cell to enhance field confinement. The theoretical Q factor in an ideal structure is over 4 × 10(5). The structure was fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator wafer and optically characterized by transmission spectroscopy. The resonance wavelength and quality factor were measured as a function of slot height. The measured trends show good agreement with simulation.

  11. Growth Factor Independence-1 (Gfi1) Is Required for Pancreatic Acinar Unit Formation and Centroacinar Cell Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Nyeng, Pia; Xiao, Fan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The genetic specification of the compartmentalized pancreatic acinar/centroacinar unit is poorly understood. Growth factor independence-1 (Gfi1) is a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, pre-T-cell differentiation, formation...... of pancreatic acinar cells as well as the centroacinar cells (CACs) in Gfi1(-/-) mice when compared with wild-type littermates. Pancreatic endocrine differentiation, islet architecture, and function were unaffected. Organ domain patterning and the formation of ductal cells occurred normally during the murine...... of granulocytes, inner ear hair cells, and the development of secretory cell types in the intestine. As GFI1/Gfi1 is expressed in human and rodent pancreas, we characterized the potential function of Gfi1 in mouse pancreatic development. METHODS: Gfi1 knockout mice were analyzed at histological and molecular...

  12. The nonlinear anomalous lattice elasticity associated with the high-pressure phase transition in spodumene: A high precission static compression study

    CERN Document Server

    Ullrich, A; Miletich, R; 10.1007/s00269-009-0300-8

    2010-01-01

    The high-pressure behavior of the lattice elasticity of spodumene, LiAlSi2O6, was studied by static compression in a diamond-anvil cell up to 9.3 GPa. Investigations by means of single-crystal XRD and Raman spectroscopy within the hydrostatic limits of the pressure medium focus on the pressure ranges around similar to 3.2 and similar to 7.7 GPa, which have been reported previously to comprise two independent structural phase transitions. While our measurements confirm the well-established first-order C2/c-P2(1)/c transformation at 3.19 GPa (with 1.2% volume discontinuity and a hysteresis between 0.02 and 0.06 GPa), both unit-cell dimensions and the spectral changes observed in high-pressure Raman spectra give no evidence for structural changes related to a second phase transition. Monoclinic lattice parameters and unit-cell volumes at in total 59 different pressure points have been used to re-calculate the lattice-related properties of spontaneous strain, volume strain, and the bulk moduli as a function of pr...

  13. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Nasr Esfahani, S.; Taheri Andani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Ghaei, A.; Karaca, H.; Elahinia, M.

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress-strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure.

  14. Lattice dislocation in Si nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Taha, H.T. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2009-12-15

    Modified formulas were used to calculate lattice thermal expansion, specific heat and Bulk modulus for Si nanowires with diameters of 115, 56, 37 and 22 nm. From these values and Gruneisen parameter taken from reference, mean lattice volumes were found to be as 20.03 A{sup 3} for the bulk and 23.63, 29.91, 34.69 and 40.46 A{sup 3} for Si nanowire diameters mentioned above, respectively. Their mean bonding length was calculated to be as 0.235 nm for the bulk and 0.248, 0.269, 0.282 and 0.297 nm for the nanowires diameter mentioned above, respectively. By dividing the nanowires diameter on the mean bonding length, number of layers per each nanowire size was found to be as 230, 104, 65 and 37 for the diameters mentioned above, respectively. Lattice dislocations in 22 nm diameter wire were found to be from 0.00324 nm for the 1st central lattice to 0.2579 nm for the last surface lattice. Such dislocation was smaller for larger wire diameters. Dislocation concentration found to change in Si nanowires according to the proportionalities of surface thickness to nanowire radius ratios.

  15. Hamiltonian tomography of photonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruichao; Owens, Clai; LaChapelle, Aman; Schuster, David I.; Simon, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we introduce an approach to Hamiltonian tomography of noninteracting tight-binding photonic lattices. To begin with, we prove that the matrix element of the low-energy effective Hamiltonian between sites α and β may be obtained directly from Sα β(ω ) , the (suitably normalized) two-port measurement between sites α and β at frequency ω . This general result enables complete characterization of both on-site energies and tunneling matrix elements in arbitrary lattice networks by spectroscopy, and suggests that coupling between lattice sites is a topological property of the two-port spectrum. We further provide extensions of this technique for measurement of band projectors in finite, disordered systems with good band flatness ratios, and apply the tool to direct real-space measurement of the Chern number. Our approach demonstrates the extraordinary potential of microwave quantum circuits for exploration of exotic synthetic materials, providing a clear path to characterization and control of single-particle properties of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard lattices. More broadly, we provide a robust, unified method of spectroscopic characterization of linear networks from photonic crystals to microwave lattices and everything in between.

  16. Hydrodynamic behaviour of Lattice Boltzmann and Lattice BGK models

    CERN Document Server

    Behrend, O; Warren, P

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: We present a numerical analysis of the validity of classical and generalized hydrodynamics for Lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE) and Lattice BGK methods in two and three dimensions, as a function of the collision parameters of these models. Our analysis is based on the wave-number dependence of the evolution operator. Good ranges of validity are found for BGK models as long as the relaxation time is chosen smaller than or equal to unity. The additional freedom in the choice of collision parameters for LBE models does not seem to give significant improvement.

  17. Lattice thermal conductivity of minerals in the deep mantle condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekura, H.; Tsuchiya, T.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal transport property of materials under pressure and temperature is of importance for understanding the dynamics of the solid Earth and the thermal history. Both experimental and theoretical determinations of the thermal conductivity, however, still remain technically challenging particularly at the deep mantle condition. Recent progress in ab initio computational method based on the density-functional theory is now makes it possible to examine the transport phenomena including the lattice thermal conduction. The intrinsic bulk thermal conduction of insulator is caused by lattice anharmonicity owing to phonon-phonon interaction. The key parameter to predict lattice thermal conductivity is thus the anharmonic coupling constant. Earlier theoretical works calculated the lattice thermal conductivity of MgO with ab initio molecular dynamics simulation or finite difference lattice dynamics simulation (Nico de Koker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 125902, 2009; X. Tang and J. Dong, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 4539, 2010). However, in these approaches, the simulation cell size could often be insufficient for accurate description of the long wavelength phonon scattering. This leads to a lack of the decay channels for the phonons. As an alternative approach, the anharmonic coupling strength between phonon modes can be evaluated within the density-functional perturbation theory. In this approach, the higher-order force tensors are calculated through a number of phonon decay channels obtained within the perturbative scheme taking care only of the primitive cell. We have been developing a technique for calculation of the phonon linewidth necessary to obtain the phonon lifetime. Then the lattice thermal conductivity is evaluated combining with additional harmonic-level of propeties. In this presentation, we show the behavior of lattice thermal conductivity in lower mantle minerals, and discuss the effects of pressure and temperature on their conductivities up to the deep

  18. Effects of Dexamethasone on Satellite Cells and Tissue Engineered Skeletal Muscle Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syverud, Brian C; VanDusen, Keith W; Larkin, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineered skeletal muscle has potential for application as a graft source for repairing soft tissue injuries, a model for testing pharmaceuticals, and a biomechanical actuator system for soft robots. However, engineered muscle to date has not produced forces comparable to native muscle, limiting its potential for repair and for use as an in vitro model for pharmaceutical testing. In this study, we examined the trophic effects of dexamethasone (DEX), a glucocorticoid that stimulates myoblast differentiation and fusion into myotubes, on our tissue engineered three-dimensional skeletal muscle units (SMUs). Using our established SMU fabrication protocol, muscle isolates were cultured with three experimental DEX concentrations (5, 10, and 25 nM) and compared to untreated controls. Following seeding onto a laminin-coated Sylgard substrate, the administration of DEX was initiated on day 0 or day 6 in growth medium or on day 9 after the switch to differentiation medium and was sustained until the completion of SMU fabrication. During this process, total cell proliferation was measured with a BrdU assay, and myogenesis and structural advancement of muscle cells were observed through immunostaining for MyoD, myogenin, desmin, and α-actinin. After SMU formation, isometric tetanic force production was measured to quantify function. The histological and functional assessment of the SMU showed that the administration of 10 nM DEX beginning on either day 0 or day 6 yielded optimal SMUs. These optimized SMUs exhibited formation of advanced sarcomeric structure and significant increases in myotube diameter and myotube fusion index, compared with untreated controls. Additionally, the optimized SMUs matured functionally, as indicated by a fivefold rise in force production. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the addition of DEX to our process of engineering skeletal muscle tissue improves myogenesis, advances muscle structure, and increases force production in the

  19. Progress in human embryonic stem cell research in the United States between 2001 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Vakili

    Full Text Available On August 9th, 2001, the federal government of the United States announced a policy restricting federal funds available for research on human embryonic stem cell (hESCs out of concern for the "vast ethical mine fields" associated with the creation of embryos for research purposes. Until the policy was repealed on March 9th, 2009, no U.S. federal funds were available for research on hESCs extracted after August 9, 2001, and only limited federal funds were available for research on a subset of hESC lines that had previously been extracted. This paper analyzes how the 2001 U.S. federal funding restrictions influenced the quantity and geography of peer-reviewed journal publications on hESC. The primary finding is that the 2001 policy did not have a significant aggregate effect on hESC research in the U.S. After a brief lag in early 2000s, U.S. hESC research maintained pace with other areas of stem cell and genetic research. The policy had several other consequences. First, it was tied to increased hESC research funding within the U.S. at the state level, leading to concentration of related activities in a relatively small number of states. Second, it stimulated increased collaborative research between US-based scientists and those in countries with flexible policies toward hESC research (including Canada, the U.K., Israel, China, Spain, and South Korea. Third, it encouraged independent hESC research in countries without restrictions.

  20. Highly Efficient and Exceptionally Durable CO2 Photoreduction to Methanol over Freestanding Defective Single-Unit-Cell Bismuth Vanadate Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Gu, Bingchuan; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Zu, Xiaolong; Yang, Fan; Zhu, Wenguang; Wang, Chengming; Feng, Zimou; Ye, Bangjiao; Xie, Yi

    2017-03-08

    Unearthing an ideal model for disclosing the role of defect sites in solar CO2 reduction remains a great challenge. Here, freestanding gram-scale single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers are successfully synthesized for the first time. Positron annihilation spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence unveil their distinct vanadium vacancy concentrations. Density functional calculations reveal that the introduction of vanadium vacancies brings a new defect level and higher hole concentration near Fermi level, resulting in increased photoabsorption and superior electronic conductivity. The higher surface photovoltage intensity of single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with rich vanadium vacancies ensures their higher carriers separation efficiency, further confirmed by the increased carriers lifetime from 74.5 to 143.6 ns revealed by time-resolved fluorescence emission decay spectra. As a result, single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with rich vanadium vacancies exhibit a high methanol formation rate up to 398.3 μmol g(-1) h(-1) and an apparent quantum efficiency of 5.96% at 350 nm, much larger than that of single-unit-cell o-BiVO4 layers with poor vanadium vacancies, and also the former's catalytic activity proceeds without deactivation even after 96 h. This highly efficient and spectrally stable CO2 photoconversion performances hold great promise for practical implementation of solar fuel production.

  1. Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A; Luu, Thomas C

    2014-01-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low- energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path ...

  2. Quantum Gravity on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Hamber, Herbert W

    2009-01-01

    I review the lattice approach to quantum gravity, and how it relates to the non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point scenario of the continuum theory. After a brief introduction covering the general problem of ultraviolet divergences in gravity and other non-renormalizable theories, I cover the general methods and goals of the lattice approach. An underlying theme is an attempt at establishing connections between the continuum renormalization group results, which are mainly based on diagrammatic perturbation theory, and the recent lattice results, which should apply to the strong gravity regime and are inherently non-perturbative. A second theme in this review is the ever-present natural correspondence between infrared methods of strongly coupled non-abelian gauge theories on the one hand, and the low energy approach to quantum gravity based on the renormalization group and universality of critical behavior on the other. Towards the end of the review I discuss possible observational consequences of path integral q...

  3. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  4. Lattice Structures For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Olmo, E.; Grande, E.; Samartin, C. R.; Bezdenejnykh, M.; Torres, J.; Blanco, N.; Frovel, M.; Canas, J.

    2012-07-01

    The way of mass reduction improving performances in the aerospace structures is a constant and relevant challenge in the space business. The designs, materials and manufacturing processes are permanently in evolution to explore and get mass optimization solutions at low cost. In the framework of ICARO project, EADS CASA ESPACIO (ECE) has designed, manufactured and tested a technology demonstrator which shows that lattice type of grid structures is a promising weight saving solution for replacing some traditional metallic and composite structures for space applications. A virtual testing methodology was used in order to support the design of a high modulus CFRP cylindrical lattice technology demonstrator. The manufacturing process, based on composite Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) technology developed by ECE, allows obtaining high quality low weight lattice structures potentially applicable to a wide range of aerospace structures. Launcher payload adaptors, satellite platforms, antenna towers or instrument supports are some promising candidates.

  5. Kaon fluctuations from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Gunther, Jana; Parotto, Paolo; Pasztor, Attila; Vazquez, Israel Portillo; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to isolate a set of kaon fluctuations in lattice QCD. By means of the Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model, we calculate the actual kaon second-to-first fluctuation ratio, which receives contribution from primordial kaons and resonance decays, and show that it is very close to the one obtained for primordial kaons in the Boltzmann approximation. The latter only involves the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials, which are functions of $T$ and $\\mu_B$ due to the experimental constraint on strangeness and electric charge, and can therefore be calculated on the lattice. This provides an unambiguous method to extract the kaon freeze-out temperature, by comparing the lattice results to the experimental values for the corresponding fluctuations.

  6. Hadron Structure on the Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, K. U.; Kusno, A.; Mastropas, E. V.; Zanotti, J. M.

    The aim of these lectures will be to provide an introduction to some of the concepts needed to study the structure of hadrons on the lattice. Topics covered include the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon and pion, the nucleon's axial charge and moments of parton and generalised parton distribution functions. These are placed in a phenomenological context by describing how they can lead to insights into the distribution of charge, spin and momentum amongst a hadron's partonic constituents. We discuss the techniques required for extracting the relevant matrix elements from lattice simulations and draw attention to potential sources of systematic error. Examples of recent lattice results are presented and are compared with results from both experiment and theoretical models.

  7. Flavor Physics and Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, C M

    2013-01-01

    Our ability to resolve new physics effects is, largely, limited by the precision with which we calculate. The calculation of observables in the Standard (or a new physics) Model requires knowledge of associated hadronic contributions. The precision of such calculations, and therefore our ability to leverage experiment, is typically limited by hadronic uncertainties. The only first-principles method for calculating the nonperturbative, hadronic contributions is lattice QCD. Modern lattice calculations have controlled errors, are systematically improvable, and in some cases, are pushing the sub-percent level of precision. I outline the role played by, highlight state of the art efforts in, and discuss possible future directions of lattice calculations in flavor physics.

  8. Lattice QCD for nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    With ever increasing computational resources and improvements in algorithms, new opportunities are emerging for lattice gauge theory to address key questions in strongly interacting systems, such as nuclear matter. Calculations today use dynamical gauge-field ensembles with degenerate light up/down quarks and the strange quark and it is possible now to consider including charm-quark degrees of freedom in the QCD vacuum. Pion masses and other sources of systematic error, such as finite-volume and discretization effects, are beginning to be quantified systematically. Altogether, an era of precision calculation has begun, and many new observables will be calculated at the new computational facilities.  The aim of this set of lectures is to provide graduate students with a grounding in the application of lattice gauge theory methods to strongly interacting systems, and in particular to nuclear physics.  A wide variety of topics are covered, including continuum field theory, lattice discretizations, hadron spect...

  9. Investigation of potential fluctuating intra-unit cell magnetic order in cuprates by μ SR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, A.; Akintola, K.; Potma, M.; Ishikado, M.; Eisaki, H.; Hardy, W. N.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Sonier, J. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report low temperature muon spin relaxation (μ SR ) measurements of the high-transition-temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors Bi2 +xSr2 -xCaCu2O8 +δ and YBa2Cu3O6.57 , aimed at detecting the mysterious intra-unit cell (IUC) magnetic order that has been observed by spin-polarized neutron scattering in the pseudogap phase of four different cuprate families. A lack of confirmation by local magnetic probe methods has raised the possibility that the magnetic order fluctuates slowly enough to appear static on the time scale of neutron scattering, but too fast to affect μ SR or nuclear magnetic resonance signals. The IUC magnetic order has been linked to a theoretical model for the cuprates, which predicts a long-range ordered phase of electron-current loop order that terminates at a quantum crictical point (QCP). Our study suggests that lowering the temperature to T ˜25 mK and moving far below the purported QCP does not cause enough of a slowing down of fluctuations for the IUC magnetic order to become detectable on the time scale of μ SR . Our measurements place narrow limits on the fluctuation rate of this unidentified magnetic order.

  10. Results and analysis of saltstone cores taken from saltstone disposal unit cell 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    As part of an ongoing Performance Assessment (PA) Maintenance Plan, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has developed a sampling and analyses strategy to facilitate the comparison of field-emplaced samples (i.e., saltstone placed and cured in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU)) with samples prepared and cured in the laboratory. The primary objectives of the Sampling and Analyses Plan (SAP) are; (1) to demonstrate a correlation between the measured properties of laboratory-prepared, simulant samples (termed Sample Set 3), and the field-emplaced saltstone samples (termed Sample Set 9), and (2) to validate property values assumed for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) PA modeling. The analysis and property data for Sample Set 9 (i.e. six core samples extracted from SDU Cell 2A (SDU2A)) are documented in this report, and where applicable, the results are compared to the results for Sample Set 3. Relevant properties to demonstrate the aforementioned objectives include bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC), and radionuclide leaching behavior.

  11. The modeling of a standalone solid-oxide fuel cell auxiliary power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, N.; Li, Q.; Sun, X.; Khaleel, M. A.

    In this research, a Simulink model of a standalone vehicular solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) auxiliary power unit (APU) is developed. The SOFC APU model consists of three major components: a controller model; a power electronics system model; and an SOFC plant model, including an SOFC stack module, two heat exchanger modules, and a combustor module. This paper discusses the development of the nonlinear dynamic models for the SOFC stacks, the heat exchangers and the combustors. When coupling with a controller model and a power electronic circuit model, the developed SOFC plant model is able to model the thermal dynamics and the electrochemical dynamics inside the SOFC APU components, as well as the transient responses to the electric loading changes. It has been shown that having such a model for the SOFC APU will help design engineers to adjust design parameters to optimize the performance. The modeling results of the SOFC APU heat-up stage and the output voltage response to a sudden load change are presented in this paper. The fuel flow regulation based on fuel utilization is also briefly discussed.

  12. Fungal spore concentrations in two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units containing distinct air control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, C P; Miron, D; Silla, L M R; Pasqualotto, A C

    2013-04-01

    Invasive fungal diseases have emerged as important causes of morbidity and mortality in haematological patients. In this study air samples were collected in two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units, in which distinct air-control systems were in place. In hospital 1 no high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter was available whereas in hospital 2 HSCT rooms were equipped with HEPA filters, with positive air pressure in relation to the corridor. A total of 117 samples from rooms, toilets and corridors were obtained during December 2009 to January 2011, using a six-stage Andersen sampler. In both hospitals, the concentration of potentially pathogenic fungi in the air was reduced in patients' rooms compared to corridors (P < 0·0001). Despite the presence of a HEPA filter in hospital 2, rooms in both hospitals showed similar concentrations of potentially pathogenic fungi (P = 0·714). These findings may be explained by the implementation of additional protective measures in hospital 1, emphasizing the importance of such measures in protected environments.

  13. High-temperature superconductivity in one-unit-cell FeSe films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziqiao; Liu, Chaofei; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Since the dramatic enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature (T c) was reported in a one-unit-cell FeSe film grown on a SrTiO3 substrate (1-UC FeSe/STO) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), related research on this system has become a new frontier in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we present a brief review on this rapidly developing field, mainly focusing on the superconducting properties of 1-UC FeSe/STO. Experimental evidence for high-temperature superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe/STO, including direct evidence revealed by transport and diamagnetic measurements, as well as other evidence from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), are overviewed. The potential mechanisms of the enhanced superconductivity are also discussed. There are accumulating arguments to suggest that the strengthened Cooper pairing in 1-UC FeSe/STO originates from the interface effects, specifically the charge transfer and coupling to phonon modes in the TiO2 plane. The study of superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe/STO not only sheds new light on the mechanism of high-temperature superconductors with layered structures, but also provides an insight into the exploration of new superconductors by interface engineering.

  14. Giant repeater F-wave in patients with anterior horn cell disorders. Role of motor unit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I K; el-Abd, M A

    1997-01-01

    Conventional F-wave responses as well as single motor unit F-wave responses together with the volitionally recruited motor unit action potentials (MUAP) were studied in hand and feet muscles of 10 healthy subjects and 32 patients with anterior horn cell disorders. The amplitude of the largest F-wave (Fl) was significantly greater in the affected patients compared with healthy subjects. Giant repeater F-wave responses "up to 4 mV" were recorded in muscles having volitionally recruited giant MUAPs. Although, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs was significantly decreased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs that gave motor unit F-wave response was significantly increased compared with healthy subjects. The responding orthodromic MUAP gave identical motor unit F-wave response, even for complex polyphasic units. Enhanced monosynaptic (H-) reflex, proximal axon reflex (A-wave), and repetitive muscle response as possible explanations for the giant F-wave responses could be discounted. The electrophysiologic behavior of the giant late responses described here fits well with the criteria of F-waves modulated by newly formed distal (and or proximal) axonal branching.

  15. Nucleon structure from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinter, Simon

    2012-11-13

    In this thesis we compute within lattice QCD observables related to the structure of the nucleon. One part of this thesis is concerned with moments of parton distribution functions (PDFs). Those moments are essential elements for the understanding of nucleon structure and can be extracted from a global analysis of deep inelastic scattering experiments. On the theoretical side they can be computed non-perturbatively by means of lattice QCD. However, since the time lattice calculations of moments of PDFs are available, there is a tension between these lattice calculations and the results from a global analysis of experimental data. We examine whether systematic effects are responsible for this tension, and study particularly intensively the effects of excited states by a dedicated high precision computation. Moreover, we carry out a first computation with four dynamical flavors. Another aspect of this thesis is a feasibility study of a lattice QCD computation of the scalar quark content of the nucleon, which is an important element in the cross-section of a heavy particle with the nucleon mediated by a scalar particle (e.g. Higgs particle) and can therefore have an impact on Dark Matter searches. Existing lattice QCD calculations of this quantity usually have a large error and thus a low significance for phenomenological applications. We use a variance-reduction technique for quark-disconnected diagrams to obtain a precise result. Furthermore, we introduce a new stochastic method for the calculation of connected 3-point correlation functions, which are needed to compute nucleon structure observables, as an alternative to the usual sequential propagator method. In an explorative study we check whether this new method is competitive to the standard one. We use Wilson twisted mass fermions at maximal twist in all our calculations, such that all observables considered here have only O(a{sup 2}) discretization effects.

  16. Negative refraction and imaging of acoustic waves in a two-dimensional square chiral lattice structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sheng-Dong; Wang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    The negative refraction behavior and imaging effect for acoustic waves in a kind of two-dimensional square chiral lattice structure are studied in this paper. The unit cell of the proposed structure consists of four zigzag arms connected through a thin circular ring at the central part. The relation of the symmetry of the unit cell and the negative refraction phenomenon is investigated. Using the finite element method, we calculate the band structures and the equi-frequency surfaces of the system, and confirm the frequency range where the negative refraction is present. Due to the rotational symmetry of the unit cell, a phase difference is induced to the waves propagating from a point source through the structure to the other side. The phase difference is related to the width of the structure and the frequency of the source, so we can get a tunable deviated imaging. This kind of phenomenon is also demonstrated by the numerical simulation of two Gaussian beams that are symmetrical about the interface normal with the same incident angle, and the different negative refractive indexes are presented. Based on this special performance, a double-functional mirror-symmetrical slab is proposed for realizing acoustic focusing and beam separation.

  17. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Detmold, Silas Beane, Konstantinos Orginos, Martin Savage

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress toward establishing lattice Quantum Chromodynamics as a predictive calculational framework for nuclear physics. A survey of the current techniques that are used to extract low-energy hadronic scattering amplitudes and interactions is followed by a review of recent two-body and few-body calculations by the NPLQCD collaboration and others. An outline of the nuclear physics that is expected to be accomplished with Lattice QCD in the next decade, along with estimates of the required computational resources, is presented.

  18. Chiral Fermions on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    In the last century the non-perturbative regularization of chiral fermions was a long-standing problem. We review how this problem was finally overcome by the formulation of a modified but exact form of chiral symmetry on the lattice. This also provides a sound definition of the topological charge of lattice gauge configurations. We illustrate a variety of applications to QCD in the p-, the epsilon- and the delta-regime, where simulation results can now be related to Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Perturbation Theory. The latter contains Low Energy Constants as free parameters, and we comment on their evaluation from first principles of QCD.

  19. Lattices, graphs, and Conway mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Joshua Evan

    2011-01-01

    The d-invariant of an integral, positive definite lattice L records the minimal norm of a characteristic covector in each equivalence class mod 2L. We prove that the 2-isomorphism type of a connected graph is determined by the d-invariant of its lattice of integral cuts (or flows). As an application, we prove that a reduced, alternating link diagram is determined up to mutation by the Heegaard Floer homology of the link's branched double-cover. Thus, alternating links with homeomorphic branched double-covers are mutants.

  20. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  1. Unconventional superconductivity in honeycomb lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sahebsara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available   ‎ The possibility of symmetrical s-wave superconductivity in the honeycomb lattice is studied within a strongly correlated regime, using the Hubbard model. The superconducting order parameter is defined by introducing the Green function, which is obtained by calculating the density of the electrons ‎ . In this study showed that the superconducting order parameter appears in doping interval between 0 and 0.5, and x=0.25 is the optimum doping for the s-wave superconductivity in honeycomb lattice.

  2. Half-Heusler compounds with a 1 eV (1.7 eV) direct band gap, lattice-matched to GaAs (Si), for solar cell application: A first-principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Belmiloud, N.

    2016-01-10

    A systematic theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of new half-Heusler compounds is performed to find the appropriate target key physical parameters for photovoltaic application. As a result, five ternary half-Heusler compounds ScAgC, YCuC, CaZnC, NaAgO, and LiCuS are studied by density functional theory for potential applications in multi-junction solar cells. The calculated formation enthalpies indicate that these materials are thermodynamically stable. Using state-of-the-art modified Becke-Johnson exchange potential approximation, we find a direct band gap close to 1eV (∼1.88eV) for ScAgC, YCuC, CaZnC, NaAgO (LiCuS) being quasi-lattice matched to GaAs (Si). In addition, the band offsets between half-Heusler compounds and GaAs (Si) and their consequences for heterostructures are derived using the modified Tersoff method for the branch-point energy. Furthermore, the elastic constants and phonon dispersion curves are calculated. They indicate the respective mechanical and dynamical stability of these half-Heusler compounds. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Control of lattice spacing in a triangular lattice of feeble magnetic particles formed by induced magnetic dipole interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Hirota, Tsutomu Ando, Ryo Tanaka, Hitoshi Wada and Yoshio Sakka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied methods of controlling the spacing between particles in the triangular lattice formed by feeble magnetic particles through induced magnetic dipole interaction. Formation of a triangular lattice is described by the balance between the magnetic force and the interaction of induced magnetic dipoles. The intensity of the magnetic force is proportional to the volume of particles V and the difference in the magnetic susceptibilities between the particles and the surrounding medium Δχ. On the other hand, the intensity of the induced magnetic dipole interaction depends on the square of V and Δχ. Therefore, altering the magnetic susceptibility difference by changing the susceptibility of the surrounding medium, volume of the particles, and intensity and spatial distribution of the applied magnetic field effectively controls the distance between the particles. In this study, these three methods were evaluated through experiment and molecular dynamics simulations. The distance between the particles, i.e. the lattice constant of the triangular lattice, was varied from 1.7 to 4.0 in units of the particle diameter. Formation of self-organized triangular lattice through the induced magnetic dipole interaction is based on magnetism, a physical property that all materials have. Therefore, this phenomenon is applicable to any materials of any size. Consequently, structure formation through induced magnetic dipole interaction is a potential way of fabricating materials with ordered structures.

  4. Lattice Dynamical Properties of Ferroelectric Thin Films at the Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple University

    2014-01-13

    In this project, we have successfully demonstrated atomic layer-by-layer growth by laser MBE from separate targets by depositing SrTiO3 films from SrO and TiO2 targets. The RHEED intensity oscillation was used to monitor and control the growth of each SrO and TiO2 layer. We have shown that by using separate oxide targets, laser MBE can achieve the same level of stoichiometry control as the reactive MBE. We have also studied strain relaxation in LaAlO3 films and its effect on the 2D electron gas at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. We found that there are two layers of different in-plane lattice constants in the LaAlO3 films, one next to the SrTiO3 substrate nearly coherently strained, while the top part relaxed as the film thickness increases above 20 unit cells. This strain relaxation significantly affect the transport properties of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

  5. Adaptive bimaterial lattices to mitigate thermal expansion mismatch stresses in satellite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Marina M.; Steeves, Craig A.

    2015-08-01

    Earth-orbiting satellites regularly pass from sunlight to shade and back; these transitions are typically accompanied by significant temperature changes. When adjoining parts of a satellite that are made of different materials are subjected to large temperature changes, thermal mismatch stresses arise that are a function of the temperature change and the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) between the two materials. These thermal stresses are linked to undesirable deformation and, through long-term cycling, fatigue and failure of the structure. This paper describes a type of anisotropic lattice that can serve as a stress-free adaptor between two materials, eliminating thermal mismatch stresses and their concomitant consequences. The lattices consist of planar nonidentical anisotropic bimaterial cells, each designed based on a virtual triangle. Physically the cells consist of a triangle made of material with higher CTE surrounded by a hexagon made of material with lower CTE. Different skew angles of the hexagon make a particular cell and the whole lattice anisotropic. The cells can be designed and combined in a lattice in such a way that one edge of the lattice has CTE that coincides with the CTE of the first part of the structure (substrate 1), while the other edge of the lattice has CTE equal to the CTE of the second part of the structure (substrate 2). If all joints between the parts of each cell, neighbouring cells, and the lattice and the substrates are pinned, the whole structure will be free of thermal stresses. This paper will discuss the fundamental principles governing such lattices, their refinement for special circumstances, and opportunities for improving the structural performance of the lattices. This will be presented coupled to a rational strategy for lattice design.

  6. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, S.M.; Yavari, S.A.; Wauthle, R.; Pouran, B.; Schrooten, J.; Weinans, H.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primari

  7. In vivo XCT bone characterization of lattice structured implants fabricated by additive manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-F. Obaton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several cylindrical specimens and dental implants, presenting diagonal lattice structures with different cell sizes (600, 900 and 1200 μm were additively manufactured by selective laser melting process. Then they were implanted for two months in a sheep. After removal, they were studied by Archimedes’ method as well as X-ray computed tomography in order to assess the penetration of bone into the lattice. We observed that the additive manufactured parts were geometrically conformed to the theoretical specifications. However, several particles were left adhering to the surface of the lattice, thereby partly or entirely obstructing the cells. Nevertheless, bone penetration was clearly visible. We conclude that the 900 μm lattice cell size is more favourable to bone penetration than the 1200 μm lattice cell size, as the bone penetration is 84% for 900 μm against 54% for 1200 μm cell structures. The lower bone penetration value for the 1200 μm lattice cell could possibly be attributed to the short residence time in the sheep. Our results lead to the conclusion that lattice implants additively manufactured by selective laser melting enable better bone integration.

  8. Hamiltonian monodromy as lattice defect

    OpenAIRE

    Zhilinskii, B.

    2003-01-01

    The analogy between monodromy in dynamical (Hamiltonian) systems and defects in crystal lattices is used in order to formulate some general conjectures about possible types of qualitative features of quantum systems which can be interpreted as a manifestation of classical monodromy in quantum finite particle (molecular) problems.

  9. Triangles in a Lattice Parabola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, K. R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are properties possessed by polygons inscribed in the lattice parabola y=x, including the area of a triangle, triangles of minimum area, conditions for right triangles, triangles whose area is the cube of an integer, and implications of Pick's Theorem. Further directions to pursue are suggested. (MDH)

  10. Nucleon structure using lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrou, C.; Kallidonis, C. [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computational-Based Science and technology Research Center; Constantinou, M.; Hatziyiannakou, K. [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Drach, V. [DESY Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC; Jansen, K. [DESY Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Koutsou, G.; Vaquero, A. [The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computational-Based Science and technology Research Center; Leontiou, T. [Frederick Univ, Nicosia (Cyprus). General Dept.

    2013-03-15

    A review of recent nucleon structure calculations within lattice QCD is presented. The nucleon excited states, the axial charge, the isovector momentum fraction and helicity distribution are discussed, assessing the methods applied for their study, including approaches to evaluate the disconnected contributions. Results on the spin carried by the quarks in the nucleon are also presented.

  11. Triangles in a Lattice Parabola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, K. R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are properties possessed by polygons inscribed in the lattice parabola y=x, including the area of a triangle, triangles of minimum area, conditions for right triangles, triangles whose area is the cube of an integer, and implications of Pick's Theorem. Further directions to pursue are suggested. (MDH)

  12. Lattice investigation of tetraquark candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Joshua; Wagner, Marc [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Abdel-Rehim, Abdou; Alexandrou, Constantia; Gravina, Mario; Koutsou, Giannis [Department of Physics, University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus); Computation-based Science and Technology Research Center, Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus); Dalla Brida, Mattia [School of Mathematics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-07-01

    We present the status of an ongoing long-term lattice QCD project concerned with the study of light and heavy tetraquark candidates, using a variety of different creation operators. The computation of disconnected diagrams, which is technically challenging, is discussed in detail.

  13. Decompressive craniectomy with lattice duraplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P; Tseng, M; Mendelow, A D

    2004-02-01

    A method of opening dura for decompressive craniectomies is described. Numerous cuts intersecting in a lattice pattern allow the dura to expand in a gradual and controlled manner minimising the chances of cortical laceration or venous kinking on the craniectomy edge.

  14. From lattice gases to polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.

    1990-01-01

    The modification of a technique that was developed to study time correlations in lattice-gas cellular automata to facilitate the numerical simulation of chain molecules is described. As an example, the calculation of the excess chemical potential of an ideal polymer in a dense colloidal

  15. Subwavelength vortical plasmonic lattice solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fangwei; Mihalache, Dumitru; Hu, Bambi; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2011-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of vortical plasmonic lattice solitons, which form in two-dimensional arrays of metallic nanowires embedded into nonlinear media with both focusing and defocusing Kerr nonlinearities. Their existence, stability, and subwavelength spatial confinement are investigated in detail.

  16. Nuclear forces on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Silas

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies by the NPLQCD collaboration of hadronic interactions using lattice QCD are reviewed, with an emphasis on a recent calculation of meson-baryon scattering lengths. Ongoing high-statistics calculations of baryon interactions are also reviewed. In particular, new insights into the signal/noise problems that plague correlation functions involving baryons are discussed.

  17. Hybrid Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, X Q

    2006-01-01

    We review our recent results on the JPC = 0¡¡ exotic hybrid charmonium mass and JPC = 0¡+, 1¡¡ and 1++ nonexotic hybrid charmonium spectrum from anisotropic improved lattice QCD and discuss the relevance to the recent discovery of the Y(4260) state and future experimental search for other states.

  18. Chiral fermions on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Jahn, O; Jahn, Oliver; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss topological obstructions to putting chiral fermions on an even dimensional lattice. The setting includes Ginsparg-Wilson fermions, but is more general. We prove a theorem which relates the total chirality to the difference of generalised winding numbers of chiral projection operators. For an odd number of Weyl fermions this implies that particles and anti-particles live in topologically different spaces.

  19. Theoretical characterization and design of small molecule donor material containing naphthodithiophene central unit for efficient organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yu-Ai; Geng, Yun; Li, Hai-Bin; Jin, Jun-Ling; Wu, Yong; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-07-15

    To seek for high-performance small molecule donor materials used in heterojunction solar cell, six acceptor-donor-acceptor small molecules based on naphtho[2,3-b:6,7-b']dithiophene (NDT) units with different acceptor units were designed and characterized using density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Their geometries, electronic structures, photophysical, and charge transport properties have been scrutinized comparing with the reported donor material NDT(TDPP)2 (TDPP  =  thiophene-capped diketopyrrolopyrrole). The open circuit voltage (V(oc)), energetic driving force(ΔE(L-L)), and exciton binding energy (E(b)) were also provided to give an elementary understanding on their cell performance. The results reveal that the frontier molecular orbitals of 3-7 match well with the acceptor material PC61 BM, and compounds 3-5 were found to exhibit the comparable performances to 1 and show promising potential in organic solar cells. In particular, comparing with 1, system 7 with naphthobisthiadiazole acceptor unit displays broader absorption spectrum, higher V(oc), lower E(b), and similar carrier mobility. An in-depth insight into the nature of the involved excited states based on transition density matrix and charge density difference indicates that all S1 states are mainly intramolecular charge transfer states with the charge transfer from central NDT unit to bilateral acceptor units, and also imply that the exciton of 7 can be dissociated easily due to its large extent of the charge transfer. In a word, 7 maybe superior to 1 and may act as a promising donor candidate for organic solar cell. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Light-Induced Hofstadter's Butterfly Spectrum in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing-Min

    2009-01-01

    We propose a scheme to create an effective magnetic field, which can be perceived by cold neutral atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice, with a laser field with a space-dependent phase and a conventional laser field acting on A-type three-level atoms. When the dimensionless parameter α, being the ratio of flux through a lattice cell to one flux quantum, is rational, the energy spectrum shows a fractal band structure, which is so-called Hofstadter's butterfly.

  1. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  2. Orbital optical lattices with bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, T.; Hippler, C.; Ewerbeck, A.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-02-01

    This article provides a synopsis of our recent experimental work exploring Bose-Einstein condensation in metastable higher Bloch bands of optical lattices. Bipartite lattice geometries have allowed us to implement appropriate band structures, which meet three basic requirements: the existence of metastable excited states sufficiently protected from collisional band relaxation, a mechanism to excite the atoms initially prepared in the lowest band with moderate entropy increase, and the possibility of cross-dimensional tunneling dynamics, necessary to establish coherence along all lattice axes. A variety of bands can be selectively populated and a subsequent thermalization process leads to the formation of a condensate in the lowest energy state of the chosen band. As examples the 2nd, 4th and 7th bands in a bipartite square lattice are discussed. The geometry of the 2nd and 7th bands can be tuned such that two inequivalent energetically degenerate energy minima arise at the X ±-points at the edge of the 1st Brillouin zone. In this case even a small interaction energy is sufficient to lock the phase between the two condensation points such that a complex-valued chiral superfluid order parameter can emerge, which breaks time reversal symmetry. In the 4th band a condensate can be formed at the Γ-point in the center of the 1st Brillouin zone, which can be used to explore topologically protected band touching points. The new techniques to access orbital degrees of freedom in higher bands greatly extend the class of many-body scenarios that can be explored with bosons in optical lattices.

  3. Hadron Structure and Spectrum from the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, C B

    2015-01-01

    Lattice calculations for hadrons are now entering the domain of resonances and scattering, necessitating a better understanding of the observed discrete energy spectrum. This is a reviewing survey about recent lattice QCD results, with some emphasis on spectrum and scattering.

  4. Gauge Fixing on the Lattice without Ambiguity

    CERN Document Server

    Vink, Jeroen C; 10.1016/0370-2693(92)91372-G

    2009-01-01

    A new gauge fixing condition is discussed, which is (lattice) rotation invariant, has the `smoothness' properties of the Landau gauge but can be efficiently computed and is unambiguous for almost all lattice gauge field configurations.

  5. Turbo Lattices: Construction and Performance Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sakzad, Amin; Panario, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a new class of lattices called turbo lattices is introduced and established. We use the lattice Construction $D$ to produce turbo lattices. This method needs a set of nested linear codes as its underlying structure. We benefit from turbo codes as our basis codes. Therefore, a set of nested turbo codes based on nested interleavers and nested convolutional codes is built. To this end, we employ both tail-biting and zero-tail convolutional codes. Using these codes, along with construction $D$, turbo lattices are created. Several properties of Construction $D$ lattices and fundamental characteristics of turbo lattices including the minimum distance, coding gain, kissing number and an upper bound on the probability of error under a maximum likelihood decoder over AWGN channel are investigated. Furthermore, a multi-stage turbo lattice decoding algorithm based on iterative turbo decoding algorithm is given. Finally, simulation experiments provide strong agreement with our theoretical results. More prec...

  6. Chiral Four-Dimensional Heterotic Covariant Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Beye, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In the covariant lattice formalism, chiral four-dimensional heterotic string vacua are obtained from certain even self-dual lattices which completely decompose into a left-mover and a right-mover lattice. The main purpose of this work is to classify all right-mover lattices that can appear in such a chiral model, and to study the corresponding left-mover lattices using the theory of lattice genera. In particular, the Smith-Minkowski-Siegel mass formula is employed to calculate a lower bound on the number of left-mover lattices. Also, the known relationship between asymmetric orbifolds and covariant lattices is considered in the context of our classification.

  7. In vitro fertilization and stem cell harvesting from human embryos: the law and practice in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, C Christopher

    2010-07-01

    The challenges before science and medicine are these: science must explore the natural world as thoroughly as possible, while still honoring, protecting, serving and preserving the subject of its investigations, and the human beings for whom it is a tool; medicine must confront disease and disability as effectively as possible, while also honoring, protecting, and preserving those beings for whom it serves - all of those beings, not just some, or even most, at the potential expense of others. These goals are challenged by embryo-destructive human embryonic stem cell research. The human embryo is a human being as clearly defined by embryology, and as such should be protected by the codes governing human subject research. However, because of the "potential" benefits offered by pluripotent stem cells, coupled with abortion politics and a very poorly regulated infertility industry, United States governmental advisory commissions and the scientific, medical, and political communities have attempted to define away the humanity of the human embryo, with a few notable exceptions. Because infertility treatments in the United States are poorly regulated, there are large numbers of supernumerary embryos in cryopreservation. However, only a tiny portion of these will ever be potentially available for research, and thus are not a realistic source of the cells necessary to provide treatments to the millions who might benefit from proposed stem cell based therapies. Cloning will not be the answer either, given the millions of women who must be exploited to provide sufficient numbers of eggs to generate the cloned cell lines. Moreover, the disposition decisions parents must make for their extra embryos are often agonizing, and not uncommonly change. The use of supernumerary embryos as a source for human embryonic stem cells is unethical, will never be a sufficient source for the medical treatments expected from stem cell research, and is often a source of great distress for the

  8. In vitro fertilization and stem cell harvesting from human embryos: the law and practice in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Christopher Hook

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The challenges before science and medicine are these: science must explore the natural world as thoroughly as possible, while still honoring, protecting, serving and preserving the subject of its investigations, and the human beings for whom it is a tool; medicine must confront disease and disability as effectively as possible, while also honoring, protecting, and preserving those beings for whom it serves – all of those beings, not just some, or even most, at the potential expense of others. These goals are challenged by embryo-destructive human embryonic stem cell research. The human embryo is a human being as clearly defined by embryology, and as such should be protected by the codes governing human subject research. However, because of the “potential” benefits offered by pluripotent stem cells, coupled with abortion politics and a very poorly regulated infertility industry, United States governmental advisory commissions and the scientific, medical, and political communities have attempted to define away the humanity of the human embryo, witha few notable exceptions. Because infertility treatments in the United States are poorly regulated, there are large numbersof supernumerary embryos in cryopreservation. However, only a tiny portion of these will ever be potentially available for research, and thus are not a realistic source of the cells necessary to provide treatments to the millions who might benefit from proposed stem cell based therapies. Cloning willnot be the answer either, given the millions of women who must be exploited to provide sufficient numbers of eggs to generate the cloned cell lines. Moreover, the disposition decisions parents must make for their extra embryos are often agonizing, and not uncommonly change.The use of supernumerary embryos as a source for human embryonic stem cells is unethical, will never be a sufficient source for the medical treatments expected from stem cell research, and is often a source of

  9. Frequency and Risk Factors Associated with Cord Graft Failure after Transplant with Single-Unit Umbilical Cord Cells Supplemented by Haploidentical Cells with Reduced-Intensity Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Stephanie B; Liu, Hongtao; Shore, Tsiporah; Fan, Yun; Bishop, Michael; Cushing, Melissa M; Gergis, Usama; Godley, Lucy; Kline, Justin; Larson, Richard A; Martinez, Guadalupe; Mayer, Sebastian; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Stock, Wendy; Wickrema, Amittha; van Besien, Koen; Artz, Andrew S

    2016-06-01

    Delayed engraftment and cord graft failure (CGF) are serious complications after unrelated cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly when using low-cell-dose UCB units. The haplo-cord HSCT approach allows the use of a lower dose single UCB unit by co-infusion of a CD34(+) selected haploidentical graft, which provides early transient engraftment while awaiting durable UCB engraftment. We describe the frequency, complications, and risk factors of CGF after reduced-intensity conditioning haplo-cord HSCT. Among 107 patients who underwent haplo-cord HSCT, 94 were assessable for CGF, defined as risk of CGF. We conclude that assessing chimerism at day 30 may foretell impending CGF, and avoidance of high haploidentical cell doses may reduce risk of CGF after haplo-cord HSCT. However, long-term survival is possible after CGF because of predominant haploidentical or mixed chimerism and hematopoietic function.

  10. Development of integrated DMFC and PEM fuel cell units. Final report; Udvikling af integrerede DMFC og PEM braendselscelle enheder. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odgaard, M. (IRD Fuel Cell Technology, Svendborg (DK))

    2007-06-15

    The 36-month long project 'Development of integrated DMFC and PEM fuel cell units' has been completed. The project goal was to develop a completely new MEA concept for integrated PEM and DMFC unit cells with enhanced power density and in this way obtain a price reduction. The integrated unit cell consists of a MEA, a gas diffusion layer with flow fields completed with bipolar plates and seals. The main focus of the present project was to: 1) Develop new catalyst materials fabricated by the use of FSD (flame spray deposition method). 2) Optimisation of the state-of-the-art MEA materials and electrode structure. 3) Implementation of a model to account for the CO poisoning of PEM fuel cells. Results and progress obtained in the project established that the individual unit cell components were able to meet and follow the road map of LT-PEM FC regarding electrode catalyst loading and fulfilled the targets for Year 2006. The project has resulted in some important successes. The highlights are as follows: The project has resulted in some important successes. The highlights are as follows: 1) MEA structure knowledge acquired in the project provide a sound basis for further progress. 2) A novel method for the synthesis of electrode by using flame spray synthesis was explored. 3) Electrochemical and catalytic behaviours of catalysts activity for CH{sub 3}OH explored. 4) Implementation of a sub model to account for the CO poisoning of PEM FC has been developed. 5) Numerical study of the flow distribution in FC manifolds was developed and completed with experimental data. 6) The electrode catalyst loading targets for year 2006 achieved. 7) The DMFC MEA performance has been improved by 35%. 8) Optimisation of the MEAs fabrication process has been successfully developed. 9) A new simple flow field design has been designed. 10) A procedure for integrated seals has been developed (au)

  11. Distributive lattice orderings and Priestley duality

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The ordering relation of a bounded distributive lattice L is a (distributive) (0, 1)-sublattice of L \\times L. This construction gives rise to a functor \\Phi from the category of bounded distributive lattices to itself. We examine the interaction of \\Phi with Priestley duality and characterise those bounded distributive lattices L such that there is a bounded distributive lattice K such that \\Phi(K) is (isomorphic to) L.

  12. Rough Class on a Completely Distributive Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈德刚; 张文修; 宋士吉

    2003-01-01

    This paper generalizes the Pawlak rough set method to a completely distributive lattice. Theconcept of a rough set has many applications in data mining. The approximation operators on a completelydistributive lattice are studied, the rough class on a completely distributive lattice is defined and theexpressional theorems of the rough class are proven. These expressional theorems are used to prove that thecollection of all rough classes is an atomic completely distributive lattice.

  13. Elastic and failure response of imperfect three-dimensional metallic lattices: the role of geometric defects induced by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Kamm, Paul; García-Moreno, Francisco; Banhart, John; Pasini, Damiano

    2017-10-01

    This paper examines three-dimensional metallic lattices with regular octet and rhombicuboctahedron units fabricated with geometric imperfections via Selective Laser Sintering. We use X-ray computed tomography to capture morphology, location, and distribution of process-induced defects with the aim of studying their role in the elastic response, damage initiation, and failure evolution under quasi-static compression. Testing results from in-situ compression tomography show that each lattice exhibits a distinct failure mechanism that is governed not only by cell topology but also by geometric defects induced by additive manufacturing. Extracted from X-ray tomography images, the statistical distributions of three sets of defects, namely strut waviness, strut thickness variation, and strut oversizing, are used to develop numerical models of statistically representative lattices with imperfect geometry. Elastic and failure responses are predicted within 10% agreement from the experimental data. In addition, a computational study is presented to shed light into the relationship between the amplitude of selected defects and the reduction of elastic properties compared to their nominal values. The evolution of failure mechanisms is also explained with respect to strut oversizing, a parameter that can critically cause failure mode transitions that are not visible in defect-free lattices.

  14. Numerical Studies of Localized Vibrating Structures in Nonlinear Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    lattice, from Denardo [19901. 11 strings which supported adjacent elements , and was assumed to be approximately linear. For our purposes, we will assume a...City, State, and ZIP Code) 10 SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security...art in cosmology , particle physics, condensed matter physics, and hydrodynamics, to name but a few. Most of the soliton work performed to date has

  15. CL2QCD - Lattice QCD based on OpenCL

    CERN Document Server

    Philipsen, Owe; Sciarra, Alessandro; Bach, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We present the Lattice QCD application CL2QCD, which is based on OpenCL and can be utilized to run on Graphic Processing Units as well as on common CPUs. We focus on implementation details as well as performance results of selected features. CL2QCD has been successfully applied in LQCD studies at finite temperature and density and is available at http://code.compeng.uni-frankfurt.de/projects/clhmc.

  16. THE FEATURES OF CONNEXINS EXPRESSION IN THE CELLS OF NEUROVASCLAR UNIT IN NORMAL CONDITIONS AND HYPOXIA IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Morgun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to assess a role of connexin 43 (Cx43 and associated molecule CD38 in the regulation of cell-cell interactions in the neurovascular unit (NVU in vitro in physiological conditions and in hypoxia.Materials and methods. The study was done using the original neurovascular unit model in vitro. The NVU consisted of three cell types: neurons, astrocytes, and cerebral endothelial cells derived from rats. Hypoxia was induced by incubating cells with sodium iodoacetate for 30 min at37 °C in standard culture conditions.Results. We investigated the role of connexin 43 in the regulation of cell interactions within the NVU in normal and hypoxic injury in vitro. We found that astrocytes were characterized by high levels of expression of Cx43 and low level of CD38 expression, neurons demonstrated high levels of CD38 and low levels of Cx43. In hypoxic conditions, the expression of Cx43 and CD38 in astrocytes markedly increased while CD38 expression in neurons decreased, however no changes were found in endothelial cells. Suppression of Cx43 activity resulted in down-regulation of CD38 in NVU cells, both in physiological conditions and at chemical hypoxia.Conclusion. Thus, the Cx-regulated intercellular NAD+-dependent communication and secretory phenotype of astroglial cells that are the part of the blood-brain barrier is markedly changed in hypoxia.

  17. Modified $U(1)$ lattice gauge theory towards realistic lattice QED

    CERN Document Server

    Bornyakov, V G; Müller-Preussker, M

    1992-01-01

    We study properties of the compact $~4D~$ $U(1)$ lattice gauge theory with monopoles {\\it removed}. Employing Monte Carlo simulations we calculate correlators of scalar, vector and tensor operators at zero and nonzero momenta $~\\vec{p}~$. We confirm that the theory without monopoles has no phase transition, at least, in the interval $~0 < \\beta \\leq 2~$. There the photon becomes massless and fits the lattice free field theory dispersion relation very well. The energies of the $~0^{++}~$, $~1^{+-}~$ and $~2^{++}~$ states show a rather weak dependence on the coupling in the interval of $~\\beta~$ investigated, and their ratios are practically constant. We show also a further modification of the theory suppressing the negative plaquettes to improve drastically the overlap with the lowest states (at least, for $~J=1$).

  18. Multiple magnetization plateaus and magnetic structures in the S =1/2 Heisenberg model on the checkerboard lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Katsuhiro; Shibata, Naokazu

    2016-10-01

    We study the ground state of the S =1/2 Heisenberg model on the checkerboard lattice in a magnetic field by the density matrix renormalization group method with the sine-square deformation. We obtain magnetization plateaus at M /Msat=0 ,1/4 ,3/8 ,1/2 , and 3/4 , where Msat is the saturated magnetization. The obtained 3/4 plateau state is consistent with the exact result, and the 1/2 plateau is found to have a four-spin resonating loop structure similar to the six-spin loop structure of the 1/3 plateau of the kagome lattice. Different four-spin loop structures are obtained in the 1/4 and 3/8 plateaus but no corresponding states exist in the kagome lattice. The 3/8 plateau has a unique magnetic structure of three types of four-spin local quantum states in a 4 √{2 }×2 √{2 } magnetic unit cell with a 16-fold degeneracy.

  19. Tool for Generation of MAC/GMC Representative Unit Cell for CMC/PMC Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2016-01-01

    This document describes a recently developed analysis tool that enhances the resident capabilities of the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) 4.0. This tool is especially useful in analyzing ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), where higher fidelity with improved accuracy of local response is needed. The tool, however, can be used for analyzing polymer matrix composites (PMCs) as well. MAC/GMC 4.0 is a composite material and laminate analysis software developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. The software package has been built around the concept of the generalized method of cells (GMC). The computer code is developed with a user friendly framework, along with a library of local inelastic, damage, and failure models. Further, application of simulated thermomechanical loading, generation of output results, and selection of architectures to represent the composite material have been automated to increase the user friendliness, as well as to make it more robust in terms of input preparation and code execution. Finally, classical lamination theory has been implemented within the software, wherein GMC is used to model the composite material response of each ply. Thus, the full range of GMC composite material capabilities is available for analysis of arbitrary laminate configurations as well. The primary focus of the current effort is to provide a graphical user interface (GUI) capability that generates a number of different user-defined repeating unit cells (RUCs). In addition, the code has provisions for generation of a MAC/GMC-compatible input text file that can be merged with any MAC/GMC input file tailored to analyze composite materials. Although the primary intention was to address the three different constituents and phases that are usually present in CMCs-namely, fibers, matrix, and interphase-it can be easily modified to address two-phase polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials where an interphase is absent. Currently, the

  20. The Developement of A Lattice Structured Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans

    to a given set of inserted terms, that is the smallest lattice where the inserted terms preserve their value compared to the value in the initial algebra/lattice. The database is the dual representation of this most disjoint lattice. We develop algorithms to construct and make queries to the database....

  1. Lattice Boltzmann solver of Rossler equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuangwuYAN; LiRUAN

    2000-01-01

    We proposed a lattice Boltzmann model for the Rossler equation. Using a method of multiscales in the lattice Boltzmann model, we get the diffusion reaction as a special case. If the diffusion effect disappeared, we can obtain the lattice Boltzmann solution of the Rossler equation on the mesescopic scale. The numerical results show the method can be used to simulate Rossler equation.

  2. Clar sextets in square graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rene; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    A periodic array of holes transforms graphene from a semimetal into a semiconductor with a band gap tuneable by varying the parameters of the lattice. In earlier work only hexagonal lattices have been treated. Using atomistic models we here investigate the size of the band gap of a square lattice...

  3. Modal analysis of kagome-lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, H.; Blakley, S.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    The first few lowest order circularly symmetric electromagnetic eigenmodes of a full kagome lattice are compared to those of a kagome lattice with a hexagonal defect. This analysis offers important insights into the physics behind the waveguiding properties of hollow-core fibers with a kagome-lattice cladding.

  4. Perfect and Quasi-Perfect Lattice Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, W

    1998-01-01

    Perfect lattice actions are exiting with several respects: they provide new insight into conceptual questions of the lattice regularization, and quasi-perfect actions could enable a great leap forward in the non-perturbative solution of QCD. We try to transmit a flavor of them, also beyond the lattice community.

  5. The lattice of d-structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fajstrup, Lisbeth

    The set of d-structures on a topological space form a lattice and in fact a locale. There is a Galois connection between the lattice of subsets of the space and the lattice of d-structures. Variation of the d-structures induces change in the spaces of directed paths. Hence variation of d...

  6. SIMPLE LATTICE BOLTZMANN MODEL FOR TRAFFIC FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Guangwu; Hu Shouxin

    2000-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with 5-bit lattice for traffic flows is proposed.Using the Chapman-Enskog expansion and multi-scale technique,we obtain the higher-order moments of equilibrium distribution function.A simple traffic light problem is simulated by using the present lattice Boltzmann model,and the result agrees well with analytical solution.

  7. Exact Chiral Symmetry on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, H

    2001-01-01

    Developments during the last eight years have refuted the folklore that chiral symmetries cannot be preserved on the lattice. The mechanism that permits chiral symmetry to coexist with the lattice is quite general and may work in Nature as well. The reconciliation between chiral symmetry and the lattice is likely to revolutionize the field of numerical QCD.

  8. Mayet-Godowski Hilbert Lattice Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Megill, Norman D.; Pavicic, Mladen

    2006-01-01

    Several new results in the field of Hilbert lattice equations based on states defined on the lattice as well as novel techniques used to arrive at these results are presented. An open problem of Mayet concerning Hilbert lattice equations based on Hilbert-space-valued states is answered.

  9. On the structure of Lattice code WIMSD-5B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Young; Min, Byung Joo

    2004-03-15

    The WIMS-D code is a freely available thermal reactor physics lattice code used widely for thermal research and power reactor calculation. Now the code WIMS-AECL, developed on the basis of WIMS-D, has been used as one of lattice codes for the cell calculation in Canada and also, in 1998, the latest version WIMSD-5B is released for OECD/NEA Data Bank. While WIMS-KAERI was developed and has been used, originated from WIMS-D, in Korea, it was adjusted for the cell calculation of research reactor HANARO and so it has no confirmaty to CANDU reactor. Therefore, the code development applicable to cell calculation of CANDU reactor is necessary not only for technological independence and but also for the establishment of CANDU safety analysis system. A lattice code WIMSD-5B was analyzed in order to set the system of reactor physics computer codes, to be used in the assessment of void reactivity effect. In order to improve and validate WIMSD-5B code, the analysis of the structure of WIMSD-5B lattice code was made and so its structure, algorithm and the subroutines of WIMSD-5B were presented for the cluster type and the pij method modelling the CANDU-6 fuel

  10. Indium phosphide solar cell research in the United States: Comparison with non-photovoltaic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of the InP solar cell research program are presented. Homojunction cells with efficiencies approaching 19 percent are demonstrated, while 17 percent is achieved for ITO/InP cells. The superior radiation resistance of the two latter cell configurations over both Si and GaAs cells has been shown. InP cells aboard the LIPS3 satellite show no degradation after more than a year in orbit. Computed array specific powers are used to compare the performance of an InP solar cell array to solar dynamic and nuclear systems.

  11. Lattice gaugefixing and other optics in lattice gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Ken

    1992-06-01

    We present results from four projects. In the first, quark and gluon propagators and effective masses and {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule operator matching coefficients are computed numerically in gaugefixed lattice QCD. In the second, the same quantities are evaluated analytically in the strong coupling, N {yields} {infinity} limit. In the third project, the Schwinger model is studied in covariant gauges, where we show that the effective electron mass varies with the gauge parameter and that longitudinal gaugefixing ambiguities affect operator product expansion coefficients (analogous to {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule matching coefficients) determined by matching gauge variant matrix elements. However, we find that matching coefficients even if shifted by the unphysical modes are {xi} invariant. In the fourth project, we show that the strong coupling parallelogram lattice Schwinger model as a different thermodynamic limit than the weak coupling continuum limit. As a function of lattice skewness angle these models span the {Delta} = {minus}1 critical line of 6-vertex models which, in turn, have been identified as c = 1 conformal field theories.

  12. Lattice gaugefixing and other optics in lattice gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Ken.

    1992-06-01

    We present results from four projects. In the first, quark and gluon propagators and effective masses and {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule operator matching coefficients are computed numerically in gaugefixed lattice QCD. In the second, the same quantities are evaluated analytically in the strong coupling, N {yields} {infinity} limit. In the third project, the Schwinger model is studied in covariant gauges, where we show that the effective electron mass varies with the gauge parameter and that longitudinal gaugefixing ambiguities affect operator product expansion coefficients (analogous to {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule matching coefficients) determined by matching gauge variant matrix elements. However, we find that matching coefficients even if shifted by the unphysical modes are {xi} invariant. In the fourth project, we show that the strong coupling parallelogram lattice Schwinger model as a different thermodynamic limit than the weak coupling continuum limit. As a function of lattice skewness angle these models span the {Delta} = {minus}1 critical line of 6-vertex models which, in turn, have been identified as c = 1 conformal field theories.

  13. Tunable Multifunctional Thermal Metamaterials: Manipulation of Local Heat Flux via Assembly of Unit-Cell Thermal Shifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwanwoo; Kang, Sunggu; Lee, Howon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-01-20

    Thermal metamaterials, designed by transformation thermodynamics are artificial structures that can actively control heat flux at a continuum scale. However, fabrication of them is very challenging because it requires a continuous change of thermal properties in materials, for one specific function. Herein, we introduce tunable thermal metamaterials that use the assembly of unit-cell thermal shifters for a remarkable enhancement in multifunctionality as well as manufacturability. Similar to the digitization of a two-dimensional image, designed thermal metamaterials by transformation thermodynamics are disassembled as unit-cells thermal shifters in tiny areas, representing discretized heat flux lines in local spots. The programmed-reassembly of thermal shifters inspired by LEGO enable the four significant functions of thermal metamaterials-shield, concentrator, diffuser, and rotator-in both simulation and experimental verification using finite element method and fabricated structures made from copper and PDMS. This work paves the way for overcoming the structural and functional limitations of thermal metamaterials.

  14. Tunable Multifunctional Thermal Metamaterials: Manipulation of Local Heat Flux via Assembly of Unit-Cell Thermal Shifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwanwoo; Kang, Sunggu; Lee, Howon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-01-01

    Thermal metamaterials, designed by transformation thermodynamics are artificial structures that can actively control heat flux at a continuum scale. However, fabrication of them is very challenging because it requires a continuous change of thermal properties in materials, for one specific function. Herein, we introduce tunable thermal metamaterials that use the assembly of unit-cell thermal shifters for a remarkable enhancement in multifunctionality as well as manufacturability. Similar to the digitization of a two-dimensional image, designed thermal metamaterials by transformation thermodynamics are disassembled as unit-cells thermal shifters in tiny areas, representing discretized heat flux lines in local spots. The programmed-reassembly of thermal shifters inspired by LEGO enable the four significant functions of thermal metamaterials—shield, concentrator, diffuser, and rotator—in both simulation and experimental verification using finite element method and fabricated structures made from copper and PDMS. This work paves the way for overcoming the structural and functional limitations of thermal metamaterials. PMID:28106156

  15. Compact Circularly Polarized Patch Antenna Using a Composite Right/Left-Handed Transmission Line Unit-Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Geng

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A compact circularly polarized (CP patch antenna using a composite right/left-handed (CRLH transmission line (TL unit-cell is proposed. The CRLH TL unit-cell includes a complementary split ring resonator (CSRR for shunt inductance and a gap loaded with a circular-shaped slot for series capacitance. The CSRR can decrease the TM10 mode resonance frequency, thus reducing the electrical size of the proposed antenna. In addition, the asymmetry of the CSRR brings about the TM01 mode, which can be combined with the TM10 mode by changing the slot radius. The combination of these two orthogonal modes with 90° phase shift makes the proposed antenna provide a CP property. The experimental results show that the proposed antenna has a wider axial ratio bandwidth and a smaller electrical size than the reported CP antennas. Moreover, the proposed antenna is designed without impedance transformer, 90° phase shift, dual feed and ground via.

  16. Interfacing of science, medicine and law: The stem cell patent controversy in the United States and the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya eDavey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The patent eligibility of stem cells – particularly those derived from human embryos – has long been under debate in both the scientific and legal communities. On the basis of moral grounds, the European Patent Office (EPO has refrained from granting patents for stem cells obtained through the destruction of human embryos. On the contrary, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO has historically granted patents regarding the isolation and use of human embryonic and other stem cells. To date, these US patents remain valid despite an increasing onslaught of challenges in court. However, recent precedents established in US courts significantly narrow the scope of patent eligibility within biotechnology. This article compares the implications of recent legal changes on stem cell patent eligibility between the EU and US.

  17. Red cell storage age policy for patients with sickle cell disease: A survey of transfusion service directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafin, Matthew S; Singavi, Arun K; Irani, Mehraboon S; Puca, Kathleen E; Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Field, Joshua J

    2016-02-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the effects of the red cell storage lesion are not well defined. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of transfusion services that limit red cell units by storage age for patients with SCD. We developed a 22 question survey of transfusion service director opinions and their corresponding blood bank policies. Target subjects were systematically identified on the AABB website. Responses were recorded in SurveyMonkey and summarized using standard statistical techniques. Ninety transfusion service directors responded to the survey. Response rate was 22%. Only 23% of respondents had storage age policies in place for patients with SCD, even though 36% of respondents consider older units to be potentially harmful in this patient population. Of those with a policy, a less-than 15 day storage age requirement was most often used (75%), but practices varied, and most respondents (65%) agreed that evidence-based guidelines regarding storage age are needed for patients with SCD. Policies, practices and opinions about the risks of older units for patients with SCD vary. As patients with SCD may have unique susceptibilities to features of the red cell storage lesion, prospective studies in this population are needed to determine best practice.

  18. Computation of the effective nonlinear mechanical response of lattice materials considering geometrical nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElNady, Khaled; Goda, Ibrahim; Ganghoffer, Jean-François

    2016-09-01

    The asymptotic homogenization technique is presently developed in the framework of geometrical nonlinearities to derive the large strains effective elastic response of network materials viewed as repetitive beam networks. This works extends the small strains homogenization method developed with special emphasis on textile structures in Goda et al. (J Mech Phys Solids 61(12):2537-2565, 2013). A systematic methodology is established, allowing the prediction of the overall mechanical properties of these structures in the nonlinear regime, reflecting the influence of the geometrical and mechanical micro-parameters of the network structure on the overall response of the chosen equivalent continuum. Internal scale effects of the initially discrete structure are captured by the consideration of a micropolar effective continuum model. Applications to the large strain response of 3D hexagonal lattices and dry textiles exemplify the powerfulness of the proposed method. The effective mechanical responses obtained for different loadings are validated by FE simulations performed over a representative unit cell.

  19. YPO4 nanocrystals: preparation and size-induced lattice symmetry enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiong; SU Yiguo; YU Hongsheng; HAN Wei

    2008-01-01

    YPO4 and Eu doped YPO4 nanocrystals were prepared via a simple hydrothermal method. The phase purity, microstructure, surface absorbed water and luminescence properties were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence spectrum, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis(TGA). Combined with XRD and TEM analysis, it was found that YPO4 nanocrystals crystallized into a single phase of tetragonal (I41/amd) zircon structure. YPO4 nanocrystals showed a size reduction with the reaction temperature decreasing. Considering the XRD, IR and Raman results, a lattice expansion and the unit cell symmetry enhancement were observed with the particle size decreasing. A dipole to dipole interaction model was applied to investigate the relationship of the variation of microstructure and the particle size. The emission spectrum of Eu doped YPO4 nanocrystals was also presented and the emission bands were clearly ascribed to the f to f transitions of Eu3+.

  20. Structure and lattice dynamics of rare-earth ferroborate crystals: Ab initio calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshev, V. A.; Nikiforov, A. E.; Petrov, V. P.; Serdtsev, A. V.; Kashchenko, M. A.; Klimin, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    The ab initio calculation of the crystal structure and the phonon spectrum of crystals RFe3(BO3)4 ( R = Pr, Nd, Sm) has been performed in the framework of the density functional theory. The ion coordinates in the unit cell, the lattice parameters, the frequencies and the types of fundamental vibrations, and also the intensities of lines in the Raman spectrum and infrared reflection spectra have been found. The elastic constants of the crystals have been calculated. For low-frequency A 2 mode in PrFe3(BO3)4, a "seed" vibration frequency that strongly interacts with the electronic excitation on a praseodymium ion was found. The calculation results satisfactory agree with the experimental data.

  1. A Miniaturized Antenna with Negative Index Metamaterial Based on Modified SRR and CLS Unit Cell for UWB Microwave Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Moinul Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A miniaturized antenna employing a negative index metamaterial with modified split-ring resonator (SRR and capacitance-loaded strip (CLS unit cells is presented for Ultra wideband (UWB microwave imaging applications. Four left-handed (LH metamaterial (MTM unit cells are located along one axis of the antenna as the radiating element. Each left-handed metamaterial unit cell combines a modified split-ring resonator (SRR with a capacitance-loaded strip (CLS to obtain a design architecture that simultaneously exhibits both negative permittivity and negative permeability, which ensures a stable negative refractive index to improve the antenna performance for microwave imaging. The antenna structure, with dimension of 16 × 21 × 1.6 mm3, is printed on a low dielectric FR4 material with a slotted ground plane and a microstrip feed. The measured reflection coefficient demonstrates that this antenna attains 114.5% bandwidth covering the frequency band of 3.4–12.5 GHz for a voltage standing wave ratio of less than 2 with a maximum gain of 5.16 dBi at 10.15 GHz. There is a stable harmony between the simulated and measured results that indicate improved nearly omni-directional radiation characteristics within the operational frequency band. The stable surface current distribution, negative refractive index characteristic, considerable gain and radiation properties make this proposed negative index metamaterial antenna optimal for UWB microwave imaging applications.

  2. On the Effect of Unit-Cell Parameters in Predicting the Elastic Response of Wood-Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Alavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the effect of unit-cell geometrical parameters in predicting elastic properties of a typical wood plastic composite (WPC. The ultimate goal was obtaining the optimal values of representative volume element (RVE parameters to accurately predict the mechanical behavior of the WPC. For each unit cell, defined by a given combination of the above geometrical parameters, finite element simulation in ABAQUS was carried out, and the corresponding stress-strain curve was obtained. A uniaxial test according to ASTM D638-02a type V was performed on the composite specimen. Modulus of elasticity was determined using hyperbolic tangent function, and the results were compared to the sets of finite element analyses. Main effects of RVE parameters and their interactions were demonstrated and discussed, specially regarding the inclusion of two adjacent wood particles within one unit cell of the material. Regression analysis was performed to mathematically model the RVE parameter effects and their interactions over the modulus of elasticity response. The model was finally employed in an optimization analysis to arrive at an optimal set of RVE parameters that minimizes the difference between the predicted and experimental moduli of elasticity.

  3. A Miniaturized Antenna with Negative Index Metamaterial Based on Modified SRR and CLS Unit Cell for UWB Microwave Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Moinul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Samsuzzaman, Md; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Misran, Norbahiah; Mansor, Mohd Fais

    2015-01-23

    A miniaturized antenna employing a negative index metamaterial with modified split-ring resonator (SRR) and capacitance-loaded strip (CLS) unit cells is presented for Ultra wideband (UWB) microwave imaging applications. Four left-handed (LH) metamaterial (MTM) unit cells are located along one axis of the antenna as the radiating element. Each left-handed metamaterial unit cell combines a modified split-ring resonator (SRR) with a capacitance-loaded strip (CLS) to obtain a design architecture that simultaneously exhibits both negative permittivity and negative permeability, which ensures a stable negative refractive index to improve the antenna performance for microwave imaging. The antenna structure, with dimension of 16 × 21 × 1.6 mm³, is printed on a low dielectric FR4 material with a slotted ground plane and a microstrip feed. The measured reflection coefficient demonstrates that this antenna attains 114.5% bandwidth covering the frequency band of 3.4-12.5 GHz for a voltage standing wave ratio of less than 2 with a maximum gain of 5.16 dBi at 10.15 GHz. There is a stable harmony between the simulated and measured results that indicate improved nearly omni-directional radiation characteristics within the operational frequency band. The stable surface current distribution, negative refractive index characteristic, considerable gain and radiation properties make this proposed negative index metamaterial antenna optimal for UWB microwave imaging applications.

  4. A Miniaturized Antenna with Negative Index Metamaterial Based on Modified SRR and CLS Unit Cell for UWB Microwave Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Moinul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Samsuzzaman, Md.; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Misran, Norbahiah; Mansor, Mohd Fais

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna employing a negative index metamaterial with modified split-ring resonator (SRR) and capacitance-loaded strip (CLS) unit cells is presented for Ultra wideband (UWB) microwave imaging applications. Four left-handed (LH) metamaterial (MTM) unit cells are located along one axis of the antenna as the radiating element. Each left-handed metamaterial unit cell combines a modified split-ring resonator (SRR) with a capacitance-loaded strip (CLS) to obtain a design architecture that simultaneously exhibits both negative permittivity and negative permeability, which ensures a stable negative refractive index to improve the antenna performance for microwave imaging. The antenna structure, with dimension of 16 × 21 × 1.6 mm3, is printed on a low dielectric FR4 material with a slotted ground plane and a microstrip feed. The measured reflection coefficient demonstrates that this antenna attains 114.5% bandwidth covering the frequency band of 3.4–12.5 GHz for a voltage standing wave ratio of less than 2 with a maximum gain of 5.16 dBi at 10.15 GHz. There is a stable harmony between the simulated and measured results that indicate improved nearly omni-directional radiation characteristics within the operational frequency band. The stable surface current distribution, negative refractive index characteristic, considerable gain and radiation properties make this proposed negative index metamaterial antenna optimal for UWB microwave imaging applications. PMID:28787945

  5. Intra-unit-cell magnetic correlations near optimal doping in YBa2Cu3O6.85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin-Thro, L; Sidis, Y; Wildes, A; Bourges, P

    2015-07-03

    The pseudo-gap phenomenon in copper oxide superconductors is central to any description of these materials as it prefigures the superconducting state itself. A magnetic intra-unit-cell order was found to occur just at the pseudo-gap temperature in four cuprate high-Tc superconducting families. Here we present polarized neutron-scattering measurements of nearly optimally doped YBa2Cu3O6.85, carried out on two different spectrometers, that reveal several features. The intra-unit-cell order consists of finite-sized planar domains that are very weakly correlated along the c axis. At high temperature, only the out-of-plane magnetic components correlate, indicating a strong Ising anisotropy. An aditional in-plane response develops at low temperature, giving rise to an apparent tilt of the magnetic moment. The discovery of these two regimes puts stringent constraints, which are tightly bound to the pseudo-gap physics, on the intrinsic nature of intra-unit-cell order.

  6. Design and Manufacturing of a Composite Lattice Structure Reinforced by Continuous Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hualin; YANG Wei; WANG Bin; YAN Yong; FU Qiang; FANG Daining; ZHUANG Zhuo

    2006-01-01

    New techniques have been developed to make materials with a periodic three-dimensional lattice structure. The high stiffness per unit weight and multifunction of such lattice structures make them attractive for use in aeronautic and astronautic structures. In this paper, epoxy-soaked continuous carbon fibres were first introduced to make lattice composite structures, which maximize the specific load carrying capacity. A micromechanical analysis of several designs, each corresponding to a different manufacturing route, was carried out, in order to find the optimized lattice structure with maximum specific stiffness. An intertwining method was chosen and developed as the best route to make lattice composite materials reinforced by carbon fibers. A sandwich-weaved sample with a three-dimensional intertwined lattice structure core was found to be best. The manufacturing of such a composite lattice material was outlined. In addition to a high shear strength of the core and the integral manufacturing method, the lattice sandwich structure is expected to possess better mechanical capability.

  7. Innovations in Lattice QCD Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-06-25

    Lattice QCD calculations demand a substantial amount of computing power in order to achieve the high precision results needed to better understand the nature of strong interactions, assist experiment to discover new physics, and predict the behavior of a diverse set of physical systems ranging from the proton itself to astrophysical objects such as neutron stars. However, computer power alone is clearly not enough to tackle the calculations we need to be doing today. A steady stream of recent algorithmic developments has made an important impact on the kinds of calculations we can currently perform. In this talk I am reviewing these algorithms and their impact on the nature of lattice QCD calculations performed today.

  8. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Michelitsch, Thomas; Riascos, Alejandro Perez; Nowakowski, Andrzeij; Nicolleau, Franck

    2016-01-01

    We analyze time-discrete and continuous `fractional' random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in $n=1,2,3,..$ dimensions.The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving {\\it fractional powers of Laplacian matrices $L^{\\frac{\\alpha}{2}}$}where $\\alpha=2$ recovers the normal walk.First we demonstrate thatthe interval $0\\textless{}\\alpha\\leq 2$ is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for fractional transition matrix and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain thefundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$, and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk.The representation for the fundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$ relates fractional random walks with normal random walks.We show that the fractional transition matrix elements exihibit for large cubic $n$-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an $n$-dimensional infinite spaceRiesz fractional deriva...

  9. Fluctuating multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, D; Sbragaglia, M; Biferale, L; Gross, M; Varnik, F

    2015-02-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating lattice Boltzmann equations (FLBEs) describe single component fluids. In this paper, a model based on the continuum kinetic Boltzmann equation for describing multicomponent fluids is extended to incorporate the effects of thermal fluctuations. The thus obtained fluctuating Boltzmann equation is first linearized to apply the theory of linear fluctuations, and expressions for the noise covariances are determined by invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem directly at the kinetic level. Crucial for our analysis is the projection of the Boltzmann equation onto the orthonormal Hermite basis. By integrating in space and time the fluctuating Boltzmann equation with a discrete number of velocities, the FLBE is obtained for both ideal and nonideal multicomponent fluids. Numerical simulations are specialized to the case where mean-field interactions are introduced on the lattice, indicating a proper thermalization of the system.

  10. Lattice QCD on nonorientable manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mages, Simon; Tóth, Bálint C.; Borsányi, Szabolcs; Fodor, Zoltán; Katz, Sándor D.; Szabó, Kálmán K.

    2017-05-01

    A common problem in lattice QCD simulations on the torus is the extremely long autocorrelation time of the topological charge when one approaches the continuum limit. The reason is the suppressed tunneling between topological sectors. The problem can be circumvented by replacing the torus with a different manifold, so that the connectivity of the configuration space is changed. This can be achieved by using open boundary conditions on the fields, as proposed earlier. It has the side effect of breaking translational invariance strongly. Here we propose to use a nonorientable manifold and show how to define and simulate lattice QCD on it. We demonstrate in quenched simulations that this leads to a drastic reduction of the autocorrelation time. A feature of the new proposal is that translational invariance is preserved up to exponentially small corrections. A Dirac fermion on a nonorientable manifold poses a challenge to numerical simulations: the fermion determinant becomes complex. We propose two approaches to circumvent this problem.

  11. Entanglement scaling in lattice systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audenaert, K M R [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Prince' s Gate, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom); Cramer, M [QOLS, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Eisert, J [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Prince' s Gate, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom); Plenio, M B [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Prince' s Gate, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    We review some recent rigorous results on scaling laws of entanglement properties in quantum many body systems. More specifically, we study the entanglement of a region with its surrounding and determine its scaling behaviour with its size for systems in the ground and thermal states of bosonic and fermionic lattice systems. A theorem connecting entanglement between a region and the rest of the lattice with the surface area of the boundary between the two regions is presented for non-critical systems in arbitrary spatial dimensions. The entanglement scaling in the field limit exhibits a peculiar difference between fermionic and bosonic systems. In one-spatial dimension a logarithmic divergence is recovered for both bosonic and fermionic systems. In two spatial dimensions in the setting of half-spaces however we observe strict area scaling for bosonic systems and a multiplicative logarithmic correction to such an area scaling in fermionic systems. Similar questions may be posed and answered in classical systems.

  12. Fungal keratitis in Lattice dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Samrat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of fungal keratitis occurring in a patient with lattice dystrophy. A 57-year-old farmer presented with a corneal ulcer following probable entry of paddy husk in the right eye, of one month duration. Corneal scraping revealed pigmented fungal filaments while culture grew Alternaria alternata. Treatment with 5% natamycin eye drops and 1% atropine healed the infection in four weeks. We would like to draw attention to the fact that the cornea in lattice dystrophy is prone to frequent erosions and is a compromised epithelial barrier to invasion by microorganisms. Patients must be made aware of this fact and should seek attention at the earliest following any trivial trauma. Management of minor corneal abrasions in them should be directed at healing the epithelium with adequate lubricants and preventing infection with topical antibiotic prophylaxis.

  13. Screening in graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Marco Haller; Jauho, A. P.; Pedersen, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    We compute the dynamical polarization function for a graphene antidot lattice in the random-phase approximation. The computed polarization functions display a much more complicated structure than what is found for pristine graphene (even when evaluated beyond the Dirac-cone approximation); this r...... the plasmon dispersion law and find an approximate square-root dependence with a suppressed plasmon frequency as compared to doped graphene. The plasmon dispersion is nearly isotropic and the developed approximation schemes agree well with the full calculation.......We compute the dynamical polarization function for a graphene antidot lattice in the random-phase approximation. The computed polarization functions display a much more complicated structure than what is found for pristine graphene (even when evaluated beyond the Dirac-cone approximation...

  14. Shear Viscosity from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mages, Simon W; Fodor, Zoltán; Schäfer, Andreas; Szabó, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the transport properties of the the quark-gluon plasma is becoming increasingly important to describe current measurements at heavy ion collisions. This work reports on recent efforts to determine the shear viscosity h in the deconfined phase from lattice QCD. The main focus is on the integration of the Wilson flow in the analysis to get a better handle on the infrared behaviour of the spectral function which is relevant for transport. It is carried out at finite Wilson flow time, which eliminates the dependence on the lattice spacing. Eventually, a new continuum limit has to be carried out which sends the new regulator introduced by finite flow time to zero. Also the non-perturbative renormalization strategy applied for the energy momentum tensor is discussed. At the end some quenched results for temperatures up to 4 : 5 T c are presented

  15. Lattice dynamics of lithium oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabhatasree Goel; N Choudhury; S L Chaplot

    2004-08-01

    Li2O finds several important technological applications, as it is used in solid-state batteries, can be used as a blanket breeding material in nuclear fusion reactors, etc. Li2O exhibits a fast ion phase, characterized by a thermally induced dynamic disorder in the anionic sub-lattice of Li+, at elevated temperatures around 1200 K. We have carried out lattice-dynamical calculations of Li2O using a shell model in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The calculated phonon frequencies are in excellent agreement with the reported inelastic neutron scattering data. Thermal expansion, specific heat, elastic constants and equation of state have also been calculated which are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  16. Breathers in strongly anharmonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenau, Philip; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2014-02-01

    We present and study a family of finite amplitude breathers on a genuinely anharmonic Klein-Gordon lattice embedded in a nonlinear site potential. The direct numerical simulations are supported by a quasilinear Schrodinger equation (QLS) derived by averaging out the fast oscillations assuming small, albeit finite, amplitude vibrations. The genuinely anharmonic interlattice forces induce breathers which are strongly localized with tails evanescing at a doubly exponential rate and are either close to a continuum, with discrete effects being suppressed, or close to an anticontinuum state, with discrete effects being enhanced. Whereas the D-QLS breathers appear to be always stable, in general there is a stability threshold which improves with spareness of the lattice.

  17. Lattice splitting under intermittent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Schläpfer, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We study the splitting of regular square lattices subject to stochastic intermittent flows. By extensive Monte Carlo simulations we reveal how the time span until the occurence of a splitting depends on various flow patterns imposed on the lattices. Increasing the flow fluctuation frequencies shortens this time span which reaches a minimum before rising again due to inertia effects incorporated in the model. The size of the largest connected component after the splitting is rather independent of the flow fluctuations but sligthly decreases with the link capacities. Our results are relevant for assessing the robustness of real-life systems, such as electric power grids with a large share of renewable energy sources including wind turbines and photovoltaic systems.

  18. Scattering in Quantum Lattice Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Love, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA) are of interest for their use in simulating quantum mechanics on both classical and quantum computers. QLGAs are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata where the constraint of unitary evolution is added. In the late 1990s, David A. Meyer as well as Bruce Boghosian and Washington Taylor produced similar models of QLGAs. We start by presenting a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the physics of wave-packet scattering. We show that the Meyer and Boghosian-Taylor models are actually the same basic model with slightly different parameterizations and limits. We then implement these models computationally using the Python programming language and show that QLGAs are able to replicate the analytic results of quantum mechanics (for example reflected and transmitted amplitudes for step potentials and the Klein paradox).

  19. Qcd Thermodynamics On A Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Levkova, L A

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulations of full QCD on anisotropic lattices provide a convenient way to study QCD thermodynamics with fixed physics scales and reduced lattice spacing errors. We report results from calculations with two flavors of dynamical staggered fermions, where all bare parameters and the renormalized anisotropy are kept constant and the temperature is changed in small steps by varying only the number of time slices. Including results from zero- temperature scale setting simulations, which determine the Karsch coefficients, allows for the calculation of the Equation of State at finite temperatures. We also report on studies of the chiral properties of dynamical domain-wall fermions combined with the DBW2 gauge action for different gauge couplings and fermion masses. For quenched theories, the DBW2 action gives a residual chiral symmetry breaking much smaller than what was found with more traditional choices for the gauge action. Our goal is to investigate the possibilities which this and further improvemen...

  20. Lattice Embedding of Heronian Simplices

    CERN Document Server

    Lunnon, W Fred

    2012-01-01

    A rational triangle has rational edge-lengths and area; a rational tetrahedron has rational faces and volume; either is Heronian when its edge-lengths are integer, and proper when its content is nonzero. A variant proof is given, via complex number GCD, of the previously known result that any Heronian triangle may be embedded in the Cartesian lattice Z^2; it is then shown that, for a proper triangle, such an embedding is unique modulo lattice isometry; finally the method is extended via quaternion GCD to tetrahedra in Z^3, where uniqueness no longer obtains, and embeddings also exist which are unobtainable by this construction. The requisite complex and quaternionic number theoretic background is summarised beforehand. Subsequent sections engage with subsidiary implementation issues: initial rational embedding, canonical reduction, exhaustive search for embeddings additional to those yielded via GCD; and illustrative numerical examples are provided. A counter-example shows that this approach must fail in high...