WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit lattice cell

  1. Frequency distribution of the reduced unit cells of centred lattices from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2012-03-01

    In crystallography, a centred conventional lattice unit cell has its corresponding reduced primitive unit cell. This study presents the frequency distribution of the reduced unit cells of all centred lattice entries of the Protein Data Bank (as of 23 August 2011) in four unit-cell-dimension-based groups and seven interaxial-angle-based subgroups. This frequency distribution is an added layer of support during space-group assignment in new crystals. In addition, some interesting patterns of distribution are discussed as well as how some reduced unit cells could be wrongly accepted as primitive lattices in a different crystal system.

  2. Mechanical behavior of regular open-cell porous biomaterials made of diamond lattice unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, S M; Campoli, G; Amin Yavari, S; Sajadi, B; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2014-06-01

    Cellular structures with highly controlled micro-architectures are promising materials for orthopedic applications that require bone-substituting biomaterials or implants. The availability of additive manufacturing techniques has enabled manufacturing of biomaterials made of one or multiple types of unit cells. The diamond lattice unit cell is one of the relatively new types of unit cells that are used in manufacturing of regular porous biomaterials. As opposed to many other types of unit cells, there is currently no analytical solution that could be used for prediction of the mechanical properties of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cells. In this paper, we present new analytical solutions and closed-form relationships for predicting the elastic modulus, Poisson׳s ratio, critical buckling load, and yield (plateau) stress of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cell. The mechanical properties predicted using the analytical solutions are compared with those obtained using finite element models. A number of solid and porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) specimens were manufactured using selective laser melting. A series of experiments were then performed to determine the mechanical properties of the matrix material and cellular structures. The experimentally measured mechanical properties were compared with those obtained using analytical solutions and finite element (FE) models. It has been shown that, for small apparent density values, the mechanical properties obtained using analytical and numerical solutions are in agreement with each other and with experimental observations. The properties estimated using an analytical solution based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory markedly deviated from experimental results for large apparent density values. The mechanical properties estimated using FE models and another analytical solution based on the Timoshenko beam theory better matched the experimental observations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  3. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  4. Lattice cell burnup calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1977-01-01

    Accurate burnup prediction is a key item for design and operation of a power reactor. It should supply information on isotopic changes at each point in the reactor core and the consequences of these changes on the reactivity, power distribution, kinetic characters, control rod patterns, fuel cycles and operating strategy. A basic stage in the burnup prediction is the lattice cell burnup calculation. This series of lectures attempts to give a review of the general principles and calculational methods developed and applied in this area of burnup physics

  5. Integrable nonlinear Schrödinger system on a lattice with three structural elements in the unit cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhnenko, Oleksiy O.

    2018-05-01

    Developing the idea of increasing the number of structural elements in the unit cell of a quasi-one-dimensional lattice as applied to the semi-discrete integrable systems of nonlinear Schrödinger type, we construct the zero-curvature representation for the general integrable nonlinear system on a lattice with three structural elements in the unit cell. The integrability of the obtained general system permits to find explicitly a number of local conservation laws responsible for the main features of system dynamics and in particular for the so-called natural constraints separating the field variables into the basic and the concomitant ones. Thus, considering the reduction to the semi-discrete integrable system of nonlinear Schrödinger type, we revealed the essentially nontrivial impact of concomitant fields on the Poisson structure and on the whole Hamiltonian formulation of system dynamics caused by the nonzero background values of these fields. On the other hand, the zero-curvature representation of a general nonlinear system serves as an indispensable key to the dressing procedure of system integration based upon the Darboux transformation of the auxiliary linear problem and the implicit Bäcklund transformation of field variables. Due to the symmetries inherent to the six-component semi-discrete integrable nonlinear Schrödinger system with attractive-type nonlinearities, the Darboux-Bäcklund dressing scheme is shown to be simplified considerably, giving rise to the appropriately parameterized multi-component soliton solution consisting of six basic and four concomitant components.

  6. Calculational methods for lattice cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askew, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    At the current stage of development, direct simulation of all the processes involved in the reactor to the degree of accuracy required is not an economic proposition, and this is achieved by progressive synthesis of models for parts of the full space/angle/energy neutron behaviour. The split between reactor and lattice calculations is one such simplification. Most reactors are constructed of repetitions of similar geometric units, the fuel elements, having broadly similar properties. Thus the provision of detailed predictions of their behaviour is an important step towards overall modelling. We shall be dealing with these lattice methods in this series of lectures, but will refer back from time to time to their relationship with overall reactor calculation The lattice cell is itself composed of somewhat similar sub-units, the fuel pins, and will itself often rely upon a further break down of modelling. Construction of a good model depends upon the identification, on physical and mathematical grounds, of the most helpful division of the calculation at this level

  7. Conspicuous variation of the lattice unit cell in the pavonite homologous series and its relation with cation/anion occupational modulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mato, J.M., E-mail: jm.perez-mato@ehu.es [Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Elcoro, Luis [Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Makovicky, Emil [Department of Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Topa, Dan [Department of Materials Research and Physics, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Petříček, Václav [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Madariaga, Gotzon [Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Strong non-uniform variation of unit cell parameters in the pavonite homologous series. ► Conspicuous unit cell variation due to an underlying sub-lattice with cation/anion occupation. ► A modulated model common to the whole series using the superspace formalism proposed. ► Model successfully applied to the {sup 7}P pavonite Ag{sub 3}(Bi,Pb){sub 7}S{sub 12}. ► The model can be applied in a predictive way to other members of the family. - Abstract: The pavonites is a homologous series of sulfosalts with galena-like modules of variable size. A survey of their unit cells reveals that they are severely constrained by the metrics of an underlying common average sublattice. The unit cell of any compound of the series accommodates with high precision an integer number of approximately equal subcells. This explains a peculiar non-uniform variation of the unit cell parameters within the series and evidences that the interface between the galena-like modules, despite having a very different topology, approximately maintains the subperiodicity of the modules, and must therefore be subject to strong steric restrictions. It also implies that cations and anions occupy the nodes of the observed common underlying average sublattice according to a striking alternate cation/anion occupational modulation. This is the starting point for a description of these materials as modulated structures, which can make a proficient use of the approximate atomic positional non-crystallographic correlations caused by their modular character. Under this approach only four parameters suffice to define a realistic approximate model of any member of the series. A full structural characterization of any of the compounds only requires the determination of additional small/smooth modulations. As an example, the case of the {sup 7}P pavonite Ag{sub 3}Bi{sub 6.2}Pb{sub 0.8}S{sub 12}, is analyzed.

  8. Lattice cell diffusion coefficients. Definitions and comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Definitions of equivalent diffusion coefficients for regular lattices of heterogeneous cells have been given by several authors. The paper begins by reviewing these different definitions and the unification of their derivation. This unification makes clear how accurately each definition (together with appropriate cross-section definitions to preserve the eigenvalue) represents the individual reaction rates within the cell. The approach can be extended to include asymmetric cells and whereas before, the buckling describing the macroscopic flux shape was real, here it is found to be complex. A neutron ''drift'' coefficient as well as a diffusion coefficient is necessary to produce the macroscopic flux shape. The numerical calculation of the various different diffusion coefficients requires the solutions of equations similar to the ordinary transport equation for an infinite lattice. Traditional reactor physics codes are not sufficiently flexible to solve these equations in general. However, calculations in certain simple cases are presented and the theoretical results quantified. In difficult geometries, Monte Carlo techniques can be used to calculate an effective diffusion coefficient. These methods relate to those already described provided that correlation effects between different generations of neutrons are included. Again, these effects are quantified in certain simple cases. (author)

  9. Self-Sorting of White Blood Cells in a Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert H.; Gabel, Christopher V.; Chan, Shirley S.; Austin, Robert H.; Brody, James P.; James, D. W. Winkelman M.

    1997-09-01

    When a drop of human blood containing red and white blood cells is forced to move via hydrodynamic forces in a lattice of channels designed to mimic the capillary channels, the white cells self-fractionate into the different types of white cells. The pattern of white cells that forms is due to a combination of stretch-activated adhesion of cells with the walls, stochastic sticking probabilities, and heteroavoidance between granulocytes and lymphocytes.

  10. TRICE - A program for reconstructing 3D reciprocal space and determining unit-cell parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Xiaodong; Hovmoeller, Anders; Hovmoeller, Sven

    2004-01-01

    A program system-Trice-for reconstructing the 3D reciprocal lattice from an electron diffraction tilt series is described. The unit-cell parameters can be determined from electron diffraction patterns directly by Trice. The unit cell can be checked and the lattice type and crystal system can be determined from the 3D reciprocal lattice. Trice can be applied to all crystal systems and lattice types

  11. Investigation on Mechanical Properties’ Anisotropy of Rod Units in Lattice Structures Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chenchen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice structure with high strength and low mass using selective laser melting (SLM has been a hot topic. However, there are some problems in the fabrication of lattice structure by SLM. Rod unit is the basic component of lattice structure and its performance affects the whole structure. It is necessary to investigate the influence of selective laser melting on rod unit’s mechanical properties. A series of rod units with different inclination angle and diameter were fabricated by SLM in this research. And the mechanical properties of these units were measured by tensile test. The results show that the rod units with different diameters and inclination angles have good mechanical properties and show no difference. It is a good news for lattice structure designing for there is no necessary to consider the mechanical properties’ anisotropy of rod units.

  12. Sorting of White Blood Cells in a Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert; Chan, Shirley; Gabel, Chris; Austin, Robert

    1997-03-01

    White blood cells represent a heterogenous population of differentially sticky and deformable objects. We examine here experiemnts where the hydrodynamic flow of such a population in a lattice of obstacles results in the fractionation of the objects, and will present modeling of the observed fractionation of the objects.

  13. Multiphase lattice Boltzmann on the Cell Broadband Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belletti, F.; Mantovani, F.; Tripiccione, R.; Biferale, L.; Schifano, S.F.; Toschi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Computational experiments are one of the most used and flexible investigation tools in fluid dynamics. The Lattice Boltzmann Equation is a well established computational method particularly promising for multi-phase flows at micro and macro scales. Here we present preliminary results on performances of the Lbe method on the Cell Broadband Engine platform.

  14. SLAROM, Neutron Flux Distribution and Spectra in Lattice Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Tsuchihashi, K.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SLAROM solves the neutron integral transport equations to determine flux distribution and spectra in a lattice and calculates cell averaged effective cross sections. 2 - Method of solution: Collision probability method for cell calculation and 1D diffusion for core calculation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Variable dimensions are used throughout the program so that computer core requirements depend on a variety of program parameters

  15. Lattice Boltzmann method with the cell-population equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaoyang; Cheng Bing; Shi Baochang

    2008-01-01

    The central problem of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is to construct a discrete equilibrium. In this paper, a multi-speed 1D cell-model of Boltzmann equation is proposed, in which the cell-population equilibrium, a direct non-negative approximation to the continuous Maxwellian distribution, plays an important part. By applying the explicit one-order Chapman–Enskog distribution, the model reduces the transportation and collision, two basic evolution steps in LBM, to the transportation of the non-equilibrium distribution. Furthermore, 1D dam-break problem is performed and the numerical results agree well with the analytic solutions

  16. Validation of WIMS-CANDU using Pin-Cell Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Young; Min, Byung Joo; Park, Joo Hwan

    2006-01-01

    The WIMS-CANDU is a lattice code which has a depletion capability for the analysis of reactor physics problems related to a design and safety. The WIMS-CANDU code has been developed from the WIMSD5B, a version of the WIMS code released from the OECD/NEA data bank in 1998. The lattice code POWDERPUFS-V (PPV) has been used for the physics design and analysis of a natural uranium fuel for the CANDU reactor. However since the application of PPV is limited to a fresh fuel due to its empirical correlations, the WIMS-AECL code has been developed by AECL to substitute the PPV. Also, the WIMS-CANDU code is being developed to perform the physics analysis of the present operating CANDU reactors as a replacement of PPV. As one of the developing work of WIMS-CANDU, the U 238 absorption cross-section in the nuclear data library of WIMS-CANDU was updated and WIMS-CANDU was validated using the benchmark problems for pin-cell lattices such as TRX-1, TRX-2, Bapl-1, Bapl-2 and Bapl-3. The results by the WIMS-CANDU and the WIMS-AECL were compared with the experimental data

  17. The programme PIP2 for lattice cell thermal calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, A.J.

    1964-08-01

    The programme PIP2 solves the multigroup equations obtained by applying the method of collision probabilities to a fuel region (which may contain a cluster of fuel elements), and the SPECTROX flux assumption in a surrounding 'moderator'. The programme does not calculate collision probabilities for the fuel region and any geometry can be treated in the fuel region for which collision probabilities can be calculated. Lattice cell source problems may be treated and it is possible to include part of the physical moderator with the fuel region for treatment by the collision probability method. The programme is primarily intended for thermal fixed source problems, with the sources in the (physical moderator), but by including part of the moderator with the fuel it is possible to include fixed sources in the fuel for the study of fast effects. (author)

  18. Errors due to the cylindrical cell approximation in lattice calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newmarch, D A [Reactor Development Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1960-06-15

    It is shown that serious errors in fine structure calculations may arise through the use of the cylindrical cell approximation together with transport theory methods. The effect of this approximation is to overestimate the ratio of the flux in the moderator to the flux in the fuel. It is demonstrated that the use of the cylindrical cell approximation gives a flux in the moderator which is considerably higher than in the fuel, even when the cell dimensions in units of mean free path tend to zero; whereas, for the case of real cells (e.g. square or hexagonal), the flux ratio must tend to unity. It is also shown that, for cylindrical cells of any size, the ratio of the flux in the moderator to flux in the fuel tends to infinity as the total neutron cross section in the moderator tends to zero; whereas the ratio remains finite for real cells. (author)

  19. Calculation of the Flux in a Square Lattice Cell and a Comparison with Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelqvist, G [State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1961-05-15

    A calculation has been made of the thermal neutron flux in a square lattice cell using methods devised by Galanin. The f and L lattice parameters have been expressed in measurable quantities and a comparison made between measured and calculated values.

  20. Unified derivation of the various definitions of lattice cell diffusion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The various definitions of lattice cell diffusion coefficients are discussed within the context of a one-dimensional slab lattice in one energy group. It is shown how each definition, although originally derived in its own particular way, can be derived from a single approach. This makes clear the differences between, and the advantages of, the various definitions

  1. Effect of cosine current approximation in lattice cell calculations in cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanakrishnan, P.

    1978-01-01

    It is found that one-dimensional cylindrical geometry reactor lattice cell calculations using cosine angular current approximation at spatial mesh interfaces give results surprisingly close to the results of accurate neutron transport calculations as well as experimental measurements. This is especially true for tight light water moderated lattices. Reasons for this close agreement are investigated here. By re-examining the effects of reflective and white cell boundary conditions in these calculations it is concluded that one major reason is the use of white boundary condition necessitated by the approximation of the two-dimensional reactor lattice cell by a one-dimensional one. (orig.) [de

  2. Unit cell determination of epitaxial thin films based on reciprocal space vectors by high-resolution X-ray diffractometry

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ping; Liu, Huajun; Chen, Zuhuang; Chen, Lang; Wang, John

    2013-01-01

    A new approach, based on reciprocal space vectors (RSVs), is developed to determine Bravais lattice types and accurate lattice parameters of epitaxial thin films by high-resolution X-ray diffractometry (HR-XRD). The lattice parameters of single crystal substrates are employed as references to correct the systematic experimental errors of RSVs of thin films. The general procedure is summarized, involving correction of RSVs, derivation of raw unit cell, subsequent conversion to the Niggli unit ...

  3. Lattice Symmetry and Identification-The Fundamental Role of Reduced Cells in Materials Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighell, A D

    2001-01-01

    In theory, physical crystals can be represented by idealized mathematical lattices. Under appropriate conditions, these representations can be used for a variety of purposes such as identifying, classifying, and understanding the physical properties of materials. Critical to these applications is the ability to construct a unique representation of the lattice. The vital link that enabled this theory to be realized in practice was provided by the 1970 paper on the determination of reduced cells. This seminal paper led to a mathematical approach to lattice analysis initially based on systematic reduction procedures and the use of standard cells. Subsequently, the process evolved to a matrix approach based on group theory and linear algebra that offered a more abstract and powerful way to look at lattices and their properties. Application of the reduced cell to both database work and laboratory research at NIST was immediately successful. Currently, this cell and/or procedures based on reduction are widely and routinely used by the general scientific community: (i) for calculating standard cells for the reporting of crystalline materials, (ii) for classifying materials, (iii) in crystallographic database work (iv) in routine x-ray and neutron diffractometry, and (v) in general crystallographic research. Especially important is its use in symmetry determination and in identification. The focus herein is on the role of the reduced cell in lattice symmetry determination.

  4. Review of international solutions to NEACRP benchmark BWR lattice cell problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.

    1977-12-01

    This paper summarises international solutions to a set of BWR benchmark problems. The problems, posed as an activity sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Reactor Physics, were as follows: 9-pin supercell with central burnable poison pin, mini-BWR with 4 pin-cells and water gaps and control rod cruciform, full 7 x 7 pin BWR lattice cell with differential U 235 enrichment, and full 8 x 8 pin BWR lattice cell with water-hole, Pu-loading, burnable poison, and homogenised cruciform control rod. Solutions have been contributed by Denmark, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. (author)

  5. Accuracy of cell calculation methods used for analysis of high conversion light water reactor lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang-Joon; Okumura, Keisuke; Ishiguro, Yukio; Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Validation tests were made for the accuracy of cell calculation methods used in analyses of tight lattices of a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel core in a high conversion light water reactor (HCLWR). A series of cell calculations was carried out for the lattices referred from an international HCLWR benchmark comparison, with emphasis placed on the resonance calculation methods; the NR, IR approximations, the collision probability method with ultra-fine energy group. Verification was also performed for the geometrical modelling; a hexagonal/cylindrical cell, and the boundary condition; mirror/white reflection. In the calculations, important reactor physics parameters, such as the neutron multiplication factor, the conversion ratio and the void coefficient, were evaluated using the above methods for various HCLWR lattices with different moderator to fuel volume ratios, fuel materials and fissile plutonium enrichments. The calculated results were compared with each other, and the accuracy and applicability of each method were clarified by comparison with continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations. It was verified that the accuracy of the IR approximation became worse when the neutron spectrum became harder. It was also concluded that the cylindrical cell model with the white boundary condition was not so suitable for MOX fuelled lattices, as for UO 2 fuelled lattices. (author)

  6. The water proton spin-lattice relaxation times in virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valensin, G.; Gaggelli, E.; Tiezzi, E.; Valensin, P.E.; Bianchi Bandinelli, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The water proton spin-lattice relaxation times in HEp-2 cell cultures were determined immediately after 1 h of polio-virus adsorption. The shortening of the water T 1 was closely related to the multiplicity of infection, allowing direct inspections of the virus-cell interaction since the first steps of the infectious cycle. Virus-induced structural and conformational changes of cell constituents were suggested to be detectable by NMR investigation of cell water. (Auth.)

  7. Lattice vibrations in α-boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, W.

    1976-01-01

    α-rhombohedral boron is the simplest boron modification, with only 12 atoms per unit cell. The boron atoms are arranged in B 12 icosahedra, which are centered at the lattice points of a primitive rhombohedral lattice. The icosahedra are slightly deformed, as the five-fold symmetry of the ideal icosahedron is incompatible with any crystal structure. The lattice dynamics of α-boron are discussed in terms of the model developed by Weber and Thorpe. (Auth.)

  8. ISABELLE lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is given of a number of variants of the basic lattice of the planned ISABELLE storage rings. The variants were formed by removing cells from the normal part of the lattice and juggling the lengths of magnets, cells, and insertions in order to maintain a rational relation of circumference to that of the AGS and approximately the same dispersion. Special insertions, correction windings, and the working line with nonlinear resonances are discussed

  9. Neutron thermalization in reactor lattice cells: An NPY-project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamm'ler, R.J.J.; Takac, S.M.; Weiss, Z.J.

    1966-01-01

    The NPY-Project is a joint research programme in reactor physics between Norway, Poland, Yugoslavia and the International Atomic Energy Agency. One of the tasks of the project was to make a theoretical and experimental investigation of the phenomena of neutron thermalization in lattice cells, and this work is covered by the present monograph. The different lattices of the zero-power assemblies in the NPY countries offered ample opportunity for the theoreticians and experimentalists to test and compare their methods, and the exchange of experiences was stimulating and valuable. 85 refs, 26 figs, 19 tabs

  10. Energy- and cost-efficient lattice-QCD computations using graphics processing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Quarks and gluons are the building blocks of all hadronic matter, like protons and neutrons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a theory under test by large scale experiments like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and in the future at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. However, perturbative methods can only be applied to QCD for high energies. Studies from first principles are possible via a discretization onto an Euclidean space-time grid. This discretization of QCD is called Lattice QCD (LQCD) and is the only ab-initio option outside of the high-energy regime. LQCD is extremely compute and memory intensive. In particular, it is by definition always bandwidth limited. Thus - despite the complexity of LQCD applications - it led to the development of several specialized compute platforms and influenced the development of others. However, in recent years General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) came up as a new means for parallel computing. Contrary to machines traditionally used for LQCD, graphics processing units (GPUs) are a massmarket product. This promises advantages in both the pace at which higher-performing hardware becomes available and its price. CL2QCD is an OpenCL based implementation of LQCD using Wilson fermions that was developed within this thesis. It operates on GPUs by all major vendors as well as on central processing units (CPUs). On the AMD Radeon HD 7970 it provides the fastest double-precision D kernel for a single GPU, achieving 120GFLOPS. D - the most compute intensive kernel in LQCD simulations - is commonly used to compare LQCD platforms. This performance is enabled by an in-depth analysis of optimization techniques for bandwidth-limited codes on GPUs. Further, analysis of the communication between GPU and CPU, as well as between multiple GPUs, enables high-performance Krylov space solvers and linear scaling to multiple GPUs within a single system. LQCD

  11. Energy- and cost-efficient lattice-QCD computations using graphics processing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Quarks and gluons are the building blocks of all hadronic matter, like protons and neutrons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a theory under test by large scale experiments like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and in the future at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. However, perturbative methods can only be applied to QCD for high energies. Studies from first principles are possible via a discretization onto an Euclidean space-time grid. This discretization of QCD is called Lattice QCD (LQCD) and is the only ab-initio option outside of the high-energy regime. LQCD is extremely compute and memory intensive. In particular, it is by definition always bandwidth limited. Thus - despite the complexity of LQCD applications - it led to the development of several specialized compute platforms and influenced the development of others. However, in recent years General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) came up as a new means for parallel computing. Contrary to machines traditionally used for LQCD, graphics processing units (GPUs) are a massmarket product. This promises advantages in both the pace at which higher-performing hardware becomes available and its price. CL2QCD is an OpenCL based implementation of LQCD using Wilson fermions that was developed within this thesis. It operates on GPUs by all major vendors as well as on central processing units (CPUs). On the AMD Radeon HD 7970 it provides the fastest double-precision D kernel for a single GPU, achieving 120GFLOPS. D - the most compute intensive kernel in LQCD simulations - is commonly used to compare LQCD platforms. This performance is enabled by an in-depth analysis of optimization techniques for bandwidth-limited codes on GPUs. Further, analysis of the communication between GPU and CPU, as well as between multiple GPUs, enables high-performance Krylov space solvers and linear scaling to multiple GPUs within a single system. LQCD

  12. Numerical simulation of direct methanol fuel cells using lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavar, Mojtaba Aghajani; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol, P.O. Box 484 (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    In this study Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) as an alternative of conventional computational fluid dynamics method is used to simulate Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). A two dimensional lattice Boltzmann model with 9 velocities, D2Q9, is used to solve the problem. The computational domain includes all seven parts of DMFC: anode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers, membrane and cathode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers. The model has been used to predict the flow pattern and concentration fields of different species in both clear and porous channels to investigate cell performance. The results have been compared well with results in literature for flow in porous and clear channels and cell polarization curves of the DMFC at different flow speeds and feed methanol concentrations. (author)

  13. Enhanced Electron Photoemission by Collective Lattice Resonances in Plasmonic Nanoparticle-Array Photodetectors and Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Uskov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We propose to use collective lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays to enhance and tailor photoelectron emission in Schottky barrier photodetectors and solar cells. We show that the interaction between narrow-band lattice resonances (the Rayleigh anomaly) and broader-band individual-particle...... excitations (localized surface plasmon resonances) leads to stronger local field enhancement. In turn, this causes a significant increase of the photocurrent compared to the case when only individual-particle excitations are present. The results can be used to design new photodetectors with highly selective......, tunable spectral response, which are able to detect photons with the energy below the semiconductor bandgap. The findings can also be used to develop solar cells with increased efficiency....

  14. LAMP-B: a Fortran program set for the lattice cell analysis by collision probability method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keiichiro

    1979-02-01

    Nature of physical problem solved: LAMB-B solves an integral transport equation by the collision probability method for many variety of lattice cell geometries: spherical, plane and cylindrical lattice cell; square and hexagonal arrays of pin rods; annular clusters and square clusters. LAMP-B produces homogenized constants for multi and/or few group diffusion theory programs. Method of solution: LAMP-B performs an exact numerical integration to obtain the collision probabilities. Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Not more than 68 group in the fast group calculation, and not more than 20 regions in the resonance integral calculation. Typical running time: It varies with the number of energy groups and the selection of the geometry. Unusual features of the program: Any or any combination of constituent subprograms can be used so that the partial use of this program is available. (author)

  15. Disadvantage factors for square lattice cells using a collision probability method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghav, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    The flux distribution in an infinite square lattice consisting of cylindrical fuel rods and moderator is calculated by using a collision probability method. Neutrons are assumed to be monoenergetic and the sources as well as scattering are assumed to be isotropic. Carlvik's method for the calculation of collision probability is used. The important features of the method are that the square boundary is treated exactly and the contribution of the surrounding cells is calculated explicitly. The method is programmed in a computer code CELLC. This carries out integration by Simpson's rule. The convergence and accuracy of CELLC is assessed by computing disadvantage factors for the well-known Thie lattices and comparing the results with Monte Carlo and other integral transport theory methods used elsewhere. It is demonstrated that it is not correct to apply the white boundary condition in the Wigner Seitz Cell for low pitch and low cross sections. (orig.) [de

  16. CLUB - a multigroup integral transport theory code for lattice calculations of PHWR cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnani, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    The computer code CLUB has been developed to calculate lattice parameters as a function of burnup for a pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) lattice cell containing fuel in the form of cluster. It solves the multigroup integral transport equation by the method based on combination of small scale collision probability (CP) method and large scale interface current technique. The calculations are performed by using WIMS 69 group cross section library or its condensed versions of 27 or 28 group libraries. It can also compute Keff from the given geometrical buckling in the input using multigroup diffusion theory in fundamental mode. The first order differential burnup equations can be solved by either Trapezoidal rule or Runge-Kutta method. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs

  17. NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation time of human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Rosenthal, J.S.; Winston, A.; Stern, A.

    1988-01-01

    NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation times were studied as probes of water structure in human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions. Normal saline had a relaxation time of about 3000 ms while packed red blood cells had a relaxation time of about 500 ms. The relaxation time of a red blood cell suspension at 50% hematocrit was about 750 ms showing that surface charges and polar groups of the red cell membrane effectively structure extracellular water. Incubation of red cells in hypotonic saline increases relaxation time whereas hypertonic saline decreases relaxation time. Relaxation times varied independently of mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration in a sample population. Studies with lysates and resealed membrane ghosts show that hemoglobin is very effective in lowering water-proton relaxation time whereas resealed membrane ghosts in the absence of hemoglobin are less effective than intact red cells. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  18. Topological magnon bands in ferromagnetic star lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owerre, S A

    2017-01-01

    The experimental observation of topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1–3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM) spin–orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon bands, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon bands can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases. (paper)

  19. Topological magnon bands in ferromagnetic star lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S A

    2017-05-10

    The experimental observation of topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1-3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin-orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon bands, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon bands can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases.

  20. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorecka, Agnieszka [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Gremaud, Benoit [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, UPMC, 4 Place Jussieu, FR-75005 Paris (France); Miniatura, Christian [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, UMR 6618, UNS, CNRS, 1361 Route des Lucioles, FR-06560 Valbonne (France); Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological university, 60 Nanyang View, Singapore 639673 (Singapore)

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  1. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha; Button, Robert; Manzo, Michelle; McKissock, Barbara; Miller, Thomas; Gemeiner, Russel; Bennett, William; Hand, Evan

    2006-01-01

    Life-test data of Lithium-Ion battery cells is critical in order to establish their performance capabilities for NASA missions and Exploration goals. Lithium-ion cells have the potential to replace rechargeable alkaline cells in aerospace applications, but they require a more complex charging scheme than is typically required for alkaline cells. To address these requirements in our Lithium-Ion Cell Test Verification Program, a Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit was developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This unit gives researchers the ability to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and results in a substantial reduction in test costs as compared to individual cell testing. The Naval Surface Warfare Center at Crane, Indiana developed a power reduction scheme that works in conjunction with the Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit. This scheme minimizes the power dissipation required by the circuitry to prolong circuit life and improve its reliability.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of transport phenomena in fuel cells and flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ao; Shyy, Wei; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-06-01

    Fuel cells and flow batteries are promising technologies to address climate change and air pollution problems. An understanding of the complex multiscale and multiphysics transport phenomena occurring in these electrochemical systems requires powerful numerical tools. Over the past decades, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has attracted broad interest in the computational fluid dynamics and the numerical heat transfer communities, primarily due to its kinetic nature making it appropriate for modeling complex multiphase transport phenomena. More importantly, the LB method fits well with parallel computing due to its locality feature, which is required for large-scale engineering applications. In this article, we review the LB method for gas-liquid two-phase flows, coupled fluid flow and mass transport in porous media, and particulate flows. Examples of applications are provided in fuel cells and flow batteries. Further developments of the LB method are also outlined.

  3. Computer programs for unit-cell determination in electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.Z.

    2005-01-01

    A set of computer programs for unit-cell determination from an electron diffraction tilt series and pattern indexing has been developed on the basis of several well-established algorithms. In this approach, a reduced direct primitive cell is first determined from experimental data, in the means time, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. The derived primitive cell is then checked for possible higher lattice symmetry and transformed into a proper conventional cell. Finally a least-squares refinement procedure is adopted to generate optimum lattice parameters on the basis of the lengths of basic reflections in each diffraction pattern and the indices of these reflections. Examples are given to show the usage of the programs

  4. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis for coolant void reactivity in a CANDU Fuel Lattice Cell Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Yeol; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the EPBM is implemented in Seoul National university Monte Carlo (MC) code, McCARD which has the k uncertainty evaluation capability by the adjoint-weighted perturbation (AWP) method. The implementation is verified by comparing the sensitivities of the k-eigenvalue difference to the microscopic cross sections computed by the DPBM and the direct subtractions for the TMI-1 pin-cell problem. The uncertainty of the coolant void reactivity (CVR) in a CANDU fuel lattice model due to the ENDF/B-VII.1 covariance data is calculated by its sensitivities estimated by the EPBM. The method based on the eigenvalue perturbation theory (EPBM) utilizes the 1st order adjoint-weighted perturbation (AWP) technique to estimate the sensitivity of the eigenvalue difference. Furthermore this method can be easily applied in a S/U analysis code system equipped with the eigenvalue sensitivity calculation capability. The EPBM is implemented in McCARD code and verified by showing good agreement with reference solution. Then the McCARD S/U analysis have been performed with the EPBM module for the CVR in CANDU fuel lattice problem. It shows that the uncertainty contributions of nu of {sup 235}U and gamma reaction of {sup 238}U are dominant.

  5. Optical trapping via guided resonance modes in a Slot-Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-03-12

    A novel photonic crystal lattice is proposed for trapping a two-dimensional array of particles. The lattice is created by introducing a rectangular slot in each unit cell of the Suzuki-Phase lattice to enhance the light confinement of guided resonance modes. Large quality factors on the order of 10⁵ are predicted in the lattice. A significant decrease of the optical power required for optical trapping can be achieved compared to our previous design.

  6. Development of improved methods for the LWR lattice physics code EPRI-CELL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Wright, R.Q.; Barhen, J.

    1982-07-01

    A number of improvements have been made by ORNL to the lattice physics code EPRI-CELL (E-C) which is widely used by utilities for analysis of power reactors. The code modifications were made mainly in the thermal and epithermal routines and resulted in improved reactor physics approximations and more efficient running times. The improvements in the thermal flux calculation included implementation of a group-dependent rebalance procedure to accelerate the iterative process and a more rigorous calculation of interval-to-interval collision probabilities. The epithermal resonance shielding methods used in the code have been extensively studied to determine its major approximations and to examine the sensitivity of computed results to these approximations. The study has resulted in several improvements in the original methodology

  7. Lattice Vibrations in Chlorobenzenes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, P. A.; Kjems, Jørgen; White, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lattice vibrational dispersion curves for the ``intermolecular'' modes in the triclinic, one molecule per unit cell β phase of p‐C6D4Cl2 and p‐C6H4Cl2 have been obtained by inelastic neutron scattering. The deuterated sample was investigated at 295 and at 90°K and a linear extrapolation to 0°K...... was applied in order to correct for anharmonic effects. Calculations based on the atom‐atom model for van der Waals' interaction and on general potential parameters for the aromatic compounds agree reasonably well with the experimental observations. There is no substantial improvement in fit obtained either...

  8. Modeling thermal inkjet and cell printing process using modified pseudopotential and thermal lattice Boltzmann methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Salman; Liu, Yaling

    2018-03-01

    Pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) can simulate a phase transition in high-density ratio multiphase flow systems. If coupled with thermal LBMs through equation of state, they can be used to study instantaneous phase transition phenomena with a high-temperature gradient where only one set of formulations in an LBM system can handle liquid, vapor, phase transition, and heat transport. However, at lower temperatures an unrealistic spurious current at the interface introduces instability and limits its application in real flow system. In this study, we proposed new modifications to the LBM system to minimize a spurious current which enables us to study nucleation dynamic at room temperature. To demonstrate the capabilities of this approach, the thermal ejection process is modeled as one example of a complex flow system. In an inkjet printer, a thermal pulse instantly heats up the liquid in a microfluidic chamber and nucleates bubble vapor providing the pressure pulse necessary to eject droplets at high speed. Our modified method can present a more realistic model of the explosive vaporization process since it can also capture a high-temperature/density gradient at nucleation region. Thermal inkjet technology has been successfully applied for printing cells, but cells are susceptible to mechanical damage or death as they squeeze out of the nozzle head. To study cell deformation, a spring network model, representing cells, is connected to the LBM through the immersed boundary method. Looking into strain and stress distribution of a cell membrane at its most deformed state, it is found that a high stretching rate effectively increases the rupture tension. In other words, membrane deformation energy is released through creation of multiple smaller nanopores rather than big pores. Overall, concurrently simulating multiphase flow, phase transition, heat transfer, and cell deformation in one unified LB platform, we are able to provide a better insight into the

  9. Modeling thermal inkjet and cell printing process using modified pseudopotential and thermal lattice Boltzmann methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Salman; Liu, Yaling

    2018-03-01

    Pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) can simulate a phase transition in high-density ratio multiphase flow systems. If coupled with thermal LBMs through equation of state, they can be used to study instantaneous phase transition phenomena with a high-temperature gradient where only one set of formulations in an LBM system can handle liquid, vapor, phase transition, and heat transport. However, at lower temperatures an unrealistic spurious current at the interface introduces instability and limits its application in real flow system. In this study, we proposed new modifications to the LBM system to minimize a spurious current which enables us to study nucleation dynamic at room temperature. To demonstrate the capabilities of this approach, the thermal ejection process is modeled as one example of a complex flow system. In an inkjet printer, a thermal pulse instantly heats up the liquid in a microfluidic chamber and nucleates bubble vapor providing the pressure pulse necessary to eject droplets at high speed. Our modified method can present a more realistic model of the explosive vaporization process since it can also capture a high-temperature/density gradient at nucleation region. Thermal inkjet technology has been successfully applied for printing cells, but cells are susceptible to mechanical damage or death as they squeeze out of the nozzle head. To study cell deformation, a spring network model, representing cells, is connected to the LBM through the immersed boundary method. Looking into strain and stress distribution of a cell membrane at its most deformed state, it is found that a high stretching rate effectively increases the rupture tension. In other words, membrane deformation energy is released through creation of multiple smaller nanopores rather than big pores. Overall, concurrently simulating multiphase flow, phase transition, heat transfer, and cell deformation in one unified LB platform, we are able to provide a better insight into the

  10. Surface and Interface Properties of 10–12 Unit Cells Thick Sputter Deposited Epitaxial CeO2 Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Saraf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrathin and continuous epitaxial films with relaxed lattice strain can potentially maintain more of its bulk physical and chemical properties and are useful as buffer layers. We study surface, interface, and microstructural properties of ultrathin (∼10–12 unit cells thick epitaxial ceria films grown on single crystal YSZ substrates. The out-of -plane and in-plane lattice parameters indicate relaxation in the continuous film due to misfit dislocations seen by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and substrate roughness of ∼1-2 unit cells, confirmed by atomic force microscopy and HRTEM. A combination of secondary sputtering, lattice mismatch, substrate roughness, and surface reduction creating secondary phase was likely the cause of surface roughness which should be reduced to a minimum level for effective use of it as buffer layers.

  11. Thorium-Based Fuels Preliminary Lattice Cell Studies for Candu Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.; Rizoiu, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The choice of nuclear power as a major contributor to the future global energy needs must take into account acceptable risks of nuclear weapon proliferation, in addition to economic competitiveness, acceptable safety standards, and acceptable waste disposal options. Candu reactors offer a proven technology, safe and reliable reactor technology, with an interesting evolutionary potential for proliferation resistance, their versatility for various fuel cycles creating premises for a better utilization of global fuel resources. Candu reactors impressive degree of fuel cycle flexibility is a consequence of its channel design, excellent neutron economy, on-power refueling, and simple fuel bundle. These features facilitate the introduction and exploitation of various fuel cycles in Candu reactors in an evolutionary fashion. The main reasons for our interest in Thorium-based fuel cycles have been, globally, to extend the energy obtainable from natural Uranium and, locally, to provide a greater degree of energy self-reliance. Applying the once through Thorium (OTT) cycle in existing and advanced Candu reactors might be seen as an evaluative concept for the sustainable development both from the economic and waste management points of view. Two Candu fuel bundles project will be used for the proposed analysis, namely the Candu standard fuel bundle with 37 fuel elements and the CANFLEX fuel bundle with 43 fuel elements. Using the Canadian proposed scheme - loading mixed ThO 2 -SEU CANFLEX bundles in Candu 6 reactors - simulated at lattice cell level led to promising conclusions on operation at higher fuel burnups, reduction of the fissile content to the end of the cycle, minor actinide content reduction in the spent fuel, reduction of the spent fuel radiotoxicity, presence of radionuclides emitting strong gamma radiation for proliferation resistance benefit. The calculations were performed using the lattice codes WIMS and Dragon (together with the corresponding nuclear data

  12. Determination of space-energy distribution of resonance neutrons in reactor lattice cell and calculation of resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmijarevic, I.

    1980-01-01

    Space-energy distribution of resonance neutrons in reactor lattice cell was determined by solving the Boltzmann equation by spherical harmonics method applying P-3 approximation. Computer code SPLET used for these calculations is described. Resonance absorption and calculation of resonance integrals are described as well. Effective resonance integral values for U-238 resonance at 6.7 Ev are calculated for heavy water reactor cell with metal, oxide and carbide fuel elements

  13. Light-induced lattice expansion leads to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsinhan; Asadpour, Reza; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Durand, Olivier; Strzalka, Joseph W.; Chen, Bo; Verduzco, Rafael; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Tretiak, Sergei; Even, Jacky; Alam, Muhammad Ashraf; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2018-04-01

    Light-induced structural dynamics plays a vital role in the physical properties, device performance, and stability of hybrid perovskite–based optoelectronic devices. We report that continuous light illumination leads to a uniform lattice expansion in hybrid perovskite thin films, which is critical for obtaining high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. Correlated, in situ structural and device characterizations reveal that light-induced lattice expansion benefits the performances of a mixed-cation pure-halide planar device, boosting the power conversion efficiency from 18.5 to 20.5%. The lattice expansion leads to the relaxation of local lattice strain, which lowers the energetic barriers at the perovskite-contact interfaces, thus improving the open circuit voltage and fill factor. The light-induced lattice expansion did not compromise the stability of these high-efficiency photovoltaic devices under continuous operation at full-spectrum 1-sun (100 milliwatts per square centimeter) illumination for more than 1500 hours.

  14. Light-induced lattice expansion leads to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Hsinhan; Asadpour, Reza; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Durand, Olivier; Strzalka, Joseph W.; Chen, Bo; Verduzco, Rafael; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Tretiak, Sergei; Even, Jacky; Alam, Muhammad Ashraf; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2018-04-05

    Hybrid-perovskite based high-performance optoelectronic devices and clues from their operation has led to the realization that light-induced structural dynamics play a vital role on their physical properties, device performance and stability. Here, we report that continuous light illumination leads to a uniform lattice expansion in hybrid perovskite thin-films, which is critical for obtaining high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. Correlated, in-situ structural and device characterizations reveal that light-induced lattice expansion significantly benefits the performances of a mixed-cation pure-halide planar device, boosting the power conversion efficiency from 18.5% to 20.5%. This is a direct consequence of the relaxation of local lattice strains during lattice expansion, which results in the reduction of the energetic barriers at the perovskite/contact interfaces in devices, thus improving the open circuit voltage and fill factor. The light-induced lattice expansion stabilizes these high-efficiency photovoltaic devices under continuous operation of full-spectrum 1-Sun illumination for over 1500 hours. One Sentence Summary: Light-induced lattice expansion improves crystallinity, relaxes lattice strain, which enhances photovoltaic performance in hybrid perovskite device.

  15. Benchmarking of epithermal methods in the lattice-physics code EPRI-CELL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Wright, R.Q.; Barhen, J.; Rothenstein, W.; Toney, B.

    1982-01-01

    The epithermal cross section shielding methods used in the lattice physics code EPRI-CELL (E-C) have been extensively studied to determine its major approximations and to examine the sensitivity of computed results to these approximations. The study has resulted in several improvements in the original methodology. These include: treatment of the external moderator source with intermediate resonance (IR) theory, development of a new Dancoff factor expression to account for clad interactions, development of a new method for treating resonance interference, and application of a generalized least squares method to compute best-estimate values for the Bell factor and group-dependent IR parameters. The modified E-C code with its new ENDF/B-V cross section library is tested for several numerical benchmark problems. Integral parameters computed by EC are compared with those obtained with point-cross section Monte Carlo calculations, and E-C fine group cross sections are benchmarked against point-cross section descrete ordinates calculations. It is found that the code modifications improve agreement between E-C and the more sophisticated methods. E-C shows excellent agreement on the integral parameters and usually agrees within a few percent on fine-group, shielded cross sections

  16. Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfratz, P.

    1983-01-01

    The author presents a general introduction to lattice gauge theories and discusses non-perturbative methods in the gauge sector. He then shows how the lattice works in obtaining the string tension in SU(2). Lattice QCD at finite physical temperature is discussed. Universality tests in SU(2) lattice QCD are presented. SU(3) pure gauge theory is briefly dealt with. Finally, fermions on the lattice are considered. (Auth.)

  17. Thermoelectric properties of finite graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of the electronic and thermal transport properties of graphene antidot lattices with a finite length along the transport direction. The calculations are based on the π-tight-binding model and the Brenner potential. We show that both electronic and thermal transport...... properties converge fast toward the bulk limit with increasing length of the lattice: only a few repetitions (≃6) of the fundamental unit cell are required to recover the electronic band gap of the infinite lattice as a transport gap for the finite lattice. We investigate how different antidot shapes...... and sizes affect the thermoelectric properties. The resulting thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, can exceed 0.25, and it is highly sensitive to the atomic arrangement of the antidot edges. Specifically, hexagonal holes with pure armchair edges lead to an order-of-magnitude larger ZT as compared to pure...

  18. On the influence of spatial discretization in LWR cell- and lattice calculations with HELIOS 1.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.; Koch, R.

    2008-01-01

    Cell- and lattice calculations are the fundamental for all deterministic static and transient 3D full core calculations. The spatial discretization used for the cell- and lattice calculations influences the results for these transport solutions significantly. The arising differences in the neutron flux distribution due to different spatial discretization are demonstrated. These differences in the flux distribution cause significant changes in the k inf value. An evaluation of the k inf value for the case of infinitely fine discretization is made. The influence of the discretization on the calculation of homogenized few group cross-sections which are forwarded to the 3D full core calculations is investigated. Strategies for improving the discretization are developed and their influence on the calculation time is evaluated

  19. SPLET - A program for calculating the space-lethargy distribution of epithermal neutrons in a reactor lattice cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.; Zmijatevic, I.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure to solve the space-single-lethargy dependent transport equation for epithermal neutrons in a cylindricised multi-region reactor lattice cell has been developed and proposed in the earlier papers. Here, the computational algorithm is comprised and the computing program SPLET, which calculates the space-lethargy distribution of the spherical harmonics neutron flux moments, as well as the related integral quantities as reaction rates and resonance integrals, is described. (author)

  20. Physical Realization of von Neumann Lattices in Rotating Bose Gases with Dipole Interatomic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Jheng, Shih-Da

    2016-08-22

    This paper reports a novel type of vortex lattice, referred to as a bubble crystal, which was discovered in rapidly rotating Bose gases with long-range interactions. Bubble crystals differ from vortex lattices which possess a single quantum flux per unit cell, while atoms in bubble crystals are clustered periodically and surrounded by vortices. No existing model is able to describe the vortex structure of bubble crystals; however, we identified a mathematical lattice, which is a subset of coherent states and exists periodically in the physical space. This lattice is called a von Neumann lattice, and when it possesses a single vortex per unit cell, it presents the same geometrical structure as an Abrikosov lattice. In this report, we extend the von Neumann lattice to one with an integral number of flux quanta per unit cell and demonstrate that von Neumann lattices well reproduce the translational properties of bubble crystals. Numerical simulations confirm that, as a generalized vortex, a von Neumann lattice can be physically realized using vortex lattices in rapidly rotating Bose gases with dipole interatomic interactions.

  1. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  2. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B.

    2013-01-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  3. Deformation of Two-Dimensional Nonuniform-Membrane Red Blood Cells Simulated by a Lattice Boltzmann Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua-Bing, Li; Li, Jin; Bing, Qiu

    2008-01-01

    To study two-dimensional red blood cells deforming in a shear Bow with the membrane nonuniform on the rigidity and mass, the membrane is discretized into equilength segments. The fluid inside and outside the red blood cell is simulated by the D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model and the hydrodynamic forces exerted on the membrane from the inner and outer of the red blood cell are calculated by a stress-integration method. Through the global deviation from the curvature of uniform-membrane, we find that when the membrane is nonuniform on the rigidity, the deviation first decreases with the time increases and implies that the terminal profile of the red blood cell is static. To a red blood cell with the mass nonuniform on the membrane, the deviation becomes more large, and the mass distribution affects the profile of the two sides of the flattened red blood cell in a shear flow. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  4. A pore-scale model for the cathode electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell by lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaeimanesh, Gholam Reza; Akbari, Mohammad Hadi [Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    A pore-scale model based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for the cathode electrode of a PEM fuel cell with heterogeneous and anisotropic porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) and interdigitated flow field. An active approach is implemented to model multi-component transport in GDL, which leads to enhanced accuracy, especially at higher activation over-potentials. The core of the paper is the implementation of an electrochemical reaction with an active approach in a multi-component lattice Boltzmann model for the first time. After model validation, the capability of the presented model is demonstrated through a parametric study. Effects of activation over-potential, pressure differential between inlet and outlet gas channels, land width to channel width ratio, and channel width are investigated. The results show the significant influence of GDL microstructure on the oxygen distribution and current density profile.

  5. Lattice Entertain You: Paper Modeling of the 14 Bravais Lattices on Youtube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein, Lawrence T., Jr.; Sein, Sarajane E.

    2015-01-01

    A system for the construction of double-sided paper models of the 14 Bravais lattices, and important crystal structures derived from them, is described. The system allows the combination of multiple unit cells, so as to better represent the overall three-dimensional structure. Students and instructors can view the models in use on the popular…

  6. Synthesis of spatially variant lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Raymond C; Pazos, Javier

    2012-07-02

    It is often desired to functionally grade and/or spatially vary a periodic structure like a photonic crystal or metamaterial, yet no general method for doing this has been offered in the literature. A straightforward procedure is described here that allows many properties of the lattice to be spatially varied at the same time while producing a final lattice that is still smooth and continuous. Properties include unit cell orientation, lattice spacing, fill fraction, and more. This adds many degrees of freedom to a design such as spatially varying the orientation to exploit directional phenomena. The method is not a coordinate transformation technique so it can more easily produce complicated and arbitrary spatial variance. To demonstrate, the algorithm is used to synthesize a spatially variant self-collimating photonic crystal to flow a Gaussian beam around a 90° bend. The performance of the structure was confirmed through simulation and it showed virtually no scattering around the bend that would have arisen if the lattice had defects or discontinuities.

  7. Physical Realization of von Neumann Lattices in Rotating Bose Gases with Dipole Interatomic Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Jheng, Shih-Da

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a novel type of vortex lattice, referred to as a bubble crystal, which was discovered in rapidly rotating Bose gases with long-range interactions. Bubble crystals differ from vortex lattices which possess a single quantum flux per unit cell, while atoms in bubble crystals are clustered periodically and surrounded by vortices. No existing model is able to describe the vortex structure of bubble crystals; however, we identified a mathematical lattice, which is a subset of coh...

  8. Asymptotic Properties of Multistate Random Walks. II. Applications to Inhomogeneous Periodic and Random Lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Shuler, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    The previously developed formalism for the calculation of asymptotic properties of multistate random walks is used to study random walks on several inhomogeneous periodic lattices, where the periodically repeated unit cell contains a number of inequivalent sites, as well as on lattices with a random

  9. Investigation of lattice defects and compositional gradients in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Jens; Boit, Christian [Department of Semiconductor Devices, Berlin University of Technology, Einsteinufer 19, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Abou-Ras, Daniel; Rissom, Thorsten; Unold, Thomas; Schock, Hans-Werner [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber layers used in thin-film solar cells exhibit, when grown in a multi-stage process, compositional gradients of gallium and indium, dependent on process parameters such as the Ga content. The high lateral resolution of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) allows the determination of lattice defects and the elemental concentrations at identical sample positions. Cross-sectional TEM samples of ZnO/CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}/Mo/glass stacks were prepared with varying [Ga]/([In]+[Ga]) ratio in the absorber. The shape of the Ga distribution was measured by means of EDX and differs for the various [Ga]/([In]+[Ga]) ratios. Linear (dislocations) and planar defects (stacking faults, microtwins) were studied by means of TEM bright field and dark field images along the lengths of the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} layers. Strong Ga compositional gradients were found even within individual grains. It appears that these Ga gradients correlate with the occurrence of dislocation networks in large grains (diameter > 1 {mu}m). We assume that these dislocations compensate for lattice mismatch due to the change in composition in this area of the lattice.

  10. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge-Control Unit Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Buton, Robert M.; Gemeiner, Russel

    2005-01-01

    A lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell charge-control unit was developed as part of a Li-ion cell verification program. This unit manages the complex charging scheme that is required when Li-ion cells are charged in series. It enables researchers to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and reduces test costs substantially in comparison to individual cell testing.

  11. New edge-centered photonic square lattices with flat bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhong, Hua; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yanpeng; Belić, Milivoj R.

    2017-07-01

    We report a new class of edge-centered photonic square lattices with multiple flat bands, and consider in detail two examples: the Lieb-5 and Lieb-7 lattices. In these lattices, there are 5 and 7 sites in the unit cell and in general, the number is restricted to odd integers. The number of flat bands m in the new Lieb lattices is related to the number of sites N in the unit cell by a simple formula m =(N - 1) / 2. The flat bands reported here are independent of the pseudomagnetic field. The properties of lattices with even and odd number of flat bands are different. We consider the localization of light in such Lieb lattices. If the input beam excites the flat-band mode, it will not diffract during propagation, owing to the strong mode localization. In the Lieb-7 lattice, the beam will also oscillate during propagation and still not diffract. The period of oscillation is determined by the energy difference between the two flat bands. This study provides a new platform for investigating light trapping, photonic topological insulators, and pseudospin-mediated vortex generation.

  12. Unit cell parameters of wurtzite InP nanowires determined by x-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegner, D; Wintersberger, E; Kawaguchi, K; Wallentin, J; Borgström, M T; Stangl, J

    2011-10-21

    High resolution x-ray diffraction is used to study the structural properties of the wurtzite polytype of InP nanowires. Wurtzite InP nanowires are grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy using S-doping. From the evaluation of the Bragg peak position we determine the lattice parameters of the wurtzite InP nanowires. The unit cell dimensions are found to differ from the ones expected from geometric conversion of the cubic bulk InP lattice constant. The atomic distances along the c direction are increased whereas the atomic spacing in the a direction is reduced in comparison to the corresponding distances in the zinc-blende phase. Using core/shell nanowires with a thin core and thick nominally intrinsic shells we are able to determine the lattice parameters of wurtzite InP with a negligible influence of the S-doping due to the much larger volume in the shell. The determined material properties will enable the ab initio calculation of electronic and optical properties of wurtzite InP nanowires.

  13. Symmetry and fermion degeneracy on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raszillier, H.

    1982-03-01

    In this paper we consider the general form of finite difference approximation to the Dirac (Weyl) Hamiltonian on a lattice and investigate systematically the dependence on symmetry of the number of particles described by it. Our result is, that to a symmetry - expressed by a crystallographic space group - there corresponds a minimal number of particles, which are associated to prescribed points of momentum space (the unit cell of the reciprocal lattice). For convenience of the reader we show, using the existing detailed descriptions of space groups, how these results look for all the relevant (symmorphic) symmetry groups. Only for lattice Hamiltonians with a momentum dependent mass term can this degeneracy be reduced and even eliminated without reducing the symmetry. (orig./HSI)

  14. Void lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, L.T.; Johnson, E.; Wohlenberg, T.

    1976-01-01

    Void lattices in metals apparently owe their stability to elastically anisotropic interactions. An ordered array of voids on the anion sublattice in fluorite does not fit so neatly into this scheme of things. Crowdions may play a part in the formation of the void lattice, and stability may derive from other sources. (Auth.)

  15. Lattice fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randjbar-Daemi, S.

    1995-12-01

    The so-called doubling problem in the lattice description of fermions led to a proof that under certain circumstances chiral gauge theories cannot be defined on the lattice. This is called the no-go theorem. It implies that if Γ/sub/A is defined on a lattice then its infrared limit, which should correspond to the quantum description of the classical action for the slowly varying fields on lattice scale, is inevitably a vector like theory. In particular, if not circumvented, the no-go theorem implies that there is no lattice formulation of the Standard Weinberg-Salam theory or SU(5) GUT, even though the fermions belong to anomaly-free representations of the gauge group. This talk aims to explain one possible attempt at bypassing the no-go theorem. 20 refs

  16. Lattice fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randjbar-Daemi, S

    1995-12-01

    The so-called doubling problem in the lattice description of fermions led to a proof that under certain circumstances chiral gauge theories cannot be defined on the lattice. This is called the no-go theorem. It implies that if {Gamma}/sub/A is defined on a lattice then its infrared limit, which should correspond to the quantum description of the classical action for the slowly varying fields on lattice scale, is inevitably a vector like theory. In particular, if not circumvented, the no-go theorem implies that there is no lattice formulation of the Standard Weinberg-Salam theory or SU(5) GUT, even though the fermions belong to anomaly-free representations of the gauge group. This talk aims to explain one possible attempt at bypassing the no-go theorem. 20 refs.

  17. S/sub N/ computational benchmark solutions for slab geometry models of a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) lattice cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    S/sub N/ computational benchmark solutions are generated for a onegroup and multigroup fuel-void slab lattice cell which is a rough model of a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) lattice cell. The reactivity induced by the extrusion of the fuel material into the voided region is determined for a series of partially extruded lattice cell configurations. A special modified Gauss S/sub N/ ordinate array design is developed in order to obtain eigenvalues with errors less than 0.03% in all of the configurations that are considered. The modified Gauss S/sub N/ ordinate array design has a substantially improved eigenvalue angular convergence behavior when compared to existing S/sub N/ ordinate array designs used in neutron streaming applications. The angular refinement computations are performed in some cases by using a perturbation theory method which enables one to obtain high order S/sub N/ eigenvalue estimates for greatly reduced computational costs

  18. Lattice strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorn, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of studying non-perturbative effects in string theory using a world sheet lattice is discussed. The light-cone lattice string model of Giles and Thorn is studied numerically to assess the accuracy of ''coarse lattice'' approximations. For free strings a 5 by 15 lattice seems sufficient to obtain better than 10% accuracy for the bosonic string tachyon mass squared. In addition a crude lattice model simulating string like interactions is studied to find out how easily a coarse lattice calculation can pick out effects such as bound states which would qualitatively alter the spectrum of the free theory. The role of the critical dimension in obtaining a finite continuum limit is discussed. Instead of the ''gaussian'' lattice model one could use one of the vertex models, whose continuum limit is the same as a gaussian model on a torus of any radius. Indeed, any critical 2 dimensional statistical system will have a stringy continuum limit in the absence of string interactions. 8 refs., 1 fig. , 9 tabs

  19. Optimization of the spatial mesh for numerical solution of the neutron transport equation in a cluster-type lattice cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    For programs that solve the neutron transport equation with an approximation that the neutron flux is constant in each space in a user-defined mesh, optimization of that mesh yields benefits in computing time and attainable precision. The previous best practice does not optimize the mesh thoroughly, because a large number of test runs of the solving software would be necessary. The method presented here optimizes the mesh for a flux that is based on conventional approximations but is more informative, so that a minimal number of parameters, one per type of material, must be adjusted by test runs to achieve thorough optimization. For a 37 element, natural-uranium, CANDU lattice cell, the present optimization yields 7 to 12 times (depending on the criterion) better precision than the previous best practice in 37% less computing time. (author)

  20. Charge-Control Unit for Testing Lithium-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Mazo, Michelle A.; Button, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    A charge-control unit was developed as part of a program to validate Li-ion cells packaged together in batteries for aerospace use. The lithium-ion cell charge-control unit will be useful to anyone who performs testing of battery cells for aerospace and non-aerospace uses and to anyone who manufacturers battery test equipment. This technology reduces the quantity of costly power supplies and independent channels that are needed for test programs in which multiple cells are tested. Battery test equipment manufacturers can integrate the technology into their battery test equipment as a method to manage charging of multiple cells in series. The unit manages a complex scheme that is required for charging Li-ion cells electrically connected in series. The unit makes it possible to evaluate cells together as a pack using a single primary test channel, while also making it possible to charge each cell individually. Hence, inherent cell-to-cell variations in a series string of cells can be addressed, and yet the cost of testing is reduced substantially below the cost of testing each cell as a separate entity. The unit consists of electronic circuits and thermal-management devices housed in a common package. It also includes isolated annunciators to signal when the cells are being actively bypassed. These annunciators can be used by external charge managers or can be connected in series to signal that all cells have reached maximum charge. The charge-control circuitry for each cell amounts to regulator circuitry and is powered by that cell, eliminating the need for an external power source or controller. A 110-VAC source of electricity is required to power the thermal-management portion of the unit. A small direct-current source can be used to supply power for an annunciator signal, if desired.

  1. Nonsymmorphic symmetry-protected topological modes in plasmonic nanoribbon lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Liang; Wu, Raymond P. H.; Kumar, Anshuman; Si, Tieyan; Fung, Kin Hung

    2018-04-01

    Using a dynamic eigenresponse theory, we study the topological edge plasmon modes in dispersive plasmonic lattices constructed by unit cells of multiple nanoribbons. In dipole approximation, the bulk-edge correspondence in the lattices made of dimerized unit cell and one of its square-root daughter with nonsymmorphic symmetry are demonstrated. Calculations with consideration of dynamic long-range effects and retardation are compared to those given by nearest-neighbor approximations. It is shown that nonsymmorphic symmetry opens up two symmetric gaps where versatile topological edge plasmon modes are found. Unprecedented spectral shifts of the edge states with respect to the zero modes due to long-range coupling are found. The proposed ribbon structure is favorable to electrical gating and thus could serve as an on-chip platform for electrically controllable subwavelength edge states at optical wavelengths. Our eigenresponse approach provides a powerful tool for the radiative topological mode analysis in strongly coupled plasmonic lattices.

  2. Effects of thermal cycle annealing on reduction of defect density in lattice-mismatched InGaAs solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, T.; Arafune, K.; Lee, H.S.; Ekins-Daukes, N.J.; Tanaka, S.; Ohshita, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Lattice-mismatched In 0.16 Ga 0.84 As solar cells were grown on GaAs substrates using graded In x Ga 1- x As buffer layers and homogenous In 0.16 Ga 0.84 As buffer layers. The indium composition x in the graded buffer changed from 0% to 16% continuously. Thermal cycle annealing (TCA) was performed after the growth of the graded buffer layers. The effects of TCA on the solar cell open-circuit voltage and quantum efficiency have been investigated. The minority carrier lifetime is observed to increase in the p-type In 0.16 Ga 0.84 As layer after applying the TCA process. Electron-beam-induced current microscopy also shows a related reduction in dislocation density in the p-type In 0.16 Ga 0.84 As layer after TCA processing. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy performed on the graded buffer layer suggests that the strain present in the cell layers is reduced after the TCA process, implying that the TCA treatment promotes strain relaxation in the graded buffer layers

  3. Supersymmetric lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catterall, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Discretization of supersymmetric theories is an old problem in lattice field theory. It has resisted solution until quite recently when new ideas drawn from orbifold constructions and topological field theory have been brought to bear on the question. The result has been the creation of a new class of lattice gauge theory in which the lattice action is invariant under one or more supersymmetries. The resultant theories are local and free of doublers and in the case of Yang-Mills theories also possess exact gauge invariance. In principle they form the basis for a truly non-perturbative definition of the continuum supersymmetric field theory. In this talk these ideas are reviewed with particular emphasis being placed on N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory.

  4. New methods for indexing multi-lattice diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gildea, Richard J.; Waterman, David G.; Parkhurst, James M.; Axford, Danny; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David I.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Winter, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of data. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from microcrystals of ∼1 µm in size. A new indexing method is presented which is capable of indexing multiple crystal lattices from narrow wedges of diffraction data. The method takes advantage of a simplification of Fourier transform-based methods that is applicable when the unit-cell dimensions are known a priori. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with both semi-synthetic multi-lattice data and real multi-lattice data recorded from crystals of ∼1 µm in size, where it is shown that up to six lattices can be successfully indexed and subsequently integrated from a 1° wedge of data. Analysis is presented which shows that improvements in data-quality indicators can be obtained through accurate identification and rejection of overlapping reflections prior to scaling

  5. Temperature-Induced Lattice Relaxation of Perovskite Crystal Enhances Optoelectronic Properties and Solar Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Banavoth, Murali; Yengel, Emre; Peng, Wei; Chen, Zhijie; Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Alarousu, Erkki; Ooi, Boon S.; Burlakov, Victor; Goriely, Alain; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite crystals have recently become one of the most important classes of photoactive materials in the solar cell and optoelectronic communities. Albeit improvements have focused on state-of-the-art technology including

  6. Unit cell geometry of 3-D braided structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank K.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional approach used in modeling of composites reinforced by three-dimensional (3-D) braids is to assume a simple unit cell geometry of a 3-D braided structure with known fiber volume fraction and orientation. In this article, we first examine 3-D braiding methods in the light of braid structures, followed by the development of geometric models for 3-D braids using a unit cell approach. The unit cell geometry of 3-D braids is identified and the relationship of structural parameters such as yarn orientation angle and fiber volume fraction with the key processing parameters established. The limiting geometry has been computed by establishing the point at which yarns jam against each other. Using this factor makes it possible to identify the complete range of allowable geometric arrangements for 3-D braided preforms. This identified unit cell geometry can be translated to mechanical models which relate the geometrical properties of fabric preforms to the mechanical responses of composite systems.

  7. Investigation of GDL compression effects on the performance of a PEM fuel cell cathode by lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaeimanesh, G. R.; Nazemian, M.

    2017-08-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with a great potential for application in vehicle propulsion systems will have a promising future. However, to overcome the exiting challenges against their wider commercialization further fundamental research is inevitable. The effects of gas diffusion layer (GDL) compression on the performance of a PEM fuel cell is not well-recognized; especially, via pore-scale simulation technique capturing the fibrous microstructure of the GDL. In the current investigation, a stochastic microstructure reconstruction method is proposed which can capture GDL microstructure changes by compression. Afterwards, lattice Boltzmann pore-scale simulation technique is adopted to simulate the reactive gas flow through 10 different cathode electrodes with dissimilar carbon paper GDLs produced from five different compression levels and two different carbon fiber diameters. The distributions of oxygen mole fraction, water vapor mole fraction and current density for the simulated cases are presented and analyzed. The results of simulations demonstrate that when the fiber diameter is 9 μm adding compression leads to lower average current density while when the fiber diameter is 7 μm the compression effect is not monotonic.

  8. Buckling behavior of origami unit cell facets under compressive loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshad, Mohamed Ali Emhmed; Naguib, Hani E.

    2018-03-01

    Origami structures as cores for sandwich structures are designed to withstand the compressive loads and to dissipate compressive energy. The deformation of the origami panels and the unit cell facets are the primary factors behind the compressive energy dissipation in origami structures. During the loading stage, the origami structures deform through the folding and unfolding process of the unit cell facets, and also through the plastic deformation of the facets. This work presents a numerical study of the buckling behavior of different origami unit cell elements under compressive loading. The studied origami configurations were Miura and Ron-Resch-like origami structures. Finite element package was used to model the origami structures. The study investigated the buckling behavior of the unit cell facets of two types of origami structures Miura origami and Ron-Resch-Like origami structures. The simulation was conducted using ANSYS finite element software, in which the model of the unit cell represented by shell elements, and the eigenvalues buckling solver was used to predict the theoretical buckling of the unit cell elements.

  9. Lattice overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1984-01-01

    After reviewing some recent developments in supercomputer access, the author discusses a few areas where perturbation theory and lattice gauge simulations make contact. The author concludes with a brief discussion of a deterministic dynamics for the Ising model. This may be useful for numerical studies of nonequilibrium phenomena. 13 references

  10. Cell-size distribution and scaling in a one-dimensional Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami lattice model with continuous nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néda, Zoltán; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Boda, Szilárd

    2017-10-01

    The Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) growth model is considered on a one-dimensional (1D) lattice. Cells can grow with constant speed and continuously nucleate on the empty sites. We offer an alternative mean-field-like approach for describing theoretically the dynamics and derive an analytical cell-size distribution function. Our method reproduces the same scaling laws as the KJMA theory and has the advantage that it leads to a simple closed form for the cell-size distribution function. It is shown that a Weibull distribution is appropriate for describing the final cell-size distribution. The results are discussed in comparison with Monte Carlo simulation data.

  11. Advanced fuel cell development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Both molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells are being developed in the United States to complement and/or supplant phosphoric acid cells for commercial and utility use. This paper described the two technologies and the programs for their development

  12. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  13. On-lattice agent-based simulation of populations of cells within the open-source Chaste framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Grazziela P; Joshi, Tanvi V; Osborne, James M; Byrne, Helen M; Owen, Markus R

    2013-04-06

    Over the years, agent-based models have been developed that combine cell division and reinforced random walks of cells on a regular lattice, reaction-diffusion equations for nutrients and growth factors; and ordinary differential equations for the subcellular networks regulating the cell cycle. When linked to a vascular layer, this multiple scale model framework has been applied to tumour growth and therapy. Here, we report on the creation of an agent-based multi-scale environment amalgamating the characteristics of these models within a Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) Exemplar Project. This project enables reuse, integration, expansion and sharing of the model and relevant data. The agent-based and reaction-diffusion parts of the multi-scale model have been implemented and are available for download as part of the latest public release of Chaste (Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment; http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/chaste/), part of the VPH Toolkit (http://toolkit.vph-noe.eu/). The environment functionalities are verified against the original models, in addition to extra validation of all aspects of the code. In this work, we present the details of the implementation of the agent-based environment, including the system description, the conceptual model, the development of the simulation model and the processes of verification and validation of the simulation results. We explore the potential use of the environment by presenting exemplar applications of the 'what if' scenarios that can easily be studied in the environment. These examples relate to tumour growth, cellular competition for resources and tumour responses to hypoxia (low oxygen levels). We conclude our work by summarizing the future steps for the expansion of the current system.

  14. On-lattice agent-based simulation of populations of cells within the open-source Chaste framework

    KAUST Repository

    Figueredo, G. P.

    2013-02-21

    Over the years, agent-based models have been developed that combine cell division and reinforced random walks of cells on a regular lattice, reaction-diffusion equations for nutrients and growth factors; and ordinary differential equations for the subcellular networks regulating the cell cycle. When linked to a vascular layer, this multiple scale model framework has been applied to tumour growth and therapy. Here, we report on the creation of an agent-based multi-scale environment amalgamating the characteristics of these models within a Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) Exemplar Project. This project enables reuse, integration, expansion and sharing of the model and relevant data. The agent-based and reaction-diffusion parts of the multi-scale model have been implemented and are available for download as part of the latest public release of Chaste (Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment; http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/chaste/), part of the VPH Toolkit (http://toolkit.vph-noe.eu/). The environment functionalities are verified against the original models, in addition to extra validation of all aspects of the code. In this work, we present the details of the implementation of the agent-based environment, including the system description, the conceptual model, the development of the simulation model and the processes of verification and validation of the simulation results. We explore the potential use of the environment by presenting exemplar applications of the \\'what if\\' scenarios that can easily be studied in the environment. These examples relate to tumour growth, cellular competition for resources and tumour responses to hypoxia (low oxygen levels). We conclude our work by summarizing the future steps for the expansion of the current system.

  15. Temperature-Induced Lattice Relaxation of Perovskite Crystal Enhances Optoelectronic Properties and Solar Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Banavoth, Murali

    2016-12-14

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite crystals have recently become one of the most important classes of photoactive materials in the solar cell and optoelectronic communities. Albeit improvements have focused on state-of-the-art technology including various fabrication methods, device architectures, and surface passivation, progress is yet to be made in understanding the actual operational temperature on the electronic properties and the device performances. Therefore, the substantial effect of temperature on the optoelectronic properties, charge separation, charge recombination dynamics, and photoconversion efficiency are explored. The results clearly demonstrated a significant enhancement in the carrier mobility, photocurrent, charge carrier lifetime, and solar cell performance in the 60 ± 5 °C temperature range. In this temperature range, perovskite crystal exhibits a highly symmetrical relaxed cubic structure with well-aligned domains that are perpendicular to a principal axis, thereby remarkably improving the device operation. This finding provides a new key variable component and paves the way toward using perovskite crystals in highly efficient photovoltaic cells.

  16. Fabrication and characteristics of unit cell for SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwi-Yeol; Eom, Seung-Wook; Moon, Seong-In [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Kyongnam (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Research and development on solid oxide fuel cells in Korea have been mainly focused on unit cell and small stack. Fuel cell system is called clean generation system which not cause NOx or SOx. It is generation efficiency come to 50-60% in contrast to 40% of combustion generation system. Among the fuel cell system, solid oxide fuel cell is constructed of ceramics, so stack construction is simple, power density is very high, and there are no corrosion problems. The object of this study is to develop various composing material for SOFC generation system, and to test unit cell performance manufactured. So we try to present a guidance for developing mass power generation system. We concentrated on development of manufacturing process for cathode, anode and electrolyte.

  17. Computing the writhe on lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laing, C; Sumners, D W

    2006-01-01

    Given a polygonal closed curve on a lattice or space group, we describe a method for computing the writhe of the curve as the average of weighted projected writhing numbers of the polygon in a few directions. These directions are determined by the lattice geometry, the weights are determined by areas of regions on the unit 2-sphere, and the regions are formed by the tangent indicatrix to the polygonal curve. We give a new formula for the writhe of polygons on the face centred cubic lattice and prove that the writhe of polygons on the body centred cubic lattice, the hexagonal simple lattice, and the diamond space group is always a rational number, and discuss applications to ring polymers

  18. Simulation and detection of massive Dirac fermions with cold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yafei, E-mail: yfyuks@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shan Chuanjia [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Mei Feng; Zhang Zhiming [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-09-15

    We propose a simple but feasible experimental scheme to simulate and detect Dirac fermions with cold atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattice. In our scheme, through tuning the laser intensity, the one-dimensional optical lattice can have two sites in each unit cell and the atoms around the low energy behave as massive Dirac fermions. Furthermore, we show that these relativistic quasiparticles can be detected experimentally by using atomic density profile measurements and Bragg scattering.

  19. Lattice QCD on fine lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Stefan [DESY (Germany). Neumann Inst. for Computing

    2016-11-01

    These configurations are currently in use in many on-going projects carried out by researchers throughout Europe. In particular this data will serve as an essential input into the computation of the coupling constant of QCD, where some of the simulations are still on-going. But also projects computing the masses of hadrons and investigating their structure are underway as well as activities in the physics of heavy quarks. As this initial project of gauge field generation has been successful, it is worthwhile to extend the currently available ensembles with further points in parameter space. These will allow to further study and control systematic effects like the ones introduced by the finite volume, the non-physical quark masses and the finite lattice spacing. In particular certain compromises have still been made in the region where pion masses and lattice spacing are both small. This is because physical pion masses require larger lattices to keep the effects of the finite volume under control. At light pion masses, a precise control of the continuum extrapolation is therefore difficult, but certainly a main goal of future simulations. To reach this goal, algorithmic developments as well as faster hardware will be needed.

  20. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low temperature anomalies in the lattice parameters of rare earth compounds and UPd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluemacher, D.

    1980-01-01

    Using a low temperature diffractometer, intermediate valence effects and crystal defects can be identified from the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters and the Debye-Waller factor. For polycrystalline powder samples the measuring error are too large. For intermediate valence systems the relative change in the 4f-level population probability can be calculated together with the anisotropic effects on the lattice parameters and on the unit cell colume. Pronounced effects on the lattice parameters can be observed in the case of RE Cu 2 Si 2 compounds with crystal fields. (DG) [de

  2. Lattice and strain analysis of atomic resolution Z-contrast images based on template matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Jian-Min, E-mail: jianzuo@uiuc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Shah, Amish B. [Center for Microanalysis of Materials, Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kim, Honggyu; Meng, Yifei; Gao, Wenpei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rouviére, Jean-Luc [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble UMR-E, SP2M, LEMMA, Minatec, Grenoble 38054 (France)

    2014-01-15

    A real space approach is developed based on template matching for quantitative lattice analysis using atomic resolution Z-contrast images. The method, called TeMA, uses the template of an atomic column, or a group of atomic columns, to transform the image into a lattice of correlation peaks. This is helped by using a local intensity adjusted correlation and by the design of templates. Lattice analysis is performed on the correlation peaks. A reference lattice is used to correct for scan noise and scan distortions in the recorded images. Using these methods, we demonstrate that a precision of few picometers is achievable in lattice measurement using aberration corrected Z-contrast images. For application, we apply the methods to strain analysis of a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown LaMnO{sub 3} and SrMnO{sub 3} superlattice. The results show alternating epitaxial strain inside the superlattice and its variations across interfaces at the spatial resolution of a single perovskite unit cell. Our methods are general, model free and provide high spatial resolution for lattice analysis. - Highlights: • A real space approach is developed for strain analysis using atomic resolution Z-contrast images and template matching. • A precision of few picometers is achievable in the measurement of lattice displacements. • The spatial resolution of a single perovskite unit cell is demonstrated for a LaMnO{sub 3} and SrMnO{sub 3} superlattice grown by MBE.

  3. A benchmark comparison of the Canadian Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) 64-element fuel lattice cell parameters using various computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, J.; Salaun, F.; Hummel, D.; Moghrabi, A.; Nowak, M.; Pencer, J.; Novog, D.; Buijs, A.

    2015-01-01

    Discrepancies in key lattice physics parameters have been observed between various deterministic (e.g. DRAGON and WIMS-AECL) and stochastic (MCNP, KENO) neutron transport codes in modeling previous versions of the Canadian SCWR lattice cell. Further, inconsistencies in these parameters have also been observed when using different nuclear data libraries. In this work, the predictions of k∞, various reactivity coefficients, and relative ring-averaged pin powers have been re-evaluated using these codes and libraries with the most recent 64-element fuel assembly geometry. A benchmark problem has been defined to quantify the dissimilarities between code results for a number of responses along the fuel channel under prescribed hot full power (HFP), hot zero power (HZP) and cold zero power (CZP) conditions and at several fuel burnups (0, 25 and 50 MW·d·kg"-"1 [HM]). Results from deterministic (TRITON, DRAGON) and stochastic codes (MCNP6, KENO V.a and KENO-VI) are presented. (author)

  4. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell mini power unit for portable application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbani, F.; Squadrito, G.; Barbera, O.; Giacoppo, G.; Passalacqua, E. [CNR-ITAE, via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse n. 5, 98126 S. Lucia, Messina (Italy); Zerbinati, O. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Dip. di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita, via Bellini 25/g, 15100 Alessandria (Italy)

    2007-06-20

    This paper describes the design, realisation and test of a power unit based on a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, operating at room temperature, for portable application. The device is composed of an home made air breathing fuel cell stack, a metal hydride tank for H{sub 2} supply, a dc-dc converter for power output control and a fan for stack cooling. The stack is composed by 10 cells with an active surface of 25 cm{sup 2} and produces a rated power of 15 W at 6 V and 2 A. The stack successfully runs with end-off fed hydrogen without appreciable performance degradation during the time. The final assembled system is able to generate 12 W at 9.5 V, and power a portable DVD player for 3 h in continuous. The power unit has collected about 100 h of operation without maintenance. (author)

  5. Area of Lattice Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A lattice is a (rectangular) grid of points, usually pictured as occurring at the intersections of two orthogonal sets of parallel, equally spaced lines. Polygons that have lattice points as vertices are called lattice polygons. It is clear that lattice polygons come in various shapes and sizes. A very small lattice triangle may cover just 3…

  6. THE GERMLINE STEM CELL NICHE UNIT IN MAMMALIAN TESTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatley, Jon M.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses current understanding of the germline stem cell niche unit in mammalian testes. Spermatogenesis is a classic model of tissue-specific stem cell function relying on self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). These fate decisions are influenced by a niche microenvironment composed of a growth factor milieu that is provided by several testis somatic support cell populations. Investigations over the last two decades have identified key determinants of the SSC niche including cytokines that regulate SSC functions and support cells providing these factors, adhesion molecules that influence SSC homing, and developmental heterogeneity of the niche during postnatal aging. Emerging evidence suggests that Sertoli cells are a key support cell population influencing the formation and function of niches by secreting soluble factors and possibly orchestrating contributions of other support cells. Investigations with mice have shown that niche influence on SSC proliferation differs during early postnatal development and adulthood. Moreover, there is mounting evidence of an age-related decline in niche function, which is likely influenced by systemic factors. Defining the attributes of stem cell niches is key to developing methods to utilize these cells for regenerative medicine. The SSC population and associated niche comprise a valuable model system for study that provides fundamental knowledge about the biology of tissue-specific stem cells and their capacity to sustain homeostasis of regenerating tissue lineages. While the stem cell is essential for maintenance of all self-renewing tissues and has received considerable attention, the role of niche cells is at least as important and may prove to be more receptive to modification in regenerative medicine. PMID:22535892

  7. Résumé : La méthode Lattice Boltzmann (LBM)et la celle des ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOSLIN

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM ) , Finite Difference Explicit ( DFE ) , Hybrid combines the two previous methods and Finite ... In addition, simulations using four methods show that for Ra = 105 the system is damped oscillating, it is oscillating periodic ..... convection heat transfert in a horizontal concentric annulus".Computer ...

  8. The fundamental unit of pain is the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichling, David B; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2013-12-01

    The molecular/genetic era has seen the discovery of a staggering number of molecules implicated in pain mechanisms [18,35,61,69,96,133,150,202,224]. This has stimulated pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to invest billions of dollars to develop drugs that enhance or inhibit the function of many these molecules. Unfortunately this effort has provided a remarkably small return on this investment. Inevitably, transformative progress in this field will require a better understanding of the functional links among the ever-growing ranks of "pain molecules," as well as their links with an even larger number of molecules with which they interact. Importantly, all of these molecules exist side-by-side, within a functional unit, the cell, and its adjacent matrix of extracellular molecules. To paraphrase a recent editorial in Science magazine [223], although we live in the Golden age of Genetics, the fundamental unit of biology is still arguably the cell, and the cell is the critical structural and functional setting in which the function of pain-related molecules must be understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the nociceptor as a cell-biological unit that responds to a variety of extracellular inputs with a complex and highly organized interaction of signaling molecules. We also discuss the insights that this approach is providing into peripheral mechanisms of chronic pain and sex dependence in pain.

  9. Simulating Photons and Plasmons in a Three-dimensional Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletzer, A.; Shvets, G.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional metallic photonic structures are studied using a newly developed mixed finite element-finite difference (FE-FD) code, Curly3d. The code solves the vector Helmholtz equation as an eigenvalue problem in the unit cell of a triply periodic lattice composed of conductors and/or dielectrics. The mixed FE-FD discretization scheme ensures rapid numerical convergence of the eigenvalue and allows the code to run at low resolution. Plasmon and photonic band structure calculations are presented

  10. LATTICE: an interactive lattice computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.

    1976-10-01

    LATTICE is a computer code which enables an interactive user to calculate the functions of a synchrotron lattice. This program satisfies the requirements at LBL for a simple interactive lattice program by borrowing ideas from both TRANSPORT and SYNCH. A fitting routine is included

  11. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field...

  12. Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K.; Braff, William

    2009-01-01

    In a substantial improvement over present alkaline systems, an advanced hybrid bipolar plate for a unitized fuel cell/electrolyzer has been developed. This design, which operates on pure feed streams (H2/O2 and water, respectively) consists of a porous metallic foil filled with a polymer that has very high water transport properties. Combined with a second metallic plate, the pore-filled metallic plates form a bipolar plate with an empty cavity in the center.

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells coupled with a biomass gasification unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypkiewicz Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of fuelling a solid oxide fuel cell stack (SOFC with biomass fuels can be realized by coupling a SOFC system with a self-standing gasification unit. Such a solution enables multi-fuel operation, elasticity of the system as well as the increase of the efficiency of small-scale biomass-to-electricity conversion units. A system of this type, consisting of biomass gasification unit, gas purification unit, SOFC stack, anode off-gas afterburner and peripherals was constructed and operated successfully. During the process, biomass fuel (wood chips was gasified with air as gasification agent. The gasifier was capable of converting up to 30 kW of fuel to syngas with efficiencies up to 75%. Syngas leaving the gasification unit is delivered to a medium temperature adsorber for sulphur compounds removal. Steam is added to the purified fuel to maintain steam to carbon ratio higher than 2. The syngas then is passed to a SOFC stack through a fuel preheater. In such a configuration it was possible to operate a commercial 1.3 kW stack within its working regime. Conducted tests confirmed successful operation of a SOFC stack fuelled by biomass-sourced syngas.

  14. Changing electronic density in sites of crystalline lattice under superconducting of phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turaev, N.Yu.; Turaev, E.Yu.; Khuzhakulov, E.S.; Seregin, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    Results of electron density change calculations for sites of the one-dimensional Kronig-Penny lattice at the superconducting phase transition have been presented. The transition from normal state to super conducting one is accompanied by the rise of the electron density at the unit cell centre. It is agreement with Moessbauer spectroscopy data. (author)

  15. Lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1982-01-01

    After a description of a pure Yang-Mills theory on a lattice, the author considers a three-dimensional pure U(1) lattice gauge theory. Thereafter he discusses the exact relation between lattice gauge theories with the gauge groups SU(2) and SO(3). Finally he presents Monte Carlo data on phase transitions in SU(2) and SO(3) lattice gauge models. (HSI)

  16. Input-Independent Energy Harvesting in Bistable Lattices from Transition Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Myungwon; Arrieta, Andres F

    2018-02-26

    We demonstrate the utilisation of transition waves for realising input-invariant, frequency-independent energy harvesting in 1D lattices of bistable elements. We propose a metamaterial-inspired design with an integrated electromechanical transduction mechanism to the unit cell, rendering the power conversion capability an intrinsic property of the lattice. Moreover, focusing of transmitted energy to desired locations is demonstrated numerically and experimentally by introducing engineered defects in the form of perturbation in mass or inter-element forcing. We achieve further localisation of energy and numerically observe a breather-like mode for the first time in this type of lattice, improving the harvesting performance by an order of magnitude. Our approach considers generic bistable unit cells and thus provides a universal mechanism to harvest energy and realise metamaterials effectively behaving as a capacitor and power delivery system.

  17. Comparison of gas membrane separation cascades using conventional separation cell and two-unit separation cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masayoshi; Morisue, Tetsuo; Ozaki, Osamu; Miyauchi, Terukatsu.

    1978-01-01

    The adoption of two-unit separation cells in radioactive rare gas membrane separation equipment enhances the separation factor, but increases the required membrane area and compressive power. An analytical economic evaluation was undertaken to compare the conventional separation cell with the two-unit separation cells, adopting as parameters the number of cascade stages, the membrane area and the operating power requirements. This paper describes the models used for evaluating the separation performance and the economics of cascade embodying these different concepts of separation cell taken up for study, and the results obtained for the individual concepts are mutually compared. It proved that, in respect of the number required of cascade stages, of operating power requirements and of the annual expenditure, better performance could always be expected of the two-unit separation cells as compared with the conventional separation cell, at least in the range of parameters adopted in this study. As regards the minimum membrane area, the conventional separation cell and the series-type separation cell yielded almost the same values, with the parallel-type separation cell falling somewhat behind. (auth.)

  18. Zeroing in on red blood cell unit expiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyalil, Fathima; Irwin, Greg; Ross, Bryony; Manolis, Michael; Enjeti, Anoop K

    2017-12-01

    Expiry of red blood cell (RBC) units is a significant contributor to wastage of precious voluntary donations. Effective strategies aimed at optimal resource utilization are required to minimize wastage. This retrospective study analyzed the strategic measures implemented to reduce expiry of RBC units in an Australian tertiary regional hospital. The measures, which included inventory rearrangement, effective stock rotation, and the number of emergency courier services required during a 24-month period, were evaluated. There was no wastage of RBC units due to expiry over the 12 months after policy changes. Before these changes, approximately half of RBC wastage (261/511) was due to expiry. The total number of transfusions remained constant in this period and there was no increase in the use of emergency couriers. Policy changes implemented were decreasing the RBC inventory level by one-third and effective stock rotation and using a computerized system to link the transfusion services across the area. Effective stock rotation resulted in a reduction in older blood (>28 days) received in the main laboratory rotated from peripheral hospitals, down from 6%-41% to 0%-2.5%. Age-related expiry of blood products is preventable and can be significantly reduced by improving practices in the pathology service. This study provides proof of principle for "zero tolerance for RBC unit expiry" across a large networked blood banking service. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  19. Lattices with unique complements

    CERN Document Server

    Saliĭ, V N

    1988-01-01

    The class of uniquely complemented lattices properly contains all Boolean lattices. However, no explicit example of a non-Boolean lattice of this class has been found. In addition, the question of whether this class contains any complete non-Boolean lattices remains unanswered. This book focuses on these classical problems of lattice theory and the various attempts to solve them. Requiring no specialized knowledge, the book is directed at researchers and students interested in general algebra and mathematical logic.

  20. Trends in US minority red blood cell unit donations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazer, Mark H; Delaney, Meghan; Germain, Marc; Karafin, Matthew S; Sayers, Merlyn; Vassallo, Ralph; Ziman, Alyssa; Shaz, Beth

    2017-05-01

    To provide the appropriately diverse blood supply necessary to support alloimmunized and chronically transfused patients, minority donation recruitment programs have been implemented. This study investigated temporal changes in minority red blood cell (RBC) donation patterns in the United States. Data on donor race and ethnicity from 2006 through 2015, including the number of unique donors, collections, RBCs successfully donated, and average annual number of RBC donations per donor (donor fraction), were collected from eight US blood collectors. Minority donors were stratified into the following groups: Asian, black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, Native Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, white, multiracial/other, and no answer/not sure. Over the 10-year period, white donors annually constituted the majority of unique donors (range, 70.7%-73.9%), had the greatest proportion of collections (range, 76.1%-79.8%), and donated the greatest proportion of RBC units (range, 76.3%-80.2%). These donors also had the highest annual donor fraction (range, 1.82-1.91 units per donor). Black or African American donors annually constituted between 4.9 and 5.2% of all donors during the study period and donated between 4.0 and 4.3% of all RBC units. Linear regression analysis revealed decreasing numbers of donors, collections, and donated RBC units from white donors over time. Although the US population has diversified, and minority recruitment programs have been implemented, white donors constitute the majority of RBC donors and donations. Focused and effective efforts are needed to increase the proportion of minority donors. © 2017 AABB.

  1. Design of the SPEAR 3 magnet lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.; Limborg, C.; Nosochkov, Y.; Safranek, J.

    1998-01-01

    The SPEAR 3 Upgrade Project seeks to replace the present 160 nm-rad FODO lattice with an 18 nm-rad double bend achromat (DBA) lattice. The new lattice must conform to the layout of the SPEAR racetrack tunnel and service the existing photon beamlines. Working within these constraints, the authors designed a lattice with 18 achromatic cells and 3 GeV beam energy. This paper reports on design of the main DBA cells, design of the matching cells leading into the 6.5 m racetrack straights, and simulation of the dynamic aperture. The new lattice has gradient dipoles, conventional quadrupoles, and provides horizontal dynamic aperture to ± 20 mm with conservative magnetic multipole errors

  2. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  3. Molten Salt Breeder Reactor Analysis Based on Unit Cell Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yongjin; Choi, Sooyoung; Lee, Deokjung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Contemporary computer codes like the MCNP6 or SCALE are only good for solving a fixed solid fuel reactor. However, due to the molten-salt fuel, MSR analysis needs some functions such as online reprocessing and refueling, and circulating fuel. J. J. Power of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) suggested in 2013 a method for simulating the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) with SCALE, which does not support continuous material processing. In order to simulate MSR characteristics, the method proposes dividing a depletion time into short time intervals and batchwise reprocessing and refueling at each step. We are applying this method by using the MCNP6 and PYTHON and NEWT-TRITON-PYTHON and PYTHON code systems to MSBR. This paper contains various parameters to analyze the MSBR unit cell model such as the multiplication factor, breeding ratio, change of amount of fuel, amount of fuel feeding, and neutron flux distribution. The result of MCNP6 and NEWT module in SCALE show some difference in depletion analysis, but it still seems that they can be used to analyze MSBR. Using these two computer code system, it is possible to analyze various parameters for the MSBR unit cells such as the multiplication factor, breeding ratio, amount of material, total feeding, and neutron flux distribution. Furthermore, the two code systems will be able to be used for analyzing other MSR model or whole core models of MSR.

  4. Molten Salt Breeder Reactor Analysis Based on Unit Cell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yongjin; Choi, Sooyoung; Lee, Deokjung

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary computer codes like the MCNP6 or SCALE are only good for solving a fixed solid fuel reactor. However, due to the molten-salt fuel, MSR analysis needs some functions such as online reprocessing and refueling, and circulating fuel. J. J. Power of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) suggested in 2013 a method for simulating the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) with SCALE, which does not support continuous material processing. In order to simulate MSR characteristics, the method proposes dividing a depletion time into short time intervals and batchwise reprocessing and refueling at each step. We are applying this method by using the MCNP6 and PYTHON and NEWT-TRITON-PYTHON and PYTHON code systems to MSBR. This paper contains various parameters to analyze the MSBR unit cell model such as the multiplication factor, breeding ratio, change of amount of fuel, amount of fuel feeding, and neutron flux distribution. The result of MCNP6 and NEWT module in SCALE show some difference in depletion analysis, but it still seems that they can be used to analyze MSBR. Using these two computer code system, it is possible to analyze various parameters for the MSBR unit cells such as the multiplication factor, breeding ratio, amount of material, total feeding, and neutron flux distribution. Furthermore, the two code systems will be able to be used for analyzing other MSR model or whole core models of MSR

  5. A benchmark comparison of the Canadian Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) 64-element fuel lattice cell parameters using various computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, J.; Salaun, F.; Hummel, D.; Moghrabi, A., E-mail: sharpejr@mcmaster.ca [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Nowak, M. [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, Phelma, Grenoble (France); Pencer, J. [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, (Canada); Novog, D.; Buijs, A. [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Discrepancies in key lattice physics parameters have been observed between various deterministic (e.g. DRAGON and WIMS-AECL) and stochastic (MCNP, KENO) neutron transport codes in modeling previous versions of the Canadian SCWR lattice cell. Further, inconsistencies in these parameters have also been observed when using different nuclear data libraries. In this work, the predictions of k∞, various reactivity coefficients, and relative ring-averaged pin powers have been re-evaluated using these codes and libraries with the most recent 64-element fuel assembly geometry. A benchmark problem has been defined to quantify the dissimilarities between code results for a number of responses along the fuel channel under prescribed hot full power (HFP), hot zero power (HZP) and cold zero power (CZP) conditions and at several fuel burnups (0, 25 and 50 MW·d·kg{sup -1} [HM]). Results from deterministic (TRITON, DRAGON) and stochastic codes (MCNP6, KENO V.a and KENO-VI) are presented. (author)

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulation on the liquid junction potential in a concentration fuel cell. Paper no. IGEC-1-060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.; Huh, K.Y.; Li, X.

    2005-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied to investigate the liquid junction potential (LJP) at an interface between two electrolyte layers. The Poisson equation for electrostatic field is solved to extend the applicable range to micro and nano scales in which electroneutrality does not hold. The LBM solutions are validated against analytical and finite difference method (FDM) results for evolution of concentration, net charge density and electrostatic potential. Noticeable separation of the concentration profiles of positive and negative ions occurs for kd less than 67 in simulation, where k is the inverse of the thickness of electrical double layer and d is the system length. Parametric study is performed for the peak potential and the time to reach the peak with respect to kd and ξ which is the initial thickness ratio of the lower concentration to entire stream. Simple coding and easy parallelization will allow the LBM to make an efficient analysis tool for complex electrochemical systems. (author)

  7. Hydrogen and fuel cells in the United States Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacobucci, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past few years, the United States Congress has shown increasing interest in the development of hydrogen fuel and fuel cells for transportation, stationary, and mobile applications The high efficiency of fuel cell systems could address some of the concern over increasing dependence on imported petroleum. Further, lower emissions could help promote air quality goals However, many questions remain, including the affordability, safety, overall fuel-cycle efficiency and emissions. These questions, especially those related to cost, have led Members of Congress to enact legislation to speed the development and commercialization of the technologies. This paper discusses congressional action on hydrogen and fuel cells. It provides an overview of the U.S. Congress, and outlines the role of the appropriations process. It then provides a history of federal hydrogen fuel research and development (R and D), both in terms of legislative and executive initiatives, and it describes pending legislation current as of this writing, including bills on energy policy, transportation policy, tax policy, and appropriations. Finally, the paper presents some of the issues that the pending legislation may raise for industry. (author)

  8. Indirect Fabrication of Lattice Metals with Thin Sections Using Centrifugal Casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Jiwon; Ju, Jaehyung; Thurman, James

    2016-05-14

    One of the typical methods to manufacture 3D lattice metals is the direct-metal additive manufacturing (AM) process such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In spite of its potential processing capability, the direct AM method has several disadvantages such as high cost, poor surface finish of final products, limitation in material selection, high thermal stress, and anisotropic properties of parts. We propose a cost-effective method to manufacture 3D lattice metals. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed protocol on fabrication of 3D lattice metals having a complex shape and a thin wall thickness; e.g., octet truss made of Al and Cu alloys having a unit cell length of 5 mm and a cell wall thickness of 0.5 mm. An overall experimental procedure is divided into eight sections: (a) 3D printing of sacrificial patterns (b) melt-out of support materials (c) removal of residue of support materials (d) pattern assembly (e) investment (f) burn-out of sacrificial patterns (g) centrifugal casting (h) post-processing for final products. The suggested indirect AM technique provides the potential to manufacture ultra-lightweight lattice metals; e.g., lattice structures with Al alloys. It appears that the process parameters should be properly controlled depending on materials and lattice geometry, observing the final products of octet truss metals by the indirect AM technique.

  9. New integrable lattice hierarchies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, Andrew; Zhu Zuonong

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter we give a new integrable four-field lattice hierarchy, associated to a new discrete spectral problem. We obtain our hierarchy as the compatibility condition of this spectral problem and an associated equation, constructed herein, for the time-evolution of eigenfunctions. We consider reductions of our hierarchy, which also of course admit discrete zero curvature representations, in detail. We find that our hierarchy includes many well-known integrable hierarchies as special cases, including the Toda lattice hierarchy, the modified Toda lattice hierarchy, the relativistic Toda lattice hierarchy, and the Volterra lattice hierarchy. We also obtain here a new integrable two-field lattice hierarchy, to which we give the name of Suris lattice hierarchy, since the first equation of this hierarchy has previously been given by Suris. The Hamiltonian structure of the Suris lattice hierarchy is obtained by means of a trace identity formula

  10. Water droplet dynamic behavior during removal from a proton exchange membrane fuel cell gas diffusion layer by Lattice-Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaeimanesh, Golamreza; Akbari, Mohammad Hadi [Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    A major challenge in the application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is water management, with the flooding of electrodes as the main issue. The Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is a relatively new technique that is superior in modeling the dynamic interface of multiphase fluid flow in complex microstructures such as non-homogeneous and anisotropic porous media of PEMFC electrodes. In this study, the dynamic behavior of a water droplet during removal from gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC electrode with interdigitated flow field is simulated using LBM. The effects of GDL wettability and its spanwise and transverse gradients on the removal process are investigated. The results demonstrate great influence of wettability and its spanwise and transverse gradients on the dynamic behavior of droplets during the removal process. Although increasing the hydrophobicity of GDL results in better droplet removal, its increase beyond a critical value does not show a significant effect.

  11. Unit-cell refinement from powder diffraction scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawley, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure for the refinement of the crystal unit cell from a powder diffraction scan is presented. In this procedure knowledge of the crystal structure is not required, and at the end of the refinement a list of indexed intensities is produced. This list may well be usable as the starting point for the application of direct methods. The problems of least-squares ill-conditioning due to overlapping reflections are overcome by constraints. An example using decafluorocyclohexene, C 6 F 10 , shows the quality of fit obtained in a case which may even be a false minimum. The method should become more relevant as powder scans of improved resolution become available, through the use of pulsed neutron sources. (Auth.)

  12. Systematic design of 3D auxetic lattice materials with programmable Poisson's ratio for finite strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengwen

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach for designing 3D auxetic lattice materials, which exhibit constant negative Poisson's ratios over large strain intervals. A unit cell model mimicking tensile tests is established and based on the proposed model, the secant Poisson's ratio is defined as the negative ratio between the lateral and the longitudinal engineering strains. The optimization problem for designing a material unit cell with a target Poisson's ratio is formulated to minimize the average lateral engineering stresses under the prescribed deformations. Numerical results demonstrate that 3D auxetic lattice materials with constant Poisson's ratios can be achieved by the proposed optimization formulation and that two sets of material architectures are obtained by imposing different symmetry on the unit cell. Moreover, inspired by the topology-optimized material architecture, a subsequent shape optimization is proposed by parametrizing material architectures using super-ellipsoids. By designing two geometrical parameters, simple optimized material microstructures with different target Poisson's ratios are obtained. By interpolating these two parameters as polynomial functions of Poisson's ratios, material architectures for any Poisson's ratio in the interval of ν ∈ [ - 0.78 , 0.00 ] are explicitly presented. Numerical evaluations show that interpolated auxetic lattice materials exhibit constant Poisson's ratios in the target strain interval of [0.00, 0.20] and that 3D auxetic lattice material architectures with programmable Poisson's ratio are achievable.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of water transport in gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Liang; Cheng, Ping [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Power Machinery and Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, DongChuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-06-15

    The effect of wettability on water transport dynamics in gas diffusion layer (GDL) is investigated by simulating water invasion in an initially gas-filled GDL using the multiphase free-energy lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The results show that wettability plays a significant role on water saturation distribution in two-phase flow in the uniform wetting GDL. For highly hydrophobicity, the water transport falls in the regime of capillary fingering, while for neutral wettability, water transport exhibits the characteristic of stable displacement, although both processes are capillary force dominated flow with same capillary numbers. In addition, the introduction of hydrophilic paths in the GDL leads the water to flow through the hydrophilic pores preferentially. The resulting water saturation distributions show that the saturation in the GDL has little change after water breaks through the GDL, and further confirm that the selective introduction of hydrophilic passages in the GDL would facilitate the removal of liquid water more effectively, thus alleviating the flooding in catalyst layer (CL) and GDL. The LBM approach presented in this study provides an effective tool to investigate water transport phenomenon in the GDL at pore-scale level with wettability distribution taken into consideration. (author)

  14. Uncertainty analysis of light water reactor unit fuel pin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamerow, S.; Ivanov, K., E-mail: sln107@PSU.EDU, E-mail: kni1@PSU.EDU [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States); Moreno, C. Arenas, E-mail: cristina.arenas@UPC.EDU [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    The study explored the calculation of uncertainty based on available covariance data and computational tools. Uncertainty due to temperature changes and different fuel compositions are the main focus of this analysis. Selected unit fuel pin cells were analyzed according to the OECD LWR UAM benchmark specifications. Criticality and uncertainty analyses were performed using TSUNAMI-1D sequence in SCALE 6.0. It was found that uncertainties increase with increasing temperature while k{sub eff} decreases. This increase in the uncertainty is due to the increase in sensitivity of the largest contributor of uncertainty, namely nuclide reaction {sup 238}U (n, gamma). The sensitivity grew larger as the capture cross-section of {sup 238}U expanded due to Doppler broadening. In addition, three different compositions (UOx, MOx, and UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) of fuel cells were analyzed. It showed a remarkable increase in uncertainty in k{sub eff} for the case of the MOx fuel cell and UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuel cell. The increase in the uncertainty of k{sub eff} in UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuel was nearly twice of that in MOx fuel and almost four times the amount in UOx fuel. The components of the uncertainties in k{sub eff} in each case were examined and it was found that the neutron-nuclide reaction of {sup 238}U, mainly (n,n'), contributed the most to the uncertainties in the cases of MOx and UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At higher energy, the covariance coefficient matrix of {sup 238}U (n,n') to {sup 238}U (n,n') and {sup 238}U (n,n') cross-section showed very large values. Further, examination of the UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} case found that the {sup 238}U (n,n') became the dominant contributor to the uncertainty because most of the thermal neutrons in the cell were absorbed by Gadolinium in UOxGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} case and thus shifting the neutron spectrum to higher energy. For the MOx case on other hand, {sup 239}Pu has a very strong absorption cross-section at low energy

  15. The effect of diffusion induced lattice stress on the open-circuit voltage in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, V. G.; Godlewski, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that diffusion induced stresses in low resistivity silicon solar cells can significantly reduce both the open-circuit voltage and collection efficiency. The degradation mechanism involves stress induced changes in both the minority carrier mobility and the diffusion length. Thermal recovery characteristics indicate that the stresses are relieved at higher temperatures by divacancy flow (silicon self diffusion). The level of residual stress in as-fabricated cells was found to be negligible in the cells tested.

  16. Generalized isothermic lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doliwa, Adam

    2007-01-01

    We study multi-dimensional quadrilateral lattices satisfying simultaneously two integrable constraints: a quadratic constraint and the projective Moutard constraint. When the lattice is two dimensional and the quadric under consideration is the Moebius sphere one obtains, after the stereographic projection, the discrete isothermic surfaces defined by Bobenko and Pinkall by an algebraic constraint imposed on the (complex) cross-ratio of the circular lattice. We derive the analogous condition for our generalized isothermic lattices using Steiner's projective structure of conics, and we present basic geometric constructions which encode integrability of the lattice. In particular, we introduce the Darboux transformation of the generalized isothermic lattice and we derive the corresponding Bianchi permutability principle. Finally, we study two-dimensional generalized isothermic lattices, in particular geometry of their initial boundary value problem

  17. Fermi surface properties of paramagnetic NpCd11 with a large unit cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai; Haga, Yoshinori; Settai, Rikio; Sakai, Hironori; Ikeda, Shugo; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nakamura, Akio; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2010-03-01

    We succeeded in growing a high-quality single crystal of NpCd11 with the cubic BaHg11-type structure by the Cd-self flux method. The lattice parameter of a = 9.2968(2) Å and crystallographic positions of the atoms were determined by x-ray single-crystal structure analysis. From the results of the magnetic susceptibility and specific heat experiments, this compound is found to be a 5f-localized paramagnet with the singlet ground state in the crystalline electric field (CEF) scheme. Fermi surface properties were measured using the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) technique. Long-period oscillations were observed in the dHvA frequency range of 9.1 x 105 to 1.9 x 107 Oe, indicating small cross-sectional areas of Fermi surfaces, which is consistent with a small Brillouin zone based on a large unit cell. From the results of dHvA and magnetoresistance experiments, the Fermi surface of NpCd11 is found to consist of many kinds of closed Fermi surfaces and a multiply-connected-like Fermi surface, although the result of energy band calculations based on the 5f-localized Np3+(5f4) configuration reveals the existence of only closed Fermi surfaces. The corresponding cyclotron effective mass is small, ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m0, which is consistent with a small electronic specific heat coefficient γ ≅ 10mJ/K2·mol, revealing no hybridization between the 5f electrons and conduction electrons.

  18. Calculation Of A Lattice Physics Parameter For SBWR Fuel Bundle Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardjono, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The maximum power peaking factor for Nuclear Power Plant SBWR type is 1.5. The precision for that calculation is related with the result of unit cell analysis each rod in the fuel bundles. This analysis consist of lattice eigenvalue, lattice average diffusion cross section as well as relative power peaking factor in the fuel rod for each fuel bundles. The calculation by using TGBLA computer code which is based on the transport and 168 group diffusion theory. From this calculation can be concluded that the maximum relative power peaking factor is 1.304 and lower than design limit

  19. Beam position monitors for the high brightness lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, T.

    1985-06-01

    Engineering developments associated with the high brightness lattice and the projected change in machine operating parameters will inherently affect the diagnostics systems and devices installed at present in the storage ring. This is particularly true of the beam position monitoring (BPI) system. The new sixteen unit cell lattice with its higher betatron tune values and the limited space available in the redesigned machine straights for fitting standard BPI vessels forces a fundamental re-evaluation of the beam position monitor system. The design aims for the new system are based on accepting the space limitations imposed while still providing the monitor points required to give good radial and vertical closed orbit plots. The locations of BPI's in the redesigned machine straights is illustrated. A description of the new BPI assemblies and their calibration is given. The BPI's use capacitance button type pick-ups; their response is described. (U.K.)

  20. Experimental and numerical studies on pressure drop in reverse electrodialysis: Effect of unit cell configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Kook; Choi, Kyung Soo [Advanced Combustion Laboratory, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Soo; Hwang, Kyo Sik; Han, Ji Hyung; Kim, Han Ki; Jeong, Nam Jo [Jeju Global Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Experimental and numerical studies on pressure drop in Reverse electrodialysis (RED) were performed. In this study, a module with 200 unit cells is considered for the demonstration of bench-scale RED module and two different unit cell configurations are utilized. Pressure drop through the module is measured by varying flow rates. For evaluating the hydrodynamic characteristics in the unit cell, a numerical simulation is also conducted and the simplified method using a porous media model is employed to simulate the channel filled with spacer. Due to the insertion of spacer and narrow channel, great pressure loss occurs along the unit cell. Based on estimated pressure data, high pressure difference between seawater and fresh water channel takes place locally in the unit cell configuration with crossflow direction, leading to a leakage problem through the membrane and finally degradation in the output power. Consequently, it is confirmed that the unit cell configuration is one of the important design parameters in a RED module.

  1. Logic gates realized by nonvolatile GeTe/Sb2Te3 super lattice phase-change memory with a magnetic field input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Cheng, Xiaomin; Feng, Jinlong; Guan, Xiawei; Miao, Xiangshui

    2016-07-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices or circuits that can implement both storage and calculation are a crucial requirement for the efficiency improvement of modern computer. In this work, we realize logic functions by using [GeTe/Sb2Te3]n super lattice phase change memory (PCM) cell in which higher threshold voltage is needed for phase change with a magnetic field applied. First, the [GeTe/Sb2Te3]n super lattice cells were fabricated and the R-V curve was measured. Then we designed the logic circuits with the super lattice PCM cell verified by HSPICE simulation and experiments. Seven basic logic functions are first demonstrated in this letter; then several multi-input logic gates are presented. The proposed logic devices offer the advantages of simple structures and low power consumption, indicating that the super lattice PCM has the potential in the future nonvolatile central processing unit design, facilitating the development of massive parallel computing architecture.

  2. Automated assembling of single fuel cell units for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Muminovic, A.; Barz, C.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    The manufacturing of PEMFC stacks (POLYMER ELEKTROLYT MEMBRAN Fuel Cell) is nowadays still done by hand. Over hundreds of identical single components have to be placed accurate together for the construction of a fuel cell stack. Beside logistic problems, higher total costs and disadvantages in weight the high number of components produce a higher statistic interference because of faulty erection or material defects and summation of manufacturing tolerances. The saving of costs is about 20 - 25 %. Furthermore, the total weight of the fuel cells will be reduced because of a new sealing technology. Overall a one minute cycle time has to be aimed per cell at the manufacturing of these single components. The change of the existing sealing concept to a bonded sealing is one of the important requisites to get an automated manufacturing of single cell units. One of the important steps for an automated gluing process is the checking of the glue application by using of an image processing system. After bonding the single fuel cell the sealing and electrical function can be checked, so that only functional and high qualitative cells can get into further manufacturing processes.

  3. Super Unit Cells in Aperture-Based Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Tanasković

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important class of electromagnetic metamaterials are aperture-based metasurfaces. Examples include extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnets with negative refractive index. We analyze a generalization of such metamaterials where a simple aperture is now replaced by a compound object formed by superposition of two or more primitive objects (e.g., rectangles, circles, and ellipses. Thus obtained “super unit cell” shows far richer behavior than the subobjects that comprise it. We show that nonlocalities introduced by overlapping simple subobjects can be used to produce large deviations of spectral dispersion even for small additive modifications of the basic geometry. Technologically, some super cells may be fabricated by simple spatial shifting of the existing photolithographic masks. In our investigation we applied analytical calculations and ab initio finite element modeling to prove the possibility to tailor the dispersion including resonances for plasmonic nanocomposites by adjusting the local geometry and exploiting localized interactions at a subwavelength level. Any desired form could be defined using simple primitive objects, making the situation a geometrical analog of the case of series expansion of a function. Thus an additional degree of tunability of metamaterials is obtained. The obtained designer structures can be applied in different fields like waveguiding and sensing.

  4. Calcitonin, phosphate, and the osteocyte--osteoblast bone cell unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, R.V.; Matthews, J.L.; Martin, J.H.; Kennedy, J.W. III; Davis, W.L.; Roycroft, J.H. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    In this report we have attempted to correlate the morphological and chemical changes that occur in the long bone (tibia) of rats with the hypocalcemia that is produced following calcitonin injection or release from its gland of origin. By varying the supply of phosphate available to the rat, it has been possible to demonstrate that changes produced by CT both in bone and in plasma calcium concentrations were dependent upon an adequate supply of this ion. It is, therefore, postulated that the hypocalcemia produced by calcitonin is secondary to the formation of a calcium phosphate complex in and around osteocytes and lining cells. It is suggested that this complex, which is normally prevented from transforming to apatite crystal by the presence of an inhibitor, reduces the availability of calcium for rapid transport to the ECF. The reduction in calcium flux from bone to ECF results in a rapid and transient hypocalcemia. Regardless of the status of this postulate, we have at least demonstrated that the osteocyte-osteoblast unit of compact bone reacts rapidly to calcitonin in a process requiring phosphate in a sequence of events which can be closely correlated to the hypocalcemic action of the hormone.

  5. Lattice theory for nonspecialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Dass, N.D.

    1984-01-01

    These lectures were delivered as part of the academic training programme at the NIKHEF-H. These lectures were intended primarily for experimentalists, and theorists not specializing in lattice methods. The goal was to present the essential spirit behind the lattice approach and consequently the author has concentrated mostly on issues of principle rather than on presenting a large amount of detail. In particular, the author emphasizes the deep theoretical infra-structure that has made lattice studies meaningful. At the same time, he has avoided the use of heavy formalisms as they tend to obscure the basic issues for people trying to approach this subject for the first time. The essential ideas are illustrated with elementary soluble examples not involving complicated mathematics. The following subjects are discussed: three ways of solving the harmonic oscillator problem; latticization; gauge fields on a lattice; QCD observables; how to solve lattice theories. (Auth.)

  6. Lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1983-04-01

    In the last few years lattice gauge theory has become the primary tool for the study of nonperturbative phenomena in gauge theories. The lattice serves as an ultraviolet cutoff, rendering the theory well defined and amenable to numerical and analytical work. Of course, as with any cutoff, at the end of a calculation one must consider the limit of vanishing lattice spacing in order to draw conclusions on the physical continuum limit theory. The lattice has the advantage over other regulators that it is not tied to the Feynman expansion. This opens the possibility of other approximation schemes than conventional perturbation theory. Thus Wilson used a high temperature expansion to demonstrate confinement in the strong coupling limit. Monte Carlo simulations have dominated the research in lattice gauge theory for the last four years, giving first principle calculations of nonperturbative parameters characterizing the continuum limit. Some of the recent results with lattice calculations are reviewed

  7. On Traveling Waves in Lattices: The Case of Riccati Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka

    2012-09-01

    The method of simplest equation is applied for analysis of a class of lattices described by differential-difference equations that admit traveling-wave solutions constructed on the basis of the solution of the Riccati equation. We denote such lattices as Riccati lattices. We search for Riccati lattices within two classes of lattices: generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices and generalized Holling lattices. We show that from the class of generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices only the Wadati lattice belongs to the class of Riccati lattices. Opposite to this many lattices from the Holling class are Riccati lattices. We construct exact traveling wave solutions on the basis of the solution of Riccati equation for three members of the class of generalized Holling lattices.

  8. 3D Metallic Lattices for Accelerator Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of research on 3D metallic lattices operating at microwave frequencies for application in (1) accelerator structures with higher order mode suppression, (2) Smith-Purcell radiation beam diagnostics, and (3) polaritonic materials for laser acceleration. Electromagnetic waves in a 3D simple cubic lattice formed by metal wires are calculated using HFSS. The bulk modes in the lattice are determined using single cell calculations with different phase advances in all three directions. The Brillouin diagram for the bulk modes is presented and indicates the absence of band gaps in simple lattices except the band below the cutoff. Lattices with thin wires as well as with thick wires have been analyzed. The Brillouin diagram also indicates the presence of low frequency 3D plasmon mode as well as the two degenerate photon modes analogous to those in a 2D lattice. Surface modes for a semi-infinite cubic lattice are modeled as a stack of cells with different phase advances in the two directions alon...

  9. Magnetic structure and resonance properties of hexagonal antidot lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, A.I.; Krivoruchko, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    Static and resonance properties of ferromagnetic films with an antidot lattice (pores in the film) are studied. The description of the system is based on micromagnetic modeling and analytical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. The dependences of ferromagnetic resonance spectra on the in-plane direction of applied magnetic field and on the lattice parameters are investigated. The dependences of a dynamic system response on frequency at fixed magnetic field and on field at fixed frequency, when the field changes cause the static magnetic order to change are explored. It is found that the specific peculiarities of the system dynamics leave unchange for both of these experimental conditions. Namely, for low damping the resonance spectra contain three quasi-homogeneous modes which are due to the resonance of different regions (domains) of the antidot lattice cell. It is shown the angular field dependences of each mode are characterized by a twofold symmetry and the related easy axes are mutually rotated by 60 degrees. As the result, a hexagonal symmetry of the system static and dynamic magnetic characteristics is realized. The existence in the resonance spectrum of several quasi-homogeneous modes related to different regions of the unit cell could be fundamental for working elements of magnonic devices.

  10. Lattice degeneracies of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raszillier, H.

    1983-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the minimal degeneracies of geometric (Kaehler) fermions on all the lattices of maximal symmetries in n = 1, ..., 4 dimensions. We also determine the isolated orbits of the maximal symmetry groups, which are related to the minimal numbers of ''naive'' fermions on the reciprocals of these lattices. It turns out that on the self-reciprocal lattices the minimal numbers of naive fermions are equal to the minimal numbers of degrees of freedom of geometric fermions. The description we give relies on the close connection of the maximal lattice symmetry groups with (affine) Weyl groups of root systems of (semi-) simple Lie algebras. (orig.)

  11. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindler, A.

    2007-07-01

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  12. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindler, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2007-07-15

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  13. Use of the Primitive Unit Cell in Understanding Subtle Features of the Cubic Closest-Packed Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, John A.; Rittenhouse, Jeffrey L.; Soper, Linda M.; Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important crystal structures adopted by metals is characterized by the "abcabc"...stacking of close-packed layers. This structure is commonly referred to in textbooks as the cubic close-packed (ccp) or face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, since the entire lattice can be generated by replication of a face-centered cubic unit cell…

  14. HTTR criticality calculations with SCALE6: Studies of various geometric and unit-cell options in modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. Y.; Chiang, M. H.; Sheu, R. J.; Liu, Y. W. H. [Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-01

    The fuel element of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) presents a doubly heterogeneous geometry, where tiny TRISO fuel particles dispersed in a graphite matrix form the fuel region of a cylindrical fuel rod, and a number of fuel rods together with moderator or reflector then constitute the lattice design of the core. In this study, a series of full-core HTTR criticality calculations were performed with the SCALE6 code system using various geometric and unit-cell options in order to systematically investigate their effects on neutronic analysis. Two geometric descriptions (ARRAY or HOLE) in SCALE6 can be used to construct a complicated and repeated model. The result shows that eliminating the use of HOLE in the HTTR geometric model can save the computation time by a factor of 4. Four unit-cell treatments for resonance self-shielding corrections in SCALE6 were tested to create problem-specific multigroup cross sections for the HTTR core model. Based on the same ENDF/B-VII cross-section library, their results were evaluated by comparing with continuous-energy calculations. The comparison indicates that the INFHOMMEDIUM result overestimates the system multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) by 55 mk, whereas the LATTICECELL and MULTIREGION treatments predict the k{sub eff} values with similar biases of approximately 10 mk overestimation. The DOUBLEHET result shows a more satisfactory agreement, about 4.2 mk underestimation in the k{sub eff} value. In addition, using cell-weighted cross sections instead of an explicit modeling of TRISO particles in fuel region can further reduce the computation time by a factor of 5 without sacrificing accuracy. (authors)

  15. Use of variations in unit cell length, reflectance and hardness for determining the origin of Fe disulphides in sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, H. G.; Eberhard, E.; Hartmann, B.

    1997-01-01

    Fe disulphides are common opaque accessories in sedimentary rocks. Both marcasite and pyrite may shed some light on the depositional environment and help determine the diagenesis of their host rocks. Quantitative ore microscopy (reflectance measurements, Vickers hardness numbers) and X-ray diffraction methods, supplemented with scanning electron microscopy and chemical analyses, were applied to pyrite (and some marcasite) hosted by sedimentary rocks spanning the interval from the Devonian to the Pliocene, and formed in various marine and continental environments. Quantitative ore microscopy of pyrites of sedimentary origin does not seem to be an efficient tool for analyzing the environment owing to the inhomogeneous nature of sulphide aggregates when viewed under the ore microscope, and the variable amounts of minor elements (e.g., As, Ni, and Co) that control the reflectance values (RV) and Vickers hardness numbers (VHN) of the host sulphides. However, such parameters as crystal habit and unit cell length of pyrite, which correlate with FeS x, are useful for environmental analysis. The redox conditions and the presence of organic remains during formation are the main factors determining these crystallographic parameters. Differences in these parameters from those of pure, ideal FeS 2 can be related to substitution of, e.g., wustite in the pyrite lattice, reflecting moderate oxidation (i.e. in the microenvironment). As far as crystal habit and length of the cell edge are concerned, late stage diagenesis is obviously less important than the microenvironment attending initial formation. The environment of deposition (i.e. the macroenvironment) of pyrite-bearing rocks has no influence on the crystal morphology or the length of the unit cell of Fe disulphide. X-ray diffraction measurements demonstrate that this method provides useful evidence on the microenvironment of sulphide precipitation around a single, equant pyrite, as well as around pyritized fossils.

  16. Rhombicuboctahedron unit cell based scaffolds for bone regeneration: geometry optimization with a mechanobiology - driven algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Fiorentino, Michele; Uva, Antonio E; Laghetti, Luca N; Monno, Giuseppe

    2018-02-01

    In a context more and more oriented towards customized medical solutions, we propose a mechanobiology-driven algorithm to determine the optimal geometry of scaffolds for bone regeneration that is the most suited to specific boundary and loading conditions. In spite of the huge number of articles investigating different unit cells for porous biomaterials, no studies are reported in the literature that optimize the geometric parameters of such unit cells based on mechanobiological criteria. Parametric finite element models of scaffolds with rhombicuboctahedron unit cell were developed and incorporated into an optimization algorithm that combines them with a computational mechanobiological model. The algorithm perturbs iteratively the geometry of the unit cell until the best scaffold geometry is identified, i.e. the geometry that allows to maximize the formation of bone. Performances of scaffolds with rhombicuboctahedron unit cell were compared with those of other scaffolds with hexahedron unit cells. We found that scaffolds with rhombicuboctahedron unit cell are particularly suited for supporting medium-low loads, while, for higher loads, scaffolds with hexahedron unit cells are preferable. The proposed algorithm can guide the orthopaedic/surgeon in the choice of the best scaffold to be implanted in a patient-specific anatomic region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Potts ferromagnet correlation length in hypercubic lattices: Renormalization - group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curado, E.M.F.; Hauser, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    Through a real space renormalization group approach, the q-state Potts ferromagnet correlation length on hierarchical lattices is calculated. These hierarchical lattices are build in order to simulate hypercubic lattices. The high-and-low temperature correlation length asymptotic behaviours tend (in the Ising case) to the Bravais lattice correlation length ones when the size of the hierarchical lattice cells tends to infinity. It is conjectured that the asymptotic behaviours several values of q and d (dimensionality) so obtained are correct. Numerical results are obtained for the full temperature range of the correlation length. (Author) [pt

  18. Picometer registration of zinc impurity states in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ for phase determination in intra-unit-cell Fourier transform STM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamidian, M H; Firmo, I A; Fujita, K; Mukhopadhyay, S; Davis, J C; Orenstein, J W; Eisaki, H; Uchida, S; Lawler, M J; Kim, E-A

    2012-01-01

    Direct visualization of electronic-structure symmetry within each crystalline unit cell is a new technique for complex electronic matter research (Lawler et al 2010 Nature 466 347-51, Schmidt et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065014, Fujita K et al 2012 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 81 011005). By studying the Bragg peaks in Fourier transforms of electronic structure images and particularly by resolving both the real and imaginary components of the Bragg amplitudes, distinct types of intra-unit-cell symmetry breaking can be studied. However, establishing the precise symmetry point of each unit cell in real space is crucial in defining the phase for such a Bragg-peak Fourier analysis. Exemplary of this challenge is the high-temperature superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ for which the surface Bi atom locations are observable, while it is the invisible Cu atoms that define the relevant CuO 2 unit-cell symmetry point. Here we demonstrate, by imaging with picometer precision the electronic impurity states at individual Zn atoms substituted at Cu sites, that the phase established using the Bi lattice produces a ∼2%(2π) error relative to the actual Cu lattice. Such a phase assignment error would not diminish reliability in the determination of intra-unit-cell rotational symmetry breaking at the CuO 2 plane (Lawler et al 2010 Nature 466 347-51, Schmidt et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065014, Fujita K et al 2012 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 81 011005). Moreover, this type of impurity atom substitution at the relevant symmetry site can be of general utility in phase determination for the Bragg-peak Fourier analysis of intra-unit-cell symmetry. (paper)

  19. Large scale simulation of liquid water transport in a gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaida, Satoshi; Tabe, Yutaka; Chikahisa, Takemi

    2017-09-01

    A method for the large-scale simulation with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for liquid water movement in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The LBM is able to analyze two-phase flows in complex structures, however the simulation domain is limited due to heavy computational loads. This study investigates a variety means to reduce computational loads and increase the simulation areas. One is applying an LBM treating two-phases as having the same density, together with keeping numerical stability with large time steps. The applicability of this approach is confirmed by comparing the results with rigorous simulations using actual density. The second is establishing the maximum limit of the Capillary number that maintains flow patterns similar to the precise simulation; this is attempted as the computational load is inversely proportional to the Capillary number. The results show that the Capillary number can be increased to 3.0 × 10-3, where the actual operation corresponds to Ca = 10-5∼10-8. The limit is also investigated experimentally using an enlarged scale model satisfying similarity conditions for the flow. Finally, a demonstration is made of the effects of pore uniformity in GDL as an example of a large-scale simulation covering a channel.

  20. Nuclear lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epelbaum E.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress on nuclear lattice simulations using chiral effective field theory. We discuss lattice results for dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order, three-body forces at next-to-next-toleading order, isospin-breaking and Coulomb effects, and the binding energy of light nuclei.

  1. Lattice Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jersak, J.

    1986-01-01

    This year has brought a sudden interest in lattice Higgs models. After five years of only modest activity we now have many new results obtained both by analytic and Monte Carlo methods. This talk is a review of the present state of lattice Higgs models with particular emphasis on the recent development

  2. Collision probability in two-dimensional lattice by ray-trace method and its applications to cell calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro

    1985-03-01

    A series of formulations to evaluate collision probability for multi-region cells expressed by either of three one-dimensional coordinate systems (plane, sphere and cylinder) or by the general two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system is presented. They are expressed in a suitable form to have a common numerical process named ''Ray-Trace'' method. Applications of the collision probability method to two optional treatments for the resonance absorption are presented. One is a modified table-look-up method based on the intermediate resonance approximation, and the other is a rigorous method to calculate the resonance absorption in a multi-region cell in which nearly continuous energy spectra of the resonance neutron range can be solved and interaction effect between different resonance nuclides can be evaluated. Two works on resonance absorption in a doubly heterogeneous system with grain structure are presented. First, the effect of a random distribution of particles embedded in graphite diluent on the resonance integral is studied. Next, the ''Accretion'' method proposed by Leslie and Jonsson to define the collision probability in a doubly heterogeneous system is applied to evaluate the resonance absorption in coated particles dispersed in fuel pellet of the HTGR. Several optional models are proposed to define the collision rates in the medium with the microscopic heterogeneity. By making use of the collision probability method developed by the present study, the JAERI thermal reactor standard nuclear design code system SRAC has been developed. Results of several benchmark tests for the SRAC are presented. The analyses of critical experiments of the SHE, DCA, and FNR show good agreement of critical masses with their experimental values. (J.P.N.)

  3. On singularities of lattice varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Himadri

    2013-01-01

    Toric varieties associated with distributive lattices arise as a fibre of a flat degeneration of a Schubert variety in a minuscule. The singular locus of these varieties has been studied by various authors. In this article we prove that the number of diamonds incident on a lattice point $\\a$ in a product of chain lattices is more than or equal to the codimension of the lattice. Using this we also show that the lattice varieties associated with product of chain lattices is smooth.

  4. Analysis of long-time operation of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsch Marek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-cogeneration is cogeneration with small performance, with maximal electric power up to 50 kWe. On the present, there are available small micro-cogeneration units with small electric performance, about 1 kWe, which are usable also in single family houses or flats. These micro-cogeneration units operate on principle of conventional combustion engine, Stirling engine, steam engine or fuel cell. Micro-cogeneration units with fuel cells are new progressive developing type of units for single family houses. Fuel cell is electrochemical device which by oxidation-reduction reaction turn directly chemical energy of fuel to electric power, secondary products are pure water and thermal energy. The aim of paper is measuring and evaluation of operation parameters of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell which uses natural gas as a fuel.

  5. Measurements of thermal disadvantage factors in light-water moderated PuO2-UO2 and UO2 lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Akio; Kobayashi, Iwao; Tsuruta, Harumichi; Hashimoto, Masao; Suzaki, Takenori

    1980-01-01

    The disadvantage factor for thermal neutrons in light-water moderated PuO 2 -UO 2 and UO 2 square lattices were obtained from measurements of thermal neutron density distributions in a unit lattice cell, measured with Dy-Al wire detectors. The lattices consisted of 3.4 w/o PuO 2 .UO 2 and 2.6 w/o UO 2 fuel rods, and the water-to-fuel volume ratio within the unit cell was parametrically changed. The PuO 2 .UO 2 and UO 2 fuel rods were designed to realize equal fissile atomic number density. The disadvantage factors thus measured were 1.36 +- 0.07, 1.37 +- 0.08, 1.40 +- 0.06 and 1.38 +- 0.06 in the PuO 2 .UO 2 fuel lattices, and 1.30 +- 0.06, 1.31 +- 0.08, 1.30 +- 0.08 and 1.33 +- 0.06 in the UO 2 , for water-to-fuel volume ratios, of 1.76, 2.00, 2.38 and 2.95, respectively. This difference in disadvantage factor between PuO 2 .UO 2 and UO 2 fuel lattices corresponds to about 8%. Calculated results obtained by multigroup transport code LASER agreed well with the measured ones. (author)

  6. Unusually large unit cell of lipid bicontinuous cubic phase: towards nature's length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojun; Leal, Cecilia

    Lipid bicontinuous cubic phases are of great interest for drug delivery, protein crystallization, biosensing, and templates for directing hard material assembly. Structural modulations of lipid mesophases regarding phase identity and unit cell size are often necessary to augment loading and gain pore size control. One important example is the need for unit cells large enough to guide the crystallization of bigger proteins without distortion of the templating phase. In nature, bicontinuous cubic constructs achieve unit cell dimensions as high as 300 nm. However, the largest unit cell of lipid mesophases synthesized in the lab is an order of magnitude lower. In fact, it has been predicted theoretically that lipid bicontinuous cubic phases of unit cell dimensions exceeding 30 nm could not exist, as high membrane fluctuations would damp liquid crystalline order. Here we report non-equilibrium assembly methods of synthesizing metastable bicontinuous cubic phases with unit cell dimensions as high as 70 nm. The phases are stable for very long periods and become increasingly ordered as time goes by without changes to unit cell dimensions. We acknowledge the funding source as a NIH.

  7. Introduction to Louis Michel's lattice geometry through group action

    CERN Document Server

    Zhilinskii, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Group action analysis developed and applied mainly by Louis Michel to the study of N-dimensional periodic lattices is the central subject of the book. Different basic mathematical tools currently used for the description of lattice geometry are introduced and illustrated through applications to crystal structures in two- and three-dimensional space, to abstract multi-dimensional lattices and to lattices associated with integrable dynamical systems. Starting from general Delone sets the authors turn to different symmetry and topological classifications including explicit construction of orbifolds for two- and three-dimensional point and space groups. Voronoï and Delone cells together with positive quadratic forms and lattice description by root systems are introduced to demonstrate alternative approaches to lattice geometry study. Zonotopes and zonohedral families of 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-dimensional lattices are explicitly visualized using graph theory approach. Along with crystallographic applications, qualitative ...

  8. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance as Telecommunications Backup Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and industry project partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) acts as the central data repository for the data collected from real-world operation of fuel cell backup power systems. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) co-funding awarded through DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, more than 1,300 fuel cell units were deployed over a three-plus-year period in stationary, material handling equipment, auxiliary power, and backup power applications. This surpassed a Fuel Cell Technologies Office ARRA objective to spur commercialization of an early market technology by installing 1,000 fuel cell units across several different applications, including backup power. By December 2013, 852 backup power units out of 1,330 fuel cell units deployed were providing backup service, mainly for telecommunications towers. For 136 of the fuel cell backup units, project participants provided detailed operational data to the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center for analysis by NREL's technology validation team. NREL analyzed operational data collected from these government co-funded demonstration projects to characterize key fuel cell backup power performance metrics, including reliability and operation trends, and to highlight the business case for using fuel cells in these early market applications. NREL's analyses include these critical metrics, along with deployment, U.S. grid outage statistics, and infrastructure operation.

  9. Predicting lattice thermal conductivity with help from ab initio methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David

    2015-03-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity is a fundamental transport parameter that determines the utility a material for specific thermal management applications. Materials with low thermal conductivity find applicability in thermoelectric cooling and energy harvesting. High thermal conductivity materials are urgently needed to help address the ever-growing heat dissipation problem in microelectronic devices. Predictive computational approaches can provide critical guidance in the search and development of new materials for such applications. Ab initio methods for calculating lattice thermal conductivity have demonstrated predictive capability, but while they are becoming increasingly efficient, they are still computationally expensive particularly for complex crystals with large unit cells . In this talk, I will review our work on first principles phonon transport for which the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity is limited only by phonon-phonon scattering arising from anharmonicity. I will examine use of the phase space for anharmonic phonon scattering and the Grüneisen parameters as measures of the thermal conductivities for a range of materials and compare these to the widely used guidelines stemming from the theory of Liebfried and Schölmann. This research was supported primarily by the NSF under Grant CBET-1402949, and by the S3TEC, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DE-SC0001299.

  10. Spatial confinement of ferromagnetic resonances in honeycomb antidot lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchko, V.N.; Marchenko, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a theoretical investigation of the magnetic static and dynamic properties of a thin ferromagnetic film with honeycomb lattice of circular antidots using micromagnetic simulations and analytical calculations. The theoretical model is based on the Landau–Lifshitz equations and directly accounts for the effects of the magnetic state nonuniformity. A direct calculation of local dynamic susceptibility tensor yields that the resonance spectra consist of four different quasi-uniform modes of the magnetization precession related to the confinement of magnetic domains by the hole mesh. Three of four resonant modes follow a two-fold variation with respect to the in-plane orientation of the applied magnetic field. The easy axes of these modes are mutually rotated by 60° and combine to yield the apparent six-fold configurational anisotropy. Additionally, a mode with intrinsic six-fold symmetry behavior exists, as well. Micromagnetic calculations of the local dynamic susceptibility tensor allow identifying the magnetic unit cell areas/domains responsible for each resonance mode. - Highlights: ► We study the magnetic static and dynamic properties of honeycomb antidot lattices. ► Micromagnetic simulation and analytical calculation were used. ► Four quasi-uniform precession modes exist in resonance spectra. ► The antidot unit cell areas responsible for each resonance mode were identified.

  11. Fatigue behaviour of NiTi shape memory alloy scaffolds produced by SLM, a unit cell design comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, M; Van Hooreweder, B; Van Humbeeck, J; Kruth, J-P

    2017-06-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique able to produce complex functional parts via successively melting layers of metal powder. This process grants the freedom to design highly complex scaffold components to allow bone ingrowth and aid mechanical anchorage. This paper investigates the compression fatigue behaviour of three different unit cells (octahedron, cellular gyroid and sheet gyroid) of SLM nitinol scaffolds. It was found that triply periodic minimal surfaces display superior static mechanical properties in comparison to conventional octahedron beam lattice structures at identical volume fractions. Fatigue resistance was also found to be highly geometry dependent due to the effects of AM processing techniques on the surface topography and notch sensitivity. Geometries minimising nodal points and the staircase effect displayed the greatest fatigue resistance when normalized to yield strength. Furthermore oxygen analysis showed a large oxygen uptake during SLM processing which must be altered to meet ASTM medical grade standards and may significantly reduce fatigue life. These achieved fatigue properties indicate that NiTi scaffolds produced via SLM can provide sufficient mechanical support over an implants lifetime within stress range values experienced in real life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Empirical Derivation of Correction Factors for Human Spiral Ganglion Cell Nucleus and Nucleolus Count Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Mark E; Linthicum, Fred H

    2016-01-01

    Profile count method for estimating cell number in sectioned tissue applies a correction factor for double count (resulting from transection during sectioning) of count units selected to represent the cell. For human spiral ganglion cell counts, we attempted to address apparent confusion between published correction factors for nucleus and nucleolus count units that are identical despite the role of count unit diameter in a commonly used correction factor formula. We examined a portion of human cochlea to empirically derive correction factors for the 2 count units, using 3-dimensional reconstruction software to identify double counts. The Neurotology and House Histological Temporal Bone Laboratory at University of California at Los Angeles. Using a fully sectioned and stained human temporal bone, we identified and generated digital images of sections of the modiolar region of the lower first turn of cochlea, identified count units with a light microscope, labeled them on corresponding digital sections, and used 3-dimensional reconstruction software to identify double-counted count units. For 25 consecutive sections, we determined that double-count correction factors for nucleus count unit (0.91) and nucleolus count unit (0.92) matched the published factors. We discovered that nuclei and, therefore, spiral ganglion cells were undercounted by 6.3% when using nucleolus count units. We determined that correction factors for count units must include an element for undercounting spiral ganglion cells as well as the double-count element. We recommend a correction factor of 0.91 for the nucleus count unit and 0.98 for the nucleolus count unit when using 20-µm sections. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  13. MEETING: Lattice 88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The forty-year dream of understanding the properties of the strongly interacting particles from first principles is now approaching reality. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD - the field theory of the quark and gluon constituents of strongly interacting particles) was initially handicapped by the severe limitations of the conventional (perturbation) approach in this picture, but Ken Wilson's inventions of lattice gauge theory and renormalization group methods opened new doors, making calculations of masses and other particle properties possible. Lattice gauge theory became a major industry around 1980, when Monte Carlo methods were introduced, and the first prototype calculations yielded qualitatively reasonable results. The promising developments over the past year were highlighted at the 1988 Symposium on Lattice Field Theory - Lattice 88 - held at Fermilab

  14. Angles in hyperbolic lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Morten S.; Södergren, Carl Anders

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that the angles in a lattice acting on hyperbolic n -space become equidistributed. In this paper we determine a formula for the pair correlation density for angles in such hyperbolic lattices. Using this formula we determine, among other things, the asymptotic behavior of the den......It is well known that the angles in a lattice acting on hyperbolic n -space become equidistributed. In this paper we determine a formula for the pair correlation density for angles in such hyperbolic lattices. Using this formula we determine, among other things, the asymptotic behavior...... of the density function in both the small and large variable limits. This extends earlier results by Boca, Pasol, Popa and Zaharescu and Kelmer and Kontorovich in dimension 2 to general dimension n . Our proofs use the decay of matrix coefficients together with a number of careful estimates, and lead...

  15. Reactor lattice codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikowska, T.

    1999-01-01

    The present lecture has a main goal to show how the transport lattice calculations are realised in a standard computer code. This is illustrated on the example of the WIMSD code, belonging to the most popular tools for reactor calculations. Most of the approaches discussed here can be easily modified to any other lattice code. The description of the code assumes the basic knowledge of reactor lattice, on the level given in the lecture on 'Reactor lattice transport calculations'. For more advanced explanation of the WIMSD code the reader is directed to the detailed descriptions of the code cited in References. The discussion of the methods and models included in the code is followed by the generally used homogenisation procedure and several numerical examples of discrepancies in calculated multiplication factors based on different sources of library data. (author)

  16. MEETING: Lattice 88

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Paul

    1989-03-15

    The forty-year dream of understanding the properties of the strongly interacting particles from first principles is now approaching reality. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD - the field theory of the quark and gluon constituents of strongly interacting particles) was initially handicapped by the severe limitations of the conventional (perturbation) approach in this picture, but Ken Wilson's inventions of lattice gauge theory and renormalization group methods opened new doors, making calculations of masses and other particle properties possible. Lattice gauge theory became a major industry around 1980, when Monte Carlo methods were introduced, and the first prototype calculations yielded qualitatively reasonable results. The promising developments over the past year were highlighted at the 1988 Symposium on Lattice Field Theory - Lattice 88 - held at Fermilab.

  17. Computers for Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, Norman H

    2000-01-01

    The architecture and capabilities of the computers currently in use for large-scale lattice QCD calculations are described and compared. Based on this present experience, possible future directions are discussed

  18. Reactor lattice codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikowska, T.

    2001-01-01

    The description of reactor lattice codes is carried out on the example of the WIMSD-5B code. The WIMS code in its various version is the most recognised lattice code. It is used in all parts of the world for calculations of research and power reactors. The version WIMSD-5B is distributed free of charge by NEA Data Bank. The description of its main features given in the present lecture follows the aspects defined previously for lattice calculations in the lecture on Reactor Lattice Transport Calculations. The spatial models are described, and the approach to the energy treatment is given. Finally the specific algorithm applied in fuel depletion calculations is outlined. (author)

  19. Report of the workshop on realistic SSC lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    A workshop was held at the SSC Central Design Group from May 29 to June 4, 1985, on topics relating to the lattice of the SSC. The workshop marked a shift of emphasis from the investigation of simplified test lattices to the development of a realistic lattice suitable for the conceptual design report. The first day of the workshop was taken up by reviews of accelerator system requirements, of the reference design solutions for these requirements, of lattice work following the reference design, and of plans for the workshop. The work was divided among four working groups. The first, chaired by David Douglas, concerned the arcs of regular cells. The second group, which studied the utility insertions, was chaired by Beat Leemann. The third group, under David E. Johnson, concerned itself with the experimental insertions, dispersion suppressors, and phase trombones. The fourth group, responsible for global lattice considerations and the design of a new realistic lattice example, was led by Ernest Courant. The papers resulting from this workshop are roughly divided into three sets: those relating to specific lattice components, to complete lattices, and to other topics. Among the salient accomplishments of the workshop were additions to and optimization of lattice components, especially those relating to lattices using 1-in-1 magnets, either horizontally or vertically separated, and the design of complete lattice examples. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  20. Lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petronzio, R.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gauge theories are about fifteen years old and I will report on the present status of the field without making the elementary introduction that can be found in the proceedings of the last two conferences. The talk covers briefly the following subjects: the determination of α s , the status of spectroscopy, heavy quark physics and in particular the calculation of their hadronic weak matrix elements, high temperature QCD, non perturbative Higgs bounds, chiral theories on the lattice and induced theories

  1. Permutohedral Lattice CNNs

    OpenAIRE

    Kiefel, Martin; Jampani, Varun; Gehler, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a convolutional layer that is able to process sparse input features. As an example, for image recognition problems this allows an efficient filtering of signals that do not lie on a dense grid (like pixel position), but of more general features (such as color values). The presented algorithm makes use of the permutohedral lattice data structure. The permutohedral lattice was introduced to efficiently implement a bilateral filter, a commonly used image processing operation....

  2. Additive lattice kirigami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  3. Lattice regularized chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borasoy, Bugra; Lewis, Randy; Ouimet, Pierre-Philippe A.

    2004-01-01

    Chiral perturbation theory can be defined and regularized on a spacetime lattice. A few motivations are discussed here, and an explicit lattice Lagrangian is reviewed. A particular aspect of the connection between lattice chiral perturbation theory and lattice QCD is explored through a study of the Wess-Zumino-Witten term

  4. Vortex lattices in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, V.; Davidovic, D.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.

    1995-01-01

    We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear

  5. The Daniell Cell, Ohm's Law and the Emergence of the International System of Units

    OpenAIRE

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Telegraphy originated in the 1830s and 40s and flourished in the following decades, but with a patchwork of electrical standards. Electromotive force was for the most part measured in units of the predominant Daniell cell. Each company had their own resistance standard. In 1862 the British Association for the Advancement of Science formed a committee to address this situation. By 1873 they had given definition to the electromagnetic system of units (emu) and defined the practical units of the...

  6. Structure and oxidation states of giant unit cell compound Dy{sub 117+x}Fe{sub 57-y}Sn{sub 112-z}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Alexander T.; Barron, Keaton G.; Salazar, Bryan G.; Kirby, Parker; McCandless, Gregory T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Walker, Amy V.; Chan, Julia Y. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas, Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States)

    2017-12-13

    Motivated by the complex structure and properties of giant unit cell intermetallic compounds, a new isostructural Fe analogue of the Dy{sub 117}Co{sub 57}Sn{sub 112} structure type was synthesized. Single crystals of Dy{sub 122}Fe{sub 55}Sn{sub 101} were grown at 1260 C via a Dy-Fe eutectoid flux. The Fe analogue also adopts the space group Fm anti 3m with lattice parameters a = 29.914(9) Aa, V = 26769(23) Aa{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Dy{sub 122}Fe{sub 55}Sn{sub 101} has a large cell volume, structural complexity, and consists of seven Dy, eight Fe, and ten Sn unique crystallographic sites. There are fifteen fully occupied atomic positions, three unique pairs of alternating atomic positions with positional disorder, and seven partially occupied atomic sites. Within this complex unit cell, only approximately half the unique atomic positions are fully occupied with the remainder of the atoms either positionally or occupationally disordered. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the compound contains Dy{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 0}, Fe{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 0}, and Sn{sup 4+}. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. The Static and Fatigue Behavior of AlSiMg Alloy Plain, Notched, and Diamond Lattice Specimens Fabricated by Laser Powder Bed Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Soul

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of engineered lattice structures has recently gained momentum due to the development of novel additive manufacturing techniques. Interest in lattice structures resides not only in the possibility of obtaining efficient lightweight materials, but also in the functionality of pre-designed architectured structures for specific applications, such as biomimetic implants, chemical catalyzers, and heat transfer devices. The mechanical behaviour of lattice structures depends not only the composition of the base material, but also on the type and size of the unit cells, as well as on the material microstructure resulting from a specific fabrication procedure. The present work focuses on the static and fatigue behavior of diamond cell lattice structures fabricated from an AlSiMg alloy by laser powder bed fusion technology. In particular, the specimens were fabricated with three different orientations of lattice cells—[001], [011], [111]—and subjected to static tensile testing and force-controlled pull–pull fatigue testing up to 1 × 107 cycles. In parallel, the mechanical behavior of dense tensile plain and notched specimens was also studied and compared to that of their lattice counterparts. Results showed a significant effect of the cell orientation on the fatigue lives: specimens oriented at [001] were ~30% more fatigue-resistant than specimens oriented at [011] and [111].

  8. Symmetry of semi-reduced lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stróż, Kazimierz

    2015-05-01

    The main result of this work is extension of the famous characterization of Bravais lattices according to their metrical, algebraic and geometric properties onto a wide class of primitive lattices (including Buerger-reduced, nearly Buerger-reduced and a substantial part of Delaunay-reduced) related to low-restricted semi-reduced descriptions (s.r.d.'s). While the `geometric' operations in Bravais lattices map the basis vectors into themselves, the `arithmetic' operators in s.r.d. transform the basis vectors into cell vectors (basis vectors, face or space diagonals) and are represented by matrices from the set {\\bb V} of all 960 matrices with the determinant ±1 and elements {0, ±1} of the matrix powers. A lattice is in s.r.d. if the moduli of off-diagonal elements in both the metric tensors M and M(-1) are smaller than corresponding diagonal elements sharing the same column or row. Such lattices are split into 379 s.r.d. types relative to the arithmetic holohedries. Metrical criteria for each type do not need to be explicitly given but may be modelled as linear derivatives {\\bb M}(p,q,r), where {\\bb M} denotes the set of 39 highest-symmetry metric tensors, and p,q,r describe changes of appropriate interplanar distances. A sole filtering of {\\bb V} according to an experimental s.r.d. metric and subsequent geometric interpretation of the filtered matrices lead to mathematically stable and rich information on the Bravais-lattice symmetry and deviations from the exact symmetry. The emphasis on the crystallographic features of lattices was obtained by shifting the focus (i) from analysis of a lattice metric to analysis of symmetry matrices [Himes & Mighell (1987). Acta Cryst. A43, 375-384], (ii) from the isometric approach and invariant subspaces to the orthogonality concept {some ideas in Le Page [J. Appl. Cryst. (1982), 15, 255-259]} and splitting indices [Stróż (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 421-429] and (iii) from fixed cell transformations to transformations

  9. Electrochemical characterization of a polybenzimidazole-based high temperature proton exchange membrane unit cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Schaltz, Erik; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    This work constitutes detailed EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) measurements on a PBIbased HT-PEM unit cell. By means of EIS the fuel cell is characterized in several modes of operation by varying the current density, temperature and the stoichiometry of the reactant gases. Using...

  10. Quasi bound states in the continuum with few unit cells of photonic crystal slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh, Alireza; Chung, Il-Sug

    2017-01-01

    cell structures. They are explained by a viewpoint of BICs originating from the tight-binding of individual resonances of each unit cell as in semiconductors. Combined with a reciprocal-space matching technique, the microcavities based on quasi-BICs can achieve a Q-factor as high as defect-based Ph...

  11. Tight multilattices calculated by extended-cell cylindrization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segev, M; Carmona, S

    1983-01-01

    Among the common features of advanced LWR concepts are the tightness of lattices and the symbiotic setting of different fuels. Such symbioses often come in the form of multilattices, whose numerically-repeated unit is a configuration of several pins, typically with one pin type at the center and pins of a second type surrounding the center pin. If this extended-cell (EC) unit is cylindricized, then a simple transport calculation of the unit will be possible. If the lattice of such units is tight, there is further an a priori reason to expect the cylindrization to introduce only a small distortion of the true neutron fluxes in the lattice. A strict numerical validation of the EC cylindrization approximation is impractical, but similar validations can be carried out for regular lattices, viewed as being made up of multicell units whose centers are moderators and whose peripheries are fuel pins. In these comparisons the EC cylindrization approximation gives good results.

  12. Storage characteristics of multiple-donor pooled red blood cells compared to single-donor red blood cell units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Aabhas; Chowdhury, Raquibul; Hillyer, Christopher D; Mitchell, W Beau; Shaz, Beth H

    2016-12-01

    Each unit of blood donated is processed and stored individually resulting in variability in the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) collected, RBC properties, and the 24-hour posttransfusion RBC survivability. As a result, each unit differs in its ability to deliver oxygen and potentially its effects on the recipient. The goal of this study was to investigate the storage of pooled RBCs from multiple donors in comparison to control standard RBC units. Two units of irradiated, leukoreduced RBCs of same ABO, D, E, C, and K antigen phenotype were collected from each of five donors using apheresis. One unit from each donor was pooled in a 2-L bag and remaining units were used as controls. After being pooled, RBCs were separated in five bags and stored at 4°C along with the controls. Quality indexes were measured on Days 2, 14, and 28 for all the units. Adenosine triphosphate assays for both pooled and controls showed a slight decrease from Day 2 to Day 28 (pooled/control from 5.22/5.24 to 4.35/4.33 µmol/g hemoglobin [Hb]). 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate was successfully rejuvenated for all RBC units on Day 28 (pooled 11.46 µmol/g Hb; control 11.86 µmol/g Hb). The results showed a nonsignificant difference between pooled and control units, with a general trend of lower standard deviation for pooled units when compared to controls. Pooled units have reduced unit-to-unit variability. Future exploration of their immunogenicity is required before using pooled units for transfusion. © 2016 AABB.

  13. Dynamical lattice theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodos, A.

    1978-01-01

    A version of lattice gauge theory is presented in which the shape of the lattice is not assumed at the outset but is a consequence of the dynamics. Other related features which are not specified a priori include the internal and space-time symmetry groups and the dimensionality of space-time. The theory possesses a much larger invariance group than the usual gauge group on a lattice, and has associated with it an integer k 0 analogous to the topological quantum numer of quantum chromodynamics. Families of semiclassical solutions are found which are labeled by k 0 and a second integer x, but the analysis is not carried far enough to determine which space-time and internal symmetry groups characterize the lowest-lying states of the theory

  14. Graphene antidot lattice waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We introduce graphene antidot lattice waveguides: nanostructured graphene where a region of pristine graphene is sandwiched between regions of graphene antidot lattices. The band gaps in the surrounding antidot lattices enable localized states to emerge in the central waveguide region. We model...... the waveguides via a position-dependent mass term in the Dirac approximation of graphene and arrive at analytical results for the dispersion relation and spinor eigenstates of the localized waveguide modes. To include atomistic details we also use a tight-binding model, which is in excellent agreement...... with the analytical results. The waveguides resemble graphene nanoribbons, but without the particular properties of ribbons that emerge due to the details of the edge. We show that electrons can be guided through kinks without additional resistance and that transport through the waveguides is robust against...

  15. Thermal expansion and lattice parameters of shaped metal deposited Ti-6Al-4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swarnakar, Akhilesh Kumar; Van der Biest, Omer [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, MTM, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Baufeld, Bernd, E-mail: b.baufeld@sheffield.ac.uk [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, MTM, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2011-02-10

    Research highlights: > Measurement of thermal expansion and of the lattice parameters of Ti-6Al-4V fabricated by shaped metal deposition up to 1100 {sup o}C. > The observation of alpha to beta transformation not reflected in the expansion but in the contraction curve is explained by non-equilibrium alpha phase of the SMD material. > Denuding of the {alpha} phase and enrichment of the {beta} phase of Vanadium due to high temperature experiments. > The unit cell volumes derived from lattice parameters measured by X-ray diffraction are at room temperature larger for the {alpha} than for the {beta} phase. With increasing temperature the unit cell volume of the {beta} phase increases stronger than the one of the {alpha} phase resulting in a similar unit cell volume at the {beta} transus temperature. - Abstract: Thermal expansion and lattice parameters are investigated up to 1100 deg. C for Ti-6Al-4V components, fabricated by shaped metal deposition. This is a novel additive layer manufacturing technique where near net-shape components are built by tungsten inert gas welding. The as-fabricated SMD Ti-6Al-4V components exhibit a constant coefficient of thermal expansion of 1.17 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} during heating up to 1100 {sup o}C, not reflecting the {alpha} to {beta} phase transformation. During cooling a stalling of the contraction is observed starting at the {beta} transus temperature. These high temperature experiments denude the {alpha} phase of V and enrich the {beta} phase. The development of the lattice parameters in dependence on temperature are observed with high temperature X-ray diffraction. The unit cell volumes derived from these parameters are at room temperature larger for the {alpha} than for the {beta} phase. With increasing temperature the unit cell volume of the {beta} phase increases stronger than the one of the {alpha} phase resulting in a similar unit cell volume at the {beta} transus temperature. These observations are interpreted as an

  16. International stem cell collaboration: how disparate policies between the United States and the United Kingdom impact research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyuan; Flynn, Jesse M; Solnick, Rachel E; Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Matthews, Kirstin R W

    2011-03-08

    As the scientific community globalizes, it is increasingly important to understand the effects of international collaboration on the quality and quantity of research produced. While it is generally assumed that international collaboration enhances the quality of research, this phenomenon is not well examined. Stem cell research is unique in that it is both politically charged and a research area that often generates international collaborations, making it an ideal case through which to examine international collaborations. Furthermore, with promising medical applications, the research area is dynamic and responsive to a globalizing science environment. Thus, studying international collaborations in stem cell research elucidates the role of existing international networks in promoting quality research, as well as the effects that disparate national policies might have on research. This study examined the impact of collaboration on publication significance in the United States and the United Kingdom, world leaders in stem cell research with disparate policies. We reviewed publications by US and UK authors from 2008, along with their citation rates and the political factors that may have contributed to the number of international collaborations. The data demonstrated that international collaborations significantly increased an article's impact for UK and US investigators. While this applied to UK authors whether they were corresponding or secondary, this effect was most significant for US authors who were corresponding authors. While the UK exhibited a higher proportion of international publications than the US, this difference was consistent with overall trends in international scientific collaboration. The findings suggested that national stem cell policy differences and regulatory mechanisms driving international stem cell research in the US and UK did not affect the frequency of international collaborations, or even the countries with which the US and UK most

  17. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  18. On techniques of ATR lattice computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    Lattice computation is to compute the average nuclear constants of unit fuel lattice which are required for computing core nuclear characteristics such as core power distribution and reactivity characteristics. The main nuclear constants are infinite multiplying rate, neutron movement area, cross section for diffusion computation, local power distribution and isotope composition. As for the lattice computation code, WIMS-ATR is used, which is based on the WIMS-D code developed in U.K., and for the purpose of heightening the accuracy of analysis, which was improved by adding heavy water scattering cross section considering the temperature dependence by Honeck model. For the computation of the neutron absorption by control rods, LOIEL BLUE code is used. The extrapolation distance of neutron flux on control rod surfaces is computed by using THERMOS and DTF codes, and the lattice constants of adjoining lattices are computed by using the WIMS-ATR code. As for the WIMS-ATR code, the computation flow and nuclear data library, and as for the LOIEL BLUE code, the computation flow are explained. The local power distribution in fuel assemblies determined by the WIMS-ATR code was verified with the measured data, and the results are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Importance of unit cells in accurate evaluation of the characteristics of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzyan, Hassan; Sadeghpour, Narges [Isfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-08-01

    Effects of the size of the unit cell on energy, atomic charges, and phonon frequencies of graphene at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone are studied in the absence and presence of an electric field using density functional theory (DFT) methods (LDA and DFT-PBE functionals with Goedecker-Teter-Hutter (GTH) and Troullier-Martins (TM) norm-conserving pseudopotentials). Two types of unit cells containing n{sub c}=4-28 carbon atoms are considered. Results show that stability of graphene increases with increasing size of the unit cell. Energy, atomic charges, and phonon frequencies all converge above n{sub c}=24 for all functional-pseudopotentials used. Except for the LDA-GTH calculations, application of an electric field of 0.4 and 0.9 V/nm strengths does not change the trends with the size of the unit cell but instead slightly decreases the binding energy of graphene. Results of this study show that the choice of unit cell size and type is critical for calculation of reliable characteristics of graphene.

  20. Thermal conductivity prediction of nanoscale phononic crystal slabs using a hybrid lattice dynamics-continuum mechanics technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M. Reinke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has demonstrated that nanostructuring of a semiconductor material to form a phononic crystal (PnC can significantly reduce its thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present a classical method that combines atomic-level information with the application of Bloch theory at the continuum level for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of finite-thickness PnCs with unit cells sized in the micron scale. Lattice dynamics calculations are done at the bulk material level, and the plane-wave expansion method is implemented at the macrosale PnC unit cell level. The combination of the lattice dynamics-based and continuum mechanics-based dispersion information is then used in the Callaway-Holland model to calculate the thermal transport properties of the PnC. We demonstrate that this hybrid approach provides both accurate and efficient predictions of the thermal conductivity.

  1. Quarks, gluons and lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krojts, M.

    1987-01-01

    The book by the known american physicist-theoretist M.Kreuts represents the first monography in world literature, where a new perspective direction in elementary particle physics and quantum field theory - lattice formulation of gauge theories is stated systematically. Practically all main ideas of this direction are given. Material is stated in systematic and understandable form

  2. Phenomenology Using Lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R.

    2005-08-01

    This talk provides a brief summary of the status of lattice QCD calculations of the light quark masses and the kaon bag parameter BK. Precise estimates of these four fundamental parameters of the standard model, i.e., mu, md, ms and the CP violating parameter η, help constrain grand unified models and could provide a window to new physics.

  3. Baryons on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bali, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    I comment on progress of lattice QCD techniques and calculations. Recent results on pentaquark masses as well as of the spectrum of excited baryons are summarized and interpreted. The present state of calculations of quantities related to the nucleon structure and of electromagnetic transition form factors is surveyed

  4. Finite lattice extrapolation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, M.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-08-01

    Two algorithms for sequence extrapolation, due to von den Broeck and Schwartz and Bulirsch and Stoer are reviewed and critically compared. Applications to three states and six states quantum chains and to the (2+1)D Ising model show that the algorithm of Bulirsch and Stoer is superior, in particular if only very few finite lattice data are available. (orig.)

  5. Lattice Multiverse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, S. Gill

    2010-01-01

    Will the cosmological multiverse, when described mathematically, have easily stated properties that are impossible to prove or disprove using mathematical physics? We explore this question by constructing lattice multiverses which exhibit such behavior even though they are much simpler mathematically than any likely cosmological multiverse.

  6. Quantum lattice problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raedt, Hans; von der Linden, W.; Binder, K

    1995-01-01

    In this chapter we review methods currently used to perform Monte Carlo calculations for quantum lattice models. A detailed exposition is given of the formalism underlying the construction of the simulation algorithms. We discuss the fundamental and technical difficulties that are encountered and

  7. Convex Lattice Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A "convex" polygon is one with no re-entrant angles. Alternatively one can use the standard convexity definition, asserting that for any two points of the convex polygon, the line segment joining them is contained completely within the polygon. In this article, the author provides a solution to a problem involving convex lattice polygons.

  8. Lattices for antiproton rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.

    1984-01-01

    After a description of the constraints imposed by the cooling of Antiprotons on the lattice of the rings, the reasons which motivate the shape and the structure of these machines are surveyed. Linear and non-linear beam optics properties are treated with a special amplification to the Antiproton Accumulator. (orig.)

  9. The Daniell cell, Ohm's law, and the emergence of the International System of Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    Telegraphy originated in the 1830s and 40 s and flourished in the following decades but with a patchwork of electrical standards. Electromotive force was for the most part measured in units of the predominant Daniell cell, but each telegraphy company had their own resistance standard. In 1862, the British Association for the Advancement of Science formed a committee to address this situation. By 1873, they had given definition to the electromagnetic system of units (emu) and defined the practical units of the ohm as 109 emu units of resistance and the volt as 108 emu units of electromotive force. These recommendations were ratified and expanded upon in a series of international congresses held between 1881 and 1904. A proposal by Giovanni Giorgi in 1901 took advantage of a coincidence between the conversion of the units of energy in the emu system (the erg) and in the practical system (the Joule). As it was, the same conversion factor existed between the cgs based emu system and a theretofore undefined MKS system. By introducing another unit X (where X could be any of the practical electrical units), Giorgi demonstrated that a self-consistent MKSX system was tenable without the need for multiplying factors. Ultimately, the ampere was selected as the fourth unit. It took nearly 60 years, but in 1960, Giorgi's proposal was incorporated as the core of the newly inaugurated International System of Units (SI). This article surveys the physics, physicists, and events that contributed to those developments.

  10. Dancoff factors of unit cells in cluster geometry with partial absorption of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Leticia Jenisch

    2011-01-01

    In its classical formulation, the Dancoff factor for a perfectly absorbing fuel rod is defined as the relative reduction in the incurrent of resonance neutrons into the rod in the presence of neighboring rods, as compared to the incurrent into a single fuel rod immersed in an infinite moderator. Alternatively, this factor can be viewed as the probability that a neutron emerging from the surface of a fuel rod will enter another fuel rod without any collision in the moderator or cladding. For perfectly absorbing fuel these definitions are equivalent. In the last years, several works appeared in literature reporting improvements in the calculation of Dancoff factors, using both the classical and the collision probability definitions. In this work, we step further reporting Dancoff factors for perfectly absorbing (Black) and partially absorbing (Grey) fuel rods calculated by the collision probability method, in cluster cells with square outer boundaries. In order to validate the results, comparisons are made with the equivalent cylindricalized cell in hypothetical test cases. The calculation is performed considering specularly reflecting boundary conditions, for the square lattice, and diffusive reflecting boundary conditions, for the cylindrical geometry. The results show the expected asymptotic behavior of the solution with increasing cell sizes. In addition, Dancoff factors are computed for the Canadian cells CANDU-37 and CANFLEX by the Monte Carlo and Direct methods. Finally, the effective multiplication factors, k eff , for these cells (cluster cell with square outer boundaries and the equivalent cylindricalized cell) are also computed, and the differences reported for the cases using the perfect and partial absorption assumptions. (author)

  11. Unquenched lattice upsilon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcantonio, L.M.

    2001-03-01

    A non-relativistic effective theory of QCD (NRQCD) is used in calculations of the upsilon spectrum. Simultaneous multi-correlation fitting routines are used to yield lattice channel energies and amplitudes. The lattice configurations used were both dynamical, with two flavours of sea quarks included in the action; and quenched, with no sea quarks. These configurations were generated by the UKQCD collaboration. The dynamical configurations used were ''matched'', having the same lattice spacing, but differing in the sea quark mass. Thus, it was possible to analyse trends of observables with sea quark mass, in the certainty that the trend isn't partially due to varying lattice spacing. The lattice spacing used for spectroscopy was derived from the lattice 1 1 P 1 - 1 3 S 1 splitting. On each set of configurations two lattice bare b quark masses were used, giving kinetic masses bracketing the physical Υ mass. The only quantity showing a strong dependence on these masses was the hyperfine splitting, so it was interpolated to the real Υ mass. The radial and orbital splittings gave good agreement with experiment. The hyperfine splitting results showed a clear signal for unquenching and the dynamical hyperfine splitting results were extrapolated to a physical sea quark mass. This result, combined with the quenched result yielded a value for the hyperfine splitting at n f = 3, predicting an η b mass of 9.517(4) GeV. The NRQCD technique for obtaining a value of the strong coupling constant in the M-barS-bar scheme was followed. Using quenched and dynamical results a value was extrapolated to n f = 3. Employing a three loop beta function to run the coupling, with suitable matching conditions at heavy quark thresholds, the final result was obtained for n f = 5 at a scale equal to the Z boson mass. This result was α(5)/MS(Mz)=0.110(4). Two methods for finding the mass of the b quark in the MS scheme were employed. The results of both methods agree within error but the

  12. Influence of Boundary Conditions on the Simulation of a Diamond-Type Lattice Structure: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Terriault

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergent additive manufacturing processes allow the use of metallic porous structures in various industrial applications. Because these structures comprise a large number of ordered unit cells, their design using conventional modeling approaches, such as finite elements, becomes a real challenge. A homogenization technique, in which the lattice structure is simulated as a fully dense volume having equivalent material properties, can then be employed. To determine these equivalent material properties, numerical simulations can be performed on a single unit cell of the lattice structure. However, a critical aspect to consider is the boundary conditions applied to the external faces of the unit cell. In the literature, different types of boundary conditions are used, but a comparative study is definitely lacking. In this publication, a diamond-type unit cell is studied in compression by applying different boundary conditions. If the porous structure’s boundaries are free to deform, then the periodic boundary condition is found to be the most representative, but constraint equations must be introduced in the model. If, instead, the porous structure is inserted in a rigid enclosure, it is then better to use frictionless boundary conditions. These preliminary results remain to be validated for other types of unit cells loaded beyond the yield limit of the material.

  13. Using stochastic cell division and death to probe minimal units of cellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chib, Savita; Das, Suman; Venkatesan, Soumya; Sai Narain Seshasayee, Aswin; Thattai, Mukund

    2018-03-01

    The invariant cell initiation mass measured in bacterial growth experiments has been interpreted as a minimal unit of cellular replication. Here we argue that the existence of such minimal units induces a coupling between the rates of stochastic cell division and death. To probe this coupling we tracked live and dead cells in Escherichia coli populations treated with a ribosome-targeting antibiotic. We find that the growth exponent from macroscopic cell growth or decay measurements can be represented as the difference of microscopic first-order cell division and death rates. The boundary between cell growth and decay, at which the number of live cells remains constant over time, occurs at the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the antibiotic. This state appears macroscopically static but is microscopically dynamic: division and death rates exactly cancel at MIC but each is remarkably high, reaching 60% of the antibiotic-free division rate. A stochastic model of cells as collections of minimal replicating units we term ‘widgets’ reproduces both steady-state and transient features of our experiments. Sub-cellular fluctuations of widget numbers stochastically drive each new daughter cell to one of two alternate fates, division or death. First-order division or death rates emerge as eigenvalues of a stationary Markov process, and can be expressed in terms of the widget’s molecular properties. High division and death rates at MIC arise due to low mean and high relative fluctuations of widget number. Isolating cells at the threshold of irreversible death might allow molecular characterization of this minimal replication unit.

  14. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentrup, Martin, E-mail: frentrup@physik.tu-berlin.de; Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Kneissl, Michael [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Hatui, Nirupam; Bhattacharya, Arnab [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2013-12-07

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances d{sub hkl} is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112{sup ¯}2) Al{sub κ}Ga{sub 1−κ}N epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  15. Evaluation of the impact of banking umbilical cord blood units with high cell dose for ethnically diverse patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritesky, Gretta; Wadsworth, Kimberly; Duffy, Merry; Buck, Kelly; Dehn, Jason

    2018-02-01

    Umbilical cord blood units provide an important stem cell source for transplantation, particularly for patients of ethnic diversity who may not have suitably matched available, adult-unrelated donors. However, with the cost of cord blood unit acquisition from public banks significantly higher than that for adult-unrelated donors, attention is focused on decreasing cost yet still providing cord blood units to patients in need. Historical practices of banking units with low total nucleated cell counts, including units with approximately 90 × 10 7 total nucleated cells, indicates that most banked cord blood units have much lower total nucleated cell counts than are required for transplant. The objective of this study was to determine the impact on the ability to identify suitable cord blood units for transplantation if the minimum total nucleated cell count for banking were increased from 90 × 10 7 to 124 or 149 × 10 7 . We analyzed ethnically diverse patients (median age, 3 years) who underwent transplantation of a single cord blood unit in 2005 to 2016. A cord blood unit search was evaluated to identify units with equal or greater human leukocyte antigen matching and a greater total nucleated cell count than that of the transplanted cord blood unit (the replacement cord blood unit). If the minimum total nucleated cell count for banking increased to 124 or 149 × 10 7 , then from 75 to 80% of patients would still have at least 1 replacement cord blood unit in the current (2016) cord blood unit inventory. The best replacement cord blood units were often found among cords with the same ethnic background as the patient. The current data suggest that, if the minimum total nucleated cell count were increased for banking, then it would likely lead to an inventory of more desirable cord blood units while having minimal impact on the identification of suitable cord blood units for transplantation. © 2017 AABB.

  16. Culture of human cells in experimental units for spaceflight impacts on their behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Moscheni, Claudia; Maier, Jeanette Am; Castiglioni, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Because space missions produce pathophysiological alterations such as cardiovascular disorders and bone demineralization which are very common on Earth, biomedical research in space is a frontier that holds important promises not only to counterbalance space-associated disorders in astronauts but also to ameliorate the health of Earth-bound population. Experiments in space are complex to design. Cells must be cultured in closed cell culture systems (from now defined experimental units (EUs)), which are biocompatible, functional, safe to minimize any potential hazard to the crew, and with a high degree of automation. Therefore, to perform experiments in orbit, it is relevant to know how closely culture in the EUs reflects cellular behavior under normal growth conditions. We compared the performances in these units of three different human cell types, which were recently space flown, i.e. bone mesenchymal stem cells, micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells are only slightly and transiently affected by culture in the EUs, whereas these devices accelerate mesenchymal stem cell reprogramming toward osteogenic differentiation, in part by increasing the amounts of reactive oxygen species. We conclude that cell culture conditions in the EUs do not exactly mimic what happens in a culture dish and that more efforts are necessary to optimize these devices for biomedical experiments in space. Impact statement Cell cultures represent valuable preclinical models to decipher pathogenic circuitries. This is true also for biomedical research in space. A lot has been learnt about cell adaptation and reaction from the experiments performed on many different cell types flown to space. Obviously, cell culture in space has to meet specific requirements for the safety of the crew and to comply with the unique environmental challenges. For these reasons, specific devices for cell culture in space have been developed. It is important to clarify whether these

  17. Superspace approach to lattice supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelecky, V.A.; Rabin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    We construct a cubic lattice of discrete points in superspace, as well as a discrete subgroup of the supersymmetry group which maps this ''superlattice'' into itself. We discuss the connection between this structure and previous versions of lattice supersymmetry. Our approach clarifies the mathematical problems of formulating supersymmetric lattice field theories and suggests new methods for attacking them

  18. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torreão Dassen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    We develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. We present algorithms to compute both Gram-Schmidt and reduced bases in this generalized setting. A layered lattice can be seen as lattices where certain directions have infinite weight. It can also be

  19. An overview of lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloshyn, R.M.

    1988-03-01

    The basic concepts of the Lagrangian formulation of lattice field theory are discussed. The Wilson and staggered schemes for dealing with fermions on the lattice are described. Some recent results for hadron masses and vector and axial vector current matrix elements in lattice QCD are reviewed. (Author) (118 refs., 16 figs.)

  20. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L. Torreão Dassen (Erwin)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWe develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. With this new theory certain problems that usually are solved by using classical lattices with a "weighting" gain a new, more natural form. Using the layered lattice basis reduction algorithms introduced here these

  1. A simplistic analytical unit cell based model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X H; Kuang, J J; Lu, T J; Han, F S; Kim, T

    2013-01-01

    We present a simplistic yet accurate analytical model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams saturated in a low conducting fluid (air). The model is derived analytically based on a realistic representative unit cell (a tetrakaidecahedron) under the assumption of one-dimensional heat conduction along highly tortuous-conducting ligaments at high porosity ranges (ε ⩾ 0.9). Good agreement with existing experimental data suggests that heat conduction along highly conducting and tortuous ligaments predominantly defines the effective thermal conductivity of open-cell metal foams with negligible conduction in parallel through the fluid phase. (paper)

  2. Replacement of the moderator cell unit of JRR-3's cold neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazawa, Tomoya; Nagahori, Kazuhisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi

    2006-10-01

    The moderator cell of the JRR-3's cold neutron source (CNS) facility, converts thermal neutrons into cold neutrons by passing through liquid cold hydrogen. The cold neutrons are used for material and life science research such as the neutron scattering. The CNS has been operated since the start of JRR-3's in 1990. The moderator cell containing liquid hydrogen is made of stainless steel. The material irradiation lifetime is limited to 7 years due to irradiation brittleness. The first replacement was done by using a spare part made in France. This replacement work of 2006 was carried out by using the domestic moderator cell unit. The following technologies were developed for the moderator cell unit production. 1) Technical development of black treatment on moderator cell surface to increase radiation heat. 2) Development of bending technology of concentric triple tubes consisting from inside tube, Outside tube and Vacuum insulation tube. 3) Development of manufacturing technique of the moderator cell with complicated shapes. According to detail planed work procedures, replacement work was carried out. As results, the working days were reduced to 80% of old ones. The radiation dose was also reduced due to reduction of working days. It was verified by measurement of neutrons characteristics that the replaced moderator cell has the same performance as that of the old moderator cell. The domestic manufacturing of the moderator cell was succeeded. As results, the replacement cost was reduced by development of domestic production technology. (author)

  3. IRPHE/B and W-SS-LATTICE, Spectral Shift Reactor Lattice Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    plutonium utilisation in commercial reactors. A fourth report concerns Critical Experiments Supporting Close Proximity Water Storage of Power Reactor Fuel. The fifth report concerns critical experiments supporting underwater storage of tightly packed configurations of spent fuel pins. The sixth report entitled 'Physics verification program', covers principally a series of experiments to measure the effect of lattice heterogeneities. The seventh report concerns Development and Demonstration of an Advanced Extended-Burnup Fuel- Assembly Design Incorporating Urania-Gadolinia. The eighth report concerns 'Urania-Gadolinia: Nuclear Model Development and Critical Experiment Benchmark'. The purpose was development and verification within an extended-burnup program for pressurised water reactors of advanced fuel assembly design. The ninth report concerns the Characterization and Irradiation Program: Extended-Burnup Gadolinia Lead Test Assembly (Mark GdB). The goal of the program was to extend the burnup of pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies to 50,000 MWd/mtU batch average burnup. The tenth report concerns the Hot Cell Examination of Gadolinia Lead Test Assembly Rods After One Cycle of Irradiation as described in the eighth and ninth report. The eleventh report covering April 1986 through March 1987, combines the progress report for the program entitled Development of an Advanced Extended Burnup Fuel Assembly Design Incorporating Urania-Gadolinia, and the final progress report for the program entitled Qualification of the B and W Mark B Fuel Assembly for High Burnup. The twelfth report describes five lead test assemblies designed, manufactured, characterized, and inserted for irradiation in Oconee Unit 1 cycle 8

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 76 - Phase I Affected Coal-Fired Utility Units With Group 1 or Cell Burner Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Units With Group 1 or Cell Burner Boilers A Appendix A to Part 76 Protection of Environment... 1 or Cell Burner Boilers Table 1—Phase I Tangentially Fired Units State Plant Unit Operator ALABAMA... Vertically fired boiler. 2 Arch-fired boiler. Table 3—Phase I Cell Burner Technology Units State Plant Unit...

  5. Datagrids for lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechner, O. [Zentralinstitut fuer Angewandte Mathematik ZAM, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ernst, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Jansen, K. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Lippert, Th. [Zentralinstitut fuer Angewandte Mathematik ZAM, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Melkumyan, D. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Orth, B. [Zentralinstitut fuer Angewandte Mathematik ZAM, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Pleiter, D. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany)]. E-mail: dirk.pleiter@desy.de; Stueben, H. [Konrad-Zuse-Institut fuer Informationstechnik ZIB, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Wegner, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Wollny, S. [Konrad-Zuse-Institut fuer Informationstechnik ZIB, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-04-01

    As the need for computing resources to carry out numerical simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) formulated on a lattice has increased significantly, efficient use of the generated data has become a major concern. To improve on this, groups plan to share their configurations on a worldwide level within the International Lattice DataGrid (ILDG). Doing so requires standardized description of the configurations, standards on binary file formats and common middleware interfaces. We describe the requirements and problems, and discuss solutions. Furthermore, an overview is given on the implementation of the LatFor DataGrid [http://www-zeuthen.desy.de/latfor/ldg], a France/German/Italian grid that will be one of the regional grids within the ILDG grid-of-grids concept.

  6. Lattice QCD for cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsanyi, Sz.; Kampert, K.H.; Fodor, Z.; Forschungszentrum Juelich; Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest

    2016-06-01

    We present a full result for the equation of state (EoS) in 2+1+1 (up/down, strange and charm quarks are present) flavour lattice QCD. We extend this analysis and give the equation of state in 2+1+1+1 flavour QCD. In order to describe the evolution of the universe from temperatures several hundreds of GeV to the MeV scale we also include the known effects of the electroweak theory and give the effective degree of freedoms. As another application of lattice QCD we calculate the topological susceptibility (χ) up to the few GeV temperature region. These two results, EoS and χ, can be used to predict the dark matter axion's mass in the post-inflation scenario and/or give the relationship between the axion's mass and the universal axionic angle, which acts as a initial condition of our universe.

  7. Lattice vibration spectra. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, H.D.; Willich, P.

    1977-01-01

    The FIR absorption spectra of pyrite type compounds RuS 2 , RuSsub(2-x)Sesub(x), RuSe 2 , RuTe 2 , OsS 2 , OsSe 2 , and PtP 2 as well as loellingite type phosphides FeP 2 , RuP 2 , and OsP 2 are reported. For RuS 2 , RuSe 2 , RuTe 2 , OsS 2 , and PtP 2 all of the five infrared allowed modes (k = 0) are observed. As a first result of a numerical normal coordinate treatment vibration forms of pyrite structure are communicated. The spectra show that lattice forces of corresponding sulfides, tellurides, and phosphides are about the same strength, but increase strongly by substitution of iron by ruthenium and especially of ruthenium by osmium. The lattice constants of the RuSsub(2-x)Sesub(x) solid solution obey Vegard's rule. (author)

  8. Lattice Wigner equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano, S.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme to solve the Wigner equation, based on a lattice discretization of momentum space. The moments of the Wigner function are recovered exactly, up to the desired order given by the number of discrete momenta retained in the discretization, which also determines the accuracy of the method. The Wigner equation is equipped with an additional collision operator, designed in such a way as to ensure numerical stability without affecting the evolution of the relevant moments of the Wigner function. The lattice Wigner scheme is validated for the case of quantum harmonic and anharmonic potentials, showing good agreement with theoretical results. It is further applied to the study of the transport properties of one- and two-dimensional open quantum systems with potential barriers. Finally, the computational viability of the scheme for the case of three-dimensional open systems is also illustrated.

  9. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sachrajda, C T

    2016-01-01

    I review the the application of the lattice formulation of QCD and large-scale numerical simulations to the evaluation of non-perturbative hadronic effects in Standard Model Phenomenology. I present an introduction to the elements of the calculations and discuss the limitations both in the range of quantities which can be studied and in the precision of the results. I focus particularly on the extraction of the QCD parameters, i.e. the quark masses and the strong coupling constant, and on important quantities in flavour physics. Lattice QCD is playing a central role in quantifying the hadronic effects necessary for the development of precision flavour physics and its use in exploring the limits of the Standard Model and in searches for inconsistencies which would signal the presence of new physics.

  10. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  11. Lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfratz, A.; Hasenfratz, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals almost exclusively with applications in QCD. Presumably QCD will remain in the center of lattice calculations in the near future. The existing techniques and the available computer resources should be able to produce trustworthy results in pure SU(3) gauge theory and in quenched hadron spectroscopy. Going beyond the quenched approximation might require some technical breakthrough or exceptional computer resources, or both. Computational physics has entered high-energy physics. From this point of view, lattice QCD is only one (although the most important, at present) of the research fields. Increasing attention is devoted to the study of other QFTs. It is certain that the investigation of nonasymptotically free theories, the Higgs phenomenon, or field theories that are not perturbatively renormalizable will be important research areas in the future

  12. Lattice degeneracies of geometric fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raszillier, H.

    1983-05-01

    We give the minimal numbers of degrees of freedom carried by geometric fermions on all lattices of maximal symmetries in d = 2, 3, and 4 dimensions. These numbers are lattice dependent, but in the (free) continuum limit, part of the degrees of freedom have to escape to infinity by a Wilson mechanism built in, and 2sup(d) survive for any lattice. On self-reciprocal lattices we compare the minimal numbers of degrees of freedom of geometric fermions with the minimal numbers of naive fermions on these lattices and argue that these numbers are equal. (orig.)

  13. Light water lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The panel was attended by prominent physicists from most of the well-known laboratories in the field of light-water lattices, who exchanged the latest information on the status of work in their countries and discussed both the theoretical and the experimental aspects of the subjects. The supporting papers covered most problems, including criticality, resonance absorption, thermal utilization, spectrum calculations and the physics of plutonium bearing systems. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Diffusion in heterogeneous lattices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarasenko, Alexander; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 256, č. 17 (2010), s. 5137-5144 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : lattice- gas systems * diffusion * Monte Carlo simulations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.795, year: 2010

  15. Automated lattice data generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyar Venkitesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of generating ensembles of gauge configurations (and measuring various observables over them can be tedious and error-prone when done “by hand”. In practice, most of this procedure can be automated with the use of a workflow manager. We discuss how this automation can be accomplished using Taxi, a minimal Python-based workflow manager built for generating lattice data. We present a case study demonstrating this technology.

  16. Automated lattice data generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyar, Venkitesh; Hackett, Daniel C.; Jay, William I.; Neil, Ethan T.

    2018-03-01

    The process of generating ensembles of gauge configurations (and measuring various observables over them) can be tedious and error-prone when done "by hand". In practice, most of this procedure can be automated with the use of a workflow manager. We discuss how this automation can be accomplished using Taxi, a minimal Python-based workflow manager built for generating lattice data. We present a case study demonstrating this technology.

  17. Lattice dynamics of thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, J [Agra Coll. (India). Dept. of Physics

    1977-03-01

    In the present work, a local model pseudopotential has been proposed to study the lattice dynamics of thorium. The model potential depends on the core and ionic radii, and accounts for the s-d-f hybridization effects in a phenomenological way. When this form of potential is applied to derive the photon dispersion curves of Th, sufficiently good agreement is found between the computed and experimental results.

  18. Computing: Lattice work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, Ken

    1990-01-01

    One of the major recent developments in particle theory has been the use of very high performance computers to obtain approximate numerical solutions of quantum field theories by formulating them on a finite space-time lattice. The great virtue of this new technique is that it avoids the straitjacket of perturbation theory and can thus attack new, but very fundamental problems, such as the calculation of hadron masses in quark-gluon field theory (quantum chromodynamics - QCD)

  19. Fuel Cells in Distributed Power Market Applications in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastler, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews results from EPRI market analysis, which examined the technical and economic market potential of fuel cells in distributed power markets in the United States. A methodology and approach for developing realistic quantitative estimates of market potential in competitive electricity markets is presented. Market size estimates for phosphoric acid, polymer exchange membrane, high temperature fuel cells (carbonate and solid oxide systems) and ultra-high efficient fuel cell hybrids are estimated. Market potentials are reviewed for fuel cells systems ranging in size from 3 kW up to 20-30 MW in scale and underlying assumptions are provided. The results and implications are discussed in relation to the changing U.S. electric utility market structures. Results will be of value to energy companies and to fuel cell developers seeking to understand revenue sales estimates, market size, and most profitable segments for fuel cells in the competitive US electric markets. (author)

  20. Robots and lattice automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The book gives a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art research and engineering in theory and application of Lattice Automata in design and control of autonomous Robots. Automata and robots share the same notional meaning. Automata (originated from the latinization of the Greek word “αυτόματον”) as self-operating autonomous machines invented from ancient years can be easily considered the first steps of robotic-like efforts. Automata are mathematical models of Robots and also they are integral parts of robotic control systems. A Lattice Automaton is a regular array or a collective of finite state machines, or automata. The Automata update their states by the same rules depending on states of their immediate neighbours. In the context of this book, Lattice Automata are used in developing modular reconfigurable robotic systems, path planning and map exploration for robots, as robot controllers, synchronisation of robot collectives, robot vision, parallel robotic actuators. All chapters are...

  1. Digital lattice gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a general scheme for a digital construction of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. In this method, the four-body interactions arising in models with 2 +1 dimensions and higher are obtained stroboscopically, through a sequence of two-body interactions with ancillary degrees of freedom. This yields stronger interactions than the ones obtained through perturbative methods, as typically done in previous proposals, and removes an important bottleneck in the road towards experimental realizations. The scheme applies to generic gauge theories with Lie or finite symmetry groups, both Abelian and non-Abelian. As a concrete example, we present the construction of a digital quantum simulator for a Z3 lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermionic matter in 2 +1 dimensions, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices, involving three atomic species, representing the matter, gauge, and auxiliary degrees of freedom, that are separated in three different layers. By moving the ancilla atoms with a proper sequence of steps, we show how we can obtain the desired evolution in a clean, controlled way.

  2. Dielectric lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1983-06-01

    Dielectric lattice gauge theory models are introduced. They involve variables PHI(b)epsilong that are attached to the links b = (x+esub(μ),x) of the lattice and take their values in the linear space g which consists of real linear combinations of matrices in the gauge group G. The polar decomposition PHI(b)=U(b)osub(μ)(x) specifies an ordinary lattice gauge field U(b) and a kind of dielectric field epsilonsub(ij)proportionalosub(i)osub(j)sup(*)deltasub(ij). A gauge invariant positive semidefinite kinetic term for the PHI-field is found, and it is shown how to incorporate Wilson fermions in a way which preserves Osterwalder Schrader positivity. Theories with G = SU(2) and without matter fields are studied in some detail. It is proved that confinement holds, in the sense that Wilson loop expectation values show an area law decay, if the Euclidean action has certain qualitative features which imply that PHI = 0 (i.e. dielectric field identical 0) is the unique maximum of the action. (orig.)

  3. Dielectric lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1984-01-01

    Dielectric lattice gauge theory models are introduced. They involve variables PHI(b)element ofG that are attached to the links b = (x+esub(μ), x) of the lattice and take their values in the linear space G which consists of real linear combinations of matrices in the gauge group G. The polar decomposition PHI(b)=U(b)sigmasub(μ)(x) specifies an ordinary lattice gauge field U(b) and a kind of dielectric field epsilonsub(ij)proportional sigmasub(i)sigmasub(j)sup(*)deltasub(ij). A gauge invariant positive semidefinite kinetic term for the PHI-field is found, and it is shown how to incorporate Wilson fermions in a way which preserves Osterwalder-Schrader positivity. Theories with G = SU(2) and without matter fields are studied in some detail. It is proved that confinement holds, in the sense that Wilson-loop expectation values show an area law decay, if the euclidean action has certain qualitative features which imply that PHI=0 (i.e. dielectric field identical 0) is the unique maximum of the action. (orig.)

  4. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  5. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vast, N.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B 4 C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B 4 C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  6. Improved reproducibility of unit-cell parameters in macromolecular cryocrystallography by limiting dehydration during crystal mounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Christopher; Burks, Geoffry; Siegert, Thomas; Juers, Douglas H

    2014-08-01

    In macromolecular cryocrystallography unit-cell parameters can have low reproducibility, limiting the effectiveness of combining data sets from multiple crystals and inhibiting the development of defined repeatable cooling protocols. Here, potential sources of unit-cell variation are investigated and crystal dehydration during loop-mounting is found to be an important factor. The amount of water lost by the unit cell depends on the crystal size, the loop size, the ambient relative humidity and the transfer distance to the cooling medium. To limit water loss during crystal mounting, a threefold strategy has been implemented. Firstly, crystal manipulations are performed in a humid environment similar to the humidity of the crystal-growth or soaking solution. Secondly, the looped crystal is transferred to a vial containing a small amount of the crystal soaking solution. Upon loop transfer, the vial is sealed, which allows transport of the crystal at its equilibrated humidity. Thirdly, the crystal loop is directly mounted from the vial into the cold gas stream. This strategy minimizes the exposure of the crystal to relatively low humidity ambient air, improves the reproducibility of low-temperature unit-cell parameters and offers some new approaches to crystal handling and cryoprotection.

  7. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  8. Experimental broadband absorption enhancement in silicon nanohole structures with optimized complex unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-09-09

    We design silicon membranes with nanohole structures with optimized complex unit cells that maximize broadband absorption. We fabricate the optimized design and measure the optical absorption. We demonstrate an experimental broadband absorption about 3.5 times higher than an equally-thick thin film.

  9. Development of a unit cell model for interim performance assessment of vitrified low level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, N.W.

    1995-09-01

    The unit cell modeling approach has been developed and used in analysis of some design options for a vitrified low level waste disposal facility. The unit cell modeling approach is likely to be useful in interim performance assessment for the facility. The present unit cell model will probably need to be refitted in terms of some model parameters for the latter purpose. Two present disposal facility concepts differ in the length of a capillary barrier proposed to limit effective recharge through the top of the facility. Results of the study summarized herein suggest design of a capillary barrier which can reduce a recharge rate of 0.1 cm/yr by one or two orders of magnitude seems feasible for both concepts. A benchmark comparison of the unit cell model against a full facility model shows comparable predictive accuracy in less than one percent of the computer time. Results suggest that model parameters include capillary barrier performance, inter-canister spacing, rate of moisture withdrawal due to glass corrosion, contaminant inventory, and the well interceptor factor. It is also important that variations of waste form hydraulic parameters suggest that transport through the waste form is dominated by diffusion

  10. Identification of two distinct chromosome 12-derived amplification units in neuroblastoma cell line NGP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roy, N.; Forus, A.; Myklebost, O.; Cheng, N. C.; Versteeg, R.; Speleman, F.

    1995-01-01

    The neuroblastoma cell line NGP contains two homogeneously staining regions (hsr). One of these hsrs contains MYCN sequences. Reverse painting experiments demonstrated that the second HSR consisted of two chromosome 12-derived amplification units, located at 12q14-15 and 12q24. Southern blot and

  11. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  12. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D 2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude

  13. Interconnection between the geometry and the structure of unit cells of substances in inorganic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseev, A.A.; Kuz'micheva, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Regularity of interconnection between the geometry and the structure of elementary cells of inorganic compounds is investigated. Structural motives on the basis of NaCl structure for all phases of rare earth chalcogenides are built. It is shown that compounds (phases of variable content), detected on 23 (out of 48 possible) state diagrams of rare earths chalcogen binary systems are closely bound both from the viewpoint of geometric dimensions of elementary cells and structural motives. It is shown that using ion representations the number of formula units in the cell of a new rare earth chalcogenide can be calculated and its structural motif can be built

  14. Modulation of the androgenetic response in diverse skin cell types: the pilosebaceous unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurvarra, F.; Kerner, N.; Hagelin, K.

    2009-01-01

    Androgens play a central role in diverse morphogenetic processes of the skin. Hair growth and follicular cycle are regulated in part by androgens. Androgens also play a key function, together with other receptors such as the PPARs receptors family, on the proliferation and differentiation of the sebaceous gland that forms part of the pilosebaceous unit and influences hair growth and skin well-being. UV radiation may affect androgens regulation of skin homeostasis. Objectives: to study the modulation of androgenetic response related to UV radiation on the pilosebaceous unit, in two skin conditions: androgenetic alopecia and acne, both affecting skin and constituting major concerns for affected individuals. Methods: primary cultures of cells and established cell lines from the pilosebaceous unit: dermal papillae cells, keratinocytes and sebocytes. Analysis of lipid content, inflammatory response and proliferation of cells under the influence of androgens, PPARs ligands and UVR. Results: sebocytes primary cultures were obtained from human sebaceous glands. Proliferation and differentiation, as well as the expression of proinflammatory molecules (IL-1, TNF alpha, iNOs) and lipogenic enzymes (FASN) under androgens and UV treatment were assessed. The response to androgens under UV exposure was also analyzed in dermal papillae cells in culture. (authors)

  15. Vortex structure in abelian-projected lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.; Giedt, J.; Greensite, J.

    2000-01-01

    We report on a breakdown of both monopole dominance and positivity in abelian-projected lattice Yang-Mills theory. The breakdown is associated with observables involving two units of the abelian charge. We find that the projected lattice has at most a global Z 2 symmetry in the confined phase, rather than the global U(1) symmetry that might be expected in a dual superconductor or monopole Coulomb gas picture. Implications for monopole and center vortex theories of confinement are discussed

  16. Three-dimensional reconstruction of statistically optimal unit cells of polydisperse particulate composites from microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.; Brandyberry, M.; Tudor, A.; Matous, K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic approach for characterization and reconstruction of statistically optimal representative unit cells of polydisperse particulate composites. Microtomography is used to gather rich three-dimensional data of a packed glass bead system. First-, second-, and third-order probability functions are used to characterize the morphology of the material, and the parallel augmented simulated annealing algorithm is employed for reconstruction of the statistically equivalent medium. Both the fully resolved probability spectrum and the geometrically exact particle shapes are considered in this study, rendering the optimization problem multidimensional with a highly complex objective function. A ten-phase particulate composite composed of packed glass beads in a cylindrical specimen is investigated, and a unit cell is reconstructed on massively parallel computers. Further, rigorous error analysis of the statistical descriptors (probability functions) is presented and a detailed comparison between statistics of the voxel-derived pack and the representative cell is made.

  17. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloy, K.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10 -18 and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  18. In vivo studies of the long-term 51Cr red cell survival of serologically incompatible red cell units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.L.; Ness, P.M.; Barrasso, C.; Kickler, T.S.; Drew, H.; Tsan, M.F.; Shirey, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The long-term survival of serologically incompatible red cell units was measured in five patients with antibodies to high-frequency antigens. Initially, the survival of 1 ml of 51 Cr-labeled incompatible red cells was measured over 1 hour. After demonstrating that the 1-hour survival times were successful (greater than 70%), each patient then received 5 ml of the same 51 Cr-labeled red cells followed by the transfusion of the remainder of the red cell unit. The long-term T 1/2Cr survival for each case was patient 1 (anti-McCa), 15 days; patient 2 (anti-JMH), 12 days; patient 3 (anti-Kna), 31 days; patient 4 (anti-McCa), 12 days; and patient 5 (anti-Hya), 14 days. Each antibody tested in an in vitro homologous macrophage assay showed less than 5 percent phagocytosis. Anti-JMH was the only antibody to react with IgG subclass antisera and was determined to be IgG4. The macrophage assay, IgG subclass testing, and short-term (1 hour, 1 ml) 51 Cr survival studies all indicated that the short-term survival was good. However, only the measurement of long-term survival with transfused units of serologically incompatible red cells was able to determine the actual survival, and clinical significance of the alloantibodies. Determining the actual long-term survival by the method described here can be of importance for patients requiring chronic red cell transfusion

  19. Lattice topology dictates photon statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakci, H Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F; Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2017-08-21

    Propagation of coherent light through a disordered network is accompanied by randomization and possible conversion into thermal light. Here, we show that network topology plays a decisive role in determining the statistics of the emerging field if the underlying lattice is endowed with chiral symmetry. In such lattices, eigenmode pairs come in skew-symmetric pairs with oppositely signed eigenvalues. By examining one-dimensional arrays of randomly coupled waveguides arranged on linear and ring topologies, we are led to a remarkable prediction: the field circularity and the photon statistics in ring lattices are dictated by its parity while the same quantities are insensitive to the parity of a linear lattice. For a ring lattice, adding or subtracting a single lattice site can switch the photon statistics from super-thermal to sub-thermal, or vice versa. This behavior is understood by examining the real and imaginary fields on a lattice exhibiting chiral symmetry, which form two strands that interleave along the lattice sites. These strands can be fully braided around an even-sited ring lattice thereby producing super-thermal photon statistics, while an odd-sited lattice is incommensurate with such an arrangement and the statistics become sub-thermal.

  20. Long-Lived Feshbach Molecules in a Three-Dimensional Optical Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, G.; Winkler, K.; Lang, F.; Schmid, S.; Denschlag, J. Hecker; Grimm, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have created and trapped a pure sample of 87 Rb 2 Feshbach molecules in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Compared to previous experiments without a lattice, we find dramatic improvements such as long lifetimes of up to 700 ms and a near unit efficiency for converting tightly confined atom pairs into molecules. The lattice shields the trapped molecules from collisions and, thus, overcomes the problem of inelastic decay by vibrational quenching. Furthermore, we have developed an advanced purification scheme that removes residual atoms, resulting in a lattice in which individual sites are either empty or filled with a single molecule in the vibrational ground state of the lattice

  1. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. Follow up report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Fuel cell technology continues to grow in the United States, with strong sales in stationary applications and early markets such as data centers, materials handling equipment, and telecommunications sites. New fuel cell customers include Fortune 500 companies Apple, eBay, Coca-Cola, and Walmart, who will use fuel cells to provide reliable power to data centers, stores, and facilities. Some are purchasing multi-megawatt (MW) systems, including three of the largest non-utility purchases of stationary fuel cells in the world by AT and T, Apple and eBay - 17 MW, 10 MW and 6 MW respectively. Others are replacing fleets of battery forklifts with fuel cells. Sysco, the food distributor, has more than 700 fuel cell-powered forklifts operating at seven facilities, with more on order. Mega-retailer Walmart now operates more than 500 fuel cell forklifts at three warehouses, including a freezer facility. Although federal government budget reduction efforts are impacting a wide range of departments and programs, fuel cell and hydrogen technology continues to be funded, albeit at a lower level than in past years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding fuel cell and hydrogen R and D and has nearly 300 ongoing projects at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes universities. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and DOE's Market Transformation efforts have acted as a government ''catalyst'' for market success of emerging technologies. Early market deployments of about 1,400 fuel cells under the ARRA have led to more than 5,000 additional fuel cell purchases by industry with no DOE funding. In addition, interest in Congress remains high. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Coons (D-DE), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and John Hoeven (R-ND) re-launched the bipartisan Senate Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Caucus in August 2012 to promote the continued development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

  2. A cornucopia of lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcup, G.

    1986-01-01

    A progress report on a lattice project at Los Alamos is presented. The projects are basically of two sorts: approaching the continuum (determination of MCRG flows under the blocking transformation, and beta-function along Wilson and improved action lines); and arriving at the continuum (hadron spectrum, coupling constants, and matrix elements). Since the ultimate goal is to determine matrix elements for which chiral symmetry is very relevant, the authors choose the formalism whose chiral properties are easier to understand, i.e., staggered fermions

  3. Lattice of quantum predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Michael

    1993-10-01

    What is the structure of reality? Physics is supposed to answer this question, but a purely empiristic view is not sufficient to explain its ability to do so. Quantum mechanics has forced us to think more deeply about what a physical theory is. There are preconditions every physical theory must fulfill. It has to contain, e.g., rules for empirically testable predictions. Those preconditions give physics a structure that is “a priori” in the Kantian sense. An example is given how the lattice structure of quantum mechanics can be understood along these lines.

  4. Diamond lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oitmaa, J.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate ground-state and high-temperature properties of the nearest-neighbour Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the three-dimensional diamond lattice, using series expansion methods. The ground-state energy and magnetization, as well as the magnon spectrum, are calculated and found to be in good agreement with first-order spin-wave theory, with a quantum renormalization factor of about 1.13. High-temperature series are derived for the free energy, and physical and staggered susceptibilities for spin S  =  1/2, 1 and 3/2, and analysed to obtain the corresponding Curie and Néel temperatures.

  5. Renormalons on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Crisafulli, M.; Martinelli, G.; Sachrajda, Christopher T.; Crisafulli, M; Gimenez, V; Martinelli, G; Sachrajda, C T

    1994-01-01

    We present the first lattice calculation of the B-meson binding energy \\labar and of the kinetic energy \\lambda_1/2 m_Q of the heavy-quark inside the pseudoscalar B-meson. In order to cancel the ambiguities due to the ultraviolet renormalons present in the operator matrix elements, this calculation has required the non-perturbative subtraction of the power divergences present in the Lagrangian operator \\energy and in the kinetic energy operator \\kkinetic. The non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant operators has been implemented by imposing suitable renormalization conditions on quark matrix elements in the Landau gauge.

  6. Study of Gd lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovsky, I.; Kereszturi, A.

    1991-11-01

    The results of experiments and calculations on Gd lattices are presented, and a comparison of experimental and calculational data is given. This latter can be divided into four groups. The first belongs to the comparison of criticality parameters, the second group is related with the comparison of 2D distributions, the third one relates the comparison of intra-macrocell distributions, whereas the fourth group is devoted for the comparison of spectral parameters. For comparison, the computer code RFIT based on strict statistical criteria has been used. The calculated and measured results agree, in most cases, sufficiently. (R.P.) 11 refs.; 13 figs.; 9 tabs

  7. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  8. First multi-bend achromat lattice consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einfeld, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.einfeld@maxlab.lu.se [Lund University, PO Box 118, Lund SE-221 00 (Sweden); Plesko, Mark [COSYLAB, Teslova ulica 30, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovakia); Schaper, Joachim [HAWK University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Hohnsen 4, D-31134 Hildesheim (Germany)

    2014-08-27

    The first proposed lattice for a ‘diffraction-limited light source’ is reported. This approach has now more or less been used for the MAX IV project. By the beginning of 1990, three third-generation synchrotron light sources had been successfully commissioned in Grenoble, Berkeley and Trieste (ESRF, ALS and ELETTRA). Each of these new machines reached their target specifications without any significant problems. In parallel, already at that time discussions were underway regarding the next generation, the ‘diffraction-limited light source (DLSR)’, which featured sub-nm rad electron beam emittance, photon beam brilliance exceeding 10{sup 22} and the potential to emit coherent radiation. Also, at about that time, a first design for a 3 GeV DLSR was developed, based on a modified multiple-bend achromat (MBA) design leading to a lattice with normalized emittance of ∊{sub x} = 0.5 nm rad. The novel feature of the MBA lattice was the use of seven vertically focusing bend magnets with different bending angles throughout the achromat cell to keep the radiation integrals and resulting beam emittance low. The baseline design called for a 400 m ring circumference with 12 straight sections of 6 m length. The dynamic aperture behaviour of the DLSR lattice was estimated to produce > 5 h beam lifetime at 100 mA stored beam current.

  9. Lattices gauge theories in terms of knots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecernyes, P.

    1989-01-01

    Cluster expansion is developed in lattice gauge theories with finite gauge groups in d≥3 dimensions where the clusters are connected (d - 2)-dimensional surfaces which can branch along (d - 3)-cells. The interaction between them has a knot theoretical interpretation. It can be many body linking or knotting self-interaction. For small enough gauge coupling g the authors prove analyticity of the correlation functions in the variable exp(-1/g 2

  10. Truncated Groebner fans and lattice ideals

    OpenAIRE

    Lauritzen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    We outline a generalization of the Groebner fan of a homogeneous ideal with maximal cells parametrizing truncated Groebner bases. This "truncated" Groebner fan is usually much smaller than the full Groebner fan and offers the natural framework for conversion between truncated Groebner bases. The generic Groebner walk generalizes naturally to this setting by using the Buchberger algorithm with truncation on facets. We specialize to the setting of lattice ideals. Here facets along the generic w...

  11. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM UNITED STATES COAST GUARD AIR STATION CAPE COD BOURNE, MASSACHUSETTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John K. Steckel Jr

    2004-06-30

    This report covers the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant, installed by PPL Spectrum, Inc. (PPL) under contract with the United States Coast Guard (USCG), Research and Development Center (RDC). The fuel cell was installed at Air Station Cape Cod in Bourne, MA. The project had the support of the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative (MTC), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Keyspan Energy. PPL selected FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) and its fuel cell model DFC{reg_sign}300 for the contract. Grant contributions were finalized and a contract between PPL and the USCG for the manufacture, installation, and first year's maintenance of the fuel cell was executed on September 24, 2001. As the prime contractor, PPL was responsible for all facets of the project. All the work was completed by PPL through various subcontracts, including the primary subcontract with FCE for the manufacture, delivery, and installation of the fuel cell. The manufacturing and design phases proceeded in a relatively timely manner for the first half of the project. However, during latter stages of manufacture and fuel cell testing, a variety of issues were encountered that ultimately resulted in several delivery delays, and a number of contract modifications. Final installation and field testing was completed in April and May 2003. Final acceptance of the fuel cell was completed on May 16, 2003. The fuel cell has operated successfully for more than one year. The unit achieved an availability rate of 96%, which exceeded expectations. The capacity factor was limited because the unit was set at 155 kW (versus a nameplate of 250 kW) due to the interconnection with the electric utility. There were 18 shutdowns during the first year and most were brief. The ability of this plant to operate in the island mode improved availability by 3 to 4%. Events that would normally be shutdowns were simply island mode events. The mean time between failure was calculated at 239 hours, or slightly

  12. Lattice Transparency of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sieun; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Kim, Youn Sang; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Lee, Jeong-O

    2017-03-08

    Here, we demonstrated the transparency of graphene to the atomic arrangement of a substrate surface, i.e., the "lattice transparency" of graphene, by using hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods as a model system. The growth behaviors of ZnO nanocrystals on graphene-coated and uncoated substrates with various crystal structures were investigated. The atomic arrangements of the nucleating ZnO nanocrystals exhibited a close match with those of the respective substrates despite the substrates being bound to the other side of the graphene. By using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we confirmed the energetic favorability of the nucleating phase following the atomic arrangement of the substrate even with the graphene layer present in between. In addition to transmitting information about the atomic lattice of the substrate, graphene also protected its surface. This dual role enabled the hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods on a Cu substrate, which otherwise dissolved in the reaction conditions when graphene was absent.

  13. Low-Velocity Impact Behavior of Sandwich Structures with Additively Manufactured Polymer Lattice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew J.; Al Rifaie, Mohammed; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2018-05-01

    Sandwich panel structures are widely used in aerospace, marine, and automotive applications because of their high flexural stiffness, strength-to-weight ratio, good vibration damping, and low through-thickness thermal conductivity. These structures consist of solid face sheets and low-density cellular core structures, which are traditionally based upon honeycomb folded-sheet topologies. The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing process allow lattice core configurations to be designed with improved mechanical properties. In this work, the sandwich core is comprised of lattice truss structures (LTS). Two different LTS designs are 3D-printed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and are tested under low-velocity impact loads. The absorption energy and the failure mechanisms of lattice cells under such loads are investigated. The differences in energy-absorption capabilities are captured by integrating the load-displacement curve found from the impact response. It is observed that selective placement of vertical support struts in the unit-cell results in an increase in the absorption energy of the sandwich panels.

  14. Low-Velocity Impact Behavior of Sandwich Structures with Additively Manufactured Polymer Lattice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew J.; Al Rifaie, Mohammed; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2018-04-01

    Sandwich panel structures are widely used in aerospace, marine, and automotive applications because of their high flexural stiffness, strength-to-weight ratio, good vibration damping, and low through-thickness thermal conductivity. These structures consist of solid face sheets and low-density cellular core structures, which are traditionally based upon honeycomb folded-sheet topologies. The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing process allow lattice core configurations to be designed with improved mechanical properties. In this work, the sandwich core is comprised of lattice truss structures (LTS). Two different LTS designs are 3D-printed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and are tested under low-velocity impact loads. The absorption energy and the failure mechanisms of lattice cells under such loads are investigated. The differences in energy-absorption capabilities are captured by integrating the load-displacement curve found from the impact response. It is observed that selective placement of vertical support struts in the unit-cell results in an increase in the absorption energy of the sandwich panels.

  15. Introduction to lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cock, P.

    1988-03-01

    A general introduction to Lattice Gauge Theory (LGT) is given. The theory is discussed from first principles to facilitate an understanding of the techniques used in LGT. These include lattice formalism, gauge invariance, fermions on the lattice, group theory and integration, strong coupling methods and mean field techniques. A review of quantum chromodynamics on the lattice at finite temperature and density is also given. Monte Carlo results and analytical methods are discussed. An attempt has been made to include most relevant data up to the end of 1987, and to update some earlier reviews existing on the subject. 224 refs., 33 figs., 14 tabs

  16. Hadron structure from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Some elements and current developments of lattice QCD are reviewed, with special emphasis on hadron structure observables. In principle, high precision experimental and lattice data provide nowadays a very detailled picture of the internal structure of hadrons. However, to relate both, a very good controle of perturbative QCD is needed in many cases. Finally chiral perturbation theory is extremely helpful to boost the precision of lattice calculations. The mutual need and benefit of all four elements: experiment, lattice QCD, perturbative QCD and chiral perturbation theory is the main topic of this review

  17. Lattice formulations of reggeon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, R.C.; Ellis, J.; Savit, R.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1976-01-01

    A class of lattice analogues to reggeon field theory is examined. First the transition from a continuum to a lattice field theory is discussed, emphasizing the necessity of a Wick rotation and the consideration of symmetry properties. Next the theory is transformed to a discrete system with two spins at each lattice site, and the problems of the triple-reggeon interaction and the reggeon energy gap are discussed. It is pointed out that transferring the theory from the continuum to a lattice necesarily introduces new relevant operators not normally present in reggeon field theory. (Auth.)

  18. Computation of a Canadian SCWR unit cell with deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrisson, G.; Marleau, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Canadian SCWR has the potential to achieve the goals that the generation IV nuclear reactors must meet. As part of the optimization process for this design concept, lattice cell calculations are routinely performed using deterministic codes. In this study, the first step (self-shielding treatment) of the computation scheme developed with the deterministic code DRAGON for the Canadian SCWR has been validated. Some options available in the module responsible for the resonance self-shielding calculation in DRAGON 3.06 and different microscopic cross section libraries based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluated nuclear data file have been tested and compared to a reference calculation performed with the Monte Carlo code SERPENT under the same conditions. Compared to SERPENT, DRAGON underestimates the infinite multiplication factor in all cases. In general, the original Stammler model with the Livolant-Jeanpierre approximations are the most appropriate self-shielding options to use in this case of study. In addition, the 89 groups WIMS-AECL library for slight enriched uranium and the 172 groups WLUP library for a mixture of plutonium and thorium give the most consistent results with those of SERPENT. (authors)

  19. Increased numbers of spleen colony forming units in B cell deficient CBA/N mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W.; Krupienicz, A.; Scher, I.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of exogenous and endogenous spleen colonies was studied in immune-defective mice expressing the CBA/N X-linked xid gene. Bone marrow and spleen cells of immune deficient mice formed increased numbers of eight-day exogenous spleen colonies when transferred to either normal or B cell deficient lethally irradiated recipients. Moreover, defective mice showed increased formation of five-day endogenous spleen colonies (derived from transient endogenous colony forming units; T-CFU) and of ten-day endogenous spleen colonies (derived from CFU-S). Among the possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effects, the most probable appears the one in which decreased numbers of B cell precursors stimulate stem cell pools through a feedback mechanism. (orig.) [de

  20. Convection-diffusion lattice Boltzmann scheme for irregular lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Ernst, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a lattice Boltzmann (LB) scheme for convection diffusion on irregular lattices is presented, which is free of any interpolation or coarse graining step. The scheme is derived using the axioma that the velocity moments of the equilibrium distribution equal those of the

  1. New capabilities of the lattice code WIMS-AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altiparmakov, Dimitar

    2008-01-01

    The lattice code WIMS-AECL has been restructured and rewritten in Fortran 95 in order to increase the accuracy of its responses and extend its capabilities. Significant changes of computing algorithms have been made in the following two areas: geometric calculations and resonance self-shielding. Among various geometry enhancements, the code is no longer restricted to deal with single lattice cell problems. The multi-cell capability allows modelling of various lattice structures such as checkerboard lattices, a de-fuelled channel, and core-reflector interface problems. The new resonance method performs distributed resonance self-shielding including the skin effect. This paper describes the main code changes and presents selected code verification results. (authors)

  2. Magnetoresistance oscillations of two-dimensional electron systems in lateral superlattices with structured unit cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardts, Rolf R.

    2015-11-01

    Model calculations for commensurability oscillations of the low-field magnetoresistance of two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in lateral superlattices, consisting of unit cells with an internal structure, are compared with recent experiments. The relevant harmonics of the effective modulation potential depend not only on the geometrical structure of the modulated unit cell, but also strongly on the nature of the modulation. While higher harmonics of an electrostatically generated surface modulation are exponentially damped at the position of the 2DES about 90 nm below the surface, no such damping appears for strain-induced modulation generated, e.g., by the deposition of stripes of calixarene resist on the surface before cooling down the sample.

  3. Lattice quantum gravity and asymptotic safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiho, J.; Bassler, S.; Coumbe, D.; Du, D.; Neelakanta, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    We study the nonperturbative formulation of quantum gravity defined via Euclidean dynamical triangulations (EDT) in an attempt to make contact with Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario. We find that a fine-tuning is necessary in order to recover semiclassical behavior. Such a fine-tuning is generally associated with the breaking of a target symmetry by the lattice regulator; in this case we argue that the target symmetry is the general coordinate invariance of the theory. After introducing and fine-tuning a nontrivial local measure term, we find no barrier to taking a continuum limit, and we find evidence that four-dimensional, semiclassical geometries are recovered at long distance scales in the continuum limit. We also find that the spectral dimension at short distance scales is consistent with 3 /2 , a value that could resolve the tension between asymptotic safety and the holographic entropy scaling of black holes. We argue that the number of relevant couplings in the continuum theory is one, once symmetry breaking by the lattice regulator is accounted for. Such a theory is maximally predictive, with no adjustable parameters. The cosmological constant in Planck units is the only relevant parameter, which serves to set the lattice scale. The cosmological constant in Planck units is of order 1 in the ultraviolet and undergoes renormalization group running to small values in the infrared. If these findings hold up under further scrutiny, the lattice may provide a nonperturbative definition of a renormalizable quantum field theory of general relativity with no adjustable parameters and a cosmological constant that is naturally small in the infrared.

  4. Hot B violation, the lattice, and hard thermal loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, P.

    1997-01-01

    It has recently been argued that the rate per unit volume of baryon number violation (topological transitions) in the hot, symmetric phase of electroweak theory is of the form ηα w 5 T 4 in the weak-coupling limit, where η is a nonperturbative numerical coefficient. Over the past several years, there have been attempts to extract the rate of baryon number violation from real-time simulations of classical thermal field theory on a spatial lattice. Unfortunately, the coefficient η will not be the same for classical lattice theories and the real quantum theory. However, by analyzing the appropriate effective theory on the lattice using the method of hard thermal loops, I show that the only obstruction to precisely relating the rates in the real and lattice theories is the fact that the long-distance physics on the lattice is not rotationally invariant. (This is unlike Euclidean-time measurements, where rotational invariance is always recovered in the continuum limit.) I then propose how this violation of rotational invariance can be eliminated emdash and the real B violation rate measured emdash by choosing an appropriate lattice Hamiltonian. I also propose a rough measure of the systematic error to be expected from using simpler, unimproved Hamiltonians. As a byproduct of my investigation, the plasma frequency and Debye mass are computed for classical thermal field theory on the lattice. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Utilization of transmission probabilities in the calculation of unit-cell by the interface-current method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz Bogado Leite, S. de.

    1989-10-01

    A widely used but otherwise physically incorrect assumption in unit-cell calculations by the method of interface currents in cylindrical or spherical geometries, is that of that of isotropic fluxes at the surfaces of the cell annular regions, when computing transmission probabilities. In this work, new interface-current relations are developed without making use of this assumption and the effects on calculated integral parameters are shown for an idealized unit-cell example. (author) [pt

  6. Dielectric Behavior of Low Microwave Loss Unit Cell for All Dielectric Metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhuan Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With a deep study of the metamaterial, its unit cells have been widely extended from metals to dielectrics. The dielectric based unit cells attract much attention because of the advantage of easy preparation, tunability, and higher frequency response, and so forth. Using the conventional solid state method, we prepared a kind of incipient ferroelectrics (calcium titanate, CaTiO3 with higher microwave permittivity and lower loss, which can be successfully used to construct metamaterials. The temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric constant are also measured under different sintering temperatures. The dielectric spectra showed a slight permittivity decrease with the increase of temperature and exhibited a loss of 0.0005, combined with a higher microwave dielectric constant of ~167 and quality factor Q of 2049. Therefore, CaTiO3 is a kind of versatile and potential metamaterial unit cell. The permittivity of CaTiO3 at higher microwave frequency was also examined in the rectangular waveguide and we got the permittivity of 165, creating a new method to test permittivity at higher microwave frequency.

  7. Comparison of elastic properties of open-cell metallic biomaterials with different unit cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedayati, R.; Sadighi, M.; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Hosseini-Toudeshky, H

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques have made it possible to create open-cell porous structures with arbitrary micro-geometrical characteristics. Since a wide range of micro-geometrical features is available for making an implant, having a comprehensive knowledge of the mechanical response of

  8. Lattice quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenfratz, P.

    1983-01-01

    It is generally accepted that relativistic field theory is relevant in high energy physics. It is also recognized that even in QCD, which is asymptotically free, the scope of perturbation theory is very limited. Despite the tremendous theoretical and experimental effort to study scaling, scaling violations, e + e - , lepton pair creation, jets, etc., the answer to the question whether and to what extent is QCD the theory of strong interactions is vague. At present-day energies it is difficult to disentangle perturbative and non-perturbative effects. The author states that QCD must be understood and that quantitative non-perturbative methods are needed. He states that the lattice formulation of field theories is a promising approach to meeting this need and discusses the formulation in detail in this paper

  9. Inulin isoforms differ by repeated additions of one crystal unit cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D.; Barclay, Thomas G.; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R.; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    Inulin isoforms, especially delta inulin, are important biologically as immune activators and clinically as vaccine adjuvants. In exploring action mechanisms, we previously found regular increments in thermal properties of the seven-member inulin isoform series that suggested regular additions of some energetic structural unit. Because the previous isolates carried additional longer chains that masked defining ranges, these were contrasted with new isoform isolates comprising only inulin chain lengths defining that isoform. The new series began with 19 fructose units per chain (alpha-1 inulin), increasing regularly by 6 fructose units per isoform. Thus the ‘energetic unit’ equates to 6 fructose residues per chain. All isoforms showed indistinguishable X-ray diffraction patterns that were also identical with known inulin crystals. We conclude that an ‘energetic unit’ equates to one helix turn of 6 fructose units per chain as found in one unit cell of the inulin crystal. Each isoform chain comprised progressively more helix turns plus one additional fructose and glucose residues per chain. PMID:24528745

  10. Geometry of lattice field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honan, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Using some tools of algebraic topology, a general formalism for lattice field theory is presented. The lattice is taken to be a simplicial complex that is also a manifold and is referred to as a simplicial manifold. The fields on this lattice are cochains, that are called lattice forms to emphasize the connections with differential forms in the continuum. This connection provides a new bridge between lattice and continuum field theory. A metric can be put onto this simplicial manifold by assigning lengths to every link or I-simplex of the lattice. Regge calculus is a way of defining general relativity on this lattice. A geometric discussion of Regge calculus is presented. The Regge action, which is a discrete form of the Hilbert action, is derived from the Hilbert action using distribution valued forms. This is a new derivation that emphasizes the underlying geometry. Kramers-Wannier duality in statistical mechanics is discussed in this general setting. Nonlinear field theories, which include gauge theories and nonlinear sigma models are discussed in the continuum and then are put onto a lattice. The main new result here is the generalization to curved spacetime, which consists of making the theory compatible with Regge calculus

  11. Homogenization theory in reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, P.

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of the theory of homogenization of reactor lattices is to determine, by the mean of transport theory, the constants of a homogeneous medium equivalent to a given lattice, which allows to treat the reactor as a whole by diffusion theory. In this note, the problem is presented by laying emphasis on simplicity, as far as possible [fr

  12. Remarks on lattice gauge models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, H.

    1981-01-01

    The author reports a study of the phase structure of lattice gauge models where one takes as a gauge group a non-abelian discrete subgroup of SU(3). In addition he comments on a lattice action proposed recently by Manton and observes that it violates a positivity property. (Auth.)

  13. Remarks on lattice gauge models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, H.

    1981-01-01

    The author reports on a study of the phase structure of lattice gauge models where one takes as a gauge group a non-abelian discrete subgroup of SU(3). In addition he comments on a lattice action proposed recently by Manton (1980) and observes that it violates a positivity property. (Auth.)

  14. Lattices, supersymmetry and Kaehler fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that a graded extension of the space group of a (generalised) simple cubic lattice exists in any space dimension, D. The fermionic variables which arise admit a Kaehlerian interpretation. Each graded space group is a subgroup of a graded extension of the appropriate Euclidean group, E(D). The relevance of this to the construction of lattice theories is discussed. (author)

  15. Lattice polytopes in coding theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Soprunov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss combinatorial questions about lattice polytopes motivated by recent results on minimum distance estimation for toric codes. We also include a new inductive bound for the minimum distance of generalized toric codes. As an application, we give new formulas for the minimum distance of generalized toric codes for special lattice point configurations.

  16. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  17. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  18. Quantum scattering theory on the momentum lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubtsova, O. A.; Pomerantsev, V. N.; Kukulin, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach based on the wave-packet continuum discretization method recently developed by the present authors for solving quantum-mechanical scattering problems for atomic and nuclear scattering processes and few-body physics is described. The formalism uses the complete continuum discretization scheme in terms of the momentum stationary wave-packet basis, which leads to formulation of the scattering problem on a lattice in the momentum space. The solution of the few-body scattering problem can be found in the approach from linear matrix equations with nonsingular matrix elements, averaged on energy over lattice cells. The developed approach is illustrated by the solution of numerous two- and three-body scattering problems with local and nonlocal potentials below and well above the three-body breakup threshold.

  19. Atomic and electronic structures of lattice mismatched Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuzhi [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 66, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavaipatti, Balasubramaniam; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kim, Sung-Joo; Pan, Xiaoqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ager, Joel W.; Wang, Lin-Wang, E-mail: lwwang@lbl.gov [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 66, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Joint Center of Artificial Photosynthesis, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-26

    Heterojunction interfaces between metal oxides are often highly lattice mismatched. The atomic and electronic structures of such interfaces, however, are not well understood. We have synthesized Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} heterojunction thin films with 13% lattice mismatch and studied the interface via experimental methods and large-scale density function theory calculations of supercells containing ∼1300 atoms. We find that an interface of epitaxial quality is formed via a coincidence site lattice of 8 Cu{sub 2}O unit cells matching 9 TiO{sub 2} unit cells. Calculations reveal the existence of a dislocation core of the O sublattices at the interface and a random arrangement of one layer of interfacial Cu atoms. The interfacial electronic structure is found to be mostly determined by the interfacial Cu distribution, rather than by the O dislocation core. The conduction band minimum and valence band maximum states are spatially separated, and there is no strongly localized state near the core.

  20. Quantum interference between two phonon paths and reduced heat transport in diamond lattice with atomic-scale planar defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yu. A.; Strelnikov, I. A.

    2018-02-01

    Destructive quantum interference between the waves propagating through laterally inhomogeneous layer can result in their total reflection, which in turn reduces energy flux carried by these waves. We consider the systems of Ge atoms, which fully or partly, in the chequer-wise order, fill a crystal plane in diamond-like Si lattice. We have revealed that a single type of the atomic defects, which are placed in identical positions in different unit cells in the defect crystal plane, can result in double transmission antiresonances of phonon wave packets. This new effect we relate with the complex structure of the diamond-like unit cell, which comprises two atoms in different positions and results in two distinct vibration resonances in two interfering phonon paths. We also consider the propagation of phonon wave packets in the superlatticies made of the defect planes, half-filled in the chequer-wise order with Ge atoms. We have revealed relatively broad phonon stop bands with center frequencies at the transmission antiresonances. We elaborate the equivalent analytical quasi-1D lattice model of the two phonon paths through the complex planar defect in the diamond-like lattice and describe the reduction of phonon heat transfer through the atomic-scale planar defects.

  1. Lattice gas cellular automata and lattice Boltzmann models an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A

    2000-01-01

    Lattice-gas cellular automata (LGCA) and lattice Boltzmann models (LBM) are relatively new and promising methods for the numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. The book provides an introduction for graduate students and researchers. Working knowledge of calculus is required and experience in PDEs and fluid dynamics is recommended. Some peculiarities of cellular automata are outlined in Chapter 2. The properties of various LGCA and special coding techniques are discussed in Chapter 3. Concepts from statistical mechanics (Chapter 4) provide the necessary theoretical background for LGCA and LBM. The properties of lattice Boltzmann models and a method for their construction are presented in Chapter 5.

  2. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  3. Cell phone recycling experiences in the United States and potential recycling options in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Geraldo T R; Chang, Shoou-Yuh

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of cell phone recycling programs currently available in the United States. At the same time, it also provides analyses of the current recycling situation and possible recycling alternatives for Brazil. Although there are several recycling options in the United States, collection rates are still only 10% of all potential devices because customers are not aware of these possibilities. The whole system is financially based on reselling refurbished cell phones and recycled materials to developing countries which represent an effective and strong market. Several recyclers offer funds to collection partners who are either charities or who work with charities while obtaining the materials that they need in order to run their operations. A mobile phone recycling system for Brazil considering the United States experience and the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) principle is suggested. A deposit/refund/advance-recycling fee is proposed which might be implemented as a voluntary industrial initiative managed by PRO Brazil, a producer responsibility organization. One widespread public-private agreement will integrate all mobile phone stakeholders, and environmental education actions and promotional events will promote citizen's participation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous microwave photonic and phononic band gaps in piezoelectric–piezomagnetic superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zheng-hua [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Jiang, Zheng-Sheng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen, Tao [Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Lei, Da-Jun [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Yan, Wen-Yan, E-mail: yanwenyan88@126.com [School of Software and Communication Engineering, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Qiu, Feng; Huang, Jian-Quan; Deng, Hai-Ming; Yao, Min [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China)

    2016-04-29

    A novel phoxonic crystal using the piezoelectric (PMN-PT) and piezomagnetic (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell (PPSUC) is present, in which dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can be obtained simultaneously. Two categories of phononic band gaps, originating from both the Bragg scattering of acoustic waves in periodic structures at the Brillouin zone boundary and the electromagnetic wave-lattice vibration couplings near the Brillouin zone center, can be observed in the phononic band structures. The general characteristics of the microwave photonic band structures are similar to those of pure piezoelectric or piezomagnetic superlattices, with the major discrepancy being the appearance of nearly dispersionless branches within the microwave photonic band gaps, which show an extremely large group velocity delay. Thus, the properties may also be applied to compact acoustic-microwave devices. - Highlights: • Dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can coexist in the PPSUC. • Two categories of phononic band gaps with different mechanism can be obtained. • Nearly dispersionless branches appear in the microwave photonic band gaps.

  5. Irreversible stochastic processes on lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nord, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Models for irreversible random or cooperative filling of lattices are required to describe many processes in chemistry and physics. Since the filling is assumed to be irreversible, even the stationary, saturation state is not in equilibrium. The kinetics and statistics of these processes are described by recasting the master equations in infinite hierarchical form. Solutions can be obtained by implementing various techniques: refinements in these solution techniques are presented. Programs considered include random dimer, trimer, and tetramer filling of 2D lattices, random dimer filling of a cubic lattice, competitive filling of two or more species, and the effect of a random distribution of inactive sites on the filling. Also considered is monomer filling of a linear lattice with nearest neighbor cooperative effects and solve for the exact cluster-size distribution for cluster sizes up to the asymptotic regime. Additionally, a technique is developed to directly determine the asymptotic properties of the cluster size distribution. Finally cluster growth is considered via irreversible aggregation involving random walkers. In particular, explicit results are provided for the large-lattice-size asymptotic behavior of trapping probabilities and average walk lengths for a single walker on a lattice with multiple traps. Procedures for exact calculation of these quantities on finite lattices are also developed

  6. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2014-01-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity. (papers)

  7. Halo Mitigation Using Nonlinear Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnad, Kiran G

    2005-01-01

    This work shows that halos in beams with space charge effects can be controlled by combining nonlinear focusing and collimation. The study relies on Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations for a one dimensional, continuous focusing model. The PIC simulation results show that nonlinear focusing leads to damping of the beam oscillations thereby reducing the mismatch. It is well established that reduced mismatch leads to reduced halo formation. However, the nonlinear damping is accompanied by emittance growth causing the beam to spread in phase space. As a result, inducing nonlinear damping alone cannot help mitigate the halo. To compensate for this expansion in phase space, the beam is collimated in the simulation and further evolution of the beam shows that the halo is not regenerated. The focusing model used in the PIC is analysed using the Lie Transform perturbation theory showing that by averaging over a lattice period, one can reuduce the focusing force to a form that is identical to that used in the PIC simula...

  8. Finite Temperature Lattice QCD with GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, N.; Cardoso, M.; Bicudo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are being used in many areas of physics, since the performance versus cost is very attractive. The GPUs can be addressed by CUDA which is a NVIDIA's parallel computing architecture. It enables dramatic increases in computing performance by harnessing the power of the GPU. We present a performance comparison between the GPU and CPU with single precision and double precision in generating lattice SU(2) configurations. Analyses with single and multiple GPUs, using CUDA and OPENMP, are also presented. We also present SU(2) results for the renormalized Polyakov loop, colour averaged free energy and the string tension as a function of the temperature. (authors)

  9. Mechanical properties of regular porous biomaterials made from truncated cube repeating unit cells: Analytical solutions and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has enabled fabrication of open-cell porous biomaterials based on repeating unit cells. The micro-architecture of the porous biomaterials and, thus, their physical properties could then be precisely controlled. Due to their many favorable properties, porous biomaterials manufactured using AM are considered as promising candidates for bone substitution as well as for several other applications in orthopedic surgery. The mechanical properties of such porous structures including static and fatigue properties are shown to be strongly dependent on the type of the repeating unit cell based on which the porous biomaterial is built. In this paper, we study the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively new unit cell, namely truncated cube. We present analytical solutions that relate the dimensions of the repeating unit cell to the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, and buckling load of those porous structures. We also performed finite element modeling to predict the mechanical properties of the porous structures. The analytical solution and computational results were found to be in agreement with each other. The mechanical properties estimated using both the analytical and computational techniques were somewhat higher than the experimental data reported in one of our recent studies on selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V porous biomaterials. In addition to porosity, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the porous structures were found to be strongly dependent on the ratio of the length of the inclined struts to that of the uninclined (i.e. vertical or horizontal) struts, α, in the truncated cube unit cell. The geometry of the truncated cube unit cell approaches the octahedral and cube unit cells when α respectively approaches zero and infinity. Consistent with those geometrical observations, the analytical solutions presented in this study approached those of the octahedral and cube unit cells when

  10. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.

    1987-01-01

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off ≅ 1/α, where α is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit α → 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics. This will be the emphasis of the first lecture. In the second lecture, the author reviews the essential ingredients of formulating QCD on the lattice and discusses scaling and the continuum limit. In the last lecture the author summarizes the status of some of the main results. He also mentions the bottlenecks and possible directions for research. 88 refs

  11. Lattice Design in High-energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    This lecture gives an introduction into the design of high-energy storage ring lattices. Applying the formalism that has been established in transverse be am optics, the basic principles of the development of a magnet lattice are explained and the characteristics of the resulting magnet structure are discussed. The periodic assembly of a storage ring cell with its boundary conditions concerning stability and scaling of the beam optics parameters is addressed as well as special lattice insertions such as drifts, mini beta sections, dispersion suppressors, etc. In addition to the exact calculations that are indispensable for a rigorous treatment of the matter, scaling rules are shown and simple rules of thumb are included that enable the lattice designer to do the first estimates and get the basic numbers ‘ on the back of an envelope.

  12. Lattice design in high-energy particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, B J

    2006-01-01

    This lecture introduces storage-ring lattice desing. Applying the formalism that has been established in transverse beam optics, the basic principles of the development of a magnet lattice are explained and the characteristics of the resulting magnet structure are discussed. The periodic assembly of a storage ring cell with its boundary conditions concerning stability and scaling of the beam optics parameters is addressed as well as special lattice structures: drifts, mini beta insertions, dispersion suppressors, etc. In addition to the exact calculations indispensable for a rigorous treatment of the matter, scaling rules are shown and simple rules of thumb are included that enable the lattice designer to do the first estimates and get the basic numbers ‘on the back of an envelope’.

  13. Composition dependence of the thermodynamic activity and lattice parameter of zeta nickel-indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, B.; Masson, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    The vapor pressure of indium over six alloys in the zeta phase of the nickel-indium system was measured by the method of atomic absorption. Values of thermodynamic activity were calculated from the vapor pressure, and partial heat and entropy of indium were calculated from the temperature coefficients. The lattice parameters of the hexagonal B8 2 unit cell of all alloys were calculated from X-ray diffraction powder patterns. It was found that the a lattice parameter passed through a minimum at the same composition that the excess chemical potential showed a sharp change of slope, when graphed as a function of composition. These effects were similar to those observed previously which have been attributed to overlap by the Fermi surface of a Brillouin zone face. In the present case they were attributed to overlap of the Fermi surface across faces tentatively identified as the [110] faces of the Brillouin zone of the B8 2 structure. The influence of substitutional disorder was also considered as a cause of the thermodynamic effects, but this was rejected because it does not explain the minimum in lattice parameter. (Auth.)

  14. Lattice Methods for Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    DeGrand, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of lattice-regulated QCD has become an important source of information about strong interactions. In the last few years there has been an explosion of techniques for performing ever more accurate studies on the properties of strongly interacting particles. Lattice predictions directly impact many areas of particle and nuclear physics theory and phenomenology. This book provides a thorough introduction to the specialized techniques needed to carry out numerical simulations of QCD: a description of lattice discretizations of fermions and gauge fields, methods for actually do

  15. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Avadh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bishop, Alan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Law, K J H [UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS; Kevrekidis, P G [UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  16. Lattice QCD: Status and Prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukawa, Akira

    2006-01-01

    A brief review is given of the current status and near-future prospect of lattice QCD studies of the Standard Model. After summarizing a bit of history, we describe current attempts toward inclusion of dynamical up, down and strange quarks. Recent results on the light hadron mass spectrum as well as those on the heavy quark quantities are described. Recent work on lattice pentaquark search is summarized. We touch upon the PACS-CS Project for building our next machine for lattice QCD, and conclude with a summary of computer situation and the physics possibilities over the next several years

  17. Lattice sums then and now

    CERN Document Server

    Borwein, J M; McPhedran, R C

    2013-01-01

    The study of lattice sums began when early investigators wanted to go from mechanical properties of crystals to the properties of the atoms and ions from which they were built (the literature of Madelung's constant). A parallel literature was built around the optical properties of regular lattices of atoms (initiated by Lord Rayleigh, Lorentz and Lorenz). For over a century many famous scientists and mathematicians have delved into the properties of lattices, sometimes unwittingly duplicating the work of their predecessors. Here, at last, is a comprehensive overview of the substantial body of

  18. Two-photon laser-generated microtracks in 3D collagen lattices: principles of MMP-dependent and -independent collective cancer cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, Olga; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Vasaturo, Angela; Hoffman, Robert M.; Friedl, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Cancer invasion into an extracellular matrix (ECM) results from a biophysical reciprocal interplay between the expanding cancer lesion and tissue barriers imposed by the adjacent microenvironment. In vivo, connective tissue provides both densely packed ECM barriers adjacent to channel/track-like spaces and loosely organized zones, both of which may impact cancer invasion mode and efficiency; however little is known about how three-dimensional (3D) spaces and aligned tracks present in interstitial tissue guide cell invasion. We here describe a two-photon laser ablation procedure to generate 3D microtracks in dense 3D collagen matrices that support and guide collective cancer cell invasion. Whereas collective invasion of mammary tumor (MMT) breast cancer cells into randomly organized collagen networks required matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity for cell-derived collagen breakdown, re-alignment and track generation, preformed tracks supported MMP-independent collective invasion down to a track caliber of 3 µm. Besides contact guidance along the track of least resistance and initial cell deformation (squeezing), MMP-independent collective cell strands led to secondary track expansion by a pushing mechanism. Thus, two-photon laser ablation is useful to generate barrier-free microtracks in a 3D ECM which guide collective invasion independently of pericellular proteolysis.

  19. Two-photon laser-generated microtracks in 3D collagen lattices: principles of MMP-dependent and -independent collective cancer cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilina, Olga; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Hoffman, Robert M; Friedl, Peter; Vasaturo, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Cancer invasion into an extracellular matrix (ECM) results from a biophysical reciprocal interplay between the expanding cancer lesion and tissue barriers imposed by the adjacent microenvironment. In vivo, connective tissue provides both densely packed ECM barriers adjacent to channel/track-like spaces and loosely organized zones, both of which may impact cancer invasion mode and efficiency; however little is known about how three-dimensional (3D) spaces and aligned tracks present in interstitial tissue guide cell invasion. We here describe a two-photon laser ablation procedure to generate 3D microtracks in dense 3D collagen matrices that support and guide collective cancer cell invasion. Whereas collective invasion of mammary tumor (MMT) breast cancer cells into randomly organized collagen networks required matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity for cell-derived collagen breakdown, re-alignment and track generation, preformed tracks supported MMP-independent collective invasion down to a track caliber of 3 µm. Besides contact guidance along the track of least resistance and initial cell deformation (squeezing), MMP-independent collective cell strands led to secondary track expansion by a pushing mechanism. Thus, two-photon laser ablation is useful to generate barrier-free microtracks in a 3D ECM which guide collective invasion independently of pericellular proteolysis

  20. Theoretical Analysis of Moving Reference Planes Associated with Unit Cells of Nonreciprocal Lossy Periodic Transmission-Line Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lamultree

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis of moving reference planes associated with unit cells of nonreciprocal lossy periodic transmission-line structures (NRLSPTLSs by the equivalent bi-characteristic-impedance transmission line (BCITL model. Applying the BCITL theory, only the equivalent BCITL parameters (characteristic impedances for waves propagating in forward and reverse directions and associated complex propagation constants are of interest. An infinite NRLSPTLS is considered first by shifting a reference position of unit cells along TLs of interest. Then, a semi-infinite terminated NRLSPTLS is investigated in terms of associated load reflection coefficients. It is found that the equivalent BCITL characteristic impedances of the original and shifted unit cells are mathematically related by the bilinear transformation. In addition, the associated load reflection coefficients of both unit cells are mathematically related by the bilinear transformation. However, the equivalent BCITL complex propagation constants remain unchanged. Numerical results are provided to show the validity of the proposed theoretical analysis.

  1. Unit cell modeling in support of interim performance assessment for low level tank waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, N.W.

    1996-01-01

    A unit cell model is used to simulate the base analysis case and related sensitivity cases for the interim performance assessment of low level tank waste disposal. Simulation case results are summarized in terms of fractional contaminant release rates to the vadose zone and to the water table at the unconfined aquifer. Results suggest that the crushed glass water conditioning layer at the top of the facility and the chemical retardation pad at the bottom of the facility can be important components of the facility. Results also suggest that the release rates to the water table are dominated by the release rate from the waste form

  2. High quality-factor fano metasurface comprising a single resonator unit cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Warne, Larry K.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Campione, Salvatore; Brener, Igal; Liu, Sheng

    2017-06-20

    A new monolithic resonator metasurface design achieves ultra-high Q-factors while using only one resonator per unit cell. The metasurface relies on breaking the symmetry of otherwise highly symmetric resonators to induce intra-resonator mixing of bright and dark modes (rather than inter-resonator couplings), and is scalable from the near-infrared to radio frequencies and can be easily implemented in dielectric materials. The resulting high-quality-factor Fano metasurface can be used in many sensing, spectral filtering, and modulation applications.

  3. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. A report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide members of the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells with information regarding collaborative opportunities in the United States. The report is designed to provide an overview of key issues and activities and to provide guidance on strategies for finding U.S. research and commercial partners and gaining access to the U.S. market. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the key drivers of policy at the federal and state government levels regarding hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and provides a perspective of the U.S. industry and key players. It also suggests three general pathways for accessing U.S. opportunities: enhancing visibility; developing vendor relationships; and establishing a formal presence in the U.S. The next sections summarize focus areas for commercial and research activity that currently are of the greatest interest in the U.S. Section 2 describes major programs within the federal government and national laboratories, and discusses various methods for identifying R and D funding opportunities, with an overview of federal acquisition regulations. Section 3 reviews the efforts of several state governments engaging the fuel cell industry as an economic driver and presents an overview of acquisition at the state level. Section 4 discusses university research and development (R and D) and university-industry partnerships. There are 12 appendices attached to the report. These appendices provide more detailed information regarding the key federal government agencies involved in fuel cells and hydrogen, state-specific policies and activities, national laboratories and universities, and other information regarding the fuel cell and hydrogen industry in the U.S. (Author)

  4. Development of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) automotive auxiliary power unit (APU) fueled by gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMinco, C.; Mukerjee, S.; Grieve, J.; Faville, M.; Noetzel, J.; Perry, M.; Horvath, A.; Prediger, D.; Pastula, M.; Boersma, R.; Ghosh, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the development progress of a 3 to 5 auxiliary power unit (APU) based on a gasoline fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This fuel cell was supplied reformate gas (reactant) by a partial oxidation (POx) catalytic reformer utilizing liquid gasoline and designed by Delphi Automotive Systems. This reformate gas consists mainly of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and nitrogen and was fed directly in to the SOFC stack without any additional fuel reformer processing. The SOFC stack was developed by Global Thermoelectric and operates around 700 o C. This automotive APU produces power to support future 42 volt vehicle electrical architectures and loads. The balance of the APU, designed by Delphi Automotive Systems, employs a packaging and insulation design to facilitate installation and operation on-board automobiles. (author)

  5. Non-Abelian vortex lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarita, Gianni; Peterson, Adam

    2018-04-01

    We perform a numerical study of the phase diagram of the model proposed in [M. Shifman, Phys. Rev. D 87, 025025 (2013)., 10.1103/PhysRevD.87.025025], which is a simple model containing non-Abelian vortices. As per the case of Abrikosov vortices, we map out a region of parameter space in which the system prefers the formation of vortices in ordered lattice structures. These are generalizations of Abrikosov vortex lattices with extra orientational moduli in the vortex cores. At sufficiently large lattice spacing the low energy theory is described by a sum of C P (1 ) theories, each located on a vortex site. As the lattice spacing becomes smaller, when the self-interaction of the orientational field becomes relevant, only an overall rotation in internal space survives.

  6. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 sextet quarks on Nt=8 lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogut, J. B.; Sinclair, D. K.

    2011-01-01

    We continue our lattice simulations of QCD with 2 flavors of color-sextet quarks as a model for conformal or walking technicolor. A 2-loop perturbative calculation of the β function which describes the evolution of this theory's running coupling constant predicts that it has a second zero at a finite coupling. This nontrivial zero would be an infrared stable fixed point, in which case the theory with massless quarks would be a conformal field theory. However, if the interaction between quarks and antiquarks becomes strong enough that a chiral condensate forms before this IR fixed point is reached, the theory is QCD-like with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry and confinement. However, the presence of the nearby IR fixed point means that there is a range of couplings for which the running coupling evolves very slowly, i.e. it ''walks.'' We are simulating the lattice version of this theory with staggered quarks at finite temperature, studying the changes in couplings at the deconfinement and chiral-symmetry restoring transitions as the temporal extent (N t ) of the lattice, measured in lattice units, is increased. Our earlier results on lattices with N t =4, 6 show both transitions move to weaker couplings as N t increases consistent with walking behavior. In this paper we extend these calculations to N t =8. Although both transitions again move to weaker couplings, the change in the coupling at the chiral transition from N t =6 to N t =8 is appreciably smaller than that from N t =4 to N t =6. This indicates that at N t =4, 6 we are seeing strong-coupling effects and that we will need results from N t >8 to determine if the chiral-transition coupling approaches zero as N t →∞, as needed for the theory to walk.

  7. Diffractive stacks of metamaterial lattices with a complex unit cell : Self-consistent long-range bianisotropic interactions in experiment and theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwadrin, A.; Koenderink, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces and metamaterials promise arbitrary rerouting of light using two-dimensional (2D) planar arrangements of electric and magnetic scatterers, respectively, 3D stacks built out of such 2D planes. An important problem is how to self-consistently model the response of these systems in a

  8. Lattice Studies of Hyperon Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, David G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    I describe recent progress at studying the spectrum of hadrons containing the strange quark through lattice QCD calculations. I emphasise in particular the richness of the spectrum revealed by lattice studies, with a spectrum of states at least as rich as that of the quark model. I conclude by prospects for future calculations, including in particular the determination of the decay amplitudes for the excited states.

  9. Harmonic oscillator on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ader, J.P.; Bonnier, B.; Hontebeyrie, M.; Meyers, C.

    1983-01-01

    The continuum limit of the ground state energy for the harmonic oscillator with discrete time is derived for all possible choices of the lattice derivative. The occurrence of unphysical values is shown to arise whenever the lattice laplacian is not strictly positive on its Brillouin zone. These undesirable limits can either be finite and arbitrary (multiple spectrum) or infinite (overlapping sublattices with multiple spectrum). (orig.)

  10. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-01-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and α s (M z ), and B-anti B mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs

  11. Wigner Functions on a Lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Takami, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Horibe, M.; Hayashi, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Wigner functions on the one dimensional lattice are studied. Contrary to the previous claim in literature, Wigner functions exist on the lattice with any number of sites, whether it is even or odd. There are infinitely many solutions satisfying the conditions which reasonable Wigner functions should respect. After presenting a heuristic method to obtain Wigner functions, we give the general form of the solutions. Quantum mechanical expectation values in terms of Wigner functions are also ...

  12. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGrand, T. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  13. Unit Cell Structure of Crystal Polytypes in InAs and InSb Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegner, Dominik; Panse, Christian; Mandl, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The atomic distances in hexagonal polytypes of III−V compound semiconductors differ from the values expected from simply a change of the stacking sequence of (111) lattice planes. While these changes were difficult to quantify so far, we accurately determine the lattice parameters of zinc blende......, wurtzite, and 4H polytypes for InAs and InSb nanowires, using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results are compared to density functional theory calculations. Experiment and theory show that the occurrence of hexagonal bilayers tends to stretch the distances of atomic layers...

  14. The Electronic Structure of Coupled Semiconductor Quantum Dots Arranged as a Graphene Hexagonal Lattice under a Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Juan; Li Shu-Shen

    2012-01-01

    We study the electronic spectrum of coupled quantum dots (QDs) arranged as a graphene hexagonal lattice in the presence of an external perpendicular magnetic field. In our tight-binding model, the effect of the magnetic field is included in both the Peierls phase of the Hamiltonian and the tight-binding basis Wannier function. The energy of the system is analyzed when the magnetic flux through the lattice unit cell is a rational fraction of the quantum flux. The calculated spectrum has recursive properties, similar to those of the classical Hofstadter butterfly. However, unlike the ideal Hofstadter butterfly structure, our result is asymmetric since the impacts of the specific material and the magnetic field on the wavefunctions are included, making the results more realistic. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. X-ray diffraction measurements to determine longitudinal and transverse lattice deformation in shocked LiF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigg, P.A.; Gupta, Y.M.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental methods using both single and multiple x-ray diffraction were developed to determine real time, lattice deformation in directions parallel and perpendicular to shock wave propagation in single crystals subjected to plate impact loading. Initial experiments used single diffraction to monitor the interplanar spacing change, parallel to the shock propagation direction, in LiF crystals shocked along the [111] and [100] directions. These measurements, in combination with the macroscopic volume compression, were used to determine the state of compression of the unit cell. Subsequent development of a multiple diffraction technique permitted simultaneous determination of both the longitudinal and transverse lattice deformations. The present results showed that shock compression, below 4 GPa, along the [111] orientation--which results in macroscopic elastic deformation - produced one-dimensional unit cell compression. In contrast, shock compression along the [100] orientation - which results in macroscopic elastic-plastic deformation--produced isotropic unit cell compression. The implications of the present results and the ability to make quantitative x-ray diffraction measurements under shock loading are discussed

  16. Strong-coupling study of the Gribov ambiguity in lattice Landau gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, Axel; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Spielmann, Daniel; Sternbeck, Andre; Smekal, Lorenz von

    2010-01-01

    We study the strong-coupling limit β=0 of lattice SU(2) Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory. In this limit the lattice spacing is infinite, and thus all momenta in physical units are infinitesimally small. Hence, the infrared behavior can be assessed at sufficiently large lattice momenta. Our results show that at the lattice volumes used here, the Gribov ambiguity has an enormous effect on the ghost propagator in all dimensions. This underlines the severity of the Gribov problem and calls for refined studies also at finite β. In turn, the gluon propagator only mildly depends on the Gribov ambiguity. (orig.)

  17. Unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing system for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Park, Jeong Hun; Kang, Tae-Yun; Seol, Young-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in the regeneration of artificial tissues or organs. A scaffold is a porous structure with a micro-scale inner architecture in the range of several to several hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, computer-aided construction of scaffolds should provide sophisticated functionality for porous structure design and a tool path generation strategy that can achieve micro-scale architecture. In this study, a new unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) system was developed for the automated design and fabrication of a porous structure with micro-scale inner architecture that can be applied to composite tissue regeneration. The CAM system was developed by first defining a data structure for the computing process of a unit cell representing a single pore structure. Next, an algorithm and software were developed and applied to construct porous structures with a single or multiple pore design using solid freeform fabrication technology and a 3D tooth/spine computer-aided design model. We showed that this system is quite feasible for the design and fabrication of a scaffold for tissue engineering. (paper)

  18. Unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing system for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Park, Jeong Hun; Kang, Tae-Yun; Seol, Young-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-03-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in the regeneration of artificial tissues or organs. A scaffold is a porous structure with a micro-scale inner architecture in the range of several to several hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, computer-aided construction of scaffolds should provide sophisticated functionality for porous structure design and a tool path generation strategy that can achieve micro-scale architecture. In this study, a new unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) system was developed for the automated design and fabrication of a porous structure with micro-scale inner architecture that can be applied to composite tissue regeneration. The CAM system was developed by first defining a data structure for the computing process of a unit cell representing a single pore structure. Next, an algorithm and software were developed and applied to construct porous structures with a single or multiple pore design using solid freeform fabrication technology and a 3D tooth/spine computer-aided design model. We showed that this system is quite feasible for the design and fabrication of a scaffold for tissue engineering.

  19. OECD benchmark a of MOX fueled PWR unit cells using SAS2H, triton and mocup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganda, F.; Greenspan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Three code systems are tested by applying them to calculate the OECD PWR MOX unit cell benchmark A. The codes tested are the SAS2H code sequence of the SCALE5 code package using 44 group library, MOCUP (MCNP4C + ORIGEN2), and the new TRITON depletion sequence of SCALE5 using 238 group cross sections generated using CENTRM with continuous energy cross sections. The burnup-dependent k ∞ and actinides concentration calculated by all three code-systems were found to be in good agreement with the OECD benchmark average results. Limited results were calculated also with the WIMS-ANL code package. WIMS-ANL was found to significantly under-predict k ∞ as well as the concentration of Pu 242 , consistently with the predictions of the WIMS-LWR reported by two of the OECD benchmark participants. Additionally, SAS2H is benchmarked against MOCUP for a hydride fuel containing unit cell, giving very satisfactory agreement. (authors)

  20. Fatigue design of a mechanically biocompatible lattice for a proof-of-concept femoral stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabnejad Khanoki, Sajad; Pasini, Damiano

    2013-06-01

    A methodology is proposed to design a spatially periodic microarchitectured material for a two-dimensional femoral implant under walking gait conditions. The material is composed of a graded lattice with controlled property distribution that minimizes concurrently bone resorption and interface failure. The periodic microstructure of the material is designed for fatigue fracture caused by cyclic loadings on the hip joint as a result of walking. The bulk material of the lattice is Ti6AL4V and its microstructure is assumed free of defects. The Soderberg diagram is used for the fatigue design under multiaxial loadings. Two cell topologies, square and Kagome, are chosen to obtain optimized property gradients for a two-dimensional implant. Asymptotic homogenization (AH) theory is used to address the multiscale mechanics of the implant as well as to capture the stress and strain distribution at both the macro and the microscale. The microstress distribution found with AH is also compared with that obtained from a detailed finite element analysis. For the maximum value of the von Mises stress, we observe a deviation of 18.6% in unit cells close to the implant boundary, where the AH assumption of spatial periodicity of the fluctuating fields ceases to hold. In the second part of the paper, the metrics of bone resorption and interface shear stress are used to benchmark the graded cellular implant with existing prostheses made of fully dense titanium implant. The results show that the amount of initial postoperative bone loss for square and Kagome lattice implants decreases, respectively, by 53.8% and 58%. In addition, the maximum shear interface failure at the distal end is significantly reduced by about 79%. A set of proof-of-concepts of planar implants have been fabricated via Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to demonstrate the manufacturability of Ti6AL4V into graded lattices with alternative cell size. Optical microscopy has been used to measure the morphological parameters

  1. Uncertainty Analysis of Light Water Reactor Fuel Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arenas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the calculation of uncertainty based on available cross-section covariance data and computational tool on fuel lattice levels, which included pin cell and the fuel assembly models. Uncertainty variations due to temperatures changes and different fuel compositions are the main focus of this analysis. Selected assemblies and unit pin cells were analyzed according to the OECD LWR UAM benchmark specifications. Criticality and uncertainty analysis were performed using TSUNAMI-2D sequence in SCALE 6.1. It was found that uncertainties increase with increasing temperature, while kinf decreases. This increase in the uncertainty is due to the increase in sensitivity of the largest contributing reaction of uncertainty, namely, the neutron capture reaction 238U(n, γ due to the Doppler broadening. In addition, three types (UOX, MOX, and UOX-Gd2O3 of fuel material compositions were analyzed. A remarkable increase in uncertainty in kinf was observed for the case of MOX fuel. The increase in uncertainty of kinf in MOX fuel was nearly twice the corresponding value in UOX fuel. The neutron-nuclide reaction of 238U, mainly inelastic scattering (n, n′, contributed the most to the uncertainties in the MOX fuel, shifting the neutron spectrum to higher energy compared to the UOX fuel.

  2. Racetrack lattices for the TRIUMF KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servranckx, R.V.; Wienands, U.; Craddock, M.K.; Rees, G.H.

    1989-03-01

    Separated-function racetrack lattices have been developed for the KAON Factory accelerators that have more flexibility than the old circular lattices. Straight sections with zero dispersion are provided for rf cavities and fast injection and extraction, and with controlled dispersion for H - injection and slow extraction. In addition the new lattices have fewer depolarizing resonances than the old circular lattices

  3. Lattice gauge theory using parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.; Chou, K.C.; Zichichi, A.

    1987-01-01

    The book's contents include: Lattice Gauge Theory Lectures: Introduction and Current Fermion Simulations; Monte Carlo Algorithms for Lattice Gauge Theory; Specialized Computers for Lattice Gauge Theory; Lattice Gauge Theory at Finite Temperature: A Monte Carlo Study; Computational Method - An Elementary Introduction to the Langevin Equation, Present Status of Numerical Quantum Chromodynamics; Random Lattice Field Theory; The GF11 Processor and Compiler; and The APE Computer and First Physics Results; Columbia Supercomputer Project: Parallel Supercomputer for Lattice QCD; Statistical and Systematic Errors in Numerical Simulations; Monte Carlo Simulation for LGT and Programming Techniques on the Columbia Supercomputer; Food for Thought: Five Lectures on Lattice Gauge Theory

  4. Lattice gas simulations of replicating domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, S.P.; Hasslacher, B.; Pearson, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    We use the lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) developed to simulate a process of pattern-formation recently observed in reaction-diffusion systems. We study the reaction mechanism, which is an extension of the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. We are able to reproduce the self-replicating domains observed in this work. We use the LGCA simulation to estimate the smallest length-scale on which this process can occur under conditions encountered in the cell. These estimates are similar to those obtained for Turing patterns in the same setting

  5. Lattice gas simulations of replicating domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.P.; Hasslacher, B.; Pearson, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    We use the lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) developed to simulate a process of pattern-formation recently observed in reaction-diffusion systems. We study the reaction mechanism, which is an extension of the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. We are able to reproduce the self-replicating domains observed in this work. We use the LGCA simulation to estimate the smallest length-scale on which this process can occur under conditions encountered in the cell. These estimates are similar to those obtained for Turing patterns in the same setting.

  6. Lattice Study for the Taiwan Photon Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Chin-Cheng; Chen Chien Te; Luo, Gwo-Huei; Tsai, Hung-Jen; Wang, Min-Huey

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility study for the new 3.0~3.3 GeV Taiwan synchrotron light source, dubbed Taiwan Photon Source, was initiated in July, 2004. The goal is to construct a high performance light source with extremely bright X-ray in complementary to the existing 1.5 GeV light source in Taiwan. The ring circumference is 518.4 m and a 24-cell DBA lattice structure is chosen. The natural emittance with distributed dispersion is less than 2 nm-rad. A large booster ring of 499.2 m sharing the storage ring tunnel will be adopted.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Optimized Diamond Lattice Structure for Bone Scaffolds Fabricated via Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David Z.; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Miao; Jafar, Salman

    2018-01-01

    Developments in selective laser melting (SLM) have enabled the fabrication of periodic cellular lattice structures characterized by suitable properties matching the bone tissue well and by fluid permeability from interconnected structures. These multifunctional performances are significantly affected by cell topology and constitutive properties of applied materials. In this respect, a diamond unit cell was designed in particular volume fractions corresponding to the host bone tissue and optimized with a smooth surface at nodes leading to fewer stress concentrations. There were 33 porous titanium samples with different volume fractions, from 1.28 to 18.6%, manufactured using SLM. All of them were performed under compressive load to determine the deformation and failure mechanisms, accompanied by an in-situ approach using digital image correlation (DIC) to reveal stress–strain evolution. The results showed that lattice structures manufactured by SLM exhibited comparable properties to those of trabecular bone, avoiding the effects of stress-shielding and increasing longevity of implants. The curvature of optimized surface can play a role in regulating the relationship between density and mechanical properties. Owing to the release of stress concentration from optimized surface, the failure mechanism of porous titanium has been changed from the pattern of bottom-up collapse by layer (or cell row) to that of the diagonal (45°) shear band, resulting in the significant enhancement of the structural strength. PMID:29510492

  8. Mechanical Properties of Optimized Diamond Lattice Structure for Bone Scaffolds Fabricated via Selective Laser Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, David Z; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Miao; Jafar, Salman

    2018-03-03

    Developments in selective laser melting (SLM) have enabled the fabrication of periodic cellular lattice structures characterized by suitable properties matching the bone tissue well and by fluid permeability from interconnected structures. These multifunctional performances are significantly affected by cell topology and constitutive properties of applied materials. In this respect, a diamond unit cell was designed in particular volume fractions corresponding to the host bone tissue and optimized with a smooth surface at nodes leading to fewer stress concentrations. There were 33 porous titanium samples with different volume fractions, from 1.28 to 18.6%, manufactured using SLM. All of them were performed under compressive load to determine the deformation and failure mechanisms, accompanied by an in-situ approach using digital image correlation (DIC) to reveal stress-strain evolution. The results showed that lattice structures manufactured by SLM exhibited comparable properties to those of trabecular bone, avoiding the effects of stress-shielding and increasing longevity of implants. The curvature of optimized surface can play a role in regulating the relationship between density and mechanical properties. Owing to the release of stress concentration from optimized surface, the failure mechanism of porous titanium has been changed from the pattern of bottom-up collapse by layer (or cell row) to that of the diagonal (45°) shear band, resulting in the significant enhancement of the structural strength.

  9. The histone genes in HeLa cells are on individual transcriptional units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, P.B.; Traub, P.; Gallwitz, D.

    1978-01-01

    The distances of the five major histone genes from their promotors have been investigated in order to determine whether in human cells these genes could be transcribed as a single polycistronic transcriptional unit. By measuring the decreases of both histone protein and histone mRNA synthesis as functions of the ultraviolet light dosage, it was possible to calculate the distances of the histone genes from their promotors. The inactivation kinetics for histone genes H1 and H3 are first-order, indicating a single type of transcriptional unit for each gene. The dose-response kinetics for genes H2A, H2B and H4 are first-order with two distinct rates; 10 to 15% of the genes for each of these histones appear to be much more sensitive to ultraviolet light inactivation than are the majority. It is concluded that the transcriptional units for 85 to 90% of the genes for H2A, H2B and H4 are similar. As determined by the inhibition of protein synthesis, the inactivation coefficients for the major component of each histone are: H1, 907 mm 2 /erg; H2A, 878 mm 2 /erg; H2B, 871 mm 2 /erg; H3, 965 mm 2 /erg; and H4, 792 mm 2 /erg. The sensitivities of histone mRNA synthesis to irradiation were measured by translation in vitro with similar results. The calculated target sizes for the genes (in base-pairs) are: H1, 1190; H2A, 1240; H2B, 1250; H3, 1130; and H4, 1380. This similarity in target sizes for all five of the histones genes indicates that they are primarily transcribed from individual transcriptional units. (author)

  10. Mechanical properties of regular hexahedral lattice structure formed by selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Yang, Yongqiang; Wang, Di

    2013-01-01

    The Ti–6Al–4V lattice structure is widely used in the aerospace field. This research first designs a regular hexahedral unit, processes the lattice structure composed of the Ti–6Al–4V units by selective laser melting technology, obtains the experimental fracture load and the compression deformation of them through compression tests, then conducts a simulation of the unit and the lattice structure through ANSYS to analyze the failure point. Later, according to the force condition of the point, the model of maximum load is built, through which the analytical formula of the fracture load of the unit and the lattice structure are obtained. The results of groups of experiments demonstrate that there exists an exponential relationship between the practical fracture load and the porosity of the lattice structure. There also exists a trigonometric function relationship between the compression deformation and the porosity of the lattice structure. The fracture analysis indicates that fracture of the units and lattice structure is brittle fracture due to cleavage fracture. (paper)

  11. Ambulatory cell phone injuries in the United States: an emerging national concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel C; Schreiber, Kristin M; Saltos, Andreas; Lichenstein, Sarah B; Lichenstein, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, the use of cell phones has increased 8-fold in the United States. Cell phone use has been shown to increase crash risks for drivers, but no systematic analyses have described injuries related to ambulatory cell phone use. The purpose of this study is to describe and quantitate injuries and deaths among persons using cell phones while walking. We searched the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for emergency department (ED) reports of injuries related to phone use. The cases that returned were screened initially using words that would eliminate cases unlikely to be related to cell phone use and walking, possibly linked to distraction. The resulting cases were randomized and evaluated for consistency with predetermined case definitions by two authors blinded to the dates of the incidents. Cases that were disagreed upon were evaluated in a second screening by both authors for final case determination. National ED visit rates were estimated based on NEISS sampling methods. Annual variations were analyzed using linear regression with a restricted maximum likelihood approach. Our screening process identified 5,754 possible cases that occurred between 2000 and 2011, and 310 were agreed on as cases of cell-phone-induced distraction. The majority of the patients were female (68%) and 40 years of age or younger (54%). The primary mechanism of injury was a fall (72%), and most patients were treated and released from the ED (85%). No patients died from their injuries while they were in the ED. Linear modeling by year revealed a statistically significant increase in distraction injury rates over the years of study (pcell phone use has been increasing. More research is needed to determine the risks associated with walking and talking on a cell phone and to develop strategies for intervention. Cell phone use continues to increase both at home and outdoor environments. The use of smart phones, with their more enticing features, increases

  12. Embedded Lattice and Properties of Gram Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize in Mizar [14] the definition of embedding of lattice and its properties. We formally define an inner product on an embedded module. We also formalize properties of Gram matrix. We formally prove that an inverse of Gram matrix for a rational lattice exists. Lattice of Z-module is necessary for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lov´asz base reduction algorithm [16] and cryptographic systems with lattice [17].

  13. Half-Heusler compounds with a 1 eV (1.7 eV) direct band gap, lattice-matched to GaAs (Si), for solar cell application: A first-principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Belmiloud, N.

    2016-01-10

    A systematic theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of new half-Heusler compounds is performed to find the appropriate target key physical parameters for photovoltaic application. As a result, five ternary half-Heusler compounds ScAgC, YCuC, CaZnC, NaAgO, and LiCuS are studied by density functional theory for potential applications in multi-junction solar cells. The calculated formation enthalpies indicate that these materials are thermodynamically stable. Using state-of-the-art modified Becke-Johnson exchange potential approximation, we find a direct band gap close to 1eV (∼1.88eV) for ScAgC, YCuC, CaZnC, NaAgO (LiCuS) being quasi-lattice matched to GaAs (Si). In addition, the band offsets between half-Heusler compounds and GaAs (Si) and their consequences for heterostructures are derived using the modified Tersoff method for the branch-point energy. Furthermore, the elastic constants and phonon dispersion curves are calculated. They indicate the respective mechanical and dynamical stability of these half-Heusler compounds. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Akt2 and nucleophosmin/B23 function as an oncogenic unit in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Sang Bae; Park, Sang Bum; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Cho, Sung-Woo; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2011-01-01

    The signaling network of protein kinase B(PKB)/Akt has been implicated in survival of lung cancer cells. However, understanding the relative contribution of the different isoform of Akt network is nontrival. Here, we report that Akt2 is highly expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 cells. Suppression of Akt2 expression in A549 cells results in notable inhibition of cell poliferation, soft agar growth, and invasion, accompanying by a decrease of nucleophosmin/B23 protein. Overexpression of Akt1 restores cancerous growth of A549 cells in B23-knockdown (KD) cells while Akt2 overexpression did not restore proliferating potential in cells with downregulated B23, thus suggesting Akt2 requires B23 to drive proliferation of lung cancer cell. Loss of functional Akt2 and B23 has similar defects on cell proliferation, apoptotic resistance and cell cycle regulation, while loss of Akt1 has less defects on cell proliferation, survial and cell cycle progression in A549 cells. Moreover, overexpression of B23 rescues the proliferative block induced as a consequence of loss of Akt2. Thus our data suggest that Akt2/B23 functions as an oncogenic unit to drive tumorigenesis of A549 lung cancer cells.

  15. Computational benchmark on the void reactivity effect in MOX lattices. Contribution to a NEA-NSC benchmark study organized by the Working Party on Plutonium Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenreich, W.E.; Aaldijk, J.K.

    1994-08-01

    The Working Party on Plutonium Recycling of the Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has initiated a benchmark study on the calculation of the void reactivity effect in MOX lattices. The results presented here were obtained with the continuous energy, generalized geometry Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The cross-section libraries used were processed from the JEF-2.2 evaluation taking into account selfshielding in the unresolved resonance ranges (selfshielding in the resolved resonance ranges is treated by MCNP). For an infinite lattice of unit cells a positive void reactivity effect was found only for the MOX fuel with the largest Pu content. For an infinite lattice of macro cells (voidable inner zone with different fuel mixtures surrounded by an outer zone of UO 2 fuel with moderator) a positive void reactivity effect was obtained for the three MOX fuel types considered. The results are not representative for MOX-loaded power reactor lattices, but serve only to intercompare reactor physics codes and libraries. (orig.)

  16. Design and optical characterization of high-Q guided-resonance modes in the slot-graphite photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luis Javier; Huang, Ningfeng; Ma, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Jaquay, Eric; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-12-16

    A new photonic crystal structure is generated by using a regular graphite lattice as the base and adding a slot in the center of each unit cell to enhance field confinement. The theoretical Q factor in an ideal structure is over 4 × 10(5). The structure was fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator wafer and optically characterized by transmission spectroscopy. The resonance wavelength and quality factor were measured as a function of slot height. The measured trends show good agreement with simulation.

  17. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravari, M R Karamooz; Kadkhodaei, M; Ghaei, A; Esfahani, S Nasr; Andani, M Taheri; Elahinia, M; Karaca, H

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress–strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure. (paper)

  18. Relationship between unit cell type and porosity and the fatigue behavior of selective laser melted meta-biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Yavari, S; Ahmadi, S M; Wauthle, R; Pouran, B; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-03-01

    Meta-materials are structures when their small-scale properties are considered, but behave as materials when their homogenized macroscopic properties are studied. There is an intimate relationship between the design of the small-scale structure and the homogenized properties of such materials. In this article, we studied that relationship for meta-biomaterials that are aimed for biomedical applications, otherwise known as meta-biomaterials. Selective laser melted porous titanium (Ti6Al4V ELI) structures were manufactured based on three different types of repeating unit cells, namely cube, diamond, and truncated cuboctahedron, and with different porosities. The morphological features, static mechanical properties, and fatigue behavior of the porous biomaterials were studied with a focus on their fatigue behavior. It was observed that, in addition to static mechanical properties, the fatigue properties of the porous biomaterials are highly dependent on the type of unit cell as well as on porosity. None of the porous structures based on the cube unit cell failed after 10(6) loading cycles even when the applied stress reached 80% of their yield strengths. For both other unit cells, higher porosities resulted in shorter fatigue lives for the same level of applied stress. When normalized with respect to their yield stresses, the S-N data points of structures with different porosities very well (R(2)>0.8) conformed to one single power law specific to the type of the unit cell. For the same level of normalized applied stress, the truncated cuboctahedron unit cell resulted in a longer fatigue life as compared to the diamond unit cell. In a similar comparison, the fatigue lives of the porous structures based on both truncated cuboctahedron and diamond unit cells were longer than that of the porous structures based on the rhombic dodecahedron unit cell (determined in a previous study). The data presented in this study could serve as a basis for design of porous biomaterials

  19. Finite-lattice-spacing corrections to masses and g factors on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roskies, R.; Wu, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We suggest an alternative method for extracting masses and g factors from lattice calculations. Our method takes account of more of the infrared and ultraviolet lattice effects. It leads to more reasonable results in simulations of QED on a lattice

  20. Direct Observation of High-Temperature Superconductivity in One-Unit-Cell FeSe Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wen-Hao; Zhang Jin-Song; Li Fang-Sen; Guo Ming-Hua; Ding Hao; Tang Chen-Jia; Wang Qing-Yan; He Ke; Ji Shuai-Hua; Chen Xi; Sun Yi; Zhao Yan-Fei; Xing Ying; Wang Hui-Chao; Zhang Hui-Min; Peng Jun-Ping; Li Zhi; Wang Meng; Fujita Takeshi; Hirata Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    We prepared one-unit-cell (1-UC) thick FeSe films on insulating SrTiO 3 substrates with non-superconducting FeTe protection layers by molecular beam epitaxy for ex situ studies. By direct transport and magnetic measurements, we provide definitive evidence for high temperature superconductivity in the 1-UC FeSe films with an onset T C above 40 K and an extremely large critical current density J C ∼1.7×10 6 A/cm 2 at 2 K, which are much higher than T C ∼8 K and J C ∼10 4 A/cm 2 for bulk FeSe, respectively. Our work may pave the way to enhancing and tailoring superconductivity by interface engineering. (express letter)

  1. Flexible and elastic metamaterial absorber for low frequency, based on small-size unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Y. J.; Zheng, H. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, Y. P., E-mail: yplee@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Physics and RINS, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, J. Y. [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, J.-H. [Department of Nano and Electronic Physics, Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. W. [Department of Information Display, Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, H. [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. H. [Infovion Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-28

    Using a planar and flexible metamaterial (MM), we obtained the low-frequency perfect absorption even with very small unit-cell size in snake-shape structure. These shrunken, deep-sub-wavelength and thin MM absorbers were numerically and experimentally investigated by increasing the inductance. The periodicity/thickness (the figure of merit for perfect absorption) is achieved to be 10 and 2 for single-snake-bar and 5-snake-bar structures, respectively. The ratio between periodicity and resonance wavelength (in mm) is close to 1/12 and 1/30 at 2 GHz and 400 MHz, respectively. The absorbers are specially designed for absorption peaks around 2 GHz and 400 MHz, which can be used for depressing the electromagnetic noise from everyday electronic devices and mobile phones.

  2. Mitigation of Unwanted Forward Narrow-band Radiation from PCBs with a Metamaterial Unit Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruaro, Andrea; Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Mitigation of EMI from a PCB is obtained through the use of a metamaterial unit cell. The focus is on the reduction of narrow-band radiation in the forward hemisphere when the resonant element is etched on a layer located between the source of radiation and the ground plane. As opposed to previous...... publications in the literature, the aim of this work is the application of a filter to scattered radiation, generalizing the former characterizations based solely upon transmission lines’ insertion loss. The radiating area accounts for traces and components placed on the top layer of a PCB and is simulated via...... a patch antenna. The study exhibits how the radiation pattern and the electric field on the patch antenna change within and outside the resonance bandwidth of the parasitic element. An EMC assessment provides experimental verification of the operating principle....

  3. Asymmetric lateral distribution of melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Kelly G; Iyer, Jayasri G; Nghiem, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background A recent report suggested a trend towards more UV-linked skin cancers arising on the left rather than the right side of the body in the United States. Objective To test whether the reported incidences of two UV-linked skin cancers, malignant melanoma (MM) and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), are greater on the left than the right in the US. Methods MMs (n = 82,587) and MCCs (n = 2,384) occurring on the left or right side of the face, arm or leg that were reported in the SE*ER registry between 1986–2006 were included for analysis. Results MM and MCC were significantly more likely to present on the left than the right (p automobile UV exposure (approximately 20-fold stronger on the left than right arm) is a likely contributing factor. It may be prudent to remind skin cancer-prone individuals to take appropriate sun precautions when driving in an automobile. PMID:21514002

  4. Prognosis of Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgaard, Sidsel Christy; Nielsen, Jonas; Lindmark, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a procedure with inherent complications and intensive care may be necessary. We evaluated the short- and long-term outcomes of the HSCT recipients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We...... ventilation had a statistically significant effect on in-ICU (p = 0.02), 6-month (p = 0.049) and 1-year (p = 0.014) mortality. Renal replacement therapy also had a statistically significant effect on in-hospital (p = 0.038) and 6-month (p = 0.026) mortality. Short ICU admissions, i.e. ... to the ICU was confirmed in our study. Mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy and an ICU admission of ≥10 days were each risk factors for mortality in the first year after ICU admission....

  5. Mean link versus average plaquette tadpoles in lattice NRQCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Norman H.; Trottier, Howard D.

    1999-03-01

    We compare mean-link and average plaquette tadpole renormalization schemes in the context of the quarkonium hyperfine splittings in lattice NRQCD. Simulations are done for the three quarkonium systems c overlinec, b overlinec, and b overlineb. The hyperfine splittings are computed both at leading and at next-to-leading order in the relativistic expansion. Results are obtained at a large number of lattice spacings. A number of features emerge, all of which favor tadpole renormalization using mean links. This includes much better scaling of the hyperfine splittings in the three quarkonium systems. We also find that relativistic corrections to the spin splittings are smaller with mean-link tadpoles, particularly for the c overlinec and b overlinec systems. We also see signs of a breakdown in the NRQCD expansion when the bare quark mass falls below about one in lattice units (with the bare quark masses turning out to be much larger with mean-link tadpoles).

  6. Quantum lattice model solver HΦ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuaki; Yoshimi, Kazuyoshi; Misawa, Takahiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Todo, Synge; Kawashima, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    HΦ [aitch-phi ] is a program package based on the Lanczos-type eigenvalue solution applicable to a broad range of quantum lattice models, i.e., arbitrary quantum lattice models with two-body interactions, including the Heisenberg model, the Kitaev model, the Hubbard model and the Kondo-lattice model. While it works well on PCs and PC-clusters, HΦ also runs efficiently on massively parallel computers, which considerably extends the tractable range of the system size. In addition, unlike most existing packages, HΦ supports finite-temperature calculations through the method of thermal pure quantum (TPQ) states. In this paper, we explain theoretical background and user-interface of HΦ. We also show the benchmark results of HΦ on supercomputers such as the K computer at RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) and SGI ICE XA (Sekirei) at the Institute for the Solid State Physics (ISSP).

  7. Frustrated lattices of Ising chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudasov, Yurii B; Korshunov, Aleksei S; Pavlov, V N; Maslov, Dmitrii A

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic structure and magnetization dynamics of systems of plane frustrated Ising chain lattices are reviewed for three groups of compounds: Ca 3 Co 2 O 6 , CsCoCl 3 , and Sr 5 Rh 4 O 12 . The available experimental data are analyzed and compared in detail. It is shown that a high-temperature magnetic phase on a triangle lattice is normally and universally a partially disordered antiferromagnetic (PDA) structure. The diversity of low-temperature phases results from weak interactions that lift the degeneracy of a 2D antiferromagnetic Ising model on the triangle lattice. Mean-field models, Monte Carlo simulation results on the static magnetization curve, and results on slow magnetization dynamics obtained with Glauber's theory are discussed in detail. (reviews of topical problems)

  8. Lattice QCD for nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    With ever increasing computational resources and improvements in algorithms, new opportunities are emerging for lattice gauge theory to address key questions in strongly interacting systems, such as nuclear matter. Calculations today use dynamical gauge-field ensembles with degenerate light up/down quarks and the strange quark and it is possible now to consider including charm-quark degrees of freedom in the QCD vacuum. Pion masses and other sources of systematic error, such as finite-volume and discretization effects, are beginning to be quantified systematically. Altogether, an era of precision calculation has begun, and many new observables will be calculated at the new computational facilities.  The aim of this set of lectures is to provide graduate students with a grounding in the application of lattice gauge theory methods to strongly interacting systems, and in particular to nuclear physics.  A wide variety of topics are covered, including continuum field theory, lattice discretizations, hadron spect...

  9. Planar conjugated polymers containing 9,10-disubstituted phenanthrene units for efficient polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangwu; Kang, Chong; Li, Cuihong; Lu, Zhen; Zhang, Jicheng; Gong, Xue; Zhao, Guangyao; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping; Bo, Zhishan

    2014-06-01

    Four novel conjugated polymers (P1-4) with 9,10-disubstituted phenanthrene (PhA) as the donor unit and 5,6-bis(octyloxy)benzothiadiazole as the acceptor unit are synthesized and characterized. These polymers are of medium bandgaps (2.0 eV), low-lying HOMO energy levels (below -5.3 eV), and high hole mobilities (in the range of 3.6 × 10(-3) to 0.02 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ). Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs) with P1-4:PC71 BM blends as the active layer and an alcohol-soluble fullerene derivative (FN-C60) as the interfacial layer between the active layer and cathode give the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.24%, indicating that 9,10-disubstituted PhA are potential donor materials for high-efficiency BHJ PSCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. WIMSD4 calculations of the Westinghouse 'EDASA' lattices with plutonium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.

    1977-03-01

    A series of Westinghouse critical PuO 2 /UO 2 pin-cell assemblies is analysed using the lattice code WIMSD4. The results are presented in terms of computed k-effective values, with comment on the choice of method for calculating high leakage systems and on the adequacy of WIMSD4 for evaluating plutonium enriched lattices. (author)

  11. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Ahmadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primarily because of the challenge in fabricating porous biomaterials with arbitrarily complex morphological designs. In the present work, we studied the relationship between relative density (RD of porous Ti6Al4V EFI alloy and five compressive properties of the material, namely elastic gradient or modulus (Es20–70, first maximum stress, plateau stress, yield stress, and energy absorption. Porous structures with different RD and six different unit cell configurations (cubic (C, diamond (D, truncated cube (TC, truncated cuboctahedron (TCO, rhombic dodecahedron (RD, and rhombicuboctahedron (RCO were fabricated using selective laser melting. Each of the compressive properties increased with increase in RD, the relationship being of a power law type. Clear trends were seen in the influence of unit cell configuration and porosity on each of the compressive properties. For example, in terms of Es20–70, the structures may be divided into two groups: those that are stiff (comprising those made using C, TC, TCO, and RCO unit cell and those that are compliant (comprising those made using D and RD unit cell.

  12. Nucleon structure from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinter, Simon

    2012-11-13

    In this thesis we compute within lattice QCD observables related to the structure of the nucleon. One part of this thesis is concerned with moments of parton distribution functions (PDFs). Those moments are essential elements for the understanding of nucleon structure and can be extracted from a global analysis of deep inelastic scattering experiments. On the theoretical side they can be computed non-perturbatively by means of lattice QCD. However, since the time lattice calculations of moments of PDFs are available, there is a tension between these lattice calculations and the results from a global analysis of experimental data. We examine whether systematic effects are responsible for this tension, and study particularly intensively the effects of excited states by a dedicated high precision computation. Moreover, we carry out a first computation with four dynamical flavors. Another aspect of this thesis is a feasibility study of a lattice QCD computation of the scalar quark content of the nucleon, which is an important element in the cross-section of a heavy particle with the nucleon mediated by a scalar particle (e.g. Higgs particle) and can therefore have an impact on Dark Matter searches. Existing lattice QCD calculations of this quantity usually have a large error and thus a low significance for phenomenological applications. We use a variance-reduction technique for quark-disconnected diagrams to obtain a precise result. Furthermore, we introduce a new stochastic method for the calculation of connected 3-point correlation functions, which are needed to compute nucleon structure observables, as an alternative to the usual sequential propagator method. In an explorative study we check whether this new method is competitive to the standard one. We use Wilson twisted mass fermions at maximal twist in all our calculations, such that all observables considered here have only O(a{sup 2}) discretization effects.

  13. Nucleon structure from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinter, Simon

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we compute within lattice QCD observables related to the structure of the nucleon. One part of this thesis is concerned with moments of parton distribution functions (PDFs). Those moments are essential elements for the understanding of nucleon structure and can be extracted from a global analysis of deep inelastic scattering experiments. On the theoretical side they can be computed non-perturbatively by means of lattice QCD. However, since the time lattice calculations of moments of PDFs are available, there is a tension between these lattice calculations and the results from a global analysis of experimental data. We examine whether systematic effects are responsible for this tension, and study particularly intensively the effects of excited states by a dedicated high precision computation. Moreover, we carry out a first computation with four dynamical flavors. Another aspect of this thesis is a feasibility study of a lattice QCD computation of the scalar quark content of the nucleon, which is an important element in the cross-section of a heavy particle with the nucleon mediated by a scalar particle (e.g. Higgs particle) and can therefore have an impact on Dark Matter searches. Existing lattice QCD calculations of this quantity usually have a large error and thus a low significance for phenomenological applications. We use a variance-reduction technique for quark-disconnected diagrams to obtain a precise result. Furthermore, we introduce a new stochastic method for the calculation of connected 3-point correlation functions, which are needed to compute nucleon structure observables, as an alternative to the usual sequential propagator method. In an explorative study we check whether this new method is competitive to the standard one. We use Wilson twisted mass fermions at maximal twist in all our calculations, such that all observables considered here have only O(a 2 ) discretization effects.

  14. Kondo length in bosonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Sodano, Pasquale; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that the low-energy properties of the Kondo model can be effectively simulated in spin chains, we study the realization of the effect with bond impurities in ultracold bosonic lattices at half filling. After presenting a discussion of the effective theory and of the mapping of the bosonic chain onto a lattice spin Hamiltonian, we provide estimates for the Kondo length as a function of the parameters of the bosonic model. We point out that the Kondo length can be extracted from the integrated real-space correlation functions, which are experimentally accessible quantities in experiments with cold atoms.

  15. Supersymmetry on the noncommutative lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Jun; Rey, Soo-Jong; Sugino, Fumihiko

    2003-01-01

    Built upon the proposal of Kaplan et al. (heplat{0206109}), we construct noncommutative lattice gauge theory with manifest supersymmetry. We show that such theory is naturally implementable via orbifold conditions generalizing those used by Kaplan et al. We present the prescription in detail and illustrate it for noncommutative gauge theories latticized partially in two dimensions. We point out a deformation freedom in the defining theory by a complex-parameter, reminiscent of discrete torsion in string theory. We show that, in the continuum limit, the supersymmetry is enhanced only at a particular value of the deformation parameter, determined solely by the size of the noncommutativity. (author)

  16. Machines for lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, P.B.

    1989-05-01

    The most promising approach to the solution of the theory of strong interactions is large scale numerical simulation using the techniques of lattice gauge theory. At the present time, computing requirements for convincing calculations of the properties of hadrons exceed the capabilities of even the most powerful commercial supercomputers. This has led to the development of massively parallel computers dedicated to lattice gauge theory. This talk will discuss the computing requirements behind these machines, and general features of the components and architectures of the half dozen major projects now in existence. 20 refs., 1 fig

  17. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  18. Unconventional superconductivity in honeycomb lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sahebsara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available   ‎ The possibility of symmetrical s-wave superconductivity in the honeycomb lattice is studied within a strongly correlated regime, using the Hubbard model. The superconducting order parameter is defined by introducing the Green function, which is obtained by calculating the density of the electrons ‎ . In this study showed that the superconducting order parameter appears in doping interval between 0 and 0.5, and x=0.25 is the optimum doping for the s-wave superconductivity in honeycomb lattice.

  19. [Lattice degeneration of the retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, E V; Suetov, A A; Mal'tsev, D S

    2014-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is a clinically important type of peripheral retinal dystrophies due to its participation in the pathogenesis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In spite of extensive epidemiological, morphological, and clinical data, the question on causes of this particular type of retinal dystrophies currently remains debatable. Existing hypotheses on pathogenesis of retinal structural changes in lattice degeneration explain it to a certain extent. In clinical ophthalmology it is necessary to pay close attention to this kind of degenerations and distinguish between cases requiring preventive treatment and those requiring monitoring.

  20. Lattice calculations in gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebbi, C.

    1985-01-01

    The lattice formulation of quantum gauge theories is discussed as a viable technique for quantitative studies of nonperturbative effects in QCD. Evidence is presented to ascertain that whole classes of lattice actions produce a universal continuum limit. Discrepancies between numerical results from Monto Carlo simulations for the pure gauge system and for the system with gauge and quark fields are discussed. Numerical calculations for QCD require very substantial computational resources. The use of powerful vector processors of special purpose machines, in extending the scope and magnitude or the calculations is considered, and one may reasonably expect that in the near future good quantitative predictions will be obtained for QCD

  1. Chiral symmetry on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1994-11-01

    The author reviews some of the difficulties associated with chiral symmetry in the context of a lattice regulator. The author discusses the structure of Wilson Fermions when the hopping parameter is in the vicinity of its critical value. Here one flavor contrasts sharply with the case of more, where a residual chiral symmetry survives anomalies. The author briefly discusses the surface mode approach, the use of mirror Fermions to cancel anomalies, and finally speculates on the problems with lattice versions of the standard model

  2. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Detmold, Silas Beane, Konstantinos Orginos, Martin Savage

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress toward establishing lattice Quantum Chromodynamics as a predictive calculational framework for nuclear physics. A survey of the current techniques that are used to extract low-energy hadronic scattering amplitudes and interactions is followed by a review of recent two-body and few-body calculations by the NPLQCD collaboration and others. An outline of the nuclear physics that is expected to be accomplished with Lattice QCD in the next decade, along with estimates of the required computational resources, is presented.

  3. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Mass Transfer in Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells under Operation Mode Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional, single-phase, isothermal, multicomponent, transient model is built to investigate the transport phenomena in unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs under the condition of switching from the fuel cell (FC mode to the water electrolysis (WE mode. The model is coupled with an electrochemical reaction. The proton exchange membrane (PEM is selected as the solid electrolyte of the URFC. The work is motivated by the need to elucidate the complex mass transfer and electrochemical process under operation mode switching in order to improve the performance of PEM URFC. A set of governing equations, including conservation of mass, momentum, species, and charge, are considered. These equations are solved by the finite element method. The simulation results indicate the distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, water mass fraction, and electrolyte potential response to the transient phenomena via saltation under operation mode switching. The hydrogen mass fraction gradients are smaller than the oxygen mass fraction gradients. The average mass fractions of the reactants (oxygen and hydrogen and product (water exhibit evident differences between each layer in the steady state of the FC mode. By contrast, the average mass fractions of the reactant (water and products (oxygen and hydrogen exhibit only slight differences between each layer in the steady state of the WE mode. Under either the FC mode or the WE mode, the duration of the transient state is only approximately 0.2 s.

  4. Representation theory of lattice current algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.Yu.; Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich; Faddeev, L.D.; Froehlich, L.D.; Schomerus, V.; Kyoto Univ.

    1996-04-01

    Lattice current algebras were introduced as a regularization of the left-and right moving degrees of freedom in the WZNW model. They provide examples of lattice theories with a local quantum symmetry U q (G). Their representation theory is studied in detail. In particular, we construct all irreducible representations along with a lattice analogue of the fusion product for representations of the lattice current algebra. It is shown that for an arbitrary number of lattice sites, the representation categories of the lattice current algebras agree with their continuum counterparts. (orig.)

  5. In vivo XCT bone characterization of lattice structured implants fabricated by additive manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-F. Obaton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several cylindrical specimens and dental implants, presenting diagonal lattice structures with different cell sizes (600, 900 and 1200 μm were additively manufactured by selective laser melting process. Then they were implanted for two months in a sheep. After removal, they were studied by Archimedes’ method as well as X-ray computed tomography in order to assess the penetration of bone into the lattice. We observed that the additive manufactured parts were geometrically conformed to the theoretical specifications. However, several particles were left adhering to the surface of the lattice, thereby partly or entirely obstructing the cells. Nevertheless, bone penetration was clearly visible. We conclude that the 900 μm lattice cell size is more favourable to bone penetration than the 1200 μm lattice cell size, as the bone penetration is 84% for 900 μm against 54% for 1200 μm cell structures. The lower bone penetration value for the 1200 μm lattice cell could possibly be attributed to the short residence time in the sheep. Our results lead to the conclusion that lattice implants additively manufactured by selective laser melting enable better bone integration.

  6. Vortex lattice melting, pinning and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doniach, S.; Ryu, S.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenology of the high T c superconductors is discussed both at the level of the thermodynamics of melting of the Abrikosov flux lattice and in terms of the melting and kinetics of the flux lattice for a pinned system. The authors review results on 3D melting obtained by a Monte Carlo simulation approach in which the 2D open-quotes pancakeclose quotes vortices are treated as statistical variables. The authors discuss pinning in the context of the strong pinning regime in which the vortex density given in terms of the applied field B is small compared to that represented by an effective field B pin measuring the pinning center density. The authors introduce a new criterion for the unfreezing of a vortex glass on increase of magnetic field or temperature, in the strong pinning, small field unit. The authors model this limit in terms of a single flux line interacting with a columnar pin. This model is studied both analytically and by computer simulation. By applying a tilt potential, the authors study the kinetics of the vortex motion in an external current and show that the resulting current-voltage characteristic follows a basic vortex glass-like scaling relation in the vicinity of the depinning transition

  7. Study of the lattice parameter evolution of PWR irradiated MOX fuel by X-Ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavier, B.

    1995-01-01

    Fuel irradiation leads to a swelling resulting from the formation of gaseous (Kr, Xe) or solid fission products which are found either in solution or as solid inclusions in the matrix. This phenomena has to be evaluated to be taken into account in fuel cladding Interaction. Fuel swelling was studied as a function of burn up by measuring the corresponding cell constant evolution by X-Ray diffraction. This study was realized on Mixed Oxide Fuels (MOX) irradiated in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at different burn-up for 3 initial Pu contents. Lattice parameter evolutions were followed as a function of burn-up for the irradiated fuel with and without an annealing thermal treatment. These experimental evolutions are compared to the theoretical evolutions calculated from the hard sphere model, using the fission product concentrations determined by the APPOLO computer code. Contribution of varying parameters influencing the unit cell value is discussed. Thermal treatment effects were checked by metallography, X-Ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. After thermal treatment, no structural change was observed but a decrease of the lattice parameter was measured. This modification results essentially from self-irradiation defect annealing and not from stoichiometry variations. Microprobe analysis showed that about 15% of the formed Molybdenum is in solid solution In the oxide matrix. Micrographs showed the existence of Pu packs in the oxide matrix which induces a broadening of diffraction lines. The RIETVELD method used to analyze the X-Ray patterns did not allow to characterize independently the Pu packs and the oxide matrix lattice parameters. Nevertheless, with this method, the presence of micro-strains in the irradiated nuclear fuel could be confirmed. (author)

  8. Light-Induced Hofstadter's Butterfly Spectrum in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Jingmin

    2009-01-01

    We propose a scheme to create an effective magnetic field, which can be perceived by cold neutral atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice, with a laser field with a space-dependent phase and a conventional laser field acting on Λ-type three-level atoms. When the dimensionless parameter α, being the ratio of flux through a lattice cell to one flux quantum, is rational, the energy spectrum shows a fractal band structure, which is so-called Hofstadter's butterfly. (general)

  9. Lattice Dynamical Properties of Ferroelectric Thin Films at the Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple University

    2014-01-13

    In this project, we have successfully demonstrated atomic layer-by-layer growth by laser MBE from separate targets by depositing SrTiO3 films from SrO and TiO2 targets. The RHEED intensity oscillation was used to monitor and control the growth of each SrO and TiO2 layer. We have shown that by using separate oxide targets, laser MBE can achieve the same level of stoichiometry control as the reactive MBE. We have also studied strain relaxation in LaAlO3 films and its effect on the 2D electron gas at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. We found that there are two layers of different in-plane lattice constants in the LaAlO3 films, one next to the SrTiO3 substrate nearly coherently strained, while the top part relaxed as the film thickness increases above 20 unit cells. This strain relaxation significantly affect the transport properties of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

  10. Computers for lattice field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Parallel computers dedicated to lattice field theories are reviewed with emphasis on the three recent projects, the Teraflops project in the US, the CP-PACS project in Japan and the 0.5-Teraflops project in the US. Some new commercial parallel computers are also discussed. Recent development of semiconductor technologies is briefly surveyed in relation to possible approaches toward Teraflops computers. (orig.)

  11. From lattice gases to polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.

    1990-01-01

    The modification of a technique that was developed to study time correlations in lattice-gas cellular automata to facilitate the numerical simulation of chain molecules is described. As an example, the calculation of the excess chemical potential of an ideal polymer in a dense colloidal

  12. Flavor extrapolation in lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    Explicit calculation of the effect of virtual quark-antiquark pairs in lattice QCD has eluded researchers. To include their effect explicitly one must calculate the determinant of the fermion-fermion coupling matrix. Owing to the large number of sites in a continuum limit size lattice, direct evaluation of this term requires an unrealistic amount of computer time. The effect of the virtual pairs can be approximated by ignoring this term and adjusting lattice couplings to reproduce experimental results. This procedure is called the valence approximation since it ignores all but the minimal number of quarks needed to describe hadrons. In this work the effect of the quark-antiquark pairs has been incorporated in a theory with an effective negative number of quark flavors contributing to the closed loops. Various particle masses and decay constants have been calculated for this theory and for one with no virtual pairs. The author attempts to extrapolate results towards positive numbers of quark flavors. The results show approximate agreement with experimental measurements and demonstrate the smoothness of lattice expectations in the number of quark flavors

  13. Nuclear physics on the lattice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to try to adapt lattice gauge theory to build in some biases in order for being applicable to nuclear physics. In so doing the calculations are made more precise, and the author can address questions like the size of the nucleon, the nucleon-nucleon potential, the modifications of the nucleon in the nuclear medium, etc. (Auth.)

  14. Differential geometry of group lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakis, Aristophanes; Mueller-Hoissen, Folkert

    2003-01-01

    In a series of publications we developed ''differential geometry'' on discrete sets based on concepts of noncommutative geometry. In particular, it turned out that first-order differential calculi (over the algebra of functions) on a discrete set are in bijective correspondence with digraph structures where the vertices are given by the elements of the set. A particular class of digraphs are Cayley graphs, also known as group lattices. They are determined by a discrete group G and a finite subset S. There is a distinguished subclass of ''bicovariant'' Cayley graphs with the property ad(S)S subset of S. We explore the properties of differential calculi which arise from Cayley graphs via the above correspondence. The first-order calculi extend to higher orders and then allow us to introduce further differential geometric structures. Furthermore, we explore the properties of ''discrete'' vector fields which describe deterministic flows on group lattices. A Lie derivative with respect to a discrete vector field and an inner product with forms is defined. The Lie-Cartan identity then holds on all forms for a certain subclass of discrete vector fields. We develop elements of gauge theory and construct an analog of the lattice gauge theory (Yang-Mills) action on an arbitrary group lattice. Also linear connections are considered and a simple geometric interpretation of the torsion is established. By taking a quotient with respect to some subgroup of the discrete group, generalized differential calculi associated with so-called Schreier diagrams are obtained

  15. Lattice dynamics of lithium oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Li2O finds several important technological applications, as it is used in solid- state batteries, can be used as a blanket breeding material in nuclear fusion reactors, etc. Li2O exhibits a fast ion phase, characterized by a thermally induced dynamic disorder in the anionic sub-lattice of Li+, at elevated temperatures ...

  16. Lattice fields and strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1989-06-01

    I review the lattice formulation of gauge theories and the use of numerical methods to investigate nonperturbative phenomena. These methods are directly applicable to studying hadronic matter at high temperatures. Considerable recent progress has been made in numerical algorithms for including dynamical fermions in such calculations. Dealing with a nonvanishing baryon density adds new unsolved challenges. 33 refs

  17. Mean-field lattice trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgs, C.; Chayes, J.T.; Hofstad, van der R.W.; Slade, G.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a mean-field model of lattice trees based on embeddings into d of abstract trees having a critical Poisson offspring distribution. This model provides a combinatorial interpretation for the self-consistent mean-field model introduced previously by Derbez and Slade [9], and provides an

  18. Lattice quantum chromodynamics: Some topics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I will begin with a lightning quick overview of the basic lattice gauge theory and then go on to .... The Monte Carlo technique to evaluate C(t), or the expectation value of any other observable ... x }occurs with a probability proportional to. 890.

  19. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  20. Fields on a random lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itzykson, C.

    1983-10-01

    We review the formulation of field theory and statistical mechanics on a Poissonian random lattice. Topics discussed include random geometry, the construction of field equations for arbitrary spin, the free field spectrum and the question of localization illustrated in the one dimensional case

  1. Disconnected Diagrams in Lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Arjun Singh

    In this work, we present state-of-the-art numerical methods and their applications for computing a particular class of observables using lattice quantum chromodynamics (Lattice QCD), a discretized version of the fundamental theory of quarks and gluons. These observables require calculating so called "disconnected diagrams" and are important for understanding many aspects of hadron structure, such as the strange content of the proton. We begin by introducing the reader to the key concepts of Lattice QCD and rigorously define the meaning of disconnected diagrams through an example of the Wick contractions of the nucleon. Subsequently, the calculation of observables requiring disconnected diagrams is posed as the computationally challenging problem of finding the trace of the inverse of an incredibly large, sparse matrix. This is followed by a brief primer of numerical sparse matrix techniques that overviews broadly used methods in Lattice QCD and builds the background for the novel algorithm presented in this work. We then introduce singular value deflation as a method to improve convergence of trace estimation and analyze its effects on matrices from a variety of fields, including chemical transport modeling, magnetohydrodynamics, and QCD. Finally, we apply this method to compute observables such as the strange axial charge of the proton and strange sigma terms in light nuclei. The work in this thesis is innovative for four reasons. First, we analyze the effects of deflation with a model that makes qualitative predictions about its effectiveness, taking only the singular value spectrum as input, and compare deflated variance with different types of trace estimator noise. Second, the synergy between probing methods and deflation is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Third, we use the synergistic combination of deflation and a graph coloring algorithm known as hierarchical probing to conduct a lattice calculation of light disconnected matrix elements

  2. Disconnected Diagrams in Lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambhir, Arjun [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we present state-of-the-art numerical methods and their applications for computing a particular class of observables using lattice quantum chromodynamics (Lattice QCD), a discretized version of the fundamental theory of quarks and gluons. These observables require calculating so called \\disconnected diagrams" and are important for understanding many aspects of hadron structure, such as the strange content of the proton. We begin by introducing the reader to the key concepts of Lattice QCD and rigorously define the meaning of disconnected diagrams through an example of the Wick contractions of the nucleon. Subsequently, the calculation of observables requiring disconnected diagrams is posed as the computationally challenging problem of finding the trace of the inverse of an incredibly large, sparse matrix. This is followed by a brief primer of numerical sparse matrix techniques that overviews broadly used methods in Lattice QCD and builds the background for the novel algorithm presented in this work. We then introduce singular value deflation as a method to improve convergence of trace estimation and analyze its effects on matrices from a variety of fields, including chemical transport modeling, magnetohydrodynamics, and QCD. Finally, we apply this method to compute observables such as the strange axial charge of the proton and strange sigma terms in light nuclei. The work in this thesis is innovative for four reasons. First, we analyze the effects of deflation with a model that makes qualitative predictions about its effectiveness, taking only the singular value spectrum as input, and compare deflated variance with different types of trace estimator noise. Second, the synergy between probing methods and deflation is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Third, we use the synergistic combination of deflation and a graph coloring algorithm known as hierarchical probing to conduct a lattice calculation of light disconnected matrix elements

  3. Lattice Boltzmann Pore-Scale Investigation of Coupled Physical-electrochemical Processes in C/Pt and Non-Precious Metal Cathode Catalyst Layers in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Li; Wu, Gang; Holby, Edward F; Zelenay, Piotr; Tao, Wen-Quan; Kang, Qinjun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoscale structures of catalyst layer are reconstructed. • Pore-scale simulation is performed to predict macroscopic transport properties. • Reactive transport in catalyst layer with non-precious metal and Pt catalysts is studied. • Mesopores rather than micropores are required to enhance mass transport. - Abstract: High-resolution porous structures of catalyst layers (CLs) including non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) or Pt for proton exchange membrane fuel cells are reconstructed using the quartet structure generation set. The nanoscale structures are analyzed in terms of pore size distribution, specific surface area, and phase connectivity. Pore-scale simulation methods based on the lattice Boltzmann method are developed to predict the macroscopic transport properties in CLs. The non-uniform distribution of ionomer in CL generates more tortuous pathways for reactant transport, greatly reducing the effective diffusivity. The tortuosity of CLs is much higher than that adopted by the Bruggeman equation. Knudsen diffusion plays a significant role in oxygen diffusion and significantly reduces the effective diffusivity. Reactive transport inside the CLs is also investigated. Although the reactive surface area of the non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) CL is much higher than that of the Pt CL, the oxygen reaction rate is lower in the NPMC CL due to the much lower reaction rate coefficient. Although pores of a few nanometers in size can increase the number of reactive sites in NPMC CLs, they contribute little to enhance the mass transport. Mesopores, which are a few tens of nanometers or larger in size, are shown to be required in order to increase the mass transport rate

  4. Local structure theory: calculation on hexagonal arrays, and interaction of rule and lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutowitz, H.A.; Victor, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Local structure theory calculations are applied to the study of cellular automata on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice. A particular hexagonal lattice rule denoted (3422) is considered in detail. This rule has many features in common with Conway's Life. The local structure theory captures many of the statistical properties of this rule; this supports hypotheses raised by a study of Life itself. As in Life, the state of a cell under (3422) depends only on the state of the cell itself and the sum of states in its neighborhood at the previous time step. This property implies that evolution rules which operate in the same way can be studied on different lattices. The differences between the behavior of these rules on different lattices are dramatic. The mean field theory cannot reflect these differences. However, a generalization of the mean field theory, the local structure theory, does account for the rule-lattice interaction

  5. RAHAB calculation of lattice parameters for CANDU-type lattices using Monte Carlo calculations for resolved resonance capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.S.; Festarini, G.L.

    1986-07-01

    The Monte Carlo code, REPC, has been used to calculate resonance reaction rates for the thermal test lattices TRX-1 and MIT-4, and for the CRNL lattices ZEEP-1, 19 UO 2 and 37 UO 2 . These reaction rates were used in the RAHAB cell code to calculate k eff , conversion ratios, and fast fission ratios, for comparison with experimental values. The calculations used the cluster geometry for the 19-, 28-, and 37-element clusters. Calculations were also made using annular representations of the cluster for comparison of the rates with those obtained using the discrete ordinate code OZMA

  6. Red blood cell-derived microparticles isolated from blood units initiate and propagate thrombin generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Olivier; Delobel, Julien; Prudent, Michel; Lion, Niels; Kohl, Kid; Tucker, Erik I; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne

    2013-08-01

    Red blood cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) are small phospholipid vesicles shed from RBCs in blood units, where they accumulate during storage. Because microparticles are bioactive, it could be suggested that RMPs are mediators of posttransfusion complications or, on the contrary, constitute a potential hemostatic agent. This study was performed to establish the impact on coagulation of RMPs isolated from blood units. Using calibrated automated thrombography, we investigated whether RMPs affect thrombin generation (TG) in plasma. We found that RMPs were not only able to increase TG in plasma in the presence of a low exogenous tissue factor (TF) concentration, but also to initiate TG in plasma in absence of exogenous TF. TG induced by RMPs in the absence of exogenous TF was neither affected by the presence of blocking anti-TF nor by the absence of Factor (F)VII. It was significantly reduced in plasma deficient in FVIII or F IX and abolished in FII-, FV-, FX-, or FXI-deficient plasma. TG was also totally abolished when anti-XI 01A6 was added in the sample. Finally, neither Western blotting, flow cytometry, nor immunogold labeling allowed the detection of traces of TF antigen. In addition, RMPs did not comprise polyphosphate, an important modulator of coagulation. Taken together, our data show that RMPs have FXI-dependent procoagulant properties and are able to initiate and propagate TG. The anionic surface of RMPs might be the site of FXI-mediated TG amplification and intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase complex assembly. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. On the structure of Lattice code WIMSD-5B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Young; Min, Byung Joo

    2004-03-01

    The WIMS-D code is a freely available thermal reactor physics lattice code used widely for thermal research and power reactor calculation. Now the code WIMS-AECL, developed on the basis of WIMS-D, has been used as one of lattice codes for the cell calculation in Canada and also, in 1998, the latest version WIMSD-5B is released for OECD/NEA Data Bank. While WIMS-KAERI was developed and has been used, originated from WIMS-D, in Korea, it was adjusted for the cell calculation of research reactor HANARO and so it has no confirmaty to CANDU reactor. Therefore, the code development applicable to cell calculation of CANDU reactor is necessary not only for technological independence and but also for the establishment of CANDU safety analysis system. A lattice code WIMSD-5B was analyzed in order to set the system of reactor physics computer codes, to be used in the assessment of void reactivity effect. In order to improve and validate WIMSD-5B code, the analysis of the structure of WIMSD-5B lattice code was made and so its structure, algorithm and the subroutines of WIMSD-5B were presented for the cluster type and the pij method modelling the CANDU-6 fuel

  8. Statistical hydrodynamics of lattice-gas automata

    OpenAIRE

    Grosfils, Patrick; Boon, Jean-Pierre; Brito López, Ricardo; Ernst, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the space and time behavior of spontaneous thermohydrodynamic fluctuations in a simple fluid modeled by a lattice-gas automaton and develop the statistical-mechanical theory of thermal lattice gases to compute the dynamical structure factor, i.e., the power spectrum of the density correlation function. A comparative analysis of the theoretical predictions with our lattice gas simulations is presented. The main results are (i) the spectral function of the lattice-gas fluctuation...

  9. Lattice QCD. A critical status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Karl

    2008-10-15

    The substantial progress that has been achieved in lattice QCD in the last years is pointed out. I compare the simulation cost and systematic effects of several lattice QCD formulations and discuss a number of topics such as lattice spacing scaling, applications of chiral perturbation theory, non-perturbative renormalization and finite volume effects. Additionally, the importance of demonstrating universality is emphasized. (orig.)

  10. Lattice QCD. A critical status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Karl

    2008-10-01

    The substantial progress that has been achieved in lattice QCD in the last years is pointed out. I compare the simulation cost and systematic effects of several lattice QCD formulations and discuss a number of topics such as lattice spacing scaling, applications of chiral perturbation theory, non-perturbative renormalization and finite volume effects. Additionally, the importance of demonstrating universality is emphasized. (orig.)

  11. Gauge theories on a small lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, D.; Webber, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    We present exact solutions to U(1), SU(2), and SU(3) lattice gauge theories on a Kogut-Susskind lattice consisting of a single plaquette. We demonstrate precise equivalence between the U(1) theory and the harmonic oscillator on an infinite one-dimensional lattice, and between the SU(N) theory and an N-fermion Schroedinger equation. (orig.)

  12. Spatiotemporal complexity in coupled map lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    1986-01-01

    Some spatiotemporal patterns of couple map lattices are presented. The chaotic kink-like motions are shown for the phase motion of the coupled circle lattices. An extension of the couple map lattice approach to Hamiltonian dynamics is briefly reported. An attempt to characterize the high-dimensional attractor by the extension of the correlation dimension is discussed. (author)

  13. Clar sextets in square graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rene; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    A periodic array of holes transforms graphene from a semimetal into a semiconductor with a band gap tuneable by varying the parameters of the lattice. In earlier work only hexagonal lattices have been treated. Using atomistic models we here investigate the size of the band gap of a square lattice...

  14. Spatial classification with fuzzy lattice reasoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mavridis, Constantinos; Athanasiadis, I.N.

    2017-01-01

    This work extends the Fuzzy Lattice Reasoning (FLR) Classifier to manage spatial attributes, and spatial relationships. Specifically, we concentrate on spatial entities, as countries, cities, or states. Lattice Theory requires the elements of a Lattice to be partially ordered. To match such

  15. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma incidence and mortality trends in the United States, 1973-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megwalu, Uchechukwu C; Sirjani, Davud; Devine, Erin E

    2017-10-31

    To analyze oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma incidence and mortality trends in the United States for the years 1973 through 2013. Cross-sectional study using a large population-based cancer database. Data on incidence and mortality rates were extracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9 Database. Annual percentage change in rates was calculated using Joinpoint regression analysis (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD). Incidence rates increased (annual percent change [APC]; 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.17 to 2.88) from 1973 to 1983, remained stable (APC -0.52, 95% CI -1.30 to 0.26) from 1983 to 1997, and increased (APC 1.32, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.81) from 1997 to 2013. Overall, incidence rates increased for males (APC 0.73, 95% CI 0.22 to 1.25) but not females (APC -0.77, 95% CI -0.68 to 0.82). Incidence rates increased in the white population (APC 0.79, 95% CI 0.33 to 1.25) but decreased in the black population (APC -0.72, 95% CI -1.41 to -0.02). The incidence rates increased for tongue-base tumors (APC 1.17, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.92) and tonsil tumors (APC 0.47, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.96) but decreased for other sites. Incidence-based mortality decreased (APC -0.78, 95% CI -1.13 to -0.42) from 1993 to 2013. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma incidence rates increased in a nonlinear fashion from 1973 to 2013, whereas mortality rates declined. This, along with variation in trends by demographic and tumor factors, suggest that human papilloma virus is the main driver of the recent rise in incidence. 2b. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Progress in human embryonic stem cell research in the United States between 2001 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Vakili

    Full Text Available On August 9th, 2001, the federal government of the United States announced a policy restricting federal funds available for research on human embryonic stem cell (hESCs out of concern for the "vast ethical mine fields" associated with the creation of embryos for research purposes. Until the policy was repealed on March 9th, 2009, no U.S. federal funds were available for research on hESCs extracted after August 9, 2001, and only limited federal funds were available for research on a subset of hESC lines that had previously been extracted. This paper analyzes how the 2001 U.S. federal funding restrictions influenced the quantity and geography of peer-reviewed journal publications on hESC. The primary finding is that the 2001 policy did not have a significant aggregate effect on hESC research in the U.S. After a brief lag in early 2000s, U.S. hESC research maintained pace with other areas of stem cell and genetic research. The policy had several other consequences. First, it was tied to increased hESC research funding within the U.S. at the state level, leading to concentration of related activities in a relatively small number of states. Second, it stimulated increased collaborative research between US-based scientists and those in countries with flexible policies toward hESC research (including Canada, the U.K., Israel, China, Spain, and South Korea. Third, it encouraged independent hESC research in countries without restrictions.

  17. A cost effective model for appropriate administration of red cell units and salvaging un-transfused red cell units by using temperature sensitive indicators for blood component transportation in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseem K Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A rule called "30-min rule" defines that red cell unit cannot be used if it has been out of blood bank refrigerator for over 30 min. This rule is useful to guide initiation of transfusion, but is inadequate for deciding whether to reuse or discard units received-back at blood transfusion services (BTS. A simple cost-effective temperature-sensitive indicator was evaluated to decide upon reuse (cold chain was uninterrupted or discard (where cold chain was interrupted in a simulation exercise. Materials and Methods: Temperature-sensitive indicators TH-F™ that irreversibly changed color from white to red demonstrated that heat excursion has occurred and the cumulative temperature has exceeded 10°C for over 30 min, were used in outdated red cells for simulating units, which are not used and received-back. These units were also tagged with a standard temperature monitoring device, which was a re-usable credit card sized device, which would log the actual time and temperature. In few units percent hemolysis was also calculated. Results: Statistically insignificant elevation in average temperature was noted in 102 simulated units at the time of return to BTS (Δ 0.04°C, despite the fact that these units were in the transport box for over 4 h. The average supernatant hemoglobin in these units was 0.24%, much below the prescribed threshold. Conclusion: Transportation of blood in controlled conditions with temperature-sensitive indicator is a cost-effective model to save blood, a precious human resource.

  18. The role of total cell-free DNA in predicting outcomes among trauma patients in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Mikail; Burcharth, Jakob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    searched Pubmed, Embase, Scopus and the Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials and reference lists of relevant articles for studies that assessed the prognostic value of cell-free DNA detection in trauma patients in the intensive care unit. Outcomes of interest included survival, posttraumatic...

  19. Inexpensive chirality on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamleh, W.; Williams, A.G.; Adams, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Implementing lattice fermions that resemble as closely as possible continuum fermions is one of the main goals of the theoretical physics community. Aside from a lack of infinitely powerful computers, one of the main impediments to this is the Nielsen-Ninomiya No-Go theorem for chirality on the lattice. One of the consequences of this theorem is that exact chiral symmetry and a lack of fermion doublers cannot be simultaneously satisfied for fermions on the lattice. In the commonly used Wilson fermion formulation, chiral symmetry is explicitly sacrificed on the lattice to avoid fermion doubling. Recently, an alternative has come forward, namely, the Ginsparg-Wilson relation and one of its solutions, the Overlap fermion. The Ginsparg-Wilson relation is a statement of lattice-deformed chirality. The Overlap-Dirac operator is a member of the family of solutions of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation. In recent times, Overlap fermions have been of great interest to the community due to their excellent chiral properties. However, they are significantly more expensive to implement than Wilson fermions. This expense is primarily due to the fact that the Overlap implementation requires an evaluation of the sign function for the Wilson-Dirac operator. The sign function is approximated by a high order rational polynomial function, but this approximation is poor close to the origin. The less near-zero modes that the Wilson- Dirac operator possesses, the cheaper the Overlap operator will be to implement. A means of improving the eigenvalue properties of the Wilson-Dirac operator by the addition of a so-called 'Clover' term is put forward. Numerical results are given that demonstrate this improvement. The Nielsen-Ninomiya no-go theorem and chirality on the lattice are reviewed. The general form of solutions of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation are given, and the Overlap solution is discussed. Properties of the Overlap-Dirac operator are given, including locality and analytic

  20. WIMSD5, Deterministic Multigroup Reactor Lattice Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) is a general code for reactor lattice cell calculation on a wide range of reactor systems. In particular, the code will accept rod or plate fuel geometries in either regular arrays or in clusters and the energy group structure has been chosen primarily for thermal calculations. The basic library has been compiled with 14 fast groups, 13 resonance groups and 42 thermal groups, but the user is offered the choice of accurate solutions in many groups or rapid calculations in few groups. Temperature dependent thermal scattering matrices for a variety of scattering laws are included in the library for the principal moderators which include hydrogen, deuterium, graphite, beryllium and oxygen. WIMSD5 is a successor version of WIMS-D/4. 2 - Method of solution: The treatment of resonances is based on the use of equivalence theorems with a library of accurately evaluated resonance integrals for equivalent homogeneous systems at a variety of temperatures. The collision theory procedure gives accurate spectrum computations in the 69 groups of the library for the principal regions of the lattice using a simplified geometric representation of complicated lattice cells. The computed spectra are then used for the condensation of cross-sections to the number of groups selected for solution of the transport equation in detailed geometry. Solution of the transport equation is provided either by use of the Carlson DSN method or by collision probability methods. Leakage calculations including an allowance for streaming asymmetries may be made using either diffusion theory or the more elaborate B1-method. The output of the code provides Eigenvalues for the cases where a simple buckling mode is applicable or cell-averaged parameters for use in overall reactor calculations. Various reaction rate edits are provided for direct comparison with experimental measurements. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of

  1. Perfect pattern formation of neutral atoms in an addressable optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vala, J.; Whaley, K.B.; Thapliyal, A.V.; Vazirani, U.; Myrgren, S.; Weiss, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a physical scheme for formation of an arbitrary pattern of neutral atoms in an addressable optical lattice. We focus specifically on the generation of a perfect optical lattice of simple orthorhombic structure with unit occupancy, as required for initialization of a neutral atom quantum computer. The scheme employs a compacting process that is accomplished by sequential application of two types of operations: a flip operator that changes the internal state of the atoms, and a shift operator that selectively moves the atoms in one internal state along the lattice principal axis. Realizations of these elementary operations and their physical limitations are analyzed. The complexity of the compacting scheme is analyzed and we show that this scales linearly with the number of lattice sites per row of the lattice

  2. The problem of reactivity and reaction-rate calculations for mixed graphite lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, H.H.W.

    1963-05-01

    The dependence of reactor physics quantities, such as η f and Pu239/U235 fission ratio, in a single cell on the environment of the cell, and the relationship of the reactivity of a mixed lattice to the reactivity of its components, in graphite-moderated reactors are investigated. In a particular case, a mixed lattice fuelled with uranium at 0 and 3000 MWD/Te showed at 8 cm. pitch a small but appreciable change (∼ 1%) in cell quantities, and at 25 cm. pitch a smaller change. It is found that the present method of calculating lattice reactivity, ignoring intercell effects, is probably adequate for standard-pitch metal-fuelled graphite-moderated systems. More general mixed-lattice systems, particularly if accurate values of cell quantities are required, may need special calculation techniques; these are discussed, and techniques adequate for most systems are presented. (author)

  3. Elastic and failure response of imperfect three-dimensional metallic lattices: the role of geometric defects induced by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Kamm, Paul; García-Moreno, Francisco; Banhart, John; Pasini, Damiano

    2017-10-01

    This paper examines three-dimensional metallic lattices with regular octet and rhombicuboctahedron units fabricated with geometric imperfections via Selective Laser Sintering. We use X-ray computed tomography to capture morphology, location, and distribution of process-induced defects with the aim of studying their role in the elastic response, damage initiation, and failure evolution under quasi-static compression. Testing results from in-situ compression tomography show that each lattice exhibits a distinct failure mechanism that is governed not only by cell topology but also by geometric defects induced by additive manufacturing. Extracted from X-ray tomography images, the statistical distributions of three sets of defects, namely strut waviness, strut thickness variation, and strut oversizing, are used to develop numerical models of statistically representative lattices with imperfect geometry. Elastic and failure responses are predicted within 10% agreement from the experimental data. In addition, a computational study is presented to shed light into the relationship between the amplitude of selected defects and the reduction of elastic properties compared to their nominal values. The evolution of failure mechanisms is also explained with respect to strut oversizing, a parameter that can critically cause failure mode transitions that are not visible in defect-free lattices.

  4. HTR-PROTEUS benchmark calculations. Pt. 1. Unit cell results LEUPRO-1 and LEUPRO-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogenbirk, A.; Stad, R.C.L. van der; Janssen, A.J.; Klippel, H.T.; Kuijper, J.C.

    1995-09-01

    In the framework of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on 'Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low-Enriched (LEU) HTGRs' calculational benchmarks are performed on the basis of LEU-HTR pebble-bed critical experiments carried out in the PROTEUS facility at PSI, Switzerland. Of special interest is the treatment of the double heterogeneity of the fuel and the spherical fuel elements of these pebble bed core configurations. Also of interest is the proper calculation of the safety related physics parameters like the effect of water ingress and control rod worth. This document describes the ECN results of the LEUPRO-1 and LEUPRO-2 unitcell calculations performed with the codes WIMS-E, SCALE-4 and MCNP4A. Results of the LEUPRO-1 unit cell with 20% water ingress in the void is also reported for both the single and the double heterogeneous case. Emphasis is put on the intercomparison of the results obtained by the deterministic codes WIMS-E and SCALE-4, and the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. The LEUPRO whole core calculations will be reported later. (orig.)

  5. Results and analysis of saltstone cores taken from saltstone disposal unit cell 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    As part of an ongoing Performance Assessment (PA) Maintenance Plan, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has developed a sampling and analyses strategy to facilitate the comparison of field-emplaced samples (i.e., saltstone placed and cured in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU)) with samples prepared and cured in the laboratory. The primary objectives of the Sampling and Analyses Plan (SAP) are; (1) to demonstrate a correlation between the measured properties of laboratory-prepared, simulant samples (termed Sample Set 3), and the field-emplaced saltstone samples (termed Sample Set 9), and (2) to validate property values assumed for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) PA modeling. The analysis and property data for Sample Set 9 (i.e. six core samples extracted from SDU Cell 2A (SDU2A)) are documented in this report, and where applicable, the results are compared to the results for Sample Set 3. Relevant properties to demonstrate the aforementioned objectives include bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC), and radionuclide leaching behavior.

  6. Combined UMC- DFT prediction of electron-hole coupling in unit cells of pentacene crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Luciano Almeida; de Souza Júnior, Rafael Timóteo; de Almeida Fonseca, Antonio Luciano; Ribeiro Junior, Luiz Antonio; Blawid, Stefan; da Silva Filho, Demetrio Antonio; da Cunha, Wiliam Ferreira

    2017-05-01

    Pentacene is an organic semiconductor that draws special attention from the scientific community due to the high mobility of its charge carriers. As electron-hole interactions are important aspects in the regard of such property, a computationally inexpensive method to predict the coupling between these quasi-particles is highly desired. In this work, we propose a hybrid methodology of combining Uncoupled Monte Carlo Simulations (UMC) and Density functional Theory (DFT) methodologies to obtain a good compromise between computational feasibility and accuracy. As a first step in considering a Pentacene crystal, we describe its unit cell: the Pentacene Dimer. Because many conformations can be encountered for the dimer and considering the complexity of the system, we make use of UMC in order to find the most probable structures and relative orientations for the Pentacene-Pentacene complex. Following, we carry out electronic structure calculations in the scope of DFT with the goal of describing the electron-hole coupling on the most probable configurations obtained by UMC. The comparison of our results with previously reported data on the literature suggests that the methodology is well suited for describing transfer integrals of organic semiconductors. The observed accuracy together with the smaller computational cost required by our approach allows us to conclude that such methodology might be an important tool towards the description of systems with higher complexity.

  7. New solar cell and clean unit system platform (CUSP) for earth and environmental science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, A.; Matsuoka, T.; Enomoto, R.; Yasutake, M.

    2017-11-01

    We have investigated InGaN-based multi-striped orthogonal photon-photocarrier propagation solar cell (MOP3SC) in which sunlight propagates in a direction being orthogonal to that of photocarriers generated by the sunlight. Thanks to the orthogonality, in MOP3SC, absorption of the sunlight and collection of the photocarriers can be simultaneously and independently optimized with no trade-off. Furthermore, by exploiting the degree of freedom along the photon propagation and using multi-semiconductor stripes in which the incoming photons first encounter the widest gap semiconductor, and the narrowest at last, we can convert the whole solar spectrum into electricity resulting in the high conversion efficiency. For processing MOP3SC, we have developed Clean Unit System Platform (CUSP), which turns out to be able to serve as clean versatile environment having low power-consumption and high cost-performance. CUSP is suitable not only for processing devices, but also for cross-disciplinary fields, including medical/hygienic applications.

  8. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells : The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, S.M.; Yavari, S.A.; Wauthle, R.; Pouran, B.; Schrooten, J.; Weinans, H.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited,

  9. Development of a unit suitable for corrosion monitoring in district heating systems. Experiences with the LOCOR-cell test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asbjørn; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    A by-pass unit suitable for placement of a number of different probes for corrosion monitoring has been designed. Also measurements of water parameters are allowed in a side stream from the unit. The project is a part of the Nordic Innovation Fund project KORMOF. The by-pass unit has been installed...... in 6 pressurised circulating heating systems and in one cooling system. 7 different corrosion monitoring methods have been used to study corrosion rates and types in dependency of water chemistry. This paper describes the design of the by-pass unit including water analysis methods. It also describes...... the purpose, background and gained results of one of the used monitoring techniques, the crevice corrosion measurements obtained by the LOCOR-Cell„§. The crevice corrosion cell was developed by FORCE Technology in a previous district heating project financed by Nordic Industrial Fund (1)(2). Results from...

  10. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an in balance between the strength (structural integrity......) of the units and the hydraulic stability (resistance to displacements) of the armour layers. Breakage is caused by stresses from static, pulsating and impact loads. Impact load generated stresses are difficult to investigate due to non-linear scaling laws. The paper describes a method by which impact loads on....... slender armour units can be studied. by load-cell technique. Moreover, the paper presents DoJos design diagrams for the prediction of both breakage and hydraulic stability...

  11. Risk factors for death in 632 patients with sickle cell disease in the United States and United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Gladwin

    Full Text Available The role of pulmonary hypertension as a cause of mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD is controversial.We evaluated the relationship between an elevated estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure and mortality in patients with SCD. We followed patients from the walk-PHaSST screening cohort for a median of 29 months. A tricuspid regurgitation velocity (TRV≥ 3.0 m/s cuttof, which has a 67-75% positive predictive value for mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg was used. Among 572 subjects, 11.2% had TRV ≥ 3.0 m/sec. Among 582 with a measured NT-proBNP, 24.1% had values ≥ 160 pg/mL. Of 22 deaths during follow-up, 50% had a TRV ≥ 3.0 m/sec. At 24 months the cumulative survival was 83% with TRV ≥ 3.0 m/sec and 98% with TRV 47 years, male gender, chronic transfusions, WHO class III-IV, increased hemolytic markers, ferritin and creatinine were also associated with increased risk of death.A TRV ≥ 3.0 m/sec occurs in approximately 10% of individuals and has the highest risk for death of any measured variable. The study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov with identifier: NCT00492531.

  12. Chiral fermions on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randjbar Daemi, S.; Strathdee, J.

    1995-01-01

    The overlap approach to chiral gauge theories on arbitrary D-dimensional lattices is studied. The doubling problem and its relation to chiral anomalies for D = 2 and 4 is examined. In each case it is shown that the doublers can be eliminated and the well known perturbative results for chiral anomalies can be recovered. We also consider the multi-flavour case and give the general criteria for the construction of anomaly free chiral gauge theories on arbitrary lattices. We calculate the second order terms in a continuum approximation to the overlap formula in D dimensions and show that they coincide with the bilinear part of the effective action of D-dimensional Weyl fermions coupled to a background gauge field. Finally, using the same formalism we reproduce the correct Lorentz, diffeomorphism and gauge anomalies in the coupling of a Weyl fermion to 2-dimensional gravitation and Maxwell fields. (author). 15 refs

  13. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  14. Electroweak interactions on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieu, T.D.

    1994-07-01

    It is shown that the lattice fermion doubling phenomenon is connected to the chiral anomaly which is unique to the electroweak interactions. The chiral anomaly is the breaking of chiral gauge symmetry at the quantum level due to the quantum fluctuations. Such breaking, however, is undesirable and to be avoided. The preservation of gauge symmetry imposes stringent constraints on acceptable chiral gauge theory. It is argued that the constraints are unnecessary because the conventional quantization of chiral gauge theory has missed out some crucial contributions of the chiral interactions. The corrected quantization yields consistent theory in which there is no gauge anomaly and in which various mass terms can be introduced with neither the loss of gauge invariance nor the need for the Higgs mechanism. The new quantization also provide a solution to the difficulty of how to model the electroweak interactions on the lattice. 9 refs. 1 fig

  15. Entanglement scaling in lattice systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audenaert, K M R [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Prince' s Gate, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom); Cramer, M [QOLS, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Eisert, J [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Prince' s Gate, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom); Plenio, M B [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Prince' s Gate, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    We review some recent rigorous results on scaling laws of entanglement properties in quantum many body systems. More specifically, we study the entanglement of a region with its surrounding and determine its scaling behaviour with its size for systems in the ground and thermal states of bosonic and fermionic lattice systems. A theorem connecting entanglement between a region and the rest of the lattice with the surface area of the boundary between the two regions is presented for non-critical systems in arbitrary spatial dimensions. The entanglement scaling in the field limit exhibits a peculiar difference between fermionic and bosonic systems. In one-spatial dimension a logarithmic divergence is recovered for both bosonic and fermionic systems. In two spatial dimensions in the setting of half-spaces however we observe strict area scaling for bosonic systems and a multiplicative logarithmic correction to such an area scaling in fermionic systems. Similar questions may be posed and answered in classical systems.

  16. Transitionless lattices for LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franczak, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    Some techniques are described for the design of synchrotron lattices that have zero dispersion in the straight sections and/or imaginary transition energy (negative momentum-compaction factor) but no excessive amplitudes of the dispersion function. Included as an application is a single-stage synchrotron, with variable optics, that has different ion-optical properties at injection and extraction but requires a complex way of programming the quadrupoles. In addition, a two-stage facility consisting of a 45-GeV synchrotron of 1100-m circumference and a 9-GeV booster of half that size is presented. As alternates to these separated-function lattices, some combined-function modules are given that can be used to construct a synchrotron with similar properties

  17. Graphene antidot lattice transport measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackenzie, David; Cagliani, Alberto; Gammelgaard, Lene

    2017-01-01

    We investigate graphene devices patterned with a narrow band of holes perpendicular to the current flow, a few-row graphene antidot lattice (FR-GAL). Theoretical reports suggest that a FR-GAL can have a bandgap with a relatively small reduction of the transmission compared to what is typical...... for antidot arrays devices. Graphene devices were fabricated using 100 keV electron beam lithography (EBL) for nanopatterning as well as for defining electrical contacts. Patterns with hole diameter and neck widths of order 30 nm were produced, which is the highest reported pattern density of antidot lattices...... in graphene reported defined by EBL. Electrical measurements showed that devices with one and five rows exhibited field effect mobility of ∼100 cm2/Vs, while a larger number of rows, around 40, led to a significant reduction of field effect mobility (

  18. Cellular automata in cytoskeletal lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S A; Watt, R C; Hameroff, S R

    1984-01-01

    Cellular automata (CA) activities could mediate biological regulation and information processing via nonlinear electrodynamic effects in cytoskeletal lattice arrays. Frohlich coherent oscillations and other nonlinear mechanisms may effect discrete 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -11/ s interval events which result in dynamic patterns in biolattices such as cylindrical protein polymers: microtubules (MT). Structural geometry and electrostatic forces of MT subunit dipole oscillations suggest neighbor rules among the hexagonally packed protein subunits. Computer simulations using these suggested rules and MT structural geometry demonstrate CA activities including dynamical and stable self-organizing patterns, oscillators, and traveling gliders. CA activities in MT and other cytoskeletal lattices may have important biological regulatory functions. 23 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  19. Innovations in lattice QCD algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orginos, Konstantinos

    2006-01-01

    Lattice QCD calculations demand a substantial amount of computing power in order to achieve the high precision results needed to better understand the nature of strong interactions, assist experiment to discover new physics, and predict the behavior of a diverse set of physical systems ranging from the proton itself to astrophysical objects such as neutron stars. However, computer power alone is clearly not enough to tackle the calculations we need to be doing today. A steady stream of recent algorithmic developments has made an important impact on the kinds of calculations we can currently perform. In this talk I am reviewing these algorithms and their impact on the nature of lattice QCD calculations performed today

  20. Baryon structure from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrou, C.

    2009-01-01

    We present recent lattice results on the baryon spectrum, nucleon electromagnetic and axial form factors, nucleon to Δ transition form factors as well as the Δ electromagnetic form factors. The masses of the low lying baryons and the nucleon form factors are calculated using two degenerate flavors of twisted mass fermions down to pion mass of about 270 MeV. We compare to the results of other collaborations. The nucleon to Δ transition and Δ form factors are calculated in a hybrid scheme, which uses staggered sea quarks and domain wall valence quarks. The dominant magnetic dipole nucleon to Δ transition form factor is also evaluated using dynamical domain wall fermions. The transverse density distributions of the Δ in the infinite momentum frame are extracted using the form factors determined from lattice QCD. (author)

  1. Multigrid for Staggered Lattice Fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard C. [Boston U.; Clark, M. A. [Unlisted, US; Strelchenko, Alexei [Fermilab; Weinberg, Evan [Boston U.

    2018-01-23

    Critical slowing down in Krylov methods for the Dirac operator presents a major obstacle to further advances in lattice field theory as it approaches the continuum solution. Here we formulate a multi-grid algorithm for the Kogut-Susskind (or staggered) fermion discretization which has proven difficult relative to Wilson multigrid due to its first-order anti-Hermitian structure. The solution is to introduce a novel spectral transformation by the K\\"ahler-Dirac spin structure prior to the Galerkin projection. We present numerical results for the two-dimensional, two-flavor Schwinger model, however, the general formalism is agnostic to dimension and is directly applicable to four-dimensional lattice QCD.

  2. Computing nucleon EDM on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramczyk, Michael; Aoki, Sinya; Blum, Tom; Izubuchi, Taku; Ohki, Hiroshi; Syritsyn, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    I will discuss briefly recent changes in the methodology of computing the baryon EDM on a lattice. The associated correction substantially reduces presently existing lattice values for the proton and neutron theta-induced EDMs, so that even the most precise previous lattice results become consistent with zero. On one hand, this change removes previous disagreements between these lattice results and the phenomenological estimates of the nucleon EDM. On the other hand, the nucleon EDM becomes much harder to compute on a lattice. In addition, I will review the progress in computing quark chromo-EDM-induced nucleon EDM using chiral quark action.

  3. Heavy water critical experiments on plutonium lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Yoshio; Shiba, Kiminori

    1975-06-01

    This report is the summary of physics study on plutonium lattice made in Heavy Water Critical Experiment Section of PNC. By using Deuterium Critical Assembly, physics study on plutonium lattice has been carried out since 1972. Experiments on following items were performed in a core having 22.5 cm square lattice pitch. (1) Material buckling (2) Lattice parameters (3) Local power distribution factor (4) Gross flux distribution in two region core (5) Control rod worth. Experimental results were compared with theoretical ones calculated by METHUSELAH II code. It is concluded from this study that calculation by METHUSELAH II code has acceptable accuracy in the prediction on plutonium lattice. (author)

  4. Computing nucleon EDM on a lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramczyk, Michael; Izubuchi, Taku

    2017-06-18

    I will discuss briefly recent changes in the methodology of computing the baryon EDM on a lattice. The associated correction substantially reduces presently existing lattice values for the proton and neutron theta-induced EDMs, so that even the most precise previous lattice results become consistent with zero. On one hand, this change removes previous disagreements between these lattice results and the phenomenological estimates of the nucleon EDM. On the other hand, the nucleon EDM becomes much harder to compute on a lattice. In addition, I will review the progress in computing quark chromo-EDM-induced nucleon EDM using chiral quark action.

  5. Aliasing modes in the lattice Schwinger model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Rafael G.; Tututi, Eduardo S.

    2007-01-01

    We study the Schwinger model on a lattice consisting of zeros of the Hermite polynomials that incorporates a lattice derivative and a discrete Fourier transform with many properties. Such a lattice produces a Klein-Gordon equation for the boson field and the exact value of the mass in the asymptotic limit if the boundaries are not taken into account. On the contrary, if the lattice is considered with boundaries new modes appear due to aliasing effects. In the continuum limit, however, this lattice yields also a Klein-Gordon equation with a reduced mass

  6. Scale setting in lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, Rainer

    2014-02-01

    The principles of scale setting in lattice QCD as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various commonly used scales are discussed. After listing criteria for good scales, I concentrate on the main presently used ones with an emphasis on scales derived from the Yang-Mills gradient flow. For these I discuss discretisation errors, statistical precision and mass effects. A short review on numerical results also brings me to an unpleasant disagreement which remains to be explained.

  7. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab

  8. BROOKHAVEN: Lattice gauge theory symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-12-15

    Originally introduced by Kenneth Wilson in the early 70s, the lattice formulation of a quantum gauge theory became a hot topic of investigation after Mike Creutz, Laurence Jacobs and Claudio Rebbi demonstrated in 1979 the feasibility of meaningful computer simulations. The initial enthusiasm led gradually to a mature research effort, with continual attempts to improve upon previous results, to develop better computational techniques and to find new domains of application.

  9. Harmonic Lattice Dynamics of Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelin, G

    1974-07-01

    The phonon dispersion relations of the DELTA-, LAMBDA-, and SIGMA-directions of germanium at 80 K are analysed in terms of current harmonic lattice dynamical models. On the basis of this experience, a new model is proposed which gives a unified account of the strong points of the previous models. The principal elements of the presented theory are quasiparticle bond charges combined with a valence force field.

  10. Screening in graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Marco Haller; Jauho, A. P.; Pedersen, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    We compute the dynamical polarization function for a graphene antidot lattice in the random-phase approximation. The computed polarization functions display a much more complicated structure than what is found for pristine graphene (even when evaluated beyond the Dirac-cone approximation...... the plasmon dispersion law and find an approximate square-root dependence with a suppressed plasmon frequency as compared to doped graphene. The plasmon dispersion is nearly isotropic and the developed approximation schemes agree well with the full calculation....

  11. Symplectic maps for accelerator lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnock, R.L.; Ruth, R.; Gabella, W.

    1988-05-01

    We describe a method for numerical construction of a symplectic map for particle propagation in a general accelerator lattice. The generating function of the map is obtained by integrating the Hamilton-Jacobi equation as an initial-value problem on a finite time interval. Given the generating function, the map is put in explicit form by means of a Fourier inversion technique. We give an example which suggests that the method has promise. 9 refs., 9 figs

  12. Harmonic Lattice Dynamics of Germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelin, G.

    1974-01-01

    The phonon dispersion relations of the Δ-, Λ-, and Σ-directions of germanium at 80 K are analysed in terms of current harmonic lattice dynamical models. On the basis of this experience, a new model is proposed which gives a unified account of the strong points of the previous models. The principal elements of the presented theory are quasiparticle bond charges combined with a valence force field

  13. Scale setting in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Rainer [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2014-02-15

    The principles of scale setting in lattice QCD as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various commonly used scales are discussed. After listing criteria for good scales, I concentrate on the main presently used ones with an emphasis on scales derived from the Yang-Mills gradient flow. For these I discuss discretisation errors, statistical precision and mass effects. A short review on numerical results also brings me to an unpleasant disagreement which remains to be explained.

  14. Lattice contraction and lattice deformation of UO{sub 2} and ThO{sub 2} doped with Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baena, Angela [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, P.O. Box 2404, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Cardinaels, Thomas; Govers, Kevin; Pakarinen, Janne [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Binnemans, Koen [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, P.O. Box 2404, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Verwerft, Marc, E-mail: marc.verwerft@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The lattice deformations in two doped fluorite systems, (U{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2.00} and (Th{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2−x/2}, have been reassessed by precise X-ray and electron diffraction investigations and the results were interpreted using the Bond Valence Sum (BVS) approach. For the (U{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2.00} system, the experimental findings and theoretical assessment confirm earlier work: the lattice keeps its fluorite structure with a unit cell parameter that contracts linearly with dopant concentration. The lattice contraction in the (Th{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2−x/2} system has for the first time been analyzed up to the solubility limit. Similar as for (U{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2.00}, the (Th{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2−x/2} solid solution contracts linearly as a function of dopant concentration but additionally, it develops a superstructure which is closely related to the parent fluorite structure. An excess anion bixbyite trial model is proposed to describe this superstructure. - Highlights: • Lattice deformations of (U{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2.00} & (Th{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2−x/2} are not identical. • (U{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2.00} retains its fluorite structure. • (Th{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2−x/2} forms an excess-anion bixbyite structure. • (U{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2.00} and (Th{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2−x/2} contractions were evaluated with high precision.

  15. An approach to box homogenisation-lattice properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, O.P.K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve two group coupled neutron diffusion equations in x, y geometry for a lattice cell of a thermal reactor comprising an array of fuel pins (cellules) regularly spaced in a square box. The method uses finite difference approximation considering four neighbours of a mesh point and successive iteration technique. To simulate the current vanishing boundary condition at the cell boundary, the code uses an hypothesis that the thermal neutron flux increases exponentially beyond the pin cellules boundary while the fast neutron flux follows the reverse behaviour and the flux across the cell boundary follows the mirror image distribution. The code requires two group diffusion properties of pin cellules as input data and it calculates Ksub(infinity), L 2 , Lsub(infinity)sup(2), Dsub(th), and Df of the system. This code coupled with lattice pin and global calculation codes has been used for IRT - 2000 reactor and the results are quite reasonable. (author)

  16. Wave transmission in nonlinear lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, D.; Tsironis, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    The interplay of nonlinearity with lattice discreteness leads to phenomena and propagation properties quite distinct from those appearing in continuous nonlinear systems. For a large variety of condensed matter and optics applications the continuous wave approximation is not appropriate. In the present review we discuss wave transmission properties in one dimensional nonlinear lattices. Our paradigmatic equations are discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equations and their study is done through a dynamical systems approach. We focus on stationary wave properties and utilize well known results from the theory of dynamical systems to investigate various aspects of wave transmission and wave localization. We analyze in detail the more general dynamical system corresponding to the equation that interpolates between the non-integrable discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation and the integrable Albowitz-Ladik equation. We utilize this analysis in a nonlinear Kronig-Penney model and investigate transmission and band modification properties. We discuss the modifications that are effected through an electric field and the nonlinear Wannier-Stark localization effects that are induced. Several applications are described, such as polarons in one dimensional lattices, semiconductor superlattices and one dimensional nonlinear photonic band gap systems. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Spin lattices of walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Pedro; Pucci, Giuseppe; Goujon, Alexis; Dunkel, Jorn; Bush, John

    2017-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the spontaneous emergence of collective behavior in spin lattice of droplets walking on a vibrating fluid bath. The bottom topography consists of relatively deep circular wells that encourage the walking droplets to follow circular trajectories centered at the lattice sites, in one direction or the other. Wave-mediated interactions between neighboring drops are enabled through a thin fluid layer between the wells. The sense of rotation of the walking droplets may thus become globally coupled. When the coupling is sufficiently strong, interactions with neighboring droplets may result in switches in spin that lead to preferred global arrangements, including correlated (all drops rotating in the same direction) or anti-correlated (neighboring drops rotating in opposite directions) states. Analogies with ferromagnetism and anti-ferromagnetism are drawn. Different spatial arrangements are presented in 1D and 2D lattices to illustrate the effects of topological frustration. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants CMMI-1333242 and DMS-1614043.

  18. Distribution of local magnetic field of vortex lattice near anisotropic superconductor surface in inclined external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremova, S.A.; Tsarevskij, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic field distribution in a unit cell of the Abrikosov vortex lattice near the surface of monoaxial anisotropic type-ii superconductors in inclined external magnetic field has been found in the framework of London model for the cases when the symmetry axis is perpendicular and parallel to the superconductor surface interface. Distribution of local magnetic field as a function of the distance from the superconductor interface surface and external field inclination angle has been obtained. Using high-Tc superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O by way of examples, it has been shown that the study of local magnetic field distribution function, depending on external magnetic field inclination angle towards the superconductor symmetry axis and towards the superconductor surface, can provide important data on anisotropic properties of the superconductor [ru

  19. EXPANDA-75: one-dimensional diffusion code for multi-region plate lattice heterogeneous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Katsuragi, Satoru; Suzuki, Tomoo; Ogitsu, Makoto.

    1975-08-01

    An advanced treatment has been developed for analyzing a multi-region plate lattice heterogeneous system using the coarse group constants set provided for a homogeneous system. The essential points of this treatment are modification of effective admixture cross sections and improvement of effective elastic removal cross sections. By this treatment the heterogeneity effects for flux distributions and effective cross sections in the unit cell can be reproduced accurately in comparison with the ultra fine group treatment which consumes huge amounts of computing time. Based on the present treatment and using the JAERI-Fast set, a one-dimensional diffusion code, EXPANDA-75, was developed for extensive use for analyses of fast critical experiments. The user's guide is also presented in this report. (auth.)

  20. Localized and Delocalized Motion of Colloidal Particles on a Magnetic Bubble Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierno, Pietro; Fischer, Thomas M.; Johansen, Tom H.

    2007-01-01

    We study the motion of paramagnetic colloidal particles placed above magnetic bubble domains of a uniaxial garnet film and driven through the lattice by external magnetic field modulation. An external tunable precessing field propels the particles either in localized orbits around the bubbles or in superdiffusive or ballistic motion through the bubble array. This motion results from the interplay between the driving rotating signal, the viscous drag force and the periodic magnetic energy landscape. We explain the transition in terms of the incommensurability between the transit frequency of the particle through a unit cell and the modulation frequency. Ballistic motion dynamically breaks the symmetry of the array and the phase locked particles follow one of the six crystal directions

  1. SFM-FDTD analysis of triangular-lattice AAA structure: Parametric study of the TEM mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, M.; Chemrouk, C.; Belkhir, A.; Kebci, Z.; Ndao, A.; Lamrous, O.; Baida, F. I.

    2014-05-01

    This theoretical work reports a parametric study of enhanced transmission through annular aperture array (AAA) structure arranged in a triangular lattice. The effect of the incidence angle in addition to the inner and outer radii values on the evolution of the transmission spectra is carried out. To this end, a 3D Finite-Difference Time-Domain code based on the Split Field Method (SFM) is used to calculate the spectral response of the structure for any angle of incidence. In order to work through an orthogonal unit cell which presents the advantage to reduce time and space of computation, special periodic boundary conditions are implemented. This study provides a new modeling of AAA structures useful for producing tunable ultra-compact devices.

  2. Effect Of Ionized Radiation On Blood Vessels And Neural Celle On Workers In Cardiac Catheterization Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgazzar, E.M.S.

    2015-01-01

    The catheterization laboratory is generally considered an area where exposure to radiation is particularly high. Factors such as the configuration of the of the x-ray equipment, the number of cases per day, contribute to this relatively high level of exposure, which is amongst the highest in the hospital (Butler et al., 2006). Meanwhile, Systematic reviews of the published epidemiological literature and cardiovascular diseases or reviews of studies of populations medically, occupationally or environmentally exposed to relatively low-dose radiation concluded that there is a significant association (although with substantial heterogeneity) between radiation exposure and circulatory disease, either cardiovascular or cerebra-vascular. Vascular injury is a well recognized cause of late radiation therapy morbidity and this manifests as atherosclerosis in large vessels (Nagababu et al., 2009). Since the brain is among the most critical dose-limiting organs in radiotherapy, mainly due to the development of cognitive dysfunction following white matter disruption. The neuro-vascular unit is also vulnerable to radiation effects, and cerebra-vascular atherosclerotic damage is now considered proven (Raber, 2004). Circulating EPCs (endothelial progenitor cells) has been shown to be isolated from bone marrow or circulating mononuclear cells that express a variety of endothelial surface markers. EPCs incorporate into sites of revascularization and home to sites of endothelial denudation. Initial clinical studies demonstrated that risk factors for atherosclerosis are associated with reduced levels of circulating EPCs and that the functional integrity of the endothelium correlates with the activities of EPCs (Losordo and Dimmeler 2004). Since oxidative processes are essential one of the main mechanisms associated with radiation induced hazardous effects and early ageing is an effect associated with radiation exposure, accordingly it can be suggested that low-dose irradiation

  3. Theoretical characterization and design of small molecule donor material containing naphthodithiophene central unit for efficient organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yu-Ai; Geng, Yun; Li, Hai-Bin; Jin, Jun-Ling; Wu, Yong; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-07-15

    To seek for high-performance small molecule donor materials used in heterojunction solar cell, six acceptor-donor-acceptor small molecules based on naphtho[2,3-b:6,7-b']dithiophene (NDT) units with different acceptor units were designed and characterized using density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Their geometries, electronic structures, photophysical, and charge transport properties have been scrutinized comparing with the reported donor material NDT(TDPP)2 (TDPP  =  thiophene-capped diketopyrrolopyrrole). The open circuit voltage (V(oc)), energetic driving force(ΔE(L-L)), and exciton binding energy (E(b)) were also provided to give an elementary understanding on their cell performance. The results reveal that the frontier molecular orbitals of 3-7 match well with the acceptor material PC61 BM, and compounds 3-5 were found to exhibit the comparable performances to 1 and show promising potential in organic solar cells. In particular, comparing with 1, system 7 with naphthobisthiadiazole acceptor unit displays broader absorption spectrum, higher V(oc), lower E(b), and similar carrier mobility. An in-depth insight into the nature of the involved excited states based on transition density matrix and charge density difference indicates that all S1 states are mainly intramolecular charge transfer states with the charge transfer from central NDT unit to bilateral acceptor units, and also imply that the exciton of 7 can be dissociated easily due to its large extent of the charge transfer. In a word, 7 maybe superior to 1 and may act as a promising donor candidate for organic solar cell. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Transverse Lattice Approach to Light-Front Hamiltonian QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dalley, S

    1999-01-01

    We describe a non-perturbative procedure for solving from first principles the light-front Hamiltonian problem of SU(N) pure gauge theory in D spacetime dimensions (D>2), based on enforcing Lorentz covariance of observables. A transverse lattice regulator and colour-dielectric link fields are employed, together with an associated effective potential. We argue that the light-front vacuum is necessarily trivial for large enough lattice spacing, and clarify why this leads to an Eguchi-Kawai dimensional reduction of observables to 1+1-dimensions in the infinite N limit. The procedure is then tested by explicit calculations for 2+1-dimensional SU(infinity) gauge theory, within a first approximation to the lattice effective potential. We identify a scaling trajectory which produces Lorentz covariant behaviour for the lightest glueballs. The predicted masses, in units of the measured string tension, are in agreement with recent results from conventional Euclidean lattice simulations. In addition, we obtain the poten...

  5. Multi-sphere unit cell model to calculate the effective thermal conductivity in pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Antwerpen, W.; Rousseau, P.G.; Du Toit, C.G.

    2010-01-01

    A proper understanding of the mechanisms of heat transfer, fluid flow and pressure drop through a packed bed of spheres is of utmost importance in the design of a high temperature Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). While the gas flows predominantly in the axial direction through the bed, the total effective thermal conductivity is a lumped parameter that characterises the total heat transfer in the radial direction through the packed bed. The study of the effective thermal conductivity is important because it forms an intricate part of the self-acting decay heat removal chain, which is directly related to the PBR safety case. The effective thermal conductivity is the summation of various heat transport phenomena. These are the enhanced thermal conductivity due to turbulent mixing as the fluid passes through the voids between pebbles, heat transfer due to the movement of the solid spheres and thermal conduction and thermal radiation between the spheres in a stagnant fluid environment. In this study, the conduction and radiation between the spheres are investigated. Firstly, existing correlations for the effective thermal conductivity are investigated, with particular attention given to its applicability in the near-wall region. Several phenomena in particular are examined namely: conduction through the spheres, conduction through the contact area between the spheres, conduction through the gas phase and radiation between solid surfaces. A new approach to simulate the effective thermal conductivity for randomly packed beds is then presented, namely the so-called Multi-sphere Unit Cell Model. The model is validated by comparing the results with that obtained in experiments. (authors)

  6. Indium phosphide solar cell research in the United States: Comparison with non-photovoltaic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of the InP solar cell research program are presented. Homojunction cells with efficiencies approaching 19 percent are demonstrated, while 17 percent is achieved for ITO/InP cells. The superior radiation resistance of the two latter cell configurations over both Si and GaAs cells has been shown. InP cells aboard the LIPS3 satellite show no degradation after more than a year in orbit. Computed array specific powers are used to compare the performance of an InP solar cell array to solar dynamic and nuclear systems.

  7. THE FEATURES OF CONNEXINS EXPRESSION IN THE CELLS OF NEUROVASCLAR UNIT IN NORMAL CONDITIONS AND HYPOXIA IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Morgun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to assess a role of connexin 43 (Cx43 and associated molecule CD38 in the regulation of cell-cell interactions in the neurovascular unit (NVU in vitro in physiological conditions and in hypoxia.Materials and methods. The study was done using the original neurovascular unit model in vitro. The NVU consisted of three cell types: neurons, astrocytes, and cerebral endothelial cells derived from rats. Hypoxia was induced by incubating cells with sodium iodoacetate for 30 min at37 °C in standard culture conditions.Results. We investigated the role of connexin 43 in the regulation of cell interactions within the NVU in normal and hypoxic injury in vitro. We found that astrocytes were characterized by high levels of expression of Cx43 and low level of CD38 expression, neurons demonstrated high levels of CD38 and low levels of Cx43. In hypoxic conditions, the expression of Cx43 and CD38 in astrocytes markedly increased while CD38 expression in neurons decreased, however no changes were found in endothelial cells. Suppression of Cx43 activity resulted in down-regulation of CD38 in NVU cells, both in physiological conditions and at chemical hypoxia.Conclusion. Thus, the Cx-regulated intercellular NAD+-dependent communication and secretory phenotype of astroglial cells that are the part of the blood-brain barrier is markedly changed in hypoxia.

  8. Deciphering the Role of Sulfonated Unit in Heparin-Mimicking Polymer to Promote Neural Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jiehua; Yuan, Yuqi; Lyu, Zhonglin; Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Qi; Wang, Hongwei; Yuan, Lin; Chen, Hong

    2017-08-30

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), especially heparin and heparan sulfate (HS), hold great potential for inducing the neural differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and have brought new hope for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the disadvantages of natural heparin/HS, such as difficulty in isolating them with a sufficient amount, highly heterogeneous structure, and the risk of immune responses, have limited their further therapeutic applications. Thus, there is a great demand for stable, controllable, and well-defined synthetic alternatives of heparin/HS with more effective biological functions. In this study, based upon a previously proposed unit-recombination strategy, several heparin-mimicking polymers were synthesized by integrating glucosamine-like 2-methacrylamido glucopyranose monomers (MAG) with three sulfonated units in different structural forms, and their effects on cell proliferation, the pluripotency, and the differentiation of ESCs were carefully studied. The results showed that all the copolymers had good cytocompatibility and displayed much better bioactivity in promoting the neural differentiation of ESCs as compared to natural heparin; copolymers with different sulfonated units exhibited different levels of promoting ability; among them, copolymer with 3-sulfopropyl acrylate (SPA) as a sulfonated unit was the most potent in promoting the neural differentiation of ESCs; the promoting effect is dependent on the molecular weight and concentration of P(MAG-co-SPA), with the highest levels occurring at the intermediate molecular weight and concentration. These results clearly demonstrated that the sulfonated unit in the copolymers played an important role in determining the promoting effect on ESCs' neural differentiation; SPA was identified as the most potent sulfonated unit for copolymer with the strongest promoting ability. The possible reason for sulfonated unit structure as a vital factor influencing the ability of the copolymers

  9. Development of integrated DMFC and PEM fuel cell units. Final report; Udvikling af integrerede DMFC og PEM braendselscelle enheder. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odgaard, M. (IRD Fuel Cell Technology, Svendborg (DK))

    2007-06-15

    The 36-month long project 'Development of integrated DMFC and PEM fuel cell units' has been completed. The project goal was to develop a completely new MEA concept for integrated PEM and DMFC unit cells with enhanced power density and in this way obtain a price reduction. The integrated unit cell consists of a MEA, a gas diffusion layer with flow fields completed with bipolar plates and seals. The main focus of the present project was to: 1) Develop new catalyst materials fabricated by the use of FSD (flame spray deposition method). 2) Optimisation of the state-of-the-art MEA materials and electrode structure. 3) Implementation of a model to account for the CO poisoning of PEM fuel cells. Results and progress obtained in the project established that the individual unit cell components were able to meet and follow the road map of LT-PEM FC regarding electrode catalyst loading and fulfilled the targets for Year 2006. The project has resulted in some important successes. The highlights are as follows: The project has resulted in some important successes. The highlights are as follows: 1) MEA structure knowledge acquired in the project provide a sound basis for further progress. 2) A novel method for the synthesis of electrode by using flame spray synthesis was explored. 3) Electrochemical and catalytic behaviours of catalysts activity for CH{sub 3}OH explored. 4) Implementation of a sub model to account for the CO poisoning of PEM FC has been developed. 5) Numerical study of the flow distribution in FC manifolds was developed and completed with experimental data. 6) The electrode catalyst loading targets for year 2006 achieved. 7) The DMFC MEA performance has been improved by 35%. 8) Optimisation of the MEAs fabrication process has been successfully developed. 9) A new simple flow field design has been designed. 10) A procedure for integrated seals has been developed (au)

  10. Fourier transform imaging of impurities in the unit cells of crystals: Mn in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.-L.; Bihler, C.; Schoch, W.; Limmer, W.; Daeubler, J.; Thieß, S.; Brandt, M. S.; Zegenhagen, J.

    2010-06-01

    The lattice sites of Mn in ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As thin films were imaged using the x-ray standing wave technique. The model-free images, obtained straightforwardly by Fourier inversion, disclose immediately that the Mn mostly substitutes the Ga with a small fraction residing on minority sites. The images further reveal variations in the Mn concentrations of the different sites upon post-growth treatments. Subsequent model refinement based on the directly reconstructed images resolves with high precision the complete Mn site distributions. It is found that post-growth annealing increases the fraction of substitutional Mn at the expense of interstitial Mn whereas hydrogenation has little influence on the Mn site distribution. Our study offers an element-specific high-resolution imaging approach for accurately determining the detailed site distributions of dilute concentrations of atoms in crystals.

  11. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Zongmeng [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Huai, Ping, E-mail: huaiping@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Qiu, Wujie [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Ke, Xuezhi, E-mail: xzke@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Zhang, Wenqing [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhu, Zhiyuan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-11-15

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC{sub 2} with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C{sub 2} dimer in ThC{sub 2} is similar to that of a free standing C{sub 2} dimer. This indicates that the C{sub 2} dimer in ThC{sub 2} is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC{sub 2} was calculated by means of the Debye–Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC{sub 2} contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  12. A battery-fuel cell hybrid auxiliary power unit for trucks: Analysis of direct and indirect hybrid configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsun, Remzi Can; Krupp, Carsten; Baltzer, Sidney; Gnörich, Bruno; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A battery-fuel cell hybrid auxiliary power unit for heavy duty vehicles is reported. • Comparison of direct and indirect hybrids using representative load profiles. • Evaluation based on validated fuel cell system and battery models. • Indirect hybrid with constant fuel cell load yields 29.3% hybrid system efficiency. • Fuel cell should be pre-heated using waste heat from the diesel engine during drive. - Abstract: The idling operation of engines in heavy duty vehicles to cover electricity demand during layovers entails significant fuel consumption and corresponding emissions. Indeed, this mode of operation is highly inefficient and a noteworthy contributor to the transportation sector’s aggregate carbon dioxide emissions. Here, a potential solution to this wasteful practice is outlined in the form of a hybrid battery-fuel cell system for application as an auxiliary power unit for trucks. Drawing on experimentally-validated fuel cell and battery models, several possible hybrid concepts are evaluated and direct and indirect hybrid configurations analyzed using a representative load profile. The results indicate that a direct hybrid configuration is only applicable if the load demand profile does not deviate strongly from the assumed profile. Operation of an indirect hybrid with a constant fuel cell load yields the greatest hybrid system efficiency, at 29.3%, while battery size could be reduced by 87% if the fuel cell is operated at the highest dynamics. Maximum efficiency in truck applications can be achieved by pre-heating the system prior to operation using exhaust heat from the motor, which increased system efficiency from 25.3% to 28.1%, including start-up. These findings confirm that hybrid systems could offer enormous fuel savings and constitute a sizeable step on the path toward energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly heavy duty vehicles that does not necessitate a fuel switch.

  13. Nucleon deformation from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapalis, A.

    2008-01-01

    The issue of nucleon and Delta(1232) deformation is discussed through the evaluation of the N to Delta electromagnetic transition and Delta electromagnetic form factors in Lattice QCD. The momentum dependence of the form factors is studied using 2+1 staggered dynamical flavors at pion masses as low as 350 MeV and compared to results obtained in the Wilson quenched and two-flavor dynamical theory at similar pion masses. The measurement of small non-zero quadrupole amplitudes, in agreement to recent experiments, establishes the existence of deformation in the N and Delta states. (author)

  14. Nucleon Structure from Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotti, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Lattice simulations of hadronic structure are now reaching a level where they are able to not only complement, but also provide guidance to current and forthcoming experimental programmes.By considering new simulations at low quark masses and on large volumes, we review the recent progress that has been made in this area by the QCDSF/UKQCD collaboration. In particular, results obtained close to the physical point for several quantities, including electromagnetic form factors and moments of parton distribution functions, show some indication of approaching their phenomenological values.

  15. GLAD: a generic lattice debugger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings. (author)

  16. Lattice dynamics of ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    The theory of lattice dynamics for ionic and rare-gas crystals is derived in the harmonic approximation. We start from a Hamiltonian and average over electron coordinates in order to obtain an effective interaction between ion displacements. We assume that electronic excitations are localized on a single ion, which limits the theory to ionic crystals. The deformation-dipole model and the indirect-ionic-interaction model are derived. These two contributions are closely linked, and together provide an accurate description of short-range forces

  17. Degeneración Lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas Bocanegra, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia de degeneración periférica de retina Lattice y su relación con estados refractivos y rupturas retinales. Metodología: Estudio de corte transversal con exploración de asociación, mediante análisis de casos y controles. Se examinaron 680 ojos en el Instituto de Investigaciones Optométricas e Instituto de Córnea. El estado refractivo se determinó mediante técnica estática y el estado retinal mediante oftalmoscopia indirecta con indentación escleral. Resultados...

  18. Lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, N E

    1979-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is the most important of all clinically distinct entities that effect the peripheral fundus and are related to retinal detachment. The purpose of this review is to survey the extensive literature, to evaluate the many diverse opinions on this subject, and to correlate and summarize all the known facts regarding this disease entity. The disease is fully defined and described, both clinically and histologically. Some aspects of the disease are still poorly understood, and some remain controversial, especially in the area of management. For this reason, the indications for treatment are discussed under eight subsections, with a view toward providing practical guidelines for recommendations in management.

  19. The lattice dynamics of imidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, K.H.

    1983-05-01

    The lattice dynamics of imidazole have been investigated. To this end dispersion curves have been determined at 10 K by inelastic coherent neutron scattering. RAMAN measurements have been done to investigate identical gamma - point modes. The combination of extinction rules for RAMAN - and neutron scattering leads to the symmetry assignment of identical gamma - point modes. The experiment yields a force constant of the streching vibration of the hydrogen bond of 0.33 mdyn/A. A force model has been developed to describe the intermolecular atom - atom Interactions in imidazole. (orig./BHO)

  20. [Lattice degeneration of the peripheral retina: ultrastructural study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, P; Malecaze, F; Arne, J L; Mathis, A

    1985-01-01

    The ultrastructural study of a case of snail track degeneration shows the presence of lipid inclusions in both the glial and the macrophage cells in every layer of the retina, and the existence of intraretinal fibers different from collagen fibers appearing to be glial filaments similar to those found in astrocytic gliomes and to the Rosenthal fibers observed in senile nervous cells. Other features were thinning of the retina and absence of blood vessels in the retina. There are no abnormalities of the vitreo-retinal juncture. All the lesions are in agreement with those observed by Daicker [Ophthalmologica, Basel 165: 360-365, 1972; Klin. Mbl. Augenheilk. 172: 581-583, 1978] with some differences, however. They are different from those found in lattice degeneration. They show that snail track degeneration is a specific form of peripheral retinal degeneration which is quite different from lattice degeneration and must not be considered similar.

  1. Quasi-Unit-Cell Model for an Al-Ni-Co Ideal Quasicrystal based on Clusters with Broken Tenfold Symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Eiji; Saitoh, Koh; Takakura, H.; Tsai, A. P.; Steinhardt, P. J.; Jeong, H.-C.

    2000-01-01

    We present new evidence supporting the quasi-unit-cell description of the Al 72 Ni 20 Co 8 decagonal quasicrystal which shows that the solid is composed of repeating, overlapping decagonal cluster columns with broken tenfold symmetry. We propose an atomic model which gives a significantly improved fit to electron microscopy experiments compared to a previous proposal by us and to alternative proposals with tenfold symmetric clusters. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  2. Fuel Cell Backup Power Unit Configuration and Electricity Market Participation: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhiwen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eichman, Josh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-13

    This National Renewable Energy Laboratory industry-inspired Laboratory Directed Research and Development project evaluates the feasibility and economics of using fuel cell backup power systems in cell towers to provide grid services (e.g., balancing, ancillary services, demand response). The work is intended to evaluate the integration of thousands of under-utilized, clean, efficient, and reliable fuel cell systems that are already installed in cell towers for potential grid and ancillary services.

  3. Chaos, scaling and existence of a continuum limit in classical non-Abelian lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Rugh, H.H.; Rugh, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss space-time chaos and scaling properties for classical non-Abelian gauge fields discretized on a spatial lattice. We emphasize that there is a open-quote no goclose quotes for simulating the original continuum classical gauge fields over a long time span since there is a never ending dynamical cascading towards the ultraviolet. We note that the temporal chaotic properties of the original continuum gauge fields and the lattice gauge system have entirely different scaling properties thereby emphasizing that they are entirely different dynamical systems which have only very little in common. Considered as a statistical system in its own right the lattice gauge system in a situation where it has reached equilibrium comes closest to what could be termed a open-quotes continuum limitclose quotes in the limit of very small energies (weak non-linearities). We discuss the lattice system both in the limit for small energies and in the limit of high energies where we show that there is a saturation of the temporal chaos as a pure lattice artifact. Our discussion focuses not only on the temporal correlations but to a large extent also on the spatial correlations in the lattice system. We argue that various conclusions of physics have been based on monitoring the non-Abelian lattice system in regimes where the fields are correlated over few lattice units only. This is further evidenced by comparison with results for Abelian lattice gauge theory. How the real time simulations of the classical lattice gauge theory may reach contact with the real time evolution of (semi-classical aspects of) the quantum gauge theory (e.g. Q.C.D.) is left an important question to be further examined

  4. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  5. On the Effect of Unit-Cell Parameters in Predicting the Elastic Response of Wood-Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Alavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the effect of unit-cell geometrical parameters in predicting elastic properties of a typical wood plastic composite (WPC. The ultimate goal was obtaining the optimal values of representative volume element (RVE parameters to accurately predict the mechanical behavior of the WPC. For each unit cell, defined by a given combination of the above geometrical parameters, finite element simulation in ABAQUS was carried out, and the corresponding stress-strain curve was obtained. A uniaxial test according to ASTM D638-02a type V was performed on the composite specimen. Modulus of elasticity was determined using hyperbolic tangent function, and the results were compared to the sets of finite element analyses. Main effects of RVE parameters and their interactions were demonstrated and discussed, specially regarding the inclusion of two adjacent wood particles within one unit cell of the material. Regression analysis was performed to mathematically model the RVE parameter effects and their interactions over the modulus of elasticity response. The model was finally employed in an optimization analysis to arrive at an optimal set of RVE parameters that minimizes the difference between the predicted and experimental moduli of elasticity.

  6. A Miniaturized Antenna with Negative Index Metamaterial Based on Modified SRR and CLS Unit Cell for UWB Microwave Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Moinul Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A miniaturized antenna employing a negative index metamaterial with modified split-ring resonator (SRR and capacitance-loaded strip (CLS unit cells is presented for Ultra wideband (UWB microwave imaging applications. Four left-handed (LH metamaterial (MTM unit cells are located along one axis of the antenna as the radiating element. Each left-handed metamaterial unit cell combines a modified split-ring resonator (SRR with a capacitance-loaded strip (CLS to obtain a design architecture that simultaneously exhibits both negative permittivity and negative permeability, which ensures a stable negative refractive index to improve the antenna performance for microwave imaging. The antenna structure, with dimension of 16 × 21 × 1.6 mm3, is printed on a low dielectric FR4 material with a slotted ground plane and a microstrip feed. The measured reflection coefficient demonstrates that this antenna attains 114.5% bandwidth covering the frequency band of 3.4–12.5 GHz for a voltage standing wave ratio of less than 2 with a maximum gain of 5.16 dBi at 10.15 GHz. There is a stable harmony between the simulated and measured results that indicate improved nearly omni-directional radiation characteristics within the operational frequency band. The stable surface current distribution, negative refractive index characteristic, considerable gain and radiation properties make this proposed negative index metamaterial antenna optimal for UWB microwave imaging applications.

  7. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yahong; Cai, Yangjian, E-mail: serpo@dal.ca, E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Ponomarenko, Sergey A., E-mail: serpo@dal.ca, E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2X4 (Canada)

    2016-08-08

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  8. Anisotropic square lattice Potts ferromagnet: renormalization group treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, P.M.C. de; Tsallis, C.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of a convenient self-dual cell within a real space renormalization group framework enables a satisfactory treatment of the anisotropic square lattice q-state Potts ferromagnet criticality. The exact critical frontier and dimensionality crossover exponent PHI as well as the expected universality behaviour (renormalization flow sense) are recovered for any linear scaling factor b and all values of q(q - [pt

  9. Introduction to Vortex Lattice Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pinzón

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Panel methods have been widely used in industry and are well established since the 1970s for aerodynamic analysis and computation. The Vortex Lattice Panel Method presented in this study comes across a sophisticated method that provides a quick solution time, allows rapid changes in geometry and suits well for aerodynamic analysis. The aerospace industry is highly competitive in design efficiency, and perhaps one of the most important factors on airplane design and engineering today is multidisciplinary optimization.  Any cost reduction method in the design cycle of a product becomes vital in the success of its outcome. The subsequent sections of this article will further explain in depth the theory behind the vortex lattice method, and the reason behind its selection as the method for aerodynamic analysis during preliminary design work and computation within the aerospace industry. This article is analytic in nature, and its main objective is to present a mathematical summary of this widely used computational method in aerodynamics.

  10. Coherent lattice vibrations in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadin, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    A recent analysis has shown that the pair wavefunction within the BCS theory may be represented in real-space as a spherical electronic orbital (on the scale of the coherence length ξ 0 ) coupled to a standing-wave lattice vibration with wavevector 2k F and a near-resonant phonon frequency. The present paper extends this picture to a coherent pattern of phonon standing-waves on the macroscopic scale, with electrons forming Bloch waves and an energy gap much like those in the classic band theory of crystals. These parallel planes form a diffractive waveguide permitting electron waves to traveling parallel to the planes, corresponding to lossless supercurrent. A similar picture may be extended to unconventional superconductors such as the cuprates, with an array of standing spin waves rather than phonons. Such coherent lattice vibrations should be universal indicators of the superconducting state, and should be observable below T c using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Further implications of this picture are discussed

  11. Lattice dynamics in solid oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashi, K.; Klein, M.L.; Chandrasekharan, V.

    1979-01-01

    Lattice dynamical calculations for the bulk α, β, and γ phases of solid O 2 and for the monolayer α and β phases have been made in the harmonic approximation. In the α and β phases, atom-atom 6-12 potentials are employed. In the γ phase, effective potentials are used between molecular centers and only the translational lattice vibrations are calculated. It is found that Laufer and Leroi's potential parameters give two k=O frequencies at 42.7 and 43.6 cm -1 in the bulk α-O 2 , and at 40.7 cm -1 for the degenerate k=0 modes in the β phase. The observed Raman lines for α-O 2 at 43 and 79 cm -1 , which are both known to exhibit isotope shifts, are thus tentatively assigned to an accidentally degenerate line and a two-phonon band, respectively, In view of the possible contribution from anharmonic effects, the agreement of the calculation with experiment (48-51 cm -1 ) in β-O 2 may be better than it seems. For the bulk γ-O 2 , a discrepancy is observed between the calculated elastic constants and those derived from Brillouin scattering experiments. This discrepancy may be due to the neglect of translation-rotation coupling. In the monolayer O 2 , Raman active modes at 28.3 and 40.6 cm -1 for the α phase, and 31.9 cm -1 for the β phase are predicted

  12. General point dipole theory for periodic metasurfaces: magnetoelectric scattering lattices coupled to planar photonic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuntian; Zhang, Yan; Femius Koenderink, A

    2017-09-04

    We study semi-analytically the light emission and absorption properties of arbitrary stratified photonic structures with embedded two-dimensional magnetoelectric point scattering lattices, as used in recent plasmon-enhanced LEDs and solar cells. By employing dyadic Green's function for the layered structure in combination with the Ewald lattice summation to deal with the particle lattice, we develop an efficient method to study the coupling between planar 2D scattering lattices of plasmonic, or metamaterial point particles, coupled to layered structures. Using the 'array scanning method' we deal with localized sources. Firstly, we apply our method to light emission enhancement of dipole emitters in slab waveguides, mediated by plasmonic lattices. We benchmark the array scanning method against a reciprocity-based approach to find that the calculated radiative rate enhancement in k-space below the light cone shows excellent agreement. Secondly, we apply our method to study absorption-enhancement in thin-film solar cells mediated by periodic Ag nanoparticle arrays. Lastly, we study the emission distribution in k-space of a coupled waveguide-lattice system. In particular, we explore the dark mode excitation on the plasmonic lattice using the so-called array scanning method. Our method could be useful for simulating a broad range of complex nanophotonic structures, i.e., metasurfaces, plasmon-enhanced light emitting systems and photovoltaics.

  13. High-order dynamic lattice method for seismic simulation in anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolin; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2018-03-01

    The discrete particle-based dynamic lattice method (DLM) offers an approach to simulate elastic wave propagation in anisotropic media by calculating the anisotropic micromechanical interactions between these particles based on the directions of the bonds that connect them in the lattice. To build such a lattice, the media are discretized into particles. This discretization inevitably leads to numerical dispersion. The basic lattice unit used in the original DLM only includes interactions between the central particle and its nearest neighbours; therefore, it represents the first-order form of a particle lattice. The first-order lattice suffers from numerical dispersion compared with other numerical methods, such as high-order finite-difference methods, in terms of seismic wave simulation. Due to its unique way of discretizing the media, the particle-based DLM no longer solves elastic wave equations; this means that one cannot build a high-order DLM by simply creating a high-order discrete operator to better approximate a partial derivative operator. To build a high-order DLM, we carry out a thorough dispersion analysis of the method and discover that by adding more neighbouring particles into the lattice unit, the DLM will yield different spatial accuracy. According to the dispersion analysis, the high-order DLM presented here can adapt the requirement of spatial accuracy for seismic wave simulations. For any given spatial accuracy, we can design a corresponding high-order lattice unit to satisfy the accuracy requirement. Numerical tests show that the high-order DLM improves the accuracy of elastic wave simulation in anisotropic media.

  14. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjbar, V. H.; Méot, F.; Bai, M.; Abell, D. T.; Meiser, D.

    2016-01-01

    Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. Particularly, we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. Furthermore, these results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. We then consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  15. Advancements in simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, T.

    2008-01-01

    An introduction to lattice QCD with emphasis on advanced fermion formulations and their simulation is given. In particular, overlap fermions will be presented, a quite novel fermionic discretization scheme that is able to exactly preserve chiral symmetry on the lattice. I will discuss efficiencies of state-of-the-art algorithms on highly scalable supercomputers and I will show that, due to many algorithmic improvements, overlap simulations will soon become feasible for realistic physical lattice sizes. Finally I am going to sketch the status of some current large scale lattice QCD simulations. (author)

  16. On diffeomorphism invariance for lattice theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corichi, A.; Zapata, J.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the role of the diffeomorphism constraint in the quantization of lattice formulations of diffeomorphism invariant theories of connections. It has been argued that in working with abstract lattices one automatically takes care of the diffeomorphism constraint in the quantum theory. We use two systems in order to show that imposing the diffeomorphism constraint is imperative to obtain a physically acceptable quantum theory. First, we consider 2+1 gravity where an exact lattice formulation is available. Next, general theories of connections for compact gauge groups are treated, where the quantum theories are known - for both the continuum and the lattice - and can be compared. (orig.)

  17. Elastic lattice in an incommensurate background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, R.; Chudnovsky, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    We study a harmonic triangular lattice, which relaxes in the presence of an incommensurate short-wavelength potential. Monte Carlo simulations reveal that the elastic lattice exhibits only short-ranged translational correlations, despite the absence of defects in either lattice. Extended orientational order, however, persists in the presence of the background. Translational correlation lengths exhibit approximate power-law dependence upon cooling rate and background strength. Our results may be relevant to Wigner crystals, atomic monolayers on crystals surfaces, and flux-line and magnetic bubble lattices

  18. Anomalous diffusion in a dynamical optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by experimental progress in strongly coupled atom-photon systems in optical cavities, we study theoretically the quantum dynamics of atoms coupled to a one-dimensional dynamical optical lattice. The dynamical lattice is chosen to have a period that is incommensurate with that of an underlying static lattice, leading to a dynamical version of the Aubry-André model which can cause localization of single-particle wave functions. We show that atomic wave packets in this dynamical lattice generically spread via anomalous diffusion, which can be tuned between superdiffusive and subdiffusive regimes. This anomalous diffusion arises from an interplay between Anderson localization and quantum fluctuations of the cavity field.

  19. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. Ranjbar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  20. Internal space decimation for lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flyvbjerg, H.

    1984-01-01

    By a systematic decimation of internal space lattice gauge theories with continuous symmetry groups are mapped into effective lattice gauge theories with finite symmetry groups. The decimation of internal space makes a larger lattice tractable with the same computational resources. In this sense the method is an alternative to Wilson's and Symanzik's programs of improved actions. As an illustrative test of the method U(1) is decimated to Z(N) and the results compared with Monte Carlo data for Z(4)- and Z(5)-invariant lattice gauge theories. The result of decimating SU(3) to its 1080-element crystal-group-like subgroup is given and discussed. (orig.)